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Sample records for cholesterol recycling impairs

  1. Cholesterol reduction impairs exocytosis of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Linetti, Anna; Fratangeli, Alessandra; Taverna, Elena; Valnegri, Pamela; Francolini, Maura; Cappello, Valentina; Matteoli, Michela; Passafaro, Maria; Rosa, Patrizia

    2010-02-15

    Cholesterol and sphingolipids are abundant in neuronal membranes, where they help the organisation of the membrane microdomains involved in major roles such as axonal and dendritic growth, and synapse and spine stability. The aim of this study was to analyse their roles in presynaptic physiology. We first confirmed the presence of proteins of the exocytic machinery (SNARES and Ca(v)2.1 channels) in the lipid microdomains of cultured neurons, and then incubated the neurons with fumonisin B (an inhibitor of sphingolipid synthesis), or with mevastatin or zaragozic acid (two compounds that affect the synthesis of cholesterol by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase or squalene synthase). The results demonstrate that fumonisin B and zaragozic acid efficiently decrease sphingolipid and cholesterol levels without greatly affecting the viability of neurons or the expression of synaptic proteins. Electron microscopy showed that the morphology and number of synaptic vesicles in the presynaptic boutons of cholesterol-depleted neurons were similar to those observed in control neurons. Zaragozic acid (but not fumonisin B) treatment impaired synaptic vesicle uptake of the lipophilic dye FM1-43 and an antibody directed against the luminal epitope of synaptotagmin-1, effects that depended on the reduction in cholesterol because they were reversed by cholesterol reloading. The time-lapse confocal imaging of neurons transfected with ecliptic SynaptopHluorin showed that cholesterol depletion affects the post-depolarisation increase in fluorescence intensity. Taken together, these findings show that reduced cholesterol levels impair synaptic vesicle exocytosis in cultured neurons. PMID:20103534

  2. Acute cholesterol depletion impairs functional expression of tissue factor in fibroblasts: modulation of tissue factor activity by membrane cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Samir K.; Iakhiaev, Alexei; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Mohan Rao, L. Vijaya

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol, in addition to providing rigidity to the fluid membrane, plays a critical role in receptor function, endocytosis, recycling, and signal transduction. In the present study, we examined the effect of membrane cholesterol on functional expression of tissue factor (TF), a cellular receptor for clotting factor VIIa. Depletion of cholesterol in human fibroblasts (WI-38) with methyl-β-cyclodextrin–reduced TF activity at the cell surface. Binding studies with radiolabeled VIIa and TF monoclonal antibody (mAB) revealed that reduced TF activity in cholesterol-depleted cells stems from the impairment of VIIa interaction with TF rather than the loss of TF receptors at the cell surface. Repletion of cholesterol-depleted cells with cholesterol restored TF function. Loss of caveolar structure on cholesterol removal is not responsible for reduced TF activity. Solubilization of cellular TF in different detergents indicated that a substantial portion of TF in fibroblasts is associated with noncaveolar lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion studies showed that the TF association with these rafts is cholesterol dependent. Overall, the data presented herein suggest that membrane cholesterol functions as a positive regulator of TF function by maintaining TF receptors, probably in noncaveolar lipid rafts, in a high-affinity state for VIIa binding. PMID:15328160

  3. Inflammatory remodeling of the HDL proteome impairs cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Vaisar, Tomáš; Tang, Chongren; Babenko, Ilona; Hutchins, Patrick; Wimberger, Jake; Suffredini, Anthony F; Heinecke, Jay W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that HDL's ability to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages associates strongly with cardioprotection in humans independently of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I, HDL's major protein. However, the mechanisms that impair cholesterol efflux capacity during vascular disease are unclear. Inflammation, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has been shown to impair HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity. We therefore tested the hypothesis that HDL's impaired efflux capacity is mediated by specific changes of its protein cargo. Humans with acute inflammation induced by low-level endotoxin had unchanged HDL-C levels, but their HDL-C efflux capacity was significantly impaired. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity correlated inversely with HDL content of serum amyloid A (SAA)1 and SAA2. In mice, acute inflammation caused a marked impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity that correlated with a large increase in HDL SAA. In striking contrast, the efflux capacity of mouse inflammatory HDL was preserved with genetic ablation of SAA1 and SAA2. Our observations indicate that the inflammatory impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity is due in part to SAA-mediated remodeling of HDL's protein cargo. PMID:25995210

  4. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17-22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specific efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  5. Acrolein Impairs the Cholesterol Transport Functions of High Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Holme, Rebecca L.; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J.; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. PMID:25849485

  6. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  7. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steven H.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and “recycles” it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost. PMID:20174659

  8. Loss of SNAP29 Impairs Endocytic Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Debora; Lugassy, Yevgenia; Sprecher, Eli; Horowitz, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking depends on the ordered formation and consumption of transport intermediates and requires that membranes fuse with each other in a tightly regulated and highly specific manner. Membrane anchored SNAREs assemble into SNARE complexes that bring membranes together to promote fusion. SNAP29 is a ubiquitous synaptosomal-associated SNARE protein. It interacts with several syntaxins and with the EH domain containing protein EHD1. Loss of functional SNAP29 results in CEDNIK syndrome (Cerebral Dysgenesis, Neuropathy, Ichthyosis and Keratoderma). Using fibroblast cell lines derived from CEDNIK patients, we show that SNAP29 mediates endocytic recycling of transferrin and β1-integrin. Impaired β1-integrin recycling affected cell motility, as reflected by changes in cell spreading and wound healing. No major changes were detected in exocytosis of VSVG protein from the Golgi apparatus, although the Golgi system acquired a dispersed morphology in SNAP29 deficient cells. Our results emphasize the importance of SNAP29 mediated membrane fusion in endocytic recycling and consequently, in cell motility. PMID:20305790

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid impairs atherogenesis and promotes plaque regression by cholesterol crystal dissolution in mice.

    PubMed

    Bode, Niklas; Grebe, Alena; Kerksiek, Anja; Lütjohann, Dieter; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Latz, Eicke; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease driven primarily by a continuous retention of cholesterol within the subendothelial space where it precipitates to form cholesterol crystals (CC). These CC trigger a complex inflammatory response through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and promote lesion development. Here we examined whether increasing cholesterol solubility with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) affects vascular CC formation and ultimately atherosclerotic lesion development. UDCA mediated intracellular CC dissolution in macrophages and reduced IL-1β production. In ApoE(-/-) mice, UDCA treatment not only impaired atherosclerotic plaque development but also mediated regression of established vascular lesions. Importantly, mice treated with UDCA had decreased CC-depositions in atherosclerotic plaques compared to controls. Together, our data demonstrate that UDCA impaired CC and NLRP3 dependent inflammation by increasing cholesterol solubility and diminished atherosclerosis in mice. PMID:27416761

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress impairs cholesterol efflux and synthesis in hepatic cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Winter, Katharina; Korbelius, Melanie; Obrowsky, Sascha; Kratky, Dagmar; Kovacs, Werner J.; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes cause hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which affects neutral lipid metabolism. However, the role of ER stress in cholesterol metabolism is incompletely understood. Here, we show that induction of acute ER stress in human hepatic HepG2 cells reduced ABCA1 expression and caused ABCA1 redistribution to tubular perinuclear compartments. Consequently, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I, a key step in nascent HDL formation, was diminished by 80%. Besides ABCA1, endogenous apoA-I expression was reduced upon ER stress induction, which contributed to reduced cholesterol efflux. Liver X receptor, a key regulator of ABCA1 in peripheral cells, was not involved in this process. Despite reduced cholesterol efflux, cellular cholesterol levels remained unchanged during ER stress. This was due to impaired de novo cholesterol synthesis by reduction of HMG-CoA reductase activity by 70%, although sterol response element-binding protein-2 activity was induced. In mice, ER stress induction led to a marked reduction of hepatic ABCA1 expression. However, HDL cholesterol levels were unaltered, presumably because of scavenger receptor class B, type I downregulation under ER stress. Taken together, our data suggest that ER stress in metabolic disorders reduces HDL biogenesis due to impaired hepatic ABCA1 function. PMID:24179149

  11. Reduced cholesterol levels impair Smoothened activation in Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blassberg, Robert; Macrae, James I.; Briscoe, James; Jacob, John

    2016-01-01

    Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder that results from mutations in the gene encoding the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). Impaired DHCR7 function is associated with a spectrum of congenital malformations, intellectual impairment, epileptiform activity and autism spectrum disorder. Biochemically, there is a deficit in cholesterol and an accumulation of its metabolic precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) in developing tissues. Morphological abnormalities in SLOS resemble those seen in congenital Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-deficient conditions, leading to the proposal that the pathogenesis of SLOS is mediated by aberrant SHH signalling. SHH signalling is transduced through the transmembrane protein Smoothened (SMO), which localizes to the primary cilium of a cell on activation and is both positively and negatively regulated by sterol molecules derived from cholesterol biosynthesis. One proposed mechanism of SLOS involves SMO dysregulation by altered sterol levels, but the salient sterol species has not been identified. Here, we clarify the relationship between disrupted cholesterol metabolism and reduced SHH signalling in SLOS by modelling the disorder in vitro. Our results indicate that a deficit in cholesterol, as opposed to an accumulation of 7DHC, impairs SMO activation and its localization to the primary cilium. PMID:26685159

  12. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport[S

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z.; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17–22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specfic efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependant manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  13. Influenza Virus Induces Cholesterol-Enriched Endocytic Recycling Compartments for Budozone Formation via Cell Cycle-Independent Centrosome Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yoshimi; Osari, Suguru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus particles are assembled at the plasma membrane in concert with incorporation of the virus genome, but the details of its spatio-temporal regulation are not understood. Here we showed that influenza virus infection induces the assembly of pericentrosomal endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) through the activation of Rab11a GTPase and cell cycle-independent maturation of centrosome by YB-1, a multifunctional protein that is involved in mitotic division, RNA metabolism and tumorigenesis. YB-1 is recruited to the centrosome in infected cells and is required for anchoring microtubules to the centrosome. We also found that viral infection accumulates cholesterol in ERC and is dependent on YB-1. Depletion of YB-1 shows reduced cholesterol-enriched ERC and prevented budozone formation at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that cholesterol in recycling endosomes, which are emanated from ERC, may trigger the virus assembly concomitantly with the packaging of the virus genome. We propose that the virus genome is transported to the plasma membrane by cholesterol-enriched recycling endosomes through cell cycle-independent activation of the centrosome by YB-1. PMID:26575487

  14. Cholesterol 24-hydroxylase defect is implicated in memory impairments associated with Alzheimer-like Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Burlot, Marie-Anne; Braudeau, Jérôme; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin; Potier, Brigitte; Ayciriex, Sophie; Varin, Jennifer; Gautier, Benoit; Djelti, Fathia; Audrain, Mickael; Dauphinot, Luce; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Laprévote, Olivier; Bièche, Ivan; Auzeil, Nicolas; Potier, Marie-Claude; Dutar, Patrick; Korte, Martin; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Cartier, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by both amyloid and Tau pathologies. The amyloid component and altered cholesterol metabolism are closely linked, but the relationship between Tau pathology and cholesterol is currently unclear. Brain cholesterol is synthesized in situ and cannot cross the blood-brain barrier: to be exported from the central nervous system into the blood circuit, excess cholesterol must be converted to 24S-hydroxycholesterol by the cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. In AD patients, the concentration of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in the plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid are lower than in healthy controls. The THY-Tau22 mouse is a model of AD-like Tau pathology without amyloid pathology. We used this model to investigate the potential association between Tau pathology and CYP46A1 modulation. The amounts of CYP46A1 and 24S-hydroxycholesterol in the hippocampus were lower in THY-Tau22 than control mice. We used an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer strategy to increase CYP46A1 expression in order to investigate the consequences on THY-Tau22 mouse phenotype. Injection of the AAV-CYP46A1 vector into the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 mice led to CYP46A1 and 24S-hydroxycholesterol content normalization. The cognitive deficits, impaired long-term depression and spine defects that characterize the THY-Tau22 model were completely rescued, whereas Tau hyperphosphorylation and associated gliosis were unaffected. These results argue for a causal link between CYP46A1 protein content and memory impairments that result from Tau pathology. Therefore, CYP46A1 may be a relevant therapeutic target for Tauopathies and especially for AD. PMID:26358780

  15. Recycling compartments and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies harbor most of the cholesterol found in the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Möbius, W; van Donselaar, E; Ohno-Iwashita, Y; Shimada, Y; Heijnen, H F G; Slot, J W; Geuze, H J

    2003-04-01

    We employed our recently developed immuno-electron microscopic method (W. Möbius, Y. Ohno-Iwashita, E. G. van Donselaar, V. M. Oorschot, Y. Shimada, T. Fujimoto, H. F. Heijnen, H. J. Geuze and J. W. Slot, J Histochem Cytochem 2002; 50: 43-55) to analyze the distribution of cholesterol in the endocytic pathway of human B lymphocytes. We could distinguish 6 categories of endocytic compartments on the basis of morphology, BSA gold uptake kinetics and organelle marker analysis. Of all cholesterol detected in the endocytic pathway, we found 20% in the recycling tubulo-vesicles and 63% present in two types of multivesicular bodies. In the multivesicular bodies, most of the cholesterol was contained in the internal membrane vesicles, the precursors of exosomes secreted by B cells. Cholesterol was almost absent from lysosomes, that contained the bulk of the lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, also termed lysobisphosphatidic acid. Thus, cholesterol displays a highly differential distribution in the various membrane domains of the endocytic pathway. PMID:12694561

  16. Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinker, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

  17. Plasma proteomic analysis of stable coronary artery disease indicates impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Trayambak; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ahmad, Shadab; Garg, Gaurav; V, Sreenivas; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Seth, Sandeep; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the largest causes of death worldwide yet the traditional risk factors, although useful in identifying people at high risk, lack the desired predictive accuracy. Techniques like quantitative plasma proteomics holds immense potential to identify newer markers and this study (conducted in three phases) was aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in stable CAD patients. In the first (discovery) phase, plasma from CAD cases (angiographically proven) and controls were subjected to iTRAQ based proteomic analysis. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were then validated in the second and third (verification and validation) phases in larger number of (n = 546) samples. After multivariate logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors (age, diet, etc.), four proteins involved in the reverse cholesterol pathway (Apo A1, ApoA4, Apo C1 and albumin) along with diabetes and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with CAD and could account for approximately 88% of the cases as revealed by ROC analysis. The maximum odds ratio was found to be 6.70 for albumin (p < 0.0001), followed by Apo AI (5.07, p < 0.0001), Apo CI (4.03, p = 0.001), and Apo AIV (2.63, p = 0.003). Down-regulation of apolipoproteins and albumin implicates the impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway in CAD. PMID:27350024

  18. Plasma proteomic analysis of stable coronary artery disease indicates impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway.

    PubMed

    Basak, Trayambak; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ahmad, Shadab; Garg, Gaurav; V, Sreenivas; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Seth, Sandeep; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the largest causes of death worldwide yet the traditional risk factors, although useful in identifying people at high risk, lack the desired predictive accuracy. Techniques like quantitative plasma proteomics holds immense potential to identify newer markers and this study (conducted in three phases) was aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in stable CAD patients. In the first (discovery) phase, plasma from CAD cases (angiographically proven) and controls were subjected to iTRAQ based proteomic analysis. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were then validated in the second and third (verification and validation) phases in larger number of (n = 546) samples. After multivariate logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors (age, diet, etc.), four proteins involved in the reverse cholesterol pathway (Apo A1, ApoA4, Apo C1 and albumin) along with diabetes and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with CAD and could account for approximately 88% of the cases as revealed by ROC analysis. The maximum odds ratio was found to be 6.70 for albumin (p < 0.0001), followed by Apo AI (5.07, p < 0.0001), Apo CI (4.03, p = 0.001), and Apo AIV (2.63, p = 0.003). Down-regulation of apolipoproteins and albumin implicates the impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway in CAD. PMID:27350024

  19. Impaired HDL cholesterol efflux in metabolic syndrome is unrelated to glucose tolerance status: the CODAM study

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M. J.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a key metric of the anti-atherosclerotic functionality of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The present study aimed to delineate if T2DM and MetS cross-sectionally associate with altered CEC in a large high cardiometabolic risk population. CEC was determined from THP-1 macrophage foam cells towards apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma from 552 subjects of the CODAM cohort (288 controls, 126 impaired glucose metabolism [IGM], 138 T2DM). MetS was present in 297 participants. CEC was not different between different glucose tolerance categories but was lower in MetS (P < 0.001), at least partly attributable to lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels (P < 0.001 for each). Low grade inflammation was increased in IGM, T2DM and MetS as determined by a score comprising 8 different biomarkers (P < 0.05-< 0.001; n = 547). CEC inversely associated with low-grade inflammation taking account of HDL-C or apoA-I in MetS (P < 0.02), but not in subjects without MetS (interaction: P = 0.015). This study demonstrates that IGM and T2DM do not impact the HDL CEC function, while efflux is lower in MetS, partly dependent on plasma HDL-C levels. Enhanced low-grade inflammation in MetS may conceivably impair CEC even independent of HDL-C and apoA-I. PMID:27270665

  20. Impaired HDL cholesterol efflux in metabolic syndrome is unrelated to glucose tolerance status: the CODAM study.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dullaart, Robin P F; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a key metric of the anti-atherosclerotic functionality of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The present study aimed to delineate if T2DM and MetS cross-sectionally associate with altered CEC in a large high cardiometabolic risk population. CEC was determined from THP-1 macrophage foam cells towards apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma from 552 subjects of the CODAM cohort (288 controls, 126 impaired glucose metabolism [IGM], 138 T2DM). MetS was present in 297 participants. CEC was not different between different glucose tolerance categories but was lower in MetS (P < 0.001), at least partly attributable to lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels (P < 0.001 for each). Low grade inflammation was increased in IGM, T2DM and MetS as determined by a score comprising 8 different biomarkers (P < 0.05-< 0.001; n = 547). CEC inversely associated with low-grade inflammation taking account of HDL-C or apoA-I in MetS (P < 0.02), but not in subjects without MetS (interaction: P = 0.015). This study demonstrates that IGM and T2DM do not impact the HDL CEC function, while efflux is lower in MetS, partly dependent on plasma HDL-C levels. Enhanced low-grade inflammation in MetS may conceivably impair CEC even independent of HDL-C and apoA-I. PMID:27270665

  1. Glycated human serum albumin isolated from poorly controlled diabetic patients impairs cholesterol efflux from macrophages: an investigation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traldi, Pietro; Castilho, Gabriela; Sartori, Camila H; Machado-Lima, Adriana; Nakandakare, Edna R; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lucia C; Roverso, Marco; Porcu, Simona; Lapolla, Annunziata; Passarelli, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products impair ABCA-1-mediated cholesterol efflux by eliciting inflammation, the generation of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress. The glycation level of human serum albumin (HSA) from type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients was determined by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and related to possible impairment of ER function and cellular cholesterol efflux. Comparison of the MALDI spectra from healthy and diabetic subjects allowed us to determine an increased HSA mean mass of 1297 Da for type 1 and 890 Da for type 2. These values reflect a mean condensation of at least 8 glucose units and 5 glucose units, respectively. Mouse peritoneal macrophages were treated with HSA from control, type 1 and type 2 diabetic subjects in order to measure the expression of Grp78, Grp94, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), calreticulin (CRT) and ABCA-1. (14)C-cholesterol overloaded-J774 macrophages were treated with HSA from control and diabetic subjects and further incubated with apo A-1 to determine the cholesterol efflux. Combined analyses comprising HSA from type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients were performed in cellular functional assays. In macrophages, PDI expression increased 89% and CRT 3.4 times in comparison to HSA from the control subjects. ABCA-1 protein level and apo A-I mediated cholesterol efflux were, respectively, 50% and 60% reduced in macrophages exposed to HSA from type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients when compared to that exposed to HSA from control subjects. We provide evidence that the level of glycation that occurs in albumin in vivo damages the ER function related to the impairment in macrophage reverse cholesterol transport and so contributes to atherosclerosis in diabetes. PMID:26307703

  2. A Biochemical Abnormality in Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis IMPAIRMENT OF BILE ACID BIOSYNTHESIS ASSOCIATED WITH INCOMPLETE DEGRADATION OF THE CHOLESTEROL SIDE CHAIN

    PubMed Central

    Setoguchi, T.; Salen, Gerald; Tint, G. S.; Mosbach, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Bile acid production in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is subnormal, yet the activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, the rate-determining enzyme of bile acid synthesis, is elevated. To explain this discrepancy, bile acid precursors were sought in bile and feces of three CTX subjects. Over 10% of the total sterols excreted in bile and feces consisted of compounds more polar than cholesterol. Chromatographic analysis of the polar fractions in conjunction with gasliquid chromatography (GLC)-mass spectrometry indicated two major constituents, 5β-cholestane-3α,7α,12α,25-tetrol and 5β-cholestane-3α,7α,12α,24ξ,25-pentol. After i.v. injection of [4-14C]cholesterol both bile alcohols were radioactive proving that they were derived from cholesterol. The accumulation of alcohols hydroxylated at C-25 and C-24,25 suggests that decreased bile acid synthesis in CTX results from impaired oxidation of the cholesterol side chain. This finding and the virtual absence of intermediates hydroxylated at C-26 indicate that current views of the major pathway of bile acid synthesis may require revision. PMID:4825231

  3. Dietary interesterified fat enriched with palmitic acid induces atherosclerosis by impairing macrophage cholesterol efflux and eliciting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Milessa Silva; Lavrador, Maria Silvia Ferrari; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Ferreira, Fabiana Dias; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Castilho, Gabriela; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; Paula Bombo, Renata; Catanozi, Sergio; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Passarelli, Marisa; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Lottenberg, Ana Maria

    2016-06-01

    Interesterified fats are currently being used to replace trans fatty acids. However, their impact on biological pathways involved in the atherosclerosis development was not investigated. Weaning male LDLr-KO mice were fed for 16weeks on a high-fat diet (40% energy as fat) containing polyunsaturated (PUFA), TRANS, palmitic (PALM), palmitic interesterified (PALM INTER), stearic (STEAR) or stearic interesterified (STEAR INTER). Plasma lipids, lipoprotein profile, arterial lesion area, macrophage infiltration, collagen content and inflammatory response modulation were determined. Macrophage cholesterol efflux and the arterial expression of cholesterol uptake and efflux receptors were also performed. The interesterification process did not alter plasma lipid concentrations. Although PALM INTER did not increase plasma cholesterol concentration as much as TRANS, the cholesterol enrichment in the LDL particle was similar in both groups. Moreover, PALM INTER induced the highest IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6 secretion from peritoneal macrophages as compared to others. This inflammatory response elicited by PALM INTER was confirmed in arterial wall, as compared to PALM. These deleterious effects of PALM INTER culminate in higher atherosclerotic lesion, macrophage infiltration and collagen content than PALM, STEAR, STEAR INTER and PUFA. These events can partially be attributed to a macrophage cholesterol accumulation, promoted by apoAI and HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux impairment and increased Olr-1 and decreased Abca1 and Nr1h3 expressions in the arterial wall. Interesterified fats containing palmitic acid induce atherosclerosis development by promoting cholesterol accumulation in LDL particles and macrophagic cells, activating the inflammatory process in LDLr-KO mice. PMID:27142741

  4. Hepatobiliary cholesterol transport is not impaired in Abca1-null mice lacking HDL

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Albert K.; Bloks, Vincent W.; Bandsma, Robert H.J.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Chimini, Giovanna; Kuipers, Folkert

    2001-01-01

    The ABC transporter ABCA1 regulates HDL levels and is considered to control the first step of reverse cholesterol transport from the periphery to the liver. To test this concept, we studied the effect of ABCA1 deficiency on hepatic metabolism and hepatobiliary flux of cholesterol in mice. Hepatic lipid contents and biliary secretion rates were determined in Abca1–/–, Abca1+/–, and Abca1+/+ mice with a DBA background that were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet. Hepatic cholesterol and phospholipid contents in Abca1–/– mice were indistinguishable from those in Abca1+/– and Abca1+/+ mice on both diets. In spite of the absence of HDL, biliary secretion rates of cholesterol, bile salts, and phospholipid were unimpaired in Abca1–/– mice. Neither the hepatic expression levels of genes controlling key steps in cholesterol metabolism nor the contribution of de novo synthesis to biliary cholesterol and bile salts were affected by Abca genotype. Finally, fecal excretion of neutral and acidic sterols was similar in all groups. We conclude that plasma HDL levels and ABCA1 activity do not control net cholesterol transport from the periphery via the liver into the bile, indicating that the importance of HDL in reverse cholesterol transport requires re-evaluation. PMID:11560953

  5. Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Junya; Santorelli, Michael

    Recycling systems are classified into those employing typically three methods, and the progress of each method is described. In mechanical recycling, powders of phenolic materials are recovered via a mechanical process and reused as fillers or additives in virgin materials. The effects to flowability, curability, and mechanical properties of the materials are explained. In feedstock recycling, monomers, oligomers, or oils are recovered via chemical processes and reused as feedstock. Pyrolysis, solvolysis or hydrolysis, and supercritical or subcritical fluid technology will also be introduced. When using a subcritical fluid of phenol, the recycled material maintains excellent properties similar to the virgin material, and a demonstration plant has been constructed to carry out mass production development. In energy recovery, wastes of phenolic materials are used as an alternative solid fuel to coal because they are combustible and have good calorific value. Industrial wastes of these have been in practical use in a cement plant. Finally, it is suggested that the best recycling method should be selected according to the purpose or situation, because every recycling method has both strengths and weaknesses. Therefore, quantitative and objective evaluation methods in recycling are desirable and should be established.

  6. In type 2 diabetes mellitus glycated albumin alters macrophage gene expression impairing ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Machado-Lima, Adriana; Iborra, Rodrigo T; Pinto, Raphael S; Castilho, Gabriela; Sartori, Camila H; Oliveira, Erika R; Okuda, Ligia S; Nakandakare, Edna R; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Machado, Ubiratan F; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lucia C; Traldi, Pietro; Porcu, Simona; Roverso, Marco; Lapolla, Annunziata; Passarelli, Marisa

    2015-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are elevated in diabetes mellitus (DM) and predict the development of atherosclerosis. AGE-albumin induces oxidative stress, which is linked to a reduction in ABCA-1 and cholesterol efflux. We characterized the glycation level of human serum albumin (HSA) isolated from poorly controlled DM2 (n = 11) patients compared with that of control (C, n = 12) individuals and determined the mechanism by which DM2-HSA can interfere in macrophage lipid accumulation. The HSA glycation level was analyzed by MALDI/MS. Macrophages were treated for 18 h with C- or DM2-HSA to measure the (14) C-cholesterol efflux, the intracellular lipid accumulation and the cellular ABCA-1 protein content. Agilent arrays (44000 probes) were used to analyze gene expression, and the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time RT-PCR. An increased mean mass was observed in DM2-HSA compared with C-HSA, reflecting the condensation of at least 5 units of glucose. The cholesterol efflux mediated by apo AI, HDL3 , and HDL2 was impaired in DM2-HSA-treated cells, which was related to greater intracellular lipid accumulation. DM2-HSA decreased Abcg1 mRNA expression by 26%. Abca1 mRNA was unchanged, although the final ABCA-1 protein content decreased. Compared with C-HAS-treated cells, NADPH oxidase 4 mRNA expression increased in cells after DM2-HSA treatment. Stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1, janus kinase 2, and low density lipoprotein receptor mRNAs were reduced by DM2-HSA. The level of glycation that occurs in vivo in DM2-HSA-treated cells selectively alters macrophage gene expression, impairing cholesterol efflux and eliciting intracellular lipid accumulation, which contribute to atherogenesis, in individuals with DM2. PMID:25413254

  7. Intake of grape procyanidins during gestation and lactation impairs reverse cholesterol transport and increases atherogenic risk indexes in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Del Bas, Josep Maria; Crescenti, Anna; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Arola, Lluís; Caimari, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most prevalent noncommunicable diseases in humans. Different studies have identified dietary procyanidins as bioactive compounds with beneficial properties against CVD by improving lipid homeostasis, among other mechanisms. The aim of this work was to assess whether grape seed procyanidin consumption at a physiological dose during the perinatal period could influence the CVD risk of the offspring. Wistar rat dams were treated with a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE; 25mg/kg of body weight per day) or vehicle during gestation and lactation. The adult male offspring of GSPE-treated dams presented decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, increased total cholesterol-to-HDL-C ratios and an exacerbated fasting triglyceride-to-HDL-C ratios (atherogenic index of plasma) compared to the control group. Impaired reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) was evidenced by the accumulation of cholesterol in skeletal muscle and by decreased fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids, which was consistent with the observed mRNA down-regulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in the hepatic bile acid synthesis pathway Cyp7A1. Conversely, GSPE programming also resulted in up-regulated gene expression of different key components of the RCT process, such as hepatic Npc1, Abcg1, Abca1, Lxra, Srebp2, Lcat, Scarb1 and Pltp, and the repression of microRNA miR-33a expression, a key negative controller of hepatic RCT at the gene expression level. Our results show that maternal intake of grape procyanidins during the perinatal period impacts different components of the RCT process, resulting in increased CVD risk in the adult offspring. PMID:26365577

  8. Chronic intermittent psychological stress promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport by impairing bile acid absorption in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silvennoinen, Reija; Quesada, Helena; Kareinen, Ilona; Julve, Josep; Kaipiainen, Leena; Gylling, Helena; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, yet the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain elusive. The transfer of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells to liver and feces (the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, m-RCT) is an important antiatherogenic pathway. Because exposure of mice to physical restraint, a model of psychological stress, increases serum levels of corticosterone, and as bile acid homeostasis is disrupted in glucocorticoid-treated animals, we investigated if chronic intermittent restraint stress would modify m-RCT by altering the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. C57Bl/6J mice exposed to intermittent stress for 5 days exhibited increased transit through the large intestine and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion. Of the transcription factors and transporters that regulate bile acid homeostasis, the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile salt export pump (BSEP), and the intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) were reduced, whereas those of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), responsible for active bile acid absorption, remained unchanged. Neither did the hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key enzyme regulating bile acid synthesis, change in the stressed mice. Evaluation of the functionality of the m-RCT pathway revealed increased fecal excretion of bile acids that had been synthesized from macrophage-derived cholesterol. Overall, our study reveals that chronic intermittent stress in mice accelerates m-RCT specifically by increasing fecal excretion of bile acids. This novel mechanism of m-RCT induction could have antiatherogenic potential under conditions of chronic stress. PMID:25969465

  9. Chronic intermittent psychological stress promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport by impairing bile acid absorption in mice.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Reija; Quesada, Helena; Kareinen, Ilona; Julve, Josep; Kaipiainen, Leena; Gylling, Helena; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-05-11

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, yet the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain elusive. The transfer of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells to liver and feces (the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, m-RCT) is an important antiatherogenic pathway. Because exposure of mice to physical restraint, a model of psychological stress, increases serum levels of corticosterone, and as bile acid homeostasis is disrupted in glucocorticoid-treated animals, we investigated if chronic intermittent restraint stress would modify m-RCT by altering the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. C57Bl/6J mice exposed to intermittent stress for 5 days exhibited increased transit through the large intestine and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion. Of the transcription factors and transporters that regulate bile acid homeostasis, the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile salt export pump (BSEP), and the intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) were reduced, whereas those of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), responsible for active bile acid absorption, remained unchanged. Neither did the hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key enzyme regulating bile acid synthesis, change in the stressed mice. Evaluation of the functionality of the m-RCT pathway revealed increased fecal excretion of bile acids that had been synthesized from macrophage-derived cholesterol. Overall, our study reveals that chronic intermittent stress in mice accelerates m-RCT specifically by increasing fecal excretion of bile acids. This novel mechanism of m-RCT induction could have antiatherogenic potential under conditions of chronic stress. PMID:25969465

  10. Impaired Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein Isolated From Interstitial Fluid in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Dikkers, Arne; Parini, Paolo; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanism of which is incompletely understood. Their high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in plasma have been reported to have impaired cholesterol efflux capacity. However, the efflux capacity of HDL from interstitial fluid (IF), the starting point for reverse cholesterol transport, has not been studied. We here investigated the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL from IF and plasma from T2D patients and healthy controls. Approach and Results— HDL was isolated from IF and peripheral plasma from 35 T2D patients and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cholesterol efflux to HDL was determined in vitro, normalized for HDL cholesterol, using cholesterol-loaded macrophages. Efflux capacity of plasma HDL was 10% lower in T2D patients than in healthy controls, in line with previous observations. This difference was much more pronounced for HDL from IF, where efflux capacity was reduced by 28% in T2D. Somewhat surprisingly, the efflux capacity of HDL from IF was lower than that of plasma HDL, by 15% and 32% in controls and T2D patients, respectively. Conclusion— These data demonstrate that (1) HDL from IF has a lower cholesterol efflux capacity than plasma HDL and (2) the efflux capacity of HDL from IF is severely impaired in T2D when compared with controls. Because IF comprises the compartment where reverse cholesterol transport is initiated, the marked reduction in cholesterol efflux capacity of IF-HDL from T2D patients may play an important role for their increased risk to develop atherosclerosis. PMID:27034474

  11. 7-Ketocholesterol Incorporation into Sphingolipid/Cholesterol-enriched (Lipid Raft) Domains Is Impaired by Vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Marie-Charlotte; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Monier, Serge; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Athias, Anne; Néel, Dominique; Lagrost, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol oxides, in particular 7-ketocholesterol, are proatherogenic compounds that induce cell death in the vascular wall when localized in lipid raft domains of the cell membrane. Deleterious effects of 7-ketocholesterol can be prevented by vitamin E, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, unlike γ-tocopherol, the α-tocopherol vitamin E form was found to prevent 7-ketocholesterol-mediated apoptosis of A7R5 smooth muscle cells. To be operative, α-tocopherol needed to be added to the cells before 7-ketocholesterol, and its anti-apoptotic effect was reduced and even suppressed when added together or after 7-ketocholesterol, respectively. Both pre- and co-treatment of the cells with α-tocopherol resulted in the redistribution of 7-ketocholesterol out of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains. In turn, fewer amounts of α-tocopherol associated with lipid rafts on 7-ketocholesterol-pretreated cells compared with untreated cells, with no prevention of cell death in this case. In further support of the implication of lipid raft domains, the dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt-PKB was involved in the 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Akt-PKB dephosphorylation was prevented by α-tocopherol, but not γ-tocopherol pretreatment. PMID:19351882

  12. Impairment of the ABCA1 and SR-BI-mediated cholesterol efflux pathways and HDL anti-inflammatory activity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Abdelouahed; Berrougui, Hicham; Pawelec, Graham; Fulop, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on the cholesterol efflux capacity and anti-inflammatory activity of HDL. HDL and apoA-I were isolated from 20 healthy subjects and from 39 AD patients. Our results showed that serum- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux is significantly impaired in AD patients. This impairment of serum and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly inversely correlated to the AD severity as evaluated by MMSE scores. Results obtained from SR-BI-enriched Fu5AH and ABCA1-enriched J774 cells revealed that AD impaired the interaction of HDL and apoA-I with both the ABCA1 transporter and SR-BI receptor. Purified apoA-I from AD patients also failed to remove free excess cholesterol from ABCA1-enriched J774 macrophages. Interestingly, the decrease in plasma α-tocopherol content and the increase in MDA formation and HDL relative electrophoretic mobility indicated that AD patients had higher levels of oxidative stress. The anti-inflammatory activity of HDL was also significantly lower in AD patients as measured by the level of ICAM-1 expression. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the first time that the functionality of HDL is impaired in AD and that this alteration might be caused by AD-associated oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:22178419

  13. Cholesterol removal from adult skeletal muscle impairs excitation–contraction coupling and aging reduces caveolin-3 and alters the expression of other triadic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Genaro; Llanos, Paola; Hidalgo, Jorge; Bolaños, Pura; Caputo, Carlo; Riquelme, Alexander; Sánchez, Gina; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca2+ transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not SR membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na+/K+-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47phox and gp91phox), implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs E–C coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged animals. PMID:25914646

  14. A computer-based interactive game to train persons with cognitive impairments to perform recycling tasks independently.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Kang, Ya-Shu; Liu, Fang-Lin

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the possibility of training three people with cognitive impairments using a computer-based interactive game. A game was designed to provide task prompts in recycling scenarios, identify incorrect task steps on the fly, and help users learn to make corrections. Based on a multiple baseline design, the data showed that the three participants considerably increased their target response, which improved their vocational job skills during the intervention phases and enabled them to maintain the acquired job skills after intervention. The practical and developmental implications of the results are discussed. PMID:25262012

  15. Lessons from hepatocyte-specific Cyp51 knockout mice: impaired cholesterol synthesis leads to oval cell-driven liver injury.

    PubMed

    Lorbek, Gregor; Perše, Martina; Jeruc, Jera; Juvan, Peter; Gutierrez-Mariscal, Francisco M; Lewinska, Monika; Gebhardt, Rolf; Keber, Rok; Horvat, Simon; Björkhem, Ingemar; Rozman, Damjana

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate unequivocally that defective cholesterol synthesis is an independent determinant of liver inflammation and fibrosis. We prepared a mouse hepatocyte-specific knockout (LKO) of lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the part of cholesterol synthesis that is already committed to cholesterol. LKO mice developed hepatomegaly with oval cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation, but without steatosis. The key trigger was reduced cholesterol esters that provoked cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated secretory phenotype and ultimately the oval cell response, while elevated CYP51 substrates promoted the integrated stress response. In spite of the oval cell-driven fibrosis being histologically similar in both sexes, data indicates a female-biased down-regulation of primary metabolism pathways and a stronger immune response in males. Liver injury was ameliorated by dietary fats predominantly in females, whereas dietary cholesterol rectified fibrosis in both sexes. Our data place defective cholesterol synthesis as a focus of sex-dependent liver pathologies. PMID:25739789

  16. Lessons from Hepatocyte-Specific Cyp51 Knockout Mice: Impaired Cholesterol Synthesis Leads to Oval Cell-Driven Liver Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorbek, Gregor; Perše, Martina; Jeruc, Jera; Juvan, Peter; Gutierrez-Mariscal, Francisco M.; Lewinska, Monika; Gebhardt, Rolf; Keber, Rok; Horvat, Simon; Björkhem, Ingemar; Rozman, Damjana

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate unequivocally that defective cholesterol synthesis is an independent determinant of liver inflammation and fibrosis. We prepared a mouse hepatocyte-specific knockout (LKO) of lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the part of cholesterol synthesis that is already committed to cholesterol. LKO mice developed hepatomegaly with oval cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation, but without steatosis. The key trigger was reduced cholesterol esters that provoked cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated secretory phenotype and ultimately the oval cell response, while elevated CYP51 substrates promoted the integrated stress response. In spite of the oval cell-driven fibrosis being histologically similar in both sexes, data indicates a female-biased down-regulation of primary metabolism pathways and a stronger immune response in males. Liver injury was ameliorated by dietary fats predominantly in females, whereas dietary cholesterol rectified fibrosis in both sexes. Our data place defective cholesterol synthesis as a focus of sex-dependent liver pathologies.

  17. Lessons from Hepatocyte-Specific Cyp51 Knockout Mice: Impaired Cholesterol Synthesis Leads to Oval Cell-Driven Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lorbek, Gregor; Perše, Martina; Jeruc, Jera; Juvan, Peter; Gutierrez-Mariscal, Francisco M.; Lewinska, Monika; Gebhardt, Rolf; Keber, Rok; Horvat, Simon; Björkhem, Ingemar; Rozman, Damjana

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate unequivocally that defective cholesterol synthesis is an independent determinant of liver inflammation and fibrosis. We prepared a mouse hepatocyte-specific knockout (LKO) of lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from the part of cholesterol synthesis that is already committed to cholesterol. LKO mice developed hepatomegaly with oval cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation, but without steatosis. The key trigger was reduced cholesterol esters that provoked cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated secretory phenotype and ultimately the oval cell response, while elevated CYP51 substrates promoted the integrated stress response. In spite of the oval cell-driven fibrosis being histologically similar in both sexes, data indicates a female-biased down-regulation of primary metabolism pathways and a stronger immune response in males. Liver injury was ameliorated by dietary fats predominantly in females, whereas dietary cholesterol rectified fibrosis in both sexes. Our data place defective cholesterol synthesis as a focus of sex-dependent liver pathologies. PMID:25739789

  18. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  19. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL. PMID:25130461

  20. Children with health impairments by heavy metals in an e-waste recycling area.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Xu, Xijin; Boezen, H Marike; Huo, Xia

    2016-04-01

    E-waste recycling has become a global environmental health issue. Pernicious chemicals escape into the environment due to informal and nonstandard e-waste recycling activities involving manual dismantling, open burning to recover heavy metals and open dumping of residual fractions. Heavy metals derived from electronic waste (e-waste), such as, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), aluminum (Al) and cobalt (Co), differ in their chemical composition, reaction properties, distribution, metabolism, excretion and biological transmission. Our previous studies showed that heavy metal exposure have adverse effects on children's health including lower birth weight, lower anogenital distance, lower Apgar scores, lower current weight, lower lung function, lower hepatitis B surface antibody levels, higher prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and higher DNA and chromosome damage. Heavy metals influence a number of diverse systems and organs, resulting in both acute and chronic effects on children's health, ranging from minor upper respiratory irritation to chronic respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, urinary and reproductive disease, as well as aggravation of pre-existing symptoms and disease. These effects of heavy metals on children's health are briefly discussed. PMID:26829309

  1. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most cholesterol is LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is more likely to clog blood vessels because ... Here's a way to remember the difference: the LDL cholesterol is the bad kind, so call it "lousy" ...

  2. Altered GPM6A/M6 dosage impairs cognition and causes phenotypes responsive to cholesterol in human and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Anne; Kramer, Jamie M; van der Voet, Monique; Schanze, Ina; Uebe, Steffen; Donders, Rogier; Reis, André; Schenck, Annette; Zweier, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    Glycoprotein M6A (GPM6A) is a neuronal transmembrane protein of the PLP/DM20 (proteolipid protein) family that associates with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts and promotes filopodia formation. We identified a de novo duplication of the GPM6A gene in a patient with learning disability and behavioral anomalies. Expression analysis in blood lymphocytes showed increased GPM6A levels. An increase of patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells carrying membrane protrusions supports a functional effect of this duplication. To study the consequences of GPM6A dosage alterations in an intact nervous system, we employed Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. We found that knockdown of Drosophila M6, the sole member of the PLP family in flies, in the wing, and whole organism causes malformation and lethality, respectively. These phenotypes as well as the protrusions of patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells with increased GPM6A levels can be alleviated by cholesterol supplementation. Notably, overexpression as well as loss of M6 in neurons specifically compromises long-term memory in the courtship conditioning paradigm. Our findings thus indicate a critical role of correct GPM6A/M6 levels for cognitive function and support a role of the GPM6A duplication for the patient's phenotype. Together with other recent findings, this study highlights compromised cholesterol homeostasis as a recurrent feature in cognitive phenotypes. PMID:25224183

  3. About Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cholesterol Updated:Aug 10,2016 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  4. Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate accumulation in macrophages induces intracellular cholesterol redistribution, attenuates liver-X receptor/ATP-Binding cassette transporter A1/ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 pathway, and impairs cholesterol efflux

    PubMed Central

    Luquain-Costaz, Céline; Lefai, Etienne; Arnal-Levron, Maud; Markina, Daria; Sakaï, Shota; Euthine, Vanessa; Makino, Asami; Guichardant, Michel; Yamashita, Shizuya; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Lagarde, Michel; Moulin, Philippe; Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endosomal signature phospholipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) has been involved in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Accumulation of BMP is a hallmark of lipid storage disorders and was recently reported as a noticeable feature of oxidized LDL-laden macrophages. This study was designed to delineate the consequences of macrophage BMP accumulation on intracellular cholesterol distribution, metabolism and efflux and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods and results We have developed an experimental design to specifically increase BMP content in RAW macrophages. Following BMP accumulation, cell cholesterol distribution was markedly altered despite no change in LDL uptake and hydrolysis, cholesterol esterification, or total cell cholesterol content. The expression of cholesterol regulated genes SREBP2 and HMGCoAR was decreased by 40%, indicative of an increase of endoplasmic reticulum associated-cholesterol. Cholesterol delivery to plasma membrane was reduced as evidenced by the 20% decrease of efflux by cyclodextrin. Functionally, BMP accumulation reduced cholesterol efflux to both apoA1 and HDL by 40%, correlated with a 40% decrease in mRNA contents of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transporters and LXR α and β. Foam cell formation induced by oxidized LDL exposure was exacerbated in BMP enriched cells. Conclusion The present work shows for the first time a strong functional link between BMP and cholesterol regulating genes involved in both intracellular metabolism and efflux. We propose that accumulation of cellular BMP might contribute to the deregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in atheromatous macrophages. PMID:23788762

  5. Cholesterol Regulates Multiple Forms of Vesicle Endocytosis at a Mammalian Central Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis in synapses sustains neurotransmission by recycling vesicle membrane and maintaining the homeostasis of synaptic membrane. A role of membrane cholesterol in synaptic endocytosis remains controversial because of conflicting observations, technical limitations in previous studies, and potential interference from nonspecific effects after cholesterol manipulation. Furthermore, it is unclear whether cholesterol participates in distinct forms of endocytosis that function under different activity levels. In this study, applying the whole-cell membrane capacitance measurement to monitor endocytosis in real time at the rat calyx of Held terminals, we found that disrupting cholesterol with dialysis of cholesterol oxidase (COase) or methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) impaired three different forms of endocytosis, i.e., slow endocytosis, rapid endocytosis, and endocytosis of the retrievable membrane that exists at the surface before stimulation. The effects were observed when disruption of cholesterol was mild enough not to change Ca2+ channel current or vesicle exocytosis, indicative of stringent cholesterol requirement in synaptic endocytosis. Extracting cholesterol with high concentrations of MCD reduced exocytosis, mainly by decreasing the readily releasable pool (RRP) and the vesicle replenishment after RRP depletion. Our study suggests that cholesterol is an important, universal regulator in multiple forms of vesicle endocytosis at mammalian central synapses. PMID:25893258

  6. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  7. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root. PMID:27457987

  8. Cholesterol (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  9. Role of endolysosomes and cholesterol in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease: Insights into why statins might not provide clinical benefit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuesong; Hui, Liang; Geiger, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Altered cholesterol homeostasis in general and increased levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol specifically is a robust risk factor for the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Because of this, the family of drugs known as statins have been tried extensively to lower cholesterol levels in attempting to prevent and/or lessen the neuropathogenesis of AD. Unfortunately, evidence accumulated to date is insufficient to support the continued use of statins as a viable pharmacotherapeutic approach against AD. To understand these complex and inter-related issues it is important to review how altered cholesterol homeostasis contributes to AD pathogenesis and why statins have not provided clinical benefit against AD. Apolipoproteins with their different affinities for various lipids and the receptors that control cholesterol uptake can result in drastic differences in cholesterol trafficking into and its distribution within neurons. The presence of the apoE4 or elevated plasma levels of LDL cholesterol can lead to a set of conditions that resembles lysosomal lipid storage disorders observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease such as impaired recycling of cholesterol back to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi and plasma membranes, cholesterol deficiencies in plasma membranes, and increased cholesterol accumulation in endolysosomes resulting in endolysosome dysfunction. Consequently, the use of statins to block cholesterol synthesis in ER might not only decrease further plasma membrane cholesterol levels thus disturbing synaptic integrity, but also could also increase cholesterol burden in endolysosomes thus worsening endolysosome dysfunction. Therefore, it is not surprising that the use of cholesterol-lowering strategies with statins has not resulted in clinical benefit for patients living with AD. PMID:25859562

  10. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M.; Howles, Philip N.; Kier, Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  11. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  12. How cholesterol regulates endothelial biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhongkui; Staiculescu, Marius C.; Hampel, Paul; Levitan, Irena; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    As endothelial cells form the barrier between blood flow and surrounding tissue, many of their functions depend on mechanical integrity, in particular those of the plasma membrane. As component and organizer of the plasma membrane, cholesterol is a regulator of cellular mechanical properties. Disruption of cholesterol balance leads to impairment of endothelial functions and eventually to disease. The mechanical properties of the membrane are strongly affected by the cytoskeleton. As Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key mediator between the membrane and cytoskeleton, it also affects cellular biomechanical properties. Typically, PIP2 is concentrated in cholesterol-rich microdomains, such as caveolae and lipid rafts, which are particularly abundant in the endothelial plasma membrane. We investigated the connection between cholesterol and PIP2 by extracting membrane tethers from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at different cholesterol levels and PIP2 conditions. Our results suggest that in BAEC the role of PIP2, as a mediator of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, is regulated by cholesterol. Our findings confirm the specific role of cholesterol in endothelial cells and may have implications for cholesterol-dependent vascular pathologies. PMID:23162471

  13. Eicosapentaenoic acid membrane incorporation impairs ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux via a protein kinase A signaling pathway in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Natalie; Tardivel, Sylviane; Benoist, Jean-François; Vedie, Benoît; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Nowak, Maxime; Allaoui, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A diet rich in n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is cardioprotective. Dietary PUFAs affect the cellular phospholipids composition, which may influence the function of membrane proteins. We investigated the impact of the membrane incorporation of several PUFAs on ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, a key antiatherogenic pathway. Arachidonic acid (AA) (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6 n-3) decreased or increased cholesterol efflux from J774 mouse macrophages, respectively, whereas they had no effect on efflux from human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Importantly, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20:5 n-3) induced a dose-dependent reduction of ABCA1 functionality in both cellular models (-28% for 70μM of EPA in HMDM), without any alterations in ABCA1 expression. These results show that PUFA membrane incorporation does not have the same consequences on cholesterol efflux from mouse and human macrophages. The EPA-treated HMDM exhibited strong phospholipid composition changes, with high levels of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (C22:5 n-3), which is associated with a decreased level of AA. In HMDM, EPA reduced the ATPase activity of the membrane transporter. Moreover, the activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine restored ABCA1 cholesterol efflux in EPA-treated human macrophages. In conclusion, EPA membrane incorporation reduces ABCA1 functionality in mouse macrophages as well as in primary human macrophages and this effect seems to be PKA-dependent in human macrophages. PMID:26776055

  14. Recycling, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Suggestions for creating a successful office recycling system are enumerated from start up plans to waste reduction and paper recycling. Contact information for recycling equipment, potential buyers of recycled materials, recycled products for purchase, and ideas for promotion and education of staff are included. (MCO)

  15. Recycling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, James R

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal membrane recycling system represents a dynamic conduit for sorting and re-exporting internalized membrane constituents. The recycling system is composed of multiple tubulovesicular recycling pathways that likely confer distinct trafficking pathways for individual cargoes. In addition, elements of the recycling system are responsible for assembly and maintenance of apical membrane specializations including primary cilia and apical microvilli. The existence of multiple intersecting and diverging recycling tracks likely accounts for specificity in plasma membrane recycling trafficking. PMID:26022676

  16. Women and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... Glossary Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  17. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  18. 7-ketocholesterol incorporation into sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains is impaired by vitamin E: a specific role for alpha-tocopherol with consequences on cell death.

    PubMed

    Royer, Marie-Charlotte; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Monier, Serge; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Athias, Anne; Néel, Dominique; Lagrost, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    Cholesterol oxides, in particular 7-ketocholesterol, are proatherogenic compounds that induce cell death in the vascular wall when localized in lipid raft domains of the cell membrane. Deleterious effects of 7-ketocholesterol can be prevented by vitamin E, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, unlike gamma-tocopherol, the alpha-tocopherol vitamin E form was found to prevent 7-ketocholesterol-mediated apoptosis of A7R5 smooth muscle cells. To be operative, alpha-tocopherol needed to be added to the cells before 7-ketocholesterol, and its anti-apoptotic effect was reduced and even suppressed when added together or after 7-ketocholesterol, respectively. Both pre- and co-treatment of the cells with alpha-tocopherol resulted in the redistribution of 7-ketocholesterol out of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains. In turn, fewer amounts of alpha-tocopherol associated with lipid rafts on 7-ketocholesterol-pretreated cells compared with untreated cells, with no prevention of cell death in this case. In further support of the implication of lipid raft domains, the dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt-PKB was involved in the 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Akt-PKB dephosphorylation was prevented by alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol pretreatment. PMID:19351882

  19. Hanford recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall

  20. All about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... are several kinds of fats in your blood. • LDL cholesterol is sometimes called “bad” cholesterol. It can narrow ... medicine to manage blood fats. They help lower LDL cholesterol. They also help lower your risk for a ...

  1. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePlus

    ... lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol) Triglycerides (another type of fat in your blood) Very ... made of fat and protein. They carry cholesterol, triglycerides, and other fats, called lipids, in the blood ...

  2. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000403.htm High blood cholesterol levels To use the sharing features on this page, ... called "bad" cholesterol For many people, abnormal cholesterol levels are partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. This ...

  3. Recycled roads

    SciTech Connect

    Tarricone, P.

    1993-04-01

    This article examines the efforts of various states in the USA to recycle waste materials in highway construction as fill and pavements. The topics of the article include recycling used tires whole, ground, and shredded, cost of recycling, wood fiber chips as fill material in embankments, and mining wastes used to construct embankments and as coarse aggregates in asphalt pavement.

  4. EHD1 regulates cholesterol homeostasis and lipid droplet storage

    PubMed Central

    Naslavsky, Naava; Rahajeng, Juliati; Rapaport, Debora; Horowitz, Mia; Caplan, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Endocytic transport is critical for the subcellular distribution of free cholesterol and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) is an important organelle that stores cholesterol and regulates its trafficking. The C-terminal EHD protein, EHD1, controls receptor recycling through the ERC and affects free cholesterol distribution in the cell. We utilized embryonic fibroblasts from EHD1 knockout mice (Ehd1-/-MEF) and SiRNA in normal MEF cells to assess the role of EHD1 in intracellular transport of cholesterol. Surprisingly, Ehd1-/-MEFs displayed reduced levels of esterified and free cholesterol, which returned to normal level upon re-introduction of wild-type, but not dysfunctional EHD1. Moreover, triglyceride and cholesterol storage organelles known as ‘lipid droplets’ were smaller in size in cells lacking EHD1, indicating that less esterified cholesterol and triglycerides were being stored. Decreased cellular cholesterol and reduced lipid droplet size in Ehd1-/-MEFs correlated with ineffectual cholesterol uptake via LDL receptor, suggesting involvement of EHD1 in LDL receptor internalization. PMID:17451652

  5. Cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Favari, Elda; Chroni, Angelika; Tietge, Uwe J F; Zanotti, Ilaria; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Bernini, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Both alterations of lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory events contribute to the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque, characterized by the accumulation of abnormal amounts of cholesterol and macrophages in the artery wall. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may counteract the pathogenic events leading to the formation and development of atheroma, by promoting the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated removal of cholesterol from the artery wall. Recent in vivo studies established the inverse relationship between RCT efficiency and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), thus suggesting that the promotion of this process may represent a novel strategy to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and subsequent cardiovascular events. HDL plays a primary role in all stages of RCT: (1) cholesterol efflux, where these lipoproteins remove excess cholesterol from cells; (2) lipoprotein remodeling, where HDL undergo structural modifications with possible impact on their function; and (3) hepatic lipid uptake, where HDL releases cholesterol to the liver, for the final excretion into bile and feces. Although the inverse association between HDL plasma levels and CVD risk has been postulated for years, recently this concept has been challenged by studies reporting that HDL antiatherogenic functions may be independent of their plasma levels. Therefore, assessment of HDL function, evaluated as the capacity to promote cell cholesterol efflux may offer a better prediction of CVD than HDL levels alone. Consistent with this idea, it has been recently demonstrated that the evaluation of serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a predictor of atherosclerosis extent in humans. PMID:25522988

  6. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... You also get cholesterol by eating foods like egg yolks, fatty meats, and regular cheese. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up inside your blood vessels and make it hard for blood to ...

  7. Critical role of cellular cholesterol in bovine rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is a non-enveloped dsRNA virus that cause neonatal calf diarrhea. Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enrich membrane mircodomains that play a vital role in many cellular processes. In this study, the effect of cellular cholesterol depletion on infection of MA-104 cells with bovine rotavirus was investigated. Results We demonstrated that cholesterol depletion of the plasma membrane by MβCD had no effect on BRV binding to cells but significantly impaired BRV entry in a dose-dependent manner and the effect was partially reversed by addition of exogenous cholesterol, suggesting the reduction of BRV infection by MβCD was specifically due to cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol depletion after virus entry did not reduce BRV replication, whereas affected virus assembly. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate that cell membrane cholesterol is essential to BRV infectivity. PMID:24884772

  8. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  9. Cholesterol and Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, E. J.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    There is a widespread belief among the public and even among chemist that plants do not contain cholesterol. This wrong belief is the result of the fact that plants generally contain only small quantities of cholesterol and that analytical methods for the detection of cholesterol in this range were not developed until recently.

  10. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  11. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  12. Textile recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, E. ); Carlton, J.

    1995-01-01

    The most common household textiles include clothing, linens, draperies, carpets, shoes, handbags, and rugs. Old clothing, of course, is the most readily reused and/or recycled residentially generated textile category. State and/or local mandates to recycle a percentage of the waste stream are providing the impetus to add new materials to existing collection programs. Concurrently, the textile industry is aggressively trying to increase its throughput by seeking new sources of material to meet increased world demand for product. As experienced with drop-off programs for traditional materials, a majority of residents will not recycle materials unless the collection programs are convenient, i.e., curbside collection. The tonnage of marketable textiles currently being landfilled provide evidence of this. It is the authors' contention that if textile recycling is made convenient and accessible to every household in a municipality or region, then the waste stream disposed may be reduced in a similar fashion as when traditional recyclables are included in curbside programs.

  13. Tire Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

  14. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test does: This is a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) in your blood. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) ("good" cholesterol) helps protect your heart, but low-density lipoprotein (LDL) ("bad" cholesterol) can clog the arteries of your ...

  15. Children and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... a coronary artery procedure; or who suffered a heart attack or sudden cardiac death before age 55. Those with a parent who has a history of high total cholesterol levels (240 mg/dL or higher). Talk to your child’s pediatrician ... Risk Calculator Printable Cholesterol Information Sheets Heart360 Health ...

  16. Kids and Cholesterol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficklen, Ellen

    1992-01-01

    According to a 1991 National Cholesterol Education Program report, the best way to avoid heart trouble is to take early preventive measures. This means that children over age two should follow the same low-fat, low-cholesterol guidelines already recommended for adults. Sidebars contain a fat glossary and tips for cutting fat in school lunches.…

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  18. Cholesterol and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... traveling together are called lipoproteins . Two kinds — low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) — are the ones that most of us have heard about. Low-density lipoproteins , or "bad cholesterol," are the primary cholesterol ...

  19. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  20. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean Updated:Aug 17,2016 How’s your cholesterol? Time to get it checked! Keeping your cholesterol levels healthy is a great way to keep your ...

  1. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  2. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes: implications for viral trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Salonen, Emppu; Mäkelä, Anna R.; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Vuento, Matti

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the effect of desipramine (DMI) on phospholipid bilayers and parvoviral entry was elucidated. In atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, DMI was found to introduce disorder in cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers. This was manifested by a decrease in the deuterium order parameter SCD as well as an increase in the membrane area. Disordering of the membrane suggested DMI to destabilize cholesterol-rich membrane domains (rafts) in cellular conditions. To relate the raft disrupting ability of DMI with novel biological relevance, we studied the intracellular effect of DMI using canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect on the viral traffic. As recycling endosomes and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies are known to contain raft components, the effect of desipramine beyond the plasma membrane step could be caused by raft disruption leading to impaired endosomal function and possibly have direct influence on the penetration of the virus through an endosomal membrane.

  3. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 ... warm What are the different types of dietary fat? The four main types of fat found in ...

  4. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... is checked with a blood test called a lipid profile. During the test, a nurse will take ... blood tests that can check cholesterol, but a lipid profile gives the most information. Find out more ...

  5. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  6. High Blood Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cholesterol is called plaque. Plaque Buildup Can Lead to… Click for more information Artherosclerosis. Over time, ... disease (CHD). Angina. The buildup of plaque can lead to chest pain called angina. Angina is a ...

  7. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... most (and preferably all) days; and stressing the importance of avoiding tobacco products. Learn more about cholesterol ... Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  8. Cholesterol and Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver makes ldl & hdl In the liver, triglycerides, cholesterol, and proteins form together to make LDL ... This is especially important for individuals with high triglyceride and/or low HDL levels who are overweight ...

  9. Cholesterol in unusual places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Nieh, M. P.; Marquardt, D.; Harroun, T. A.; Wassail, S. R.; Katsaras, J.

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cells, and is required for building and maintaining cell membranes, regulating their fluidity, and possibly acting as an antioxidant. Cholesterol has also been implicated in cell signaling processes, where it has been suggested that it triggers the formation of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. Aside from cholesterol's physiological roles, what is also becoming clear is its poor affinity for lipids with unsaturated fatty acids as opposed to saturated lipids, such as sphingomyelin with which it forms rafts. We previously reported the location of cholesterol in membranes with varying degrees of acyl chain unsaturation as determined by neutron diffraction studies (Harroun et al 2006 Biochemistry 45, 1227; Harroun et al 2008 Biochemistry 47, 7090). In bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules with a saturated acyl chain at the sn-1 position or a monounsaturated acyl chain at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions, cholesterol was found in its much-accepted "upright" position. However, in dipolyunsaturated 1,2-diarachidonyl phosphatidylcholine (20:4-20:4PC) membranes the molecule was found sequestered in the center of the bilayers. In further experiments, mixing l-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0-18:1 PC) with 20:4-20:4PC resulted in cholesterol reverting to its upright orientation at approximately 40 mol% 16:0-18:1 PC. Interestingly, the same effect was achieved with only 5 mol% 1,2-dimyristoyl phosphatidylchoile (14:0-14:0PC).

  10. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26806306

  11. Recycling Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Environmental Resources, Harrisburg.

    This document contains lesson plans about recycling for teachers in grades K-12. Titles include: (1) "Waste--Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?" (2) "Litter Detectives," (3) "Classroom Paper Recycling," (4) "Recycling Survey," (5) "Disposal and Recycling Costs," (6) "Composting Project," (7) Used Motor Oil Recycling," (8) "Unwrapping…

  12. Cryptosporidium parvum scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol and micellar cholesterol internalized into enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenman, Karen; Wanyiri, Jane W.; Bhat, Najma; Ward, Honorine D.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for devastating diarrhea in immunodeficient individuals. In the intestinal tract, the developmental stages of the parasite are confined to the apical surfaces of epithelial cells. Upon invasion, Cryptosporidium incorporates the microvillous membrane of the enterocyte to form the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and sequesters itself from the host cytoplasm by rearranging the host cytoskeleton. Cryptosporidium parvum has minimal anabolic capabilities and relies on transporters and salvage pathways to meet its basic metabolic requirements. The cholesterol salvage pathway is crucial for the development of protozoan parasites. In this study, we have examined the sources of cholesterol from C. parvum infecting enterocytes. We illustrated that the intracellular stages of Cryptosporidium as well as the oocysts shed by the host, contain cholesterol. Incubation of infected enterocytes in lipoprotein-free medium impairs parasite development and results in substantial decrease in cholesterol content associated with the PV. Among lipoproteins, LDL constitutes an important source of cholesterol for Cryptosporidium. Dietary cholesterol incorporated into micelles is internalized into enterocytes by the NPC1L1 transporter. We showed that C. parvum also obtains cholesterol from micelles in enterocytes. Pharmacological blockade of NPC1L1 function by ezetimibe or moderate down-regulation of NPC1L1 expression decreases parasite infectivity. These observations indicate that, despite its dual sequestration from the intestinal lumen and the host cytoplasm, C. parvum can, in fact, obtain cholesterol both from the gut’s lumen and the host cell. This study highlights the evolutionary advantages for epicellular pathogens to access to nutrients from the outside and inside of the host cell. PMID:23311949

  13. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  14. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  15. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A M; Kasimov, M R; Zefirov, A L

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body's total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington's, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  16. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A. M.; Kasimov, M. R.; Zefirov, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body’s total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington’s, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  17. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  18. Recycled pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Bryan Anthony

    2005-11-01

    In a survey of ~4,150 square degrees, we discovered 26 previously unknown pulsars, including 7 "recycled" millisecond or binary pulsars. The most significant discovery of this survey is PSR J1909-3744, a 2.95 ms pulsar in an extremely circular 1.5 d orbit with a low-mass white dwarf companion. Though this system is a fairly typical low-mass binary pulsar (LMBP) system, it has several exceptional qualities: an extremely narrow pulse profile and stable rotation have enabled the most precise long-term timing ever reported, and a nearly edge-on orbit gives rise to a strong Shapiro delay which has allowed the most precise measurement of the mass of a millisecond pulsar: m p = (1.438 +/- 0.024) [Special characters omitted.] . Our accurate parallax distance measurement, d p = ([Special characters omitted.] ) kpc, combined with the mass of the optically-detected companion, m c = (0.2038 +/- 0.022) [Special characters omitted.] , will provide an important calibration for white dwarf models relevant to other LMBP companions. We have detected optical counterparts for two intermediate mass binary pulsar (IMBP) systems; taken together with optical detections and non-detections of several similar systems, our results indicate that the characteristic age t = c P /2 P consistently overestimates the time since the end of mass accretion in these recycled systems. We have measured orbital decay in the double neutron star system PSR B2127+11C in the globular cluster M15. This has allowed an improved measurement of the mass of the pulsar, m p = (1.3584 +/- 0.0097) [Special characters omitted.] , and companion, m c = (1.3544 +/- 0.0097) [Special characters omitted.] , as well as a test of general relativity at the 3% level. We find that the proper motions of this pulsar as well as PSR B2127+11A and PSR B2127+11B are consistent with each other and with one published measurement of the cluster proper motion. We have discovered three binary millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster M62

  19. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  20. Cholesterol crystal induced arterial inflammation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Janoudi, Abed; Shamoun, Fadi E; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K; Abela, George S

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of plaque that is prone to rupture is characterized by inflammation and physical changes. Accumulation of low-density lipoprotein in the sub-intima provides esterified cholesterol (ESC) to macrophages and smooth muscle cells that convert it into free cholesterol (FRC) by cholesteryl ester hydrolases (CEHs). Membrane-bound cholesterol carriers transport FRC to high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Impaired HDL transport function and altered composition can lead to extracellular accumulation of FRC, whereas impaired membrane carrier activity can lead to intracellular FRC accumulation. Saturation of FRC can result in cholesterol crystallization with cell death and intimal injury. Disequilibrium between ESC and FRC can impact foam cell and cholesterol crystal (CC) formation. Cholesterol crystals initiate inflammation via NLRP3 inflammasome leading to interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production inducing C-reactive protein. Eventually, crystals growing from within the plaque and associated inflammation destabilize the plaque. Thus, inhibition of inflammation by antagonists to IL-1β or agents that dissolve or prevent CC formation may stabilize vulnerable plaques. PMID:26705388

  1. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    Steps you can take to improve their cholesterol levels, and help prevent heart disease and a heart attack include: Quit smoking. This is the single biggest change you can make to reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke. Eat foods ...

  2. Niacin for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Niacin is a B-vitamin. When taken as a prescription in larger doses, ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics B Vitamins Cholesterol Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  3. Cholesterol, inflammasomes, and atherogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma cholesterol levels have been strongly associated with atherogenesis, underscoring the role of lipid metabolism in defining cardiovascular disease risk. However, atherosclerotic plaque is highly dynamic and contains elements of both the innate and adaptive immune system that respond to the abe...

  4. What's so special about cholesterol?

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G; Zuckermann, Martin J

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol (or other higher sterols such as ergosterol and phytosterols) is universally present in large amounts (20-40 mol%) in eukaryotic plasma membranes, whereas it is universally absent in the membranes of prokaryotes. Cholesterol has a unique ability to increase lipid order in fluid membranes while maintaining fluidity and diffusion rates. Cholesterol imparts low permeability barriers to lipid membranes and provides for large mechanical coherence. A short topical review is given of these special properties of cholesterol in relation to the structure of membranes, with results drawn from a variety of theoretical and experimental studies. Particular focus is put on cholesterol's ability to promote a special membrane phase, the liquid-ordered phase, which is unique for cholesterol (and other higher sterols like ergosterol) and absent in membranes containing the cholesterol precursor lanosterol. Cholesterol's role in the formation of special membrane domains and so-called rafts is discussed. PMID:15726825

  5. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    Bile acid sequestrants are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can ... block them. These medicines work by blocking bile acid in your stomach from being absorbed in your ...

  6. Cholesterol regulates Syntaxin 6 trafficking at trans-Golgi network endosomal boundaries.

    PubMed

    Reverter, Meritxell; Rentero, Carles; Garcia-Melero, Ana; Hoque, Monira; Vilà de Muga, Sandra; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Conway, James R W; Wood, Peta; Cairns, Rose; Lykopoulou, Lilia; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Bosch, Marta; Heeren, Joerg; Blasi, Juan; Timpson, Paul; Pol, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Murray, Rachael Z; Grewal, Thomas; Enrich, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Inhibition of cholesterol export from late endosomes causes cellular cholesterol imbalance, including cholesterol depletion in the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Here, using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) mutant cell lines and human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts, we show that altered cholesterol levels at the TGN/endosome boundaries trigger Syntaxin 6 (Stx6) accumulation into VAMP3, transferrin, and Rab11-positive recycling endosomes (REs). This increases Stx6/VAMP3 interaction and interferes with the recycling of αVβ3 and α5β1 integrins and cell migration, possibly in a Stx6-dependent manner. In NPC1 mutant cells, restoration of cholesterol levels in the TGN, but not inhibition of VAMP3, restores the steady-state localization of Stx6 in the TGN. Furthermore, elevation of RE cholesterol is associated with increased amounts of Stx6 in RE. Hence, the fine-tuning of cholesterol levels at the TGN-RE boundaries together with a subset of cholesterol-sensitive SNARE proteins may play a regulatory role in cell migration and invasion. PMID:24746815

  7. Facts about Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This fact sheet offers information on blood cholesterol and its implications for a healthy heart. An explanation is given of the known facts about cholesterol and how it affects the body. A chart is provided that lists various foods and their fat and cholesterol contents. (JD)

  8. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  9. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  10. Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... or trans fats also increases the amount of LDL cholesterol in your blood. If high blood cholesterol runs ... may not be enough to help lower your LDL blood cholesterol. View an animation of cholesterol . More information: Women ...

  11. Overview of Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol and Lipid Disorders Dyslipidemia Hypolipidemia Cholesterol and triglycerides are important fats (lipids) in the blood. Cholesterol ... needs, but it also obtains cholesterol from food. Triglycerides, which are contained in fat cells, can be ...

  12. Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

  13. Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Boyd W.

    2000-01-01

    Explains that motor oils can be reused and recycled. Educates students about environmental hazards and oil management and includes classroom activities. Addresses the National Science Education Standards. (YDS)

  14. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  15. Cholesterol dynamics in membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yeagle, P L; Albert, A D; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Young, J; Frye, J

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of the sterol analogue, cholestatrienol, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin lattice relaxation time (T1c) measurements of [13C4] labeled cholesterol were exploited to determine the correlation times characterizing the major modes of motion of cholesterol in unsonicated phospholipid multilamellar liposomes. Two modes of motion were found to be important: (a) rotational diffusion and (b) time dependence of the orientation of the director for axial diffusion, or "wobble." From the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decays of cholestatrienol in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers, a value for tau perpendicular, the correlation time for wobble, of 0.9 x 10(-9) s and a value for S perpendicular, the order parameter characterizing the same motion, of 0.45 s were calculated. Both tau perpendicular and S perpendicular were relatively insensitive to temperature and cholesterol content of the membranes. The T1c measurements of [13C4] labeled cholesterol did not provide a quantitative determination of tau parallel, the correlation time for axial diffusion. T1c from the lipid hydrocarbon chains suggested a value for tau perpendicular similar to that for cholesterol. Steady-state anisotropy measurements and time-resolved anisotropy measurements of cholestatrienol were used to probe sterol behavior in a variety of pure and mixed lipid multilamellar liposomes. Both the lipid headgroups and the lipid hydrocarbons chains contributed to the determination of the sterol environment in the membrane, as revealed by these fluorescence measurements. In particular, effects of the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroup and of multiple unsaturation in the lipid hydrocarbon chains were observed. However, while the steady-state anisotropy was sensitive to these factors, the time-resolved fluorescence analysis indicated that tau perpendicular was not strongly affected by the lipid composition of the membrane. S perpendicular may be increased

  16. Recycling overview in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This article discusses the recycling programs currently in use in Sweden. Recycling of newspapers, batteries, plastics are all mentioned in this report by the Swedish Association of Public Cleansing and Solid Waste Management.

  17. Recycling Research. Tracking Trash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLago, Louise Furia

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students research the effectiveness of recycling is presented. Students compare the types and amount of litter both before and after recycling is implemented. Directions for the activity and a sample data sheet are included. (KR)

  18. [An operative case of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex].

    PubMed

    Saino, M; Kayama, T; Kuroki, A; Siraisi, Y; Sato, K; Nakai, O

    1996-11-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with a rare cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex manifesting as headache, left facial dysesthesia, diplopia, left hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Neurological examination revealed dysesthesia of territory in all divisions of the left trigeminal nerve, left incomplete abducens nerve palsy, left mixed hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Plain CT scan showed a smoothly marginated mass involving the left petrous apex. The mass was isodense with the brain parenchyma and not enhanced by contrast medium. The mass appeared heterogeneously slightly hyperintense on the T1-weighted MR image and homogeneously hyperintense on the T2-weighted MR image except for the peripheral portion. The mass was not enhanced after intravenous gadolinium DTPA administration. Surgery via a petrosal approach totally removed the mass in the intracranial, extradural space. Histological examination showed typical features of cholesterol granuloma, with cholesterin clefts, hemosiderin deposits, and erythrocytes in non-specific granulation tissue. Cholesterol granuloma most commonly occurs in the middle ear cavity, and rarely in the petrous apex. The characteristic hyperintense appearance of cholesterol granuloma on T1- and T2-weighted MR images is very useful for differentiation from other lesions of the petrous apex and the cerebellopontine angle such as cholesteatoma, mucocele, chordoma, and meningioma. Solid cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex should be treated by total removal via craniotomy, not by drainage which is commonly performed by otorhinologists. PMID:8934474

  19. Recycling and the automobile

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    This article examines the current status of automobile recycling and contains a summary of a survey which points out the major drivers and their impacts on automotive recycling. The topics of the article include computerized dismantling, polyurethane, sheet molding compound, polyester, thermoplastic polyester, recycling salvaged parts, vinyl and automotive shredder residue.

  20. The Sustainability of Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juniper, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Describes the need for closing the business cycle in the recycling process. Discusses whether the government should mandate or the free market create uses for recycled products. Presents challenges associated with marketing recycled materials including what has been and what needs to be done to stimulate markets, encourage business, and balance…

  1. Rethink, Rework, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrhen, Linda; DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Information about the recycling and reuse of plastics, aluminum, steel, glass, and newspapers is presented. The phases of recycling are described. An activity that allows students to separate recyclable materials is included. The objectives, a list of needed materials, and procedure are provided. (KR)

  2. A highly conserved mycobacterial cholesterol catabolic pathway

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Esther; Frank, Daniel J.; Galán, Beatriz; Kells, Petrea M.; Podust, Larissa M.; García, José L.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Degradation of the cholesterol side-chain in M. tuberculosis is initiated by two cytochromes P450, CYP125A1 and CYP142A1, that sequentially oxidize C26 to the alcohol, aldehyde and acid metabolites. Here we report characterization of the homologous enzymes CYP125A3 and CYP142A2 from M. smegmatis mc2 155. Heterologously expressed, purified CYP125A3 and CYP142A2 bound cholesterol, 4-cholesten-3-one, and antifungal azole drugs. CYP125A3 or CYP142A2 reconstituted with spinach ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase efficiently hydroxylated 4-cholesten-3-one to the C-26 alcohol and subsequently to the acid. The X-ray structures of both substrate-free CYP125A3 and CYP142A2 and of cholest-4-en-3-one-bound CYP142A2 reveal significant differences in the substrate binding sites compared with the homologous M. tuberculosis proteins. Deletion of cyp125A3 or cyp142A2 does not impair growth of M. smegmatis mc2 155 on cholesterol. However, deletion only of cyp125A3 causes a reduction of both the alcohol and acid metabolites and a strong induction of cyp142 at the mRNA and protein levels, indicating that CYP142A2 serves as a functionally redundant back up enzyme for CYP125A3. In contrast to M. tuberculosis, the M. smegmatis Δcyp125Δcyp142 double mutant retains its ability to grow on cholesterol albeit with a diminished capacity, indicating an additional level of redundancy within its genome. PMID:23489718

  3. Cholesterol diet counteracts repeated anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits in male Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Ehrlich, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A variety of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are associated with alterations in cholesterol levels and metabolism. Moreover, convincing evidence shows that high cholesterol diet can lead to learning and memory impairments. On the other hand, a significant body of research has also demonstrated that learning is improved by elevated dietary cholesterol. Despite these conflicting findings, it is clear that cholesterol plays an important role in these cognitive properties. However, it remains unclear how this blood-brain barrier (BBB)-impenetrable molecule affects the brain and under what circumstances it provides either detrimental or beneficial effects to learning and memory. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of 5% cholesterol diet on six-month-old inbred Brown Norway rats. More important, we sought to examine the role that cholesterol can play when repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion disrupts cognitive function. This present study supports previous work showing that enriched cholesterol diet leads to significant alterations in neuroinflammation and BBB disruption. Following repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion of saline we observe that animals under normal diet conditions exhibit significant deficiencies in spatial learning and cholinergic neuron populations compared to animals under enriched cholesterol diet, which do not show such deficiencies. These findings indicate that cholesterol diet can protect against or counteract anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits. Ultimately, these results suggest that cholesterol homeostasis serves an important functional role in the brain and that altering this homeostasis can either exert positive or negative effects on cognitive properties. PMID:23973449

  4. Epigenetic regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Although best known as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cholesterol is a vital component of all mammalian cells. In addition to key structural roles, cholesterol is a vital biochemical precursor for numerous biologically important compounds including oxysterols and bile acids, as well as acting as an activator of critical morphogenic systems (e.g., the Hedgehog system). A variety of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms interact to coordinate the overall level of cholesterol in cells, tissues and the entire organism. Accumulating evidence indicates that in additional to the more “traditional” regulatory schemes, cholesterol homeostasis is also under the control of epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation and DNA methylation. The available evidence supporting a role for these mechanisms in the control of cholesterol synthesis, elimination, transport and storage are the focus of this review. PMID:25309573

  5. Cholesterol-mediated surfactant dysfunction is mitigated by surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Hiansen, Joshua Qua; Keating, Eleonora; Aspros, Alex; Yao, Li-Juan; Bosma, Karen J; Yamashita, Cory M; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-03-01

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce surface tension at the alveolar surface is impaired in various lung diseases. Recent animal studies indicate that elevated levels of cholesterol within surfactant may contribute to its inhibition. It was hypothesized that elevated cholesterol levels within surfactant inhibit human surfactant biophysical function and that these effects can be reversed by surfactant protein A (SP-A). The initial experiment examined the function of surfactant from mechanically ventilated trauma patients in the presence and absence of a cholesterol sequestering agent, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. The results demonstrated improved surface activity when cholesterol was sequestered in vitro using a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). These results were explored further by reconstitution of surfactant with various concentrations of cholesterol with and without SP-A, and testing of the functionality of these samples in vitro with the CBS and in vivo using surfactant depleted rats. Overall, the results consistently demonstrated that surfactant function was inhibited by levels of cholesterol of 10% (w/w phospholipid) but this inhibition was mitigated by the presence of SP-A. It is concluded that cholesterol-induced surfactant inhibition can actively contribute to physiological impairment of the lungs in mechanically ventilated patients and that SP-A levels may be important to maintain surfactant function in the presence of high cholesterol within surfactant. PMID:25522687

  6. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000211.htm Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor To use the ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your body needs cholesterol to work properly. When you have extra cholesterol ...

  7. How to Get Your Cholesterol Tested

    MedlinePlus

    ... HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. A small sample of blood will be drawn ... the amount of LDL (bad) cholesterol level and triglycerides can be affected by what you've recently ...

  8. What Do My Cholesterol Levels Mean?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More What Do My Cholesterol Levels Mean? Updated:Mar 22,2016 High cholesterol can ... a fasting “lipoprotein profile” to measure your cholesterol levels. It assesses several types of fat in the ...

  9. Lateral organization of cholesterol molecules in lipid-cholesterol assemblies.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sengupta, Pinaki; Cox, Daniel L.

    2005-05-01

    We present results of an off-lattice simulation of a two-component planar system, as a model for lateral organization of cholesterol molecules in lipid-cholesterol assemblies. We explore the existence of 'superlattice' structures even in fluid systems, in the absence of an underlying translational long-range order, and study their coupling to hexatic or bond-orientational order. We discuss our results in context of geometric superlattice theories and 'condensation complexes' in understanding a variety of experiments in artificial lipid-cholesterol assemblies.

  10. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  11. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  12. Serum cholesterol concentrations in parasuicide.

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, M.; Manfredini, R.; Caracciolo, S.; Scapoli, C.; Molinari, S.; Fersini, C.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate whether people who have committed parasuicide have low serum cholesterol concentrations. DESIGN--Results of blood tests in subjects admitted to hospital for parasuicide compared with those of a control group of non-suicidal subjects; comparison in subgroup of parasuicide subjects of two sets of blood test results (one set from admission for parasuicide and the other from admission for some other illness). SETTING--General hospital, Ferrara, Italy. SUBJECTS--331 parasuicide subjects aged 44 (SD 21) years (109 with two sets of blood test results) and 331 controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Serum cholesterol concentrations and possible association with parasuicide, considering sex, violence of method of parasuicide, and underlying psychiatric disorder. RESULTS--Lower serum cholesterol concentrations (4.96 (SD 1.16) mmol/l) were found in the parasuicide subjects than in the controls (5.43 (1.30); P < 0.001), regardless of sex and degree of violence of parasuicide method. Both men and women with two sets of blood test results had lower cholesterol concentrations after parasuicide. Linear regression analysis showed that the difference in cholesterol concentrations was significantly related to the length of time between the taking of the two sets of blood samples. CONCLUSION--The study showed low cholesterol concentrations after parasuicide. This finding agrees with previous studies, which suggest an association between low cholesterol concentration and suicide. PMID:7795448

  13. Cholesterol-metabolizing cytochromes P450: implications for cholesterol lowering

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be a leading cause of death worldwide. Elevated serum cholesterol is one of the classical risk factors for CVD which also include age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, obesity and family history. A number of therapeutic drug classes have been developed to treat hypercholesterolemia, yet, an important percentage of patients do not reach their treatment goals. Therefore, new cholesterol-lowering medications, having a site of action different from that of currently available drugs need to be developed. This review summarizes new information about cytochrome P450 enzymes 7A1, 27A1, and 46A1, that play key roles in cholesterol elimination and that have potential to serve as targets for cholesterol-lowering. PMID:18950282

  14. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-05-16

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K{sub C}, the thickness D{sub HH}, and the orientational order parameter S{sub xray} of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K{sub C} when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains.

  15. Targeting cancer using cholesterol conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Awwad A.; Alanazi, Fares K.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of cholesterol moiety to active compounds for either cancer treatment or diagnosis is an attractive approach. Cholesterol derivatives are widely studied as cancer diagnostic agents and as anticancer derivatives either in vitro or in vivo using animal models. In largely growing studies, anticancer agents have been chemically conjugated to cholesterol molecules, to enhance their pharmacokinetic behavior, cellular uptake, target specificity, and safety. To efficiently deliver anticancer agents to the target cells and tissues, many different cholesterol–anticancer conjugates were synthesized and characterized, and their anticancer efficiencies were tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24493968

  16. Improving Access to Vision Care for People Who are Homeless through Eyeglasses Recycling.

    PubMed

    Lam, Janna; Robertson, Kirstin; Robertson, Wesley; Bernstein, Rebecca

    2015-11-01

    Visual impairment disproportionately affects the health and function of people who are homeless. A common and correctable cause of visual impairment is refractive error. However, eyeglasses remain an unmet need for the poor and underinsured. This report describes eyeglasses recycling and vision screening to reduce the burden of correctable visual impairment. PMID:26548683

  17. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4) and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293) cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn) present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1) levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells. PMID:20546600

  18. Metabolism, Energetics, and Lipid Biology in the Podocyte – Cellular Cholesterol-Mediated Glomerular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Merscher, Sandra; Pedigo, Christopher E.; Mendez, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a high risk of death. Dyslipidemia is commonly observed in patients with CKD and is accompanied by a decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein, and an increase in plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and oxidized lipids. The observation that statins may decrease albuminuria but do not stop the progression of CKD indicates that pathways other than the cholesterol synthesis contribute to cholesterol accumulation in the kidneys of patients with CKD. Recently, it has become clear that increased lipid influx and impaired reverse cholesterol transport can promote glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial damage. Lipid-rafts are cholesterol-rich membrane domains with important functions in regulating membrane fluidity, membrane protein trafficking, and in the assembly of signaling molecules. In podocytes, which are specialized cells of the glomerulus, they contribute to the spatial organization of the slit diaphragm (SD) under physiological and pathological conditions. The discovery that podocyte-specific proteins such as podocin can bind and recruit cholesterol contributing to the formation of the SD underlines the importance of cholesterol homeostasis in podocytes and suggests cholesterol as an important regulator in the development of proteinuric kidney disease. Cellular cholesterol accumulation due to increased synthesis, influx, or decreased efflux is an emerging concept in podocyte biology. This review will focus on the role of cellular cholesterol accumulation in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases with a focus on glomerular diseases. PMID:25352833

  19. AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY WASTEWATER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of recycling certain categories of water used in the manufacture of airplanes was demonstrated. Water in four categories was continuously recycled in 380-liter (100-gallon) treatment plants; chemical process rinse water, dye-penetrant crack-detection rinse water, ...

  20. Wee Recyclers Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Hands-on activities in this guide are designed to help preschool children (ages 3-5) understand that reducing, reusing, and recycling preserves natural resources and prolongs the life of landfills. Children sort, match and compare recyclable items and learn to separate some items by number and color. The 29 activities are divided into units that…

  1. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  2. Carbon dioxide recycling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  3. Design for aluminum recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article describes the increasing use of aluminum in automobiles and the need to recycle to benefit further growth of aluminum applications by assuring an economical, high-quality source of metal. The article emphasizes that coordination of material specifications among designers can raise aluminum scrap value and facilitate recycling. Applications of aluminum in automobile construction are discussed.

  4. Reuse, Reduce, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Georgia

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of recycling paper in law libraries is also applicable to other types of libraries. Results of surveys of law libraries that investigated recycling practices in 1987 and again in 1990 are reported, and suggestions for reducing the amount of paper used and reusing as much as possible are offered. (LRW)

  5. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  6. Cholesterol and synaptic vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fratangeli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Lipids may affect synaptic function in at least two ways: by acting as ligands for effector proteins [e.g., phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, diacylglycerol-mediated signaling] or by modifying the physicochemical properties and molecular organization of synaptic membranes. One that acts in the latter manner is cholesterol, an essential structural component of plasma membranes that is largely enriched in the membranes of synapses and synaptic vesicles, in which it may be involved in lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions. Cholesterol is an important constituent of the “membrane rafts” that may play a role in recruiting and organizing the specific proteins of the exocytic pathways. Furthermore, many synaptic proteins bind directly to cholesterol. The regulation of cholesterol and lipid levels may therefore influence the specific interactions and activity of synaptic proteins, and have a strong impact on synaptic functions. PMID:20798824

  7. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  8. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy.

    PubMed

    DuBroff, Robert; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2015-07-26

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) and the true effect of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular, whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently, the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary, we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD. PMID:26225201

  9. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  10. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy

    PubMed Central

    DuBroff, Robert; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) and the true effect of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular, whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently, the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary, we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD. PMID:26225201

  11. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown - at least in some bilayers - to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in the vicinity of the lipid-water interface. In this article we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies. PMID:27056099

  12. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  13. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  14. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  15. Advances in plastic recycling. Volume 1: Recycling of polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, K.C.; Klempner, D.; Prentice, G.

    1999-07-01

    ``Recycling of Polyurethanes'', the first volume in the Advances in Plastics Recycling series, is focused on the physical and chemical recycling of polyurethanes, with attention given to energy conversion. A compilation of the present ongoing studies on recycling of urethane and, in general, isocyanate-based polymers, the focus is on thermosetting urethane polymers. Contents include: Recycling of Polyurethane Plastics in the European Automotive Industry; Present State of Polyurethane Recycling in Europe; Processing Overview of Bonded Polyurethane Foam; Mechanical Recycling of Polyurethane Scrap; Ecostream{trademark}--A Technology Beyond Recycling; Recycling of Flexible polyurethane Foam; General purpose Adhesives Prepared from Chemically Recycled Waste Rigid Polyurethane Foams; and Utilization of Isocyanate Binders in Recycling of Scrap Automotive Headliners.

  16. Facts about...Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This fact sheet on blood cholesterol examines the connection between cholesterol and heart disease, lists risk factors for heart disease that can and cannot be controlled, points out who can benefit from lowering blood cholesterol, distinguishes between blood and dietary cholesterol, describes low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein…

  17. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  18. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  19. Phosphatidylcholine: Greasing the Cholesterol Transport Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lagace, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of cholesterol metabolism in mammalian cells ensures a proper balance of cholesterol with other membrane lipids, principal among these being the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Processes such as cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux, cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets, and uptake of plasma lipoproteins are tuned to the cholesterol/PC ratio. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions display increased PC biosynthesis that buffers against elevated cholesterol levels and may also facilitate cholesterol trafficking to enhance cholesterol sensing and efflux. These same mechanisms could play a generic role in homeostatic responses to acute changes in membrane free cholesterol levels. Here, I discuss the established and emerging roles of PC metabolism in promoting intracellular cholesterol trafficking and membrane lipid homeostasis. PMID:27081313

  20. Cholesterol stabilizes fluid phosphoinositide domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiping; Redfern, Roberta E.; Isler, Yasmin; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2014-01-01

    Local accumulation of phosphoinositides (PIPs) is an important factor for a broad range of cellular events including membrane trafficking and cell signaling. The negatively charged phosphoinositide headgroups can interact with cations or cationic proteins and this electrostatic interaction has been identified as the main phosphoinositide clustering mechanism. However, an increasing number of reports show that phosphoinositide-mediated signaling events are at least in some cases cholesterol dependent, suggesting other possible contributors to the segregation of phosphoinositides. Using fluorescence microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles and monolayers at the air/water interface, we present data showing that cholesterol stabilizes fluid phosphoinositide-enriched phases. The interaction with cholesterol is observed for all investigated phosphoinositides (PI(4)P, PI(3,4)P2, PI(3,5)P2, PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3) as well as phosphatidylinositol. We find that cholesterol is present in the phosphoinositide-enriched phase and that the resulting phase is fluid. Cholesterol derivatives modified at the hydroxyl group (cholestenone, cholesteryl ethyl ether) do not promote formation of phosphoinositide domains, suggesting an instrumental role of the cholesterol hydroxyl group in the observed cholesterol/phosphoinositide interaction. This leads to the hypothesis that cholesterol participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond network formed among the phosphoinositide lipids. We had previously reported that the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bond network between the phosphoinositide lipids leads to a reduction of the charge density at the phosphoinositide phosphomonoester groups (Kooijman et al. Biochemistry 48, (2009) 9360). We believe that cholesterol acts as a spacer between the phosphoinositide lipids, thereby reducing the electrostatic repulsion, while participating in the hydrogen bond network, leading to its further stabilization. To illustrate the effect of

  1. Amperometric determination of serum total cholesterol with nanoparticles of cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, V; Malik, J; Prashant, A; Jaiwal, P K; Pundir, C S

    2016-05-01

    We describe the preparation of glutaraldehyde cross-linked and functionalized cholesterol esterase nanoparticles (ChENPs) and cholesterol oxidase nanoparticles (ChOxNPs) aggregates and their co-immobilization onto Au electrode for improved amperometric determination of serum total cholesterol. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of ChENPs and ChOxNPs showed their spherical shape and average size of 35.40 and 56.97 nm, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of Au electrode confirmed the co-immobilization of enzyme nanoparticles (ENPs). The biosensor exhibited optimal response at pH 5.5 and 40 °C within 5 s when polarized at +0.25 V versus Ag/AgCl. The working/linear range of the biosensor was 10-700 mg/dl for cholesterol. The sensor showed high sensitivity and measured total cholesterol as low as 0.1 mg/dl. The biosensor was evaluated and employed for total cholesterol determination in sera of apparently healthy and diseased persons. The analytical recovery of added cholesterol was 90%, whereas the within-batch and between-batch coefficients of variation (CVs) were less than 2% and less than 3%. There was a good correlation (r = 0.99) between serum cholesterol values as measured by the standard enzymic colorimetric method and the current method. The initial activity of ENPs/working electrode was reduced by 50% during its regular use (200 times) over a period of 60 days when stored dry at 4 °C. PMID:26853742

  2. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Marleen; Freark de Boer, Jan; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Tietge, Uwe J F; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-08-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we investigated the effects on cholesterol metabolism in mice in detail. Surprisingly, direct measurement of whole body cholesterol synthesis revealed that cholesterol synthesis was robustly increased in statin-treated mice. Measurement of organ-specific cholesterol synthesis demonstrated that the liver is predominantly responsible for the increase in cholesterol synthesis. Excess synthesized cholesterol did not accumulate in the plasma, as plasma cholesterol decreased. However, statin treatment led to an increase in cholesterol removal via the feces. Interestingly, enhanced cholesterol excretion in response to rosuvastatin and lovastatin treatment was mainly mediated via biliary cholesterol secretion, whereas atorvastatin mainly stimulated cholesterol removal via the transintestinal cholesterol excretion pathway. Moreover, we show that plasma cholesterol precursor levels do not reflect cholesterol synthesis rates during statin treatment in mice. In conclusion, cholesterol synthesis is paradoxically increased upon statin treatment in mice. However, statins potently stimulate the excretion of cholesterol from the body, which sheds new light on possible mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins. PMID:27313057

  3. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  4. The Totem Pole Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Susan Breyer

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

  5. A Practical Recycling Project . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Raymond H.; Mikuska, James M.

    1973-01-01

    Descirbes a school district's recycling program of aluminum lunch trays that are collected after their use. The trays are used as scrap metal in industrial education workshop and used for sand castings. (PS)

  6. Recycle plastics into feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

  7. TMEM55B is a Novel Regulator of Cellular Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Marisa W.; Bauzon, Frederick; Naidoo, Devesh; Theusch, Elizabeth; Stevens, Kristen; Schilde, Jessica; Schubert, Christian; Mangravite, Lara M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Temel, Ryan E.; Runz, Heiko; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inter-individual variation in pathways impacting cellular cholesterol metabolism can influence levels of plasma cholesterol, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Inherent variation among immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from different donors can be leveraged to discover novel genes that modulate cellular cholesterol metabolism. The objective of this study was to identify novel genes that regulate cholesterol metabolism by testing for evidence of correlated gene expression with cellular levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) mRNA, a marker for cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in a large panel of LCLs. Approach and Results Expression array profiling was performed on 480 LCLs established from participants of the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics statin clinical trial, and transcripts were tested for evidence of correlated expression with HMGCR as a marker of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Of these, transmembrane protein 55b (TMEM55B) showed the strongest correlation (r=0.29, p=4.0E-08) of all genes not previously implicated in cholesterol metabolism and was found to be sterol regulated. TMEM55B knock-down in human hepatoma cell lines promoted the decay rate of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), reduced cell surface LDLR protein, impaired LDL uptake, and reduced intracellular cholesterol. Conclusions Here we report identification of TMEM55B as a novel regulator of cellular cholesterol metabolism through the combination of gene expression profiling and functional studies. The findings highlight the value of an integrated genomic approach for identifying genes that influence cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:25035345

  8. Recycling of nonmetallics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, E.B.; Kelly, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    The first factor determining recyclability is the composition of the material itself. Metals, for example, can be reused with little or no loss in quality. Paper and rubber, by this criterion, are less recyclable. Each time paper is recycled, some cellulose fibers are broken. Shorter fibers can mean weaker paper of perceived lower quality and value. Vulcanizing is an irreversible chemical process that precludes recycling rubber in its original form. Both materials may be reused in other applications often of lower value than the original one. To be recyclable, the discarded material must have a collection infrastructure at the source of waste generation, at a central collection site, or at curbside. The recovered material must also have a market. If it is priced noncompetitively or no market exists, if it does not meet specifications, or if it requires special technology investments which cannot be recovered through future sales, the recovered material may be stockpiled or discarded rather than recycled. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  9. Dietary probucol preserves endothelial function in cholesterol-fed rabbits by limiting vascular oxidative stress and superoxide generation.

    PubMed Central

    Keaney, J F; Xu, A; Cunningham, D; Jackson, T; Frei, B; Vita, J A

    1995-01-01

    Excess vascular oxidative stress and the local formation of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) have been implicated in the development of impaired endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation in hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Dietary antioxidants limit LDL oxidation in vitro and treatment of cholesterol-fed rabbits with dietary antioxidants preserves endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) action. To investigate the mechanism(s) responsible for these observations, we examined EDRF action, vascular oxidative stress, and antioxidant protection in male New Zealand White rabbits using four dietary treatments. Animals consumed standard chow (chow group) or chow supplemented with: (a) 0.5% cholesterol (0.5% cholesterol group); (b) 1% cholesterol (1% cholesterol group); or (c) 1% cholesterol and 1% probucol (probucol group). After 28 d of dietary treatment, segments of thoracic aorta from the 0.5 and 1% cholesterol groups demonstrated impairment of acetylcholine-mediated endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation compared to chow-fed animals (57 +/- 11% and 45 +/- 9% vs 78 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05). In contrast, vessels from the probucol group demonstrated normal relaxation to acetylcholine (83 +/- 5%). Plasma cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerosis were similar among all cholesterol-fed groups. Probucol treatment was associated a threefold increase in LDL resistance to copper-induced oxidative modification (P < 0.05) and a reduction in tissue lipid peroxidation (as assessed by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; P < 0.05) compared to animals fed cholesterol alone. Most importantly, both of these changes were strongly correlated with preserved EDRF action. Moreover, cholesterol feeding was associated with a dose-dependent increase in vascular superoxide generation and lysophosphatidylcholine content, both of which were prevented by probucol treatment. From these findings, we conclude that probucol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant, preserves EDRF action in

  10. Cholesterol Granule of the Ethmoid Sinus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Praweswararat, Puangmali

    2016-02-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) is common in the mastoid air cells, less common in the skull base and orbit, and uncommon in the paranasal sinuses. The most commonly affected sinus is the maxillary sinus, and it is very rare in the ethmoid and sphenoid sinus. CG is thought to be due to impair the venous and lymphatic drainage from the sinus cavity. In the early period of the disease, the patient has no symptoms but when the expanding cysts compress the surrounding structures, they cause bony erosion that leads to clinical symptoms such as nasal blockage, eye pain or visual loss. If the patients' presentation does not correlate with physical examination, concerns are raised, and imaging should be performed. This study reports a case of cholesterol granuloma of the ethmoid sinus treated with the endoscopic marsupialization technique. This paper will remind physicians of the characteristics of cholesterol granuloma, which are useful for differential diagnosis of patients with this condition. In addition, it is the first reported case of cholesterol granuloma of the ethmoid sinus in the Thai literature. PMID:27266241

  11. Probiotics and the BSH-related cholesterol lowering mechanism: a Jekyll and Hyde scenario.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sy-Bing; Lew, Lee-Ching; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nair Parvathy, Seema; Liong, Min-Tze

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms have been documented over the past two decades to play a role in cholesterol-lowering properties via various clinical trials. Several mechanisms have also been proposed and the ability of these microorganisms to deconjugate bile via production of bile salt hydrolase (BSH) has been widely associated with their cholesterol lowering potentials in prevention of hypercholesterolemia. Deconjugated bile salts are more hydrophobic than their conjugated counterparts, thus are less reabsorbed through the intestines resulting in higher excretion into the feces. Replacement of new bile salts from cholesterol as a precursor subsequently leads to decreased serum cholesterol levels. However, some controversies have risen attributed to the activities of deconjugated bile acids that repress the synthesis of bile acids from cholesterol. Deconjugated bile acids have higher binding affinity towards some orphan nuclear receptors namely the farsenoid X receptor (FXR), leading to a suppressed transcription of the enzyme cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase (7AH), which is responsible in bile acid synthesis from cholesterol. This notion was further corroborated by our current docking data, which indicated that deconjugated bile acids have higher propensities to bind with the FXR receptor as compared to conjugated bile acids. Bile acids-activated FXR also induces transcription of the IBABP gene, leading to enhanced recycling of bile acids from the intestine back to the liver, which subsequently reduces the need for new bile formation from cholesterol. Possible detrimental effects due to increased deconjugation of bile salts such as malabsorption of lipids, colon carcinogenesis, gallstones formation and altered gut microbial populations, which contribute to other varying gut diseases, were also included in this review. Our current findings and review substantiate the need to look beyond BSH deconjugation as a single factor/mechanism in strain selection for

  12. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  13. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, M Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content. PMID:27119638

  14. Community Guide to Cholesterol Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This guide is divided into two sections, one for physicians and the other for patients. The physician section lists different resources including continuing medical education opportunities on the medical and scientific aspects of cholesterol and heart disease and on the physician's role in diagnosis and patient management. Additional materials on…

  15. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  16. Inherited Cholesterol Disorder Significantly Boosts Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic disorder that causes high levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol have an increased risk for heart disease and ... in previous studies. Compared to people with average LDL cholesterol levels (less than 130 mg/dL), those with ...

  17. High Cholesterol: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Cholesterol--Medicines To Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Test to check your cholesterol (LDL-C) Combination Medicines Brand Name Generic Name Advicor Niacin and Lovastatin ...

  18. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  19. Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Center Do You Know Your Cholesterol Levels? Print-friendly Version (PDF, 6.1 MB) Spanish ... Syndrome? My Family Plan To Lower Blood Cholesterol Levels My Heart Health Card Play It Smart, Take ...

  20. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  1. Who owns the recyclables

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.

    1994-05-01

    On March 31, the California Supreme Court decided the much awaited Rancho Mirage'' case (Waste Management of the Desert, Inc., and the City of Rancho Mirage v. Palm Springs Recycling Center, Inc.), and held that the California Integrated Waste Management Act of 1989 does not allow an exclusive franchise for the collection of recyclables not discarded by their owner.'' This ends a three-year slugfest between secondary materials processors in the state and municipalities and their franchised garbage haulers who also collect and process recyclables as part of their exclusive arrangement. Central to this nationally-watched litigation is a most fundamental question in waste management: at what point in time do articles in the solid waste stream become actual or potentially valuable secondary materials

  2. Scrap tire recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

    1997-03-01

    As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

  3. Isolation of Cholesterol from an Egg Yolk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Douglass F.; Li, Rui; Anson, Cory M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple procedure for the isolation of the cholesterol, by hydrolysis and extraction followed by column chromatography, is described. The cholesterol can be further purified by complexation with oxalic acid. It can also be oxidized and conjugated to cholestenone. The source of the cholesterol is one egg yolk, which contains about 200 mg of…

  4. A sensitive assay for ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux using BODIPY -cholesterol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have shown a negative association between cellular cholesterol efflux and coronary artery disease (CAD). Standard protocol for quantifying cholesterol efflux involves labeling cells with [(3)H]cholesterol and measuring release of the labeled sterol. Using [(3)H]cholesterol is not ideal for...

  5. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels are Adequately Controlled High cholesterol can double a ... with High Cholesterol that is Controlled by Education Level 8k4c-k22f Download these data » Click on legends ...

  6. Liver Cholesterol Overload Aggravates Obstructive Cholestasis by Inducing Oxidative Stress and Premature Death in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Domínguez-Pérez, Mayra; Baulies-Domenech, Anna; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J. G.; Rosales-Cruz, Patricia; Souza, Verónica; Miranda, Roxana U.; Bucio, Leticia; Montalvo-Jave, Eduardo E.; Concepción Gutiérrez-Ruiz, María; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is one of the leading causes of liver disease. Dietary factors determine the clinical presentation of steatohepatitis and can influence the progression of related diseases. Cholesterol has emerged as a critical player in the disease and hence consumption of cholesterol-enriched diets can lead to a progressive form of the disease. The aim was to investigate the impact of liver cholesterol overload on the progression of the obstructive cholestasis in mice subjected to bile duct ligation surgery. Mice were fed with a high cholesterol diet for two days and then were subjected to surgery procedure; histological, biochemical, and molecular analyses were conducted to address the effect of cholesterol in liver damage. Mice under the diet were more susceptible to damage. Results show that cholesterol fed mice exhibited increased apoptosis and oxidative stress as well as reduction in cell proliferation. Mortality following surgery was higher in HC fed mice. Liver cholesterol impairs the repair of liver during obstructive cholestasis and aggravates the disease with early fatal consequences; these effects were strongly associated with oxidative stress.

  7. The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux as a HDL function index in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Narita, Ichiei; Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux are considered to be a key player in atherosclerotic formation in relation to the function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The HDL function can be evaluated by the reaction between lipid-loaded macrophages and lipid-acceptors in the HDL fraction from the plasma, apolipoprotein B-depleted serum, and/or whole serum/plasma. Recent studies have reported that an impaired cholesterol efflux of HDL is observed in patients with cardiometabolic diseases, such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. A population-based cohort study has reported an inverse association between the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL and the incidence of atherosclerotic disease, regardless of the serum HDL-cholesterol level. Moreover, in this paper, when we summarized several clinical interventional studies of statin treatment that examined cholesterol efflux, a potential increase in the efflux in patients treated with statins was implied. However, the effect was not fully defined in the current situation because of the small sample sizes, lack of a unified protocol for measuring the efflux, and short-term intervention periods without cardiovascular outcomes in available studies. Further investigation is necessary to determine the effect of drugs on cholesterol efflux. With additional advanced studies, cholesterol efflux is a promising laboratory index to understand the HDL function. PMID:27087419

  8. Slow intestinal transit: a motor disorder contributing to cholesterol gallstone formation in the ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q W; Scott, R B; Tan, D T; Shaffer, E A

    1996-06-01

    Impaired gallbladder motility is an established factor in cholesterol gallstone formation. We assessed whether altered small intestinal smooth muscle contractility with slow transit might potentiate gallstone formation by further impeding enterohepatic cycling of bile acids. Ground squirrels were fed a 1% or a trace (controls) cholesterol diet. Small intestinal transit was evaluated from 51Cr distribution in conscious, fasted animals 20 minutes after infusion into the proximal jejunum. Small intestinal and gallbladder smooth muscle contractility was determined in vitro. Biliary lipid secretion was measured from the cannulated common duct and the bile salt pool size calculated by isotope dilution. Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) assessed bile salt profile. In animals on the 1% cholesterol diet, aboral transit was significantly delayed, the maximal contractile response to bethanechol was markedly increased (P <.05) with no change in median effective concentration in either circular or longitudinal muscle strips from both the jejunum and ileum, and the gallbladder contractile responses to bethanechol and cholecystokinin (CCK) were decreased. Cholesterol saturation index and the fraction of deoxycholic acid in the pool doubled, whereas the total bile salt pool size remained unchanged in cholesterol-fed animals. In this model, a high-cholesterol diet is associated with altered small intestinal smooth muscle contractility and prolonged small intestinal transit, in addition to diminished gallbladder contractility. The resulting sluggish enterohepatic cycling of bile salts, associated with expanded deoxycholate pool, contributes to cholesterol gallstone formation. PMID:8675191

  9. A specific cholesterol metabolic pathway is established in a subset of HCCs for tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Hu, Xi-Han; Li, Qin; Xiong, Ying; Hu, Guang-Jing; Xu, Jia-Jia; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xi-Xiao; Chang, Catherine C.Y.; Liu, Yin-Kun; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in cholesterol homeostasis. It exclusively receives and metabolizes oxysterols, which are important metabolites of cholesterol and are more cytotoxic than free cholesterol, from all extrahepatic tissues. Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) impair certain liver functions and cause pathological alterations in many processes including cholesterol metabolism. However, the link between an altered cholesterol metabolism and HCC development is unclear. Human ACAT2 is abundantly expressed in intestine and fetal liver. Our previous studies have shown that ACAT2 is induced in certain HCC tissues. Here, by investigating tissue samples from HCC patients and HCC cell lines, we report that a specific cholesterol metabolic pathway, involving induction of ACAT2 and esterification of excess oxysterols for secretion to avoid cytotoxicity, is established in a subset of HCCs for tumor growth. Inhibiting ACAT2 leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified oxysterols and suppresses the growth of both HCC cell lines and their xenograft tumors. Further mechanistic studies reveal that HCC-linked promoter hypomethylation is essential for the induction of ACAT2 gene expression. We postulate that specifically blocking this HCC-established cholesterol metabolic pathway may have potential therapeutic applications for HCC patients. PMID:24163426

  10. Dietary cholesterol and plasma lipoprotein profiles: Randomized controlled trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work suggested that dietary cholesterol increased plasma total cholesterol concentrations in humans. Given the relationship between elevated plasma cholesterol concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk, dietary guidelines have consistently recommended limiting food sources of cholesterol....

  11. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux. PMID:24267242

  12. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell. PMID:26719944

  13. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam; Noutsi, Pakiza; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low.

  14. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G.; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell.

  15. Recycling Decisions and Green Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lave, Lester B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Explores the facts and perceptions regarding recycling, what can be done to make products more environmentally compatible, and how to think about recycling decisions in a more helpful way. (Contains 39 references.) (MDH)

  16. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  17. Recycled Insect Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Meyer, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an engaging activity in which high school students use a dichotomous key to guide the creation and classification of model insects from recycled plastic lids and containers. Besides teaching the use of a dichotomous key and the effect of evolutionary descent upon groupings of organisms, this activity focuses on an…

  18. RECYCLABILITY INDEX FOR AUTOMOBILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project's purpose is to create a rating system for the ecological impacts of vehicles at the end of their life based on recyclability, toxic material content, and ultimate disposal. Each year, 10-11 million vehicles are retired from service in the United States. The vehi...

  19. Fuels from Recycling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, David A.

    1975-01-01

    Three systems, operating at sufficient scale, produce fuels that may be alternatives to oil and gas. These three recycling systems are: Black Clawson Fiberclaim, Franklin, Ohio; Union Carbide, South Charleston, West Virginia; and Union Electric, St. Louis, Missouri. These produce a wet fuel, a pyrolytic gas, and a dry fuel, respectively. (BT)

  20. Recycling Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallowell, Anne; And Others

    This study guide was designed to help teachers and students understand the problems surrounding solid wastes. It includes an overview of solid waste and recycling, a glossary, suggested activities and a list of resource publications, audiovisual materials and organizations. There are 19 activity suggestions included in this guide designed for use…

  1. The Recycle Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Roger; And Others

    This guide provides lessons that enable students to learn how important it is for each of us to take care of the environment by minimizing the problems caused by too much trash. In the 10 lessons included here, students and their families learn how they can be part of the solution by practicing source reduction and by reusing, recycling, and…

  2. Intracellular trafficking of recycling apolipoprotein E in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Braun, Nicole A; Mohler, Peter J; Weisgraber, Karl H; Hasty, Alyssa H; Linton, MacRae F; Yancey, Patricia G; Su, Yan Ru; Fazio, Sergio; Swift, Larry L

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated apolipoprotein E (apoE) recycling in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, a peripheral cell that does not produce lipoproteins or express apoE. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cells were pulsed with 125I-apoE-VLDL and chased for different periods, approximately 30% of the apoE internalized during the pulse was resecreted within a 4 h chase in a relatively lipid-free state. The addition of lysosomotropic agents or brefeldin A had no effect on apoE recycling. Unlike previous results with hepatocytes and macrophages, neither apoA-I nor upregulation of ABCA1 stimulated apoE recycling. However, cyclodextrin, which extracts cholesterol from plasma membrane lipid rafts, increased recycling. Confocal studies revealed that apoE, internalized during a 1 h pulse, colocalizes with early endosomal antigen-1, Rab5, Rab11a, and lysobisphosphatidic acid but not with lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1. Colocalization of apoE and Rab11a persisted even after cells had been chased for 1 h, suggesting a pool of apoE within the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC). Our data suggest that apoE recycling in CHO cells is linked to cellular cholesterol removal via the ERC and phospholipid-containing acceptors in a pathway alternative to the ABCA1-apoA-I axis. PMID:16534141

  3. Does cholesterol lowering prevent stroke?

    PubMed

    Henry, R Y; Kendall, M J

    1998-10-01

    The importance of lowering plasma cholesterol to reduce the incidence of coronary events is well established. However, in the prevention of stroke disease, control of hypertension has been the main aim of treatment and lipid lowering therapy has not hitherto been considered to be desirable or necessary. In this review, the evidence from large multicentre trials, imaging studies and meta-analyses is presented. It shows convincingly that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (Statins) reduce stroke risk. PMID:9875681

  4. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  5. Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

    2005-01-01

    This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking…

  6. Recycling of the #5 polymer.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Marino

    2012-08-10

    Polypropylene (PP) is a widely used plastic with consumer applications ranging from food packaging to automotive parts, including car battery casings. To differentiate it from other recyclable plastics, it is designated as #5. Here, the factors contributing to PP recycling rates are briefly reviewed. Considerations include collection and separation efficiency, processing chemistry, and market dynamics for the products derived from recyclates. PMID:22879510

  7. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion in the rat. Role of hepatic cholesterol esterification.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Bronfman, M; Allalón, W; Depiereux, E; Del Pozo, R

    1984-01-01

    Although the significance of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in the solubilization and biliary excretion of cholesterol is well established, little is known about the intrahepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol output. Studies were undertaken to elucidate some of these determinants in the rat. Feeding 1% diosgenin for 1 wk increased biliary cholesterol output and saturation by 400%. Bile flow, biliary bile salt, phospholipid and protein outputs remained in the normal range. When ethynyl estradiol (EE) was injected into these animals, biliary cholesterol output decreased to almost normal levels under circumstances of minor changes in the rates of biliary bile salt and phospholipid outputs. Similarly, when chylomicron cholesterol was intravenously injected into diosgenin-fed animals, biliary cholesterol output significantly decreased as a function of the dose of chylomicron cholesterol administered. Relative rates of hepatic cholesterol synthesis and esterification were measured in isolated hepatocytes. Although hepatic cholesterogenesis increased 300% in diosgenin-fed animals, the contribution of newly synthesized cholesterol to total biliary cholesterol output was only 19 +/- 9%, compared with 12 +/- 6% in control and 15 +/- 5% in diosgenin-fed and EE-injected rats. The rate of oleate incorporation into hepatocytic cholesterol esters was 30% inhibited in diosgenin-fed rats. When EE was injected into these animals, the rate of cholesterol esterification increased to almost 300%. To investigate further the interrelationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and biliary cholesterol output, we studied 21 diosgenin-fed rats. Six of them received in addition EE and 10 received chylomicron cholesterol. The relationships between biliary cholesterol output as a function of both microsomal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and hepatic cholesterol ester concentration were significantly correlated in a reciprocal manner. From these

  8. Recycling endosome tubule morphogenesis from sorting endosomes requires the kinesin motor KIF13A

    PubMed Central

    Delevoye, Cédric; Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Montagnac, Guillaume; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Giordano, Francesca; Waharte, François; Marks, Michael S.; Goud, Bruno; Raposo, Graça

    2014-01-01

    Summary Early endosomes consist of vacuolar sorting and tubular recycling domains that segregate components fated for degradation in lysosomes or reuse by recycling to the plasma membrane or Golgi. The tubular transport intermediates that constitute recycling endosomes function in cell polarity, migration and cytokinesis. Endosomal tubulation and fission require both actin and intact microtubules, but while factors that stabilize recycling endosomal tubules have been identified, those required for tubule generation from vacuolar sorting endosomes remain unknown. We show that the microtubule motor KIF13A associates with recycling endosome tubules and controls their morphogenesis. Interfering with KIF13A function impairs the formation of endosomal tubules from sorting endosomes with consequent defects in endosome homeostasis and cargo recycling. Moreover, KIF13A interacts and cooperates with RAB11 to generate endosomal tubules. Our data illustrate how a microtubule motor couples early endosome morphogenesis to its motility and function. PMID:24462287

  9. The Role of Cholesterol in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Omer F; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2016-04-15

    The roles played by cholesterol in cancer development and the potential of therapeutically targeting cholesterol homeostasis is a controversial area in the cancer community. Several epidemiologic studies report an association between cancer and serum cholesterol levels or statin use, while others suggest that there is not one. Furthermore, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project using next-generation sequencing has profiled the mutational status and expression levels of all the genes in diverse cancers, including those involved in cholesterol metabolism, providing correlative support for a role of the cholesterol pathway in cancer development. Finally, preclinical studies tend to more consistently support the role of cholesterol in cancer, with several demonstrating that cholesterol homeostasis genes can modulate development. Because of space limitations, this review provides selected examples of the epidemiologic, TCGA, and preclinical data, focusing on alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and its consequent effect on patient survival. In melanoma, this focused analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of cholesterol synthesis genes was associated with decreased patient survival. Collectively, the studies in melanoma and other cancer types suggested a potential role of disrupted cholesterol homeostasis in cancer development but additional studies are needed to link population-based epidemiological data, the TCGA database results, and preclinical mechanistic evidence to concretely resolve this controversy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2063-70. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197250

  10. Importance of cholesterol in dopamine transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kymry T.; Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E.A.

    2012-01-01

    The conformation and function of the dopamine transporter (DAT) can be affected by manipulating membrane cholesterol, yet there is no agreement as to the impact of cholesterol on the activity of lipid-raft localized DATs compared to non-raft DATs. Given the paucity of information regarding the impact of cholesterol on substrate efflux by the DAT, this study explores its influence on the kinetics of DAT-mediated DA efflux induced by dextroamphetamine, as measured by rotating disk electrode voltammetry (RDEV). Treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD), which effectively depletes total membrane cholesterol- uniformly affecting cholesterol-DAT interactions in both raft and non-raft membrane domains- reduced both DA uptake and efflux rate. In contrast, disruption of raft localized DAT by cholesterol chelation with nystatin had no effect, arguing against a vital role for raft-localized DAT in substrate uptake or efflux. Supra-normal repletion of cholesterol depleted cells with the analogue desmosterol, a non-raft promoting sterol, was as effective as cholesterol itself in restoring transport rates. Further studies with Zn2+ and the conformationally-biased W84L DAT mutant supported the idea that cholesterol is important for maintaining the outward-facing DAT with normal rates of conformational interconversions. Collectively, these results point to a role for direct cholesterol-DAT interactions in regulating DAT function. PMID:22957537

  11. The phase behavior of hydrated cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1979-05-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of cholesterol monohydrate in water was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In contrast to anhydrous cholesterol which undergoes a polymorphic crystalline transition at 39 degrees C and a crystalline to liquid transition at 151 degrees C, the closed system of cholesterol monohydrate and water exhibited three reversible endothermic transitions at 86, 123, and 157 degrees C. At 86 degrees C, cholesterol monohydrate loses its water of hydration, forming the high temperature polymorph of anhydrous cholesterol. At least 24 hours were required for re-hydration of cholesterol and the rate of hydration was dependent on the polymorphic crystalline form of anhydrous cholesterol. At 123 degrees C, anhydrous crystalline cholesterol in the presence of excess water undergoes a sharp transition to a birefringent liquid crystalline phase of smectic texture. The x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from this phase contained two sharp low-angle reflections at 37.4 and 18.7 A and a diffuse wide-angle reflection centered at 5.7 A, indicating a layered smectic type of liquid crystalline structure with each layer being two cholesterol molecules thick. The liquid crystalline phase is stable over the temperature range of 123 to 157 degrees C before melting to a liquid dispersed in water. The observation of a smectic liquid crystalline phase for hydrated cholesterol correlates with its high surface activity and helps to explain its ability to exist in high concentrations in biological membranes. PMID:458269

  12. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E; Stansfield, I; Romano, M C

    2014-09-01

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3' end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called 'closed-loop' model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces a substantial increase in ribosome current. Furthermore, for sufficiently large values of the recycling rate, the lattice does not transition directly from low to high ribosome density, as seen in lattice models without recycling. Instead, a maximal current phase becomes accessible for much lower values of the initiation rate, and multiple phase transitions occur over a wide region of the phase plane. Crucially, we show that in the presence of ribosome recycling, mRNAs can exhibit a peak in protein production at low values of the initiation rate, beyond which translation rate decreases. This has important implications for translation of certain mRNAs, suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of ribosomes at which protein synthesis is maximal, and beyond which translational efficiency is impaired. PMID:25008084

  13. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, E.; Stansfield, I.; Romano, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3′ end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called ‘closed-loop’ model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces a substantial increase in ribosome current. Furthermore, for sufficiently large values of the recycling rate, the lattice does not transition directly from low to high ribosome density, as seen in lattice models without recycling. Instead, a maximal current phase becomes accessible for much lower values of the initiation rate, and multiple phase transitions occur over a wide region of the phase plane. Crucially, we show that in the presence of ribosome recycling, mRNAs can exhibit a peak in protein production at low values of the initiation rate, beyond which translation rate decreases. This has important implications for translation of certain mRNAs, suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of ribosomes at which protein synthesis is maximal, and beyond which translational efficiency is impaired. PMID:25008084

  14. The Recycling Endosome of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells Is a Mildly Acidic Compartment Rich in Raft Components

    PubMed Central

    Gagescu, Raluca; Demaurex, Nicolas; Parton, Robert G.; Hunziker, Walter; Huber, Lukas A.; Gruenberg, Jean

    2000-01-01

    We present a biochemical and morphological characterization of recycling endosomes containing the transferrin receptor in the epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line. We find that recycling endosomes are enriched in molecules known to regulate transferrin recycling but lack proteins involved in early endosome membrane dynamics, indicating that recycling endosomes are distinct from conventional early endosomes. We also find that recycling endosomes are less acidic than early endosomes because they lack a functional vacuolar ATPase. Furthermore, we show that recycling endosomes can be reached by apically internalized tracers, confirming that the apical endocytic pathway intersects the transferrin pathway. Strikingly, recycling endosomes are enriched in the raft lipids sphingomyelin and cholesterol as well as in the raft-associated proteins caveolin-1 and flotillin-1. These observations may suggest that a lipid-based sorting mechanism operates along the Madin-Darby canine kidney recycling pathway, contributing to the maintenance of cell polarity. Altogether, our data indicate that recycling endosomes and early endosomes differ functionally and biochemically and thus that different molecular mechanisms regulate protein sorting and membrane traffic at each step of the receptor recycling pathway. PMID:10930469

  15. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating

  16. Reduction of blood serum cholesterol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    By feeding a human subject as the sole source of sustenance a defined diet wherein the carbohydrate consists substantially entirely of glucose, maltose or a polysaccharide of glucose, the blood serum cholesterol level of the human subject is substantially reduced. If 25 percent of the carbohydrate is subsequently supplied in the form of sucrose, an immediate increase from the reduced level is observed. The remainder of the defined diet normally includes a source of amino acids, such as protein or a protein hydrolysate, vitamins, minerals and a source of essential fatty acid.

  17. microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn J.; Rayner, Katey J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level. In addition to classic transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism (e.g., by SREBP and LXR), members of a class of non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified to be potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism genes, including cholesterol homeostasis. We and others have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis by downregulating the expression of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition to miR-33, miR-122 and miR-370 have been shown to play important roles in regulating cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. These new data suggest important roles of microRNAs in the epigenetic regulation of cholesterol metabolism and have opened new avenues for the treatment of dyslipidemias. PMID:20880716

  18. Haptoglobin binds apolipoprotein E and influences cholesterol esterification in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Alfonso; Cigliano, Luisa; Carlucci, Alessandro; Bucci, Enrico M; Abrescia, Paolo

    2009-07-01

    Haptoglobin (Hpt) binds the apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I domain, which is involved in stimulating the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) for cholesterol esterification. This binding was shown to protect ApoA-I against hydroxyl radicals, thus preventing loss of ApoA-I function in enzyme stimulation. In this study, we report that Hpt is also able to bind ApoE. The Hpt binding site on the ApoE structure was mapped by using synthetic peptides, and found homologous to the Hpt binding site of ApoA-I. Hydroxyl radicals promoted in vitro the formation of ApoE-containing adducts which were detected by immunoblotting. Hpt impaired this oxidative modification whereas albumin did not. CSF from patients with multiple sclerosis or subjects without neurodegeneration contains oxidized forms of ApoE and ApoA-I similar to those observed in vitro. CSF was analyzed for its level of ApoA-I, ApoE, Hpt, cholesteryl esters, and unesterified cholesterol. The ratio of esterified with unesterified cholesterol, assumed to reflect the LCAT activity ex vivo, did not correlate with either analyzed protein, but conversely correlated with the ratio [Hpt]/([ApoE]+[ApoA-I]). The results suggest that Hpt might save the function of ApoA-I and ApoE for cholesterol esterification, a process contributing to cholesterol elimination from the brain. PMID:19457062

  19. Municipal solid waste recycling issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, L.B.; Hendrickson, C.T.; Conway-Schempf, N.M.; McMichael, F.C.

    1999-10-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) recycling targets have been set nationally and in many states. Unfortunately, the definitions of recycling, rates of recycling, and the appropriate components of MSW vary. MSW recycling has been found to be costly for most municipalities compared to landfill disposal. MSW recycling policy should be determined by the cost to the community and to society more generally. In particular, recycling is a good policy only if environmental impacts and the resources used to collect, sort, and recycle a material are less than the environmental impacts and resources needed to provide equivalent virgin material plus the resources needed to dispose of the postconsumer material safely. From a review of the existing economic experience with recycling and an analysis of the environmental benefits (including estimation of external social costs), the authors find that, for most communities, curbside recycling is only justifiable for some postconsumer waste, such as aluminum and other metals. They argue that alternatives to curbside recycling collection should be explored, including product takeback for products with a toxic content (such as batteries) or product redesign to permit more effective product remanufacture.

  20. Effect of Selenium-Enriched Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts, Obtained by Pressurized Water Extraction, on the Expression of Cholesterol Homeostasis Related Genes by Low-Density Array.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Marín, Francisco Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Culinary-medicinal mushrooms are able to lower blood cholesterol levels in animal models by different mechanisms. They might impair the endogenous cholesterol synthesis and exogenous cholesterol absorption during digestion. Mushroom extracts, obtained using pressurized water extractions (PWE) from Agaricus bisporus basidiomes, supplemented or not supplemented with selenium, were applied to HepG2 cell cultures to study the expression of 19 genes related to cholesterol homeostasis by low-density arrays (LDA). Only the PWE fractions obtained at 25°C showed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity. Besides the enzymatic inhibition, PWE extracts may downregulate some of the key genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis, such as the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1), since its mRNA expression falls by one third of its initial value. In summary, A. bisporus extracts may also modulate biological cholesterol levels by molecular mechanisms further than the enzymatic way previously reported. PMID:25746616

  1. Inhibition of HMG CoA reductase reveals an unexpected role for cholesterol during PGC migration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiaxi; Jiang, DeChen; Kurczy, Michael; Nalepka, Jennifer; Dudley, Brian; Merkel, Erin I; Porter, Forbes D; Ewing, Andrew G; Winograd, Nicholas; Burgess, James; Molyneaux, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Background Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic precursors of the sperm and eggs. Environmental or genetic defects that alter PGC development can impair fertility or cause formation of germ cell tumors. Results We demonstrate a novel role for cholesterol during germ cell migration in mice. Cholesterol was measured in living tissue dissected from mouse embryos and was found to accumulate within the developing gonads as germ cells migrate to colonize these structures. Cholesterol synthesis was blocked in culture by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) resulting in germ cell survival and migration defects. These defects were rescued by co-addition of isoprenoids and cholesterol, but neither compound alone was sufficient. In contrast, loss of the last or penultimate enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis did not alter PGC numbers or position in vivo. However embryos that lack these enzymes do not exhibit cholesterol defects at the stage at which PGCs are migrating. This demonstrates that during gestation, the cholesterol required for PGC migration can be supplied maternally. Conclusion In the mouse, cholesterol is required for PGC survival and motility. It may act cell-autonomously by regulating clustering of growth factor receptors within PGCs or non cell-autonomously by controlling release of growth factors required for PGC guidance and survival. PMID:19117526

  2. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  3. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells. PMID:26493158

  4. Activation of Membrane Cholesterol by 63 Amphipaths†

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Steck, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    A few membrane-intercalating amphipaths have been observed to stimulate the interaction of cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, saponin and cyclodextrin, presumably by displacing cholesterol laterally from its phospholipid complexes. We now report that this effect, referred to as cholesterol activation, occurs with dozens of other amphipaths, including alkanols, saturated and cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, sphingosine derivatives, terpenes, alkyl ethers, ketones, aromatics and cyclic alkyl derivatives. The apparent potency of the agents tested ranged from 3 μM to 7 mM and generally paralleled their octanol/water partition coefficients, except that relative potency declined for compounds with> 10 carbons. Some small amphipaths activated cholesterol at a membrane concentration of ~3 moles per 100 moles bilayer lipids, about equimolar with the cholesterol they displaced. Lysophosphatidylserine countered the effects of all these agents, consistent with its ability to reduce the pool of active membrane cholesterol. Various amphipaths stabilized red cells against the hemolysis elicited by cholesterol depletion, presumably by substituting for the extracted sterol. The number and location of cis and trans fatty acid unsaturations and the absolute stereochemistry of enantiomer pairs had only small effects on amphipath potency. Nevertheless, potency varied ~7-fold within a group of diverse agents with similar partition coefficients. We infer that a wide variety of amphipaths can displace membrane cholesterol by competing stoichiometrically but with only limited specificity for its weak association with phospholipids. Any number of other drugs and experimental agents might do the same. PMID:19655814

  5. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  6. Lysobisphosphatidic acid controls endosomal cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Julien; Chamoun, Zeina; Jiang, Guowei; Prestwich, Glenn; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, Jean

    2008-10-10

    Most cell types acquire cholesterol by endocytosis of circulating low density lipoprotein, but little is known about the mechanisms of intra-endosomal cholesterol transport and about the primary cause of its aberrant accumulation in the cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). Here we report that lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), an unconventional phospholipid that is only detected in late endosomes, regulates endosomal cholesterol levels under the control of Alix/AlP1, which is an LBPA-interacting protein involved in sorting into multivesicular endosomes. We find that Alix down-expression decreases both LBPA levels and the lumenal vesicle content of late endosomes. Cellular cholesterol levels are also decreased, presumably because the storage capacity of endosomes is affected and thus cholesterol clearance accelerated. Both lumenal membranes and cholesterol can be restored in Alix knockdown cells by exogenously added LBPA. Conversely, we also find that LBPA becomes limiting upon pathological cholesterol accumulation in NPC cells, because the addition of exogenous LBPA, but not of LBPA isoforms or analogues, partially reverts the NPC phenotype. We conclude that LBPA controls the cholesterol capacity of endosomes. PMID:18644787

  7. Cholesterol modulates Orai1 channel function.

    PubMed

    Derler, Isabella; Jardin, Isaac; Stathopulos, Peter B; Muik, Martin; Fahrner, Marc; Zayats, Vasilina; Pandey, Saurabh K; Poteser, Michael; Lackner, Barbara; Absolonova, Marketa; Schindl, Rainer; Groschner, Klaus; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ikura, Mitsu; Romanin, Christoph

    2016-01-26

    STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1) and Orai proteins are the essential components of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. We focused on the role of cholesterol in the regulation of STIM1-mediated Orai1 currents. Chemically induced cholesterol depletion enhanced store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and Orai1 currents. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion in mucosal-type mast cells augmented endogenous CRAC currents, which were associated with increased degranulation, a process that requires calcium influx. Single point mutations in the Orai1 amino terminus that would be expected to abolish cholesterol binding enhanced SOCE to a similar extent as did cholesterol depletion. The increase in Orai1 activity in cells expressing these cholesterol-binding-deficient mutants occurred without affecting the amount in the plasma membrane or the coupling of STIM1 to Orai1. We detected cholesterol binding to an Orai1 amino-terminal fragment in vitro and to full-length Orai1 in cells. Thus, our data showed that Orai1 senses the amount of cholesterol in the plasma membrane and that the interaction of Orai1 with cholesterol inhibits its activity, thereby limiting SOCE. PMID:26814231

  8. Regulation of Plasma Cholesterol by Lipoprotein Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael S.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1981-05-01

    The lipoprotein transport system holds the key to understanding the mechanisms by which genes, diet, and hormones interact to regulate the plasma cholesterol level in man. Crucial components of this system are lipoprotein receptors in the liver and extrahepatic tissues that mediate the uptake and degradation of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The number of lipoprotein receptors, and hence the efficiency of disposal of plasma cholesterol, can be increased by cholesterol-lowering drugs. Regulation of lipoprotein receptors can be exploited pharmacologically in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in man.

  9. Rapid labeling of lipoproteins in plasma with radioactive cholesterol. Application for measurement of plasma cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, F.T.; Nishida, T. )

    1990-02-01

    In order to efficiently and rapidly label lipoproteins in plasma with ({sup 3}H)cholesterol, micelles consisting of lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and ({sup 3}H)cholesterol (molar ratio, 50:1) were prepared. When trace amounts of these micelles were injected into plasma, ({sup 3}H)cholesterol rapidly equilibrated among the plasma lipoproteins, as compared to ({sup 3}H)cholesterol from an albumin-stabilized emulsion. The distributions of both ({sup 3}H)cholesterol and unlabeled free cholesterol in plasma lipoproteins were similar in labeled plasma samples. This method of labeling can be used for the measurement of cholesterol esterification, or lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity, in small amounts (20-40 microliters) of plasma samples.

  10. Understanding recycling behavior in Kentucky: Who recycles and why

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Fred W.; Hughes, Margaret V.

    2006-08-01

    Recycling behavior and the motivations behind recycling are being analyzed in a collaborative study between the Sloan Industry Center for a Sustainable Aluminum Industry, the Center for Aluminum Technology, Secat, and the Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. The goals of this study are to determine why people recycle and to find ways to motivate people to recycle more, using Fayette County, Kentucky, as a sample study. It is hoped that the information gathered through educational and motivational efforts in this county can be used on a larger scale in communities throughout the United States.

  11. Why recycle? A comparison of recycling motivations in four communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vining, Joanne; Linn, Nancy; Burdge, Rabel J.

    1992-11-01

    Four Illinois communities with different sociode-mographic compositions and at various stages of planning for solid waste management were surveyed to determine the influence of sociodemographic variables and planning stages on the factors that motivate recycling behavior. A factor analysis of importance ratings of reasons for recycling and for not recycling yielded five factors interpreted as altruism, personal inconvenience, social influences, economic incentives, and household storage. The four communities were shown to be significantly different in multivariate analyses of the five motivational factors. However, attempts to explain these community differences with regression analyses, which predicted the motivational factors with dummy codes for planning stages, a measure of self-reported recycling behavior, and sociodemographic measures were unsatisfactory. Contrary to expectation, the solid waste management planning stages of the cities (curbside pickup, recycling dropoff center, and planning in progress) contributed only very slightly to the prediction of motivational factors for recycling. Community differences were better explained by different underlying motivational structures among the four communities. Altruistic reasons for recycling (e.g., conserving resources) composed the only factor which was similar across the four communities. This factor was also perceived to be the most important reason for recycling by respondents from all four communities. The results of the study supported the notion that convenient, voluntary recycling programs that rely on environmental concern and conscience for motivation are useful approaches to reducing waste.

  12. Hearing Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  13. Statins impair glucose uptake in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowis, Dominika; Malenda, Agata; Furs, Karolina; Oleszczak, Bozenna; Sadowski, Radoslaw; Chlebowska, Justyna; Firczuk, Malgorzata; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Staruch, Adam D; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Szablewski, Leszek; Golab, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the increasing number of clinical observations indicating hyperglycemic effects of statins, this study was designed to measure the influence of statins on the uptake of glucose analogs by human cells derived from liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Design Flow cytometry and scintillation counting were used to measure the uptake of fluorescently labeled or tritiated glucose analogs by differentiated visceral preadipocytes, skeletal muscle cells, skeletal muscle myoblasts, and contact-inhibited human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A bioinformatics approach was used to predict the structure of human glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and to identify the presence of putative cholesterol-binding (cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC)) motifs within this transporter. Mutagenesis of CRAC motifs in SLC2A1 gene and limited proteolysis of membrane GLUT1 were used to determine the molecular effects of statins. Results Statins significantly inhibit the uptake of glucose analogs in all cell types. Similar effects are induced by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which removes membrane cholesterol. Statin effects can be rescued by addition of mevalonic acid, or supplementation with exogenous cholesterol. Limited proteolysis of GLUT1 and mutagenesis of CRAC motifs revealed that statins induce conformational changes in GLUTs. Conclusions Statins impair glucose uptake by cells involved in regulation of glucose homeostasis by inducing cholesterol-dependent conformational changes in GLUTs. This molecular mechanism might explain hyperglycemic effects of statins observed in clinical trials. PMID:25452863

  14. Para-Tyrosine Supplementation Improves Insulin- and Liraglutide- Induced Vasorelaxation in Cholesterol-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Sélley, Eszter; Kun, Szilárd; Kürthy, Mária; Kovács, Tibor; Wittmann, István; Molnár, Gergo A

    2015-01-01

    Former data of our workgroup indicated that the accumulation of oxidized amino acids (meta- and ortho-tyrosine) due to oxidative stress may play an important role in the impaired insulininduced vasoactive properties of different arterial segments. There are evidences, that incorporation of these amino acids into cellular proteins leads to certain hormonal resistances, which might be restored by supplementation with the physiologic isoform, para-tyrosine. Rats in the control group were kept on a regular diet, rats in the cholesterol-fed group received high-fat diet, while the third group of rats received high-fat diet with para-tyrosine supplementation for 16 weeks. Plasma cholesterol level was significantly higher in the cholesterol-fed group, while the level of cholesterol in the cholesterol+para-tyrosine group did not differ significantly from that of the controls. Plasma level of insulin after glucose stimulation was decreased in the cholesterol-fed group, while that in the para-tyrosine supplemented group did not differ significantly from the controls. Vascular para-, meta- and ortho-tyrosine content was measured with HPLC. Elevated vascular meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine ratio of cholesterol fed rats could be avoided by para-tyrosine supplementation. Vascular response of the thoracic aorta to insulin and liraglutide was assessed by a DMT multi-myograph. Cholesterol feeding resulted in vascular insulin-and liraglutide resistance, which was restored by para-tyrosine supplementation. Incorporation of the oxidative stress induced pathological tyrosine isoforms leads to vascular-hormone-resistances. We show that the physiological amino acid para-tyrosine is capable of restoring hypercholesterolemia-induced increased meta-tyrosine content of the vascular wall, thus attenuating functional vascular damage. PMID:26202368

  15. Neonatal dietary cholesterol and alleles of cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase affect piglet cerebrum weight, cholesterol concentration, and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was designed to test the effect of polymorphism in the cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase (CYP7) gene locus, and dietary cholesterol (C) on cerebrum C in neonatal pigs fed sow's milk formulas. Thirty-six pigs (18 male and 18 female) genetically selected for high (HG), or low (LG) plasma...

  16. Cholesterol exchange as a function of cholesterol/phospholipid mole ratios.

    PubMed Central

    Poznansky, M J; Czekanski, S

    1979-01-01

    The activation energy (Ea) for cholesterol exchange between dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles and erythrocyte 'ghosts' is measured as a function of molar percentage of cholesterol in both donor and acceptor membranes. A sharp increase in Ea occurs (from 39.9kJ/mol to 84kJ/mol) when the molar percentage of cholesterol decreases from 30 to 20%. PMID:444215

  17. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  18. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  19. PFC concentration and recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, G.M.; McManus, J.; Knolle, W.; Stoll, I.

    1994-12-31

    The semiconductor industry uses PFC gases such as CF{sub 4} and C{sub 2}F{sub 6} as etchant and cleaning gases during plasma processes. The gases do not fully react within the reactor chamber. The unused gases enter the atmosphere through the process effluent. These gases have long persistence in the atmosphere and absorb infrared radiation. The PFC gases are, therefore, potential global warming gases. A method is described that will recover and recycle PFC gases. The method that the authors have employed to trap and concentrate the PFC gases is based on a dual bed adsorber. The adsorption material is activated carbon.

  20. Recycled rubber roads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    The paper describes several innovative approaches for recycling old tires in the construction of roads. In one, 18 inches of shredded tire chips (2 X 2 inches) were used on top of 6-8 inches of small stone to construct a road across a sanitary landfill. No compacting or linders were needed. In another application, sidewall mats linked together with steel strapping were used as a sub-base for a road across a swampy area. A third application uses 1/2 inch bits of groundup rubber tires as a replacement for aggregate in an asphalt road base.

  1. Cholesterol modulates bitter taste receptor function.

    PubMed

    Pydi, Sai Prasad; Jafurulla, Md; Wai, Lisa; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Bitter taste perception in humans is believed to act as a defense mechanism against ingestion of potential toxic substances. Bitter taste is perceived by 25 distinct bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in GPCR function, we show here that T2R4, a representative member of the bitter taste receptor family, displays cholesterol sensitivity in its signaling function. In order to gain further insight into cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4, we mutated two residues Tyr114(3.59) and Lys117(3.62) present in the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif in T2R4 with alanines. We carried out functional characterization of the mutants by calcium mobilization, followed by cholesterol depletion and replenishment. CRAC motifs in GPCRs have previously been implicated in preferential cholesterol association. Our analysis shows that the CRAC motif represents an intrinsic feature of bitter taste receptors and is conserved in 22 out of 25 human T2Rs. We further demonstrate that Lys117, an important CRAC residue, is crucial in the reported cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4. Interestingly, cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4 was observed at quinine concentrations in the lower mM range. To the best of our knowledge, our results represent the first report addressing the molecular basis of cholesterol sensitivity in the function of taste receptors. PMID:27288892

  2. Computational model for monitoring cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, R; Rashith Muhammad, M; Poornima Devi, G

    2014-12-01

    A non-deterministic finite automaton is designed to observe the cholesterol metabolism with the states of acceptance and rejection. The acceptance state of the automaton depicts the normal level of metabolism and production of good cholesterol as an end product. The rejection state of this machine shows the inhibition of enzymatic activity in cholesterol synthesis and removal of free fatty acids. The deficiency in human cholesterol metabolism pathway results in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in plasma, arterial tissues leading to diseases such as hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis respectively and formation of gallstones. The designed machine can be used to monitor the cholesterol metabolism at molecular level through regulation of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol for the treatment of diseases incident due to the respective metabolic disorder. In addition, an algorithm for this machine has been developed to compare the programmed string with the given string. This study demonstrates the construction of a machine that is used for the development of molecular targeted therapy for the disorders in cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26396654

  3. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-05-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio (w/c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  4. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-06-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio ( w/ c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/ c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  5. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  6. PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol: unravelling the target to design the bullet.

    PubMed

    Costet, Philippe; Krempf, Michel; Cariou, Bertrand

    2008-09-01

    Gain-of-function mutations within proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are linked to familial autosomal dominant hypercholesterolaemia, a disease characterized by elevated plasma concentrations of cholesterol associated with low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). Conversely, PCSK9 loss-of-function mutations result in low levels of LDL cholesterol (LDLC) and protect against coronary heart disease. Although compelling evidence indicates that PCSK9 impairs the LDLR pathway, its role in cholesterol metabolism remains incompletely defined. In the past two years, several new biochemical findings, including the PCSK9 crystal structure and the identification of several transcriptional repressors, were reported. Moreover, new clinical and epidemiological data have revealed the correlation between plasma PCSK9 concentrations and LDLC levels. PMID:18672372

  7. Analysis of cholesterol trafficking with fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wüstner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport processes are not well understood. Fluorescence microscopy is a valuable tool for studying intracellular transport processes, but this method can be challenging for lipid molecules because addition of a fluorophore may alter the properties of the molecule greatly. We discuss the use of fluorescent molecules that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly. PMID:22325611

  8. Cholesterol granulomas in three meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Sladky, K K; Dalldorf, F G; Steinberg, H; Wright, J F; Loomis, M R

    2000-11-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are uncommon pathologic lesions in animals, although they are important intracranial tumors in humans. This report describes cholesterol granulomas associated with multiple organ systems of three captive meerkats. In the most severe case, meerkat No. 1, the pathologic behavior of the cholesterol granuloma was unique in that it appeared to locally invade the cerebrum and calvarium, possibly contributing to neurological deficits observed antemortem. A review of other meerkat necropsies revealed incidental, asymptomatic cholesterol granulomas in organs of two other individuals, meerkat Nos. 2 and 3. Histologically, all lesions were composed of cholesterol clefts admixed with large, foamy macrophages containing hemosiderin, multinucleated giant cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and foci of mineralization. Hypercholesterolemia was documented in two of the three meerkats. PMID:11105964

  9. Cholesterol-β1 AR interaction versus cholesterol-β2 AR interaction.

    PubMed

    Cang, Xiaohui; Yang, Linlin; Yang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Zheng, Mingyue; Yu, Kunqian; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang

    2014-05-01

    Two 8-µs all-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the two highly homologous G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes, β1 - and β2 -adrenergic receptors, which were embedded in a lipid bilayer with randomly dispersed cholesterol molecules. During the simulations, cholesterol molecules accumulate to different surface regions of the two receptors, suggesting the subtype specificity of cholesterol-β-adrenergic receptor interaction and providing some clues to the physiological difference of the two subtypes. Meanwhile, comparison between the two receptors in interacting with cholesterols shed some new light on general determinants of cholesterol binding to GPCRs. Our results indicate that although the concave surface, charged residues and aromatic residues are important, neither of these stabilizing factors is indispensable for a cholesterol interaction site. Different combinations of these factors lead to the diversified binding modes of cholesterol binding to the receptors. Our long-time simulations, for the first time, revealed the pathway of a cholesterol molecule entering the consensus cholesterol motif (CCM) site, and the binding process of cholesterol to CCM is accompanied by a side chain flipping of the conserved Trp4.50. Moreover, the simulation results suggest that the I-/V-/L-rich region on the extracellular parts of helix 6 might be an alternatively conserved cholesterol-binding site for the class-A GPCRs. PMID:24265091

  10. Recycling of vitamin E in human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kagan, V E; Serbinova, E A; Forte, T; Scita, G; Packer, L

    1992-03-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their unrestricted scavenger receptor-dependent uptake is believed to account for cholesterol deposition in macrophage-derived foam cells. It has been suggested that vitamin E that is transported by LDL plays a critical role in protecting against LDL oxidation. We hypothesize that the maintenance of sufficiently high vitamin E concentrations in LDL can be achieved by reducing its chromanoxyl radicals, i.e., by vitamin E recycling. In this study we demonstrate that: i) chromanoxyl radicals of endogenous vitamin E and of exogenously added alpha-tocotrienol, alpha-tocopherol or its synthetic homologue with a 6-carbon side-chain, chromanol-alpha-C6, can be directly generated in human LDL by ultraviolet (UV) light, or by interaction with peroxyl radicals produced either by an enzymic oxidation system (lipoxygenase + linolenic acid) or by an azo-initiator, 2,2'-azo-bis(2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (AMVN; ii) ascorbate can recycle endogenous vitamin E and exogenously added chromanols by direct reduction of chromanoxyl radicals in LDL; iii) dihydrolipoic acid is not efficient in direct reduction of chromanoxyl radicals but recycles vitamin E by synergistically interacting with ascorbate (reduces dehydroascorbate thus maintaining the steady-state concentration of ascorbate); and iv) beta-carotene is not active in vitamin E recycling but may itself be protected against oxidative destruction by the reductants of chromanoxyl radicals. We suggest that the recycling of vitamin E and other phenolic antioxidants by plasma reductants may be an important mechanism for the enhanced antioxidant protection of LDL. PMID:1314881

  11. TOMATO CLEANING AND WATER RECYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full-scale dump tank water recycle system was developed and demonstrated. A false bottom-ejector transport system removed soil from the water. Clarified water was either recycled back to the dump tank or discharged to the sewer. A vacuum belt was developed for dewatering the mu...

  12. Garbage project on recycling behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.H.; Hughes, W.W.; Rathje, W.L.

    1982-02-01

    Results are presented of a study undertaken to determine the factors which are most effective in motivating different socio-economic groups to change their recycling behaviors and participate in recycling programs. Four types of data were collected and analyzed in Tucson: (1) purchase data from local recyclers, (2) traditional interview-survey data on recycling behavior, (3) long-term and short-term household refuse data, and (4) combined interview-garbage data. Findings reveal that disposal patterns for newspapers and aluminum cans are tuse data, and (4) combined interview-garbage data. Findings reveal that disposal patterns for newspapers and aluminum cans are the same across census tracts with significantly different socio-economic characteristics. Further, analysis of interview and garbage data matched by household reaffirm that what people say about recycling and how they dispose of recyclable materials are two different things. Thus, interview reports of newspaper recycling correlate with higher income informants, but their interview reports do not correlate with what is thrown into their garbage cans. Money is concluded to be the most powerful incentive toward recycling.

  13. The Dynamic Earth: Recycling Naturally!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Allison, Elizabeth; Fowler, Lisa; Glaze, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article begins with a thought-provoking question: What do you think of when you hear the term "recycle?" Many think about paper, glass, aluminum cans, landfills, and reducing waste by reusing some of these materials. How many of us ever consider the way the systems of Earth dynamically recycle its materials? In the following…

  14. Information Sources on Rural Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg; Kuske, Jodee

    1992-01-01

    Provides resources for rural recycling operations with the principle aim of assisting rural government officials, planners, residents, and educators to encourage recycling as an integral part of an individual's or community's solid waste management plan. Sources range from bibliographies, directories, and government documents to case studies. (49…

  15. American Art of Conspicuous Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Aurelia

    1999-01-01

    Characterizes the use of recycling "junk" as a means for creating art by exploring various recycling traditions that are present in the United States. Demonstrates to students that "junk" can be fashioned into beautiful works of art. Offers four works of art and provides discussion questions and project ideas for each artwork. (CMK)

  16. Recycling Study Guide [Resource Packet].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    This resource packet contains six documents developed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in order to help teachers infuse the environmental education topics of recycling and solid waste into social studies, art, English, health, mathematics, science, and environmental education classes. "Recycling Study Guide" contains 19 activities…

  17. Recycling Solid Waste in Chattanooga

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vredeveld, Ruth; Martin, Robin

    1973-01-01

    Students undertook a group project in collaboration with city officials to study garbage types in the community and possibilities of recycling solid wastes. Data collected from various sources revealed that public attitude was favorable for recycling efforts and that it was feasible economically. (PS)

  18. Training Governments to Buy Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Describes a program developed by the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority to teach government buyers how to buy recycled materials. The program consists of a hands-on training seminar and a manual that offers step-by-step instructions for setting up a buy-recycled purchasing program. (LZ)

  19. Is recycling worth the trouble

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, C.M.

    1995-03-01

    A panel of waste industry experts met recently at a Washington, DC, conference to discuss and debate the costs, benefits, and economics of recycling solid waste. The nearly unanimous conclusion from some of the speakers--that recycling, as it is implemented today, has costs that far outweigh its benefits--is evidence of a growing backlash among solid waste officials against a recycling movement they feel has been grossly over-inflated by environmental groups as a solution to a non-existent problem known as the garbage crisis. The public should not place such a strong emphasis on recycling as a cure-all for environmental problems, according to the panel of four waste management policy analysts at The State of Garbage'' session held in mid-January at the 1995 US/Canadian Federation Solid Waste Management Conference. Moreover, some panel members said, recycling should take place only if it makes economic sense.

  20. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  1. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  2. Phospholipid-cholesterol bilayers under osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Sparr, Emma; Hallin, Linda; Markova, Natalia; Wennerström, Håkan

    2002-01-01

    Isothermal (27 degrees C) phase behavior of dimyristoyl phosphatidyl choline-cholesterol mixtures at various osmotic pressures and cholesterol contents was investigated by means of isothermal sorption microcalorimetry and (2)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. The calorimetric method allows for simultaneous measurement of the partial molar enthalpy and the chemical potential (the osmotic pressure) of water, thus providing an almost complete thermodynamic description of the sorption process. From the experimental results, the Pi(osm) - X(chol) and the ternary composition phase diagrams are constructed. We note that there are strong similarities between the Pi(osm) - X(chol) phase diagram and the previously reported T - X(chol) phase diagram at excess water. At high cholesterol contents a single liquid ordered (L(alpha)(o)) phase is present over the whole range of water contents, implying that this phase has a remarkable stability not only at decreasing temperature but also at increasing osmotic pressure. At low cholesterol contents, the microcalorimetric experiments confirm the extraordinary property of cholesterol not to cause any substantial melting point depression. One important conclusion in the present study is that the P(beta) phase can dissolve cholesterol more readily than the L(beta) phase and that the addition of cholesterol induces the P(beta) phase. Finally, the putative P(beta) - L(alpha)(o) periodic modulated structure is discussed. PMID:12324420

  3. Cholesterol-sensitive Modulation of Transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Leyt, Julieta; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Vaerman, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, Shulamit; Weiss, Aryeh M.

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich membrane domains (e.g., lipid rafts) are thought to act as molecular sorting machines, capable of coordinating the organization of signal transduction pathways within limited regions of the plasma membrane and organelles. The significance of these domains in polarized postendocytic sorting is currently not understood. We show that dimeric IgA stimulates the incorporation of its receptor into cholesterol-sensitive detergent-resistant membranes confined to the basolateral surface/basolateral endosomes. A fraction of human transferrin receptor was also found in basolateral detergent-resistant membranes. Disrupting these membrane domains by cholesterol depletion (using methyl-β-cyclodextrin) before ligand-receptor internalization caused depolarization of traffic from endosomes, suggesting that cholesterol in basolateral lipid rafts plays a role in polarized sorting after endocytosis. In contrast, cholesterol depletion performed after ligand internalization stimulated cargo transcytosis. It also stimulated caveolin-1 phosphorylation on tyrosine 14 and the appearance of the activated protein in dimeric IgA-containing apical organelles. We propose that cholesterol depletion stimulates the coupling of transcytotic and caveolin-1 signaling pathways, consequently prompting the membranes to shuttle from endosomes to the plasma membrane. This process may represent a unique compensatory mechanism required to maintain cholesterol balance on the cell surface of polarized epithelia. PMID:17392516

  4. Partial molecular volumes of lipids and cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Alexander I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric measurements are reported for fully hydrated lipid/cholesterol bilayer mixtures using the neutral flotation method. Apparent specific volume data were obtained with the lipids DOPC, POPC and DMPC at T = 30 °C, DPPC at 50 °C, and brain sphingomyelin (BSM) at 45 and 24 °C for mole fractions of cholesterol x from 0 to 0.5. Unlike previous cholesterol mixture studies, we converted our raw data to partial molecular volume VL of the lipid and VC of the cholesterol. The partial molecular volumes were constant for POPC and DOPC as x was varied, but had sharp breaks for the other lipids at values of xC near 0.25 ± 0.05. Results for x < xC clearly exhibit the condensation effect of cholesterol on DPPC, DMPC and BSM when measured at temperatures above their main transition temperatures TM. The break points at xC are compared to phase diagrams in the literature. For x > xC the values of the partial molecular volumes of cholesterol clustered near 630 ± 10 Å3 in all the lipids when measured for T > TM; we suggest that this is the most appropriate measure of the bare volume of cholesterol in lipid bilayers. PMID:16737691

  5. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  6. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  7. Tissue storage and control of cholesterol metabolism in man on high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Quintão, E C; Brumer, S; Stechhahn, K

    1977-03-01

    The possibility of accumulation of tissue cholesterol in human beings submitted to high cholesterol feeding was investigated in liver biopsies and through fecal sterol balance studies. Feeding to 10 individuals 3.1 to 3.4 g/day of cholesterol for 3 weeks raised the mean serum level from 293 to 349 mg/100 ml, namely 19%, whereas the liver cholesterol content was 417 mg/100 g of wet weight. In 10 control cases eating 0.1--0.4 g/day of cholesterol serum cholesterol remained stable throughout the experimental period and the liver cholesterol content was 256 mg/100 g. Difference of liver colesterol level between the two groups was 62%. In 7 patients submitted to two periods of balance investigation on a cholesterol-free synthetic formula diet respectively prior to (PI) and after (PIII) eating the high cholesterol solid food from 4 to 15 weeks (PII), fecal steroid excretion in PIII exceeded PI in 3 patients. Such data are a direct evidence for the existence of an efficient system to release acutely stored cholesterol. In one patient bile acid excretion accounted for the difference between PIII and PI. PMID:849375

  8. Cholesterol Depletion from a Ceramide/Cholesterol Mixed Monolayer: A Brewster Angle Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Pritam; Noutsi, Pakiza; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is crucial to the mechanical properties of cell membranes that are important to cells’ behavior. Its depletion from the cell membranes could be dramatic. Among cyclodextrins (CDs), methyl beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) is the most efficient to deplete cholesterol (Chol) from biomembranes. Here, we focus on the depletion of cholesterol from a C16 ceramide/cholesterol (C16-Cer/Chol) mixed monolayer using MβCD. While the removal of cholesterol by MβCD depends on the cholesterol concentration in most mixed lipid monolayers, it does not depend very much on the concentration of cholesterol in C16-Cer/Chol monolayers. The surface pressure decay during depletion were described by a stretched exponential that suggested that the cholesterol molecules are unable to diffuse laterally and behave like static traps for the MβCD molecules. Cholesterol depletion causes morphology changes of domains but these disrupted monolayers domains seem to reform even when cholesterol level was low. PMID:27245215

  9. Dietary cholesterol and fats at a young age: do they influence cholesterol metabolism in adult life?

    PubMed

    Temmerman, A M; Vonk, R J; Niezen-Koning, K; Berger, R; Fernandes, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of dietary cholesterol and fats on cholesterol metabolism later in life were studied in Mongolian gerbils. Three groups were given a basic diet with soybean oil, palm kernel oil amounting to 8.75% (w/w), or the basic diet only. In three other groups, cholesterol (0.05%) was added to the above diets. Measurements were done in animals of the third generation on the diets. On all diets, teh serum cholesterol of the sucklings was increased as compared to the young that were suckled by mothers on the basic diet only, while body cholesterol was highest in sucklings of mothers on the basic diet or palm-kernel-oil-enriched diets. When the diets were replaced by the basic diets at 6 months of age, serum cholesterol was still increased at 12 months of age in animals previously fed on the cholesterol-enriched diets. Tissue cholesterol did not differ. However, after a challenge with cholesterol at that age, the differences in serum cholesterol were not significantly different. PMID:2802529

  10. All Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobs Home > Statistics and Data > All Vision Impairment All Vision Impairment Vision Impairment Defined Vision impairment is ... being blind by the U.S. definition.) The category “All Vision Impairment” includes both low vision and blindness. ...

  11. Niemann-Pick C disease and mobilization of lysosomal cholesterol by cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Jean E.; Karten, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disease in which endocytosed cholesterol becomes sequestered in late endosomes/lysosomes (LEs/Ls) because of mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. Mutations in either of these genes can lead to impaired functions of the NPC1 or NPC2 proteins and progressive neurodegeneration as well as liver and lung disease. NPC1 is a polytopic protein of the LE/L limiting membrane, whereas NPC2 is a soluble protein in the LE/L lumen. These two proteins act in tandem and promote the export of cholesterol from LEs/Ls. Consequently, a defect in either NPC1 or NPC2 causes cholesterol accumulation in LEs/Ls. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms leading to NPC disease, particularly in the CNS. Recent exciting data on the mechanism by which the cholesterol-sequestering agent cyclodextrin can bypass the functions of NPC1 and NPC2 in the LEs/Ls, and mobilize cholesterol from LEs/Ls, will be highlighted. Moreover, the possible use of cyclodextrin as a valuable therapeutic agent for treatment of NPC patients will be considered. PMID:24664998

  12. Glucosylceramidase mass and subcellular localization are modulated by cholesterol in Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    PubMed

    Salvioli, Rosa; Scarpa, Susanna; Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Tatti, Massimo; Ramoni, Carlo; Vanier, Marie T; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2004-04-23

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. The mechanism by which the concentration of sphingolipids such as glucosylceramide is increased in this disease is poorly understood. We have found that, in NPC fibroblasts, the cholesterol storage affects the stability of glucosylceramidase (GCase), decreasing its mass and activity; a reduction of cholesterol raises the level of GCase to nearly normal values. GCase is activated and stabilized by saposin C (Sap C) and anionic phospholipids. Here we show by immunofluorescence microscopy that in normal fibroblasts, GCase, Sap C, and lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), the most abundant anionic phospholipid in the endolysosomal system, reside in the same intracellular vesicular structures. In contrast, the colocalization of GCase, Sap C, and LBPA is markedly impaired in NPC fibroblasts but can be re-established by cholesterol depletion. These data show for the first time that the level of cholesterol modulates the interaction of GCase with its protein and lipid activators, namely Sap C and LBPA, regulating the GCase activity and stability. PMID:14757764

  13. An investigative look: selective cholesterol absorption inhibitors--embarking on a new standard of care.

    PubMed

    Stein, Evan A

    2002-02-01

    Phase 2 and 3 clinical trials evaluating the selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe have demonstrated that the drug is safe and effective, both as monotherapy and in combination with several statins. Placebo-controlled phase 2 studies of 8 and 12 weeks' duration established that ezetimibe monotherapy achieved maximum cholesterol lowering at doses between 10 and 20 mg daily. Additional dose-scheduling studies demonstrated that evening dosing was only slightly more effective than morning dosing, and that the drug could be taken with or without food without any impairment in efficacy. These studies also showed that ezetimibe was well tolerated, with side effects no different from those seen with placebo. Short-term, early phase 2 studies evaluating the coadministration of ezetimibe and a number of different statins found that coadministration was safe, that ezetimibe did not alter the pharmacokinetics of the statins or vice versa, and that the reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were complementary, with the degree of cholesterol lowering seen with ezetimibe monotherapy maintained when it was given in combination with a statin. These studies indicate that combination therapy with ezetimibe and a starting dose of a statin produces a reduction in cholesterol levels equivalent to that seen with an 8-fold higher statin dose. Larger, long-term phase 3 trials confirmed the efficacy and safety of the 10-mg dose and also demonstrated that ezetimibe monotherapy is an excellent alternative for patients who cannot tolerate statins. PMID:11855701

  14. Lecithin:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Deficiency Protects against Cholesterol-induced Hepatic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Lauren; Li, Lixin; Pun, Henry; Liu, Lu; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Maguire, Graham F.; Naples, Mark; Baker, Chris; Magomedova, Lilia; Tam, Jonathan; Adeli, Khosrow; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Connelly, Philip W.; Ng, Dominic S.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) knock-out mice, particularly in the LDL receptor knock-out background, are hypersensitive to insulin and resistant to high fat diet-induced insulin resistance (IR) and obesity. We demonstrated that chow-fed Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice have elevated hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes IR, compared with wild-type controls, and this effect is normalized in Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that hepatic ER cholesterol metabolism differentially regulates ER stress using these models. We observed that the Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice accumulate excess hepatic total and ER cholesterol primarily attributed to increased reuptake of biliary cholesterol as we observed reduced biliary cholesterol in conjunction with decreased hepatic Abcg5/g8 mRNA, increased Npc1l1 mRNA, and decreased Hmgr mRNA and nuclear SREBP2 protein. Intestinal NPC1L1 protein was induced. Expression of these genes was reversed in the Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice, accounting for the normalization of total and ER cholesterol and ER stress. Upon feeding a 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD), Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice accumulated a similar amount of total hepatic cholesterol compared with the Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice, but the hepatic ER cholesterol levels remained low in conjunction with being protected from HCD-induced ER stress and IR. Hepatic ER stress correlates strongly with hepatic ER free cholesterol but poorly with hepatic tissue free cholesterol. The unexpectedly low ER cholesterol seen in HCD-fed Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice was attributable to a coordinated marked up-regulation of ACAT2 and suppressed SREBP2 processing. Thus, factors influencing the accumulation of ER cholesterol may be important for the development of hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:22500017

  15. Cholesterol Accumulation Sequesters Rab9 and Disrupts Late Endosome Function in NPC1-deficient Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, Ian G.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is an autosomal recessive disorder that leads to massive accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in late endosomes and lysosomes. To understand how cholesterol accumulation influences late endosome function, we investigated the effect of elevated cholesterol on Rab9-dependent export of mannose 6-phosphate receptors from this compartment. Endogenous Rab9 levels were elevated 1.8-fold in Niemann-Pick type C cells relative to wild type cells, and its half-life increased 1.6-fold, suggesting that Rab9 accumulation is caused by impaired protein turnover. Reduced Rab9 degradation was accompaniedby stabilization on endosome membranes, as shown by a reduction in the capacity of Rab9 for guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor-mediated extraction from Niemann-Pick type C membranes. Cholesterol appeared to stabilize Rab9 directly, as liposomes loaded with prenylated Rab9 showed decreased extractability with increasing cholesterol content. Rab9 is likely sequestered in an inactive form on Niemann-Pick type C membranes, as cation-dependent man-nose 6-phosphate receptorswere missorted to the lysosome for degradation, a process that was reversed by overexpression of GFP-tagged Rab9. In addition to using primary fibroblasts isolated from Niemann-Pick type C patients, RNA interference was utilized to recapitulate the disease phenotype in cultured cells, greatly facilitating the analysis of cholesterol accumulation and late endosome function. We conclude that cholesterol contributes directly to the sequestration of Rab9 on Niemann-Pick type C cell membranes, which in turn, disrupts mannose 6-phosphate receptor trafficking. PMID:16644737

  16. The role of cholesterol in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Lee, Jinwoo; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol modulates the bilayer structure of biological membranes in multiple ways. It changes the fluidity, thickness, compressibility, water penetration and intrinsic curvature of lipid bilayers. In multi-component lipid mixtures, cholesterol induces phase separations, partitions selectively between different coexisting lipid phases, and causes integral membrane proteins to respond by changing conformation or redistribution in the membrane. But, which of these often overlapping properties are important for membrane fusion?-Here we review a range of recent experiments that elucidate the multiple roles that cholesterol plays in SNARE-mediated and viral envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:27179407

  17. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  18. Evidence of deregulated cholesterol efflux in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evanthia; Vasilaki, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanouel; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Tsezou, Aspasia

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies indicated that lipids may be associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of cholesterol efflux related proteins in AAA. Liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), Apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI), smooth muscle α-actin (α-SM) and vimentin expression levels were evaluated in human AAA, atherosclerotic (ATH) and normal abdominal aortic tissues. We found significant differences in LXRα, LXRβ and ABCA1 mRNA expression levels between AAA, ATH and normal whole aortic tissues and also within the AAA, ATH and normal "intima-media" layers. Specifically, LXRα, LXRβ and ABCA1 mRNA levels were decreased in AAA compared to ATH-whole tissues, as well as in AAA "intima-media" compared to ATH and normal "intima-media" layers. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that LXRα and ABCA1 immunoreactivities (IR) were reduced in the AAA media compared to the normal and ATH media layers and that they were also reduced in the intima layer of AAA and ATH tissues, whereas ApoAI-IR was increased in the AAA and ATH aortic walls compared to normal pointing to possible deregulation of the cholesterol efflux mechanism in AAA. Furthermore, double staining for vimentin and α-SM showed vimentin expression in the intima and inner media layer of AAA with sparse vimentin positive SMCs designating possible SMCs phenotype switch from contractile to synthetic form. In addition, histochemical analysis showed excessive lipid accumulation in the AAA wall, while co-staining using Oil Red O with α-SM or CD68 revealed lipid accumulation in SMCs and macrophages, respectively. Our study provides novel evidence for impaired cholesterol efflux in AAA associated with lipid accumulation in SMCs and macrophages, as well as switch of SMCs phenotype from contractile to synthetic form. PMID:26725543

  19. Raising HDL cholesterol in women

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Danny J; Kalra, Girish L; Rifai, Luay; Eapen, Christina A; Merchant, Nadya; Khan, Bobby V

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is essential in the determination of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in women. This is especially true in the postmenopausal state, where lipid profiles and CHD risk mimic that of age-matched men. Thus, interventions designed to reduce CHD risk by raising HDL-C levels may have particular significance during the transition to menopause. This review discusses HDL-C-raising therapies and the role of HDL in the primary prevention of CHD in women. Lifestyle-based interventions such as dietary change, aerobic exercise regimens, and smoking cessation are initial steps that are effective in raising HDL-C, and available data suggest women respond similarly to men with these interventions. When combined with pharmacotherapy, the effects of these lifestyle alterations are further amplified. Though studies demonstrating gender-specific differences in therapy are limited, niacin continues to be the most effective agent in raising HDL-C levels, especially when used in combination with fibrate or statin therapy. Emerging treatments such as HDL mimetic therapy show much promise in further raising HDL-C levels and improving cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21072287

  20. Hopanoids as functional analogues of cholesterol in bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, James P; Grosser, Daniel; Bradley, Alexander S; Lagny, Thibaut J; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Broda, Martyna; Simons, Kai

    2015-09-22

    The functionality of cellular membranes relies on the molecular order imparted by lipids. In eukaryotes, sterols such as cholesterol modulate membrane order, yet they are not typically found in prokaryotes. The structurally similar bacterial hopanoids exhibit similar ordering properties as sterols in vitro, but their exact physiological role in living bacteria is relatively uncharted. We present evidence that hopanoids interact with glycolipids in bacterial outer membranes to form a highly ordered bilayer in a manner analogous to the interaction of sterols with sphingolipids in eukaryotic plasma membranes. Furthermore, multidrug transport is impaired in a hopanoid-deficient mutant of the gram-negative Methylobacterium extorquens, which introduces a link between membrane order and an energy-dependent, membrane-associated function in prokaryotes. Thus, we reveal a convergence in the architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic membranes and implicate the biosynthetic pathways of hopanoids and other order-modulating lipids as potential targets to fight pathogenic multidrug resistance. PMID:26351677

  1. Hopanoids as functional analogues of cholesterol in bacterial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, James P.; Grosser, Daniel; Bradley, Alexander S.; Lagny, Thibaut J.; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Broda, Martyna; Simons, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The functionality of cellular membranes relies on the molecular order imparted by lipids. In eukaryotes, sterols such as cholesterol modulate membrane order, yet they are not typically found in prokaryotes. The structurally similar bacterial hopanoids exhibit similar ordering properties as sterols in vitro, but their exact physiological role in living bacteria is relatively uncharted. We present evidence that hopanoids interact with glycolipids in bacterial outer membranes to form a highly ordered bilayer in a manner analogous to the interaction of sterols with sphingolipids in eukaryotic plasma membranes. Furthermore, multidrug transport is impaired in a hopanoid-deficient mutant of the gram-negative Methylobacterium extorquens, which introduces a link between membrane order and an energy-dependent, membrane-associated function in prokaryotes. Thus, we reveal a convergence in the architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic membranes and implicate the biosynthetic pathways of hopanoids and other order-modulating lipids as potential targets to fight pathogenic multidrug resistance. PMID:26351677

  2. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  3. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  4. Use of BODIPY-Cholesterol (TF-Chol) for Visualizing Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Sezgin, Erdinc; Eggeling, Christian; Ikonen, Elina

    2016-09-01

    Dipyrromethene difluoride-cholesterol (TopFluor-Cholesterol, TF-Chol) is a widely used cholesterol analogue due to its excellent fluorescence properties and considerable similarity with natural cholesterol in terms of membrane partitioning. However, the suitability of TF-Chol for detecting lysosomal cholesterol deposition has recently been questioned. Here, we highlight the fact that the method of lipid delivery and the analysis of time-point both affect the membrane distribution and labeling pattern of TF-Chol, similarly as with radiolabeled cholesterol. Lysosomal sterol accumulation characteristic to a lysosomal storage disease is most readily detected when the probe is introduced via the physiological route, i.e. as a sterol fatty acid ester in low-density lipoprotein particles. When administered to cells from solvent, lysosomal sterol sequestration becomes evident after an overnight equilibration between membranes. PMID:27187581

  5. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  6. Recycling and Life Cycle Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2010-01-01

    This chapter addresses recycling and life cycle considerations related to the growing use of lightweight materials in vehicles. The chapter first addresses the benefit of a life cycle perspective in materials choice, and the role that recycling plays in reducing energy inputs and environmental impacts in a vehicle s life cycle. Some limitations of life cycle analysis and results of several vehicle- and fleet-level assessments are drawn from published studies. With emphasis on lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and polymer composites, the status of the existing recycling infrastructure and technological challenges being faced by the industry also are discussed.

  7. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26774359

  8. Cholesterol oxidation products and their biological importance.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-09-01

    The main biological cause of oxysterols is the oxidation of cholesterol. They differ from cholesterol by the presence of additional polar groups that are typically hydroxyl, keto, hydroperoxy, epoxy, or carboxyl moieties. Under typical conditions, oxysterol concentration is maintained at a very low and precisely regulated level, with an excess of cholesterol. Like cholesterol, many oxysterols are hydrophobic and hence confined to cell membranes. However, small chemical differences between the sterols can significantly affect how they interact with other membrane components, and this in turn can have a substantial effect on membrane properties. In this spirit, this review describes the biological importance and the roles of oxysterols in the human body. We focus primarily on the effect of oxysterols on lipid membranes, but we also consider other issues such as enzymatic and nonenzymatic synthesis processes of oxysterols as well as pathological conditions induced by oxysterols. PMID:26956952

  9. Serum cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease in population with low cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Peto, R; Collins, R; MacMahon, S; Lu, J; Li, W

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between serum cholesterol concentration and mortality (from coronary heart disease and from other causes) below the range of cholesterol values generally seen in Western populations. DESIGN--Prospective observational study based on 8-13 years of follow up of subjects in a population with low cholesterol concentrations. SETTING--Urban Shanghai, China. SUBJECTS--9021 Chinese men and women aged 35-64 at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death from coronary heart disease and other causes. RESULTS--The average serum cholesterol concentration was 4.2 mmol/l at baseline examination, and only 43 (7%) of the deaths that occurred during 8-13 years of follow up were attributed to coronary heart disease. There was a strongly positive, and apparently independent, relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from coronary heart disease (z = 3.47, p less than 0.001), and within the range of usual serum cholesterol concentration studied (3.8-4.7 mmol/l) there was no evidence of any threshold. After appropriate adjustment for the regression dilution bias, a 4 (SD 1)% difference in usual cholesterol concentration was associated with a 21 (SD 6)% (95% confidence interval 9% to 35%) difference in mortality from coronary heart disease. There was no significant relation between serum cholesterol concentration and death from stroke or all types of cancer. The 79 deaths due to liver cancer or other chronic liver disease were inversely related to cholesterol concentration at baseline. CONCLUSION--Blood cholesterol concentration was directly related to mortality from coronary heart disease even in those with what was, by Western standards, a "low" cholesterol concentration. There was no good evidence of an adverse effect of cholesterol on other causes of death. PMID:1888927

  10. Cholesterol Degradation by Gordonia cholesterolivorans ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Drzyzga, O.; Fernández de las Heras, L.; Morales, V.; Navarro Llorens, J. M.; Perera, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports physiological and genetic data about the type strain Gordonia cholesterolivorans, a strain that is able to degrade steroid compounds containing a long carbon side chain such as cholesterol (C27), cholestenone (C27), ergosterol (C28), and stigmasterol (C29). The length of the carbon side chain appears to be of great importance for this bacterium, as the strain is unable to grow using steroids with a shorter or nonaliphatic carbon side chain such as cholic acid (C24), progesterone (C21), testosterone, androsterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione (all C19), and further steroids. This study also demonstrates that the degradation of cholesterol is a quite common feature of the genus Gordonia by comparing Gordonia cholesterolivorans with some other species of this genus (e.g., G. sihwensis, G. hydrophobica, G. australis, and G. neofelifaecis). Pyrosequencing of the genome of G. cholesterolivorans led to the identification of two conventional cholesterol oxidase genes on an 8-kb and a 12.8-kb genomic fragment with genetic organizations that are quite unique as compared to the genomes of other cholesterol-degrading bacteria sequenced so far. The identified two putative cholesterol oxidases of G. cholesterolivorans are both intracellularly acting enzymes of the class I type. Whereas one of these two cholesterol oxidases (ChoOx-1) shows high identity with an oxidoreductase of the opportunistic pathogen G. bronchialis and is not transcribed during growth with cholesterol, the other one (ChoOx-2) appears phylogenetically closer to cholesterol oxidases from members of the genus Rhodococcus and is transcribed constitutively. By using targeted gene disruption, a G. cholesterolivorans ChoOx-2 gene mutant strain that was unable to grow with steroids was obtained. PMID:21622796

  11. Regulation of cholesterol esterification by micellar cholesterol in CaCo-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Field, F J; Albright, E; Mathur, S N

    1987-09-01

    The regulation of acylcoenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity by cholesterol was studied in an established enterocyte cell line. CaCo-2 cells were grown in culture to confluency and dome formation. They were characterized morphologically by light and transmission electron microscopy. During the culture period, ACAT activity remained stable while the activities of the brush border enzymes sucrase and alkaline phosphatase progressively increased with time and plateaued 12 days after plating. As determined by the rate of incorporation of oleic acid into the individual lipid classes, the rate of triglyceride synthesis was twice that of phospholipid and 15 times that of cholesteryl ester synthesis in these cells. Incubating CaCo-2 cells with cholesterol solubilized in taurocholate micelles resulted in a significant increase in ACAT activity (149 +/- 5 pmol/dish per 2 hr vs. 366 +/- 5, (P less than 0.001) without changing the rates of triglyceride or phospholipid synthesis. The stimulation of ACAT activity by micellar cholesterol was rapid, occurring within 5 min and reaching a maximal effect by 2 hr. The regulation of ACAT activity by cholesterol was directly dependent upon the concentration of cholesterol solubilized in the micelle and was independent of protein synthesis. Incubating CaCo-2 cells with micellar cholesterol did not increase the esterification of, nor did the cholesterol enter the pool of, newly synthesized or performed cholesterol within 2 hr. The micellar cholesterol that was taken up by the cells was esterified within 5 min after starting the incubation. Progesterone, a known ACAT inhibitor, significantly decreased the rate of esterification of intracellular micellar cholesterol proving that the cholesterol taken up by CaCo-2 cells was indeed entering the ACAT pool. Despite increasing amounts of unesterified cholesterol entering the cells via micelles, the percent of cholesterol that was esterified at any one time remained constant at 1

  12. Cholesterol aided etching of tomatine gold nanoparticles: a non-enzymatic blood cholesterol monitor.

    PubMed

    Raj, Vidya; Johnson, Teslin; Joseph, Kuruvilla

    2014-10-15

    Colloidal gold is extensively used for molecular sensing because of the wide flexibilities it offers in terms of modifications of the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface with a variety of functional groups. We describe a simple, enzyme free assay for the detection of cholesterol, and demonstrate its applicability by estimating cholesterol in human serum samples. To enable cholesterol detection, we functionalized GNPs with tomatine, a glycoalkaloid found in the leaves and stem of tomato plants. The binding of cholesterol onto tomatine functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs) was characterized by a blue shift in the plasmon absorption spectra (SPR) followed by reduction in the particle size. The TGNPs have been core etched with increasing concentration of cholesterol and with 800 ng/mL of cholesterol particles in the size range of 10-12 nm have been obtained. This behavior was attributed to the enhanced hydrophobicity of the surface acquired by cholesterol binding resulting in the folding or shrinkage of molecule in turn leading to core etching. The method was successfully applied for the detection of cholesterol in real samples and agrees well with values obtained from the conventional method. Because of its significant plasmonic shift and simplicity, this biosensor could be used for cholesterol detection as it does not demand either any hazardous and costly chemicals or any complex synthetic routes. PMID:24811192

  13. Statin-induced chronic cholesterol depletion inhibits Leishmania donovani infection: Relevance of optimum host membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Aditya; Roy, Saptarshi; Jafurulla, Md; Mandal, Chitra; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that invade and survive within host macrophages leading to leishmaniasis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly among economically weaker sections in tropical and subtropical regions. Visceral leishmaniasis is a potent disease caused by Leishmania donovani. The detailed mechanism of internalization of Leishmania is poorly understood. A basic step in the entry of Leishmania involves interaction of the parasite with the host plasma membrane. In this work, we have explored the effect of chronic metabolic cholesterol depletion using lovastatin on the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in host macrophages. We show here that chronic cholesterol depletion of host macrophages results in reduction in the attachment of Leishmania promastigotes, along with a concomitant reduction in the intracellular amastigote load. These results assume further relevance since chronic cholesterol depletion is believed to mimic physiological cholesterol modulation. Interestingly, the reduction in the ability of Leishmania to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, enrichment of host membrane cholesterol resulted in reduction in the entry and survival of Leishmania in host macrophages. As a control, the binding of Escherichia coli to host macrophages remained invariant under these conditions, thereby implying specificity of cholesterol requirement for effective leishmanial infection. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first comprehensive demonstration that an optimum content of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for leishmanial infection. Our results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated leishmanial infection. PMID:27319380

  14. Cholesterol Modulates the Dimer Interface of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor via Cholesterol Occupancy Sites

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Xavier; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Sengupta, Durba

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor is an important member of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, whose stability and function are modulated by membrane cholesterol. The recent high-resolution crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor revealed the presence of possible cholesterol-binding sites in the receptor. However, the functional relevance of cholesterol binding to the receptor remains unexplored. We used MARTINI coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to explore dimerization of the β2-adrenergic receptor in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol. A novel (to our knowledge) aspect of our results is that receptor dimerization is modulated by membrane cholesterol. We show that cholesterol binds to transmembrane helix IV, and cholesterol occupancy at this site restricts its involvement at the dimer interface. With increasing cholesterol concentration, an increased presence of transmembrane helices I and II, but a reduced presence of transmembrane helix IV, is observed at the dimer interface. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to explore the correlation between cholesterol occupancy and GPCR organization. Our results indicate that dimer plasticity is relevant not just as an organizational principle but also as a subtle regulatory principle for GPCR function. We believe these results constitute an important step toward designing better drugs for GPCR dimer targets. PMID:24655504

  15. Obesity, Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Donald P.; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T.; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Guyton, John R.; Nelson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor (LXR) in macrophages and possibly other cells is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25060521

  16. Dietary Cholesterol Modulates Pathogen Blocking by Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Caragata, Eric P.; Rancès, Edwige; Hedges, Lauren M.; Gofton, Alexander W.; Johnson, Karyn N.; O'Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This “pathogen blocking” could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV), a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2–5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking. PMID:23825950

  17. Role of cholesterol in parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Devendra; Bhatti, Harinderpal Singh; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    The requirement of cholesterol for internalization of eukaryotic pathogens like protozoa (Leishmaniasis, Malaria and Toxoplasmosis) and the exchange of cholesterol along with other metabolites during reproduction in Schistosomes (helminths) under variable circumstances are poorly understood. In patients infected with some other helminthes, alterations in the lipid profile have been observed. Also, the mechanisms involved in lipid changes especially in membrane proteins related to parasite infections remain uncertain. Present review of literature shows that parasites induce significant changes in lipid parameters, as has been shown in the in vitro study where substitution of serum by lipid/cholesterol in medium and in experimental models (in vivo). Thus changes in lipid profile occur in patients having active infections with most of the parasites. Membrane proteins are probably involved in such reactions. All parasites may be metabolising cholesterol, but the exact relationship with pathogenic mechanism is not clear. So far, studies suggest that there may be some factors or enzymes, which allow the parasite to breakup and consume lipid/cholesterol. Further studies are needed for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in vivo. The present review analysis the various studies till date and the role of cholesterol in pathogenesis of different parasitic infections. PMID:15882457

  18. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  19. The link between cholesterol and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Magnus; Blennow, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    A leading hypothesis on the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the mis-metabolism of amyloid precursor protein. This mis-metabolism causes the 42-amino acid form of A beta(Abeta42) to form oligomers that in turn start a chain of events leading to the accumulation of amyloid plaques. Vascular factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes as well as the inheritance of the epsilon4 allele of the ApoE gene are risk factors for AD. These risks are thought to promote the production of beta-amyloid (Abeta). An association between cholesterol and the development of AD was suggested in 1994 and since then, research has confirmed a link between cholesterol and the development of AD. A high cholesterol level in mid-life is a risk for AD and statins i.e. cholesterol-lowering drugs, reduce this risk. Statins inhibit enzymes involved in the endogenous synthesis of cholesterol and evidence is mounting that they also affect enzymes in Abeta metabolism i.e. beta-secretase. This normalises the breakdown of the precursor of Abeta, amyloid precursor protein, thereby promoting the nonamyloidogenic pathway. This review focusses on the link between cholesterol and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16156481

  20. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad Reza; White, Kenneth; Qharebeglou, Mohammad; Ansar, Malek Moein

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol. PMID:26877857

  1. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  2. Progress reported in PET recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The Goodyear Polyester Division has demonstrated its ability to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from recycled plastic soft drink bottles and remanufacture the material into PET suitable for containers. Most people are familiar with PET in the form of lightweight, shatter resistant beverage bottles. About 20 percent of these beverage containers currently are being recycled. The recycled PET is currently used in many applications such as carpeting, pillow stuffing, sleeping bag filling, insulation for water heaters and non-food containers. This is the first step of Goodyear's increased efforts to recycle PET from containers into a material suitable for food packing. The project is extremely complex, involving sophisticated understanding of the chemical reactions involved, PET production and the technology testing protocols necessary to design a process that addresses all the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns. The research conducted so far indicated that additional processing beyond simply cleaning the shredded material, called flake, will be required to assure a quality polymer.

  3. New approaches to recycling tires

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, R.

    1991-03-01

    Steel-belted radial tires are potentially one of the most recyclable products created by modern industry, although the potential has been barely tapped. Discarded tires pile up at an astonishing rate each year - 234 million in the US and 26 million passenger tire equivalents in Canada. They represent a mother lode of raw material waiting for modern day miners to transform them into recycled rubber, steel, fiber and energy. The tremendous increase in use of steel belted radials since the early 1970s has complicated their recyclability compared to the bias ply tire, but it has also accomplished waste reduction by tripling tire service life. Part one of this report describes processes being developed to convert tires to crumb rubber, as well as some potential uses of recycled rubber. Part two, to appear next month, will examine such uses as rubberized athletic tracks and highway asphalt.

  4. Operating A Recycling Program: A Citizen's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Kevin; Powell, Jerry

    Presented are recycling program alternatives, procedures for handling and marketing recyclable materials, and suggestions for financing and publicizing a recycling operation. This publication offers a general overview of the possibilities and potential pitfalls of recycling efforts, thereby serving as a catalyst and guide for organizations wishing…

  5. You're a "What"? Recycling Coordinator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    Recycling coordinators supervise curbside and dropoff recycling programs for municipal governments or private firms. Today, recycling is mandatory in many communities. And advancements in collection and processing methods have helped to increase the quantity of materials for which the recycling coordinator is responsible. In some communities,…

  6. The Three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1991

    1991-01-01

    A student hand-out for a recycling unit defines the terms reduce, recycle, and reuse as they relate to solid waste management. Presents the characteristics of recyclable items such as yard wastes, metals, glass, and paper. Lists organizations through which more information about recycling can be obtained. (MCO)

  7. Cholesterol transport through lysosome-peroxisome membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei-Bei; Liao, Ya-Cheng; Qi, Wei; Xie, Chang; Du, Ximing; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Hongyuan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is dynamically transported among organelles, which is essential for multiple cellular functions. However, the mechanism underlying intracellular cholesterol transport has remained largely unknown. We established an amphotericin B-based assay enabling a genome-wide shRNA screen for delayed LDL-cholesterol transport and identified 341 hits with particular enrichment of peroxisome genes, suggesting a previously unappreciated pathway for cholesterol transport. We show dynamic membrane contacts between peroxisome and lysosome, which are mediated by lysosomal Synaptotagmin VII binding to the lipid PI(4,5)P2 on peroxisomal membrane. LDL-cholesterol enhances such contacts, and cholesterol is transported from lysosome to peroxisome. Disruption of critical peroxisome genes leads to cholesterol accumulation in lysosome. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected role of peroxisome in intracellular cholesterol transport. We further demonstrate massive cholesterol accumulation in human patient cells and mouse model of peroxisomal disorders, suggesting a contribution of abnormal cholesterol accumulation to these diseases. PMID:25860611

  8. Corporate America urges consumers to buy recycled

    SciTech Connect

    Rabasca, L.

    1995-04-01

    The National Recycling Coalition`s (NRC, Washington, DC) buy Recycled Business Alliance (BRBA), the US EPA`s WasteWi$e program, and the US Conference of Mayors` (Washington, DC) buy-recycled program are just a few of the national groups that have formed since 1990 to encourage the purchase of products made from recyclables. Indeed, corporate America and governments are buying recycled. More than $1 billion worth of recycled-content products have been bought by McDonald`s Corp. since 1990. The nearly 950 members of the BRBA reported spending $9.1 billion on recycled-content products in 1993. State governments reported in 1993 that they had spent more than $600 million on recycled products. Several states, cities, and counties have adopted buy-recycled executive orders. Now, many of these companies and government officials are urging consumers to use their own purchasing power to spur markets for recyclables.

  9. Chromatographic separation of cholesterol in foods.

    PubMed

    Fenton, M

    1992-10-30

    Based on the current literature and on experience gained in the laboratory, a simplified procedure using direct saponification (0.4 M potassium hydroxide in ethanol and heating at 60 degrees C for 1 h) is the most appropriate method for the determination of total cholesterol in foods. Extraction of the unsaponifiable matter with hexane is efficient and no extra clean-up is required before quantification. An internal standard, 5 alpha-cholestane or epicoprostanol, should be added to the sample prior to saponification and, together with reference standards, carried through the entire procedure to ensure accurate results. A significant improvement in cholesterol methodology has been achieved by decreasing the sample size and performing all the sample preparation steps in a single tube. The method has the advantages of elimination of an initial solvent extraction for total lipids and errors resulting from multiple extractions, transfers, filtration and wash steps after saponification. The resulting hexane extract, which contains a variety of sterols and fat soluble vitamins, requires an efficient capillary column for complete resolution of cholesterol from the other compounds present. The development of fused-silica capillary columns using cross-linked and bonded liquid phases has provided high thermal stability, inertness and separation efficiency and, together with automated cold on-column gas chromatographic injection systems, has resulted in reproducible cholesterol determinations in either underivatized or derivatized form. If free cholesterol and its esters need to be determined separately, they are initially extracted with other lipids with chloroform-methanol followed by their separation by column or thin-layer chromatography and subsequently analysed by gas or liquid chromatography. Although capillary gas chromatography offers superior efficiency in separation, the inherent benefits of liquid chromatography makes it a potential alternative. Isotope dilution

  10. Tryptophan 415 Is Critical for the Cholesterol Transport Functions of Scavenger Receptor BI.

    PubMed

    Holme, Rebecca L; Miller, James J; Nicholson, Kay; Sahoo, Daisy

    2016-01-12

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are anti-atherogenic particles, primarily due to their role in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway whereby HDL delivers cholesteryl esters (CE) to the liver for excretion upon interaction with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI). We designed experiments to test the hypothesis that one or more of the eight highly conserved tryptophan (Trp; W) residues in SR-BI are critical for mediating function. We created a series of Trp-to-phenylalanine (Phe, F) mutant receptors, as well as Trp-less SR-BI (ΔW-SR-BI), and assessed their ability to mediate cholesterol transport. Wild-type (WT) or mutant SR-BI receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, and cell surface expression was confirmed. Next, we showed that Trp-less- and W415F-SR-BI had significantly decreased abilities to bind HDL and promote selective uptake of HDL-CE, albeit with higher selective uptake efficiency as compared to WT-SR-BI. Interestingly, only Trp-less-, but not W415F-SR-BI, showed an impaired ability to mediate efflux of free cholesterol (FC). Furthermore, both W415F- and Trp-less-SR-BI were unable to reorganize plasma membrane pools of FC based on lack of sensitivity to exogenous cholesterol oxidase. Restoration of Trp 415 into the Trp-less-SR-BI background was unable to rescue Trp-less-SR-BI's impaired functions, suggesting that Trp 415 is critical, but not sufficient for full receptor function. Furthermore, with the exception of Trp 262, restoration of individual extracellular Trp residues, in combination with Trp 415, into the Trp-less-SR-BI background partially rescued SR-BI function, indicating that Trp 415 must be present in combination with other Trp residues for proper cholesterol transport functions. PMID:26652912

  11. Taurine ameliorates cholesterol metabolism by stimulating bile acid production in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru; Fujita, Michiko; Nakamura, Masakazu; Sakono, Masanobu; Nishizono, Shoko; Sato, Masao; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Mori, Mari; Fukuda, Nobuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary taurine on cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol-fed rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two dietary groups (n = 6 in each group): a high-cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholesterol and 0.15% sodium cholate, and a high-cholesterol diet with 5% (w/w) taurine. The experimental diets were given for 2 weeks. Taurine supplementation reduced the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels by 37% and 32%, respectively. Faecal excretion of bile acids was significantly increased in taurine-treated rats, compared with untreated rats. Biliary bile acid concentrations were also increased by taurine. Taurine supplementation increased taurine-conjugated bile acids by 61% and decreased glycine-conjugated bile acids by 53%, resulting in a significant decrease in the glycine/taurine (G/T) ratio. Among the taurine-conjugated bile acids, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid were significantly increased. In the liver, taurine supplementation increased the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, by three- and two-fold, respectively. Taurine also decreased the enzymatic activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). These observations suggest that taurine supplementation increases the synthesis and excretion of taurine-conjugated bile acids and stimulates the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid by elevating the expression and activity of CYP7A1. This may reduce cholesterol esterification and lipoprotein assembly for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, leading to reductions in the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels. PMID:26710098

  12. Aspirin Prevention of Cholesterol Gallstone Formation in Prairie Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sum P.; Carey, Martin C.; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1981-03-01

    When prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are fed a diet containing cholesterol, a marked increase in gallbladder mucin secretion parallels the evolution of cholesterol supersaturated bile. Gelation of mucin precedes the precipitation of cholesterol liquid and solid crystals and the development of gallstones. Aspirin given to prairie dogs inhibited mucin hypersecretion and gel accumulation and prevented gallstone formation without influencing the cholesterol content of supersaturated bile. This suggests that gallbladder mucin is a nucleation matrix for cholesterol gallstones.

  13. Deep Recycling of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    While most of the subducted H2O is recycled at shallow and subarc depths, carbon is less readily mobilized and susceptive to complex redox processes involving CO2 in solids, fluids and melts, elemental carbon, Fe- and Si- carbides, and methane. Here I review the various ways of recycling carbon during subduction and present a spectrum of possible reaction products in the mantle. Metamorphic reactions liberate <20% of the subducted CO2 to the subarc region (Connolly 2005, EPSL). Larger amounts might be mobilized through (sediment) melting. Although the wet pelite solidus is only shifted by 30-50 oC (at 3 GPa) with carbonates, the latter remain stable with melts that are saturated in a H2O+CO2-fluid. Complete dissolution of carbonates requires temperatures above any predicted subduction geotherm. Carbonated sediments yield CO2-rich phonolites to 5 GPa but carbonatites at higher pressures. The silicate melts become increasingly potassic with pressure, while the alkali-rich carbonatites have their highest K/Na at 8 GPa, slightly decreasing to 13 GPa and become sodic with the disappearance of residual cpx at ~16 GPa. What may happen when carbonated pelite derived melts migrate into the mantle is illustrated in Central Italy: in this case, it can be experimentally demonstrated that hybridization of ultrapotassic phonolitic melts with ~2 wt% H2O and ~6 wt% CO2 in the mantle results in the primitive parents of the ultrapotassic kamafugite suites which have ~43 wt% SiO2. Hence, despite a crustal isotopic signature of C, O, and Sr in these rocks, the CO2 of the Italian magmatism does not stem from assimilation in the crust but from melts derived from subducted marine carbonates mixed with pelagic clays and then reacted in the mantle. The migration of CO2-bearing fluids and melts into the mantle may lead to a redox-shock. Where high liquid/mantle ratios prevail, carbonatites rest in their oxidized form and may only freeze in relatively cold lithospheric keels where they form

  14. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  16. Prevention of cholesterol gallstones by inhibiting hepatic biosynthesis and intestinal absorption of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Helen H; Portincasa, Piero; de Bari, Ornella; Liu, Kristina J; Garruti, Gabriella; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Wang, David Q.-H

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol cholelithiasis is a multifactorial disease influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors, and represents a failure of biliary cholesterol homeostasis in which the physical-chemical balance of cholesterol solubility in bile is disturbed. The primary pathophysiologic event is persistent hepatic hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol, which has both hepatic and small intestinal components. The majority of the environmental factors are probably related to Western-type dietary habits, including excess cholesterol consumption. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the US, is nowadays a major treatment for gallstones. However, it is invasive and can cause surgical complications, and not all patients with symptomatic gallstones are candidates for surgery. The hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been employed as first-line pharmacological therapy in a subgroup of symptomatic patients with small, radiolucent cholesterol gallstones. Long-term administration of UDCA can promote the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones. However, the optimal use of UDCA is not always achieved in clinical practice because of failure to titrate the dose adequately. Therefore, the development of novel, effective, and noninvasive therapies is crucial for reducing the costs of health care associated with gallstones. In this review, we summarize recent progress in investigating the inhibitory effects of ezetimibe and statins on intestinal absorption and hepatic biosynthesis of cholesterol, respectively, for the treatment of gallstones, as well as in elucidating their molecular mechanisms by which combination therapy could prevent this very common liver disease worldwide. PMID:23419155

  17. Cholesterol and markers of cholesterol turnover in multiple sclerosis: relationship with disease outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhornitsky, Simon; McKay, Kyla A; Metz, Luanne M; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Rangachari, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disease that is associated with progressive loss of myelin and subsequent axonal degeneration. Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cellular and myelin membranes. In this systematic review, we examined the relationship between levels of cholesterol and markers of cholesterol turnover in circulation and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and disease outcomes in adults with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) or confirmed MS. Studies suggest that elevated levels of circulating low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), total cholesterol, and particularly, apolipoprotein B and oxidized LDL are associated with adverse clinical and MRI outcomes in MS. These relationships were observed as early as CIS. The studies also suggest that oxysterols, cholesterol precursors, and apolipoprotein E may be markers of specific disease processes in MS, but more research is required to elucidate these processes and relationships. Taken together, the data indicate that cholesterol and markers of cholesterol turnover have potential to be used clinically as biomarkers of disease activity and may even be implicated in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:26856944

  18. Cholesterol Status Modulates mRNA and Protein Levels of Genes Associated with Cholesterol Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary saturated (S), monounsaturated (MU) and polyunsaturated (PU) fatty acids (FA) and cholesterol have been shown to be major determinants of plasma lipoprotein profiles. The objective was to determine the effect of whole body cholesterol status and dietary fatty acid saturation on genes associ...

  19. A novel alkyne cholesterol to trace cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kristina; Thiele, Christoph; Schött, Hans-Frieder; Gaebler, Anne; Schoene, Mario; Kiver, Yuriy; Friedrichs, Silvia; Lütjohann, Dieter; Kuerschner, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells and plays a fundamental role in many biological processes. Its concentration in the various cellular membranes differs and is tightly regulated. Here, we present a novel alkyne cholesterol analog suitable for tracing both cholesterol metabolism and localization. This probe can be detected by click chemistry employing various reporter azides. Alkyne cholesterol is accepted by cellular enzymes from different biological species (Brevibacterium, yeast, rat, human) and these enzymes include cholesterol oxidases, hydroxylases, and acyl transferases that generate the expected metabolites in in vitro and in vivo assays. Using fluorescence microscopy, we studied the distribution of cholesterol at subcellular resolution, detecting the lipid in the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, but also in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In summary, alkyne cholesterol represents a versatile, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool for tracking cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization as it allows for manifold detection methods including mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography/fluorography, and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24334219

  20. A Lipolytic Lecithin:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Secreted by Toxoplasma Facilitates Parasite Replication and Egress.

    PubMed

    Pszenny, Viviana; Ehrenman, Karen; Romano, Julia D; Kennard, Andrea; Schultz, Aric; Roos, David S; Grigg, Michael E; Carruthers, Vern B; Coppens, Isabelle

    2016-02-19

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii develops within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in mammalian cells, where it scavenges cholesterol. When cholesterol is present in excess in its environment, the parasite expulses this lipid into the PV or esterifies it for storage in lipid bodies. Here, we characterized a unique T. gondii homologue of mammalian lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), a key enzyme that produces cholesteryl esters via transfer of acyl groups from phospholipids to the 3-OH of free cholesterol, leading to the removal of excess cholesterol from tissues. TgLCAT contains a motif characteristic of serine lipases "AHSLG" and the catalytic triad consisting of serine, aspartate, and histidine (SDH) from LCAT enzymes. TgLCAT is secreted by the parasite, but unlike other LCAT enzymes it is cleaved into two proteolytic fragments that share the residues of the catalytic triad and need to be reassembled to reconstitute enzymatic activity. TgLCAT uses phosphatidylcholine as substrate to form lysophosphatidylcholine that has the potential to disrupt membranes. The released fatty acid is transferred to cholesterol, but with a lower transesterification activity than mammalian LCAT. TgLCAT is stored in a subpopulation of dense granule secretory organelles, and following secretion, it localizes to the PV and parasite plasma membrane. LCAT-null parasites have impaired growth in vitro, reduced virulence in animals, and exhibit delays in egress from host cells. Parasites overexpressing LCAT show increased virulence and faster egress. These observations demonstrate that TgLCAT influences the outcome of an infection, presumably by facilitating replication and egress depending on the developmental stage of the parasite. PMID:26694607

  1. Neuronal loss of Drosophila NPC1a causes cholesterol aggregation and age-progressive neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott E; Woodruff, E A; Liang, Ping; Patten, Meaghan; Broadie, Kendal

    2008-06-25

    The mistrafficking and consequent cytoplasmic accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids is linked to multiple neurodegenerative diseases. One class of disease, the sphingolipid storage diseases, includes Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC), caused predominantly (95%) by mutation of the NPC1 gene. A disease model has been established through mutation of Drosophila NPC1a (dnpc1a). Null mutants display early lethality attributable to loss of cholesterol-dependent ecdysone steroid hormone production. Null mutants rescued to adults by restoring ecdysone production mimic human NPC patients with progressive motor defects and reduced life spans. Analysis of dnpc1a null brains shows elevated overall cholesterol levels and progressive accumulation of filipin-positive cholesterol aggregates within brain and retina, as well as isolated cultured brain neurons. Ultrastructural imaging of dnpc1a mutant brains reveals age-progressive accumulation of striking multilamellar and multivesicular organelles, preceding the onset of neurodegeneration. Consistently, electroretinogram recordings show age-progressive loss of phototransduction and photoreceptor synaptic transmission. Early lethality, movement impairments, neuronal cholesterol deposits, accumulation of multilamellar bodies, and age-dependent neurodegeneration are all rescued by targeted neuronal expression of a wild-type dnpc1a transgene. Interestingly, targeted expression of dnpc1a in glia also provides limited rescue of adult lethality. Generation of dnpc1a null mutant neuron clones in the brain reveals cell-autonomous requirements for dNPC1a in cholesterol and membrane trafficking. These data demonstrate a requirement for dNPC1a in the maintenance of neuronal function and viability and show that loss of dNPC1a in neurons mimics the human neurodegenerative condition. PMID:18579730

  2. Neuronal Loss of Drosophila NPC1a Causes Cholesterol Aggregation and Age-Progressive Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Scott E.; Woodruff, E. A.; Liang, Ping; Patten, Meaghan; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    The mistrafficking and consequent cytoplasmic accumulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids is linked to multiple neurodegenerative diseases. One class of disease, the sphingolipid storage diseases, includes Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC) caused predominantly (95%) by mutation of the NPC1 gene. A disease model has been established through mutation of Drosophila NPC1a (dnpc1a). Null mutants display early lethality due to loss of cholesterol-dependent ecdysone steroid hormone production. Null mutants rescued to adults by restoring ecdysone production mimic human NPC patients with progressive motor defects and reduced life spans. Analysis of dnpc1a null brains shows elevated overall cholesterol levels and progressive accumulation of filipin-positive cholesterol aggregates within brain and retina, as well as isolated cultured brain neurons. Ultrastructural imaging of dnpc1a mutant brains reveals age-progressive accumulation of striking multilamellar and multivesicular organelles, preceding the onset of neurodegeneration. Consistently, electroretinogram (ERG) recordings show age-progressive loss of phototransduction and photoreceptor synaptic transmission. Early lethality, movement impairments, neuronal cholesterol deposits, accumulation of multilamellar bodies and age-dependent neurodegeneration are all rescued by targeted neuronal expression of a wildtype dnpc1a transgene. Interestingly, targeted expression of dnpc1a in glia also provides limited rescue of adult lethality. Generation of dnpc1a null mutant neuron clones in the brain reveals cell autonomous requirements for dNPC1a in cholesterol and membrane trafficking. These data demonstrate a requirement for dNPC1a in the maintenance of neuronal function and viability, and show that loss of dNPC1a in neurons mimics the human neurodegenerative condition. PMID:18579730

  3. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase by mevinolin in familial hypercholesterolemia heterozygotes: effects on cholesterol balance.

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, S M; Bilheimer, D W

    1984-01-01

    Patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) have a deficiency of receptors for plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) that impairs removal of LDL from plasma. In these patients, mevinolin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase [mevalonate:NAD+ oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.88], increases receptors for LDL and decreases LDL concentrations. To determine whether mevinolin also causes severe decreases in total body synthesis of cholesterol, fecal excretions of neutral steroids and acidic steroids were determined in five FH heterozygotes before and during treatment with mevinolin. The drug produced an average decrease in plasma total cholesterol of 23% and in LDL cholesterol of 24%. Mevinolin caused a significant decrease in the output of neutral and acidic steroids in three patients, but it caused no alterations in two others. Changes in fecal output of steroids did not correlate with the degree of lowering of the patients' LDL-cholesterol level. In none of the patients did the output of fecal steroids fall below the values seen in normal subjects studied under similar conditions. One patient had a previous ileal exclusion operation and had a massive output of acidic steroids in the control period; mevinolin therapy caused a slight decrease in excretion of acidic steroids, but the output was still markedly above normal. We conclude that the LDL lowering action of mevinolin does not appear to require a severe decrease in cholesterol synthesis that might lead to depletion of vital body stores of cholesterol. PMID:6371816

  4. Quantification of In Vitro Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux and In Vivo Macrophage-Specific Reverse Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Santos, David; Cedó, Lídia; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Julve, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is thought to be a major HDL-mediated mechanism for protecting against atherosclerosis. Preclinical studies support the concept that increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages may confer atheroprotective benefits independently of the plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration. The application of the macrophage-to-feces RCT method in genetically engineered mice has provided evidence that this major HDL property correlates closely with changes in atherosclerosis susceptibility. This chapter provides details on the methodologies currently used to measure in vitro cholesterol efflux from macrophages or in vivo macrophage-specific RCT. The general principles and techniques described herein may be applied to measure the in vitro cholesterol efflux capacity of human serum in macrophage cultures and to evaluate the effect of different experimental pathophysiological conditions or the efficacy of different therapeutic strategies on the modulation of in vivo macrophage-RCT in mice. PMID:26445792

  5. A diet rich in leafy vegetable fiber improves cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ezz El-Arab, A M

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, the hypocholesterolemic effect of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) was studied in high-cholesterol fed rats. The animals were fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (0.25%) for 4 weeks. Leaf vegetable diet produced an important hypocholesterolemic action: it led to a significant lowering (p<0.05) of cholesterol in the plasma and liver, as well as of the atherogenic index and a significant increase (p<0.05) in cecal short chain fatty acids, with respect to the control group. Concurrently, total fecal neutral sterols in the excretion increased (p<0.05) and apparent absorption of dietary cholesterol was significantly depressed (-58%). The consumption of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) with a hypercholesterolemic diet improved the lipidemic profile and increased excretion of the total cholesterol end-products. PMID:20387744

  6. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of cellular unesterified cholesterol was studied in fibroblasts, which had been depleted of plasma membrane sphingomyelin by exposure to exogenous sphingomyelinase. This treatment has previously been shown to induce an increase in cholesterol esterification, a decrease in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, and a decreased susceptibility of cell cholesterol to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase. When the cellular localization of cholesterol was studied with fluorescent filipin staining, sphingomyelin depletion did not cause any visible changes in the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern, suggesting that the major part of cellular cholesterol was retained in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelinase treatment. After the oxidation of cell-surface cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, the plasma membrane was no longer stained by filipin, but the plasma membrane cholesterol of sphingomyelin-depleted cells appeared to be resistant to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase when sphingomyelinase was used as an oxidation-promoting agent. However, the use of hypotonic buffer or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C together with cholesterol oxidase resulted in a complete oxidation of the cell-surface cholesterol in sphingomyelin-depleted cells, as evidenced by the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern. Similar results were obtained when [3H]cholesterol-labelled fibroblasts were used for determination of the susceptibility to cholesterol oxidation. The kinetics of [3H]cholesterol oxidation in sphingomyelin-depleted cells with cholesterol oxidase in hypotonic buffer indicated that approximately 85% of the cellular cholesterol still resided in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelin depletion. These results are contradictory to earlier reports on sphingomyelinase-induced changes in cellular cholesterol distribution and suggest that minor changes in the kinetics of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum may be responsible

  7. Recycling concepts for thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lochem, J.H. van; Henriksen, C.; Lund, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    Thermoplastic short fiber composite materials are increasingly being used as insulating materials in electricity distribution. Economically they possess good opportunities for material recycling and reuse due to the high virgin price. To investigate the recycling potential of post-consumer components, PPS40%GF and PBT30%GF, representing commonly used insulating materials, have been artificially aged and recycled. To simulate 10 years of service life, injection molded tensile bars have been aged in different environments varying temperature, humidity and pH. After accelerated aging, the aging state has been characterized by tensile and impact strength, viscoelastic behavior (DMTA), molecular weight, crystallinity (DSC) and fracture behavior (SEM). These properties have been compared to virgin material. The aged materials have been recycled by regranulation and compounds with different ratios virgin/aged material and different coupling agents to repair the glass-matrix interface. Injection molded compounds were characterized by short and long term properties. Recompounding PBT30%GF with virgin material and no added coupling agents results in a partial recovery of the fiber-matrix adhesion. Based on the first short-term characterizations PBT30%GF seems not very suitable for reuse in primary applications. PPS40%GF seems more suitable for reuse in primary applications after recycling. Although the short-term mechanical properties of the aged batches do not recover after recycling, the fiber-matrix adhesion improves especially when adding coupling agents. Further long-term testing in creep and humid environments during the remaining part of this project will show whether the improved interface properties make recycled materials valuable for reuse in various industrial applications.

  8. [PCSK9 Inhibitors - the magic bullet for LDL cholesterol reduction?].

    PubMed

    Richter, Kurt; Barthel, Andreas; Bornstein, Stefan R; El-Armouche, Ali; Wagner, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin / kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays an important role in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) metabolism. Subjects harboring loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding for PCSK9 display markedly reduced LDL-C plasma levels. PCSK9 is secreted by the liver, binds to the LDL receptor and, following endocytosis, induces lysosomal degradation of the receptor together with the bound LDL-C. Current PCSK9 inhibitors are monoclonal antibodies that specifically absorb PCSK9. Subsequently, instead of being degraded the receptor can dissociate from LDL-C and recycle, consecutively resulting in an increased hepatocyte LDL receptor density and higher LDL-C clearance. In clinical trials, the PCSK9 inhibitors alirocumab and evolocumab induced reductions in LDL-C of up to 70 % in statin-treated as well as statin-naïve patients. So far, serious side effects (requiring cessation of drug treatment) occurred only in rare cases. Since this new class of lipid lowering drugs promises a high potential benefit, they have been approved by the EMA even before completion of the studies addressing clinically relevant endpoints like cardiovascular events and mortality. Therefore, the expected publication of these study results in 2017 may allow a better assessment of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors. PMID:27305302

  9. Lead contamination around a kindergarten near a battery recycling plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jung-Der Wang; Chang-Sheng Jang; Yaw-Huei Hwang; Zueng-Sang Chen

    1992-07-01

    Lead poisoning has been noticed for more than a thousand years. Increased lead absorption and/or impaired neurobehavioral function among children who lived nearby lead smelters were reported in many different countries. In November of 1987, a worker from a lead battery recycling smelter suffered from anemia and bilateral weakness of his extremities. He was diagnosed as lead poisoning at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). A subsequent epidemiological survey of the workers from this recycling smelter showed that 31 out of 64 who came for a medical examination suffered from lead poisoning. Since there was a kindergarten next to the factory, we performed this study to determine whether there was an increased lead absorption among children of the exposed kindergarten and its association with the extent of air and soil pollution in the surrounding area. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Cholesterol metabolites exported from human brain.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, Luigi; Crick, Peter J; Zerbinati, Chiara; Tritapepe, Luigi; Abdel-Khalik, Jonas; Poirot, Marc; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J

    2015-07-01

    The human brain contains approximately 25% of the body's cholesterol. The brain is separated from the circulation by the blood brain barrier. While cholesterol will not passes this barrier, oxygenated forms of cholesterol can cross the barrier. Here by measuring the difference in the oxysterol content of blood plasma in the jugular vein and in a forearm vein by mass spectrometry (MS) we were able to determine the flux of more than 20 cholesterol metabolites between brain and the circulation. We confirm that 24S-hydroxycholesterol is exported from brain at a rate of about 2-3mg/24h. Gas chromatography (GC)-MS data shows that the cholesterol metabolites 5α-hydroxy-6-oxocholesterol (3β,5α-dihydroxycholestan-6-one), 7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-oxocholesterol, generally considered to be formed through reactive oxygen species, are similarly exported from brain at rates of about 0.1, 2 and 2mg/24h, respectively. Although not to statistical significance both GC-MS and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS methods indicate that (25R)26-hydroxycholesterol is imported to brain, while LC-MS indicates that 7α-hydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-enoic acid is exported from brain. PMID:25668615

  11. LDL cholesterol: controversies and future therapeutic directions.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M

    2014-08-16

    Lifelong exposure to raised concentrations of LDL cholesterol increases cardiovascular event rates, and the use of statin therapy as an adjunct to diet, exercise, and smoking cessation has proven highly effective in reducing the population burden associated with hyperlipidaemia. Yet, despite consistent biological, genetic, and epidemiological data, and evidence from randomised trials, there is controversy among national guidelines and clinical practice with regard to LDL cholesterol, its measurement, the usefulness of population-based screening, the net benefit-to-risk ratio for different LDL-lowering drugs, the benefit of treatment targets, and whether aggressive lowering of LDL is safe. Several novel therapies have been introduced for the treatment of people with genetic defects that result in loss of function within the LDL receptor, a major determinant of inherited hyperlipidaemias. Moreover, the usefulness of monoclonal antibodies that extend the LDL-receptor lifecycle (and thus result in substantial lowering of LDL cholesterol below the levels achieved with statins alone) is being assessed in phase 3 trials that will enrol more than 60,000 at-risk patients worldwide. These trials represent an exceptionally rapid translation of genetic observations into clinical practice and will address core questions of how low LDL cholesterol can be safely reduced, whether the mechanism of LDL-cholesterol lowering matters, and whether ever more aggressive lipid-lowering provides a safe, long-term mechanism to prevent atherothrombotic complications. PMID:25131980

  12. Melatonin directly interacts with cholesterol and alleviates cholesterol effects in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngjik; Attwood, Simon J; Hoopes, Matthew I; Drolle, Elizabeth; Karttunen, Mikko; Leonenko, Zoya

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a pineal hormone that has been shown to have protective effects in several diseases that are associated with cholesterol dysregulation, including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and certain types of cancers. Cholesterol is a major membrane constituent with both a structural and functional influence. It is also known that melatonin readily partitions into cellular membranes. We investigated the effects of melatonin and cholesterol on the structure and physical properties of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayer as a simple membrane model using the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) monolayer technique and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We report that melatonin increases the area per lipid and elastic compressibility of the DPPC monolayer in a concentration dependent manner, while cholesterol has the opposite effect. When both melatonin and cholesterol were present in the monolayer, the compression isotherms showed normalization of the area per molecule towards that of the pure DPPC monolayer, thus indicating that melatonin counteracts and alleviates cholesterol's effects. Atomistic MD simulations of melatonin enriched DPPC systems correlate with our experimental findings and illustrate the structural effects of both cholesterol and melatonin. Our results suggest that melatonin is able to lessen the influence of cholesterol through two different mechanisms. Firstly, we have shown that melatonin has a fluidizing effect on monolayers comprising only lipid molecules. Secondly, we also observe that melatonin interacts directly with cholesterol. Our findings suggest a direct nonspecific interaction of melatonin may be a mechanism involved in reducing cholesterol associated membrane effects, thus suggesting the existence of a new mechanism of melatonin's action. This may have important biological relevance in addition to the well-known anti-oxidative and receptor binding effects. PMID:24651707

  13. Enzymatic Quantification of Cholesterol and Cholesterol Esters from Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Thangavelu, Mirunalni

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this work was to develop an enzymatic method of quantification of cholesterol and cholesterol esters derived from contact lenses, both in vitro and ex vivo. Methods. Lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix; CIBA Vision, Inc., Duluth, GA) and galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance; Vistakon, Inc., Jacksonville, FL) silicone hydrogel contact lenses were independently incubated in cholesterol oleate solutions varying in concentrations. After incubation, the lenses were removed and underwent two separate 2:1 chloroform-methanol extractions. After in vitro studies, 10 human subjects wore both lotrafilcon B and galyfilcon A contact lenses for 7 days. The lenses also underwent two separate 2:1 chloroform-methanol extractions. All in vitro and ex vivo samples were quantified with a cholesterol esterase enzymatic reaction. Results. Calibration curves from quantifications of in vitro contact lens samples soaked in successively decreasing concentrations of cholesterol oleate yielded coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.99 (lotrafilcon B) and 0.97 (galyfilcon A). For in vitro contact lens samples, galyfilcon A was associated with an average cholesterol oleate extraction of 39.85 ± 48.65 μg/lens, whereas lotrafilcon B was associated with 5.86 ± 3.36 μg/lens (P = 0.05) across both extractions and all incubation concentrations. For ex vivo contact lens samples, there was significantly more cholesterol and cholesterol esters deposited on galyfilcon A (5.77 ± 1.87 μg/lens) than on lotrafilcon B (2.03 ± 1.62 μg/lens; P = 0.0005). Conclusions. This is an efficient and simple method of quantifying total cholesterol extracted from silicone hydrogel contact lenses and, potentially, the meibum and/or tear film. Certain silicone hydrogel materials demonstrate more affinity for cholesterol and its esters than do others. PMID:20089871

  14. 50 Simple Things Kids Can Do To Recycle. California Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javna, John

    This book provides 50 recycling ideas for children and features Recycle Rex, the state of California's "spokesdinosaur" for recycling. An introduction contains recycling background information on waste disposal options and reducing, reusing, and recycling. Recycling suggestions are divided into nine sections: (1) "Learn What You Can Recycle"…

  15. Normalization of Cholesterol Homeostasis by 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in Neurons and Glia from Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Peake, Kyle B.; Vance, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is an inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 gene that result in an accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/L) and impaired export of cholesterol from LE/L to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recent studies demonstrate that administration of cyclodextrin (CD) to Npc1−/− mice eliminates cholesterol sequestration in LE/L of many tissues, including the brain, delays neurodegeneration, and increases lifespan of the mice. We have now investigated cholesterol homeostasis in NPC1-deficient cells of the brain in response to CD. Primary cultures of neurons and glial cells from Npc1−/− mice were incubated for 24 h with 0.1 to 10 mm CD after which survival and cholesterol homeostasis were monitored. Although 10 mm CD was profoundly neurotoxic, and altered astrocyte morphology, 0.1 and 1 mm CD were not toxic but effectively mobilized stored cholesterol from the LE/L as indicated by filipin staining. However, 0.1 and 1 mm CD altered cholesterol homeostasis in opposite directions. The data suggest that 0.1 mm CD releases cholesterol trapped in LE/L of neurons and astrocytes and increases cholesterol availability at the ER, whereas 1 mm CD primarily extracts cholesterol from the plasma membrane and reduces ER cholesterol. These studies in Npc1−/− neurons and astrocytes establish a dose of CD (0.1 mm) that would likely be beneficial in NPC disease. The findings are timely because treatment of NPC disease patients with CD is currently being initiated. PMID:22277650

  16. PRESENT CONDITION OF FOOD WASTE RECYCLING LOOP BASED ON RECYCLING PROJECT CERTIFICATION OF THE FOOD WASTE RECYCLING LAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomoko; Kanaya, Ken

    Purpose of this research is to clear present condition of food waste recycling loops based on recycling project certification of the Food Waste Recycling Law. Method of this research is questionnaire survey to companies constituting the loops. Findings of this research are as follows: 1. Proponents of the loop is most often the recycling companies. 2. Food waste recycling rate is 61% for the food retailing industry and 81% for the food service industry. These values are higher than the national average in 2006. The effect of the revision of recycling project certification is suggested.

  17. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  18. What can Recycling in Thermal Reactors Accomplish?

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson

    2007-09-01

    Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives.

  19. Radioactive materials in recycled metals.

    PubMed

    Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

    1995-04-01

    In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap--radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations. PMID:7883556

  20. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  1. [Basic mechanisms: absorption and excretion of cholesterol and other sterols].

    PubMed

    Cofan Pujol, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is of vital importance for vertebrate cell membrane structure and function. It is obvious that adequate regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is essential. Hypercholesterolemia promotes atherosclerosis and thereby represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The liver has been considered the major site of control in maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. The liver facilitates clearance of (very) low density lipoprotein particles and cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants, synthesizes cholesterol, synthesizes and secretes (nascent) high density lipoprotein particles, secretes cholesterol and bile salts to bile, and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. In recent years, however, the importance of the intestine in many aspects of cholesterol physiology is increasingly recognized. It has become apparent that direct secretion of cholesterol from the blood compartment into the intestine, or transintestinal cholesterol excretion, plays a major role in disposal of cholesterol via the feces. This review will discuss current knowledge on the physiology of cholesterol homeostasis, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24461630

  2. CHOBIMALT: A Cholesterol-Based Detergent†

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Mittal, Ritesh; Huang, Lijun; Travis, Benjamin; Breyer, Richard M.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol and its hemisuccinate and sulfate derivatives are widely used in studies of purified membrane proteins, but are difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, even in the presence of detergent micelles. Other cholesterol derivatives do not form conventional micelles and lead to viscous solutions. To address these problems a cholesterol-based detergent, CHOBIMALT, has been synthesized and characterized. At concentrations above 3–4μM, CHOBIMALT forms micelles without the need for elevated temperatures or sonic disruption. Diffusion and fluorescence measurements indicated that CHOBIMALT micelles are large (210 ± 30 kDa). The ability to solubilize a functional membrane protein was explored using a G-protein coupled receptor, the human kappa opioid receptor type 1 (hKOR1). While CHOBIMALT alone was not found to be effective as a surfactant for membrane extraction, when added to classical detergent micelles CHOBIMALT was observed to dramatically enhance the thermal stability of solubilized hKOR1. PMID:20919740

  3. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  4. Recycling Expensive Medication: Why Not?

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Jay M

    2004-01-01

    New (and proposed) advances in packaging, preserving, labeling, and verifying product integrity of individual tablets and capsules may allow for the recycling of certain expensive medicines. Previously sold, but unused, medication, if brought back to special pharmacies for resale or donation, may provide a low-cost source of patent-protected medicines. Benefits of such a program go beyond simply providing affordable medication to the poor. This article suggests that medicine recycling may be a possibility (especially if manufacturers are mandated to blister-package and bar-code individual tablets and capsules). This early discussion of medication recycling identifies relevant issues, such as: need, rationale, existing programs, available supplies, expiration dates, new technology for ensuring safety and potency, environmental impact, public health benefits, program focus, program structure, and liability. PMID:15266231

  5. Recycling expensive medication: why not?

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Jay M

    2004-01-01

    New (and proposed) advances in packaging, preserving, labeling, and verifying product integrity of individual tablets and capsules may allow for the recycling of certain expensive medicines. Previously sold, but unused, medication, if brought back to special pharmacies for resale or donation, may provide a low-cost source of patent-protected medicines. Benefits of such a program go beyond simply providing affordable medication to the poor. This article suggests that medicine recycling may be a possibility (especially if manufacturers are mandated to blister-package and bar-code individual tablets and capsules). This early discussion of medication recycling identifies relevant issues, such as: need, rationale, existing programs, available supplies, expiration dates, new technology for ensuring safety and potency, environmental impact, public health benefits, program focus, program structure, and liability. PMID:15266231

  6. Differing rates of cholesterol absorption among inbred mouse strains yield differing levels of HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Timothy J; Chellan, Bijoy; Getz, Godfrey S; Reardon, Catherine A

    2013-09-01

    Inbred strains of mice with differing susceptibilities to atherosclerosis possess widely varying plasma HDL levels. Cholesterol absorption and lipoprotein formation were compared between atherosclerosis-susceptible, low-HDL C57BL6/J mice and atherosclerosis-resistant, high-HDL FVBN/J mice. [(3)H]cholesterol and triglyceride appeared in the plasma of FVB mice gavaged with cholesterol in olive oil at a much higher rate than in C57 mice. The plasma cholesterol was found almost entirely as HDL-cholesterol in both strains. Inhibition of lipoprotein catabolism with Tyloxapol revealed that the difference in the rate of [(3)H]cholesterol appearance in the plasma was due entirely to a greater rate of chylomicron secretion from the intestine of the FVB mice. Lipid absorption into the 2nd quarter of the small intestine is greater in the FVB mice and indicates that this region may contain the factors that give rise to the differences in absorption observed between the two mouse strains. Additionally, ad libitum feeding prior to cholesterol gavage accentuates the absorption rate differences compared with fasting. The resultant remodeling of the increased levels of chylomicron in the plasma may contribute to increased plasma HDL. Intestinal gene expression analysis reveals several genes that may play a role in these differences, including microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and ABCG8. PMID:23812556

  7. Serum cholesterol and variant in cholesterol-related gene CETP predict white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Warstadt, Nicholus M; Dennis, Emily L; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) and high-density lipoprotein levels and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8 ± 2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomic magnetic resonance imaging at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related, single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in Alzheimer's disease risk predicted fractional anisotropy. We focused on the single-nucleotide polymorphism with the largest individual effects, CETP (rs5882), and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected white matter associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3 ± 7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence white matter integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects on the brain. PMID:24997672

  8. Serum Cholesterol and Variant in Cholesterol-Related Gene CETP Predict White Matter Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Warstadt, Nicholus M.; Dennis, Emily L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Henders, Anjali K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) levels and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8±2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomical MRI at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related SNPs implicated in AD risk predicted FA. We focused on the SNP with the largest individual effects - CETP (rs5882) – and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher FA and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected WM associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3±7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence WM integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects. PMID:24997672

  9. Cholesterol homeostasis: How do cells sense sterol excess?

    PubMed

    Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Alexopoulos, Stephanie J; Kunze, Sarah V; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Li, Dianfan; Brown, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is vital in mammals, but toxic in excess. Consequently, elaborate molecular mechanisms have evolved to maintain this sterol within narrow limits. How cells sense excess cholesterol is an intriguing area of research. Cells sense cholesterol, and other related sterols such as oxysterols or cholesterol synthesis intermediates, and respond to changing levels through several elegant mechanisms of feedback regulation. Cholesterol sensing involves both direct binding of sterols to the homeostatic machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and indirect effects elicited by sterol-dependent alteration of the physical properties of membranes. Here, we examine the mechanisms employed by cells to maintain cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26993747

  10. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pundir, C.S.; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Methods: Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. Results: The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. Km and Imax for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4±2.8 and 92.3±3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were <2 and <4 per cent, respectively. Biosensor had a storage life of 6 months at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential. PMID:23168704

  11. Cholesterol versus cholesterol sulfate: effects on properties of phospholipid bilayers containing docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Schofield, M; Jenski, L J; Dumaual, A C; Stillwell, W

    1998-09-01

    The important omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is present at high concentration in some membranes that also contain the unusual sterol cholesterol sulfate (CS). The association between these lipids and their effect on membrane structure is presented here. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), MC540 fluorescence, erythritol permeability, pressure/area isotherms on lipid monolayers and molecular modeling are used to compare the effect of CS and cholesterol on model phospholipid membranes. By DSC, CS decreases the main phase transition temperature and broadens the transitions of dipalmitolyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,18:1 PC) and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,22:6 PC) to a much larger extent than does cholesterol. In addition CS produces a three-component transition in 18:0,18:1 PC bilayers that is not seen with cholesterol. In a mixed phospholipid bilayer composed of 18:0,18:1 PC/18:0,22:6 PC (1:1, mol/mol), CS at 2.5 membrane mol% or more induces lateral phase separation while cholesterol does not. CS decreases lipid packing density and increases permeability of 18:0,18:1 PC and 18:0,22:6 PC bilayers to a much larger extent than cholesterol. CS disrupts oleic acid-containing bilayers more than those containing DHA. Molecular modeling confirms that the anionic sulfate moiety on CS renders this sterol more polar than cholesterol with the consequence that CS likely resides higher (extends further into the aqueous environment) in the bilayer. CS can therefore be preferentially accommodated into DHA-enriched bilayers where its tetracyclic ring system may fit into the delta 4 pocket of DHA, a location excluded to cholesterol. It is proposed that CS may in part replace the membrane function of cholesterol in DHA-rich membranes. PMID:9807808

  12. MCPIP is induced by cholesterol and participated in cholesterol-caused DNA damage in HUVEC

    PubMed Central

    Da, Jingjing; Zhuo, Ming; Qian, Minzhang

    2015-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and cholesterol treatment would cause multiple damages, including DNA damage, on endothelial cells. In this work, we have used human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVEC) to explore the mechanism of cholesterol induced damage. We have found that cholesterol treatment on HUVEC could induce the expression of MCPIP1. When given 12.5 mg/L cholesterol on HUVEC, the expression of MCPIP1 starts to increase since 4 hr after treatment and at 24 hr after treatment it could reach to 10 fold of base line level. We hypothesis this induction of MCPIP1 may contribute to the damaging process and we have used siRNA of MCPIP1 in further research. This MCPIP1 siRNA (siMCPIP) could down regulate MCPIP1 by 73.4% and when using this siRNA on HUVECs, we could see the cholesterol induced DNA damage have been reduced. We have detected DNA damage by γH2AX foci formation in nuclear, γH2AX protein level and COMET assay. Compare to cholesterol alone group, siMCPIP group shows much less γH2AX foci formation in nuclear after cholesterol treatment, less γH2AX protein level in cell and also less tail moment detected in COMET assay. We have also seen that using siMCPIP1 could result in less reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell after cholesterol treatment. We have also seen that using siMCPIP could reduce the protein level of Nox4 and p47phox, two major regulators in ROS production. These results suggest that MCPIP1 may play an important role in cholesterol induced damage. PMID:26617772

  13. International radioactive material recycling challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Greeves, John T.; Lieberman, James

    2007-07-01

    The paper explores current examples of successful International radioactive recycling programs and also explores operational regulatory and political challenges that need to be considered for expanding international recycling world-wide. Most countries regulations are fully consistent with the International Atomic Agency (IAEA) Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material and the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. IAEA member States reported on the status of their efforts to control transboundary movement of radioactive material recently during the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management meeting in May 2006. (authors)

  14. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  15. Polymer recycling: opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R S

    1992-01-01

    The disposal of polymer solid waste by means other than landfilling is necessary. The various approaches-source reduction, incineration, degradation, composting, and recycling-all have their roles and must be employed in an integrated manner. Where appropriate, recycling has ecological advantages, but its application is dependent upon the feasibility of collection, sorting, and/or compatibilization of resulting mixtures to produce economically viable products. The practice should be encouraged by societal or legislative pressure which recognizes that the cost of disposal should be a factor in determining the cost of a product. PMID:11607263

  16. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  17. A Guide to Running a Recycling Project. [Includes Recycling Handbook].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Recycling Information and Organizing Network, Portland.

    This guide, designed for both students and adults, is intended for individuals who feel they might be interested in establishing a recycling depot. The guide includes such pertinent information as deciding how to set up a depot, markets and transportation, preparation of materials, where to place the depot and when to operate it, publicity and…

  18. The Recycling Solution: How I Increased Recycling on Dilworth Road

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, J. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The grandson of Fred Keller, one of the founders of behavior analysis, Jacob was 10 years old when he conducted the project for his elementary school science fair. We recently contacted Jacob to learn more about his project. He told us the inspiration came from a class field trip to the county recycling center, which included seeing video footage…

  19. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion. Functional relationship between the canalicular and sinusoidal cholesterol secretory pathways in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Marinović, I; Rigotti, A; Ulloa, N

    1988-01-01

    The functional interrelationship between biliary cholesterol secretion, sinusoidal lipoprotein cholesterol secretion and bile salt synthesis was studied in the rat. Diosgenin, fructose, and colestipol in the diet were used to, respectively, influence biliary cholesterol output, VLDL production and bile salt synthesis. In the acute bile fistula rat, biliary cholesterol output was 700% increased by diosgenin and 50% decreased by fructose. In the rats fed both diosgenin and fructose, biliary cholesterol secretion was increased only by approximately 200%, whereas biliary bile salts and phospholipid outputs were unchanged. In the isolated perfused liver, VLDL-cholesterol output was 50% reduced by diosgenin alone, but was unchanged following feeding of diosgenin plus fructose. However, the livers of rats fed diosgenin plus fructose exhibited a 700% increase in VLDL-triglyceride production and a 200% increase in VLDL-cholesterol output. A significant reciprocal relationship between VLDL-cholesterol secretion and the coupling ratio of cholesterol to bile salts in bile was observed. Colestipol added to the diet maintained both sinusoidal and biliary cholesterol outputs within the normal range. In the chronic bile fistula rat, colestipol increased bile salt synthesis by 100% while diosgenin and fructose diets had no effect. Similarly, the addition of fructose to the colestipol diet did not decrease bile salt synthesis. These data suggest a reciprocal relationship between biliary cholesterol secretion and hepatic secretion of cholesterol as VLDL particles. The free cholesterol pool used for bile salt synthesis seems functionally unrelated to the pool from which VLDL-cholesterol and biliary cholesterol originate. These findings support the idea that metabolic compartmentalization of hepatic cholesterol is a major determinant of the quantity of cholesterol available for recruitment by the bile salt-dependent biliary cholesterol secretory mechanism. PMID:3198756

  20. Initial steps of Shigella infection depend on the cholesterol/sphingolipid raft-mediated CD44-IpaB interaction.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Frank; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Hanada, Kentaro; Sansonetti, Philippe; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2002-09-01

    Shigellosis is an acute inflammatory bowel disease caused by the enteroinvasive bacterium SHIGELLA: Upon host cell-Shigella interaction, major host cell signalling responses are activated. Deciphering the initial molecular events is crucial to understanding the infectious process. We identified a molecular complex involving proteins of both the host, CD44 the hyaluronan receptor, and Shigella, the invasin IpaB, which partitions during infection within specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called rafts. We also document accumulation of cholesterol and raft-associated proteins at Shigella entry foci. Moreover, we report that Shigella entry is impaired after cholesterol depletion using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Finally, we find that Shigella is less invasive in sphingosid-based lipid-deficient cell lines, demonstrating the involvement of sphingolipids. Our results show that rafts are implicated in Shigella binding and entry, suggesting that raft-associated molecular machineries are engaged in mediating the cell signalling response required for the invasion process. PMID:12198147

  1. Ligand-dependent contribution of RXRβ to cholesterol homeostasis in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Mascrez, Bénédicte; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Chambon, Pierre; Auwerx, Johan; Mark, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    We show that mice expressing retinoid X receptor β (RXRβ) impaired in its transcriptional activation function AF-2 (Rxrbaf20 mutation) do not display the spermatid release defects observed in RXRβ-null mutants, indicating that the role of RXRβ in spermatid release is ligand-independent. In contrast, like RXRβ-null mutants, Rxrbaf20 mice accumulate cholesteryl esters in Sertoli cells (SCs) due to reduced ABCA1 transporter-mediated cholesterol efflux. We provide genetic and molecular evidence that cholesterol homeostasis in SCs does not require PPARα and β, but depends upon the TIF2 coactivator and RXRβ/LXRβ heterodimers, in which RXRβ AF-2 is transcriptionally active. Our results also indicate that RXRβ may be activated by a ligand distinct from 9-cis retinoic acid. PMID:14993927

  2. Garbanzo diet lowers cholesterol in hamsters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cholesterol-lowering potential of diets with 22% protein from Chickpea (Cicer arietinum, European variety of Garbanzo, Kabuli Chana), Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum, Asian variety of Garbanzo, Desi Chana, smaller in size, yellow to black color), lentils, soy protein isolate, hydrolyzed salmon protein...

  3. [Giant cholesterol cysts of the petrous apex].

    PubMed

    Pellet, W; Valenzuela, S; Malca, S; Cannoni, M; Perez-Castillo, A M

    1992-01-01

    In connection with their two own cases, the authors deal about the giant cholesterol cysts of the petrous apex. The lesions which are to be differentiated from epidermoid cysts are cholesterol granulomas. Their petrous apex location explains their characteristic large appearance. As each cholesterol granuloma, they occur when a bony cell is obstructed. This chronic obstruction induces mucosal edema then bleedings which lead to the formation and, by the lack of drainage, to the accumulation of cholesterol crystals. These crystals initiate a non specific reaction to foreign bodies, a granuloma, which also can bleed. Thus, a continuous cycle perpetuates the growth of the lesion. This lesion, when it is localized in the petrous apex, can reach a big size before the appearance of some signs. Usually, these are otologic (sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo) and/or cranial nerve palsies (V, VI, VII). C.T. scan (well defined, sharply marginated bony expansible lesion with isodense to the brain central part) and M.R.I. (central region of increased intensity on both T1 and T2 weighted images and peripheral rim of markedly decreased signal intensity in all instances) features are characteristic enough to allow diagnose with other petrous apex lesions (cholesteatoma, mucocele, epithelial cyst, histiocytosis X, ...). Surgical treatment must try to evacuate and to aerate the cavity or perhaps to obliterate it with fatty pieces in order to prevent the recurrence. PMID:1299772

  4. The Success Story of LDL Cholesterol Lowering.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Terje R

    2016-02-19

    We can look back at >100 years of cholesterol research that has brought medicine to a stage where people at risk of severe or fatal coronary heart disease have a much better prognosis than before. This progress has not come about without resistance. Perhaps one of the most debated topics in medicine, the cholesterol controversy, could only be brought to rest through the development of new clinical research methods that were capable of taking advantage of the amazing achievements in basic and pharmacological science after the second World War. It was only after understanding the biochemistry and physiology of cholesterol synthesis, transport and clearance from the blood that medicine could take advantage of drugs and diets to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic diseases. This review points to the highlights of the history of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol lowering, with the discovery of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and its physiology and not only the development of statins as the stellar moments but also the development of clinical trial methodology as an effective tool to provide scientifically convincing evidence. PMID:26892969

  5. Cholesterol - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Cholesterol Colesterol - português (Portuguese) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

  6. Intracranial cholesterol granuloma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Emanuele; Abbiati, Gianluca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    A case of intracranial cholesterol granuloma is described in a 4-year-old neutered European male cat presented with a 5-month history of progressive weakness, ataxia and depression. On clinical evaluation, haematological and biochemical profiles revealed only mild hypercholesterolemia and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large space-occupying extra-axial mass in the area of the falx, not homogeneous after contrast enhancement. At post-mortem examination, an orange-yellowish mass of 22 mm in diameter extended from the right frontal lobe to the temporo-parietal region, causing atrophy of the prosencephalic region of the brain. The site of origin of the mass was within the subarachnoid space of the supracallosum sulcus of the right cerebral hemisphere. Histological examination of the lesion revealed abundant deposits of cholesterol clefts, surrounded by clusters of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Neither inflammatory lesions, nor cholesterol deposits were detected in other areas of the brain and in other organs. On the basis of the histological examination, a diagnosis of intracranial cholesterol granuloma was made. PMID:20543528

  7. Retinal cholesterol emboli during diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Blanco, V R; Morís, C; Barriales, V; González, C

    2000-11-01

    Retinal embolism is a highly infrequent complication of cardiac catheterization of thrombotic, lipidic, and calcific etiology. We provide the first reported clinical case of retinal embolism caused by cholesterol crystal without systemic adverse effects as a severe complication of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Cathet. Cardiovasc. Intervent. 51:323-325, 2000. PMID:11066118

  8. Molecularly "wired" cholesterol oxidase for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Leonida, Mihaela D; Aurian-Blajeni, Benedict

    2015-02-01

    The influence of several factors on the activity of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) transiently exposed to a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was studied. Presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, prosthetic group of ChOx) during exposure to RTIL makes the procedure enzyme-friendly, while the use of RTIL (green reagent) makes it environmentally-friendly. Following exposure to RTIL and its subsequent removal, FAD becomes part of the molecular structure of the refolded protein (a molecular "wire"). This makes the procedure used here a molecular one. The factors studied were: FAD presence in RTIL during modification, water presence during exposure to RTIL, and ratio FAD:RTIL during "wiring". Performance parameters monitored were: enzyme activity before and after "wiring" (expressed as (dA/dt)/mg enzyme, and measured spectrophotometrically), peak current in an amperometric biosensor for cholesterol detection, and linearity of the biosensor response depending on cholesterol concentration. After RTIL removal, the modified enzyme (ME) retained a high percentage of the added FAD, which supplemented that of the native enzyme (functioning as a "wire" and enhancing electron transfer kinetics), and a fraction of the initial activity. Used in an amperometric biosensor, ME showed catalytic activity, linear behavior as a function of cholesterol concentration, and stability. PMID:25579496

  9. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen; Grot, Walther

    2007-08-14

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  10. Food Service Recycling: Whose Responsibility Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settanni, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    The food service department at a Pennsylvania school district recycles polystyrene "styrofoam" cups, plates, and food trays. In addition, the department recycles glass, aluminum, and paper. Offers advice on how to set up a school program. (MLF)

  11. Household-battery recycling plant

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.; Antenen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Batrec operates a plant for the recycling of used dry batteries with a capacity of 3,000 tons per year. The plant is situated in a tourist area of Switzerland and has complied with all the strict emission restrictions. The process yields four products: FeMn, Zn, Hg and slag. No hazardous waste is produced. All types of batteries can be treated.

  12. Recycling, Thermodynamics and Environmental Thrift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, R. Stephen

    1972-01-01

    Compares the cost, in terms of thermodynamic potential, of manufacturing automobiles from raw mineral resources or from recycled vehicles, and of the production of extended-life products. Uses this as an example for arguing that new technologies, with efficiencies closer to the theoretical themodynamic minima, are needed if a society is to…

  13. Recycling: Activities for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Mary Lynne, Comp.; Coon, Herbert L., Comp.

    This publication provides 80 classroom activities for the teacher. These activities are designed for elementary through high school students and are action-oriented for participation in the school community. Each activity is classified according to appropriate grade level, subject matter, and recycling concept involved. In addition, each activity…

  14. Chemical recycling of scrap composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Salas, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    There are no well-developed technologies for recycling composite materials other than grinding to produce fillers. New approaches are needed to reclaim these valuable resources. Chemical or tertiary recycling, conversion of polymers into low molecular weight hydrocarbons for reuse as chemicals or fuels, is emerging as the most practical means for obtaining value from waste plastics and composites. Adherent Technologies is exploring a low-temperature catalytic process for recycling plastics and composites. Laboratory results show that all types of plastics, thermosets as well as thermoplastics, can be converted in high yields to valuable hydrocarbon products. This novel catalytic process runs at 200 C, conversion times are rapid, the process is closed and, thus, nonpolluting, and no highly toxic gas or liquid products have been observed so no negative environmental impact will result from its implementation. Tests on reclamation of composite materials show that epoxy, imide, and engineering thermoplastic matrices can be converted to low molecular weight hydrocarbons leaving behind the reinforcing fibers for reuse as composite reinforcements in secondary, lower-performance applications. Chemical recycling is also a means to dispose of sensitive or classified organic materials without incineration and provides a means to eliminate or reduce mixed hazardous wastes containing organic materials.

  15. Status of the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The author presents the current operational status of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. Using a mix of stochastic and electron cooling, we prepare antiproton beams for the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program. Included are discussion of stashing and cooling performance, operational scenarios, and collider performance.

  16. NATURAL SURFACTANTS IN PAPER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to introduce new types of surfactants based on renewable materials (sugar surfactants) for use in ink removal from recycled paper. By applying green chemistry approaches we not only will solve an important industry and environmental problem but...

  17. Recycling steel from grinding swarf

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Matthews, M.A.; Warner, L.S.

    1998-12-31

    Two cleaning processes have been investigated for removing contaminants (cutting oil with phosphorus ester) from high speed steel (HSS) griding swarf. One process uses an aqueous surfactant washing technique, and the second process uses supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) extraction. Both technical and preliminary financial analysis are performed to have a better evaluation of these two competing cleaning technologies. Bench scale aqueous washings have shown that the required phosphorus removal is easily obtained, but a sufficient oil removal is more difficult. The experimental results also indicate a strong dependence of the aqueous washing efficiency on the choice of a suitable surfactant. SCCO{sub 2} extraction at 80 C and 340 atm shows that approximately 80% of the oil can be removed from swarf during a 60-minute process to produce a batch of recyclable steel, and that the phosphorus removal also reaches the required level. The cost of processing swarf using either aqueous surfactant washing or SCCO{sub 2} extraction in a 3,000,000 lbs per year plant is analyzed and the market forces impacting the feasibility of recycling on a commercial basis are reviewed. Commercial scale recycling is, in part, dependent upon resolution of regulatory uncertainty on the definition of swarf. States regulating swarf as hazardous provide a significant financial incentive to recycle. In states that regulate swarf as a solid waste, low disposal costs provide a disincentive that must be balanced with the possible hidden, future liabilities of landfill disposal.

  18. Recycled Water Poses Disinfectant Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the possible health hazards resulting from released nucleic acid of inactivated viruses, chlorinated nonliving organic molecules, and overestimated reliability of waste treatment standards. Suggests the recycle system use a dual disinfectant such as chlorine and ozone in water treatment. (CC)

  19. How to Succeed in Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Mark

    1973-01-01

    A detailed manual for the establishment and maintenance of a recycling center. Presented in steps, it covers the following: Start Up; Operation (glass, paper, aluminum cans, etc., troubles and recommendations); and Key Addresses of organizations able to supply helpful information. (LK)

  20. Poor Sleep May Not Add to Cholesterol Problems, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157561.html Poor Sleep May Not Add to Cholesterol Problems, Study Finds ... disease risk factors such as high cholesterol, because sleep apnea -- another type of sleep disorder -- has been ...

  1. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... you do? Always ask your provider what your cholesterol numbers are and write them down. Discuss these ... provider may prescribe medicine to help lower your cholesterol. y y Take your medicine every day, or ...

  2. Weight Loss Surgery May Boost Good Cholesterol in Obese Boys

    MedlinePlus

    ... or federal policy. More Health News on: Cholesterol Obesity in Children Weight Loss Surgery Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cholesterol Obesity in Children Weight Loss Surgery About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

  3. Proceedings of the waste recycling workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.E.; Thomas, A.F.; Ries, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recorded are seventeen talks from five sessions at the workshop. FERMCO`s recycling program, state of the art recycling technology, and an integrated demonstration of deactivation, decommissioning and decommissioning are presented in the plenary session. In the concrete session, decontamination and recycling are discussed. In the transite session, regulations are considered along with recycling and decontamination. In the metals session, radioactive scrap metals are emphasized. And in the regulatory considerations and liabilities session, DOE and EPA viewpoints are discussed. (GHH)

  4. Role of Cholesterol Pathways in Norovirus Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2009-01-01

    Norwalk virus (NV) is a prototype strain of the noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) that have emerged as major causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. I have developed NV replicon systems using reporter proteins such as a neomycin-resistant protein (NV replicon-bearing cells) and a green fluorescent protein (pNV-GFP) and demonstrated that these systems were excellent tools to study virus replication in cell culture. In the present study, I first performed DNA microarray analysis of the replicon-bearing cells to identify cellular factors associated with NV replication. The analysis demonstrated that genes in lipid (cholesterol) or carbohydrate metabolic pathways were significantly (P < 0.001) changed by the gene ontology analysis. Among genes in the cholesterol pathways, I found that mRNA levels of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, squalene epoxidase, and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), ACAT2, small heterodimer partner, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related proteins were significantly changed in the cells. I also found that the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis using statins (an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) significantly increased the levels of NV proteins and RNA, whereas inhibitors of ACAT significantly reduced the replication of NV in replicon-bearing cells. Up- or downregulation of virus replication with these agents significantly correlated with the mRNA level of LDLR in replicon-bearing cells. Finally, I found that the expression of LDLR promoted NV replication in trans by transfection study with pNV-GFP. I conclude that the cholesterol pathways such as LDLR expression and ACAT activity may be crucial in the replication of noroviruses in cells, which may provide potential therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:19515767

  5. Fluorimetric determination of cholesterol in hypercholesterolemia serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xiufeng; Liu, Jiangang; Liu, Ying; Luo, Xiaosen; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    With the increase of people"s living standard and the changes of living form, the number of people who suffer from hypercholesterolemia is increasing. It is not only harmful to heart and blood vessel, but also leading to obstruction of cognition. The conventional blood detection technology has weakness such as complex operation, long detecting period, and bad visibility. In order to develop a new detection method that can checkout hypercholesterolemia conveniently, spectroscopy of cholesterol in hypercholesterolemia serum is obtained by the multifunctional grating spectrograph. The experiment results indicate that, under the excitation of light-emitting diode (LED) with the wavelength at 407 nm, the serum from normal human and the hypercholesterolemia serum emit different fluorescence spectra. The former can emit one fluorescence region with the peak locating at 516 nm while the latter can emit two more regions with peaks locating at 560 nm and 588 nm. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity of serum is non-linear increasing with the concentration of cholesterol increases when the concentration of cholesterol is lower than 13.8 mmol/L, and then, with the concentration of cholesterol increase, the fluorescence intensity decreases. However, the fluorescence intensity is still much higher than that of serum from normal human. Conclusions can be educed from the experiments: the intensity and the shape of fluorescence spectra of hypercholesterolemia serum are different of those of normal serum, from which the cholesterol abnormal in blood can be judged. The consequences in this paper may offer an experimental reference for the diagnosis of the hypercholesterolemia.

  6. Recycling at Penn State's Beaver Stadium. "Recycle on the Go" Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2009

    2009-01-01

    With a 13-year-old recycling program, The Pennsylvania State University's (Penn State) Beaver Stadium in the past diverted nearly 30 tons of recyclables per year from local landfills. A new initiative to promote recycling in the stadium's tailgating area has helped Penn State more than triple its old recycling record, collecting 112 tons in 2008.…

  7. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  8. Recycled Office Paper: Why It Costs More.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usherson, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Discusses obstacles to making recycled office paper cheaper. Explains how the economics of recycled office paper discourages recycling by commodity mills. Includes discussion of integrated and nonintegrated mills, commodity and specialty mills, specialty printing and writing mills, postconsumer material, supply and demand, and economic…

  9. Recycling Technology: Can It Be Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clum, James A.; Loper, Carl R., Jr.

    This paper describes the content of a seminar-type engineering course dealing with materials reutilization (recycling). The course, consisting of lecture and discussion by various faculty and outside experts as well as student presentations of research papers on recycling topics, is intended to investigate current areas in which recycling of…

  10. Fermilab Recycler Stochastic Cooling for Luminosity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmelsiek, D.; Gattuso, C.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Recycler began regularly delivering antiprotons for Tevatron luminosity operations in 2005. Methods for tuning the Recycler stochastic cooling system are presented. The unique conditions and resulting procedures for minimizing the longitudinal phase space density of the Recycler antiproton beam are outlined.

  11. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

  12. Communication and Recycling in Park Campgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Sam H.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the Canby Washington State Park campground recycling program by determining whether campers (N=147) read and followed the provided instructions when disposing of garbage, understood the sorting and disposal instructions, and arrived at the park equipped with receptacles for recyclables and non-recyclables.…

  13. School Recycling Programs: A Handbook for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brochure describes some of the many recycling program options that schools can implement in their communities. It focuses on implementing actual recycling projects as a way of teaching the importance and benefits of recycling. The text examines the solid waste crisis and why Americans cannot continue to possess a disposable mentality. It…

  14. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  15. Polymer sorbent with the properties of an artificial cholesterol receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, I. V.; Ezhova, N. M.; Osipenko, A. A.; Pisarev, O. A.

    2015-02-01

    A cholesterol-imprinted polymer sorbent and the corresponding reticular control copolymer were synthesized from hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. The sorption isotherms of cholesterol were analyzed using the generalized Langmuir and Freundlich equations. In the case of the imprinted reticular polymer, cholesterol sorption occurred on the energetically homogeneous binding centers, forming one monolayer, while the nonspecific sorption of cholesterol on the control copolymer occurred with energetically nonhomogeneous binding of the sorbate and depended on the physicochemical conditions of sorption.

  16. Acute increase of α-synuclein inhibits synaptic vesicle recycling evoked during intense stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Oliphint, Paul A.; Walsh, Rylie B.; Banks, Susan M. L.; Woods, Wendy S.; George, Julia M.; Morgan, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with multiplication of the α-synuclein gene and abnormal accumulation of the protein. In animal models, α-synuclein overexpression broadly impairs synaptic vesicle trafficking. However, the exact steps of the vesicle trafficking pathway affected by excess α-synuclein and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore we acutely increased synuclein levels at a vertebrate synapse and performed a detailed ultrastructural analysis of the effects on presynaptic membranes. At stimulated synapses (20 Hz), excess synuclein caused a loss of synaptic vesicles and an expansion of the plasma membrane, indicating an impairment of vesicle recycling. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of synuclein, which folds into an α-helix, was sufficient to reproduce these effects. In contrast, α-synuclein mutants with a disrupted N-terminal α-helix (T6K and A30P) had little effect under identical conditions. Further supporting this model, another α-synuclein mutant (A53T) with a properly folded NTD phenocopied the synaptic vesicle recycling defects observed with wild type. Interestingly, the vesicle recycling defects were not observed when the stimulation frequency was reduced (5 Hz). Thus excess α-synuclein impairs synaptic vesicle recycling evoked during intense stimulation via a mechanism that requires a properly folded N-terminal α-helix. PMID:25273557

  17. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  18. Synthesis of a Smoothened Cholesterol: 18,19-Di-nor-cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the first synthesis of a demethylated form of cholesterol (18,19-di-nor-cholesterol), in which the C18 and C19 methyl groups of the β-face were eliminated. Recent molecular simulations modeling 18,19-di-nor-cholesterol have suggested that cholesterol’s opposing rough β-face and smooth α-face play necessary roles in cholesterol’s membrane condensing abilities and, additionally, that specific facial preferences are displayed as cholesterol interacts with different neighboring lipids and transmembrane proteins. Inspired by these poorly characterized biochemical interactions, an extensive 18-step synthesis was completed as part of a collaborative effort, wherein synthesizing a “smoothened” cholesterol analogue would provide a direct way to experimentally measure the significance of the β-face methyl groups. Starting from known perhydrochrysenone A, the synthesis of 18,19-di-nor-cholesterol was accomplished with an excellent overall yield of 3.5%. The use of the highly stereoselective Dieckmann condensation and the employment of Evans’ chiral auxiliary were both key to ensuring the success of this synthesis. PMID:24823889

  19. Synthetic LXR agonist suppresses endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis and efficiently lowers plasma cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Thomas; Buchebner, Marlene; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay; Kratzer, Adelheid; Obrowsky, Sascha; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kadam, Rajendra S; Kompella, Uday B; Kostner, Gerhard M; Kratky, Dagmar; Levak-Frank, Sanja

    2011-02-01

    The liver X receptors (LXRs) are key regulators of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Natural ligands and activators of LXRs are oxysterols. Numerous steroidal and non-steroidal synthetic LXR ligands are under development as potential drugs for individuals suffering from lipid disorders. N,N-dimethyl-3β-hydroxycholenamide (DMHCA) is a steroidal ligand of LXRs that exerts anti-atherogenic effects in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice without causing negative side effects such as liver steatosis or hypertriglyceridemia. In this report, we investigated the consequences of DMHCA treatment on cholesterol homeostasis in vivo and in vitro. Despite its hydrophobicity, DMHCA is readily absorbed by C57BL/6 mice and taken up by intestinal cells, the lung, heart and kidneys, but is undetectable in the brain. DMHCA significantly reduces cholesterol absorption and uptake in duodenum and jejunum of the small intestine and in turn leads to a reduction of plasma cholesterol by 24%. The most striking finding of this study is that DMHCA inhibited the enzyme 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ24-reductase resulting in an accumulation of desmosterol in the plasma and in feces. Thus, the reduction of plasma cholesterol was due to a block in the final step of cholesterol biosynthesis. Taken together, DMHCA is an interesting compound with properties distinct from other LXR ligands and might be used to study desmosterol-mediated effects in cells and tissues. PMID:21190543

  20. The Liver-Selective Thyromimetic T-0681 Influences Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Atherosclerosis Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Philipp; Duwensee, Kristina; Hoefer, Julia; Heim, Christiane; Stanzl, Ursula; Wehinger, Andreas; Auer, Kristina; Karer, Regina; Huber, Julia; Schgoer, Wilfried; Van Eck, Miranda; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Fievet, Catherine; Stellaard, Frans; Rudling, Mats; Patsch, Josef R.; Ritsch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver-selective thyromimetics have been reported to efficiently reduce plasma cholesterol through the hepatic induction of both, the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor; the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Here, we investigated the effect of the thyromimetic T-0681 on reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and atherosclerosis, and studied the underlying mechanisms using different mouse models, including mice lacking LDLr, SR-BI, and apoE, as well as CETP transgenic mice. Methodology/Principal Findings T-0681 treatment promoted bile acid production and biliary sterol secretion consistently in the majority of the studied mouse models, which was associated with a marked reduction of plasma cholesterol. Using an assay of macrophage RCT in mice, we found T-0681 to significantly increase fecal excretion of macrophage-derived neutral and acidic sterols. No positive effect on RCT was found in CETP transgenic mice, most likely due to the observed decrease in plasma CETP mass. Studies in SR-BI KO and LDLr KO mice suggested hepatic LDLr to be necessary for the action of T-0681 on lipid metabolism, as the compound did not have any influence on plasma cholesterol levels in mice lacking this receptor. Finally, prolonged treatment with T-0681 reduced the development of atherosclerosis by 60% in apoE KOs on Western type diet. In contrast, at an earlier time-point T-0681 slightly increased small fatty streak lesions, in part due to an impaired macrophage cholesterol efflux capacity, when compared to controls. Conclusions/Significance The present results show that liver-selective thyromimetics can promote RCT and that such compounds may protect from atherosclerosis partly through induction of bile acid metabolism and biliary sterol secretion. On-going clinical trials will show whether selective thyromimetics do prevent atherosclerosis also in humans. PMID:20090943

  1. Adrenal steroidogenesis disruption caused by HDL/cholesterol suppression in diethylstilbestrol-treated adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Haeno, Satoko; Maeda, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Kousuke; Sato, Michiko; Uto, Aika; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol is used to prevent miscarriages and as a therapeutic treatment for prostate cancer, but it has been reported to have adverse effects on endocrine homeostasis. However, the toxicity mechanism is poorly understood. Recently, we reported that diethylstilbestrol impairs adrenal steroidogenesis via cholesterol insufficiency in adult male rats. In the present study, we found that the adrenal cholesterol level was significantly reduced without of the decrease in other precursors in the adrenal steroidogenesis 24 h after a single dose of diethylstilbestrol (0.33 μg/g body mass). The serum HDL/cholesterol level was also reduced only 12 h after the diethylstilbestrol exposure. The level of Apo E, which is indispensable for HDL/cholesterol maturation, was decreased in both the HDL and VLDL/LDL fractions, whereas the level of Apo A1, which is an essential constituent of HDL, was not altered in the HDL fraction. Because the liver is a major source of Apo E and Apo A1, the secretion rates of these proteins were examined using a liver perfusion experiment. The secretion rate of Apo A1 from the liver was consistent between DES-treated and control rats, but that of Apo E was comparatively suppressed in the DES-treated rats. The disruption of adrenal steroidogenesis by diethylstilbestrol was caused by a decrease in serum HDL/cholesterol, which is the main source of adrenal steroidogenesis, due to the inhibition of Apo E secretion from the liver. PMID:26349937

  2. Molecular events linking cholesterol to Alzheimer's disease and inclusion body myositis in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing Yan; Koukiekolo, Roger; Zhang, Dong Ling; Smith, Brandon; Ly, Dao; Lei, Joy X; Ghribi, Othman

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by cognitive impairment and dementia, resulting from progressive synaptic dysfunction, loss and neuronal cell death. Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is a skeletal muscle degenerative disease, displaying progressive proximal and distal muscle weakness, in association with muscle fiber atrophy, degeneration and death. Studies have shown that the late onset version of AD (LOAD) and sporadic IBM (sIBM) in muscle share many pathological features, including the presence of extracellular plaques of β-amyloid peptides and intracellular tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. High blood cholesterol is suggested to be a risk factor for LOAD. Many neuropathological changes of LOAD can be reproduced by feeding rabbits a 2% enriched cholesterol diet for 12 weeks. The cholesterol fed rabbit model also simultaneously develops sIBM like pathology, which makes it an ideal model to study the molecular mechanisms common to the development of both diseases. In the present study, we determined the changes of gene expression in rabbit brain and muscle during the progression of LOAD and sIBM pathology using a custom rabbit nucleotide microarray, followed by qRT-PCR analyses. Out of 869 unique transcripts screened, 47 genes showed differential expression between the control and the cholesterol-treated group during the 12 week period and 19 changed transcripts appeared to be common to LOAD and sIBM. The most notable changes are the upregulation of the hemoglobin gene family and the downregulation of the genes required for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in both brain and muscle tissues throughout the time course. The significant overlap on the changes of gene expression in the brain and muscle of rabbits fed with cholesterol-enriched diet supports the notion that LOAD and sIBM may share a common etiology. PMID:27073745

  3. Effect of certain toxicants on gonadotropin-induced ovarian non-esterified cholesterol depletion and steroidogenic enzyme stimulation of the common carp Cyprinus carpio in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, D.; Guha, D.; Kumar, V. )

    1992-06-01

    Isolated ovarian tissues from the common carp, Cyprinus carpio were incubated in vitro to obtain a discrete effect of four common toxicants of industrial origin, namely phenol, sulfide, mercuric chloride and cadmium chloride, on gonadotropin-induced alteration of nonesterified and esterified cholesterol and steroidogenic enzymes, delta 5-3 beta-HSD and 17 beta-HSD activity. Stage II ovarian tissue containing 30-40% mature oocytes were shown to be most responsive to gonadotropins in depleting only nonesterified cholesterol moiety and stimulating the activity of both. Safe doses of above mentioned toxicants when added separately to stage II ovarian tissue with oLH (1 microgram/incubation) gonadotropin-induced depletion of nonesterified cholesterol and gonadotropin-induced stimulation of the activity of both enzymes was significantly inhibited. Esterified cholesterol remained almost unaltered. Findings clearly indicate the impairment of gonadotropin induced fish ovarian steroidogenesis by the four toxicants separately.

  4. On the puzzling distribution of cholesterol in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Giang, H; Schick, M

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of cholesterol between the two leaves of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells presents a conundrum; given cholesterol's known affinity for sphingomyelin, which resides predominantly in the exoplasmic leaf, why is it that experiment finds a majority of the cholesterol in the cytoplasmic leaf? This article reviews a recently proposed solution to this puzzle. PMID:26724709

  5. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  6. Carbon Inverse Opal Rods for Nonenzymatic Cholesterol Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qifeng; Xie, Zhuoying; Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Yang, Zixue; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-18

    Carbon inverse opal rods made from silica photonic crystal rods are used for nonenzymatic cholesterol sensing. The characteristic reflection peak originating from the physical periodic structure works as sensing signals for quantitatively estimating cholesterol concentrations. Carbon inverse opal rods work both in cholesterol standard solutions and human serum. They are suitable for practical use in clinical diagnose. PMID:26415111

  7. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Increases the Availability of Cholesterol in Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-02-01

    Side-chain oxysterols are enzymatically generated oxidation products of cholesterol that serve a central role in mediating cholesterol homeostasis. Recent work has shown that side-chain oxysterols, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), alter membrane structure in very different ways from cholesterol, suggesting a possible mechanism for how these oxysterols regulate cholesterol homeostasis. Here we extend our previous work, using molecular dynamics simulations of 25-HC and cholesterol mixtures in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers to examine interactions between 25-HC and cholesterol in the same bilayer. When added to cholesterol-containing membranes, 25-HC causes larger changes in membrane structure than when added to cholesterol-free membranes, demonstrating interactions between the two sterols. We also find that the presence of 25-HC changes the position, orientation, and solvent accessibility of cholesterol, shifting it into the water interface and therefore its availability to external acceptors. This is consistent with experimental results showing that oxysterols can trigger cholesterol trafficking from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum. These interactions provide a potential mechanism for 25-HC-mediated regulation of cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis through direct modulation of cholesterol availability.

  8. Effect of melatonin on cholesterol absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saad Abdul-Rehman

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of melatonin on cholesterol absorption in rats fed on high cholesterol diet (HCD). HCD induced a remarkable increase in hepatic and plasma total cholesterol, plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, a decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and an elevation in triacylglyceride (TG) levels in plasma and in the liver. Melatonin suspension (10 mg/kg), specially prepared for this purpose, cholestyramine (230 mg/kg) and ezetimibe (145 microg/kg) were administered orally to the rats fed HCD for 30 days. Melatonin significantly reduced cholesterol absorption in rats fed on HCD and caused significant decreases in total cholesterol, TG, VLDL- and LDL-cholesterol in the plasma and contents of cholesterol and TG in the liver. The level of HDL cholesterol was significantly increased after melatonin. These results suggested that inhibition of cholesterol absorption caused by melatonin could be a mechanism contributing to the positive changes in plasma cholesterol, lipoprotein profile and the lipid contents in the liver. PMID:17349025

  9. Hypercholesterolemia: The Role of Schools in Cholesterol Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Casler, Suzanne M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors among children and adolescents, the pros and cons of cholesterol screening among youth, cholesterol assessments of at-risk youth, and the role of schools in cholesterol education and screening (focusing on comprehensive school health education and services). (SM)

  10. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  11. Materials Recycling: The Virtue of Necessity. Worldwatch Paper 56.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, William U.

    This report focuses on the necessity and advantages of recycling. Following an introduction, the report is divided into five sections, addressing respectively: the necessity of recycling; waste paper recycling; aluminum recycling; iron and steel recycling; and three steps to a "recycling society." These steps include: (1) requiring that consumers…

  12. ABCG1 regulates mouse adipose tissue macrophage cholesterol levels and ratio of M1 to M2 cells in obesity and caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hao; Tarling, Elizabeth J; McMillen, Timothy S; Tang, Chongren; LeBoeuf, Renée C

    2015-12-01

    In addition to triacylglycerols, adipocytes contain a large reserve of unesterified cholesterol. During adipocyte lipolysis and cell death seen during severe obesity and weight loss, free fatty acids and cholesterol become available for uptake and processing by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). We hypothesize that ATMs become cholesterol enriched and participate in cholesterol clearance from adipose tissue. We previously showed that ABCG1 is robustly upregulated in ATMs taken from obese mice and further enhanced by caloric restriction. Here, we found that ATMs taken from obese and calorie-restricted mice derived from transplantation of WT or Abcg1-deficient bone marrow are cholesterol enriched. ABCG1 levels regulate the ratio of classically activated (M1) to alternatively activated (M2) ATMs and their cellular cholesterol content. Using WT and Abcg1(-/-) cultured macrophages, we found that Abcg1 is most highly expressed by M2 macrophages and that ABCG1 deficiency is sufficient to retard macrophage chemotaxis. However, changes in myeloid expression of Abcg1 did not protect mice from obesity or impaired glucose homeostasis. Overall, ABCG1 modulates ATM cholesterol content in obesity and weight loss regimes leading to an alteration in M1 to M2 ratio that we suggest is due to the extent of macrophage egress from adipose tissue. PMID:26489644

  13. Understanding Cholesterol and Heart Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholesterol throughout the body: Low-density lipoproteins (LDL): LDL cholesterol sometimes is called "bad" cholesterol. A high LDL ... or even death. The higher the level of LDL cholesterol in your blood, the GREATER your chance is ...

  14. Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol Cholesterol Levels: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents Measuring Cholesterol Levels Learn more at MedlinePlus: https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterol. ...

  15. Dairy shed effluent treatment and recycling: Effluent characteristics and performance.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Julian; Hagare, Dharma; Sivakumar, Muttucumaru

    2016-09-15

    Dairy farm milking operations produce considerable amounts of carbon- and nutrient-rich effluent that can be a vital source of nutrients for pasture and crops. The study aim was to characterise dairy shed effluent from a commercial farm and examine the changes produced by treatment, storage and recycling of the effluent through a two-stage stabilisation pond system. The data and insights from the study are broadly applicable to passive pond systems servicing intensive dairy and other livestock operations. Raw effluent contained mostly poorly biodegradable particulate organic material and organically bound nutrients, as well as a large fraction of fixed solids due to effluent recycling. The anaerobic pond provided effective sedimentation and biological treatment, but hydrolysis of organic material occurred predominantly in the sludge and continually added to effluent soluble COD, nutrients and cations. Sludge digestion also suppressed pH in the pond and increased salt levels through formation of alkalinity. High sludge levels significantly impaired pond treatment performance. In the facultative pond, BOD5 concentrations were halved; however smaller reductions in COD showed the refractory nature of incoming organic material. Reductions in soluble N and P were proportional to reductions in respective particulate forms, suggesting that respective removal mechanisms were not independent. Conditions in the ponds were unlikely to support biological nutrient removal. Recycling caused conservative inert constituents to accumulate within the pond system. Material leaving the system was mostly soluble (86% TS) and inert (65% TS), but salt concentrations remained below thresholds for safe land application. PMID:27213866

  16. Effect of plant sterol-enriched diets on plasma and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhao, H L; Thiessen, S; House, J D; Jones, P J H

    2010-02-01

    Egg exists as a major dietary source of cholesterol in Western diets. In North America, laying hen diets are usually devoid of cholesterol when diets are formulated to exclude animal-based products. Hence, laying hens meet their physiological cholesterol requirement through de novo synthesis. Plant sterols exert a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans by interfering with intestinal sterol absorption. However, it is unknown whether plant sterol supplementation could be effective in reducing intestinal reabsorption of biliary cholesterol in laying hens, thus modulating whole body cholesterol in favor of lower plasma and yolk cholesterol content. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of diets enriched with 0, 0.5, 1, and 2% plant sterols on cholesterol absorption, synthesis, as well as plasma, liver, and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations in laying hens. After 8 wk of plant sterol intervention (first 2 wk were acclimatization), feed intake, BW, egg weight, egg yolk weight, egg production, Haugh units, liver mass, plasma, and hepatic cholesterol concentrations did not differ as a function of plant sterol supplementation. Egg cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) fluctuated during the 6-wk experimental period. At wk 6, a minor reduction in egg yolk cholesterol concentration (mg per g of yolk, P<0.05, vs. control) was observed in hens fed 1 and 2% cholesterol-enriched diets, respectively. However, such result failed to affect total egg cholesterol content. No statistical difference was observed across treatments over 6 wk. Neither cholesterol absorption rates nor synthesis differed as a function of treatment. Results suggested that overall cholesterol content in egg yolk was not affected by feeding hens plant sterol-enriched diets over 6 wk. PMID:20075279

  17. Recycling Trends in the Plastics Manufacturing and Recycling Companies in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, D. A.; Abidin, A.; Azhari, C. H.

    This study presents the findings from a study on the consumption of recycled materials and recycling practices in the plastics manufacturing industry and recycling companies in Malaysia. The findings were obtained from a survey conducted in twenty plastic manufacturing companies and detailed case studies in three recycling companies. The survey conducted in the plastic manufacturing companies` shows that the consumption rate for poly-olefins (PP and PE) is the highest among the resin types and the industrial sector that consumes the most plastic materials is the electrical and electronics sector. The consumption of recycled materials is high among the local manufacturing companies (80%) which are largely due to cost savings; about 20% of these companies conducted in-house recycling. The study has also shown that the medium scale industry consumes the most recycled materials as compared to the large and small scale industry. The rate of disposal for plastic materials in the local industry is approximately 5%. The detailed case studies conducted in the recycling companies have successfully identified the main processes involved in plastic recycling namely manual sorting, cleaning, drying, meshing/pelletising and packaging. These recycling companies obtained recycled materials from various sources including industrial scrap, dumping sites, local producers as well as imported sources. Pricing of recycled materials were based on classification according to grade and quality of the recycled materials. The study has reflected the extent of in-house recycling trends in the local plastic manufacturing companies and their dependency on the supply from the local recycling companies.

  18. Geranylgeraniol prevents the cytotoxic effects of mevastatin in THP-1 cells, without decreasing the beneficial effects on cholesterol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Campia, I; Lussiana, C; Pescarmona, G; Ghigo, D; Bosia, A; Riganti, C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Statins, inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, reduce the intracellular synthesis of cholesterol and prevent the onset of atherosclerosis. They also decrease the synthesis of isoprenoid molecules, such as the side chain of ubiquinone and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. As a consequence, statins impair mitochondrial metabolism and the activation of small monomeric GTPases (such as Rho and Ras), causing toxic effects. To date, a successful strategy to prevent statin toxicity is lacking. Experimental approach: In human monocytic THP-1 cells, we measured the synthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, mitochondrial electron flow, the activity of RhoA and Rac, cell death and proliferation. Key results: Mevastatin reduced the synthesis of cholesterol, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate and ubiquinone, mitochondrial electron transport, activity of RhoA and Rac, and cell proliferation, accompanied by increased cell death. Geranylgeraniol, a cell-permeable analogue of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, reversed all these effects of mevastatin, without affecting its ability to reduce cholesterol synthesis. Notably, geranylgeraniol was more effective than the addition of exogenous ubiquinone, which rescued mitochondrial respiratory activity and reversed mevastatin cytotoxicity, but did not alter the decrease in cell proliferation. The same results were obtained in human liver HepG2 cells. Conclusions and implications: Geranylgeraniol had a broader protective effect against the cytotoxicity of statins than exogenous ubiquinone. Therefore, geranylgeraniol may be a more useful and practical means of limiting the toxicities of statins, without reducing their efficacy as cholesterol lowering agents. PMID:19888963

  19. Maternal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure deregulates blood pressure, adiposity, cholesterol metabolism and social interaction in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-I; Chiang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Hui-Ching; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Li, Cheng-Ta; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-05-01

    Long-term exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is highly associated with carcinogenicity, fetotoxicity, psychological disorders and metabolic diseases, but the detrimental effects and mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the effect of exposing mouse mothers to DEHP, and the underlying mechanism, on blood pressure, obesity and cholesterol metabolism as well as psychological and learning behaviors in offspring. Tail-cuff plethysmography was used for blood pressure measurement; Western blot used was for phosphorylation and expression of protein; hematoxylin and eosin staining, Nissl staining and Golgi staining were used for histological examination. The serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose were measured by blood biochemical analysis. Hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels were assessed by colorimetric assay kits. Offspring behaviors were evaluated by open-field activity, elevated plus maze, social preference test and Morris water maze. Maternal DEHP exposure deregulated the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and upregulated angiotensin type 1 receptor in offspring, which led to increased blood pressure. It led to obesity in offspring by increasing the size of adipocytes in white adipose tissue and number of adipocytes in brown adipose tissue. It increased the serum level of cholesterol in offspring by decreasing the hepatic capacity for cholesterol clearance. The impaired social interaction ability induced by maternal DEHP exposure might be due to abnormal neuronal development. Collectively, our findings provide new evidence that maternal exposure to DEHP has a lasting effect on the physiological functions of the vascular system, adipose tissue and nerve system in offspring. PMID:25995009

  20. An overview of recycling refractory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing

    2004-09-01

    Refractory materials must be disposed of or recycled when removed from service. Off-specification or reject material has been reused by the refractory industry for a number of years, with small percentages of these materials added as a part of refractory formulations. Historically, limed reuse of spent refractory materials in other applications has occurred. Environmental legislation, stewardship programs, and other forces encouraged some businesses to recycle spent refractories. Reuse of spent refractory material varies considerably among different industries and with the location of the industrial user. Efforts to recycle, the driving forces for recycling, and issues and steps to be taken into account initiating a recycling program will be discussed.

  1. Carambola optics for recycling of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutz, Ralf; Fu, Ling; Ries, Harald

    2006-04-01

    Recycling of light allows the luminance (radiance) emitted by a light source to be increased at the cost of reducing the total luminous flux (radiant power). Recycling of light means returning part of the emitted light to the source, where part of it will escape absorption. An optical design that is suitable for multiple and controlled recycling is described. Carambola optics is named for its resemblance to star fruit. Several pairs of mirrors or prisms redirect light repeatedly onto the source, thus achieving multiple transits of the light through the source. This recycled light exits the carambola in the same phase space as light directly emitted and not recycled.

  2. Composite material from recycled polyester for recyclable automobile structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lertola, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    DuPont has developed a compression-moldable composite made from the thermoplastic polyester PET and long glass fibers. This material, XTC{trademark}, is part of the class of materials known as GMT`s, or glass-mat thermoplastics. The PET content in XTC{trademark} allows the use of a wide variety of recycled material that might otherwise end up in landfills and incinerators. DuPont has succeeded in using 100% post-consumer polyester, from bottles, film, or fibers, in the composite. Since processing involves heating the material to the melt in air, the main technical issues are hydrolysis and oxidative degradation. Impurities in the recycled material must be carefully monitored, as they often increase the extent of degradation. The product itself, used to mold shaped structures and body panels for automobiles, may be recycled after its useful life. Depending on the needed purity level, processes ranging from injection molding to methanolysis can turn ground XTC{trademark} parts back into new, useful products.

  3. The Transport of Exogenous Cholesterol in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, L. L.; Morris, M. D.; Felts, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Thoracic lymph duct cannulations were performed shortly after a meal in rabbits trained to ingest a moderate fat, low cholesterol diet. A tracer dose of cholesterol-3H was administered to label exogenous (dietary) cholesterol during absorption. Sequential lymph samples were collected up to 24 hr postprandially, after which ultracentrifugal fractionation of lymph lipoproteins was carried out. The d < 1.006 lipoproteins were separated into two classes, chylomicra and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). A comparison was made between chylomicra and VLDL of lymph in the transport of exogenous cholesterol after ingestion of a single meal. The per cent of exogenous cholesterol present in VLDL of sequential lymph collections progressively increased with time after a meal and by 18 hr had reached a value of 80% or greater. In chylomicra the per cent of exogenous cholesterol of sequential lymph collections progressively decreased. Therefore, exogenous cholesterol was preferentially transported in VLDL compared with chylomicra. Cholesterol ester specific activity (CESA) of lymph chylomicra and VLDL increased at a more rapid rate than free cholesterol specific activity (FCSA). CESA of VLDL was three times higher than FCSA at the maximum. Exogenous cholesterol which appeared in both chylomicra and VLDL was consistently 80% esterified. while the per cent of total cholesterol esterified decreased with time and was significantly lower than that for exogenous cholesterol from 6 to 24 hr postprandially. These results demonstrate preferential esterification of exogenous cholesterol during absorption and indicate that a mechanism exists within the intestinal mucosal cell to maintain both free and esterified exogenous cholesterol in a chemically distinct pool from endogenous cholesterol during incorporation into both chylomicra and VLDL. PMID:4341437

  4. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Tonjes, David J.; Mallikarjun, Sreekanth

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  5. Sequential recycling of enzymatic lipid-extracted hydrolysate in fermentations with a thraustochytrid.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-06-01

    This study extends the findings of prior studies proposing and validating nutrient recycling for the heterotrophic microalgae, Thraustochytrium sp. (T18), grown in optimized fed-batch conditions. Sequential nutrient recycling of enzymatically-derived hydrolysate in fermentors succeeded at growing the tested thraustochytrid strain, with little evidence of inhibition or detrimental effects upon culture health. The average maximum biomass obtained in the recycled hydrolysate was 63.68±1.46gL(-1) in 90h the first recycle followed by 65.27±1.15gL(-1) in 90h in the subsequent recycle of the same material. These compared to 58.59gL(-1) and 64.92gL(-1) observed in fresh media in the same time. Lipid production was slightly impaired, however, with a maximum total fatty acid content of 62.2±0.30% in the recycled hydrolysate compared to 69.4% in fresh control media. PMID:26994462

  6. Occurrence and fate of acrylamide in water-recycling systems and sludge in aggregate industries.

    PubMed

    Junqua, Guillaume; Spinelli, Sylvie; Gonzalez, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Acrylamide is a hazardous substance having irritant and toxic properties as well as carcinogen, mutagen, and impaired fertility possible effects. Acrylamide might be found in the environment as a consequence of the use of polyacrylamides (PAMs) widely added as a flocculant for water treatment. Acrylamide is a monomer used to produce polyacrylamide (PAM) polymers. This reaction of polymerization can be incomplete, and acrylamide molecules can be present as traces in the commercial polymer. Thus, the use of PAMs may generate a release of acrylamide in the environment. In aggregate industries, PAM is widely involved in recycling process and water reuse (aggregate washing). Indeed, these industries consume large quantities of water. Thus, European and French regulations have favored loops of recycling of water in order to reduce water withdrawals. The main goal of this article is to study the occurrence and fate of acrylamide in water-recycling process as well as in the sludge produced by the flocculation treatment process in aggregate production plants. Moreover, to strengthen the relevance of this article, the objective is also to demonstrate if the recycling system leads to an accumulation effect in waters and sludge and if free acrylamide could be released by sludge during their storage. To reach this objective, water sampled at different steps of recycling water process has been analyzed as well as different sludge corresponding to various storage times. The obtained results reveal no accumulation effect in the water of the water-recycling system nor in the sludge. PMID:24840357

  7. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  8. Endoscopic Transnasal Approach for Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex

    PubMed Central

    Samadian, Mohammad; Akbari Dilmaghani, Nader; Ahmady Roozbahany, Navid; Farzin, Navid; Bahadoram, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol granulomas are rare round or ovoid cysts. They contain cholesterol crystals surrounded by foreign bodies of giant cells and are characterized by chronic inflammation. Large cholesterol granuloma can compress surrounding tissue especially cranial nerves. There are several types of surgery for the resection of cholesterol granuloma. We describe 4 cases of cholesterol granuloma operated on via transnasal endoscopic approach. In this report, we describe radiologic and pathologic features of this lesion and explain the advantages and disadvantages of transsphenoidal endoscopic approach for these rare lesions. PMID:26266065

  9. [HDL cholesterol as a sensitive diagnostic parameter in malaria].

    PubMed

    Kittl, E M; Diridl, G; Lenhart, V; Neuwald, C; Tomasits, J; Pichler, H; Bauer, K

    1992-01-01

    In patients with malaria the lipid parameters triglycerides, cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol were determined routinely. At the time of admission hypertriglyceridemia, hypocholesterolemia, and an extreme decrease in HDL-cholesterol were found. This dyslipoproteinemia was present in cases of falciparum malaria, as well as in cases of benign tertian malaria. The extent of HDL-cholesterol decrease showed no correlation to the severity of the clinical course of disease. HDL-cholesterol has proven to be an independent diagnostic laboratory finding in cases of suspected malarial infection. This parameter displays high diagnostic sensitivity, but no specificity for malaria. PMID:1546481

  10. Is the FXR the fix for cholesterol gallstone disease?

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2005-07-01

    Cholesterol gallstone disease is characterized by several events, including cholesterol precipitation in bile, increased bile salt hydrophobicity and gallbladder inflammation. Here, we describe the same phenotype in mice lacking the bile acid receptor, FXR. Furthermore, in susceptible wild-type mice that recapitulate human cholesterol gallstone disease, treatment with a synthetic FXR agonist prevented sequelae of the disease. These effects were mediated by FXR-dependent increases in biliary bile salt and phospholipid concentrations, which restored cholesterol solubility and thereby prevented gallstone formation. Taken together, these results indicate that FXR is a promising therapeutic target for treating or preventing cholesterol gallstone disease. PMID:15962294

  11. Cholesterol: a novel regulatory role in myelin formation.

    PubMed

    Saher, Gesine; Quintes, Susanne; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2011-02-01

    Myelin consists of tightly compacted membranes that form an insulating sheath around axons. The function of myelin for rapid saltatory nerve conduction is dependent on its unique composition, highly enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate limiting for the development of CNS and PNS myelin. Experiments with conditional mouse mutants that lack cholesterol biosynthesis in oligodendrocytes revealed that only minimal changes of the CNS myelin lipid composition are tolerated. In Schwann cells of the PNS, protein trafficking and myelin compaction depend on cholesterol. In this review, the authors summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and myelin disease. PMID:21343408

  12. Step by Step: Eating To Lower Your High Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet offers advice for adults who want to lower their blood cholesterol level. The first section, "What You Need To Know about High Blood Cholesterol," discusses blood cholesterol and why it matters, what cholesterol numbers mean, and what affects blood cholesterol levels. Section 2, "What You Need To Do To Lower Blood Cholesterol,"…

  13. Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ``hands-on`` refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided.

  14. DWPF recycle minimization: Brainstorming session

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.A.; Poirier, M.R.

    1993-10-12

    The recycle stream from the DWPF constitutes a major source of water addition to the High Level Waste evaporator system. As now designed, the entire flow of 3.5 to 6.5 gal/min (@ 25% and 75% attainment, respectively), or 2 gal/min during idling, flow to the 2H evaporator system (Tank 43). Substantial improvement in the HLW water balance and tank volume management is expected if the DWPF recycle to the HLW evaporator system can be significantly reduced. A task team has been appointed to study alternatives for reducing the flow to the HLW evaporator system and make recommendations for implementation and/or further study and evaluation. The brainstorming session detailed in this report was designed to produce the first cut options for the task team to further evaluate.

  15. Scrap car recycling in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Tai, H.S.; Fan, R.K.S.

    1997-12-31

    The official figure of registered automobiles released by the Ministry of Transportation of Taiwan, R.O.C. as of the end of April 1996, is approximately 4.8 millions. Among them, 18% of the cars are between seven and ten years old and 15% of the cars are old than ten years. The result of this large number of old cars is the problem of abandoned cars on the street of Taiwan. This phenomena not only hinders traffic flow but also undermines the living quality in the cities. To minimize these negative effects, EPA has promulgated a Scrap Motor Vehicles Management Regulation to enforce the scrap car recycling in Taiwan. Under this regulation, a buyer of a new vehicle has to pay the Scrap Motor Vehicle Disposal fee (NT$ 3000, or US$ 110 for a car; and NT$ 700, or US$ 25 for a motorcycle). This paper presents the current status of scrap car recycling in Taiwan.

  16. Potent and selective mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K; Johansson, Jan

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  17. Cholesterol - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) ... コレステロール - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Cholesterol 콜레스테롤 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  18. Cholesterol in serum lipoprotein fractions after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.; Krauhs, Jane M.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from blood-lipid measurements obtained from 125 Space Shuttle crew members before and after space flight. The data are presented in tables and discussed in detail. The main differences noted between preflight and postflight values are a 12.8-percent decrease in high-density lipoproteins on postflight day 1 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and both high- and low-density lipoproteins later in the 23-day postflight period.

  19. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  20. Human FABP1 T94A variant enhances cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Martin, Gregory G; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    Although expression of the human liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) T94A variant alters serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels in human subjects, nothing is known whereby the variant elicits these effects. This issue was addressed by in vitro cholesterol binding assays using purified recombinant wild-type (WT) FABP1 T94T and T94A variant proteins and in cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the FABP1 T94T (genotyped as TT) or T94A (genotyped as CC) proteins. The human FABP1 T94A variant protein had 3-fold higher cholesterol-binding affinity than the WT FABP1 T94T as shown by NBD-cholesterol fluorescence binding assays and by cholesterol isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) binding assays. CC variant hepatocytes also exhibited 30% higher total FABP1 protein. HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was faster in CC variant than TT WT human hepatocytes. VLDL-mediated uptake of NBD-cholesterol did not differ between CC and TT human hepatocytes. The increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was not associated with any significant change in mRNA levels of SCARB1, LDLR, CETP, and LCAT encoding the key proteins in lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, the increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake by CC hepatocytes may be associated with higher affinity of T94A protein for cholesterol and/or increased total T94A protein level. PMID:25732850

  1. Effect of cholesterol nanodomains on monolayer morphology and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Siyoung Q.; Zell, Zachary A.; Squires, Todd M.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    At low mole fractions, cholesterol segregates into 10- to 100-nm-diameter nanodomains dispersed throughout primarily dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) domains in mixed DPPC:cholesterol monolayers. The nanodomains consist of 6:1 DPPC:cholesterol “complexes” that decorate and lengthen DPPC domain boundaries, consistent with a reduced line tension, λ. The surface viscosity of the monolayer, ηs, decreases exponentially with the area fraction of the nanodomains at fixed surface pressure over the 0.1- to 10-Hz range of frequencies common to respiration. At fixed cholesterol fraction, the surface viscosity increases exponentially with surface pressure in similar ways for all cholesterol fractions. This increase can be explained with a free-area model that relates ηs to the pure DPPC monolayer compressibility and collapse pressure. The elastic modulus, G′, initially decreases with cholesterol fraction, consistent with the decrease in λ expected from the line-active nanodomains, in analogy to 3D emulsions. However, increasing cholesterol further causes a sharp increase in G′ between 4 and 5 mol% cholesterol owing to an evolution in the domain morphology, so that the monolayer is elastic rather than viscous over 0.1–10 Hz. Understanding the effects of small mole fractions of cholesterol should help resolve the controversial role cholesterol plays in human lung surfactants and may give clues as to how cholesterol influences raft formation in cell membranes. PMID:23901107

  2. Isoform dependent regulation of human HCN channels by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol has been shown to regulate numerous ion channels. HCN channels represent the molecular correlate of If or Ih in sinoatrial node (SAN) and neuronal cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for cholesterol in the regulation of rabbit HCN4 channels with effects on pacing in the rabbit SAN. Using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we examined the effect of cholesterol modulation on human HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 isoforms. Patch-clamp experiments uncovered isoform specific differences in the effect of cholesterol on gating kinetics upon depletion by MβCD or mevastatin or enrichment using MβCD/cholesterol. Most dramatically cholesterol had isoform specific effects on mode-shifting, which has been suggested to play a key role in stabilizing firing rate and preventing arrhythmic firing in SAN cells and neurons. Mode-shifting in HCN1 channels was insensitive to cholesterol manipulation, while HCN2 and HCN4 were strongly affected. Trafficking of each isoform to the plasma membrane was also affected by cholesterol modulation differentially between isoforms, however, each isoform remained localized in lipid raft domains after cholesterol depletion. These effects may contribute to the side effects of cholesterol reducing therapies including disrupted heart rhythm and neuropathic pain, as well as the susceptibility of sinus dysfunction in patients with elevated cholesterol. PMID:26404789

  3. Loss of Mitochondrial Function Impairs Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Demers-Lamarche, Julie; Guillebaud, Gérald; Tlili, Mouna; Todkar, Kiran; Bélanger, Noémie; Grondin, Martine; Nguyen, Angela P; Michel, Jennifer; Germain, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial function, as observed in neurodegenerative diseases, lead to disrupted energy metabolism and production of damaging reactive oxygen species. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction also disrupts the structure and function of lysosomes, the main degradation and recycling organelle. Specifically, inhibition of mitochondrial function, following deletion of the mitochondrial protein AIF, OPA1, or PINK1, as well as chemical inhibition of the electron transport chain, impaired lysosomal activity and caused the appearance of large lysosomal vacuoles. Importantly, our results show that lysosomal impairment is dependent on reactive oxygen species. Given that alterations in both mitochondrial function and lysosomal activity are key features of neurodegenerative diseases, this work provides important insights into the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26987902

  4. LXR driven induction of HDL-cholesterol is independent of intestinal cholesterol absorption and ABCA1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kannisto, Kristina; Gåfvels, Mats; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Slätis, Katharina; Hu, Xiaoli; Jorns, Carl; Steffensen, Knut R; Eggertsen, Gösta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether: (1) liver X receptor (LXR)-driven induction of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and other LXR-mediated effects on cholesterol metabolism depend on intestinal cholesterol absorption; and (2) combined treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 and the cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe results in synergistic effects on cholesterol metabolism that could be beneficial for treatment of atherosclerosis. Mice were fed 0.2 % cholesterol and treated with GW3965+ezetimibe, GW3965 or ezetimibe. GW3965+ezetimibe treatment elevated serum HDL-C and Apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, effectively reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased the excretion of faecal neutral sterols. No changes in intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1 or ABCG5 protein expression were observed, despite increased mRNA expression, while hepatic ABCA1 was slightly reduced. The combined treatment caused a pronounced down-regulation of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and reduced hepatic and intestinal cholesterol levels. GW3965 did not affect the intestinal cholesterol absorption, but increased serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels. GW3965 also increased Apoa1 mRNA levels in primary mouse hepatocytes and HEPA1-6 cells. Ezetimibe reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption, ABCA1 and ABCG5, but did not affect the serum HDL-C or ApoAI levels. Thus, the LXR-driven induction of HDL-C and ApoAI was independent of the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased expression of intestinal or hepatic ABCA1 was not required. Inhibited influx of cholesterol via NPC1L1 and/or low levels of intracellular cholesterol prevented post-transcriptional expression of intestinal ABCA1 and ABCG5, despite increased mRNA levels. Combined LXR activation and blocked intestinal cholesterol absorption induced effective faecal elimination of cholesterol. PMID:24163219

  5. Mechanisms of cholesterol-lowering effects of dietary insoluble fibres: relationships with intestinal and hepatic cholesterol parameters.

    PubMed

    van Bennekum, Ariëtte M; Nguyen, David V; Schulthess, Georg; Hauser, Helmut; Phillips, Michael C

    2005-09-01

    Fibres with a range of abilities to perturb cholesterol homeostasis were used to investigate how the serum cholesterol-lowering effects of insoluble dietary fibres are related to parameters of intestinal cholesterol absorption and hepatic cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Cholestyramine, chitosan and cellulose were used as examples of fibres with high, intermediate and low bile acid-binding capacities, respectively. The serum cholesterol levels in a control group of mice fed a high fat/high cholesterol (HFHC) diet for 3 weeks increased about 2-fold to 4.3 mm and inclusion of any of these fibres at 7.5 % of the diet prevented this increase from occurring. In addition, the amount of cholesterol accumulated in hepatic stores due to the HFHC diet was reduced by treatment with these fibres. The three kinds of fibres showed similar hypocholesterolaemic activity; however, cholesterol depletion of liver tissue was greatest with cholestyramine. The mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effect of cholestyramine were (1) decreased cholesterol (food) intake, (2) decreased cholesterol absorption efficiency, and (3) increased faecal bile acid and cholesterol excretion. The latter effects can be attributed to the high bile acid-binding capacity of cholestyramine. In contrast, incorporation of chitosan or cellulose in the diet reduced cholesterol (food) intake, but did not affect either intestinal cholesterol absorption or faecal sterol output. The present study provides strong evidence that above all satiation and satiety effects underlie the cholesterol-lowering properties of insoluble dietary fibres with moderate or low bile acid-binding capabilities. PMID:16176602

  6. Liver fatty acid binding protein gene ablation potentiates hepatic cholesterol accumulation in cholesterol-fed female mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Mackie, John T; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2006-01-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is postulated to influence cholesterol homeostasis, the physiological significance of this hypothesis remains to be resolved. This issue was addressed by examining the response of young (7 wk) female mice to L-FABP gene ablation and a cholesterol-rich diet. In control-fed mice, L-FABP gene ablation alone induced hepatic cholesterol accumulation (2.6-fold), increased bile acid levels, and increased body weight gain (primarily as fat tissue mass). In cholesterol-fed mice, L-FABP gene ablation further enhanced the hepatic accumulation of cholesterol (especially cholesterol ester, 12-fold) and potentiated the effects of dietary cholesterol on increased body weight gain, again mainly as fat tissue mass. However, in contrast to the effects of L-FABP gene ablation in control-fed mice, biliary levels of bile acids (as well as cholesterol and phospholipids) were reduced. These phenotypic alterations were not associated with differences in food intake. In conclusion, it was shown for the first time that L-FABP altered cholesterol metabolism and the response of female mice to dietary cholesterol. While the biliary and lipid phenotype of female wild-type L-FABP+/+ mice was sensitive to dietary cholesterol, L-FABP gene ablation dramatically enhanced many of the effects of dietary cholesterol to greatly induce hepatic cholesterol (primarily cholesterol ester) and triacylglycerol accumulation as well as to potentiate body weight gain (primarily as fat tissue mass). Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that L-FABP is involved in the physiological regulation of cholesterol metabolism, body weight gain, and obesity. PMID:16123197

  7. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, P.K.

    1995-04-05

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium.

  8. Ozone bleaching of recycled paper

    SciTech Connect

    Muguet, M.; Kogan, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Chlorinated bleaching chemicals, notably chlorine and hypochlorite, are still being used to bleach deinked, woodfree pulps. Increasing environmental concern about the use of these chemicals--coupled with the industry's efforts to increase the use of recycled fibers--highlight the need to develop better techniques for producing high-quality deinked pulp. Results presented in this report suggest that deinked fibers can be treated with ozone followed by a peroxide bleaching stage to produce a high-quality pulp.

  9. High Cholesterol Deteriorates Bone Health: New Insights into Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Chandi C.

    2015-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies show a positive connection between cardiovascular diseases and risk of osteoporosis, suggesting a role of hyperlipidemia and/or hypercholesterolemia in regulating osteoporosis. The majority of the studies indicated a correlation between high cholesterol and high LDL-cholesterol level with low bone mineral density, a strong predictor of osteoporosis. Similarly, bone metastasis is a serious complication of cancer for patients. Several epidemiological and basic studies have established that high cholesterol is associated with increased cancer risk. Moreover, osteoporotic bone environment predisposes the cancer cells for metastatic growth in the bone microenvironment. This review focuses on how cholesterol and cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) regulate the functions of bone residential osteoblast and osteoclast cells to augment or to prevent bone deterioration. Moreover, this study provides an insight into molecular mechanisms of cholesterol-mediated bone deterioration. It also proposes a potential mechanism by which cellular cholesterol boosts cancer-induced bone metastasis. PMID:26557105

  10. Preterm delivery and low maternal serum cholesterol level: Any correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Ayodeji A.; Adegbesan-Omilabu, Maymunah A.; Okunade, Kehinde S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The study assessed whether low maternal serum cholesterol during early pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery. Patients and Methods: It was a prospective observational cohort study involving pregnant women at gestational age of 14-20 weeks over a period of 12 months. Blood samples were obtained to measure total serum cholesterol concentrations and the sera were then analysed enzymatically by the cholesterol oxidase: p-aminophenazone (CHOD PAP) method. Results: The study showed an incidence of 5.0% for preterm delivery in the low risk study patients. Preterm birth was 4.83-times more common with low total maternal cholesterol than with midrange total cholesterol (11.8% versus 2.2%, P = 0.024). Conclusion: Low maternal serum cholesterol (hypocholesterolaemia) is associated with preterm delivery. Optimal maternal serum cholesterol during pregnancy may have merit, therefore pregnant women should be encouraged to follow a healthy, balanced diet. PMID:25298606

  11. The role of the lymphatic system in cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Hao; Elvington, Andrew; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the pathway for removal of peripheral tissue cholesterol and involves transport of cholesterol back to liver for excretion, starting from cellular cholesterol efflux facilitated by lipid-free apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) or other lipidated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles within the interstitial space. Extracellular cholesterol then is picked up and transported through the lymphatic vasculature before entering into bloodstream. There is increasing evidence supporting a role for enhanced macrophage cholesterol efflux and RCT in ameliorating atherosclerosis, and recent data suggest that these processes may serve as better diagnostic biomarkers than plasma HDL levels. Hence, it is important to better understand the processes governing ApoA1 and HDL influx into peripheral tissues from the bloodstream, modification and facilitation of cellular cholesterol removal within the interstitial space, and transport through the lymphatic vasculature. New findings will complement therapeutic strategies for the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:26388772

  12. Cholesterol in pregnancy: a review of knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Änne; O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol forms part of every cell in the human body, and also helps make and metabolize hormones, bile acids and vitamin D. Human plasma cholesterol levels are determined by production in the liver and by dietary intake. Lipoproteins carry cholesterol around the body, and facilitate it crossing the placenta. Cholesterol is carefully monitored in the non-pregnant adult population, where its association with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease is well understood. Although it is known that cholesterol rises in pregnancy, at present it is not routinely measured or treated. The effects of maternal high cholesterol on pregnancy and on fetal development are not yet fully understood. However, a growing body of evidence from animal and human studies suggests adverse consequences of high cholesterol levels in pregnancy.

  13. Human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Jauhiainen, M.; Stevenson, K.J.; Dolphin, P.J.

    1988-05-15

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a plasma enzyme which catalyzes the transacylation of the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of lecithin to cholesterol forming lysolecithin and cholesteryl ester. The substrates for and products of this reaction are present within the plasma lipoproteins upon which the enzyme acts to form the majority of cholesteryl ester in human plasma. The authors proposed a covalent catalytic mechanism of action for LCAT in which serine and histidine residues mediate lecithin cleavage and two cysteine residues cholesterol esterification. With the aid of sulfhydryl reactive trivalent organoarsenical compounds which are specific for vicinal thiols they have probed the geometry of the catalytic site. They conclude that the two catalytic cysteine residues of LCAT (Cys/sup 31/ and Cys /sup 184/) are vicinal with a calculated distance between their sulfur atoms of 3.50-3.62 A. The additional residue alkylated by teh bifunctional reagent is within the catalytic site and may represent a previously identified catalytic serine or histidine residue.

  14. Neurosteroids: oligodendrocyte mitochondria convert cholesterol to pregnenolone

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.Y.; Bourreau, E.; Jung-Testas, I.; Robel, P.; Baulieu, E.E.

    1987-12-01

    Oligodendrocyte mitochondria from 21-day-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were incubated with 100 nM (/sup 3/H)cholesterol. It yielded (/sup 3/H)pregnenolone at a rate of 2.5 +/- 0.7 and 5-(/sup 3/H)pregnene-3..beta..,20..cap alpha..-diol at a rate of 2.5 +/- 1.1 pmol per mg of protein per hr. Cultures of glial cells from 19- to 21-day-old fetuses (a mixed population of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were incubated for 24 hr with (/sup 3/H)mevalonolactone. (/sup 3/H)Cholesterol, (/sup 3/H)pregnenolone, and 5-(/sup 3/H)pregnene-3..beta..,20..cap alpha..-diol were characterized in cellular extracts. The formation of the /sup 3/H-labeled steroids was increased by dibutyryl cAMP (0.2 mM) added to the culture medium. The active cholesterol side-chain cleavage mechanism, recently suggested immunohistochemically and already observed in cultures of C6 glioma cells, reinforces the concept of neurosteroids applied to ..delta../sup 5/-3..beta..-hydroxysteroids previously isolated from brain.

  15. Scrap tire recycling in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The author discusses the problems associated with scrap tires. For example, surface storing of scrap tires poses a fire hazard and the rainwater trapped in the tire casings is an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes. Use as a fuel for energy production is unattractive as long as oil retails at its present low price. Past reclamation processes have not met expectations. Legislation alone is not the answer, because scrap tires cannot be regulated out of existence. However, the Minnesota state legislature has come up with an approach that seems to be successful. It has passed the Waste Tire Act, which not only formulates regulations but also provides funding for research and development. Thus, it has established a tire disposal fund for financing construction costs of tire recycling facilities. One of the outcomes was the construction of the St. Louis county Waste Tire Recycling Facility. Through a leasing arrangement with Minneapolis-based Rubber Elastomerics, Inc. (RRE), construction costs financed by the tire disposal fund eventually will be repaid by RRE to the fund. The arrangement is described in detail. By a process also described, RRE produces a product that can be used in thermoset and in thermoplastic compounds. The user can incorporate between 50 percent and 85 percent of the recycled product into a rubber or plastic compound without significantly affecting the physical properties of the compound.

  16. Association of Cholesterol Granuloma and Aspergillosis in the Sphenoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Kyun; Kim, Yoonjung

    2008-01-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) is usually associated with chronic middle ear disease, and is not common in the paranasal sinuses. Additionally, it is very rare for cases of CG to be associated with a fungal infection. However, in this paper, we report a case of sphenoid sinus CG that is associated with aspergilloma in a 78-year-old male patient who presented with right hemifacial pain, headache and toothache. CT revealed the presence of an expansile cystic mass lesion in the sphenoid sinus that showed a high signal intensity on both the T1 and T2 weighted images. This mass was later determined to be CG. The suspected etiologic mechanisms of both CG and aspergilloma of the paranasal sinuses are similar, and impaired drainage and obstruction of the ventilation of the paranasal sinuses are considered to be the causative mechanism of both diseases. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the use of MRI findings could be helpful for differentiating CG from other paranasal sinus mass lesions. PMID:18607122

  17. Cholesterol-induced modifications in lipid bilayers: a simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, S W; Jakobsson, Eric; Mashl, R Jay; Scott, H Larry

    2002-01-01

    We present analysis of new configurational bias Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation data for bilayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline:cholesterol ratios of 24:1, 47:3, 11.5:1, 8:1, 7:1, 4:1, 3:1, 2:1, and 1:1, using long molecular dynamics runs and interspersed configurational bias Monte Carlo to ensure equilibration and enhance sampling. In all cases with cholesterol concentrations above 12.5% the area per molecule of the heterogeneous membrane varied linearly with cholesterol fraction. By extrapolation to pure cholesterol, we find the cross-sectional area of cholesterol in these mixtures is approximately 22.3 A(2). From the slope of the area/molecule relationship, we also find that the phospholipid in these mixtures is in a liquid ordered state with an average cross-sectional area per lipid of 50.7 A(2), slightly above the molecular area of a pure phospholipid gel. For lower concentrations of cholesterol, the molecular area rises above the straight line, indicating the "melting" of at least some of the phospholipid into a fluid state. Analysis of the lateral distribution of cholesterol molecules in the leaflets reveals peaks in radial distributions of cholesterols at multiples of approximately 5 A. These peaks grow in size as the simulation progresses, suggesting a tendency for small subunits of one lipid plus one cholesterol, hydrogen bonded together, to act as one composite particle, and perhaps to aggregate with other composites. Our results are consistent with experimentally observed effects of cholesterol, including the condensation effect of cholesterol in phospholipid monolayers and the tendency of cholesterol-rich domains to form in cholesterol-lipid bilayers. We are continuing to analyze this tendency on longer timescales and for larger bilayer patches. PMID:12324406

  18. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  19. Cholesterol side chain analogs but not its ether analogs possess cholesterol-lowering activity.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lin; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weihuan; Liu, Yuwei; Zheng, Fangrui; Ma, Ka Ying; Li, Yuk Man; Wang, Lijun; Man, Sun Wa; Zhang, Chengnan; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Cholesterol analogs can be used to treat hypercholesterolemia. The present study was to test the effects of cholesteryl 3β-ethoxy (CE) and cholesteryl 3β-methoxy (CM) on plasma total cholesterol (TC) compared with that of β-sitosterol (SI) in hamsters fed a high cholesterol diet. CM and CE are the methoxy and ethoxy analogs of cholesterol while SI is an analog of cholesterol having an additional ethyl group on the side chain. Results showed that SI at a dose of 0.1% could effectively reduce plasma TC by 18%. The analysis of sterols in the plasma and liver did not detect the presence of SI, proving that it was poorly absorbed in the intestine. In contrast, both CE and CM had no effect on plasma TC. However, CE and CM were found to accumulate in both plasma and liver, indicating that they could be well absorbed in the intestine. It was therefore concluded that analogs having different side chains possessed plasma TC-lowering activity, while analogs or derivatives on the hydroxyl group had no hypocholesterolemic activity. PMID:25536519

  20. Continuous monitoring of cholesterol oleate hydrolysis by hormone-sensitive lipase and other cholesterol esterases.

    PubMed

    Ali, Yassine Ben; Carrière, Frédéric; Verger, Robert; Petry, Stefan; Muller, Günter; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2005-05-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) contributes importantly to the hydrolysis of cholesteryl ester in steroidogenic tissues, releasing the cholesterol required for adrenal steroidogenesis. HSL has broad substrate specificity, because it hydrolyzes triacylglycerols (TAGs), diacylglycerols, monoacylglycerols, and cholesteryl esters. In this study, we developed a specific cholesterol esterase assay using cholesterol oleate (CO) dispersed in phosphatidylcholine and gum arabic by sonication. To continuously monitor the hydrolysis of CO by HSL, we used the pH-stat technique. For the sake of comparison, the hydrolysis of CO dispersion was also tested using other cholesteryl ester-hydrolyzing enzymes. The specific activities measured on CO were found to be 18, 100, 27, and 3 micromol/min/mg for HSL, cholesterol esterase from Pseudomonas species, Candida rugosa lipase-3, and cholesterol esterase from bovine pancreas, respectively. The activity of HSL on CO is approximately 4- to 5-fold higher than on long-chain TAGs. In contrast, with all other enzymes tested, the rates of TAG hydrolysis were higher than those of CO hydrolysis. The relatively higher turnover of HSL on CO observed in vitro adds further molecular insight on the physiological importance of HSL in cholesteryl ester catabolism in vivo. Thus, HSL could be considered more as a cholesteryl ester hydrolase than as a TAG lipase. PMID:15716583

  1. Hyperlipidemia offers protection against Leishmania donovani infection: role of membrane cholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, June; Das, Shantanabha; Guha, Rajan; Ghosh, Debopam; Naskar, Kshudiram; Das, Anjan; Roy, Syamal

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania donovani (LD), the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), extracts membrane cholesterol from macrophages and disrupts lipid rafts, leading to their inability to stimulate T cells. Restoration of membrane cholesterol by liposomal delivery corrects the above defects and offers protection in infected hamsters. To reinforce further the protective role of cholesterol in VL, mice were either provided a high-cholesterol (atherogenic) diet or underwent statin treatment. Subsequent LD infection showed that an atherogenic diet is associated with protection, whereas hypocholesterolemia due to statin treatment confers susceptibility to the infection. This observation was validated in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (AE) mice that displayed intrinsic hypercholesterolemia with hepatic granuloma, production of host-protective cytokines, and expansion of antileishmanial CD8+IFN- γ + and CD8+IFN- γ +TNF- α + T cells in contrast to the wild-type C57BL/6 (BL/6) mice when infected with LD. Normal macrophages from AE mice (N-AE-M ϕ) showed 3-fold higher membrane cholesterol coupled with increased fluorescence anisotropy (FA) compared with wild-type macrophage (N-BL/6-M ϕ). Characterization of in vitro LD-infected AE macrophage (LD-AE-M ϕ) revealed intact raft architecture and ability to stimulate T cells, which were compromised in LD-BL/6-Mϕ. This study clearly indicates that hypercholesterolemia, induced intrinsically or extrinsically, can control the pathogenesis of VL by modulating immune repertoire in favor of the host. PMID:23060454

  2. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    Language impairment; Impairment of speech; Inability to speak; Aphasia; Dysarthria; Slurred speech; Dysphonia voice disorders ... disorders develop gradually, but anyone can develop a speech and ... suddenly, usually in a trauma. APHASIA Alzheimer disease ...

  3. Mild Cognitive Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Portfolio (IADRP) AMP-AD Detecting Cognitive Impairment Database ... Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a condition in which people have more memory or other thinking problems than normal for their ...

  4. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    Language impairment; Impairment of speech; Inability to speak; Aphasia; Dysarthria; Slurred speech; Dysphonia voice disorders ... Common speech and language disorders include: APHASIA Aphasia is ... understand or express spoken or written language. It commonly ...

  5. Deep water recycling through time

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dehydration processes in subduction zones and their implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We use a numerical tool that combines thermo-mechanical models with a thermodynamic database to examine slab dehydration for present-day and early Earth settings and its consequences for the deep water recycling. We investigate the reactions responsible for releasing water from the crust and the hydrated lithospheric mantle and how they change with subduction velocity (vs), slab age (a) and mantle temperature (Tm). Our results show that faster slabs dehydrate over a wide area: they start dehydrating shallower and they carry water deeper into the mantle. We parameterize the amount of water that can be carried deep into the mantle, W (×105 kg/m2), as a function of vs (cm/yr), a (Myrs), and Tm (°C):. We generally observe that a 1) 100°C increase in the mantle temperature, or 2) ∼15 Myr decrease of plate age, or 3) decrease in subduction velocity of ∼2 cm/yr all have the same effect on the amount of water retained in the slab at depth, corresponding to a decrease of ∼2.2×105 kg/m2 of H2O. We estimate that for present-day conditions ∼26% of the global influx water, or 7×108 Tg/Myr of H2O, is recycled into the mantle. Using a realistic distribution of subduction parameters, we illustrate that deep water recycling might still be possible in early Earth conditions, although its efficiency would generally decrease. Indeed, 0.5–3.7 × 108 Tg/Myr of H2O could still be recycled in the mantle at 2.8 Ga. Key Points Deep water recycling might be possible even in early Earth conditions We provide a scaling law to estimate the amount of H2O flux deep into the mantle Subduction velocity has a a major control on the crustal dehydration pattern PMID:26321881

  6. Increased hepatic cholesterol esterification with essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD): relationship to plasma lipoprotein (LP) cholesterol content

    SciTech Connect

    Ney, D.M.; Ziboh, V.A.; Schneeman, B.O.

    1986-03-01

    EFAD in the rat is associated with hepatic accumulation of esterified cholesterol and altered distribution of cholesterol between plasma and hepatic tissue. Little is known regarding the impact of EFAD on LP composition. To determine the relationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and plasma lP composition in control (C) and EFAD male Wistar rats, the authors induced EFAD with continuous intragastric (IG) infusion of EFA-free solutions containing 3.5% of calories as triolein for 7 and 14 days. C animals received IG infusion of solutions containing 3.5% of calories as linoleic acid. Data in the EFAD groups reveal: (i) marked decreases in hepatic EFAs and increases in monoenoic acids; (ii) progressive increases in hepatic content of triglyceride and esterified cholesterol with 7 and 14 days of feeding; (iii) assay of acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity in hepatic tissue using /sup 14/C-cholesterol demonstrates an increase in hepatic cholesterol esterification when compared to C animals. Increased hepatic cholesterol esterification correlates with elevated levels of esterified cholesterol in plasma VLDL and HDL particles. These data indicate that the elevated levels of cholesterol esters in LP particles is due, at least in part, to increased hepatic cholesterol esterification with EFAD.

  7. Management options for recycling radioactive scrap metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmel, J.C.; MacKinney, J.; Bartlett, J.

    1997-02-01

    The feasibility and advantages of recycling radioactive scrap metals (RSM) have yet to be assessed, given the unique technical, regulatory, safety, and cost-benefit issues that have already been raised by a concerned recycling industry. As is known, this industry has been repeatedly involved with the accidental recycling of radioactive sources and, in some cases, with costly consequences. If recycling were deemed to be a viable option, it might have to be implemented with regulatory monitoring and controls. Its implementation may have to consider various and complex issues and address the requirements and concerns of distinctly different industries. There are three basic options for the recycling of such scraps. They are: (1) recycling through the existing network of metal-scrap dealers and brokers, (2) recycling directly and only with specific steelmills, or (3) recycling through regional processing centers. Under the first option, scrap dealers and brokers would receive material from RSM generators and determine at which steelmills such scraps would be recycled. For the second option, RSM generators would deal directly with selected steelmills under specific agreements. For the third option, generators would ship scraps only to regional centers for processing and shipment to participating steelmills. This paper addresses the potential advantages of each option, identifies the types of arrangements that would need to be secured among all parties, and attempts to assess the receptivity of the recycling industry to each option.

  8. The Impaired Social Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamer, Frederic G.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses concept of the impaired professional; reviews research on various types of impairment (personality disorders, depression and other emotional problems, marital problems, and physical illness), prevalence and causes of impairment, and responses to it; and outlines model assessment and action plan for social workers who encounter an…

  9. ABE. The Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, L. Sue

    This handbook was written to help teachers of adult basic education (ABE) adapt their teaching methods for hearing impaired persons. Written in a narrative format, the guide covers the following topics: ABE for the hearing impaired, hints for working with the hearing impaired without an interpreter, peer pairing, interpreters in the classroom…

  10. Adapting for Impaired Patrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a library, with an MCI Corporation grant, approached the process of setting up computers for the visually impaired. Discusses preparations, which included hiring a visually-impaired user as a consultant and contacting the VIP (Visually Impaired Persons) group; equipment; problems with the graphical user interface; and training.…

  11. A new model of reverse cholesterol transport: enTICEing strategies to stimulate intestinal cholesterol excretion.

    PubMed

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  12. A New Model of Reverse Cholesterol Transport: EnTICEing Strategies to Stimulate Intestinal Cholesterol Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Ryan E.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  13. Regulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization by cholesterol efflux pathways

    PubMed Central

    Westerterp, Marit; Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Murphy, Andrew J; Shih, Alan; Cremers, Serge; Levine, Ross L.; Tall, Alan R; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intact cholesterol homeostasis helps to maintain hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell (HSPC) quiescence. Mice with defects in cholesterol efflux pathways due to deficiencies of the ATP binding cassette transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 displayed a dramatic increase in HSPC mobilization and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Increased extramedullary hematopoiesis was associated with elevated serum levels of G-CSF due to generation of IL-23 by splenic macrophages and dendritic cells. This favored hematopoietic lineage decisions towards granulocytes rather than macrophages in the bone marrow leading to impaired support for osteoblasts and decreased Cxcl12/SDF-1 production by mesenchymal progenitors. Greater HSPC mobilization and extramedullary hematopoiesis were reversed by raising HDL levels in Abca1−/−Abcg1−/− and Apoe−/− mice or in a mouse model of myeloproliferative neoplasm mediated by Flt3-ITD mutation. Our data identify a novel role of cholesterol efflux pathways in the control of HSPC mobilization. This may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis and hematologic malignancies. PMID:22862945

  14. The relation of saturated fats and dietary cholesterol to childhood cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naiman A; Raine, Lauren B; Drollette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Hillman, Charles H

    2015-10-01

    Identification of health behaviors and markers of physiological health associated with childhood cognitive function has important implications for public health policy targeted toward cognitive health throughout the life span. Although previous studies have shown that aerobic fitness and obesity exert contrasting effects on cognitive flexibility among prepubertal children, the extent to which diet plays a role in cognitive flexibility has received little attention. Accordingly, this study examined associations between saturated fats and cholesterol intake and cognitive flexibility, assessed using a task switching paradigm, among prepubertal children between 7 and 10 years (N = 150). Following adjustment of confounding variables (age, sex, socioeconomic status, IQ, VO2max, and BMI), children consuming diets higher in saturated fats exhibited longer reaction time during the task condition requiring greater amounts of cognitive flexibility. Further, increasing saturated fat intake and dietary cholesterol were correlated with greater switch costs, reflecting impaired ability to maintain multiple task sets in working memory and poorer efficiency of cognitive control processes involved in task switching. These data are among the first to indicate that children consuming diets higher in saturated fats and cholesterol exhibit compromised ability to flexibly modulate their cognitive operations, particularly when faced with greater cognitive challenge. Future longitudinal and intervention studies are necessary to comprehensively characterize the interrelationships between diet, aerobic fitness, obesity, and children's cognitive abilities. PMID:25865659

  15. Computational investigation of cholesterol binding sites on mitochondrial VDAC.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Brian P; Salari, Reza; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Brannigan, Grace

    2014-08-21

    The mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) allows passage of ions and metabolites across the mitochondrial outer membrane. Cholesterol binds mammalian VDAC, and we investigated the effects of binding to human VDAC1 with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that totaled 1.4 μs. We docked cholesterol to specific sites on VDAC that were previously identified with NMR, and we tested the reliability of multiple docking results in each site with simulations. The most favorable binding modes were used to build a VDAC model with cholesterol occupying five unique sites, and during multiple 100 ns simulations, cholesterol stably and reproducibly remained bound to the protein. For comparison, VDAC was simulated in systems with identical components but with cholesterol initially unbound. The dynamics of loops that connect adjacent β-strands were most affected by bound cholesterol, with the averaged root-mean-square fluctuation (RMSF) of multiple residues altered by 20-30%. Cholesterol binding also stabilized charged residues inside the channel and localized the surrounding electrostatic potentials. Despite this, ion diffusion through the channel was not significantly affected by bound cholesterol, as evidenced by multi-ion potential of mean force measurements. Although we observed modest effects of cholesterol on the open channel, our model will be particularly useful in experiments that investigate how cholesterol affects VDAC function under applied electrochemical forces and also how other ligands and proteins interact with the channel. PMID:25080204

  16. Red Blood Cells Play a Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kimberly T.; Berisha, Stela Z.; Ritchey, Brian M.; Santore, Jennifer; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) involves the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissue for excretion in the feces. Here, we determined whether red blood cells (RBCs) can contribute to RCT. Methods and Results We performed a series of studies in apoAI-deficient mice where the HDL-mediated pathway of RCT is greatly diminished. RBCs carried a higher fraction of whole blood cholesterol than plasma in apoAI-deficient mice, and as least as much of the labeled cholesterol derived from injected foam cells appeared in RBCs compared to plasma. To determine if RBCs mediate RCT to the fecal compartment, we measured RCT in anemic and control apoAI-deficient mice and found that anemia decreased RCT to the feces by over 35% after correcting for fecal mass. Transfusion of [3H]cholesterol labeled RBCs led to robust delivery of the labeled cholesterol to the feces in apoAI-deficient hosts. In wild type mice, the majority of the blood cholesterol mass, as well as [3H]cholesterol derived from the injected foam cells, was found in plasma, and anemia did not significantly alter RCT to the feces after correction for fecal mass. Conclusion The RBC cholesterol pool is dynamic and facilitates RCT of peripheral cholesterol to the feces, particularly in the low HDL state. PMID:22499994

  17. The Effects of Cholesterol on Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is vital to normal brain function including learning and memory but that involvement is as complex as the synthesis, metabolism and excretion of cholesterol itself. Dietary cholesterol influences learning tasks from water maze to fear conditioning even though cholesterol does not cross the blood brain barrier. Excess cholesterol has many consequences including peripheral pathology that can signal brain via cholesterol metabolites, proinflammatory mediators and antioxidant processes. Manipulations of cholesterol within the central nervous system through genetic, pharmacological, or metabolic means circumvent the blood brain barrier and affect learning and memory but often in animals already otherwise compromised. The human literature is no less complex. Cholesterol reduction using statins improves memory in some cases but not others. There is also controversy over statin use to alleviate memory problems in Alzheimer’s disease. Correlations of cholesterol and cognitive function are mixed and association studies find some genetic polymorphisms are related to cognitive function but others are not. In sum, the field is in flux with a number of seemingly contradictory results and many complexities. Nevertheless, understanding cholesterol effects on learning and memory is too important to ignore. PMID:20470821

  18. Mathematically modelling the dynamics of cholesterol metabolism and ageing.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent during ageing; 34.1% and 29.8% of males and females respectively, over 75 years of age have an underlying cardiovascular problem. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism is inextricably correlated with cardiovascular health and for this reason low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are routinely used as biomarkers of CVD risk. The aim of this work was to use mathematical modelling to explore how cholesterol metabolism is affected by the ageing process. To do this we updated a previously published whole-body mathematical model of cholesterol metabolism to include an additional 96 mechanisms that are fundamental to this biological system. Additional mechanisms were added to cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), bile acid synthesis, and their enterohepatic circulation. The sensitivity of the model was explored by the use of both local and global parameter scans. In addition, acute cholesterol feeding was used to explore the effectiveness of the regulatory mechanisms which are responsible for maintaining whole-body cholesterol balance. It was found that our model behaves as a hypo-responder to cholesterol feeding, while both the hepatic and intestinal pools of cholesterol increased significantly. The model was also used to explore the effects of ageing in tandem with three different cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) genotypes. Ageing in the presence of an atheroprotective CETP genotype, conferring low CETP activity, resulted in a 0.6% increase in LDL-C. In comparison, ageing with a genotype reflective of high CETP activity, resulted in a 1.6% increase in LDL-C. Thus, the model has illustrated the importance of CETP genotypes such as I405V, and their potential role in healthy ageing. PMID:27157786

  19. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, Kevin Evan; Mc Cray, Casey William; Aitken, Darren William; Galloway, Kelly

    2003-02-01

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  20. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, K. E.; Galloway, K.; McCray, C. W.; Aitken, D. W.

    2003-02-26

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  1. Pathways and mechanisms of endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barth D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2011-01-01

    Endocytic recycling is coordinated with endocytic uptake to control the composition of the plasma membrane. Although much of our understanding of endocytic recycling has come from studies on the transferrin receptor, a protein internalized through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, increased interest in clathrin-independent endocytosis has led to the discovery of new endocytic recycling systems. Recent insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control endocytic recycling have focused on recycling through tubular carriers and the return to the cell surface of cargo that enters cells through clathrin-independent mechanisms. Recent work emphasizes the importance of regulated recycling in such diverse processes as cytokinesis, cell adhesion and morphogenesis, cell fusion, and learning and memory. PMID:19696797

  2. Xerox's closed recycling loop still contains kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    Xerox Corp. has established a recycling loop for plastics screw-top toner bottles and dry-ink containers used in most of the company's high-volume copiers. However, a severe shortage of post-consumer recycled plastic has been short-circuiting Xerox's good intentions. Last year, the Stamford, Conn.-based company stopped manufacturing toner containers from virgin plastics and instead began using recycled raw materials, such as discarded milk and water jugs collected from municipal curbside recycling programs. The bottles are ground and remolded into such products as air filters for vacuum cleaners, plastic lumber, compost bins, landscape ties, benches and fence posts. However, what sounds like a win-win situation actually is costing too much money. Contrary to popular belief, post-consumer recycled plastic costs more than virgin plastic. Despite the added expense, Xerox will continue to use recycled plastics when possible.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Materials recycling. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    A large variety of materials are recycled by different sectors of our society. The materials recycling that is mainly addressed in this writing is from waste that is generated after manufacturing and use. Included is recycling that is generally more obvious to the public: the collection, reprocessing, and remanufacture of materials into new products from post-consumer UBC's, scrap metal, glass containers, paper goods, increasingly plastics, as well as rubber tires and other used goods.

  4. Memory Impairment in Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Gillian; Dworzynski, Katharina; Slonims, Vicky; Simonoff, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess whether any memory impairment co-occurring with language impairment is global, affecting both verbal and visual domains, or domain specific. Method: Visual and verbal memory, learning, and processing speed were assessed in children aged 6 years to 16 years 11 months (mean 9y 9m, SD 2y 6mo) with current,…

  5. Influenza A virus recycling revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    Current textbooks link influenza pandemics to influenza A virus subtypes H2 (1889-91), H3 (1990), H1 (1918-20), H2 (1957-58) and H3 (1968), a pattern suggesting subtype recycling in humans. Since H1 reappeared in 1977, whatever its origin, some workers feel that H2 is the next pandemic candidate. This report reviews the publications on which the concept of influenza A virus subtype recycling is based and concludes that the data are inconsistent with the purported sequence of events. The three influenza pandemics prior to 1957-58 were linked with subtypes through retrospective studies of sera from the elderly, or through seroarchaeology. The pandemic seroarchaeological model for subtype H1 has been validated by the recent recovery of swine virus RNA fragments from persons who died from influenza in 1918. Application of the model to pre-existing H3 antibody among the elderly links the H3 subtype to the pandemic of 1889-91, not that of 1900 as popularly quoted. Application of the model to pre-existing H2 antibody among the elderly fails to confirm that this subtype caused a pandemic in the late 1800's, a finding which is consistent with age-related excess mortality patterns during the pandemics of 1957 (H2) and 1968 (H3). H2 variants should be included in pandemic planning for a number of reasons, but not because of evidence of recycling. It is not known when the next pandemic will occur or which of the 15 (or more) haemagglutinin subtypes will be involved. Effective global surveillance remains the key to influenza preparedness. PMID:10593030

  6. Recycling of auto shredder residue.

    PubMed

    Nourreddine, Menad

    2007-01-31

    Currently, about 75% of end-of-life vehicle's (ELV) total weight is recycled in EU countries. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residues (ASR) or auto fluff, is disposed of as landfill because of its complexity. It is a major challenge to reduce this percentage of obsolete cars. The European draft directive states that by the year 2006, only 15% of the vehicle's weight can be disposed of at landfill sites and by 2015, this will be reduced to 5%. The draft directive states that a further 10% can be incinerated. The quantities of shredder fluff are likely to increase in the coming years. This is because of the growing number of cars being scrapped, coupled with the increase in the amount of plastics used in cars. In Sweden, some current projects are focusing on recycling of ASR material. In this paper some different alternatives for using this material are reported. The hypothetical injection of ASR into a blast furnace concentrating on ASR's effect to some blast furnace (BF) parameters has been completed using a blast furnace mass balance model. As a result, in principle, ASR can be used as reducing agent in the BF process if certain conditions are met. The particle size of ASR material must be controlled to ensure optimal gasification of the material in the raceway. Regarding the chemical composition of ASR, the non-ferrous content can affect the pig iron quality, which is difficult to rectify at a later point. The most attractive recycling alternative is to use the products obtained from pyrolysis of ASR in appropriate metallurgical processes. PMID:16600493

  7. Cholesterol Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Lethality.

    PubMed

    Stopsack, Konrad H; Gerke, Travis A; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Penney, Kathryn L; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Sesso, Howard D; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove; Cerhan, James R; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Rider, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here, we assessed the association of intratumoral mRNA expression of cholesterol synthesis enzymes, transporters, and regulators in tumor specimen at diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer, defined as mortality or metastases from prostate cancer in contrast to nonlethal disease without evidence of metastases after at least 8 years of follow-up. We analyzed the prospective prostate cancer cohorts within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 249) and the Physicians' Health Study (n = 153) as well as expectantly managed patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Study (n = 338). The expression of squalene monooxygenase (SQLE) was associated with lethal cancer in all three cohorts. Men with high SQLE expression (>1 standard deviation above the mean) were 8.3 times (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 19.7) more likely to have lethal cancer despite therapy compared with men with the mean level of SQLE expression. Absolute SQLE expression was associated with lethal cancer independently from Gleason grade and stage, as was a SQLE expression ratio in tumor versus surrounding benign prostate tissue. Higher SQLE expression was tightly associated with increased histologic markers of angiogenesis. Collectively, this study establishes the prognostic value of intratumoral cholesterol synthesis as measured via SQLE, its second rate-limiting enzyme. SQLE expression at cancer diagnosis is prognostic for lethal prostate cancer both after curative-intent prostatectomy and in a watchful waiting setting, possibly by facilitating micrometastatic disease. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4785-90. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325648

  8. Effect of dietary Maitake (Grifola frondosa) mushrooms on plasma cholesterol and hepatic gene expression in cholesterol-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mayumi; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yoneyama, Shozo; Fujii-Akiyama, Kyoko; Kinoshita, Mikio; Chiji, Hideyuki; Ohnishi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary Grifola frondosa on cholesterol, normal mice were fed a diet containing 1% cholesterol (HC group) or 1% cholesterol and 10% freeze-dried G. frondosa powder (HC+G group) for 4 weeks and hepatic and plasma lipid levels were compared with those of a cholesterol-free diet-fed mice (N group). Hepatic total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol contents were considerably increased and plasma TC / phospholipid (PL) was also increased significantly in the HC group compared with the N group. However, plasma TC content decreased in the HC+G group compared with the HC group. To characterize the mechanisms responsible for lowered plasma cholesterol in G. frondosa-supplemented mice, hepatic gene expression was profiled using DNA microarray and gene ontology. Genome analyses revealed that de novo cholesterol synthesis genes were suppressed following cholesterol intake. However, expression of bile acid biosynthesis and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes showed little change. Scarb1, Abcg5, and Abcg8, involved in cholesterol transport and excretion, were slightly upregulated in the HC+G group compared with the HC group. These data indicate the plasma cholesterol-lowering effect of G. frondosa. Moreover, fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation was promoted via adipocytokine signaling pathways, and Saa, encodes serum amyloid A related to arteriosclerosis, was suppressed in the HC+G group. PMID:24292357

  9. BP details new recycling process

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, E.

    1992-04-22

    BP Chemicals (London) is developing a preprocessing thermal cracker for recycling mixed plastics waste as an add-on to existing petrochemicals or refinery complexes. The company is currently discussing the technology with other plastic producers to {open_quotes}move forward together,{close_quotes} say Serge Huybrechts, branch R&D manager at BP Chemicals at Grangemouth. He says the unit would be able to deliver an intermediate feed of similar composition to chemical naphtha for chemical or refinery processes including steam cracking, catalytic cracking, coking, gasification, and hydrocracking. In comparison, pyrolysis gives a range of products, from light gas to heavy aromatics, that are difficult to integrate into existing equipment.

  10. Precipitation recycling in the Amazon basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, E. A. B.; Bras, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of evaporation within a region to precipitation in that same region. The recycling rate is a diagnostic measure of the potential for interactions between land surface hydrology and regional climate. In this paper we present a model for describing the seasonal and spatial variability of the recycling process. The precipitation recycling ratio, rho, is the basic variable in describing the recycling process. Rho is the fraction of precipitation at a certain location and time which is contributed by evaporation within the region under study. The recycling model is applied in studyiing the hydrologic cycle in the Amazon basin. It is estimated that about 25% of all the rain that falls in the Amazon basin is contributed by evaporation within the basin. This estimate is based on analysis of a data set supplied by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The same analysis is repeated using a different data set from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Based on this data set, the recycling ratio is estimated to be 35%. The seasonal variability of the recycling ratio is small compared with the yearly average. The new estimates of the recycling ratio are compared with results of previous studies, and the differences are explained.

  11. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  12. Recycling policy in the european union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballah, I.; Kanari, N.

    2001-11-01

    Recycling in the European Union (EU) has benefited from R&D efforts and strict environmental regulations of the EU’s members. Thanks to the adoption of sustainable development policies by the EU’s European Institutions, economic incentives are expected to further strengthen the recycling industry. Moreover, the historical accumulation of non-ferrous metals in Europe will likely enhance secondary metal production. Also contributing to EU recycling is mining in East European countries and the resulting industrial waste. The rate of growth of the recycling industry is expected to approach double digits for at least this decade.

  13. Fermilab recycler stochastic cooling commissioning and performance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Broemmelsiek; Ralph Pasquinelli

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring located in the Fermilab Main Injector tunnel near the ceiling. The Recycler has two roles in Run II. First, to store antiprotons from the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator so that the antiproton production rate is no longer compromised by large numbers of antiprotons stored in the Accumulator. Second, to receive antiprotons from the Fermilab Tevatron at the end of luminosity periods. To perform each of these roles, stochastic cooling in the Recycler is needed to preserve and cool antiprotons in preparation for transfer to the Tevatron. The commissioning and performance of the Recycler stochastic cooling systems will be reviewed.

  14. From Evolution to Revolution: miRNAs as Pharmacological Targets for Modulating Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    There has been strong evolutionary pressure to ensure that an animal cell maintain levels of cholesterol within tight limits for normal function. Imbalances in cellular cholesterol levels are a major player in the development of different pathologies associated to dietary excess. Although epidemiological studies indicate that elevated levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, recent genetic evidence and pharmacological therapies to raise HDL levels do not support their beneficial effects. Cholesterol efflux as the first and probably the most important step in reverse cholesterol transport is an important biological process relevant to HDL function. Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), post-transcriptional control different aspects of cellular cholesterol homeostasis including cholesterol efflux. miRNA families miR-33, miR-758, miR-10b, miR-26 and miR-106b directly modulates cholesterol efflux by targeting the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). Pre-clinical studies with anti-miR therapies to inhibit some of these miRNAs have increased cellular cholesterol efflux, reverse cholesterol transport and reduce pathologies associated to dyslipidemia. Although miRNAs as therapy have benefits from existing antisense technology, different obstacles need to be solved before we incorporate such research into clinical care. Here we focus on the clinical potential of miRNAs as therapeutic target to increase cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport as a new alternative to ameliorate cholesterol-related pathologies. PMID:23435093

  15. Cholesterol exchange and lateral cholesterol pools in synaptosomal membranes of pair-fed control and chronic ethanol-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, W G; Rao, A M; Igbavboa, U; Semotuk, M

    1993-04-01

    Most studies on effects of ethanol on membrane cholesterol have reported on changes in the total or bulk amount of cholesterol. Membrane cholesterol, however, can be described in terms of its kinetics and domains. The kinetics and size of lateral cholesterol exchangeable and nonexchangeable pools were examined in synaptosomes of pair-fed controls and chronic ethanol-treated mice. Effects of sphingomyelin, an exofacial leaflet phospholipid, that has been shown to affect cholesterol pools, were also examined. Radiolabeled small unilamellar vesicles were used to exchange cholesterol with synaptosomes. The total amounts of membrane cholesterol, phospholipid phosphorus, and the ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid did not differ between the pair-fed control and ethanol groups. In control mice, the rate constant (hr-1) and the t1/2 (hr) of cholesterol exchange were 0.065 +/- 0.001 and 10.7 +/- 0.25 (hr), respectively. The rate constant was significantly slower (0.053 +/- 0.001, p < 0.05) and the t1/2 significantly longer (13.33 +/- 0.58, p < 0.05) in synaptosomes of the ethanol group compared with the control group. The size of the exchangeable pool of cholesterol did not differ significantly between the two groups. Sphingomyelinase-induced hydrolysis of sphingomyelin significantly slowed cholesterol exchange with the largest effect in synaptosomes of the control group as compared with the ethanol group (p < 0.05). Hydrolysis of sphingomyelin had significantly (p < 0.05) less of an effect on cholesterol exchange in synaptosomes of the ethanol group. Membrane cholesterol can be described in terms of total content, transbilayer distribution, kinetics, and size of lateral pools.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8488977

  16. Frontal sinus cholesterol granuloma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Nicholas L.; Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Chaudhry, Ajaz L.

    2014-01-01

    A case report of a massive cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the frontal sinus in a 15-year-old male subject treated endoscopically is reported. CGs are slowly expanding, cystic lesions that are rarely observed in the frontal sinus. Frontal sinus CGs characteristically present with proptosis, diplopia, and a unilateral painless expanding mass above the orbit. Patients frequently report a history of chronic nasal obstruction or head trauma. Although the pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely multifactorial in etiology. Surgical resection via endoscopic sinus surgery has been gaining popularity because of the minimally invasive approach and lower rates of recurrence. PMID:24612824

  17. Transport of circulating serum cholesterol by human renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clayman, R.V.; Figenshau, R.S.; Prigge, W.F.; Forstrom, L.; Gebhard, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Clear cell renal cancer contains a large quantity of cholesterol ester (300-mg./gm. protein). To determine whether abnormalities in cholesterol transport could account for this sterol accumulation, the uptake, release, and imaging capabilities of intravenously injected /sup 131/I-6-iodomethyl-29-norcholesterol, a cholesterol analogue, were studied preoperatively in five patients with clear cell renal cancer. At surgery, samples of the liver, tumor, adrenal, and non-tumor kidney were obtained for analysis. /sup 131/I-sterol uptake by the tumor, when normalized for cholesterol content, was less than for adrenal, liver or kidney. In contrast, release of preloaded /sup 131/I-sterol from the human tumors was consistently slower than for normal kidney. The reduced release of free cholesterol from renal cancer cells may, in part, be responsible for the accumulation of cholesterol in human renal cancer.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Phospholipid Bilayers with Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Hofsäß, Christofer; Lindahl, Erik; Edholm, Olle

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the microscopic interactions between cholesterol and lipids in biological membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of large membranes with different levels of cholesterol content. The simulations extend to 10 ns, and were performed with hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. The bilayers contain 1024 lipids of which 0–40% were cholesterol and the rest DPPC. The effects of cholesterol on the structure and mesoscopic dynamics of the bilayer were monitored as a function of cholesterol concentration. The main effects observed are a significant ordering of the DPPC chains (as monitored by NMR type order parameters), a reduced fraction of gauche bonds, a reduced surface area per lipid, less undulations—corresponding to an increased bending modulus for the membrane, smaller area fluctuations, and a reduced lateral diffusion of DPPC-lipids as well as cholesterols. PMID:12668428

  19. Activation of factor XII and prekallikrein with cholesterol sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Kato, H; Iwanaga, S; Iwamori, M; Nagai, Y

    1985-04-01

    Cholesterol sulfate was found to display a strong ability to trigger the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein in the presence of HMW kininogen. Other sulfate ester derivatives of testosterone, estrone, pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone and cholesterol tested did not show any effect on the activation of Factor XII and prekallikrein. The activity of cholesterol acetate and sulfodeoxycholic acid was very weak. Cholesterol sulfate markedly shortened the partial thromboplastin time of normal human plasma, but not plasmas deficient in Factor XII, Factor XI and HMW kininogen. Upon prolonged incubation, the partial thromboplastin time of prekallikrein-deficient plasma was also shortened. Moreover, as well as kaolin and sulfatide, cholesterol sulfate shortened the partial thromboplastin time of plasmas from monkey, dog, rat, guinea pig, sheep, cow, hog and horse, but not from duck and chicken. Since cholesterol sulfate is distributed in erythrocytes, various organs and body fluids, it may play an important role in the activation of the intrinsic blood coagulation system. PMID:3847226

  20. The perspective on cholesterol-lowering mechanisms of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ishimwe, Nestor; Daliri, Eric B; Lee, Byong H; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng

    2015-01-01

    The use of probiotics as food components combats not only cardiovascular diseases but also many gastrointestinal tract disorders. Their health benefits along with their increased global market have interested scientists for better formulation and appropriate administration to the consumers. However, the lack of clear elucidation of their cholesterol-lowering mechanisms has complicated their proper dosage and administration to the beneficiaries. In this review, proposed mechanisms of cholesterol reduction such as deconjugation of bile via bile salt hydrolase activity, binding of cholesterol to probiotic cellular surface and incorporation into their cell membrane, production of SCFAs from oligosaccharides, coprecipitation of cholesterol with deconjugated bile, and cholesterol conversion to coprostanol have been discussed. Also, hypocholesterolemic effects on human- and animal-trial results, commonly used probiotics and synbiotics with effect on serum cholesterol regulation, types of bile salt hydrolase genes, and substrate specificities have been discussed. PMID:25403164