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Sample records for cholinesterases

  1. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  3. Cholinesterase activity in Japanese quail dusted with carbaryl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were dusted with 5% carbaryl to determine if this topical treatment would alter plasma and brain cholinesterase activities. Within 6 hours after dusting, plasma cholinesterase activity was depressed compared with controls, the depression averaging 20% for females and 27% for males. By 24 hours the cholinesterase activity of females had returned to normal, but the cholinesterase activity of males remained depressed. Brain cholinesterase activity was not affected by the treatment, and there were no overt toxic signs.

  4. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory


    Biomonitoring of organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides has focused primarily on the inhibition of blood cholinesterase. Blood biomonitoring, however, can be invasive, time-consuming, and costly, especially in young children and infants. Therefore, saliva biomonitoring ha...

  5. Composites of silica with immobilized cholinesterase incorporated into polymeric shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payentko, Victoriya; Matkovsky, Alexander; Matrunchik, Yulia

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic approaches for new nanocomposite materials with relatively high cholinesterase activity have been developed. The peculiarity of the formation of such systems is the introduction of cholinesterase into polymer with subsequent incorporation on the ready-made silica particles and into the polysiloxane matrixes during sol-gel synthesis. Evaluation of the cholinesterase activity has been fulfilled through the imitation of the acetylcholine chloride decomposition reaction. Values of activity for cholinesterase nanocomposites demonstrated in this work are higher than those for the native cholinesterase. The higher activity of cholinesterase contained in nanocomposites was found for those prepared using highly dispersed silica.

  6. Biological Studies in Childhood Schizophrenia: Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Alexander R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of plasma (pseudo) cholinesterase and erythrocyte (true) cholinesterase activity in 16 male childhood schizophrenic patients and 16 male nonpsychotic hospitalized controls revealed no significant differences between the two groups. (Author)

  7. Different Cholinesterase Inhibitor Effects on CSF Cholinesterases in Alzheimer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, Agneta; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Peskind, Elaine; Soininen, Hilkka; Mousavi, Malahat; Eagle, Gina; Lane, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Background The current study aimed to compare the effects of different cholinesterase inhibitors on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities and protein levels, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods and Findings AD patients aged 50–85 years were randomized to open-label treatment with oral rivastigmine, donepezil or galantamine for 13 weeks. AChE and BuChE activities were assayed by Ellman’s colorimetric method. Protein levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Primary analyses were based on the Completer population (randomized patients who completed Week 13 assessments). 63 patients were randomized to treatment. Rivastigmine was associated with decreased AChE activity by 42.6% and decreased AChE protein levels by 9.3%, and decreased BuChE activity by 45.6% and decreased BuChE protein levels by 21.8%. Galantamine decreased AChE activity by 2.1% and BuChE activity by 0.5%, but increased AChE protein levels by 51.2% and BuChE protein levels by10.5%. Donepezil increased AChE and BuChE activities by 11.8% and 2.8%, respectively. Donepezil caused a 215.2%increase in AChE and 0.4% increase in BuChE protein levels. Changes in mean AChE-Readthrough/Synaptic ratios, which might reflect underlying neurodegenerative processes, were 1.4, 0.6, and 0.4 for rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine, respectively. Conclusion The findings suggest pharmacologically-induced differences between rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine. Rivastigmine provides sustained inhibition of AChE and BuChE, while donepezil and galantamine do not inhibit BuChE and are associated with increases in CSF AChE protein levels. The clinical implications require evaluation. PMID:19199870

  8. Brain cholinesterase activities of passerine birds in forests sprayed with cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinkl, J.G.; Henny, C.J.; Shea, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activities were determined in passerines collected from northwestern forests that had been sprayed with trichlorfon, acephate, and carbaryl at 0.56, 1.13 and 2.26 kg/ha. Trichlorfon and carbaryl inhibited cholinesterase activity slightly in only a few birds, primarily canopy dwellers. In contrast, acephate caused marked inhibition of cholinesterase activity in nearly all birds collected. The inhibition was present even 33 days after spraying. Some birds from the acephate-sprayed forests exhibited clinical signs compatible with acute acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

  9. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  10. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  11. INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON OF CHOLINESTERASE ASSAY MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twelve wildlife toxicology laboratories participated in an interlaboratory survey of cholinesterase (ChE) assays to determine comparability of absolute ChE values and estimates of ChE inhibition from organophosphorus insecticide-dosed birds and to examine the type and consistency...

  12. METHODS USED IN DETERMINATION OF CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview and historical perspective of the many available methods for cholinesterase (ChE) activity determination. ue to the almost universal use of the spectrophotometric assay in wildlife toxicology, the remainder of the chapter focuses on this techniqu...

  13. The purification of cholinesterase from horse serum.

    PubMed

    Main, A R; Soucie, W G; Buxton, I L; Arinc, E

    1974-12-01

    A relatively simple method is described by which cholinesterase was purified about 19000-fold starting from horse serum. Typically 20 litres of serum were processed to yield 15-18mg of electrophoretically pure cholinesterase in the form of an active salt-free dry powder. The method included two stages: fractionation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and ion-exchange chromatography. The (NH(4))(2)SO(4) stage included, in principle, the acid (pH3) step of the Strelitz (1944) procedure. The step took advantage of the stabilizing effect that 33%-satd. (NH(4))(2)SO(4) has on cholinesterase activity at pH3 and it is recognized that in the absence of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) the enzyme is rapidly destroyed at pH3. Cholinesterase was significantly more stable to pH3.0 at 2 degrees C than at 24 degrees C, and the acid step was done at both temperatures. The specific activities of the final products obtained by way of acid steps were the same at either temperature, thus indicating that the step has not harmed the enzyme active sites. The product from the first two stages was purified over 18000-fold and was 85-90% cholinesterase. The remaining impurities were removed by preparative gel electrophoresis. The product was about 40% more active and contained 40% more active sites per unit weight than electrophoretically pure cholinesterase prepared from partially purified commercial starting material. Although the number of active sites per molecule was not determined with certainty, a value of at least 3 and possibly 4 was indicated. The partial specific volumes were determined with a precision density meter, on the ultracentrifuge and from the amino acid and carbohydrate composition. The values by these independent methods were 0.688, 0.71 and 0.712ml/g, respectively. The amino acid and carbohydrate composition was determined. The cholinesterase contained 17.4% carbohydrate including 3.2% N-acetylneuraminic acid. PMID:4462752

  14. Coumarins as cholinesterase inhibitors: A review.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luana G; Rennã, Magdalena N; Figueroa-Villar, Jose D

    2016-07-25

    The first report in literature of the isolation of coumarin was in the year 1820. After this report, other papers were published demonstrating the isolation and synthesis of coumarin and analogues. These compounds have been studying along the years for several different pathologies. One of these pathologies was Alzheimer's disease (AD), being the main cause of dementia in the contemporary world. There are two hypotheses to explain the pathogenesis mechanism and disease symptoms, then having the "amyloid hypothesis" and the "cholinergic hypothesis". Some drugs for AD are based on the theory of "cholinergic hypothesis", which objective is to increase the concentration of ACh in the synaptic cleft by the inhibition of cholinesterases. Over the last twenty years, many studies with coumarins compounds were reported as cholinesterases inhibitors. The aim of the present review is to discuss the studies and development of new compounds for AD treatment. PMID:27174134

  15. ALTERNATE ENZYMES FOR USE IN CHOLINESTERASE ANTAGONIST MONITORS, (CAM'S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cholinesterase Antagonist Monitors ('CAM's') normally use cholinesterase as the sensor in the detection of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. The present investigation has been concerned with a search for alternate enzymes that could be used in the CAM system and that ...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cholinesterase test system. 862.3240 Section 862.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3240 Cholinesterase test system....

  17. Carboxylic Acid Esters as Substrates of Cholinesterases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brestkin, A. P.; Rozengart, E. V.; Abduvakhabov, A. A.; Sadykov, A. A.

    1983-10-01

    Data on the kinetics of the hydrolysis of various carboxylic acid esters by two main types of cholinesterases — acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes and butyrylcholinesterase from horse blood serum — are surveyed. It is shown that the rate of enzyme hydrolysis depends significantly on the structure of the acyl part of the ester molecule, the nature of the ester heteroatom, the structure of the alcohol component, and particularly the structure of the onium group. Esters based on natural products are of special interest as specific substrates of these enzymes. The role of the productive and non-productive sorption of the substrates in enzyme catalysis is demonstrated. The bibliography includes 81 references.

  18. Cholinesterase inhibitors: cardioprotection in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Monacelli, Fiammetta; Rosa, Gianmarco

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a life shortening disease, and the lack of disease modifying therapy implies a huge impact on life expectancy as well as an outgrowing financial and socioeconomic burden. Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) represent the first line symptomatic therapy, whose benefit to harm ratio is still a matter of debate. Acetylcholinesterase enzyme is a core interest for pharmacological and toxicological research to unmask the fine balance between therapeutic drug efficacy, tolerability, safety, and detrimental effects up to adverse drug reaction. So far, a body of evidence advocated that an increased vagal tone was associated to an increased risk of gastrointestinal and cardiac side effects (negative chronotropic, arrhytmogenic, hypotensive effects), able to hamper ChEIs effects on cognition, reducing administration feasibility and compliance, especially in older and comorbid patients. Conversely, a growing body of evidence is indicating a protective role of ChEIs on overall cardiovascular mortality in patients with dementia, through a series of in vitro and in vivo investigations. The present review is aimed to report the up to date literature in the controversial field of ChEIs and cardioprotection in dementia, offering a state of the art, which may constitute the conceptual framework to be enlarged in order to build higher evidence. Chronic vagal nerve stimulation acted upon by donepezil might improve long term survival through pharmacological properties apart from cholinesterase inhibition, able to offer cardioprotection, abating the overall cardiovascular risk, and, thus profiling a new line of therapeutic intervention for ChEI drug class. PMID:25024324

  19. [Cholinesterase inhibitor poisoning: a complicated medical challenge].

    PubMed

    Lavon, Ophir; Sagi, Ram

    2013-07-01

    Exposure to insecticides, mainly cholinesterase inhibitors, is a global problem with substantial morbidity and mortality. Risk of intoxication is increased in rural areas where there is high availability and proximity of insecticides to families and children. Neglected storage and inadequate practice lead to dangerous exposure. Strict regulations and appropriate safety measures are needed for the prevention of exposure to insecticides. Broad toxicological knowledge is necessary in order to treat organophosphate and carbamate poisoned patients. Diagnosis is not trivial, since the identity of the poison is not always apparent. Multiple exposures including organic solvents are possible. The clinical presenting can be confusing. Measurement of cholinesterase activity is mandatory in establishing the diagnosis. Prompt treatment with proper antidotes and respiratory support is indicated. Early administration of anticonvulsants may mitigate central neurologic complications. Monitoring neurologic and cardiac function is advised for rapid identification of complications and prognosis evaluation. Meticulous preparedness of health care providers for insecticide poisoning is needed from the pre-hospital phase to emergency departments and the different hospital wards. PMID:23957084

  20. Prognostic Factors in Cholinesterase Inhibitor Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sun, In O; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Lee, Kwang Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphates and carbamates are insecticides that are associated with high human mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) poisoning. Material/Methods This study included 92 patients with CI poisoning in the period from January 2005 to August 2013. We divided these patients into 2 groups (survivors vs. non-survivors), compared their clinical characteristics, and analyzed the predictors of survival. Results The mean age of the included patients was 56 years (range, 16–88). The patients included 57 (62%) men and 35 (38%) women. When we compared clinical characteristics between the survivor group (n=81, 88%) and non-survivor group (n=11, 12%), there were no differences in renal function, pancreatic enzymes, or serum cholinesterase level, except for serum bicarbonate level and APACHE II score. The serum bicarbonate level was lower in non-survivors than in survivors (12.45±2.84 vs. 18.36±4.73, P<0.01). The serum APACHE II score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (24.36±5.22 vs. 12.07±6.67, P<0.01). The development of pneumonia during hospitalization was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (n=9, 82% vs. n=31, 38%, P<0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum bicarbonate concentration, APACHE II score, and pneumonia during hospitalization were the important prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Conclusions Serum bicarbonate and APACHE II score are useful prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Furthermore, pneumonia during hospitalization was also important in predicting prognosis in patients with CI poisoning. Therefore, prevention and active treatment of pneumonia is important in the management of patients with CI poisoning. PMID:26411989

  1. BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY AND THE INFLUENCE OF STRESS ON CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal activity of brain and plasma cholinesterase in higher vertebrates is known to be affected by age, genetics, circadian rhythms, sex, endocrine function, and reproductive status. arious stressors (e.g., nutritional plane, ambient temperature, disease) have also been demonstr...

  2. COMPARISONS OF THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS USING A NEUROBEHAVIORAL SCREENING BATTERY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical signs of intoxication produced by cholinesterase inhibitors, many of which are used as pesticides, are considered important information for regulatory purposes. e conducted acute studies of cholinesterase inhibitors in order to compare their effects as determined by ...

  3. [Plasma cholinesterase activity in hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Araoud, Manel; Mhenni, Hamida; Hellara, Ilhem; Hellara, Olfa; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Mili, Marwa; Saffar, Hammouda; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cholinesterase activity (ChE) may vary in some pathological circumstances. We studied the changes in activity of this enzyme according to the type of liver injury, to assess the interest of this parameter in the diagnosis of liver diseases. Our study was performed on 102 patients with different liver diseases and 53 healthy controls. The ChE activity was lower in patients compared to control group (p < 0.0001), and more pronounced in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from hepatitis. Elevated activities of AST, ALT, GGT and ALP and bilirubinemia, and decreased albuminemia were noted in patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Hypoalbuminemia was significantly important in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from cholestasis or hepatitis. A correlation between ChE and bilirubin, albumin and serum protein was found in patients with cirrhosis or those with chronic hepatitis. A significantly lower activity of ChE was found in patients with hepatic insufficiency (HI). In case of suspicion of HI, the prescription of ChE activity could guide or confirm the diagnosis of the impairment. PMID:23747666

  4. Brain cDNA clone for human cholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, C; Adkins, S; Chatonnet, A; Vaughan, T A; Bartels, C F; Kott, M; Rosenberry, T L; La Du, B N; Lockridge, O

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA library from human basal ganglia was screened with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to portions of the amino acid sequence of human serum cholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8). Five overlapping clones, representing 2.4 kilobases, were isolated. The sequenced cDNA contained 207 base pairs of coding sequence 5' to the amino terminus of the mature protein in which there were four ATG translation start sites in the same reading frame as the protein. Only the ATG coding for Met-(-28) lay within a favorable consensus sequence for functional initiators. There were 1722 base pairs of coding sequence corresponding to the protein found circulating in human serum. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA exactly matched the 574 amino acid sequence of human serum cholinesterase, as previously determined by Edman degradation. Therefore, our clones represented cholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) rather than acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7). It was concluded that the amino acid sequences of cholinesterase from two different tissues, human brain and human serum, were identical. Hybridization of genomic DNA blots suggested that a single gene, or very few genes, coded for cholinesterase. Images PMID:3477799

  5. Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Lewy Body Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yasue, Ichiro; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-01-01

    Background: We performed a meta-analysis of cholinesterase inhibitors for patients with Lewy body disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies. Methods: The meta-analysis included only randomized controlled trials of cholinesterase inhibitors for Lewy body disorders. Results: Seventeen studies (n = 1798) were assessed. Cholinesterase inhibitors significantly improved cognitive function (standardized mean difference [SMD] = −0.53], behavioral disturbances (SMD = −0.28), activities of daily living (SMD = −0.28), and global function (SMD = −0.52) compared with control treatments. Changes in motor function were not significantly different from control treatments. Furthermore, the cholinesterase inhibitor group had a higher all-cause discontinuation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.48, number needed to harm [NNH] = 14), discontinuation due to adverse events (RR = 1.59, NNH = 20), at least one adverse event (RR = 1.13, NNH = 11), nausea (RR = 2.50, NNH = 13), and tremor (RR = 2.30, NNH = 20). Conclusions: Cholinesterase inhibitors appear beneficial for the treatment of Lewy body disorders without detrimental effects on motor function. However, a careful monitoring of treatment compliance and side effects is required. PMID:26221005

  6. The carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in invertebrate deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Glynis; Moore, Samuel W

    2012-06-01

    Carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family members are responsible for controlling the nerve impulse, detoxification and various developmental functions, and are a major target of pesticides and chemical warfare agents. Comparative structural analysis of these enzymes is thus important. The invertebrate deuterostomes (phyla Echinodermata and Hemichordata and subphyla Urochordata and Cephalochordata) lie in the transition zone between invertebrates and vertebrates, and are thus of interest to the study of evolution. Here we have investigated the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in the sequenced genomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata), Saccoglossus kowalevskii (Hemichordata), Ciona intestinalis (Urochordata) and Branchiostoma floridae (Cephalochordata), using sequence analysis of the catalytic apparatus and oligomerisation domains, and phylogenetic analysis. All four genomes show blurring of structural boundaries between cholinesterases and carboxylesterases, with many intermediate enzymes. Non-enzymatic proteins are well represented. The Saccoglossus and Branchiostoma genomes show evidence of extensive gene duplication and retention. There is also evidence of domain shuffling, resulting in multidomain proteins consisting either of multiple carboxylesterase domains, or of carboxylesterase/cholinesterase domains linked to other domains, including RING finger, chitin-binding, immunoglobulin, fibronectin type 3, CUB, cysteine-rich-Frizzled, caspase activation and 7tm-1, amongst others. Such gene duplication and domain shuffling in the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family appears to be unique to the invertebrate deuterostomes, and we hypothesise that these factors may have contributed to the evolution of the morphological complexity, particularly of the nervous system and neural crest, of the vertebrates. PMID:22210164

  7. Whole Blood Cholinesterase Activity in 20 Species of Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Igal H; Yanco, Esty G; Landau, Shmulik; Nadler-Valency, Rona; Anglister, Nili; Bueller-Rosenzweig, Ariela; Apelbom-Halbersberg, Tal; Cuneah, Olga; Hanji, Vera; Bellaiche, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Clinical signs of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication in wild birds can be mistaken for those of other diseases, thus potentially delaying diagnosis and implementation of life-saving treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the reference interval for blood cholinesterase activity in 20 different wild avian species from 7 different orders, thereby compiling a reference database for wildlife veterinarians. Blood was collected from birds not suspected of having organophosphate or carbamate toxicosis, and the modified Michel method, which determines the change in blood pH that directly correlates with cholinesterase activity, was used to measure blood cholinesterase levels. Results of change in blood pH values ranged from 0.11 for the white-tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla ) to 0.90 for the honey buzzard ( Pernis apivorus ). The results showed that even within the same family, interspecies differences in normal cholinesterase blood activity were not uncommon. The findings emphasized the importance of determining reference intervals for avian blood cholinesterase activity at the species level. PMID:27315378

  8. Galantamine: new preparation. The fourth cholinesterase inhibitor for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    (1) The reference symptomatic treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease is a cholinesterase inhibitor such as donepezil, but efficacy is only moderate and only about 10% of those patients treated actually benefit. (2) Galantamine is the fourth cholinesterase inhibitor to be marketed in France for Alzheimer's disease. The clinical file contains data from five double-blind placebo-controlled trials lasting 3-6 months, but no data comparing galantamine with other drugs. (3) These trials show that about 5-13% of patients treated with galantamine may be improved. (4) Adverse effects are very frequent, and are similar to those of other cholinesterase inhibitors, i.e. nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, dyspepsia, etc. (5) For patients who are eligible for drug therapy, the reference treatment is still donepezil, for want of anything better. PMID:11824442

  9. Cholinesterase inhibition in Alzheimer's disease: is specificity the answer?

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Ian R; Rockwood, Kenneth; Martin, Earl; Darvesh, Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors are the standard of care for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the cholinergic neurotransmitter acetylcholine. However, the related enzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) also breaks down acetylcholine and is likewise targeted by the same clinical cholinesterase inhibitors. The lack of clinical efficacy for the highly specific and potent AChE inhibitor, (-) huperzine A, is intriguing, given the known cholinergic deficit in AD. Based on the proven efficacy of inhibitors affecting both cholinesterases and the apparent failure of specific AChE inhibition, focused BuChE inhibition seems important for more effective treatment of AD. Therefore, BuChE-selective inhibitors provide promise for improved benefit. PMID:24898642

  10. Cholinesterase based amperometric biosensors for assay of anticholinergic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Biosensors are analytical devices being approachable for multiple analytes assay. Here, biosensors with intercepted acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are presented as tool for assay of anticholinergic compounds such as pesticides, nerve agents and some natural toxins. Principle of assay is based on evaluation of cholinesterase activity and its pertinent decrease in presence of analyte. Nerve agents, pesticides, anticholinergic drugs useable for treatment of Alzheimer′s disease as well as myasthenia gravis and aflatoxins are enlisted as compounds simply analyzable by cholinesterase biosensors. PMID:21217847

  11. [THE CHOLINESTERASE OF BLOOD SERUM IN WORKERS OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISE].

    PubMed

    Radamishina, G G; Bakirov, A B; Gimranova, G G; Valeeva, O V

    2015-08-01

    The biochemical study of activity of serum cholinesterase in workers of industrial enterprise was carried out on the example of petrochemical industry. The indicators of average activity of enzyme and prevalence of indicators going beyond limits of reference values were analyzed depending on manufacturing-labor experience, profession and diseases established in workers. The main diseases, professional and labor experience groups were identified where activity of cholinesterase significantly changes. The impact of labor experience and profession on level of activity ofenzyme in blood serum is demonstrated. PMID:26596043

  12. Structure-Based Search for New Inhibitors of Cholinesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bajda, Marek; Więckowska, Anna; Hebda, Michalina; Guzior, Natalia; Sotriffer, Christoph A.; Malawska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Cholinesterases are important biological targets responsible for regulation of cholinergic transmission, and their inhibitors are used for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. To design new cholinesterase inhibitors, of different structure-based design strategies was followed, including the modification of compounds from a previously developed library and a fragment-based design approach. This led to the selection of heterodimeric structures as potential inhibitors. Synthesis and biological evaluation of selected candidates confirmed that the designed compounds were acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with IC50 values in the mid-nanomolar to low micromolar range, and some of them were also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors. PMID:23478436

  13. Application of brain cholinesterase reactivation to differentiate between organophosphorus and carbamate pesticide exposure in wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.R.; Thomas, N.J.; Hulse, C.

    1995-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activity was measured to evaluate pesticide exposure in wild birds. Thermal reactivation of brain cholinesterase was used to differentiate between carbamate and organophosphorus pesticide exposure. Brain cholinesterase activity was compared with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of stomach contents. Pesticides were identified and confirmed in 86 of 102 incidents of mortality from 29 states within the USA from 1986 through 1991. Thermal reactivation of cholinesterase activity was used to correctly predict carbamates in 22 incidents and organophosphates in 59 incidents. Agreement (P < 0.001) between predictions based on cholinesterase activities and GC/MS results was significant.

  14. Modifications of a cholinesterase method for determination of erythrocyte cholinesterase activity in wild mammals.

    PubMed

    Donovan, D A; Zinkl, J G

    1994-04-01

    A method to determine erythrocyte cholinesterase (ChE) activity was modified for use in wild mammals. Erythrocyte ChE of California voles (Microtus californicus) was primarily acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which was similar to the brain and unlike plasma which was primarily butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Triplicate erythrocyte AChE analyses from individual animals of several species of wild rodents revealed a mean coefficient of variation of 8.7% (SD = 4.3%). Erythrocyte ChE activity of several wild mammals of California revealed that mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) had the highest erythrocyte AChE activity (1,514.5 mU/ml) and dusky-footed woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes) had the lowest activity (524.3 mU/ml). No ChE activity was found in erythrocytes of several species of birds and fish. PMID:8028108

  15. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cholinesterase test system. 862.3240 Section 862.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cholinesterase test system. 862.3240 Section 862.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cholinesterase test system. 862.3240 Section 862.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3240 - Cholinesterase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cholinesterase test system. 862.3240 Section 862.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  19. The effect of cholinesterase inhibitors of SFEMG in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Massey, J M; Sanders, D B; Howard, J F

    1989-02-01

    We report four patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) in whom single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) jitter measurements were normal in some muslces while they were taking pyridostigmine and became abnormal 2-14 days after the medication was discontinued. When the abnormality of neuromuscular transmission in MG is mild, cholinesterase inhibitors may mask the findings of increased jitter on SFEMG. PMID:2540433

  20. Relationship Between Brain and Plasma Carbaryl Levels and Cholinesterase Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbaryl is a N-methylcarbamate pesticide and, like others in this class, is a reversible inhibitor of cholinesterase (ChE) enzymes. Although studied for many years, there is a surprising lack of information relating tissue levels of carbaryl with ChE activity in the same animals...

  1. REGULATORY AND RESEARCH ISSUES RELATED TO CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the neurotoxic potential of organophosphate and carbamate pesticides should be greatly facilitated by the knowledge that the mechanisms of action of these insecticides is presumed to be the inhibition of cholinesterase, the enzyme which controls the levels of the neurot...

  2. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN ACTIVITY OF MALLARD PLASMA CHOLINESTERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity was measured repeatedly in 27 mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings between 7 and 85 days of age to determine age-dependent changes in enzyme activity. Plasma AChE, BChe, and total cholinesterase (ChE) a...

  3. SEQUENTIAL SAMPLING OF PLASMA CHOLINESTERASE IN MALLARDS (ANAS PLATYRHYNCHOS) AS AN INDICATOR OF EXPOSURE TO CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of sequential measurements of plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity for monitoring exposure to organophosphorus pesticides was investigated in the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). t the onset of incubation, birds were assigned to treated (400 ppm methyl parathion in the diet)...

  4. Structural analysis of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides of cholinesterases. N-linked carbohydrates of cholinesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Doctor, B.P.

    1995-12-31

    Cholinesterases are serine esterases that hydrolyse choline esters faster than other substrates. They are highly glycosylated proteins with up to 24% of their molecular weight constituted of carbohydrates. Here we report the results of our studies on the glycosylation of fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase (FBS AChE) and horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (Eq BChE). Analysis of the monosaccharide content of the two enzymes indicated that Eq BChE contained 520 nmoles of monosaccharide/mg protein, as compared to 1290 nmoles/mg protein for Eq BChE. Both enzymes contained mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid. Fucose was present in Eq BChE only. The structures of the two major oligosaccharides from FBS AChE and one major oligosaccharide from Eq BChE were determined and found to be very similar except that one of the oligosaccharides from FBS AChE contained a galactose alphal-3 galactose betal-4-determinant which has been identified as a potentially immunogenic determinant.

  5. [Treatment for dementia in parkinsonian syndromes. Efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Liepelt, I; Maetzler, W; Blaicher, H-P; Gasser, T; Berg, D

    2008-01-01

    In parkinsonian syndromes dementia frequently occurs in the disease progress. The cholinergic system has been proposed as playing a key role in cognitive disturbances. Therefore the application of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) is also hotly argued for dementia associated with parkinsonian syndromes. This review focuses on the specific symptoms of dementia in Parkinson's disease (PDD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). The effect of cholinergic treatment on cognition and behaviour is reported and critically discussed. There is evidence that medication with some ChEIs reduces cognitive disturbances and to a lesser extent improves activities of daily living in PDD. Behavioural symptoms also seem to be positively influenced by treatment with ChEIs in both PDD and DLB. The effect of treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors in PSP and CBD warrants more carefully designed studies including sufficient numbers of patients. PMID:17687535

  6. Structural bases for the specificity of cholinesterase catalysis and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P; Radic, Z; Hosea, N A; Camp, S; Marchot, P; Berman, H A

    1995-12-01

    The availability of a crystal structure and comparative sequences of the cholinesterases has provided templates suitable for analyzing the molecular bases of specificity of reversible inhibitors, carbamoylating agents and organophosphates. Site-specific mutagenesis enables one to modify the structures of both the binding site and peptide ligand as well as create chimeras reflecting one type of esterase substituted in the template of another. Herein we define the bases for substrate specificity of carboxylesters, the stereospecificity of enantiomeric alkylphosphonates and the selectivity of tricyclic aromatic compounds in the active center of cholinesterase. We also describe the binding loci of the peripheral site and changes in catalytic parameters induced by peripheral site ligands, using the peptide fasciculin. PMID:8597093

  7. The kinetics of inhibition of erythrocyte cholinesterase by monomethylcarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, E.; Simeon-Rudolf, V.

    1966-01-01

    1. The kinetics of the interaction of erythrocyte cholinesterase with 1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate, 2-isopropoxyphenyl N-methylcarbamate and phenyl N-methylcarbamate were studied. Rate constants for inhibition and rate constants for spontaneous reactivation were determined. The calculated rate constants for spontaneous reactivation agreed well with those obtained experimentally. 2. The degree of inhibition obtained after preincubation of enzyme and inhibitor was found to be independent of both the substrate concentration and the dilution of the inhibited enzyme. 3. The reaction between the enzyme and the inhibitor was consistent with carbamates being regarded as poor substrates of cholinesterases. There was no evidence for the formation of a reversible complex between the enzyme and the carbamate. PMID:5941343

  8. Tea toxicity and cholinesterase inhibition of Huilliche herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Adsersen, Anne; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2013-01-01

    Eleven species of Huilliche medicinal plants used traditionally against infections and for wound healing were tested for their cholinesterase inhibition activity. Two different teas (a 5-7 min infusion and a 1 h decoction, both in water) were tested for their toxicity against Artemia salina. The results from the present study clearly show that teas boiled for 1 h is much more toxic than teas infused for 5-7 min. These results support the different traditional use of the two teas, where the 1h tea is for external use only. Additionally, significant inhibition of cholinesterase has been observed for MeOH extracts of Acaena argentea, Amomyrtas meli and Pseudopanax laetevirens, with that of A. argentea being the most potent. All findings call for further investigations. PMID:23652640

  9. [The reversible inhibition of cholinesterases from different biological sources by phosphonium betaines].

    PubMed

    Zhuzhovskiĭ, Iu G; Kuznetsova, L P; Sochilina, E E; Dmitrieva, E N; Gololobov, Iu G; Bykovskaia, E Iu

    1996-01-01

    The action of some phosphonium betains on cholinesterases from different biological sources has been studied. It has been shown, that all studied betains are reversible inhibitors of cholinesterase hydrolysis of acetyltiocholine. Inhibiting action of these compounds on acetylcholinesterases is about ten times weaker that of the majority of known phosphonium salts, while their action on butyrylcholinesterases has no peculiarities. There were found certain differences for each betain compounds in their action on cholinesterases from different biological sources. These results may be used for detail classification of cholinesterases and allow to extend knowledge in comparative enzymology. PMID:8967277

  10. Evaluation of Candidate Genes for cholinesterase Activity in Farmworkers Exposed to organophosphorous Pesticides-Association of SNPs in BCHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Organophosphate pesticides act as cholinesterase inhibitors, and as such may give rise to potential neurological effects. Cholinesterase activity is a useful, indirect measurement of pesticide exposure, especially in high-risk individuals such as farmworkers. To und...

  11. Organophosphate inhibition of human heart muscle cholinesterase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Chemnitius, J M; Sadowski, R; Winkel, H; Zech, R

    1999-05-14

    The rate of acetylcholine hydrolysis of mammalian heart muscle influences cardiac responses to vagal innervation. We characterized cholinesterases of human left ventricular heart muscle with respect to both substrate specificity and irreversible inhibition kinetics with the organophosphorus inhibitor N,N'-di-isopropylphosphorodiamidic fluoride (mipafox). Specimens were obtained postmortem from three men and four women (61 +/- 5 years) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Myocardial choline ester hydrolyzing activity was determined with acetylthiocholine (ASCh; 1.25 mM), acetyl-beta-methylthiocholine (AbetaMSCh; 2.0 mM), and butyrylthiocholine (BSCh; 30 mM). After irreversible and covalent inhibition (60 min; 25 degrees C) with a wide range of mipafox concentrations (50 nM-5 mM), residual choline ester hydrolyzing activities were fitted to a sum of up to five exponentials using weighted least-squares non-linear curve fitting. In each ease, quality of curve fitting reached its optimum on the basis of a four component model. Final classification of heart muscle cholinesterases was achieved according to substrate hydrolysis patterns (nmol/min per g wet weight) and to second-order organophosphate inhibition rate constants k2 (1/mol per min); one choline ester hydrolyzing enzyme was identified as acetylcholinesterase (AChE; k2/mipafox = 6.1 (+/- 0.8) x 10(2)), and one as butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; k2/mipafox = 5.3 (+/- 1.1) x 10(3)). An enzyme exhibiting both ChE-like substrate specificity and relative resistance to mipafox inhibition (k2/mipafox = 5.2 (+/- 1.0) x 10(-1)) was classified as atypical cholinesterase. PMID:10421452

  12. Novel cholinesterase modulators and their ability to interact with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janockova, Jana; Gulasova, Zuzana; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil; Kozurkova, Maria

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, an interaction of four cholinesterase modulators (1-4) with calf thymus DNA was studied via spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, fluorescent spectroscopy and circular dichroism). From UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis, the binding constants for DNA-pyridinium oximes complexes were calculated (K = 3.5 × 104 to 1.4 × 105 M-1). All these measurements indicated that the compounds behave as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic techniques proved that ligand 2 inhibited topoisomerase I at a concentration 5 μM.

  13. Cholinesterases in neural development: new findings and toxicologic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Brimijoin, S; Koenigsberger, C

    1999-01-01

    Developing animals are more sensitive than adults to acute cholinergic toxicity from anticholinesterases, including organophosphorus pesticides, when administered in a laboratory setting. It is also possible that these agents adversely affect the process of neural development itself, leading to permanent deficits in the architecture of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recent observations indicate that organophosphorus exposure can affect DNA synthesis and cell survival in neonatal rat brain. New evidence that acetylcholinesterase may have a direct role in neuronal differentiation provides additional grounds for interest in the developmental toxicity of anticholinesterases. For example, correlative anatomic studies show that transient bursts of acetylcholinesterase expression often coincide with periods of axonal outgrowth in maturing avian, rodent, and primate brain. Some selective cholinesterase inhibitors effectively suppress neurite outgrowth in model systems like differentiating neuroblastoma cells and explanted sensory ganglia. When enzyme expression is altered by genetic engineering, acetylcholinesterase levels on the outer surface of transfected neurons correlate with ability to extend neurites. Certain of these "morphogenic" effects may depend on protein-protein interactions rather than catalytic acetylcholinesterase activity. Nonetheless, it remains possible that some pesticides interfere with important developmental functions of the cholinesterase enzyme family. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:10229707

  14. Exposure of nonbreeding migratory shorebirds to cholinesterase-inhibiting contaminants in the western hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strum, K.M.; Hooper, M.J.; Johnson, K.A.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Zaccagnini, M.E.; Sandercock, B.K.

    2010-01-01

    Migratory shorebirds frequently forage and roost in agricultural habitats, where they may be exposed to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. Exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate compounds, common anti-cholinesterases, can cause sublethal effects, even death. To evaluate exposure of migratory shorebirds to organophosphorus and carbamates, we sampled birds stopping over during migration in North America and wintering in South America. We compared plasma cholinesterase activities and body masses of individuals captured at sites with no known sources of organophosphorus or carbamates to those captured in agricultural areas where agrochemicals were recommended for control of crop pests. In South America, plasma acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in Buff-breasted Sandpipers was lower at agricultural sites than at reference sites, indicating exposure to organophosphorus and carbamates. Results of plasma cholinesterase reactivation assays and foot-wash analyses were inconclusive. A meta-analysis of six species revealed no widespread effect of agricultural chemicals on cholinesterase activity. however, four of six species were negative for acetylcholinesterase and one of six for butyrylcholinesterase, indicating negative effects of pesticides on cholinesterase activity in a subset of shorebirds. Exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors can decrease body mass, but comparisons between treatments and hemispheres suggest that agrochemicals did not affect migratory shorebirds' body mass. Our study, one of the first to estimate of shorebirds' exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, suggests that shorebirds are being exposed to cholinesterase- inhibiting pesticides at specific sites in the winter range but not at migratory stopover sites. future research should examine potential behavioral effects of exposure and identify other potential sitesand levels of exposure. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2010.

  15. Inhibition of cholinesterases by stereoisomers of Huperzine-A

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Qian, N.; Kovach, I.M.; Ashani, Y.; Kozikowski, A.P.

    1993-05-13

    Huperzine-A, a potential drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and possible pretreament for nerve agent toxicity, has recently been characterized as a reversible inhibitor of cholinesterases (Ashani et al., BBRC, 184:719-726, 1992). Long-term incubation of purified cholinesterases with Huperzine-A did not show any chemical modification of Huperzine-A. The dissociation constant, K(I), for fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase (FBS AChE) was approximately 20 nM, for Torpedo AChE was 215 nM, and for horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) was 40 micrometers M. Inhibition studies with the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A have shown that naturally occurring (-)-Huperzine-A inhibited FBS AChE 35-fold more potently than (+)-Huperzine-A, with K(I) values of 6.2 nM and 210 nM, respectively. These results are in agreement with those reported previously using crude preparations of rat cortical AChE (McKinney et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol., 203, 303-305, 1991). (-)-Huperzine-A, on the other hand, was 80-fold more potent than (+)-Huperzine-A in inhibiting Torpedo AChE, with K(I), values of 0.25 micrometers M and 22 micrometer M, respectively. No significant differences in K(I) were observed for the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A with horse serum BChE, indicating the lack of stereoselectivity of this compound for BChE. Molecular modeling studies involving docking of each of the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A into the active-site gorge of Torpedo AChE also revealed that (-)-Huperzine-A gave a better fit than (+)-Huperzine-A.

  16. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity of chlorophenoxy derivatives-Histamine H3 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Łażewska, Dorota; Jończyk, Jakub; Bajda, Marek; Szałaj, Natalia; Więckowska, Anna; Panek, Dawid; Moore, Caitlin; Kuder, Kamil; Malawska, Barbara; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-08-15

    In recent years, multitarget-directed ligands have become an interesting strategy in a search for a new treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Combination of both: a histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist and a cholinesterases inhibitor in one molecule could provide a new therapeutic opportunity. Here, we present biological evaluation of histamine H3 receptor ligands-chlorophenoxyalkylamine derivatives against cholinesterases: acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase. The target compounds showed cholinesterase inhibitory activity in a low micromolar range. The most potent in this group was 1-(7-(4-chlorophenoxy)heptyl)homopiperidine (18) inhibiting the both enzymes (EeAChE IC50=1.93μM and EqBuChE IC50=1.64μM). Molecular modeling studies were performed to explain the binding mode of 18 with histamine H3 receptor as well as with cholinesterases. PMID:27445168

  17. REPEATED INHIBITION OF CHOLINESTERASE BY CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS: BEHAVIORAL, NEUROCHEMICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL INDICES OF TOLERANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daily sc injections of the organophosphate (OP) diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) caused prolonged inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity in whole blood and brain and downregulation of muscarinic receptors in the CNS; these changes were accompanied by progressive, persistent ...

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND THERMOREGULATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO DIISOPROPYL FLUOROPHOSPHATE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the relationship between inhibition of cholinesterase activity (CA) and thermoregulatory response in the rat following exposure to the organophosphate (OP), diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). ale Long-Evans rats were injected with DFP dissolved in peanut oil i...

  19. COMPARISON OF CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY, RESIDUE LEVELS, AND URINARY METABOLITE EXCRETION OF RATS EXPOSED TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Blood cholinesterase activity, urinary levels of phenolic and organophosphorus metabolites, and residues of intact compounds in blood and fat were determined following exposure of rats to organophosphorus pesticides. The eight pesticides studied included representative halogenate...

  20. Use of procainamide gels in the purification of human and horse serum cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Ralston, J S; Main, A R; Kilpatrick, B F; Chasson, A L

    1983-04-01

    Two large-scale methods based primarily on the use of procainamide-Sepharose gels were developed for the purification of horse and human serum non-specific cholinesterases. With method I, the procainamide-Sepharose 4B gel was used in the first step to handle large volumes of serum. With method II, the procainamide-Sepharose 4B gel was used in the final step to obtain pure enzyme. Although both methods gave electrophoretically pure cholinesterase preparations in good yields, they were significantly more efficient at purifying the horse enzyme than the human enzyme. To study this problem, the relative binding of human and horse cholinesterases to procainamide-, methylacridinium (MAC)-, m-trimethylammoniophenyl (m-PTA)- and p-trimethylammoniophenyl (p-PTA)-Sepharose 4B gels were measured, by using two approaches. In one, binding was measured by a procedure involving equilibration of pure cholinesterase in a small volume of diluted gel slurry (4%, v/v). A partially purified preparation of Electrophorus acetylcholinesterase was included. Pure human cholinesterase bound consistently more tightly to each of the gels than did horse cholinesterase, and the acetylcholinesterase appeared to bind the gels 10-100 times more tightly than did the non-specific cholinesterases. The order of binding for the cholinesterases, beginning with the tightest, was: procainamide-Sepharose 4B, MAC-Sepharose 4B, p-PTA-Sepharose 4B and m-PTA-Sepharose 4B. For the acetylcholinesterase the order was: MAC-Sepharose 4B, procainamide-Sepharose 4B, p-PTA-Sepharose 4B and m-PTA-Sepharose 4B. The second approach involved passing native sera or partially purified sera fractions through 1 ml test columns of each of the four affinity gels to determine their retention capacity for the cholinesterases. With these impure samples, the MAC-Sepharose 4B gels proved superior to the procainamide-Sepharose 4B gels at retaining human cholinesterase, but the opposite was true for the horse cholinesterase. PMID

  1. Cholinesterase activity in rat liver and serum during experimentally induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Simon, G; Budavári, I

    1977-01-01

    Cholinesterase activity of albino rats with acute local oedematous inflammation induced by turpentine, croton oil or Freund's adjuvant was elevated in the liver homogenate but decreased in the serum. Aprotinin administration prevented the decrease of serum activity. In the oedema fluid of rats treated with croton oil an enzyme with cholinester splitting activity was detected and it was shown to be identical with serum cholinesterase (EC 3. 1. 1. 8.). PMID:311577

  2. Pesticide exposures, cholinesterase depression, and symptoms among North Carolina migrant farmworkers.

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, S; Loomis, D P; Mims, S R; Auer, A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. We conducted a clinic-based study of erythrocyte cholinesterase levels, pesticide exposures, and health effects among farmworkers and nonfarmworkers to determine risks for exposure and associated morbidity. METHODS. Two hundred two farmworkers and 42 nonfarmworkers were recruited sequentially at two community health centers. Erythrocyte cholinesterase levels were measured colorimetrically. Questionnaires obtained data on demographics, occupational history, exposures, and symptoms. RESULTS. Cholinesterase levels were significantly lower among farmworkers (30.28 U/g hemoglobin) than among nonfarmworkers (32.3 U/g hemoglobin). Twelve percent of farmworkers, but no nonfarmworkers, had very low levels. Farmworkers applying pesticides also had lower cholinesterase levels. One half of farmworkers reported being sprayed by pesticides and working in fields with an obvious chemical smell. Of reported symptoms, only diarrhea was associated with cholinesterase levels. Reported exposures, however, were strongly associated with symptoms. CONCLUSIONS. Farmworkers reported many pesticide exposures that violate state and federal regulations. Farmworkers had cholinesterase levels significantly lower than those of nonfarmworkers, although only spraying pesticides was associated with very low levels. PMID:8129063

  3. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders. PMID:27369572

  4. New cholinesterase inhibiting bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Abuta grandifolia.

    PubMed

    Cometa, Maria Francesca; Fortuna, Stefano; Palazzino, Giovanna; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Rengifo Salgado, Elsa; Nicoletti, Marcello; Tomassini, Lamberto

    2012-04-01

    The phytochemical study of the stem bark and wood of Abuta grandifolia (Mart.) Sandwith led to the identification of four bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BBIQs), namely (R,S)-2 N-norberbamunine (1), (R,R)-isochondodendrine (2), (S-S)-O4″-methyl, Nb-nor-O6'-demethyl-(+)-curine (3), and (S-S)-O4″-methyl, O6'-demethyl-(+)-curine (4), together with the aporphine alkaloid R-nornuciferine (5), all obtained by countercurrent distribution separation (CCD) and identified on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Alkaloids 3 and 4 were new. All the isolated compounds were tested for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities. 1 was the most active against AChE, whereas 3 and 4 were the most potent against BChE. Interestingly, all tested alkaloids are more potent against BChE than against AChE. This selectivity of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition could be important in order to speculate on their potential therapeutic relevance. PMID:22230193

  5. Cholinesterase inhibitors affect brain potentials in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Irimajiri, Rie; Michalewski, Henry J; Golob, Edward J; Starr, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an isolated episodic memory disorder that has a high likelihood of progressing to Alzheimer’s disease. Auditory sensory cortical responses (P50, N100) have been shown to be increased in amplitude in MCI compared to older controls. We tested whether (1) cortical potentials to other sensory modalities (somatosensory and visual) were also affected in MCI and (2) cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), one of the therapies used in this disorder, modulated sensory cortical potentials in MCI. Somatosensory cortical potentials to median nerve stimulation and visual cortical potentials to reversing checkerboard stimulation were recorded from 15 older controls and 15 amnestic MCI subjects (single domain). Results were analyzed as a function of diagnosis (Control, MCI) and ChEIs treatment (Treated MCI, Untreated MCI). Somatosensory and visual potentials did not differ significantly in amplitude in MCI subjects compared to controls. When ChEIs use was considered, somatosensory potentials (N20, P50) but not visual potentials (N70, P100, N150) were of larger amplitude in untreated MCI subjects compared to treated MCI subjects. Three individual MCI subjects showed increased N20 amplitude while off ChEIs compared to while on ChEIs. An enhancement of N20 somatosensory cortical activity occurs in amnestic single domain MCI and is sensitive to modulation by ChEIs. PMID:17320833

  6. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in mallard ducklings administered organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bradbury, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Oral doses of the organophosphorus pesticides acephate, dicrotophos, fensulfothion, fonofos, malathion, and parathion were administered to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for up to 77 d after dosing. In vivo recovery of brain ChE activity to within 2 standard deviations of the mean activity of undosed birds occurred within 8 d, after being depressed an average of 25-58% at 24 h after dosing. In vivo recovery of plasma ChE appeared as fast as or faster than that of brain, but the pattern of recovery was more erratic and therefore statistical comparison with brain ChE recovery was not attempted. In vitro tests indicated that the potential for dephosphorylation to contribute to in vivo recovery of inhibited brain ChE differed among chemical treatments. Some ducklings died as a result of organophosphate dosing. In an experiment in which ducklings within each treatment group received the same dose (mg/kg), the brain ChE activity in birds that died was less than that in birds that survived. Brain ChE activities in ducklings that died were significantly different among pesticide treatments: fensulfothion > parathion> acephate > malathion (p < 0.05).

  7. Characterizations of cholinesterases in golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata).

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang-Hui; Xie, Heidi Qun-Hui; Zha, Guang-Cai; Chen, Vicky Ping; Sun, Yan-Jie; Zheng, Yu-Zhong; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Luk, Wilson Kin-Wai

    2014-07-01

    Cholinesterases (ChEs) have been identified in vertebrates and invertebrates. Inhibition of ChE activity in invertebrates, such as bivalve molluscs, has been used to evaluate the exposure of organophosphates, carbamate pesticides, and heavy metals in the marine system. The golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata) is considered as one of the worst invasive alien species harmful to rice and other crops. The ChE(s) in this animal, which has been found recently, but poorly characterized thus far, could serve as biomarker(s) for environmental surveillance as well as a potential target for the pest control. In this study, the tissue distribution, substrate preference, sensitivity to ChE inhibitors, and molecular species of ChEs in P. canaliculata were investigated. It was found that the activities of both AChE and BChE were present in all test tissues. The intestine had the most abundant ChE activities. Both enzymes had fair activities in the head, kidney, and gills. The BChE activity was more sensitive to tetra-isopropylpyrophosphoramide (iso-OMPA) than the AChE. Only one BChE molecular species, 5.8S, was found in the intestine and head, whereas two AChE species, 5.8S and 11.6S, were found there. We propose that intestine ChEs of this snail may be potential biomarkers for manipulating pollutions. PMID:24217797

  8. Toxicological Differences Between NMDA Receptor Antagonists and Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaodong; Lin, Xiaotian; Hu, Rui; Sun, Nan; Hao, Jingru; Gao, Can

    2016-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), represented by donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, used to be the only approved class of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. After the approval of memantine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been recognized by authorities and broadly used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Along with complementary mechanisms of action, NMDA antagonists and ChEIs differ not only in therapeutic effects but also in adverse reactions, which is an important consideration in clinical drug use. And the number of patients using NMDA antagonists and ChEIs concomitantly has increased, making the matter more complicated. Here we used the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System for statistical analysis , in order to compare the adverse events of memantine and ChEIs. In general, the clinical evidence confirmed the safety advantages of memantine over ChEIs, reiterating the precautions of clinical drug use and the future direction of antidementia drug development. PMID:26769920

  9. Brain cholinesterase activity of apparently normal wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides are potent anticholinesterase substances that have killed large numbers of wild birds of various species. Cause of death is diagnosed by demonstration of depressed brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in combination with chemical detection of anticholinesterase residue in the affected specimen. ChE depression is determined by comparison of the affected specimen to normal ChE activity for a sample of control specimens of the same species, but timely procurement of controls is not always possible. Therefore, a reference file of normal whole brain ChE activity is provided for 48 species of wild birds from North America representing 11 orders and 23 families for use as emergency substitutes in diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning. The ChE values, based on 83 sets of wild control specimens from across the United States, are reproducible provided the described procedures are duplicated. Overall, whole brain ChE activity varied nearly three-fold among the 48 species represented, but it was usually similar for closely related species. However, some species were statistically separable in most families and some species of the same genus differed as much as 50%.

  10. Simulating cholinesterase inhibition in birds caused by dietary insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corson, M.S.; Mora, M.A.; Grant, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a stochastic simulation model that simulates avian foraging in an agricultural landscape to evaluate factors affecting dietary insecticide exposure and to predict post-exposure cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. To evaluate the model, we simulated published field studies and found that model predictions of insecticide decay and ChE inhibition reasonably approximated most observed results. Sensitivity analysis suggested that foraging location usually influenced ChE inhibition more than diet preferences or daily intake rate. Although organophosphorus insecticides usually caused greater inhibition than carbamate insecticides, insecticide toxicity appeared only moderately important. When we simulated impact of heavy insecticide applications during breeding seasons of 15 wild bird species, mean maximum ChE inhibition in most species exceeded 20% at some point. At this level of inhibition, birds may experience nausea and/or may exhibit minor behavioral changes. Simulated risk peaked in April-May and August-September and was lowest in July. ChE inhibition increased with proportion of vegetation in the diet. This model, and ones like it, may help predict insecticide exposure of and sublethal ChE inhibition in grassland animals, thereby reducing dependence of ecological risk assessments on field studies alone.

  11. Cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphorus compounds and its clinical effects*

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Tatsuji

    1971-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of acute poisoning by organophosphorus compounds in man are in accord with, initially, the stimulation and, later, the blocking of cholinergic transmission due to acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The manifestations involve mainly the para-sympathetic nerves, the neuromuscular junctions, and the central nerve synapses, and to a smaller degree the cholinergic sympathetic nerves. Miosis and muscle fasciculations are useful signs for diagnosis and for the control of therapy. Blood cholinesterase determination is the best diagnostic test. The cause of death is usually respiratory paralysis. Persistent manifestations have not been confirmed. Atropine and pralidoxime are effective for treatment and useful for diagnosis. Other oximes are promising but their clinical value has not been established. Poisoning by malathion is characterized by a prolonged course and by motor signs. Poisoning by organophosphorus compounds in man differs from animal experiments in several ways: in man, exposure may occur by several different routes, the manifestations are detected more easily, and therapy is given throughout the course of illness. PMID:4941660

  12. Purification and studies on characteristics of cholinesterases from Daphnia magna *

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-xia; Niu, Li-zhi; Li, Shao-nan

    2013-01-01

    Due to their significant value in both economy and ecology, Daphnia had long been employed to investigate in vivo response of cholinesterase (ChE) in anticholinesterase exposures, whereas the type constitution and property of the enzyme remained unclear. A type of ChE was purified from Daphnia magna using a three-step procedure, i.e., Triton X-100 extraction, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose™-Fast-Flow chromatography. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular mass of the purified ChE was estimated to be 84 kDa. Based on substrate studies, the purified enzyme preferred butyrylthiocholine iodide (BTCh) [with maximum velocity (V max)/Michaelis constant (K m)=8.428 L/(min·mg protein)] to acetylthiocholine iodide (ATCh) [with V max/K m=5.346 L/(min·mg protein)] as its substrate. Activity of the purified enzyme was suppressed by high concentrations of either ATCh or BTCh. Inhibitor studies showed that the purified enzyme was more sensitive towards inhibition by tetraisopropylpyrophosphoramide (iso-OMPA) than by 1,5-bis(4-allyldimethylammoniumphenyl) pentan-3-one dibromide (BW284C51). Result of the study suggested that the purified ChE was more like a type of pseudocholinesterase, and it also suggested that Daphnia magna contained multiple types of ChE in their bodies. PMID:23549850

  13. Subclinical health effects of environmental pesticide contamination in a developing country: cholinesterase depression in children.

    PubMed

    McConnell, R; Pacheco, F; Wahlberg, K; Klein, W; Malespin, O; Magnotti, R; Akerblom, M; Murray, D

    1999-08-01

    The effect of exposure to pesticides among children in a Nicaraguan community in the path of rain water runoff from a large crop-dusting airport was evaluated by measuring plasma cholinesterase. Mean cholinesterase activity in 17 children in the path of runoff was 2.4 international units/ml blood/min, lower than the 2.9 IU/ml/min measured in a group of 43 children from an unexposed community (difference=0.49 IU/ml/min; 95% C.I. 0.24, 0.76). Six (35%) of the 17 exposed children had abnormally low cholinesterase levels. A possible explanation for this physiological effect of exposure to pesticides is the dermal absorption which may have occurred among children playing barefoot in puddles grossly contaminated by runoff from the airport. Drinking water from a well in the exposed community demonstrated low level residues of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides, although contamination with toxaphene (not a cholinesterase inhibitor) exceeded by over 8-fold the United States Environmental Protection Agency maximum permissible concentration in drinking water. The difficulty in measuring health effects resulting from environmental pesticide contamination, and in controlling exposure resulting from the rapidly increasing use of pesticides, is a growing problem for developing countries like Nicaragua. PMID:10433839

  14. Brain cholinesterase response in the snakehead fish (Channa striata) after field exposure to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Cong; Nguyen, Thanh Phuong; Bayley, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The snakehead Channa striata is an economically important air-breathing fish species in the Mekong delta of Vietnam. Rice paddies, which are disturbed by the frequent application of agro-chemicals, are among the preferred habitats for this species during the rainy season. Diazinon is one of most commonly used chemicals in rice paddies. In the present study, exposure of adult snakehead fish to a single diazinon application in cages within a rice field resulted in long-term brain cholinesterase inhibition, while the water concentration of this insecticide fell below the detection limit within 3 days. In addition, incubation of brain homogenates with 2-PAM caused reactivation of the cholinesterase diazinon complex to within 80% of the control level. These experiments also showed that chemical ageing of the diazinon cholinesterase binding occurred, which may explain the long-term effects of this pesticide. PMID:18514898

  15. Toluidine blue O is a potent inhibitor of human cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Biberoglu, Kevser; Tek, Melike Yuksel; Ghasemi, Seyhan Turk; Tacal, Ozden

    2016-08-15

    In this study, the inhibitory effects of three phenothiazines [toluidine blue O (TBO), thionine (TH) and methylene violet (MV)] were tested on human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and their inhibitory mechanisms were studied in detail. MV acted as a linear mixed type inhibitor of human BChE with Ki = 0.66 ± 0.06 μM and α = 13.6 ± 3.5. TBO and TH caused nonlinear inhibition of human BChE, compatible to double occupancy. Ki values estimated by nonlinear regression analysis for TBO and TH were 0.008 ± 0.003 μM and 2.1 ± 0.42 μM, respectively. The inhibitory potential of TBO was also tested on human erythrocyte AChE. TBO acted as a linear mixed type inhibitor of human AChE with Ki = 0.041 ± 0.005 μM and α = 1.6 ± 0.007. Using four site-directed BChE mutants, the role of peripheral anionic site residues of human BChE was also investigated in the binding of TBO to BChE. The peripheral anionic site mutants of BChE caused 16-69-fold increase in Ki value of TBO, compared to recombinant wild-type, suggesting that peripheral anionic site residues are involved in the binding of TBO to human BChE. In conclusion, TBO which is a potent inhibitor of human cholinesterases, may be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27296777

  16. In vitro characterization of cholinesterases in the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Federico; Gastaldi, Laura; Gambi, Naimj; Fabbri, Elena

    2006-08-01

    Assessment of pollution impact in soil ecosystems has become a priority and interest has grown concerning the use of invertebrates as sentinel organisms. Inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity has a great potential as a biomarker of pesticide exposure, and we evaluated the ChE kinetic parameters in the earthworm Eisenia andrei in the presence of acetylthiocholine (ASCh), proprionylthiocholine (PSCh) and butyrylthiocholine (BSCh). The highest ChE activity was found in the presence of ASCh and PSCh (42.45 and 49.82 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1), respectively). BSCh was hydrolyzed at a rate of 4.04 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1), but the time course did not reach a plateau under our experimental conditions. Km values were 0.142+/-0.006 and 0.183+/-0.053 mM for ASCh and PSCh, respectively. ASCh and PSCh hydrolysis were significantly inhibited by eserine (IC50 values were 1.44 x 10(-8) and 1.20 x 10(-8) M, respectively) and by carbaryl (IC50 values of 5.75 x 10(-9) and 4.79 x 10(-9) M). The presence of different ChEs in tissues from E. andrei was assessed by using selective inhibitors for AChE (BW284c51) and BChE (iso-OMPA). BW284c51 strongly reduced ASCh and PSCh hydrolysis and slightly affected that of BSCh, while iso-OMPA was without effect in all cases. PMID:16753348

  17. Pro-2-PAM therapy for central and peripheral cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Demar, James C; Clarkson, Edward D; Ratcliffe, Ruthie H; Campbell, Amy J; Thangavelu, Sonia G; Herdman, Christine A; Leader, Haim; Schulz, Susan M; Marek, Elizabeth; Medynets, Marie A; Ku, Therese C; Evans, Sarah A; Khan, Farhat A; Owens, Roberta R; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Gordon, Richard K

    2010-09-01

    Novel therapeutics to overcome the toxic effects of organophosphorus (OP) chemical agents are needed due to the documented use of OPs in warfare (e.g. 1980-1988 Iran/Iraq war) and terrorism (e.g. 1995 Tokyo subway attacks). Standard OP exposure therapy in the United States consists of atropine sulfate (to block muscarinic receptors), the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivator (oxime) pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM), and a benzodiazepine anticonvulsant to ameliorate seizures. A major disadvantage is that quaternary nitrogen charged oximes, including 2-PAM, do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) to treat brain AChE. Therefore, we have synthesized and evaluated pro-2-PAM (a lipid permeable 2-PAM derivative) that can enter the brain and reactivate CNS AChE, preventing seizures in guinea pigs after exposure to OPs. The protective effects of the pro-2-PAM after OP exposure were shown using (a) surgically implanted radiotelemetry probes for electroencephalogram (EEG), (b) neurohistopathology of brain, (c) cholinesterase activities in the PNS and CNS, and (d) survivability. The PNS oxime 2-PAM was ineffective at reducing seizures/status epilepticus (SE) in diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP)-exposed animals. In contrast, pro-2-PAM significantly suppressed and then eliminated seizure activity. In OP-exposed guinea pigs, there was a significant reduction in neurological damage with pro-2-PAM but not 2-PAM. Distinct regional areas of the brains showed significantly higher AChE activity 1.5h after OP exposure in pro-2-PAM treated animals compared to the 2-PAM treated ones. However, blood and diaphragm showed similar AChE activities in animals treated with either oxime, as both 2-PAM and pro-2-PAM are PNS active oximes. In conclusion, pro-2-PAM can cross the BBB, is rapidly metabolized inside the brain to 2-PAM, and protects against OP-induced SE through restoration of brain AChE activity. Pro-2-PAM represents the first non-invasive means of administering a CNS therapeutic for

  18. Cholinesterase activity per unit surface area of conducting membranes.

    PubMed

    Brzin, M; Dettbarn, W D; Rosenberg, P; Nachmansohn, D

    1965-08-01

    According to theory, the action of acetylcholine (ACh) and ACh-esterase is essential for the permeability changes of excitable membranes during activity. It is, therefore, pertinent to know the activity of ACh-esterase per unit axonal surface area instead of per gram nerve, as it has been measured in the past. Such information has now been obtained with the newly developed microgasometric technique using a magnetic diver. (1) The cholinesterase (Ch-esterase) activity per mm(2) surface of sensory axons of the walking leg of lobster is 1.2 x 10(-3) microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 0.3 x 10(-3); SE = 0.17 x 10(-3)); the corresponding value for the motor axons isslightly higher: 1.93 x 10(-3) microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 0.41 x 10(-3); SE = +/- 0.14 x 10(-3)). Referred to gram nerve, the Ch-esterase activity of the sensory axons is much higher than that of the motor axons: 741 microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 73.5; SE = +/- 32.6) versus 111.6 microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 28.3; SE = +/- 10). (2) The enzyme activity in the small fibers of the stellar nerve of squid is 3.2 x 10(-4) microM/mm(2)/hr. (sigma = +/- 0.96 x 10(-4); SE = +/- 0.4 x 10(-4)). (3) The Ch-esterase activity per mm(2) surface of squid giant axon is 9.5 x 10(-5) microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 1.55 x 10(-5); SE = +/- 0.38 x 10(-5)). The value was obtained with small pieces of carefully cleaned axons after removal of the axoplasm and exposure to sonic disintegration. Without the latter treatment the figurewas 3.85 x 10(-5) microM/mm(2)/hr. (sigma = +/- 3.24 x 10(-5); SE = +/- 0.93 x 10(-5)). The experiments indicate the existence of permeability barriers in the cell wall surrounding part of the enzyme, since the substrate cannot reach all the enzyme even when small fragments of the cell wall are used without disintegration. (4) On the basis of the data obtained, some tentative approximations are made of the ratio of ACh released to Na ions entering the squid giant axon per cm(2) per impulse. PMID:5865929

  19. COMPARISON OF ACUTE NEUROBEHAVIORAL AND CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF N-METHYL CARBAMATES IN RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few studies evaluating direct functional and biochemical consequences of exposure. In the present study of the acute toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamate pesticides, we evaluated the dose-response profiles of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition in brain and erythrocytes (R...

  20. Brain cholinesterase inhibition in songbirds from pecan groves sprayed with phosaline and disulfoton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Seginak, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    Disulfoton at 0.83 kg/ha caused moderate to severe brain cholinesterase (ChE) depression in 11 of 15 blue jays collected in pecan groves 6-7 hr after the application. Phosalone at 0.83 kg/ha to pecan groves caused only slight ChE inhibition in a few blue jays and red-bellied woodpeckers.

  1. Regional cholinesterase activity in white-throated sparrow brain is differentially affected by acephate (Orthene?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Kuenzel, W.J.; Hill, E.F.; Romo, G.A.; Komaragiri, M.V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of a 14-day dietary exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, acephate (acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester), were determined on cholinesterase activity in three regions (basal ganglia, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of the white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, brain. All three regions experienced depressed cholinesterase activity between 0.5-2 ppm acephate. The regions exhibited cholinesterase recovery at 2-16 ppm acephate; however, cholinesterase activity dropped and showed no recovery at higher dietary levels (>16 ppm acephate). Evidence indicates that the recovery is initiated by the magnitude of depression, not the duration. In general, as acephate concentration increased, differences in ChE activity among brain regions decreased. Three terms are introduced to describe ChE response to acephate exposure: (1) ChE resistance threshold, (2) ChE compensation threshold, and (3) ChE depression threshold. It is hypothesized that adverse effects to birds in the field may occur at pesticide exposure levels customarily considered negligible.

  2. DIFFERENTIAL PROFILES OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN RATS EXPOSED TO FENAMIPHOS AND PROFENOPHOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and neurobehavioral changes was examined using two ChE-inhibiting organophosphorus pesticides, fenamiphos and profenophos. Both pesticides inhibit blood ChE, yet brain ChE is relatively spared (little to no inhibition up t...

  3. Caregiver Acceptance of Adverse Effects and Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oremus, Mark; Wolfson, Christina; Vandal, Alain C.; Bergman, Howard; Xie, Qihao

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers play a determining role in choosing treatments for persons with Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to examine caregivers' willingness to have persons with Alzheimer's disease continue taking cholinesterase inhibitors in the event that any 1 of 11 adverse effects was to occur. Data were gathered via postal questionnaire…

  4. BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF ACUTE CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS: TOLERANCE TO PROLONGED INHIBITION OF CHOLINESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF), a commercially prevalent organophosphate (OP) pesticide, inhibits blood and brain cholinesterase for up to 10 weeks after acute s.c. injection in rats. his prolonged inhibition suggested that acute CPF may affect muscarinic receptors and behavior as does repea...

  5. Cholinesterase as inflammatory markers in a experimental infection by Trypanosoma evansi in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Costa, Márcio M; Silva, Aleksandro S da; Paim, Francine C; França, Raqueli; Dornelles, Guilherme L; Thomé, Gustavo R; Serres, Jonas D S; Schmatz, Roberta; Spanevello, Rosélia M; Gonçalves, Jamile F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Mazzanti, Cinthia M A; Lopes, Sonia T A; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of cholinesterases as an inflammatory marker in acute and chronic infection by Trypanosoma evansi in rabbits experimentally infected. Twelve adult female New Zealand rabbits were used and divided into two groups with 6 animals each: control group (rabbits 1-6) and infected group (rabbits 7-12). Infected group received intraperitoneally 0.5 mL of blood from a rat containing 108 parasites per animal. Blood samples used for cholinesterases evaluation were collected on days 0, 2, 7, 12, 27, 42, 57, 87, 102 and 118 days post-inoculation (PI). Increased activity (P<0.05) of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were observed in the blood on days 7 and 27, respectively and no differences were observed in cholinesterase activity in other periods. No significant difference in AChE activity (P>0.05) was observed in the encephalic structures. The increased activities of AChE and BChE probably have a pro-inflammatory purpose, attempting to reduce the concentration of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter which has an anti-inflammatory property. Therefore, cholinesterase may be inflammatory markers in infection with T. evansi in rabbits. PMID:23011112

  6. Crystal Structure of the Extracellular Cholinesterase-Like Domain from Neuroligin-2

    SciTech Connect

    Koehnke,J.; Jin, X.; Budreck, E.; Posy, S.; Scheiffele, P.; Hnoig, B.; Shapiro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLs) are catalytically inactive members of a family of cholinesterase-like transmembrane proteins that mediate cell adhesion at neuronal synapses. Postsynaptic neuroligins engage in Ca2+-dependent transsynaptic interactions via their extracellular cholinesterase domain with presynaptic neurexins (NRXs). These interactions may be regulated by two short splice insertions (termed A and B) in the NL cholinesterase domain. Here, we present the 3.3- Angstroms crystal structure of the ectodomain from NL2 containing splice insertion A (NL2A). The overall structure of NL2A resembles that of cholinesterases, but several structural features are unique to the NL proteins. First, structural elements surrounding the esterase active-site region differ significantly between active esterases and NL2A. On the opposite surface of the NL2A molecule, the positions of the A and B splice insertions identify a candidate NRX interaction site of the NL protein. Finally, sequence comparisons of NL isoforms allow for mapping the location of residues of previously identified mutations in NL3 and NL4 found in patients with autism spectrum disorders. Overall, the NL2 structure promises to provide a valuable model for dissecting NL isoform- and synapse-specific functions.

  7. Kinetic analysis of interactions of amodiaquine with human cholinesterases and organophosphorus compounds.

    PubMed

    Bierwisch, Anne; Wille, Timo; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2016-03-30

    Standard therapy of poisoning by organophosphorus compounds (OP) is a combined administration of an anti-muscarinic drug (e.g. atropine) and an oxime as reactivator of inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Limited efficacy of clinically used oximes against a variety of OPs was shown in numerous studies, calling for research on novel reactivators of OP-inhibited AChE. Recently, reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE by the antimalarial drug amodiaquine was reported. In the present study, amodiaquine and its interactions with human cholinesterases in presence or absence of OP nerve agents was investigated in vitro. Thereby, reversible inhibition of human cholinesterases by amodiaquine (AChE ≫ BChE) was observed. Additionally, a mixed competitive-non-competitive inhibition type of amodiaquine with human AChE was determined. Slow and partial reactivation of sarin-, cyclosarin- and VX-inhibited cholinesterases by amodiaquine was recorded, amodiaquine failed to reactivate tabun-inhibited human cholinesterases. Amodiaquine, being a potent, reversible AChE inhibitor, was tested for its potential benefit as a pretreatment to prevent complete irreversible AChE inhibition by the nerve agent soman. Hereby, amodiaquine failed to prevent phosphonylation and resulted only in a slight increase of AChE activity after removal of amodiaquine and soman. At present the molecular mechanism of amodiaquine-induced reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE is not known, nevertheless amodiaquine could be considered as a template for the design of more potent non-oxime reactivators. PMID:26851641

  8. COMPARISON OF IN VIVO CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN NEONATAL AND ADULT RATS BY THREE ORGANOPHOSPHOROTHIOATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing mammals are more sensitive than adults to acute toxicity from a variety of organophosphorothioate insecticides (OPs), compounds which act in vivo by nhibition of cholinesterase (ChE). ittle is known, however, regarding age-related differences in biochemical responses t...

  9. STUDY OF THE CHOLINESTERASES OF THE CANINE PANCREATIC SPHINCTERS AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REDUCED BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY AND PANCREATIC DUCTAL HYPERTENSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work from this laboratory revealed an increased canine pancreatic intraductal pressure following cholinesterase inhibitor intoxication. The pressure was negatively correlated with serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity, suggesting that BChE activity mediated the pre...

  10. Assay techniques for detection of exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide. Technical bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This technical bulletin provides analytical techniques to identify toxic chemical agents in urine or blood samples. It is intended to provide the clinician with laboratory tests to detect exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide.

  11. [Role of hormonal and seasonal factors in the effect of vitamin E on cholinesterase activity in the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Teplyĭ, D L; Savich, V F

    1975-01-01

    Tests were set up on 73 Citellus fulvus to study the influence exerted by different doses of vitamin E (4 and 8 mg) introduced per os on the activity of the total cholinesterase in various divisions of the central nervous system and also the part played by the hormonal and seasonal factors in this effect. Each test series lasted 30 days (in spring, summer and autumn). The cholinesterase activity was determined after Vensen and Segonzak (1968). The results of the experiments revealed some characteristic trends in the change of the cholinesterase activity occurring under the effect of vitamin E that depended upon a number of factors, such as: the dose of tocopherol, the sex of the animal, time of the year, the brain division under study and the seasonal dynamics of the initial activity. It is shown that in the brain sectors where a material difference existed in the cholinesterase activity between the control males and females it vanished under the effect of tocopherol. On the other hand, in the brain sectors where no such difference existed, it appeared under the effect of tocopherol. The regular character of changes in the cholinesterase activity of the brain and spinal cord produced by different doses of vitamin E suggest the possibility of the brain cholinesterase activity disorders to a play a part in the development of neuro-muscular pathology in cases of the E vitamin deficiency. PMID:1210181

  12. Clinical observation and comparison of the effectiveness of several oxime cholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Xue, S Z; Ding, X J; Ding, Y

    1985-01-01

    After passing toxicity and experimental therapeutic tests, four oxime cholinesterase reactivators [PAM (pyridine aldoxime methiodide), PAC (pralidoxime, pyridine aldoxime methylchloride), TMB4 (trimedoxime), and DMO4 (obidoxime, Toxogonin, LüH6)] were compared in clinical trials. All of them proved capable of restoring erythrocyte cholinesterase activity and relieving symptoms and signs of organophosphate insecticide poisoning. Mildly and moderately poisoned patients can be treated by several injections of any one of these drugs alone, but severe cases need the synergistic action of atropine, as well as treatments for two to three consecutive days. Although response to treatment is stronger with TMB4 and DMO4, they are not recommended for routine treatment because of their dangerous adverse side effects. PMID:3914075

  13. Mechanism of inhibition of cholinesterases by Huperzine A. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ashani, Y.; Peggins, J.O.; Doctor, B.P.

    1992-04-30

    Huperzine A, an alkaloid isolated from Huperzia serrata was found to reversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterases (EC 3.1.7) and (EC 3.1.1.8) with i 3.1 on- and off-rates that depend on both the type and the source of enzyme. Long incubation of high concentrations of purified (1-8 PM) with huperzine-A did not show any chemical modification of huperzine-A. A low dissociation constant K sub 1 was obtained for mammalian acetylcholinesterase-huperzine (20-40 nM) compared to mammalian butyrylcholinesterase-huperzine (20-40 microns.) This indicates that the thermodynamic stability of huperzine-cholinesterase complex may depend on the number and type of aromatic amino acid residues in the catalytic pocket region of the cholinesterase molecule.

  14. Urinary cholinesterase activity is increased in insulin-dependent diabetics: further evidence of diabetic tubular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, E; Pellegrini, L; Uncini-Manganelli, C; Cecere, M; Saviozzi, M; Giampietro, O

    1992-01-01

    We measured the cholinesterase activity in morning urines from 63 insulin-dependent diabetics and 27 controls. The total esterase (TotE) activity (Ellman's method) has been divided into aliesterase (AliE), pseudocholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase by means of two inhibitors, eserine and quinidine. Diabetics were divided in 2 groups according to the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (mg/mmol, < 2 in group 1, > 2 in group 2). The urinary cholinesterase behavior was correlated with that of a known tubular lysosomal hydrolase, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG). Compared to normals, in addition to a significant increase in urinary NAG in diabetes (in group 2 more than in group 1), TotE and AliE were also significantly raised (+36% and 109% of the controls, in group 1 as much as in group 2). PMID:1308857

  15. Identification of 4-aminoquinoline core for the design of new cholinesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Bian, Yaoyao; Sun, Yuan; Kang, Chen; Yu, Sheng; Fu, Tingming; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) using small molecules is still one of the most successful therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previously we reported compound T5369186 with a core of quinolone as a new cholinesterase inhibitor. In the present study, in order to identify new cores for the designing of AChE inhibitors, we screened different derivatives of this core with the aim to identify the best core as the starting point for further optimization. Based on the results, we confirmed that only 4-aminoquinoline (compound 04 and 07) had cholinesterase inhibitory effects. Considering the simple structure and high inhibitory potency against AChE, 4-aminoquinoline provides a good starting core for further designing novel multifunctional AChEIs. PMID:27441112

  16. The alpha/beta fold family of proteins database and the cholinesterase gene server ESTHER.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, X; Hotelier, T; Giles, K; Lievin, P; Toutant, J P; Chatonnet, A

    1997-01-01

    ESTHER (for esterases, alpha/betahydrolase enzyme and relatives) is a database of sequences phylogenetically related to cholinesterases. These sequences define a homogeneous group of enzymes (carboxylesterases, lipases and hormone-sensitive lipases) sharing a similar structure of a central beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. Among these proteins a wide range of functions can be found (hydrolases, adhesion molecules, hormone precursors). The purpose of ESTHER is to help comparison of structures and functions of members of the family. Since the last release, new features have been added to the server. A BLAST comparison tool allows sequence homology searches within the database sequences. New sections are available: kinetics and inhibitors of cholinesterases, fasciculin-acetylcholinesterase interaction and a gene structure review. The mutation analysis compilation has been improved with three-dimensional images. A mailing list has been created. PMID:9016525

  17. Effect of methylmercury on acetylcholinestrase and serum cholinesterase activity in monkeys, Macaca fascicularis

    SciTech Connect

    Petruccioli, L.; Turillazzi, P.G. )

    1991-05-01

    The consumption of fish and fish-derived products is the main pathway of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). Methylmercury levels vary widely in fish, depending on age, size, the position of the species in the food chain, and most of all, on pollution levels. MeHg affects the Acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and the serum Cholinesterase activity (BChE). Histoenzymatic studies showed that 100mg Methyoxyethylmercury chloride administered for 6 days to rats caused a reduction of AChE activity in the thalamus and an increase in different parts of the nervous central system. The present study aims at verifying whether the dose permitted by F.A.O. and doses 10 and 100 fold higher affect the Cholinesterase activity in primates, and whether there is a correlation between AChE and BChE.

  18. Identification of 4-aminoquinoline core for the design of new cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Bian, Yaoyao; Sun, Yuan; Kang, Chen; Yu, Sheng; Fu, Tingming; Li, Wei; Pei, Yuqiong; Sun, Haopeng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) using small molecules is still one of the most successful therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously we reported compound T5369186 with a core of quinolone as a new cholinesterase inhibitor. In the present study, in order to identify new cores for the designing of AChE inhibitors, we screened different derivatives of this core with the aim to identify the best core as the starting point for further optimization. Based on the results, we confirmed that only 4-aminoquinoline (compound 04 and 07) had cholinesterase inhibitory effects. Considering the simple structure and high inhibitory potency against AChE, 4-aminoquinoline provides a good starting core for further designing novel multifunctional AChEIs. PMID:27441112

  19. Serum and Plasma Cholinesterase Activity in the Cape Griffon Vulture (Gyps coprotheres).

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Vinny; Wolter, Kerri

    2016-04-28

    Vulture (Accipitridae) poisonings are a concern in South Africa, with hundreds of birds dying annually. Although some of these poisonings are accidental, there has been an increase in the number of intentional baiting of poached rhinoceros (Rhinocerotidae) and elephant (Elephantidae) carcasses to kill vultures that alert officials to poaching sites by circling overhead. The primary chemicals implicated are the organophosphorous and carbamate compounds. Although most poisoning events can be identified by dead vultures surrounding the scavenged carcass, weak birds are occasionally found and brought to rehabilitation centers for treatment. The treating veterinarian needs to make an informed decision on the cause of illness or poisoning prior to treatment. We established the reference interval for serum and plasma cholinesterase activity in the Cape Griffon Vulture ( Gyps coprotheres ) as 591.58-1,528.26 U/L, providing a clinical assay for determining potential exposure to cholinesterase-depressing pesticides. Both manual and automated samplers were used with the butyrylthiocholine method. Species reference intervals for both serum and plasma cholinesterase showed good correlation and manual and automated measurements yielded similar results. PMID:26981685

  20. Cholinesterases as markers of the inflammatory process associated oxidative stress in cattle infected by Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Rovaina L; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Oliveira, Camila B; França, Raqueli T; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Abdalla, Fátima H; Costa, Pauline; Klafke, Guilherme M; Martins, João R; Tonin, Alexandre A; Castro, Verônica S P; Santos, Franklin G B; Lopes, Sonia T A; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of an asymptomatic experimental infection by Babesia bigemina on cholinesterase's as markers of the inflammatory process and biomarkers of oxidative imbalance. For this purpose, eight naive animals were used, as follows: four as controls or uninfected; and four infected with an attenuated strain of B. bigemina. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 7 and 11 post-inoculation (PI). Parasitemia was determined by blood smear evaluation, showing that the infection by B. bigemina resulted in mean 0.725 and 0.025% on day 7 and 11 PI, respectively, as well as mild anemia. The activities of acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and catalase were lower, while levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and superoxide dismutase activity were higher in infected animals, when compared with the control group. This attenuated strain of B. bigemina induced an oxidative stress condition, as well as it reduces the cholinesterasés activity in infected and asymptomatic cattle. Therefore, this decrease of cholinesterase in infection by B. bigemina purpose is to inhibit inflammation, for thereby increasing acetylcholine levels, potent anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:27260803

  1. The Activity of Cholinesterases in Diapausing and Flying Red Mason Bees Osmia bicornis (Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Dmochowska-Slezak, Kamila; Zaobidna, Ewa; Domeracka, Joanna; Swiatkowska, Marta; Rusznica, Małgorzata; Zółtowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    The red mason bee (Osmia bicornis) is a highly effective pollinator that is exposed to various xenobiotics. The organism's potential resistance to the toxic effects of xenobiotics can be determined based on cholinesterase activity. The activity of cholinesterases (ChEs) towards acetylcholine (ACh) and butyrylcholine (BCh) was determined in extracts of diapausing (between October and late March) and flying bees (May). In both males and females, enzyme activity was higher towards ACh than towards BCh. The ratio of ACh/BCh activity was determined in the range of 1.43 to 4.15 in diapausing females and 3.00 to 7.18 in diapausing males. No significant changes in ChE activity towards ACh were observed in females before December and in males before February. Enzyme activity towards ACh increased dynamically in the second half of March. Enzyme activity towards BCh remained stable in both sexes until mid-March, after which it increased significantly. Excluding mid-March, enzyme BCh activity was significantly higher in females than in males. The activity of carboxylesterase towards 4-p-nitrophenyl butyrate was determined in females to assess the involvement of non-specific esterases in the hydrolysis of choline esters. Carboxylesterase activity was low in comparison with cholinesterase activity, and it remained practically unchanged throughout diapause, suggesting that choline esters in female O. bicornis extracts were hydrolyzed mainly by acetylcholinesterases. PMID:26975137

  2. Cholinesterases of heart muscle. Characterization of multiple enzymes using kinetics of irreversible organophosphorus inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chemnitius, J M; Chemnitius, G C; Haselmeyer, K H; Kreuzer, H; Zech, R

    1992-02-18

    Cholinesterases of porcine left ventricular heart muscle were characterized with respect to substrate specificity and inhibition kinetics with organophosphorus inhibitors N,N'-di-isopropyl-phosphorodiamidic fluoride (Mipafox), di-isopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP), and diethyl p-nitro-phenyl phosphate (Paraoxon). Total myocardial choline ester hydrolysing activity (234 nmol/min/g wet wt with 1.5 mM acetylthiocholine, ASCh; 216 nmol/min/g with 30 mM butyrylthiocholine, BSCh) was irreversibly and covalently inhibited by a wide range of inhibitor concentrations and, using weighted least-squares non-linear curve fitting, residual activities as determined with four different substrates in each case were fitted to a sum of up to four exponential functions. Quality of curve fitting as assessed by the sum of squares reached its optimum on the basis of a three component model, thus, indicating the presence of three different enzymes taking part in choline ester hydrolysis. Final classification of heart muscle cholinesterases was obtained according to both substrate hydrolysis patterns with ASCh, BSCh, acetyl-beta-methylthiocholine and propionylthiocholine, and second-order rate constants for the reaction with organophosphorus inhibitors Mipafox, DFP, and Paraoxon. One choline ester-hydrolysing enzyme was identified as acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7), and one as butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8). The third enzyme with relative resistance to organophosphorus inhibition was classified as atypical cholinesterase. PMID:1540236

  3. Mipafox differential inhibition assay for heart muscle cholinesterases: substrate specificity and inhibition of three isoenzymes by physostigmine and quinidine.

    PubMed

    Chemnitius, J M; Haselmeyer, K H; Gonska, B D; Kreuzer, H; Zech, R

    1997-04-01

    1. A differential inhibition assay was developed for the quantitative determination of cholinesterase isoenzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7), cholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8), and atypical cholinesterase in small samples of left ventricular porcine heart muscle. 2. The assay is based on kinetic analysis of irreversible cholinesterase inhibition by the organophosphorus compound N,N'-di-isopropylphosphorodiamidic fluoride (mipafox). With acetylthiocholine (ASCh) as substrate (1.25 mM), hydrolytic activities (A) of cholinesterase isoenzymes were determined after preincubation (60 min, 25 degrees C) of heart muscle samples with either saline (total activity, A tau), 7 microM mipafox (AM1), or 0.8 mM mipafox (AM2): (BChE) = A tau-AM1, (AChE) = AM1-AM2, (Atypical ChE) = AM2. 3. The mipafox differential inhibition assay was used to determine the substrate hydrolysis patterns of myocardial cholinesterases with ASCh, acetyl-beta-methylthiocholine (A beta MSCh), propionylthiocholine (PSCh), and butyrylthiocholine (BSCh). The substrate specificities of myocardial AChE and BChE resemble those of erythrocyte AChE and serum BChE, respectively. Michaelis constants KM with ASCh were determined to be 0.15 mM for AChE and 1.4 mM for BChE. 4. Atypical cholinesterase, in respect to both substrate specificity and inhibition kinetics, differs from cholinesterase activities of vertebrate tissue and, up to now, could be identified exclusively in heart muscle. The enzyme's Michaelis constant with ASCh was determined to be 4.0 mM. 5. The reversible inhibitory effects of physostigmine (eserine) and quinidine on heart muscle cholinesterases were investigated using the differential inhibition assay. With all three isoenzymes, the inhibition kinetics of both substances were strictly competitive. The physostigmine inhibition of AChE was most pronounced (Ki = 0.22 microM). Quinidine most potently inhibited myocardial BChE (Ki = 35 microM). PMID:9147026

  4. Serum Cholinesterase Activities Distinguish between Stroke Patients and Controls and Predict 12-Month Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ben Assayag, Einor; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Ofek, Keren; Soreq, Lilach; Bova, Irena; Shopin, Ludmila; Berg, Ronan MG; Berliner, Shlomo; Shapira, Itzhak; Bornstein, Natan M; Soreq, Hermona

    2010-01-01

    To date there is no diagnostic biomarker for mild stroke, although elevation of inflammatory biomarkers has been reported at early stages. Previous studies implicated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) involvement in stroke, and circulating AChE activity reflects inflammatory response, since acetylcholine suppresses inflammation. Therefore, carriers of polymorphisms that modify cholinergic activity should be particularly susceptible to inflammatory damage. Our study sought diagnostic values of AChE and Cholinergic Status (CS, the total capacity for acetylcholine hydrolysis) in suspected stroke patients. For this purpose, serum cholinesterase activities, butyrylcholinesterase-K genotype and inflammatory biomarkers were determined in 264 ischemic stroke patients and matched controls during the acute phase. AChE activities were lower (P < 0.001), and butyrylcholinesterase activities were higher in patients than in controls (P = 0.004). When normalized to sampling time from stroke occurrence, both cholinergic parameters were correlated with multiple inflammatory biomarkers, including fibrinogen, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (r = 0.713, r = 0.607; r = 0.421, r = 0.341; r = 0.276, r = 0.255; respectively; all P values < 0.001). Furthermore, very low AChE activities predicted subsequent nonsurvival (P = 0.036). Also, carriers of the unstable butyrylcholinesterase-K variant were more abundant among patients than controls, and showed reduced activity (P < 0.001). Importantly, a cholinergic score combining the two cholinesterase activities discriminated between 94.3% matched pairs of patients and controls, compared with only 75% for inflammatory measures. Our findings present the power of circulation cholinesterase measurements as useful early diagnostic tools for the occurrence of stroke. Importantly, these were considerably more distinctive than the inflammatory biomarkers, albeit closely associated with them, which may open new venues for stroke diagnosis and treatment

  5. Antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-cholinesterase potential and flavonol glycosides of Biscutella raphanifolia (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Boudouda, Houria Berhail; Zeghib, Assia; Karioti, Anastazia; Bilia, Anna Rita; Öztürk, Mehmet; Aouni, Mahjoub; Kabouche, Ahmed; Kabouche, Zahia

    2015-01-01

    Different extracts of the aerial parts of Biscutella raphanifolia (Brassicaceae), which has not been the subject of any study, were screened for the phytochemical content, anti-microbial, antioxidant and anti-cholinesterase activities. We used four methods to identify the antioxidant activity namely, ABTS(•+), DPPH• scavenging, CUPRAC and ferrous-ions chelating methods. Since there is a relationship between antioxidants and cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors, we used two methods to determine the in vitro anti-cholinesterase activity by the use of the basic enzymes that occur in causing Alzheimer's disease: acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The extracts were also tested in vitro antimicrobial activity against various bacteria. The phytochemical study of B. raphanifolia afforded four flavonol glycosides; namely, quercetin-3-O-β-D-g1ucoside, quercetin-3-O-[β-D-glucosyl(1→2)-O-β-D-glucoside], quercetin-3-O-[β-D-glucosyl(1→3)-O-β-D-glucoside] and kaempferol-3-O-[β-D-glucosyl(1→2)-[(6'''p-coumaroyl)- β-D-glucoside], being isolated here for the first time from Biscutella raphanifolia and the genus. The ethyl acetate extract showed the highest activity in ABTS(•+), DPPH• and CUPRAC assays, while the petroleum ether extract demonstrated optimum efficiency metal chelating activity. The dicloromethane and petroleum ether extracts showed a mild inhibition against AChE and BChE. However, the petroleum ether extract showed a good antibacterial activity against the pathovars Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and Enterococcus feacalis, whereas the Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strain was more sensitive to dichloromethane and n-butanol extracts. PMID:25553679

  6. Effect of long-term aluminum feeding on kinetics attributes of tissue cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kunjan R; Syal, Anshu R; Katyare, Surendra S

    2002-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) is considered a potential etiological factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neurotoxicity from excess brain exposure to Al is documented from both clinical observations and animal experiments. A key role of the acetylcholine system in memory disturbances that characterize AD has been reported. On this basis, we studied the effect of long-term Al feeding on kinetic properties of cholinesterases employing the rat as experimental model. Animals were given prolonged treatment with soluble salts of Al (100mg AlCl(3)/kg body weight mixed with food for 100-115 days), and the kinetic properties of cholinesterases (acetylcholinesterase, AChE, and butyrylcholinesterase, BChE) were determined in different tissues. Prolonged treatment with Al had no effect on the K(m) values of the soluble and membrane-bound forms of AChE in the brain, but V(max) was instead decreased in all the components of soluble and membrane-bound forms of AChE in the brain. In addition, the Al treatment resulted in complete loss of the component II of erythrocyte membrane AChE. Surprisingly, after prolonged treatment with Al, higher V(max) was observed in all the components of soluble and membrane-bound forms of BChE in the heart and liver. Variable effects of Al exposure were observed on temperature kinetic properties of cholinesterases. Altogether these findings indicate that long-term Al feeding results in inhibition of AChE, while an opposite effect is observed on BChE. Decreased V(max) of the brain AChE could represent the mode of action through which Al may contribute to pathological processes in Al-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:12127022

  7. Cholinesterase inhibition of birds inhabiting wheat fields treated with methyl parathion and toxaphene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niethammer, K.R.; Baskett, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and dickcissels (Spiza americana) inhabiting wheat fields treated with 0.67 kg AI/ha methyl parathion and 1.35 kg AI/ha toxaphene showed brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition compared with birds inhabiting untreated fields. Maximum inhibition occurred about five days after insecticide application. ChE activities again approached normal 10 days after treatment. ChE inhibition for dickcissels and red-winged blackbirds differed significantly (p<0.05); maximum inhibition for the former species was 74%, and for the latter, 40%. These differences could not be explained by the diets of the two species, as they were similar.

  8. Recovery of cholinesterase activity in five avian species exposed to dicrotophos, an organophosphorus pesticide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The responses of brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were examined in mallard ducks, bobwhite quail, barn owls, starlings, and common grackles given oral doses of dicrotophos, an organophosphorus insecticide. Up to an eightfold difference in response of brain ChE activity to dicrotophos was found among these species. Brain ChE activity recovered to within 2 SD of normal within 26 days after being depressed 55 to 64%. Recovery of brain ChE activity was similar among species and followed the model Y = a + b (log10X).

  9. RAPID ESTIMATION OF SERUM CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY USING THE ASTRUP MICRO EQUIPMENT.

    PubMed

    JOHNSON, J K; WHITEHEAD, T P

    1965-07-01

    A rapid micro technique for the estimation of serum cholinesterase is described. Acetylcholine bromide is incubated with serum within the capillary of the Astrup electrode. The enzyme hydrolyses the substrate with the liberation of acetic acid. This causes a fall of pH which is seen on the galvanometer of the instrument and the rate of this fall is shown to be proportional to enzyme concentration. The method has been calibrated in international units and compared with a more conventional technique. The values found in homozygotes with normal dibucaine-resistant enzymes and in heterozygotes are reported, together with their dibucaine and fluoride numbers. PMID:14318694

  10. Cholinesterase inhibition in meadow voles Microtus pennsylvanicus following field applications of Orthene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Brain acetylcholinesterase activity in field-caught meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) was depressed after a field-spray of Orthene (acephate: acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester) by as much as 32% in 1982 and 38% in 1983. Short-term recovery was demonstrated and occurred in a time-dependent fashion in 1982. Plasma cholinesterase levels were move variable but also were depressed. Residues were detected in vegetation samples and in the gastrointestinal tracts of exposed voles. Residues in vegetation were diluted or absent 7 to 8 d following the treatment.

  11. Cholinesterase inhibition and acetylcholine accumulation following intracerebral administration of paraoxon in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.; Liu, J.; Karanth, S.; Gao, Y.; Brimijoin, S.; Pope, C.

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the inhibition of striatal cholinesterase activity following intracerebral administration of paraoxon assaying activity either in tissue homogenates ex vivo or by substrate hydrolysis in situ. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or paraoxon in aCSF was infused unilaterally (0.5 {mu}l/min for 2 h) and ipsilateral and contralateral striata were harvested for ChE assay ex vivo. High paraoxon concentrations were needed to inhibit ipsilateral striatal cholinesterase activity (no inhibition at < 0.1 mM; 27% at 0.1 mM; 79% at 1 mM paraoxon). With 3 mM paraoxon infusion, substantial ChE inhibition was also noted in contralateral striatum. ChE histochemistry generally confirmed these concentration- and side-dependent effects. Microdialysates collected for up to 4 h after paraoxon infusion inhibited ChE activity when added to striatal homogenate, suggesting prolonged efflux of paraoxon. Since paraoxon efflux could complicate acetylcholine analysis, we evaluated the effects of paraoxon (0, 0.03, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 {mu}M, 1.5 {mu}l/min for 45 min) administered by reverse dialysis through a microdialysis probe. ChE activity was then monitored in situ by perfusing the colorimetric substrate acetylthiocholine through the same probe and measuring product (thiocholine) in dialysates. Concentration-dependent inhibition was noted but reached a plateau of about 70% at 1 {mu}M and higher concentrations. Striatal acetylcholine was below the detection limit at all times with 0.1 {mu}M paraoxon but was transiently elevated (0.5-1.5 h) with 10 {mu}M paraoxon. In vivo paraoxon (0.4 mg/kg, sc) in adult rats elicited about 90% striatal ChE inhibition measured ex vivo, but only about 10% inhibition measured in situ. Histochemical analyses revealed intense AChE and glial fibrillary acidic protein staining near the cannula track, suggesting proliferation of inflammatory cells/glia. The findings suggest that ex vivo and in situ cholinesterase assays can provide very different views

  12. Cholinesterase-Targeting microRNAs Identified in silico Affect Specific Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hanin, Geula; Soreq, Hermona

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as important gene silencers affecting many target mRNAs. Here, we report the identification of 244 miRs that target the 3′-untranslated regions of different cholinesterase transcripts: 116 for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), 47 for the synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) splice variant, and 81 for the normally rare splice variant AChE-R. Of these, 11 and 6 miRs target both AChE-S and AChE-R, and AChE-R and BChE transcripts, respectively. BChE and AChE-S showed no overlapping miRs, attesting to their distinct modes of miR regulation. Generally, miRs can suppress a number of targets; thereby controlling an entire battery of functions. To evaluate the importance of the cholinesterase-targeted miRs in other specific biological processes we searched for their other experimentally validated target transcripts and analyzed the gene ontology enriched biological processes these transcripts are involved in. Interestingly, a number of the resulting categories are also related to cholinesterases. They include, for BChE, response to glucocorticoid stimulus, and for AChE, response to wounding and two child terms of neuron development: regulation of axonogenesis and regulation of dendrite morphogenesis. Importantly, all of the AChE-targeting miRs found to be related to these selected processes were directed against the normally rare AChE-R splice variant, with three of them, including the neurogenesis regulator miR-132, also directed against AChE-S. Our findings point at the AChE-R splice variant as particularly susceptible to miR regulation, highlight those biological functions of cholinesterases that are likely to be subject to miR post-transcriptional control, demonstrate the selectivity of miRs in regulating specific biological processes, and open new venues for targeted interference with these specific processes. PMID:22007158

  13. In-silico identification of the binding mode of synthesized adamantyl derivatives inside cholinesterase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aboudi, Amal; Al-Qawasmeh, Raed A; Shahwan, Alaa; Mahmood, Uzma; Khalid, Asaad; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the binding mode of synthesized adamantly derivatives inside of cholinesterase enzymes using molecular docking simulations. Methods: A series of hybrid compounds containing adamantane and hydrazide moieties was designed and synthesized. Their inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and (butyrylcholinesterase) BChE were assessed in vitro. The binding mode of the compounds inside cholinesterase enzymes was investigated using Surflex-Dock package of Sybyl7.3 software. Results: A total of 26 adamantyl derivatives were synthesized. Among them, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid hydrazide had an almost equal inhibitory activity towards both enzymes, whereas 10 other compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against BChE. The molecular docking studies demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions between the compounds and their surrounding residues in the active site played predominant roles, while hydrophilic interactions were also found. When the compounds were docked inside each enzyme, they exhibited stronger interactions with BChE over AChE, possibly due to the larger active site of BChE. The binding affinities of the compounds for BChE and AChE estimated were in agreement with the experimental data. Conclusion: The new adamantly derivatives selectively inhibit BChE with respect to AChE, thus making them good candidates for testing the hypothesis that BChE inhibitors would be more efficient and better tolerated than AChE inhibitors in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25937631

  14. Responses of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis to a cholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Aki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Iguchi, Akihisa

    2009-10-01

    Acute gastrointestinal events (mostly manifested by nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite) are class effects of all cholinesterase inhibitors, which are prescribed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanism, however, has been unclear. Because corticotropin-releasing hormone is related to appetite control, we focused on the activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal system and food intake following the administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, in rats. We monitored the plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, c-Fos, in the paraventricular nucleus, and intakes of rat chow for 3 h after the first administration of donepezil, and 2 weeks later, after daily administration of donepezil. The intragastric administration of 3 mg/kg of donepezil significantly increased the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and c-Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus, and decreased the food intake on the first day. The increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone and loss of appetite after oral administration of the drug were attenuated after daily administration for 2 weeks. PMID:19738498

  15. The structure-function relationships in Drosophila neurotactin show that cholinesterasic domains may have adhesive properties.

    PubMed Central

    Darboux, I; Barthalay, Y; Piovant, M; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R

    1996-01-01

    Neurotactin (Nrt), a Drosophila transmembrane glycoprotein which is expressed in neuronal and epithelial tissues during embryonic and larval stages, exhibits heterophilic adhesive properties. The extracellular domain is composed of a catalytically inactive cholinesterase-like domain. A three-dimensional model deduced from the crystal structure of Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been constructed for Nrt and suggests that its extracellular domain is composed of two sub-domains organized around a gorge: an N-terminal region, whose three-dimensional structure is almost identical to that of Torpedo AChE, and a less conserved C-terminal region. By using truncated Nrt molecules and a homotypic cell aggregation assay which involves a soluble ligand activity, it has been possible to show that the adhesive function is localized in the N-terminal region of the extracellular domain comprised between His347 and His482. The C-terminal region of the protein can be removed without impairing Nrt adhesive properties, suggesting that the two sub-domains are structurally independent. Chimeric molecules in which the Nrt cholinesterase-like domain has been replaced by homologous domains from Drosophila AChE, Torpedo AChE or Drosophila glutactin (Glt), share similar adhesive properties. These properties may require the presence of Nrt cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains since authentic Drosophila AChE does not behave as an adhesive molecule when transfected in S2 cells. Images PMID:8890157

  16. Sesquiterpene Lactones from Cynara cornigera: Acetyl Cholinesterase Inhibition and In Silico Ligand Docking.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Ibrahim, Abeer Y; Mohamed, Tarik A; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; El Halawany, Ali M; Abdel-Azim, Nahla S; Alsaid, Mansour S; Paré, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Wild artichoke (Cynara cornigera), a thistle-like perennial belonging to the Asteraceae family, is native to the Mediterranean region, northwestern Africa, and the Canary Islands. While the pleasant, albeit bitter, taste of the leaves and flowers is attributed to the sesquiterpene lactones cynaropicrin and cynarin, a comprehensive phytochemical investigation still needs to be reported. In this study seven sesquiterpene lactones were isolated from an aqueous methanol plant extract, including a new halogenated metabolite (1), the naturally isolated compound sibthorpine (2), and five metabolites isolated for the first time from C. cornigera. Structures were established by spectroscopic methods, including HREIMS, (1 )H, (13 )C, DEPT, (1 )H-(1 )H COSY, HMQC, and HMBC-NMR experiments as well as by X-ray analysis. The isolated bioactive nutrients were analyzed for their antioxidant and metal chelating activity. Compound 1 exhibited a potent metal chelating activity as well as a high antioxidant capacity. Moreover, select compounds were effective as acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors presenting the possibility for such compounds to be examined for anti-neurodegenerative activity. A computational pharmacophore elucidation and docking study was performed to estimate the pharmacophoric features and binding conformation of isolated compounds in the acetyl cholinesterase active site. PMID:26441064

  17. Multitarget-directed tricyclic pyridazinones as G protein-coupled receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pau, Amedeo; Catto, Marco; Pinna, Giovanni; Frau, Simona; Murineddu, Gabriele; Asproni, Battistina; Curzu, Maria M; Pisani, Leonardo; Leonetti, Francesco; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José; Pinna, Gérard A; Carotti, Angelo

    2015-06-01

    By following a multitarget ligand design approach, a library of 47 compounds was prepared, and they were tested as binders of selected G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and inhibitors of acetyl and/or butyryl cholinesterase. The newly designed ligands feature pyridazinone-based tricyclic scaffolds connected through alkyl chains of variable length to proper amine moieties (e.g., substituted piperazines or piperidines) for GPCR and cholinesterase (ChE) molecular recognition. The compounds were tested at three different GPCRs, namely serotoninergic 5-HT1A, adrenergic α1A, and dopaminergic D2 receptors. Our main goal was the discovery of compounds that exhibit, in addition to ChE inhibition, antagonist activity at 5-HT1A because of its involvement in neuronal deficits typical of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ligands with nanomolar affinity for the tested GPCRs were discovered, but most of them behaved as dual antagonists of α1A and 5-HT1A receptors. Nevertheless, several compounds displaying this GPCR affinity profile also showed moderate to good inhibition of AChE and BChE, thus deserving further investigations to exploit the therapeutic potential of such unusual biological profiles. PMID:25924828

  18. Effect of acute and chronic cholinesterase inhibition on biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Unni, L; Shillcutt, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of five cholinesterase inhibitors on forebrain monoamine and their metabolite levels, and on forebrain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity in rat were studied in acute and chronic conditions. Acute tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) dosing caused lower brain (68%) and higher plasma (90%) ChE inhibition than the other drugs studied and increased levels of brain dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (236%), homovanillic acid (HVA) (197%) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) (130%). Acute physostigmine (PHY) administration caused a 215% increase in brain DOPAC content. Despite high brain ChE inhibition induced by metrifonate (MTF), dichlorvos (DDVP) or naled no changes in brain noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) occurred due to treatment with the study drugs in the acute study. In the chronic 10-day study THA or PHY caused no substantial ChE inhibition in brain when measured 18 hours after the last dose, whereas MTF induced 74% ChE inhibition. Long-term treatment with THA or MTF caused no changes in monoamine levels, but PHY treatment resulted in slightly increased 5-HT values. These results suggest that MTF, DDVP and naled seem to act solely by cholinergic mechanisms. However, the central neuropharmacological mechanism of action of THA and PHY may involve changes in cholinergic as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. PMID:1711162

  19. Characterization of cholinesterase from guppy (Poecilia reticulata) muscle and its in vitro inhibition by environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L M; Castro, B; Ribeiro, R; Guilhermino, L

    2000-01-01

    With a view to using the cholinesterase (ChE) activity from guppy (Poecilia reticulata) muscle as a biomarker, the objectives of this work were: (i) to characterize the soluble cholinesterases present in muscle homogenate using different substrates and specific inhibitors, (ii) to determine the normal range of activity in non-exposed individuals and (iii) to investigate the in vitro effects of two common environmental contaminants, copper sulphate and dodecylbenzene sulphonic acid sodium salt (DBS) on ChE activity. The rate of substrate hydrolysis of P. reticulata ChE decreased in the order acetylthiocholine, propionylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine. Inhibition by excess of substrate was observed at concentrations higher than 1.28 mM. Furthermore, eserine sulphate and 1,5-bis(4-allyldimethylammoniumphenyl)-pentan-3-one (BW284C51) significantly inhibited the enzyme activity at low concentrations (mM range) and N,N'-diisopropylphosphorodiamic acid (iso-OMPA) had no significant effect up to 8 mM. These findings suggest that the enzyme measured in this study is acetylcholinesterase. The activity determined in non-exposed fish was 145.1 ± 44.7 SD U mg(-1) protein. The common environmental contaminants copper and DBS significantly inhibited P. reticulata ChE at concentrations that can be ecologically relevant. PMID:23885980

  20. Caregiver acceptance of adverse effects and use of cholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Oremus, Mark; Wolfson, Christina; Vandal, Alain C; Bergman, Howard; Xie, Qihao

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers play a determining role in choosing treatments for persons with Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to examine caregivers' willingness to have persons with Alzheimer's disease continue taking cholinesterase inhibitors in the event that any 1 of 11 adverse effects was to occur. Data were gathered via postal questionnaire from 375 caregivers in Montreal. Sixty-four per cent of caregivers responded ( n = 201), and most (> or =59%) were willing to continue treatment if persons with Alzheimer's disease suffered from weight loss or loss of appetite. However, most (> or =53%) were not willing to continue treatment in the event of headache, dizziness, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, drop in blood pressure, insomnia, muscle cramps, or stomach bleeding. The use of cholinesterase inhibitors by persons with Alzheimer's disease was positively associated with caregivers' willingness to accept greater numbers of adverse effects (adjusted relative risk = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.11 to 3.61). Caregivers appear to make a risk-benefit assessment when they decide whether or not care-recipients should continue pharmacotherapy in the event of adverse effects. PMID:18238727

  1. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TISSUE LEVELS OF CARBARYL, A PROTOTYPICAL CARBAMATE PESTICIDE, AND CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to link pharmacokinetics with biochemical and physiological endpoints, the relationships between cholinesterase (ChE) activity and tissue levels of a prototypical N-methyl carbamate pesticide were examined. In a dose-response study, carbaryl (0, 3, 7.5, 15, 3...

  2. TIME COURSE OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN ADULT RATS TREATED ACUTELY WITH CARBARYL CARBOFURAN, FORMETANATE, METHOMYL, METHIOCARB, OXAMYL ON PROPOXUR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To compare the toxicity of seven N-methyl carbamates, time course profiles for brain and red blood cell (RBC) cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition were established for each. Adult, male, Long Evans rats (n=4-5 dose group) were dosed orally with either carbaryl (30 mg/kg in corn oil); ...

  3. CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND HYPOTHERMIA FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO BINARY MIXTURES OF ANTICHOLINESTERASE AGENTS: LACK OF EVIDENCE FOR CAUSE-AND-EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-additivity has been the default assumption in risk assessments of pesticides with a common mechanism of action but it has been suspected that there could be non-additive effects. Inhibition of plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity and hypothermia were used as benchmarks of e...

  4. INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE AND THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS PRODUCED BY CARBARYL IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbaryl is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response often used to detect central nervous system (CNS) changes following expos...

  5. Cholinesterase inhibitors and add-on nutritional supplements in Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, A; Meulenbroek, O; Olde Rikkert, M G M

    2014-07-01

    To date, single drug and nutrient-based interventions have failed to show a clinically relevant effect on Alzheimer's disease (AD). Multidomain interventions may alleviate symptoms and alter the disease course in a synergistic manner. This systematic review examines the effect of adding nutritional supplementation to cholinesterase inhibitors. A systematic PubMed and Cochrane search resulted in nine high quality studies. The studies had low to moderate risk of bias and focused on oxidative stress, homocysteine levels, membrane fluidity, inflammation and acetylcholine levels. Only the use of vitamin E supplements could reduce the rate of functional decline when combined with cholinesterase inhibitors in one study, whereas cognition was not affected in both this and other studies. None of the other nutritional supplements showed convincing evidence of a beneficial effect when combined with cholinesterase inhibitors. This shows that cognitive and functional improvement is difficult to achieve in patients with AD, despite epidemiological data and evidence of biological effects of nutritional supplements. Addressing one disease pathway in addition to cholinesterase inhibitor therapy is probably insufficient to alter the course of the disease. Personalized, multifactorial interventions may be more successful in improving cognition and daily functioning. PMID:24982004

  6. COMPARISON OF PLASMA CHOLINESTERASE DEPRESSION AMONG WORKERS OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES AS REPORTED BY VARIOUS STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have reported on the inhibitory effects of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) on the enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) among agricultural workers. With the increasing use of OPs, surveys of blood ChE activity on exposed workers may help to identify workers at greates...

  7. Cholinesterase - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... to chemicals called organophosphates, which are used in pesticides. This test can help determine your risk of ... jaundice Poisoning from organophosphates (chemicals found in some pesticides) Inflammation that accompanies some diseases Smaller decreases may ...

  8. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets, snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Ohlendorf, H M

    1989-07-01

    inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors. PMID:2761008

  9. Effects of repeated exposure of diazinon on cholinesterase activity and growth in snakehead fish (Channa striata).

    PubMed

    Cong, Nguyen Van; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The organophosphate insecticide diazinon is widely used in the Mekong river delta and often applied several times per rice crop. In the present study, juvenile snakehead fish Channa striata, which is a commercially important inhabitant of rice fields, were exposed twice to 4-day pulses of 0.016, 0.079 or 0.35mg/L of diazinon, separated by a 2 week interval to imitate the exposure conditions in the field. After the 4-day exposures to these environmentally realistic concentrations, the fish were moved to clean water for recovery. During this experiment, which lasted a total of 2 months, the individual growth rates and brain cholinesterase levels were measured. We show not only that diazinon caused long term inhibition of brain ChE activity, which was still significantly depressed at the termination of the experiment, but also that the highest of these realistic concentrations caused a significant 30% growth inhibition. PMID:19054558

  10. Cholinesterase-inhibitory diterpenoids and chemical constituents from aerial parts of Caryopteris mongolica.

    PubMed

    Murata, Toshihiro; Selenge, Erdenechimeg; Oikawa, Saki; Ageishi, Keita; Batkhuu, Javzan; Sasaki, Kenroh; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko

    2015-10-01

    A diterpenoid diglucoside (12,19-di-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-11-hydroxyabieta-8,11,13-triene-19-one), isoscutellarein 7-O-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, isoscutellarein 7-O-[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, hypolaetin 7-O-[6″-O-(p-E-coumaroyl)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, hypolaetin 7-O-[6″-O-(E-caffeoyl)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, and 15 known compounds were isolated from aerial parts of the Mongolian medicinal plant Caryopteris mongolica. The cholinesterase-inhibitory activities of the constituents were estimated. The abietane diterpenoids (12-O-demethylcryptojaponol and 6α-hydroxydemethylcryptojaponol) showed potent inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes and electric eel, and against butyrylcholinesterase from horse serum. PMID:25900047

  11. Sex and storage affect cholinesterase activity in blood plasma of Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Freezing at -25?C had confounding effects on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in blood plasma from breeding female quail, but did not affect ChE activity in plasma from males. Plasma ChE activity of control females increased consistently during 28 days of storage while both carbamate- and cidrotophos-inhibited ChE decreased. Refrigeration of plasma at 4?C for 2 days had little effect of ChE activity. Plasma ChE activity was averaged about 34% higher in breeding males than in females. Extreme caution should be exercised in use of blood plasma for evaluation of anti ChE exposure in free-living birds.

  12. Brain cholinesterase activities of birds from forests sprayed with trichlorfon (Dylox) and carbaryl (Sevin-4-oil)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinkl, J.G.; Henny, C.J.; DeWeese, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activities were determined in birds from forests sprayed with Dylox2 at 1.13 kg/hectare (1 lb/acre ? active ingredient [a.i.]) or Sevin-4-oil2 at 1.13 kg/hectare (1 lb/acre ? a.i.) for up to 5 days postspray. Of ten bird species evaluated from the Dylox spray area, four species represented by six individuals had values which were depressed more than 2 standard deviations below the mean. Three of these activities (two species) were about 20% less than the mean. Of 12 species evaluated from the Sevin-4-oil spraying, three individuals representing three species had depressed values. One value was depressed greater than 20% below the mean. Half of the depressed activities were in canopy-dwelling birds collected on the day of spray.

  13. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets snowy egrets and black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbamate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increases with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas (USA) increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas and California (USA) also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  14. Brain cholinesterase activity of nestling great egrets, snowy egrets, and black-crowned night-herons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity in birds is often used to diagnose exposure or death from organophosphorus or carbmate pesticides. Brain ChE activity in the young of altricial species increase with age; however, this relationship has only been demonstrated in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Brain ChE activity of nestling great egrets (Casmerodius albus) collected from a colony in Texas increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests. Brain ChE activity of nestling snowy egrets (Egretta thula) and black-crowned night -herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) collected in one colony each from Rhode Island, Texas, and California also increased significantly with age and did not differ among individuals from different nests or colonies. This study further demonstrates that age must be considered when evaluating exposure of nestling altricial birds to ChE inhibitors.

  15. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, David B

    2014-01-01

    Though the symptoms of Alzheimer disease go on for years, the phase 3 trials of the cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), the current mainstay of symptomatic pharmacotherapy for this condition, were typically of only 3- to 6-months’ duration. We have limited data on long-term (that is, a year or more) therapy with these agents. In this review, we explore the available information on the biological and clinical effects of long-term ChEI therapy, what happens when these agents are discontinued, and examine what others have recommended. An individualized approach to deciding on whether to carry on with a ChEI should be taken. If continued, treatment goals should be clarified and patients monitored over time, for both drug-related benefits and adverse effects. PMID:25702360

  16. Actions and interactions of cholinolytics and cholinesterase reactivators in the treatment of acute organophosphorus toxicity.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, S; Ghosh, A K; Chowdhri, B L; Asthana, S N; Batra, B S

    1991-01-01

    Different drug combinations consisting of cholinolytic and a cholinesterase (ChE) reactivator provide greater therapeutic efficacy in acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in mice than when used alone. Maximum protection, as determined by a shift of the LD50 for the two OP agents, was observed with the cholinolytic benactyzine. A protection index (P.I.) of 42 was obtained when benactyzine was given along with obidoxime in diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) intoxication. With the more toxic OP agent soman (o-pinacolylmethylphosphonofluoridate), the same cholinolytic only offered a maximum P.I. of 3.2 when administered with HS-6, another bispyridinium ChE reactivator. This beneficial effect of benactyzine is possibly due to its greater antimuscarinic effect in the central nervous system than atropine or dexetimide. PMID:1935707

  17. Diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning in birds: Effects of environmental temperature and underfeeding on cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity has been used extensively to monitor exposure to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides in wild birds. A series of factorial experiments was conducted to assess the extent to which noncontaminant-related environmental conditions might affect brain ChE activity and thereby confound the diagnosis of OP and CB intoxication. Underfeeding (restricting intake to 50% of control for 21 d or fasting for 1-3 d) or exposure to elevated temperature (36 + 1?C for 1 d) caused only slight reductions (10-17%) in brain AChE activity in adult male Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). This degree of 'reduction' in brain AChE activity is considerably less than the 50% 'inhibition' criterion employed in the diagnosis of insecticide-induced mortality, but nevertheless approaches the 20% 'inhibition' level used as a conservative estimate of sublethal exposure to a known insecticide application.

  18. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E.; Segerson, Nicholas A.; Kannan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  19. [Comparative studies on multiple forms of serum cholinesterase in various species].

    PubMed

    Unakami, S; Suzuki, S; Nakanishi, E; Ichinohe, K; Hirata, M; Tanimoto, Y

    1987-04-01

    Multiple forms of serum cholinesterase (ChE) were compared in 8 species by electrophoretic technique and the following characteristics were noted. The first moving fraction markedly hydrolyzed butyrylthiocholine and the activity was not inhibited by 10(-5)M eserine in the serum of some rabbits tested. Electrophoretic patterns of the ChE were obtained by use of two thiocholines as substrate, and the number of fractions against acetylthiocholine were more than against butyrylthiocholine in dogs, miniature pigs, rabbits, and hamsters. The activities of ChE fractions of dogs (C3), miniature pigs (C1, C2), rabbits (C1), and hamsters (C3) were inhibited by 6.1 X 10(-2)M caffein but not by 10(-4)M ethopropazine, which suggests that the fractions are all true-ChE. PMID:3609156

  20. Reactivation of model cholinesterases by oximes and intermediate phosphyloximes: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Shubham; Hadad, Christopher M

    2008-09-25

    Phosphyloximes (POX) are generated upon the reactivation of organophosphorus (OP)-inhibited cholinesterases (ChEs) by pyridinium oximes. These POXs are known to be potent inhibitors of the ChEs following reactivation. However, they can also decompose to give an OP derivative and a cyano derivative of the oxime when a base abstracts the benzylic proton. Using density functional theory, thermodynamic properties were calculated for the reactivation and decomposition pathways of three different oximes (2-PAM, 3-PAM and 4-PAM) with six different OPs (cyclosarin, paraoxon, sarin, tabun, VR and VX). For reactivation purposes, 2-PAM is predicted to be more efficient than 3- and 4-PAM. Based on atomic charges and relative energies, 2-POXs were found to be more inclined towards the decomposition process. PMID:18582852

  1. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E; Segerson, Nicholas A; Kannan, Latha; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2013-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  2. CHRNA7 Gene and Response to Cholinesterase Inhibitors in an Italian Cohort of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Clarelli, Ferdinando; Mascia, Elisabetta; Santangelo, Roberto; Mazzeo, Salvatore; Giacalone, Giacomo; Galimberti, Daniela; Fusco, Federica; Zuffi, Marta; Fenoglio, Chiara; Franceschi, Massimo; Scarpini, Elio; Forloni, Gianluigi; Magnani, Giuseppe; Comi, Giancarlo; Albani, Diego; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo

    2016-04-16

    Previous studies suggest that genetic variants in CHRNA7, which encodes for the major subunit of the acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), are associated with the clinical response to cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We sought to replicate the association of two SNPs in the CHRNA7 gene, rs6494223 and rs8024987, with response to ChEI treatment in an Italian cohort of 169 AD patients, further extending the study to gene-level analysis. None of the tested variants was associated with clinical response. However, rs6494223 showed a consistent effect direction (OR = 1.4; p = 0.17), which after meta-analysis with previous study yielded a significant result (OR = 1.57, p = 0.02, I2 = 0%). PMID:27104904

  3. Hepatic cholinesterase of laying hens naturally infected by Salmonella Gallinarum (fowl typhoid).

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Boiago, Marcel M; Bottari, Nathieli B; do Carmo, Guilherme M; Alves, Mariana Sauzen; Boscato, Carla; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Casagrande, Renata A; Stefani, Lenita M

    2016-09-01

    Salmonella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that may cause foodborne gastroenteritis in humans and animals consisting of over 2000 serovars. The serovar Salmonella Gallinarum is an important worldwide pathogen of poultry. However, little is known on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Salmonella in chickens. The aim of this study was to evaluate cholinesterase and myeloperoxidase activities in hepatic tissue of laying hens naturally infected by S. Gallinarum. Twenty positive liver samples for S. Gallinarum were collected, in addition to seven liver samples from healthy uninfected laying hens (control group). The right liver lobe was homogenized for analysis of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the left lobe was divided into two fragments, one for histopathology and the other for Salmonella isolation. The results showed changes in AChE and BchE activity in the liver of infected laying hens compared to the control group (P < 0.05), i.e. reduced AChE and increased BChE activities in liver samples. Infected animals showed increased MPO activity compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the histopathological findings showed fibrinoid necrosis associated to the infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages,heterophils in the liver of infected hens. These findings suggest that the inflammatory process was attenuated providing a pro-inflammatory action of both enzyme analyzed in order to reduce the free ACh, a molecule which has an anti-inflammatory action. Therefore, our results lead to the hypothesis that cholinesterase plays an important role on the modulation of immune response against S. Gallinarum with an inflammatory effect, contributing to the response against this bacterium. This study should contribute to a better understanding on the pathogenic mechanisms involved in laying hens infected by S. Gallinarum. PMID:27377431

  4. Prenylated xanthones from mangosteen as promising cholinesterase inhibitors and their molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Khaw, K Y; Choi, S B; Tan, S C; Wahab, H A; Chan, K L; Murugaiyah, V

    2014-09-25

    Garcinia mangostana is a well-known tropical plant found mostly in South East Asia. The present study investigated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities of G. mangostana extract and its chemical constituents using Ellman's colorimetric method. Cholinesterase inhibitory-guided approach led to identification of six bioactive prenylated xanthones showing moderate to potent cholinesterases inhibition with IC50 values of lower than 20.5 μM. The most potent inhibitor of AChE was garcinone C while γ-mangostin was the most potent inhibitor of BChE with IC50 values of 1.24 and 1.78 μM, respectively. Among the xanthones, mangostanol, 3-isomangostin, garcinone C and α-mangostin are AChE selective inhibitors, 8-deoxygartanin is a BChE selective inhibitor while γ-mangostin is a dual inhibitor. Preliminary structure-activity relationship suggests the importance of the C-8 prenyl and C-7 hydroxy groups for good AChE and BChE inhibitory activities. The enzyme kinetic studies indicate that both α-mangostin and garcinone C are mixed-mode inhibitors, while γ-mangostin is a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE. In contrast, both γ-mangostin and garcinone C are uncompetitive inhibitors, while α-mangostin is a mixed-mode inhibitor of BChE. Molecular docking studies revealed that α-mangostin, γ-mangostin and garcinone C interacts differently with the five important regions of AChE and BChE. The nature of protein-ligand interactions is mainly hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding. These bioactive prenylated xanthones are worthy for further investigations. PMID:25172794

  5. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legler, Patricia; Boisvert, Susanne; Compton, Jaimee; Millard, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine O?. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. pNBE was tested as a surrogate scaffold for mammalian esterases. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1. We discuss the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases.

  6. Secondary metabolites of Seseli rigidum: Chemical composition plus antioxidant, antimicrobial and cholinesterase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Stankov-Jovanović, V P; Ilić, M D; Mitić, V D; Mihajilov-Krstev, T M; Simonović, S R; Nikolić Mandić, S D; Tabet, J C; Cole, R B

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of different polarity obtained from various plant parts (root, leaf, flower and fruit) of Seseli rigidum were studied by different antioxidant assays: DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, by total reducing power method as well as via total content of flavonoids and polyphenols. Essential oils of all plant parts showed weak antioxidant characteristics. The inhibitory concentration range of the tested extracts, against bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger was 0.01-1.50 mg/mL and of a microbicidal 0.02-3.00 mg/mL. In the interaction with cholinesterase, all essential oils proved effective as inhibitors. The highest percentage of inhibition versus human and horse cholinesterase was shown by root essential oil (38.20% and 48.30%, respectively) among oils, and root hexane extract (40.56% and 50.65% respectively). Essential oils and volatile components of all plant parts were identified by GC, GC-MS and headspace/GC-MS. Statistical analysis of the ensemble of results showed that the root essential oil composition differed significantly from essential oils of other parts of the plant. Taking into account all of the studied activities, the root hexane extract showed the best overall properties. By means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, the 30 most abundant constituents were identified in extracts of different polarity. The presence of identified constituents was linked to observed specific biological activities, thus designating compounds potentially responsible for each exhibited activity. PMID:25863020

  7. Repeatability and validity of a field kit for estimation of cholinesterase in whole blood.

    PubMed Central

    London, L; Thompson, M L; Sacks, S; Fuller, B; Bachmann, O M; Myers, J E

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate a spectrophotometric field kit (Test-Mate-OP) for repeatability and validity in comparison with reference laboratory methods and to model its anticipated sensitivity and specificity based on these findings. METHODS--76 farm workers between the age of 20 and 55, of whom 30 were pesticide applicators exposed to a range of organophosphates in the preceding 10 days, had blood taken for plasma cholinesterase (PCE) and erythrocyte cholinesterase (ECE) measurement by field kit or laboratory methods. Paired blinded duplicate samples were taken from subgroups in the sample to assess repeatability of laboratory and field kit methods. Field kits were also used to test venous blood in one subgroup. The variance obtained for the field kit tests was then applied to two hypothetical scenarios that used published action guidelines to model the kit's sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS--Repeatability for PCE was much poorer and for ECE slightly poorer than that of laboratory measures. A substantial upward bias for field kit ECE relative to laboratory measurements was found. Sensitivity of the kit to a 40% drop in PCE was 67%, whereas that for ECE was 89%. Specificity of the kit with no change in mean of the population was 100% for ECE and 91% for PCE. CONCLUSION--Field kit ECE estimation seems to be sufficiently repeatable for surveillance activities, whereas PCE does not. Repeatability of both tests seems to be too low for use in epidemiological dose-response investigations. Further research is indicated to characterise the upward bias in ECE estimation on the kit. PMID:7697143

  8. Cholinesterase inhibitors improve both memory and complex learning in aged beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Joseph A; Greig, Nigel H; Ingram, Donald K; Sandin, Johan; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W

    2011-01-01

    Similar to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), dogs exhibit age-dependent cognitive decline, amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology, and evidence of cholinergic hypofunction. The present study sought to further investigate the role of cholinergic hypofunction in the canine model by examining the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors phenserine and donepezil on performance of two tasks, a delayed non-matching-to-position task (DNMP) designed to assess working memory, and an oddity discrimination learning task designed to assess complex learning, in aged dogs. Phenserine (0.5 mg/kg; PO) significantly improved performance on the DNMP at the longest delay compared to wash-out and partially attenuated scopolamine-induced deficits (15 μg/kg; SC). Phenserine also improved learning on a difficult version of an oddity discrimination task compared to placebo, but had no effect on an easier version. We also examined the effects of three doses of donepezil (0.75, 1.5, and 6 mg/kg; PO) on performance of the DNMP. Similar to the results with phenserine, 1.5 mg/kg of donepezil improved performance at the longest delay compared to baseline and wash-out, indicative of memory enhancement. These results further extend the findings of cholinergic hypofunction in aged dogs and provide pharmacological validation of the canine model with a cholinesterase inhibitor approved for use in AD. Collectively, these studies support utilizing the aged dog in future screening of therapeutics for AD, as well as for investigating the links among cholinergic function, Aβ pathology, and cognitive decline. PMID:21593569

  9. Do cholinesterase inhibitors act primarily on attention deficit? A naturalistic study in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Laura; Bessi, Valentina; Padiglioni, Sonia; Marini, Sandro; Pepeu, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Attention is the first non-memory domain affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before deficits in language and visuo-spatial function, and it is claimed that attention deficits are responsible for the difficulties with daily living in early demented patients. The aim of this longitudinal study in a group of 121 Caucasian, community-dwelling, mild-to-moderate AD patients (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score >17) was to detect which cognitive domains were most affected by the disease and whether one year treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors was more effective in preserving attention than memory. All subjects were evaluated by a neuropsychological battery including global measurements (MMSE, Information-Memory-Concentration Test) and tasks exploring verbal long-term memory, language, attention, and executive functions. The comparison between two evaluations, made 12 months apart, shows statistically significant differences, indicating deterioration compared to baseline, in the following tests: MMSE (with no gender differences), Composite Memory Score, Short Story Delayed Recall, Trail-Making Test A, Semantic Fluency Test, and Token Test. Conversely, there were no differences in the two evaluations of the Digit Span, Corsi Tapping Test, Short Story Immediate Recall, and Phonemic Fluency Tests. It appears that the treatment specifically attenuated the decline in tests assessing attention and executive functions. A stabilization of the ability to pay attention, with the ensuing positive effects on executive functions, recent memory, and information acquisition which depend on attention, appears to be the main neuropsychological mechanism through which the activation of the cholinergic system, resulting from cholinesterase inhibition, exerts its effect on cognition. PMID:24577458

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SERUM CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY AND THE CHANGE IN BODY TEMPERATURE AND MOTOR ACTIVITY IN THE RAT: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY OF DIISOPROPYL FLUOROPHATE (DFP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment of the neurotoxicology of organophosphate (OP) pesticides calls for a thorough understanding of the relationship between tissue cholinesterase (ChE) activity and changes in behavioral and autonomic responses to OP treatment. To address this issue, motor activity, ...

  11. Poverty, production, and health: inhibition of erythrocyte cholinesterase via occupational exposure to organophosphate insecticides in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Ojanguren, R; Halperin, D C

    1998-01-01

    Occupational exposure to organophosphate pesticides and its effects on the concentration of erythrocyte cholinesterase in the rural population of Chiapas, Mexico, are described. The authors surveyed agricultural production and pesticide use was surveyed among 199 campesinos (peasants) in three communities that used various agricultural production systems. The authors measured the concentration of the cholinesterase enzyme in blood samples obtained from 65 campesinos before and after exposure to the insecticide. The authors established a comparison value for the population that was not exposed occupationally. The exposure values of the enzyme concentration were significantly lower than preexposure values (p = .00001) and reference group values (p = .0008). Individuals in the community characterized by subsistence production had significantly lower levels of the enzyme than individuals in the other two communities (p = .01). This result suggested that a greater risk of adverse health effects existed among the poorest communities. PMID:9570306

  12. Phthalimide-Derived N-Benzylpyridinium Halides Targeting Cholinesterases: Synthesis and Bioactivity of New Potential Anti-Alzheimer's Disease Agents.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Mina; Golipoor, Maedeh; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Moradi, Alireza; Nadri, Hamid; Emami, Saeed; Foroumadi, Alireza; Shafiee, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    In order to develop potent dual-binding cholinesterase inhibitors as potential drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, we designed and synthesized phthalimide-based acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors (7) containing a substituted N-benzylpyridinium residue. The in vitro anti-cholinesterase assay employing the target compounds against AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) revealed the 2-fluorobenzylpyridinium derivative 7d as the most potent compound against both enzymes, with IC50 values of 0.77 and 8.71 μM. The docking study of compound 7d into the active site of AChE showed the gorge-spanning binding mode, in which the compound spans the narrow hydrophobic gorge from the bottom to the rim. PMID:26898241

  13. Recovery of plasmatic cholinesterase activity in a neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus (Pisces, Curimatidae) exposed to organophosphorous pesticides.

    PubMed

    Loteste, Alicia; Cazenave, Jimena; Parma de Croux, M Julieta

    2002-07-01

    The objective was to determine the plasmatic enzyme cholinesterase recovery, after being inhibited by an organophosphorous in juveniles of Prochilodus lineatus. Fish were exposed 12 h to a sublethal concentration of 1 mg/l of monocrotophos, and immediately placing in clean water during 12, 24, 48 and 96 h to detoxification. After this period, blood was extracted and plasma were used for the quantification of cholinesterase. The results showed a enzymatic inhibition of 91.9%, 55.1%, 50.4% and 33.4% with 12, 24, 48 and 96 h of recovery, respectively. The enzymatic activity spreads to be normalized with the course of hours and the degree of inhibition obtained initially was very high and sustained in the first 48 h. PMID:12597563

  14. A facile ionic liquid promoted synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity and molecular modeling study of novel highly functionalized spiropyrrolidines.

    PubMed

    Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Arumugam, Natarajan; Basiri, Alireza; Kia, Yalda; Ali, Mohamed Ashraf; Farooq, Mehvish; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel dimethoxyindanone embedded spiropyrrolidines were synthesized in ionic liquid, [bmim]Br and were evaluated for their inhibitory activities towards cholinesterases. Among the spiropyrrolidines, compound 4f exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 1.57 µM against acethylcholinesterase (AChE). Molecular docking simulation for the most active compound was employed with the aim of disclosing its binding mechanism to the active site of AChE receptor. PMID:25642838

  15. Acquisition and reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in rats: Effects of the cholinesterase inhibitors donepezil and rivastigmine.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-07-01

    The present study examined the influence of the cholinesterase inhibitors donepezil (a selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase) and rivastigmine (also an inhibitor of butyrylcholinesterase) on the acquisition and reinstatement of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats. Before the CPP procedure, animals received a single injection of ethanol (0.5 g/kg, 10% w/v, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) for 15 days. The ethanol-induced CPP (biased method) was developed by four injections of ethanol (0.5 g/kg, 10% w/v, i.p.) every second day. Control rats received saline instead of ethanol. Donepezil (0.5, 1 or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or rivastigmine (0.03, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered before ethanol during conditioning or before the reinstatement of ethanol-induced CPP. The cholinesterase inhibitors were equally effective in increasing (dose dependently) the acquisition of ethanol-induced CPP. Furthermore, priming injections of both inhibitors reinstated (cross-reinstatement) the ethanol-induced CPP with similar efficacy. These effects of both cholinesterase inhibitors were reversed by mecamylamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, but not by scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. Thus, our results show that the cholinergic system is involved in the reinforcing properties of ethanol, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play an important role in the relapse to ethanol-seeking behaviour. PMID:27097732

  16. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Legler, Patricia M; Boisvert, Susanne M; Compton, Jaimee R; Millard, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine Oγ. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its k cat/K m for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). We discuss the use of pNBE as a surrogate scaffold for the mammalian esterases, and the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases. PMID:25077141

  17. PON1 status does not influence cholinesterase activity in Egyptian agricultural workers exposed to chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Corie A.; Crane, Alice L.; Bonner, Matthew R.; Knaak, James B.; Browne, Richard W.; Lein, Pamela J.; Olson, James R.

    2012-12-15

    Animal studies have shown that paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genotype can influence susceptibility to the organophosphorus pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF). However, Monte Carlo analysis suggests that PON1 genotype may not affect CPF-related toxicity at low exposure conditions in humans. The current study sought to determine the influence of PON1 genotype on the activity of blood cholinesterase as well as the effect of CPF exposure on serum PON1 in workers occupationally exposed to CPF. Saliva, blood and urine were collected from agricultural workers (n = 120) from Egypt's Menoufia Governorate to determine PON1 genotype, blood cholinesterase activity, serum PON1 activity towards chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPOase) and paraoxon (POase), and urinary levels of the CPF metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy). The PON1 55 (P ≤ 0.05) but not the PON1 192 genotype had a significant effect on CPOase activity. However, both the PON1 55 (P ≤ 0.05) and PON1 192 (P ≤ 0.001) genotypes had a significant effect on POase activity. Workers had significantly inhibited AChE and BuChE after CPF application; however, neither CPOase activity nor POase activity was associated with ChE depression when adjusted for CPF exposure (as determined by urinary TCPy levels) and stratified by PON1 genotype. CPOase and POase activity were also generally unaffected by CPF exposure although there were alterations in activity within specific genotype groups. Together, these results suggest that workers retained the capacity to detoxify chlorpyrifos-oxon under the exposure conditions experienced by this study population regardless of PON1 genotype and activity and that effects of CPF exposure on PON1 activity are minimal. -- Highlights: ► CPF exposure resulted in an increase in TCPy and decreases in BuChE and AChE. ► CPOase activity decreased in subjects with the PON1 55LM and PON1 55 MM genotypes. ► Neither PON1 genotype nor CPOase activity had an effect on BuChE or AChE inhibition.

  18. Cholinesterase inhibition and behavioral toxicity of carbofuran on Oreochromis niloticus early life stages.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, P C; Luchmann, K H; Ribeiro, A B; Veras, M M; Correa, J R M B; Nogueira, A J; Bainy, A C D; Carvalho, P S M

    2011-10-01

    Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus at 9 days post-hatch were exposed in semi-static experiments to the carbamate insecticide carbofuran, which is applied in agricultural systems in Brazil. Although the molecular mechanism of carbofuran toxicity is well known, a detailed understanding of the ecological mechanisms through which carbofuran effects can propagate towards higher levels of biological organization in fish is incomplete. Mortality rates were quantified for larvae exposed for 96 h to 8.3, 40.6, 69.9, 140, 297 and 397 μg/L carbofuran, and the LC(50) 96 h was 214.7 μg/L. In addition, the biochemical biomarker cholinesterase inhibition and behavioral biomarkers related to vision, swimming, prey capture and predator avoidance were quantified in individual larvae, as well as their growth in weight. The behavioral parameters were quantified by analysis of digitally recorded videos of individual larvae within appropriate experimental setups. The activity of the enzyme cholinesterase decreased after exposure to carbofuran with a lowest observed effects concentration (LOEC) of 69.9 μg/L. Visual acuity deficits were detected after carbofuran exposure with a LOEC of 40.6 μg/L. Swimming speed decreased with carbofuran exposure, with a LOEC of 397.6 μg/L. The number of attacks to prey (Daphnia magna nauplii) decreased in larvae exposed to carbofuran, with a LOEC of 397.6 μg/L. Growth in weight was significantly reduced in a dose dependent manner, and all carbofuran groups exhibited a statistically significant decrease in growth when compared to controls (p<0.05). The number of predator attacks necessary to capture larvae decreased after exposure to carbofuran, and the LOEC was 69.9 μg/L. These results show that exposure of sensitive early life stages of tilapia O. niloticus to sublethal concentrations of carbofuran can affect fundamental aspects of fish larval ecology that are relevant to recruitment of fish populations, and that can be better understood by the

  19. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Patricia M.; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Compton, Jaimee R.; Millard, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine Oγ. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). We discuss the use of pNBE as a surrogate scaffold for the mammalian esterases, and the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases. PMID:25077141

  20. Cognitive and Affective Changes in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Undergoing Switch of Cholinesterase Inhibitors: A 6-Month Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Sorbi, Sandro; Attar, Mahmood; Colombo, Delia; Cravello, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer’s disease after an initial response to cholinesterase inhibitors may complain a later lack of efficacy. This, in association with incident neuropsychiatric symptoms, may worsen patient quality of life. Thus, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor could represent a valid therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the switch from one to another cholinesterase inhibitor on cognitive and affective symptoms in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients. Four hundred twenty-three subjects were included from the EVOLUTION study, an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study conducted on Alzheimer disease patients who switched to different cholinesterase inhibitor due either to lack/loss of efficacy or response, reduced tolerability or poor compliance. All patients underwent cognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments, carried out before the switch (baseline), and at 3 and 6-month follow-up. A significant effect of the different switch types was found on Mini-Mental State Examination score during time, with best effectiveness on mild Alzheimer’s disease patients switching from oral cholinesterase inhibitors to rivastigmine patch. Depressive symptoms, when measured using continuous Neuropsychiatric Inventory values, decreased significantly, while apathy symptoms remained stable over the 6 months after the switch. However, frequency of both depression and apathy, when measured categorically using Neuropsychiatric Inventory cut-off scores, did not change significantly during time. In mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients with loss of efficacy and tolerability during cholinesterase inhibitor treatment, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor may represent an important option for slowing cognitive deterioration. The evidence of apathy stabilization and the positive tendency of depressive symptom improvement should definitively be confirmed in double-blind controlled studies. PMID

  1. Attenuation of functional hyperemia to visual stimulation in mild Alzheimer's disease and its sensitivity to cholinesterase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Chaudhary, Simone; Dorr, Adrienne; Scouten, Amy; Schwindt, Graeme; Masellis, Mario; Stanisz, Greg J; Black, Sandra E; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2016-05-01

    Despite the growing recognition of the significance of cerebrovascular impairment in the etiology and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the early stage brain vascular dysfunction and its sensitivity to pharmacological interventions is still not fully characterized. Due to the early and aggressive treatment of probable AD with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI), which in and of themselves have direct effects on brain vasculature, the vast majority of hemodynamic measurements in early AD subjects reported hitherto have consequently been made only after the start of treatment, complicating the disentanglement of disease- vs. treatment-related effects on the cerebral vasculature. To address this gap, we used pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling MRI to measure resting perfusion and visual stimulation elicited changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood oxygenation dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal in a cohort of mild AD patients immediately prior to, 6months post, and 12months post commencement of open label cholinesterase inhibitor treatment. Although patients exhibited no gray matter atrophy prior to treatment and their resting perfusion was not distinguishable from that in age, education and gender-matched controls, the patients' visual stimulation-elicited changes in BOLD fMRI and blood flow were decreased by 10±4% (BOLD) and 23±2% (CBF), relative to those in controls. Induction of cholinesterase inhibition treatment was associated with a further, 7±2% reduction in patients' CBF response to visual stimulation, but it stabilized, at this new lower level, over the follow-up period. Likewise, MMSE scores remained stable during the treatment; furthermore, higher MMSE scores were associated with higher perfusion responses to visual stimulation. This study represents the initial step in disentangling the effects of AD pathology from those of the first line treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors on cerebral hemodynamics and supports the use of arterial spin

  2. Muscular cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in deep-sea fish from the NW Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Solé, Montserrat

    2014-03-01

    Organisms inhabiting submarine canyons can be potentially exposed to higher inputs of anthropogenic chemicals than their counterparts from the adjacent areas. To find out to what extend this observation applies to a NW Mediterranean canyon (i.e. Blanes canyon) off the Catalan coast, four deep-sea fish species were collected from inside the canyon (BC) and the adjacent open slope (OS). The selected species were: Alepocephalus rostratus, Lepidion lepidion, Coelorinchus mediterraneus and Bathypterois mediterraneus. Prior to the choice of an adequate sentinel species, the natural variation of the selected parameters (biomarkers) in relation to factors such as size, sex, sampling depth and seasonality need to be characterised. In this study, the activities of cholinesterases (ChEs) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes were determined in the muscle of the four deep-sea fish. Of all ChEs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was dominant and selected for further monitoring. Overall, AChE activity exhibited a significant relationship with fish size whereas LDH activity was mostly dependent on the sex and gonadal development status, although in a species-dependent manner. The seasonal variability of LDH activity was more marked than for AChE activity, and inside-outside canyon (BC-OS) differences were not consistent in all contrasted fish species, and in fact they were more dependent on biological traits. Thus, they did not suggest a differential stress condition between sites inside and outside the canyon. PMID:24296242

  3. Comparative analysis of cholinesterase activities in food animals using modified Ellman and Michel assays

    PubMed Central

    Askar, Kasim Abass; Kudi, A. Caleb; Moody, A. John

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated correlations between modified Ellman and Michel assay methods for measuring cholinesterase (ChE) activities. It also established a foundation for the applicability of measuring ChE activities in food animal species as biochemical biomarkers for evaluating exposure to and effects of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Measuring ChE activities in blood and tissue is currently the most important method of confirming the diagnosis of such exposure. The study also characterized the level of ChE activity in the selected organs/tissues of these animals and determined the best organ/tissue in which to measure ChE activity. The ChE activities were found to be higher in cattle than in sheep and higher in erythrocytes than in plasma and serum. The anticoagulant heparin significantly affects AChE activity in plasma compared with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). Of the different tissues tested, the mean of ChE activities was found to be highest in tissue from liver, followed by lung, muscle, kidney, and heart for sheep and cattle. In pigs, the ChE activities tested higher in kidney, liver, lung, muscle, and heart. The highest activities of ChE were found in pigs, followed by cattle and sheep. There was no significant difference between the modified Ellman and Michel method, but the percentage coefficient of variance (%CV) values were higher when the Michel method was used. PMID:22468023

  4. Evidence for inhibition of cholinesterases in insect and mammalian nervous systems by the insect repellent deet

    PubMed Central

    Corbel, Vincent; Stankiewicz, Maria; Pennetier, Cédric; Fournier, Didier; Stojan, Jure; Girard, Emmanuelle; Dimitrov, Mitko; Molgó, Jordi; Hougard, Jean-Marc; Lapied, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Background N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (deet) remains the gold standard for insect repellents. About 200 million people use it every year and over 8 billion doses have been applied over the past 50 years. Despite the widespread and increased interest in the use of deet in public health programmes, controversies remain concerning both the identification of its target sites at the olfactory system and its mechanism of toxicity in insects, mammals and humans. Here, we investigated the molecular target site for deet and the consequences of its interactions with carbamate insecticides on the cholinergic system. Results By using toxicological, biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, we show that deet is not simply a behaviour-modifying chemical but that it also inhibits cholinesterase activity, in both insect and mammalian neuronal preparations. Deet is commonly used in combination with insecticides and we show that deet has the capacity to strengthen the toxicity of carbamates, a class of insecticides known to block acetylcholinesterase. Conclusion These findings question the safety of deet, particularly in combination with other chemicals, and they highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the development of safer insect repellents for use in public health. PMID:19656357

  5. Effects of Soman Inhibition and of Structural Differences on Cholinesterase Molecular Dynamics: A Neutron Scattering Study

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, F.; Weik, M.; Masson, P.; Renault, F.; Fournier, D.; Brochier, L.; Doctor, B. P.; Saxena, A.; Silman, I.; Zaccai, G.

    2005-01-01

    Incoherent elastic neutron scattering experiments on members of the cholinesterase family were carried out to investigate how molecular dynamics is affected by covalent inhibitor binding and by differences in primary and quaternary structure. Tetrameric native and soman-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) as well as native dimeric Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase (DmAChE) hydrated protein powders were examined. Atomic mean-square displacements (MSDs) were found to be identical for native HuBChE and for DmAChE in the whole temperature range examined, leading to the conclusion that differences in activity and substrate specificity are not reflected by a global modification of subnanosecond molecular dynamics. MSDs of native and soman-inhibited HuBChE were identical below the thermal denaturation temperature of the native enzyme, indicating a common mean free-energy surface. Denaturation of the native enzyme is reflected by a relative increase of MSDs consistent with entropic stabilization of the unfolded state. The results suggest that the stabilization of HuBChE phosphorylated by soman is due to an increase in free energy of the unfolded state due to a decrease in entropy. PMID:16100272

  6. Insights into cholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of five Juniperus species.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Nilufer; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Ergun, Fatma

    2011-09-01

    In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the aqueous and ethanol extracts of the leaves, ripe fruits, and unripe fruits of Juniperus communis ssp. nana, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus sabina, Juniperus foetidissima, and Juniperus excelsa were investigated in the present study. Cholinesterase inhibition of the extracts was screened using ELISA microplate reader. Antioxidant activity of the extracts was tested by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radical scavenging, ferrous ion-chelating, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. The extracts had low or no inhibition towards AChE, whereas the leaf aqueous extract of J. foetidissima showed the highest BChE inhibition (93.94 ± 0.01%). The leaf extracts usually exerted higher antioxidant activity. We herein describe the first study on anticholinesterase and antioxidant activity by the methods of ferrous ion-chelating, superoxide radical scavenging, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays of the mentioned Juniperus species. PMID:21708212

  7. "Value for money" in treating Alzheimer's disease with the new cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajit; Jenkins, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    The absolute number of dementia cases is likely to increase due to the impending demographic changes. Several cost-of-illness studies of Alzheimer's disease, mainly from a societal perspective in developed countries, have demonstrated a huge economic burden. A substantial component of this huge economic burden is the direct costs of institutionalization and the indirect cost incurred by informal carers. This huge economic burden is of great interest because of the emergence of several cholinesterase inhibitors with proven efficacy in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Several cost-effectiveness studies of these drugs, based mainly on Markov modelling techniques and using data from population-based epidemiological studies and efficacy trials, have indicated that these drugs are cost-effective. A theoretical delay in placement into a residential or a nursing home and consequent cost savings may explain this cost-effectiveness. In the UK, although health authorities would fund the prescription of these drugs, social services would benefit from the cost savings; thus there is little financial incentive for health authorities to fund these drugs. PMID:24937241

  8. Cholinesterase in porcine saliva: Analytical characterization and behavior after experimental stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Escribano, Damián; Martínez-Miró, Silvia; Hernández, Fuensanta; Contreras, María Dolores; Cerón, José Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and characterize the enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) in porcine saliva, as well as to evaluate its behavior in experimental stressful conditions. The results of ChE characterization by using different substrates and the selective inhibitors ethopropazine and physostigmine showed that the main enzyme existing in porcine saliva was butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). An automated assay using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate was validated providing adequate reproducibility, linearity results and limit of detection. Salivary ChE was measured using the validated assay in two models of acute stress: twenty pigs stressed for 2min with a nasal snare and other twenty pigs subjected to a short-term road transport. Salivary ChE significantly increased after restraint and transport stress in pigs, as well as the ChE to total protein ratio. In conclusion, BChE is the predominant isoenzyme in porcine saliva, it can be measured by the fast, simple and automated method described in this paper and it increases in the models of stress used in this study. PMID:27234531

  9. Recovery of brain and plasma cholinesterase activities in ducklings exposed to organophosphorus pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activities were determined for mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) exposed to dicrotophos and fenthion. Recovery rates of brain ChE did not differ between ducklings administered a single oral dose vs. a 2-week dietary dose of these organophosphates. Exposure to the organophosphates, followed by recovery of brain ChE, did not significantly affect the degree of brain ChE inhibition or the recovery of ChE activity at a subsequent exposure. Recovery of brain ChE activity followed the general model Y = a + b(logX) with rapid recovery to about 50% of normal, followed by a slower rate of recovery until normal ChE activity levels were attained. Fenthion and dicrotophos-inhibited brain ChE were only slightly reactivated in vitro by pyridine-2-aldoxime methiodide, which suggested that spontaneous reactivation was not a primary method of recovery of ChE activity. Recovery of brain ChE activity can be modeled for interpretation of sublethal inhibition of brain ChE activities in wild birds following environmental applications of organophosphates. Plasma ChE activity is inferior to brain ChE activity for environmental monitoring, because of its rapid recovery and large degree of variation among individuals.

  10. Bird predation on cutworms (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in wheat fields and chlorpyrifos effects on brain cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, L.C.; DeWeese, L.R.; Schladweiler, P.

    1986-01-01

    Horned larks, Eremophila alpestris (L.), and McCown's longspurs, Calcarius mccownii (Lawrence), were collected at intervals from two winter wheat fields in Montana [USA] after aerial application of chlorpyrifos to control cutworms. Both bird species had a high (95-100%) incidence of Lepidoptera, mostly pale western cutworms, Agrotis orthogonia Morrison, in their stomachs at 3 days postspray. Incidence of cutworms and other insects in stomachs of birds from sprayed fields was lower at 9 and 16 days postspray than in control birds, presumably due to insecticide-caused reduction of insects. Effects of birds on population dynamics of insect pests in wheat are unknown, but birds do contribute to cutworm mortality. Predation is one of the limiting factors to cutworm increase and can supplement insecticidal control. Brain cholinesterase activity in horned larks collected from the sprayed fields at 3 and 9 days postspray was significantly lower than in unexposed larks, but at 16 days the difference was not significant. Although nontarget birds clearly were exposed to chlorpyrifos and manifested a sublethal physiological response, toxic effects were less severe than those resulting from endrin application for cutworm control in wheat. More study is needed of larger chlorpyrifos-treated fields under a variety of conditions to fully assess effects on nontarget life.

  11. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 μg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 μM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality.

  12. Plasma cholinesterase levels of mountain plovers (Charadrius montanus) wintering in central California, USA.

    PubMed

    Iko, William M; Archuleta, Andrew S; Knopf, Fritz L

    2003-01-01

    Declines of over 60% in mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) populations over the past 30 years have made it a species of concern throughout its current range and a proposed species for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Wintering mountain plovers spend considerable time on freshly plowed agricultural fields where they may potentially be exposed to anticholinesterase pesticides. Because of the population status and wintering ecology of plovers, the objectives of our study were to use nondestructive methods to report baseline plasma cholinesterase (ChE) levels in free-ranging mountain plovers wintering in California, USA, and to assess whether sampled birds showed signs of ChE inhibition related to anticholinesterase chemical exposure. We compared plasma ChE activity for mountain plovers sampled from the Carrizo Plain (an area relatively free of anticholinesterase pesticide use) with similar measures for plovers from the Central Valley (where anticholinesterase pesticides are widely used). Analyses for ChE inhibition indicated that none of the plovers had been recently exposed to these chemicals. However, mean ChE levels of plovers from the Central Valley were significantly higher (32%) than levels reported for plovers from the Carrizo Plain. This result differs from our original assumption of higher exposure risk to mountain plovers in the Central Valley but does suggest that some effect is occurring in the ChE activity of mountain plovers wintering in California. PMID:12503754

  13. Co-opting functions of cholinesterases in neural, limb and stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Hopker, Astrid; Sperling, Laura E; Layer, Paul G

    2012-02-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a most remarkable protein, not only because it is one of the fastest enzymes in nature, but also since it appears in many molecular forms and is regulated by elaborate genetic networks. As revealed by sensitive histochemical procedures, AChE is expressed specifically in many tissues during development and in many mature organisms, as well as in healthy and diseased states. Therefore it is not surprising that there has been a long-standing search for additional, "non-classical" functions of cholinesterases (ChEs). In principle, AChE could either act nonenzymatically, e.g. exerting cell adhesive roles, or, alternatively, it could work within the frame of classic cholinergic systems, but in non-neural tissues. AChE might be considered a highly co-opting protein, since possibly it combines such various functions within one molecule. By presenting four different developmental cases, we here review i) the expression of ChEs in the neural tube and their close relation to cell proliferation and differentiation, ii) that AChE expression reflects a polycentric brain development, iii) the retina as a model for AChE functioning in neural network formation, and iv) nonneural ChEs in limb development and mature bones. Also, possible roles of AChE in neuritic growth and of cholinergic regulations in stem cells are briefly outlined. PMID:21933123

  14. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 µg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 µM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality. PMID:22740147

  15. Effects of malathion, diazinon, and parathion on mallard embryo development and cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Eastin, W.C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of external exposure of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs to malathion, diazinon, and parathion were examined using formulations and concentrations similar to field applications. Treatment with aqueous emulsion simulated exposure at the rate of 100 gal per acre (153 liters/hectare) with three to six different doses per compound with treatment at 3 and 8 days of embryonic development. Treatment with a nontoxic oil vehicle simulated exposure at the rate of 11 gal per acre (16.8 liters/hectare) with three to six different doses per compound. The order of embryotoxicity on a pounds-per-acre basis was parathion > diazinon > malathion with either vehicle. However, the potential hazard under conditions of up to five times the maximum field level of application was greater for malathion because of the high permissible level of application for malathion on certain crops. Parathion, the most embryotoxic of the three, had the most pronounced effects when an oil vehicle was used, as reflected by an LC50 of about 2 lb of active ingredient per acre, stunted growth, and a high frequency of malformations involving distortion of the axial skeleton, particularly in the cervical region. All three compounds resulted in significant depression of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity, but parathion caused the most depression throughout development, which was still apparent in hatchlings. Treatment with either distilled water or oil vehicle alone did not result in any of these effects seen with organophosphorous insecticides.

  16. The effects of chlorpyrifos on cholinesterase activity and foraging behavior in the dragonfly, Anax junius (Odonata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Atchison, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    We examined head capsule cholinesterase (ChE) and foraging behavior in nymphs of the dragonfly, Anax junius, exposed for 24 h to 0.2, 0.6 and 1.0 ??g l-1 of the organophosphorus (OP) insecticide, chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl) phosphorothioate]. The invertebrate community is an important component of the structure and function of wetland ecosystems, yet the potential effects of insecticides on wetland ecosystems are largely unknown. Our objectives were to determine if exposure to environmentally realistic concentrations of chlorpyrifos affected foraging behavior and ChE activity in head capsules of dragonfly nymphs. Nymphs were exposed to different concentrations of chlorpyrifos and different prey densities in a factorial design. ChE activities and foraging behaviors of treated nymphs were not statistically different (p ??? 0.05) from control groups. Prey density effects exerted a greater effect on dragonfly foraging than toxicant exposures. Nymphs offered higher prey densities exhibited more foraging behaviors but also missed their prey more often. High variability in ChE activities within the control group and across treated groups precluded determination of relationships between ChE and foraging behaviors. It appears that A. junius is relatively tolerant of chlorpyrifos, although the concentrations we tested have been shown in other work to adversely affect the prey base; therefore the introduction of this insecticide may have indirect adverse affects on top invertebrate predators such as Odonata.

  17. Neuroactive Multifunctional Tacrine Congeners with Cholinesterase, Anti-Amyloid Aggregation and Neuroprotective Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kozurkova, Maria; Hamulakova, Slavka; Gazova, Zuzana; Paulikova, Helena; Kristian, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    The review summarizes research into the highly relevant topics of cholinesterase and amyloid aggregation inhibitors connected to tacrine congeners, both of which are associated with neurogenerative diseases. Various opinions will be discussed regarding the dual binding site inhibitors which are characterized by increased inhibitor potency against acetylcholin/butyrylcholine esterase and amyloid formation. It is suggested that these compounds can both raise levels of acetylcholine by binding to the active site, and also prevent amyloid aggregation. In connection with this problem, the mono/dual binding of the multifunctional derivatives of tacrine, their mode of action and their neuroprotective activities are reported. The influence of low molecular compounds on protein amyloid aggregation, which might be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease is also reported. Finally, attention is paid to some physico-chemical factors, such as desolvation energies describing the transfer of the substrate solvated by water, the metal-chelating properties of biometals reacting with amyloid precursor protein, amyloid beta peptide and tau protein.

  18. Differential effects of statins and alendronate on cholinesterases in serum and brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Cibicková, L; Palicka, V; Cibicek, N; Cermáková, E; Micuda, S; Bartosová, L; Jun, D

    2007-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors represent standard treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Cholesterol plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease development. Because cholesterol synthesis may be inhibited by statins or bisphosphonates, we hypothesized that these drugs might possibly have an influence on cholinesterases. Moreover, we also evaluated if the cholesterol-lowering agents that cross the blood-brain barrier (e.g. simvastatin) should be more effective than those which do not (e.g. atorvastatin). Four groups of rats were orally administered simvastatin, atorvastatin, alendronate or vehicle for seven days. Thereafter, blood samples were taken and the basal ganglia, septum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus were isolated from brains for measurement of acetylcholinesterase activity. In the blood, activities of neither acetyl- nor butyrylcholinesterase were influenced by any of the applied drugs. In the brain, no significant changes in AChE activity were observed after administration of atorvastatin. Both simvastatin and alendronate significantly suppressed the activity of AChE in the frontal cortex. In conclusion, our results confirmed the hypothesis that cholesterol-modifying drugs modulate AChE activity and it is more reasonable to use a blood-brain barrier penetrating drug. PMID:17087598

  19. Antioxidant, cholinesterase inhibition activities and essential oil analysis of Nelumbo nucifera seeds.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahnaz; Khan, Hidayatullah; Ali, Farman; Ali, Nayab; Khan, Fahim Ullah; Khan, Sami Ullah

    2016-06-01

    Nelumbo nucifera seeds' essential oil (EO), crude extract and subsequent fractions were evaluated for their DPPH, ABTS and superoxide anion-free radical scavenging and cholinesterase inhibitory activities. The ethyl acetate fraction and EO showed outstanding antioxidant activities with IC50 values of 191, 450 μg/mL (DPPH), 123, 221 μg/mL (ABTS) and 69, 370 μg/mL (superoxide anion). The ethyl acetate fraction and EO also caused significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase with IC50 values of 70 ± 0.6, 64 ± 0.8 and 75 ± 0.3, 58 ± 0.2, in dose-dependent manner. The first ever gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the EO obtained from N. nucifera seeds resulted in identification of 19 constituents, mainly comprised of oxygenated sesquiterpenes responsible for their promising bioactivity. The crude and fractions revealed the presence of saponins, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids, terpenoids and cardiac glycosides in phytochemical investigation. PMID:26212099

  20. Simulating the impact of cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides on non-target wildlife in irrigated crops

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pisani, J.M.; Grant, W.E.; Mora, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation model for risk assessment of the impact of insecticide inhibitors of cholinesterase (ChE) applied in irrigated agricultural fields on non-target wildlife. The model, which we developed as a compartment model based on difference equations (??t = 1 h), consists of six submodels describing the dynamics of (1) insecticide application, (2) insecticide movement into floodable soil, (3) irrigation and rain, (4) insecticide dissolution in water, (5) foraging and insecticide intake from water, and (6) ChE inhibition and recovery. To demonstrate application of the model, we simulated historical and "worst-case" scenarios of the impact of ChE-inhibiting insecticides on white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) inhabiting natural brushland adjacent to cotton and sugarcane fields in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, USA. Only when a rain event occurred just after insecticide application did predicted levels of ChE inhibition surpass the diagnostic level of 20% exposure. The present model should aid in assessing the effect of ChE-inhibiting insecticides on ChE activity of different species that drink contaminated water from irrigated agricultural fields, and in identifying specific situations in which the juxtaposition of environmental conditions and management schemes could result in a high risk to non-target wildlife. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates or carbamates and morsodren in birds. II. Plasma and cholinesterase in quail fed morsodren and orally dosed with parathion or carbofuran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Ludke, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The degree of interaction between mercury and cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides was determined by comparing enzyme responses to sublethal dosages of parathion or carbofuran in quail fed 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 ppm morsodren for 18 weeks. A statistically significant interaction was defined as greater brain cholinesterase inhibition in morsodren-fed than in clean-fed birds following pesticide dosage. The tissue residues of mercury that accumulated before significant mercury-parathion interactions occurred were higher than levels that might be expected in natural populations, but significant mercury-carbofuran interactions occurred in birds that had only accumulated 1.0 ppm liver mercury. The results indicate that indiscriminate usage of cholinesterase inhibiting pesticides are dangerous, since natural populations of fish-eating birds oftentimes contain this magnitude of mercury.

  2. Neural control of skeletal muscle cholinesterase: a study using organ-cultured rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, B; Younkin, L H; Younkin, S G

    1979-01-01

    1. It has been proposed that the influence of innervation on the cholinesterase activity (ChE) of skeletal muscle and on end-plate ChE in particular is mediated by trophic substance(s) moved by axonal transport and released from nerve. We have tested this hypothesis using rat extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) and diaphragm muscles denervated in vitro for several days and then maintained in organ culture to assay putative trophic substance(s). 2. The cholinesterase activity (ChE) of rat extensor digitorum longus (e.d.l.) muscles decreased dramatically after 5 days of denervation in vivo as previously reported. The ChE of rat e.d.l. muscles denervated in vivo for 3 days and then maintained in organ culture for 2 days was essentially identical to that of muscles denervated 5 days in vivo. 3. The ChE OF E.D.L. MUSCLES DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 3 DAYS AND THEN MAINTAINED FOR 2 DAYS IN CULTURE MEDIUM SUPPLEMENTED WITH SCIATIC NERVE OR INNERVATED MUSCLE EXTRACT WAS SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN THAT OF MUSCLES DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 5 DAYS OR DENERVATED IN VIVO FOR 3 DAYS AND THEN CULTURED FOR 2 DAYS IN CULTURE MEDIUM ALONE. Supplementing the culture medium with brain or spinal cord extract also significantly increased the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles. 4. Supplementing the culture medium with liver or spleen extract or with the extract of muscle denervated for 3--7 days in vivo before extraction did not increase the ChE or organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles. 5. The effect of muscle extract on the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles was dose dependent and occurred gradually reaching a maximum after approximately 24 h of culture. 6. Substance(s) which increased the ChE of organ-cultured e.d.l. muscles were found to accumulate in transected sciatic nerve in the region just proximal to the site of transection where substances moved by axonal transport are known to accumulate. 7. Media conditioned with neurally stimulated e.d.l. or diaphragm muscles caused a substantial and

  3. Influence of cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Jenda, Malgorzata; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2014-07-15

    The influence of systemic administration of cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was examined in rats. Additionally, this study aimed to compare the effects of donepezil, which selectively inhibits acetylcholinesterase, and rivastigmine, which inhibits both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase on morphine reward. Morphine-induced CPP (unbiased method) was induced by four injections of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Donepezil (0.5, 1, and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or rivastigmine (0.03, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were given 20 min before morphine during conditioning phase and 20 min before the expression or reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. Our results indicated that both inhibitors of cholinesterase attenuated the acquisition and expression of morphine CPP. The results were more significant after rivastigmine due to a broader inhibitory spectrum of this drug. Moreover, donepezil (1 mg/kg) and rivastigmine (0.5 mg/kg) attenuated the morphine CPP reinstated by priming injection of 5mg/kg morphine. These properties of both cholinesterase inhibitors were reversed by mecamylamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist but not scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. All effects of cholinesterase inhibitors were observed at the doses that had no effects on locomotor activity of animals. Our results suggest beneficial role of cholinesterase inhibitors in reduction of morphine reward and morphine-induced seeking behavior. Finally, we found that the efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors in attenuating reinstatement of morphine CPP provoked by priming injection may be due to stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:24755308

  4. Cholinesterase inhibition and alterations of hepatic metabolism by oral acute and repeated chlorpyrifos administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Cometa, Maria Francesca; Buratti, Franca Maria; Fortuna, Stefano; Lorenzini, Paola; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Parisi, Laura; Testai, Emanuela; Meneguz, Annarita

    2007-05-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide bioactivated in vivo to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPFO), a very potent anticholinesterase. A great majority of available animal studies on CPF and CPFO toxicity are performed in rats. The use of mice in developmental neurobehavioural studies and the availability of transgenic mice warrant a better characterization of CPF-induced toxicity in this species. CD1 mice were exposed to a broad range of acute (12.5-100.0mg/kg) and subacute (1.56-25mg/kg/day from 5 to 30 days) CPF oral doses. Functional and biochemical parameters such as brain and serum cholinesterase (ChE) and liver xenobiotic metabolizing system, including the biotransformation of CPF itself, have been studied and the no observed effect levels (NOELs) identified. Mice seem to be more susceptible than rats at least to acute CPF treatment (oral LD(50) 4.5-fold lower). The species-related differences were not so evident after repeated exposures. In mice a good correlation was observed between brain ChE inhibition and classical cholinergic signs of toxicity. After CPF-repeated treatment, mice seemed to develop some tolerance to CPF-induced effects, which could not be attributed to an alteration of P450-mediated CPF hepatic metabolism. CPF-induced effects on hepatic microsomal carboxylesterase (CE) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels observed at an early stage of treatment and then recovered after 30 days, suggest that the detoxifying mechanisms are actively involved in the protection of CPF-induced effects and possibly in the induction of tolerance in long term exposure. The mouse could be considered a suitable experimental model for future studies on the toxic action of organophosphorus pesticides focused on mechanisms, long term and age-related effects. PMID:17382447

  5. Investigation of structure-activity relationships in organophosphates-cholinesterase interaction using docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Moralev, Serge N; Tikhonov, Denis B

    2010-09-01

    It is known than the most potent homologues in various series of O,O-dialkylphosphates are the dibutyl or diamyl derivatives toward mammalian cholinesterases (ChEs) (both Acetyl- and Butyryl-ChEs), and the dimethyl or diethyl ones toward insect AChEs. To investigate the ChE interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors (OPIs) in more detail, we have performed in silico docking of the series of O,O-dialkylfluorophosphates into active center of different ChEs - both from mammals (human and mouse AChEs and horse BChE), and from insects (spring grain aphid AChE belonging to AChE-1 type, and housefly AChE belonging to AChE-2 type). According to the modeling results, one radical is directed to the anionic site W84, another to the acyl pocket. In addition to well-known residues 288 and 290 (Torpedo AChE sequence numbering), we showed an essential influence of residue 400 - a short alkyl residue in mammalian ChEs and phenylalanine in insect ChEs. Phenylalanine in this position creates sterical hindrance for proper orientation of the OPI molecule, which increases the distance between the catalytic serine gamma-oxygen and phosphorus, and decreases the angle of nucleophylic attack. This suggestion was supported by docking of dibutylfluorophosphate into the active center of AChEs with in silico mutations. Thus, we suggest both the angle of nucleophylic attack and the distance between the catalytic serine and phosphorus atom as measures of productivity of OPI binding. PMID:20347727

  6. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Halbrook, R S; Shugart, L R; Watson, A P; Munro, N B; Linnabary, R D

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release. PMID:1399773

  7. Evaluation of flow injection analysis for determination of cholinesterase activities in biological material.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Jiri; Bajgar, Jiri; Kassa, Jiri

    2010-09-01

    The method for automatic continual monitoring of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in biological material is described. It is based on flexible system of plastic pipes mixing samples of biological material with reagents for enzyme determination; reaction product penetrates through the semipermeable membrane and it is spectrophotometrically determined (Ellman's method). It consists of sampling (either in vitro or in vivo), adding the substrate and flowing to dialyzer; reaction product (thiocholine) is dialyzed and mixed with 5,5'-dithio-bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) transported to flow spectrophotometer. Flowing of all materials is realised using peristaltic pump. The method was validated: time for optimal hydratation of the cellophane membrane; type of the membrane; type of dialyzer; conditions for optimal permeation of reaction components; optimization of substrate and DTNB concentrations (linear dependence); efficacy of peristaltic pump; calibration of analytes after permeation through the membrane; excluding of the blood permeation through the membrane. Some examples of the evaluation of the effects of AChE inhibitors are described. It was demonstrated very good uniformity of peaks representing the enzyme activity (good reproducibility); time dependence of AChE inhibition caused by VX in vitro in the rat blood allowing to determine the half life of inhibition and thus, bimolecular rate constants of inhibition; reactivation of inhibited AChE by some reactivators, and continual monitoring of the activity in the whole blood in vivo in intact and VX-intoxicated rats. The method is simple and not expensive, allowing automatic determination of AChE activity in discrete or continual samples in vitro or in vivo. It will be evaluated for further research of cholinesterase inhibitors. PMID:20188079

  8. Hormetic response of cholinesterase from Daphnia magna in chronic exposure to triazophos and chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaonan; Tan, Yajun

    2011-01-01

    In vivo activity of cholinesterase (ChE) in Daphnia magna was measured at different time points during 21-day exposure to triazophos and chlorpyrifos ranging from 0.05 to 2.50 microg/L and 0.01 to 2.00 microg/L, respectively. For exposure to triazophos, ChE was induced up to 176.5% at 1.5 microg/L and day 10 when measured by acetylthiocholine (ATCh), whereas it was induced up to 174.2% at 0.5 microg/L and day 10 when measured by butyrylthiocholine (BTCh). For exposure to chlorpyrifos, ChE was induced up to 134.0% and 160.5% when measured by ATCh and BTCh, respectively, with both maximal inductions detected at 0.1 microg/L and day 8. Obvious induction in terms of ChE activity was also detected in daphnia removed from exposures 24 hr after their birth and kept in a recovery culture for 21 days. Results indicated that the enzyme displayed symptoms of hormesis, a characteristic featured by conversion from low-dose stimulation to high-dose inhibition. In spite of that, no promotion in terms of reproduction rate and body size was detected at any tested concentrations regardless of whether the daphnia were collected at end of the 21-day exposure or at end of a 21-day recovery culture. This suggested that induction of ChE caused by anticholinesterases had nothing to do with the prosperity of the daphnia population. PMID:21790060

  9. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Docking Study of Hydrazone-Containing Pyridinium Salts as Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Parlar, Sulunay; Bayraktar, Gulsah; Tarikogullari, Ayse Hande; Alptüzün, Vildan; Erciyas, Ercin

    2016-01-01

    A series of pyridinium salts bearing alkylphenyl groups at 1 position and hydrazone structure at 4 position of the pyridinium ring were synthesized and evaluated for the inhibition of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) enzymes. The cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitory activity studies were carried out by using the Ellman's colorimetric method. All compounds displayed considerable AChE and BuChE inhibitory activity and some of the compounds manifested remarkable anti-AChE activity compared to the reference compound, galantamine. Among the title compounds, the series including benzofuran aromatic ring exhibited the best inhibitory activity both on AChE and BuChE enzymes. Compound 3b, 4-[2-(1-(benzofuran-2-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinyl]-1-(3-phenylpropyl)pyridinium bromide, was the most active compound with IC50 value of 0.23 (0.24) µM against enantiomeric excess (ee)AChE (human (h)AChE) while compound 3a, 4-[2-(1-(benzofuran-2-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinyl]-1-phenethylpyridinium bromide, was the most active compound with IC50 value of 0.95 µM against BuChE. Moreover, 3a and b exhibited higher activity than the reference compound galantamine (eeAChE (hAChE) IC50 0.43 (0.52) µM; BuChE IC50 14.92 µM). Molecular docking studies were carried out on 3b having highest inhibitory activity against AChE. PMID:27581632

  10. Novel Cholinesterase Inhibitors Based on O-Aromatic N,N-Disubstituted Carbamates and Thiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Švarcová, Markéta; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2016-01-01

    Based on the presence of carbamoyl moiety, twenty salicylanilide N,N-disubstituted (thio)carbamates were investigated using Ellman's method for their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). O-Aromatic (thio)carbamates exhibited weak to moderate inhibition of both cholinesterases with IC50 values within the range of 1.60 to 311.0 µM. IC50 values for BChE were mostly lower than those obtained for AChE; four derivatives showed distinct selectivity for BChE. All of the (thio)carbamates produced a stronger inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, and five of them inhibited BChE more effectively than both established drugs rivastigmine and galantamine. In general, 5-chloro-2-hydroxy-N-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]benzamide, 2-hydroxy-N-phenylbenzamide as well as N-methyl-N-phenyl carbamate derivatives led to the more potent inhibition. O-{4-Chloro-2-[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} dimethylcarbamothioate was identified as the most effective AChE inhibitor (IC50 = 38.98 µM), while 2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl diphenylcarbamate produced the lowest IC50 value for BChE (1.60 µM). Results from molecular docking studies suggest that carbamate compounds, especially N,N-diphenyl substituted representatives with considerable portion of aromatic moieties may work as non-covalent inhibitors displaying many interactions at peripheral anionic sites of both enzymes. Mild cytotoxicity for HepG2 cells and consequent satisfactory calculated selectivity indexes qualify several derivatives for further optimization. PMID:26875979

  11. Effects of nonionic and ionic surfactants on survival, oxidative stress, and cholinesterase activity of planarian.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2008-02-01

    Eight widely used surfactants (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; CTAB, benzethonium chloride; Hyamine 1622, 4-nonylphenol; NP, octylphenol ethoxylate; Triton X-100, dodecylbenzene sulfonate; LAS, lauryl sulfate; SDS, pentadecafluorooctanoic acid; PFOA, and perfluorooctane sulfonate; PFOS) were selected to examine their acute toxicities and effects on oxidative stress and cholinesterase (ChE) activities in Dugesia japonica. The differences in acute toxicity among eight surfactants to planarians were at least in the range of three orders of magnitudes. The toxicity rank of surfactants according to estimated 48-h LC(50) was SDS>NP>LAS>Hyamine 1622>CTAB>Triton X-100>PFOS>PFOA. The toxicity rank of surfactants according to 96-h LC(50) was as follows: SDS>CTAB>NP>LAS>Hyamine 1622>Triton X-100>PFOS>PFOA. There were significant increases in catalase activities in planarians exposed to LAS at nominal concentrations of 0.5 or 1 mgl(-1) and to PFOS at nominal concentrations of 5 or 10 mgl(-1) after 48-h exposure. Inhibitions of ChE activities were found in planarians exposed to Hyamine 1622 at all concentrations tested, to PFOS at nominal concentration of 10 mgl(-1), to PFOA at nominal concentrations of 50 or 100 mgl(-1) and to NP at nominal concentration of 0.5 mgl(-1). A significant increase in ChE activities was also observed in planarian exposed to Triton X-100 at nominal concentration of 5 mgl(-1). The implication of ChE inhibition by NP, PFOS and PFOA on neurological and behavioral effects in aquatic animals requires further investigation. PMID:17905407

  12. Characterizing biological variability in livestock blood cholinesterase activity for biomonitoring organophosphate nerve agent exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Shugart, L.R.; Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Linnabary, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A biomonitoring protocol, using blood cholinesterase (ChE) activity in livestock as a monitor of potential organophosphate nerve agent exposure during the planned destruction of US unitary chemical warfare agent stockpiles, is described. The experimental design included analysis of blood ChE activity in individual healthy sheep, horses, and dairy and beef cattle during a 10- to 12-month period. Castrated and sexually intact males, pregnant and lactating females, and adult and immature animals were examined through at least one reproductive cycle. The same animals were used throughout the period of observation and were not exposed to ChE-inhibiting organophosphate or carbamate compounds. A framework for an effective biomonitoring protocol within a monitoring area includes establishing individual baseline blood ChE activity for a sentinel group of 6 animals on the bases of blood samples collected over a 6-month period, monthly collection of blood samples for ChE-activity determination during monitoring, and selection of adult animals as sentinels. Exposure to ChE-inhibiting compounds would be suspected when all blood ChE activity of all animals within the sentinel group are decreased greater than 20% from their own baseline value. Sentinel species selection is primarily a logistical and operational concern; however, sheep appear to be the species of choice because within-individual baseline ChE activity and among age and gender group ChE activity in sheep had the least variability, compared with data from other species. This protocol provides an effective and efficient means for detecting abnormal depressions in blood ChE activity in livestock and can serve as a valuable indicator of the extent of actual plume movement and/or deposition in the event of organophosphate nerve agent release.

  13. Brain cholinesterases: III. Future perspectives of AD research and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z-X

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is initially and primarily associated with the degeneration and alteration in the metabolism of cholinesterases (ChEs). The use of ChEs inhibitors to treat Alzheimer's condition, on the basis of the cholinergic hypothesis of the disease, is, therefore, without grounds. Most disturbing is the fact that the currently available anti-ChEs are designed to inhibit normal ChEs in the brain and throughout the body, but not the abnormal ones. Based on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency theory, treatment should be designed to protect the cranial ChEs system from alteration and/or to help that system fight against degeneration through restoring its homeostatic action for brain structure and function instead. The overlap in the clinical, biochemical, molecular-cellular, and pathological alterations seen in patients with AD and individuals with many other brain disorders, which has bewildered many investigators, may now be explained by the shared underlying mismetabolism of brain ChEs. The abnormal metabolism of ChEs existing in asymptomatic subjects may indicate that the system is "at risk" and deserves serious attention. Future perspectives of ChEs research in vivo and in vitro in connection with AD and clinical diagnosis, prevention and treatment are proposed. Several potentially useful therapeutic and preventive means and pharmacological agents in this regard are identified and discussed, such as physical and intellectual stimulation, and a class of drugs including vitamin E, R-(-)-deprenyl (deprenyl, selegiline), acetyl L-carnitine, cytidine diphosphocholine (CDP-choline), centrophenoxine, L-phenylalanine, naloxone, galactose, and lithium, that have been proven to be able to stimulate AChE activity. Their working mechanisms may be through directly changing the configuration of AChE molecules and/or correcting micro- and overall environmental biological conditions for ChEs. PMID:15236794

  14. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity of isoquinoline alkaloids from three Cryptocarya species (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Wan Othman, Wan Nurul Nazneem; Liew, Sook Yee; Khaw, Kooi Yeong; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-09-15

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among older adults. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase are two enzymes involved in the breaking down of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Inhibitors for these enzymes have potential to prolong the availability of acetylcholine. Hence, the search for such inhibitors especially from natural products is needed in developing potential drugs for Alzheimer's disease. The present study investigates the cholinesterase inhibitory activity of compounds isolated from three Cryptocarya species towards acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Nine alkaloids were isolated; (+)-nornantenine 1, (-)-desmethylsecoantofine 2, (+)-oridine 3, (+)-laurotetanine 4 from the leaves of Cryptocarya densiflora BI., atherosperminine 5, (+)-N-methylisococlaurine 6, (+)-N-methyllaurotetanine 7 from the bark of Cryptocarya infectoria Miq., 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8 and (+)-reticuline 9 from the bark of Cryptocarya griffithiana Wight. In general, most of the alkaloids showed higher inhibition towards BChE as compared to AChE. The phenanthrene type alkaloid; 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8, exhibited the most potent inhibition against BChE with IC50 value of 3.95μM. Analysis of the Lineweaver-Burk (LB) plot of BChE activity over a range of substrate concentration suggested that 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8 exhibited mixed-mode inhibition with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 6.72μM. Molecular docking studies revealed that 2-methoxyatherosperminine 8 docked well at the choline binding site and catalytic triad of hBChE (butyrylcholinesterase from Homo sapiens); hydrogen bonding with Tyr 128 and His 438 residues respectively. PMID:27492195

  15. Specificity and orientation of trigonal carboxyl esters and tetrahedral alkylphosphonyl esters in cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Hosea, N A; Berman, H A; Taylor, P

    1995-09-12

    We have examined the specificity of planar carboxyl and tetrahedral phosphonyl esters for mouse cholinesterases and have delineated the orientation of these ligands in the enzyme active center. The approach involved altering acyl pocket dimensions by site-specific mutagenesis of two phenylalanines and varying ligand size and enantiomer presentation. Substrate catalysis rates by wild type acetylcholinesterase (AChE) of acetyl-, butyryl-, and benzoylthiocholine diminished with increasing size of the acyl moiety. In contrast, substitution of the acyl pocket phenylalanines giving the mutants F295L and F297I of AChE yielded more efficient catalysis of the larger substrates and a specificity approaching that of butyrylcholinesterase. Extension from planar substrates to enantiomerically pure organophosphonates allowed for an analysis of enantiomeric selectivity. We found that AChE reactions are 200-fold faster with the Sp than the Rp enantiomer of of cycloheptyl methylphosphonyl thiocholine. Upon the acyl pocket size being enlarged, the Rp enantiomer became more reactive while reaction with the Sp enantiomer was slightly reduced. In fact, the F297I mutant displayed inverted stereospecificity. A visual correlation with the kinetic data has been developed by docking the ligands in the active site. Upon placement of the phosphonyl oxygen in the oxyanion hole and the leaving group being directed out of the gorge, the Rp, but not the Sp, enantiomer engendered steric hindrance between the alkoxyl group and the acyl pocket. Replacing F297 with Ile accommodated the bulky alkoxyl group of the Rp isomer in the acyl pocket, allowing similar orientations of the phosphonyl oxygen and the leaving group to the Sp isomer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7547883

  16. Monoterpenoid extract of sage (Salvia lavandulaefolia) with cholinesterase inhibiting properties improves cognitive performance and mood in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David O; Dodd, Fiona L; Robertson, Bernadette C; Okello, Edward J; Reay, Jonathon L; Scholey, Andrew B; Haskell, Crystal F

    2011-08-01

    Extracts of sage (Salvia officinalis/lavandulaefolia) with terpenoid constituents have previously been shown to inhibit cholinesterase and improve cognitive function. The current study combined an in vitro investigation of the cholinesterase inhibitory properties and phytochemical constituents of a S. lavandulaefolia essential oil, with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study assessing the effects of a single dose on cognitive performance and mood. In this latter investigation 36 healthy participants received capsules containing either 50 µL of the essential oil or placebo on separate occasions, 7 days apart. Cognitive function was assessed using a selection of computerized memory and attention tasks and the Cognitive Demand Battery before the treatment and 1-h and 4-h post-dose. The essential oil was a potent inhibitor of human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and consisted almost exclusively of monoterpenoids. Oral consumption lead to improved performance of secondary memory and attention tasks, most notably at the 1-h post-dose testing session, and reduced mental fatigue and increased alertness which were more pronounced 4-h post-dose. These results extend previous observations of improved cognitive performance and mood following AChE inhibitory sage extracts and suggest that the ability of well-tolerated terpenoid-containing extracts to beneficially modulate cholinergic function and cognitive performance deserves further attention. PMID:20937617

  17. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  18. Cholinesterases as scavengers for organophosphorus compounds: Protection of primate performance against soman toxicity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, B.P.; Blick, D.W.; Caranto, G.; Castro, C.A.; Gentry, M.K.

    1993-12-31

    The present treatment for poisoning by organophosphates consists of multiple drugs such as carbamates, antimuscarinics, and reactivators in pre- and post-exposure modalities. Recently an anticonvulsant, diazapam, has been included as a post-exposure drug to reduce convulsions and increase survival. Most regimens are effective in preventing lethality from organophosphate exposure but do not prevent toxic effects and incapacitation observed in animals and likely to occur in humans. Use of enzymes such as cholinesterases as pretreatment drugs for sequestration of highly toxic organophosphate anticholinesterases and alleviation of side effects and performance decrements was successful in animals, including non-human primates. Pretreatment of rhesus monkeys with fetal bovine serum acetyleholinesterase protected them against lethal effects of soman (up to 5 LD50) and prevented signs of OP toxicity. Monkeys pretreated with fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase were devoid of behavioral incapacitation after soman exposure, as measured by serial probe recognition or primate equilibrium platform performance tasks. Use of acetylcholinesterase as a single pretreatment drug provided greater protection against both lethal and behavioral effects of potent organophosphates than current multicomponent drug treatments that prevent neither signs of toxicity nor behavioral deficits. Cholinesterases, Pretreatment, Toxicity, Organophosphates, Soman, Scavengers.

  19. Regional inhibition of cholinesterase in free-ranging western pond turtles (Emys marmorata) occupying California mountain streams.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erik; Sparling, Donald; Blumenshine, Steve

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the potential effects of cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides on western pond turtles (Emys marmorata) occupying streams in two regions of California, USA. The southern region was suspected of having increased exposure to atmospheric deposition of contaminants originating from Central Valley agriculture. The northern region represented reference ChE activities because this area was located outside of the prominent wind patterns that deposit pesticides into the southern region. Total ChE activity was measured in plasma from a total of 81 turtles from both regions. Cholinesterase activity of turtles was significantly depressed by 31% (p = 0.005) in the southern region after accounting for additional sources of variation in ChE activity. Male turtles had significantly increased ChE activity compared with females (p = 0.054). Cloaca temperature, length, mass, handling time, body condition, and lymph presence were not significant predictors of turtle ChE activity. In the southern region, 6.3% of the turtles were below the diagnostic threshold of two standard deviations less than the reference site mean ChE activity. Another diagnostic threshold determined that 75% of the turtles from the southern region had ChE activities depressed by 20% of the reference mean. The decrease in ChE activity in the southern region suggests sublethal effects of pesticide exposure, potentially altering neurotransmission, which can result in various deleterious behaviors. PMID:23341143

  20. Comparison of cholinesterase activities in the excretion-secretion products of Trichinella pseudospiralis and Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae.

    PubMed

    Ros-Moreno, R M; De Armas-Serra, C; Gimenez-Pardo, C; Rodriguez-Caabeiro, F

    2002-06-01

    The presence of cholinesterases (ChE) is reported in T. pseudospiralis excretion-secretion products (ESP) by spectrophotometric method, using acetylthiocholine (ATCI) and butyrilthiocholine (BTCI) as substrates. By inhibition assays, we found that T. pseudospiralis release both acetyl- and butiryl-cholinesterases (AchE and BchE, respectively). The sedimentation coefficientes of these enzymes were determined by sucrose density gradient. We studied the in vivo ChE secretion by immunoblot assays using AchE from Electrophorus (electric eel) and sera from normal or infected mice with T. pseudospiralis or T. spiralis. The presence of anti-AchE antibodies was only demonstrated in the sera from T. pseudospiralis infected mice. Moreover the in vivo secretion was corroborated by the high difference determinate between the ChE activity of the immuno complexes from T. pseudospiralis infected sera and the immunocomplexes from T. spiralis infected sera as well as normal sera. Finally, we analyzed the effect of the organophosphate Neguvón (metrifonate) on the ChE activity from the T. pseudospiralis ESP. The drug inhibits in part this activity. Moreover Neguvón (metrifonate) showed a high activity against the T. pseudospiralis viability. PMID:12116861

  1. Development of HuperTacrines as non-toxic, cholinesterase inhibitors for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chioua, Mourad; Pérez, Marta; Bautista-Aguilera, Oscar M; Yañez, Matilde; López, Manuela G; Romero, Alejandro; Cacabelos, Ramón; de la Bellacasa, Raimon Puig; Brogi, Simone; Butini, Stefania; Borrell, José I; Marco-Contelles, Jose

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes our preliminary results on the ADMET, synthesis, biochemical evaluation, and molecular modeling of racemic HuperTacrines (HT), new hybrids resulting from the juxtaposition of huperzine A and tacrine for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The synthesis of these HT was executed by Friedländer-type reactions of 2-amino-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitriles, or 7-amino-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,6-naphthyridine- 8-carbonitriles, with cyclohexanone. In the biochemical evaluation, initial and particular attention was devoted to test their toxicity on human hepatoma cells, followed by the in vitro inhibition of human cholinesterases (hAChE, and hBuChE), and the kinetics/mechanism of the inhibition of the most potent HT; simultaneous molecular modeling on the best HT provided the key binding interactions with the human cholinesterases. >From these analyses, (±)-5-amino-3-methyl- 3,4,6,7,8,9-hexahydrobenzo[b][1,8]naphthyridin-2(1H)-one (HT1) and (±)-5-amino-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-3,4,6,7,8,9- hexahydrobenzo[b][1,8]naphthyridin-2(1H)-one (HT3) have emerged as characterized by extremely low liver toxicity reversible mixed-type, selective hAChE and, quite selective irreversible hBuChEIs, respectively, showing also good druglike properties for AD-targeted drugs. PMID:25694076

  2. Association between arsenic exposure and plasma cholinesterase activity: a population based study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a potent pollutant that has caused an environmental catastrophe in certain parts of the world including Bangladesh where millions of people are presently at risk due to drinking water contaminated by arsenic. Chronic arsenic exposure has been scientifically shown as a cause for liver damage, cancers, neurological disorders and several other ailments. The relationship between plasma cholinesterase (PChE) activity and arsenic exposure has not yet been clearly documented. However, decreased PChE activity has been found in patients suffering liver dysfunction, heart attack, cancer metastasis and neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the PChE activity in individuals exposed to arsenic via drinking water in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 141 Bangladeshi residents living in arsenic endemic areas with the mean arsenic exposure of 14.10 ± 3.27 years were selected as study subjects and split into tertile groups based on three water arsenic concentrations: low (< 129 μg/L), medium (130-264 μg/L) and high (> 265 μg/L). Study subjects were further sub-divided into two groups (≤50 μg/L and > 50 μg/L) based on the recommended upper limit of water arsenic concentration (50 μg/L) in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected from the study subjects by venipuncture and arsenic concentrations in drinking water, hair and nail samples were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PChE activity was assayed by spectrophotometer. Results Arsenic concentrations in hair and nails were positively correlated with the arsenic levels in drinking water. Significant decreases in PChE activity were observed with increasing concentrations of arsenic in water, hair and nails. The average levels of PChE activity in low, medium and high arsenic exposure groups were also significantly different between each group. Lower levels of PChE activity were also observed in the > 50 μg/L group compared to the ≤50 μg/L group. Moreover

  3. Decline in Serum Cholinesterase Activities Predicts 2-Year Major Adverse Cardiac Events

    PubMed Central

    Arbel, Yaron; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Waiskopf, Nir; Finkelstein, Ariel; Halkin, Amir; Revivo, Miri; Berliner, Shlomo; Herz, Itzhak; Shapira, Itzhak; Keren, Gad; Soreq, Hermona; Banai, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Parasympathetic activity influences long-term outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease, but the underlying mechanism(s) linking parasympathetic activity and the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) are incompletely understood. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the association between serum cholinesterase activities as parasympathetic biomarkers and the risk for the occurrence of MACEs. Cholinergic status was determined by measuring the cumulative capacity of serum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) to hydrolyze the AChE substrate acetylthiocholine. Cholinergic status was evaluated in randomly selected patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The patients were divided into two groups of 100 patients in each group, with or without occurrence of MACEs during a follow-up period of 40 months. Cox regression models adjusted for potential clinical, metabolic and inflammatory confounders served to evaluate association with clinical outcome. We found that patients with MACE presented lower cholinergic status and AChE values at catheterization (1,127 ± 422 and 359 ± 153 nmol substrate hydrolyzed per minute per milliliter, respectively) than no-MACE patients (1,760 ± 546 and 508 ± 183 nmol substrate hydrolyzed per minute per milliliter, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), whose levels were comparable to those of matched healthy controls (1,622 ± 303 and 504 ± 126 nmol substrate hydrolyzed per minute per milliliter, respectively). In a multivariate analysis, patients with AChE or total cholinergic status values below median showed conspicuously elevated risk for MACE (hazard ratio 1.85 [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–3.15, p = 0.02] and 2.21 [95% CI 1.22–4.00, p = 0.009]) compared with those above median, even after adjusting for potential confounders. We conclude that parasympathetic dysfunction expressed as reduced serum AChE and AChE activities in patients compared to healthy controls can

  4. Impact of geriatric comorbidity and polypharmacy on cholinesterase inhibitors prescribing in dementia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although most guidelines recommend the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) for mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease, only a small proportion of affected patients receive these drugs. We aimed to study if geriatric comorbidity and polypharmacy influence the prescription of ChEIs in patients with dementia in Germany. Methods We used claims data of 1,848 incident patients with dementia aged 65 years and older. Inclusion criteria were first outpatient diagnoses for dementia in at least three of four consecutive quarters (incidence year). Our dependent variable was the prescription of at least one ChEI in the incidence year. Main independent variables were polypharmacy (defined as the number of prescribed medications categorized into quartiles) and measures of geriatric comorbidity (levels of care dependency and 14 symptom complexes characterizing geriatric patients). Data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Results On average, patients were 78.7 years old (47.6% female) and received 9.7 different medications (interquartile range: 6-13). 44.4% were assigned to one of three care levels and virtually all patients (92.0%) had at least one symptom complex characterizing geriatric patients. 13.0% received at least one ChEI within the incidence year. Patients not assigned to the highest care level were more likely to receive a prescription (e.g., no level of care dependency vs. level 3: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR]: 5.35; 95% CI: 1.61-17.81). The chance decreased with increasing numbers of symptoms characterizing geriatric patients (e.g., 0 vs. 5+ geriatric complexes: OR: 4.23; 95% CI: 2.06-8.69). The overall number of prescribed medications had no influence on ChEI prescription and a significant effect of age could only be found in the univariate analysis. Living in a rural compared to an urban environment and contacts to neurologists or psychiatrists were associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of receiving ChEIs in the

  5. Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review of Randomised Trials

    PubMed Central

    Raschetti, Roberto; Albanese, Emiliano; Vanacore, Nicola; Maggini, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) refers to a transitional zone between normal ageing and dementia. Despite the uncertainty regarding the definition of MCI as a clinical entity, clinical trials have been conducted in the attempt to study the role of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) currently approved for symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD), in preventing progression from MCI to AD. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of ChEIs (donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine) in delaying the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer disease or dementia. Methods and Findings The terms “donepezil”, “rivastigmine”, “galantamine”, and “mild cognitive impairment” and their variants, synonyms, and acronyms were used as search terms in four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, PsycINFO) and three registers: the Cochrane Collaboration Trial Register, Current Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Published and unpublished studies were included if they were randomized clinical trials published (or described) in English and conducted among persons who had received a diagnosis of MCI and/or abnormal memory function documented by a neuropsychological assessment. A standardized data extraction form was used. The reporting quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. Three published and five unpublished trials met the inclusion criteria (three on donepezil, two on rivastigmine, and three on galantamine). Enrolment criteria differed among the trials, so the study populations were not homogeneous. The duration of the trials ranged from 24 wk to 3 y. No significant differences emerged in the probability of conversion from MCI to AD or dementia between the treated groups and the placebo groups. The rate of conversion ranged from 13% (over 2 y) to 25% (over 3 y) among treated patients, and from 18% (over 2 y) to 28% (over 3 y) among those in the placebo groups. Only for two studies was it possible to derive point

  6. Withanolides, a new class of natural cholinesterase inhibitors with calcium antagonistic properties.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, M Iqbal; Nawaz, Sarfraz Ahmad; ul-Haq, Zaheer; Lodhi, M Arif; Ghayur, M Nabeel; Jalil, Saima; Riaz, Naheed; Yousuf, Sammer; Malik, Abdul; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan; ur-Rahman, Atta

    2005-08-19

    The withanolides 1-3 and 4-5 isolated from Ajuga bracteosa and Withania somnifera, respectively, inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) enzymes in a concentration-dependent fashion with IC50 values ranging between 20.5 and 49,2 microm and 29.0 and 85.2 microm for AChE and BChE, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk as well as Dixon plots and their secondary replots indicated that compounds 1, 3, and 5 are the linear mixed-type inhibitors of AChE, while 2 and 4 are non-competitive inhibitors of AChE with K(i) values ranging between 20.0 and 45.0 microm. All compounds were found to be non-competitive inhibitors of BChE with K(i) values ranging between 27.7 and 90.6 microm. Molecular docking study revealed that all the ligands are completely buried inside the aromatic gorge of AChE, while compounds 1, 3, and 5 extend up to the catalytic triad. A comparison of the docking results showed that all ligands generally adopt the same binding mode and lie parallel to the surface of the gorge. The superposition of the docked structures demonstrated that the non-flexible skeleton of the ligands always penetrates the aromatic gorge through the six-membered ring A, allowing their simultaneous interaction with more than one subsite of the active center. The affinity of ligands with AChE was found to be the cumulative effects of number of hydrophobic contacts and hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, all compounds also displayed dose-dependent (0.005-1.0 mg/mL) spasmolytic and Ca2+ antagonistic potentials in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations, compound 4 being the most active with an ED50 value of 0.09 +/- 0.001 mg/mL and 0.22 +/- 0.01 microg/mL on spontaneous and K+ -induced contractions, respectively. The cholinesterase inhibitory potential along with calcium antagonistic ability and safe profile in human neutrophil viability assay could make compounds 1-5 possible drug candidates for further study to treat Alzheimer's disease and

  7. Acetyl- and butyryl-cholinesterase inhibitory activities of the edible brown alga Eisenia bicyclis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Haulader, Shourav; Karki, Subash; Jung, Hee Jin; Kim, Hyeung Rak; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2015-08-01

    As part of our ongoing isolation of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors from natural marine sources, the bioactivity of the ethanolic extracts from 12 Korean seaweeds were screened for their inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and total reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Eisenia bicyclis exhibited promising inhibitory properties against AChE, BChE and total ROS with inhibition percentages (%) of 68.01 ± 1.37, 95.72 ± 3.80, and 73.20 ± 1.82 at concentrations of 25 µg/mL, respectively. Among the different solvent-soluble fractions obtained from the ethanolic extract, the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction was found to cause the most potent scavenging, or inhibitory activities, against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and total ROS with the respective IC50 values of 2.48 ± 0.01, 8.70 ± 0.06, and 0.81 ± 0.03 µg/mL. Likewise, the EtOAc fraction also exhibited potent inhibitory activities against AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 2.78 ± 0.07 and 3.48 ± 0.32 µg/mL, respectively. Silica gel column chromatography of the EtOAc fraction yielded a phlorotannin, 974-B, based on the comparison with reported (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopic data. 974-B showed strong scavenging/or inhibitory potential against DPPH, ONOO(-), total ROS, AChE, and BChE with the respective IC50 values of 0.86 ± 0.02, 1.80 ± 0.01, 6.45 ± 0.04, 1.95 ± 0.01, and 3.26 ± 0.08 µM, respectively. These results indicate that the potential of E. bicyclis and its phlorotannin for use in the development of therapeutic or preventive agents of Alzheimer's disease mainly through ChE inhibition and additional antioxidant capacities. PMID:25370610

  8. A study of the cholinesterases of the canine pancreatic sphincters and the relationship between reduced butyrylcholinesterase activity and pancreatic ductal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Dressel, T D; Goodale, R L; Borner, J W; Etani, S

    1980-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory revealed in increased canine pancreatic intraductal pressure following cholinesterase inhibitor intoxication. The pressure was negatively correlated with serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity, suggesting that BChE activity mediated the pressure rise. This study uses a histochemical technique to investigate the tissue cholinesterase activity of the canine pancreatic sphincters and the effect of a cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) on tissue cholinesterase activity. In five control dogs, serial sections of the major and minor spincters were stained for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BChE activity. Four treated dogs were given the ChEI, O,O-diethyl-O- (2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl) phosphoro-thioate, 25 mg/kg, one hour prior to excising the ampullae. In the control dogs, BChE activity is present in the periampullary nerves and the pancreatic smooth muscle sphincters. AChE activity is present in nerves but not in smooth muscle. In the treated group, following a dose of ChEI known to cause ductal hypertension, BChE activity was absent in the pancreatic sphincters but AChE activity was preserved in the periampullary nerves. These data suggest that the pancreatic ductal hypertension that occurs following ChEI administration is due to a selective reduction in pancreatic smooth muscle BChE activity. Images Fig. 1A. Fig. 1B. Fig. 2A. Fig. 2B. Fig. 3. PMID:7436591

  9. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    PubMed

    Toral, Gregorio M; Baouab, Riad E; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife. PMID:25970170

  10. Differential acetyl cholinesterase inhibition by volatile oils from two specimens of Marlierea racemosa (Myrtaceae) collected from different areas of the Atlantic Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Souza, Amanda; Silva, Michelle C; Cardoso-Lopes, Elaine M; Cordeiro, Inês; Sobral, Marcos E G; Young, Maria Cláudia M; Moreno, Paulo R H

    2009-08-01

    The volatile oil composition and anti-acetyl cholinesterase activity were analyzed in two specimens of Marlierea racemosa growing in different areas of the Atlantic Rain Forest (Cananéia and Caraguatatuba, SP, Brazil). Component identifications were performed by GC/MS and their acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory activity was measured through colorimetric analysis. The major constituent in both specimens was spathulenol (25.1% in Cananéia and 31.9% in Caraguatatuba). However, the first one also presented monoterpenes (41.2%), while in the Carguatatuba plants, this class was not detected. The oils from the plants collected in Cananéia were able to inhibit the acetyl cholinesterase activity by up to 75%, but for oils from the other locality the maximal inhibition achieved was 35%. These results suggested that the monoterpenes are more effective in the inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase activity than sesquiterpenes as these compounds are present in higher amounts in the M. racemosa plants collected in Cananéia. PMID:19769001

  11. Cholinesterase Inhibition and Depression of the Photic After Discharge of Flash Evoked Potentials Following Acute or Repeated Exposures to a Mixture of Carbaryl and Propoxur

    EPA Science Inventory

    While information exists regarding inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity, little is known about neurophysiological changes produced by a mixture of N-methyl carbamate pesticides. Previously, we reported that acute treatment with propoxur or carbaryl decreased the duration o...

  12. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  13. BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION PRODUCED BY PROPOXUR AND DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propoxur is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response following stimulation of the visual system with flashes of light. They ar...

  14. Risk Factors for Nursing Home Placement in Alzheimer's Disease: A Longitudinal Study of Cognition, ADL, Service Utilization, and Cholinesterase Inhibitor Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattmo, Carina; Wallin, Asa K.; Londos, Elisabet; Minthon, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify risk factors for early nursing home placement (NHP) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on the impact of longitudinal change in cognition, activities of daily living (ADL), service utilization, and cholinesterase inhibitor treatment (ChEI). Design and Methods: In an open, 3-year, prospective, multicenter study…

  15. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  16. Ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds: Combination of cholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant and neuroprotection as multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Chen, Mohao; Liu, Zhikun; Fang, Xubin; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Li

    2016-02-15

    In order to search for novel multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents, a series of ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds were designed and synthesized. Ellman's assay revealed that the hybrid compounds showed moderate to potent inhibitory activity against the cholinesterases. Particularly, the AChE inhibition potency of compound 5k (IC50 1.9μM) was even 5-fold higher than that of galantamine. In addition, the target compounds showed pronounced antioxidant ability and neuroprotective property, especially against the ROS-induced toxicity. Notably, the neuroprotective effect of 5k was obviously superior to that of the mixture of ferulic acid and carbazole, indicating the therapeutic effect of the hybrid compound is better than the combination administration of the corresponding mixture. PMID:26795115

  17. Divergent effects of postmortem ambient temperature on organophosphorus- and carbamate-inhibited brain cholinesterase activity in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Time- and temperature-dependent postmortem changes in inhibited brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity may confound diagnosis of field poisoning of wildlife by anticholinesterase pesticide. Carbamate-inhibited ChE activity may return to normal within 1 to 2 days of exposure of intact carcass to moderate ambient temperature (18-32C). Organophosphorus-inhibited ChE activity becomes more depressed over the same time. Uninhibited ChE activity was resilient to above freezing temperature to 32C for 1 day and 25C for 3 days. Carbamate- and organophosphorus-inhibited ChE can be separated by incubation of homogenate for 1 hour at physiological temperatures; carbamylated ChE can be readily reactivated while phosphorylated ChE cannot.

  18. [Effects of biologically-active dietary supplement from marine biology on cholinesterase activity and blood lipid peroxidation in humans].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, V A; Kovalev, N N; Enikeeva, N A; Epshteĭn, L M

    2000-01-01

    Influence of dietary supplement Tinrostim-C on cholinesterase (ChE) activity and serum lipids peroxidation (LP) in patients whose work connects with emotional stress was examined. Activity of ChE was measured by Ellman calorimetric method (with acetylthiocholin as substrate), LP--by fluorimetric method with malone dialdehyde. Tinrostim-C was given three times a day in 0.5 g. On the 10th day of taking the preparation an activity of serum ChE increased 23.5% higher and had been staying higher during the whole period of observation. In vitro experiments showed an activating effect of Tinrostim-C and piracetam for serum ChE. The level of LP being initially higher was decreasing to values close to normal and had been staying at decreased level during the whole period of observation. PMID:11247159

  19. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum argentinum and Their Cholinesterase-Inhibitory Activities: An in Vitro and in Silico Study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Javier E; Pigni, Natalia B; Andujar, Sebastián A; Roitman, German; Suvire, Fernando D; Enriz, Ricardo D; Tapia, Alejandro; Bastida, Jaume; Feresin, Gabriela E

    2016-05-27

    Two new alkaloids, 4-O-methylnangustine (1) and 7-hydroxyclivonine (2) (montanine and homolycorine types, respectively), and four known alkaloids were isolated from the bulbs of Hippeastrum argentinum, and their cholinesterase-inhibitory activities were evaluated. These compounds were identified using GC-MS, and their structures were defined by physical data analysis. Compound 2 showed weak butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE)-inhibitory activity, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 67.3 ± 0.09 μM. To better understand the experimental results, a molecular modeling study was also performed. The combination of a docking study, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum theory of atoms in molecules calculations provides new insight into the molecular interactions of compound 2 with BuChE, which were compared to those of galantamine. PMID:27096334

  20. Substrate-dependent kinetic behavior of horse plasma cholinesterase: evidence for kinetically distinct populations of active sites.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Z; Ozer, I

    1984-12-01

    The inhibition of horse plasma cholinesterase by propranolol showed characteristics which depended upon the identity of the substrate used. With butyrylthiocholine as substrate, the inhibition showed a first-order dependence on inhibitor concentration, and was characterized by a Ki of 8 microM (pH 7.4, 20 degrees C). With p-nitrophenylbutyrate as substrate, a biphasic v-1 versus [I] relationship was obtained. The biphasic curve could be resolved into two components, with apparent Ki's of 9 microM and 1.3 mM. Use of butyrylthiocholine as alternative substrate resulted in partial inhibition of p-nitrophenylbutyrate hydrolysis. Inhibition of butyrylthiocholine hydrolysis by p-nitrophenylbutyrate could be accounted for by pure competitive inhibition at two sites. The results were interpreted in terms of a four-site, low-symmetry model, in which two active sites could process both substrates, and the remaining sites could process only p-nitrophenylbutyrate. PMID:6517605

  1. Effects of cholinesterase inhibiting sage (Salvia officinalis) on mood, anxiety and performance on a psychological stressor battery.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David O; Pace, Sonia; Haskell, Crystal; Okello, Edward J; Milne, Anthea; Scholey, Andrew B

    2006-04-01

    Salvia officinalis (sage) has previously been shown both to possess in vitro cholinesterase inhibiting properties, and to enhance mnemonic performance and improve mood in healthy young participants. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 30 healthy participants attended the laboratory on three separate days, 7 days apart, receiving a different treatment in counterbalanced order on each occasion (placebo, 300, 600 mg dried sage leaf). On each day mood was assessed predose and at 1 and 4 h postdose. Each mood assessment comprised completion of Bond-Lader mood scales and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) before and after 20 min performance of the Defined Intensity Stress Simulator (DISS) computerized multitasking battery. In a concomitant investigation, an extract of the sage leaf exhibited dose-dependent, in vitro inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and, to a greater extent, butyrylcholinesterase. Both doses of sage led to improved ratings of mood in the absence of the stressor (that is, in pre-DISS mood scores) postdose, with the lower dose reducing anxiety and the higher dose increasing 'alertness', 'calmness' and 'contentedness' on the Bond-Lader mood scales. The reduced anxiety effect following the lower dose was, however, abolished by performing the DISS, with the same dose also being associated with a reduction of alertness during performance. Task performance on the DISS battery was improved for the higher dose at both postdose sessions, but reduced for the lower dose at the later testing session. The results confirm previous observations of the cholinesterase inhibiting properties of S. officinalis, and improved mood and cognitive performance following the administration of single doses to healthy young participants. PMID:16205785

  2. Impact of cholinesterase inhibitors on behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Noll; Ayub, Amir; Boustani, Malaz A; Fox, Chris; Farlow, Martin; Maidment, Ian; Howard, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) in improving the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Data sources We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Registry, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) from 1966 to 2007. We limited our search to English Language, full text, published articles and human studies. Data extraction We included randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of donepezil, rivastigmine, or galantamine in managing BPSD displayed by AD patients. Using the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines, we critically appraised all studies and included only those with an attrition rate of less than 40%, concealed measurement of the outcomes, and intention to treat analysis of the collected data. All data were imputed into pre-defined evidence based tables and were pooled using the Review Manager 4.2.1 software for data synthesis. Results We found 12 studies that met our inclusion criteria but only nine of them provided sufficient data for the meta-analysis. Among patients with mild to severe AD and in comparison to placebo, ChEIs as a class had a beneficial effects on reducing BPSD with a standard mean difference (SMD) of −0.10 (95% confidence interval [CI]; −0.18, −0.01) and a weighted mean difference (WMD) of −1.38 neuropsychiatry inventory point (95% CI; −2.30, −0.46). In studies with mild AD patients, the WMD was −1.92 (95% CI; −3.18, −0.66); and in studies with severe AD patients, the WMD was −0.06 (95% CI; −2.12, +0.57). Conclusion Cholinesterase inhibitors lead to a statistical significant reduction in BPSD among patients with AD, yet the clinical relevance of this effect remains unclear. PMID:19281064

  3. The Effect of Part D Coverage Restrictions for Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, and Cholinesterase Inhibitors on Related Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, David G.; O’Malley, A. James; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Mitchell, Susan L.; Zarowitz, Barbara J.; Chernew, Michael E.; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Huskamp, Haiden A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In 2006, Medicare Part D transitioned prescription drug coverage for dual-eligible nursing home residents from Medicaid to Medicare and randomly assigned them to Part D prescription drug plans (PDPs). Because PDPs may differ in coverage, residents’ assigned plans may be relatively more or less restrictive for drugs they take. Taking advantage of the fact that randomization mitigates potential selection bias common in observational studies, this study seeks to assess the impact of PDP coverageon resident outcomes for three medication classes – antidepressants, antipsychotics, and cholinesterase inhibitors. Design, Setting, Participants Using Medicare claims, Minimum Data Set assessments, pharmacy claims, and PDP formulary information, we estimate the impact of coverage restrictions – including non-coverage and coverage with restrictions – on the following outcomes for dual-eligible nursing home residents randomized to PDPs in 2006–2008: depression; hallucinations/delusions; aggressive behaviors; cognitive performance; and activities of daily living. We further adjust for baseline health status to address any residual imbalances in the comparison groups. Results Across 5 outcomes in each of three medication classes of interest, PDP coverage restrictions impacted one resident health outcome: for cholinesterase inhibitor users, coverage restrictions were associated with a 0.04 point lower depression rating score relative to residents facing no restrictions. However, this result was not statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Our findings suggest that exogenous changes in coverage for three commonly-used medication classes had no detectable impact on nursing home resident health outcomes in 2006–2008. There are several possible explanations for this lack of association, including the role of policy protections for dual-eligible nursing home residents and the possibility that suitable clinical alternatives

  4. Development and validation of a simple assay for the determination of cholinesterase activity in whole blood of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ramachandra S; Liu, Weiyi; Saxena, Ashima

    2013-04-01

    Current methods for measuring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities in whole blood use butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-selective inhibitors. However, the poor selectivity of these inhibitors results in the inhibition of AChE activity to some degree, leading to errors in reported values. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a simple assay for measuring AChE and BChE activities in whole blood from humans as well as experimental animals. Blood was fractionated into plasma and erythrocytes, and cholinesterase activities were titrated against ethopropazine and (-)-huperzine A to determine the lowest concentration of ethopropazine that inhibited BChE completely without affecting AChE activity and the lowest concentration of (-)-huperzine A that inhibited AChE completely without interfering with BChE activity. Results indicate that 20 µm ethopropazine can be successfully used for the accurate measurement of AChE activity in blood from humans as well as animals. Use of (-)-huperzine A is not required for measuring BChE activity in normal or 'exposed' blood samples. The method was validated for blood from several animal species, including mice, rats, guinea pigs, dogs, minipigs, and African green, cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys. This method is superior to all reported methods, does not require the separation of erythrocyte and plasma fractions, and is suitable for measuring cholinesterase activities in fresh or frozen blood from animals that were exposed to nerve agents or those that were administered high doses of BChE. The method is simple, direct, reproducible, and reliable and can easily be adapted for high-throughput screening of blood samples. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22407886

  5. Possible long-term health effects of short-term exposure to chemical agents. Volume 2. Cholinesterase reactivators, psychochemicals, and irritants and vesicants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The present report evaluates toxicologic and epidemiologic data relevant to the testing of approximately 750 subjects exposed to cholinesterase reactivators, about 260 exposed to psychochemicals, and 1,500 exposed to irritants or vesicants. A remaining group of subjects used largely in tests involving placebo or innocuous chemicals or conditions is available for comparison and will be discussed later. The report is the work of three panels of scientists--the Panel on Cholinesterase Reactivator Chemicals, the Panel on Psychochemicals, and the Panel on Irritants and Vesicants. The chairman of each panel was selected from the Committee on Toxicology, and the members were selected on the basis of their knowledge of the compounds in question or because they represented required disciplines.

  6. Plasma cholinesterase inhibition in the clay-colored robin (Turdus grayi) exposed to diazinon in maradol papaya crops in Yucatan, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobos, V.M.; Mora, M.A.; Escalona, G.

    2006-01-01

    The use of organophosphorous pesticides in agriculture can result in intoxication of birds foraging in sprayed crops. Effects on birds resulting from pesticide intoxication are varied and include behavioral and reproductive effects, including death. One widely used insecticide in Maradol papaya crops is diazinon which has been associated with various incidents of intoxication and death of wild birds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of diazinon application to papaya crops on plasma cholinesterase activity of the clay-colored robin (Turdus grayi). We captured clay-colored robins foraging in a papaya crop the following day after the field had been sprayed with diazinon at a dose of 1.5 kg/ha during March and May, respectively. We took a blood sample from the brachialis vein of the birds captured and measured plasma enzymatic activity. The plasma samples from birds used as controls were taken during the same time period and were analyzed in a similar way. Enzymatic activity of males was greater than that of females (53,52%) and mean cholinesterase inhibition was 49.43%. Cholinesterase inhibition was greater during May than in March probably due to more continuous exposure and ingestion of the insecticide through food and possible absorption through the skin. This degree of enzymatic inhibition is possibly affecting the behavior of the clay-colored robin and could result in death in severe cases.

  7. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates and heavy metals in birds. I. Plasma and brain cholinesterase in Coturnix quail fed methyl mercury and orally dosed with parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Ludke, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    We found that mercury potentiated the toxicity and biochemical effects of parathion. Male Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed a sublethal concentration of morsodren (4 ppm as methyl mercury) for 18 weeks. This resulted in an accumulation of 21.0 ppm of mercury in the liver and 8.4 ppm in the carcass. Birds fed clean feed and those fed morsodren-treated feed were orally dosed with 2, 4, 6, 8,and 10 mg/kg parathion, and their 48-h survival times compared. The computed LD50 was 5.86mg/kg in birds not fed morsodren and 4.24 in those fed the heavy metal. When challenged with a sublethal, oral dose of parathion (1.0 mg/kg), morsodren-fed birds exhibited significantly greater inhibition of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity than controls dosed with parathion. Brain cholinesterase activity was inhibited 41% in morsodren-fed birds and 26in clean-fed birds dosed with parathion, which suggested that the increase in parathion toxicity in the presence of morsodren was directly related to the inhibitation of brain cholinesterase.

  8. Comparative effects of oral chlorpyrifos exposure on cholinesterase activity and muscarinic receptor binding in neonatal and adult rat heart.

    PubMed

    Howard, Marcia D; Mirajkar, Nikita; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey N

    2007-09-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for inactivating acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses. A number of OP toxicants have also been reported to interact directly with muscarinic receptors, in particular the M(2) muscarinic subtype. Parasympathetic innervation to the heart primarily regulates cardiac function by activating M(2) receptors in the sinus node, atrial-ventricular node and conducting tissues. Thus, OP insecticides can potentially influence cardiac function in a receptor-mediated manner indirectly by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase and directly by binding to muscarinic M(2) receptors. Young animals are generally more sensitive than adults to the acute toxicity of OP insecticides and age-related differences in potency of direct binding to muscarinic receptors by some OP toxicants have been reported. We thus compared the effects of the common OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on functional signs of toxicity and cardiac cholinesterase (ChE) activity and muscarinic receptor binding in neonatal and adult rats. Dosages were based on acute lethality (i.e., 0.5 and 1x LD(10): neonates, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg; adults, 68 and 136 mg/kg). Dose- and time-related changes in body weight and cholinergic signs of toxicity (involuntary movements) were noted in both age groups. With 1x LD(10), relatively similar maximal reductions in ChE activity (95%) and muscarinic receptor binding (approximately 30%) were noted, but receptor binding reductions appeared earlier in adults and were more prolonged in neonates. In vitro inhibition studies indicated that ChE in neonatal tissues was markedly more sensitive to inhibition by the active metabolite of chlorpyrifos (i.e., chlorpyrifos oxon, CPO) than enzyme in adult tissues (IC(50) values: neonates, 17 nM; adults, 200 nM). Chelation of free calcium with EDTA had relatively little effect on in vitro cholinesterase inhibition, suggesting that

  9. Use of cholinesterases as pretreatment drugs for the protection of rhesus monkeys against soman toxicity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.D.; Blick, D.W.; Murphy, M.R.; Miller, S.A.; Gentry, M.K.

    1992-12-31

    Purified fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase (FBS AChE) and horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) were successfully used as single pretreatment drugs for the prevention of pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (soman) toxicity in nonhuman primates. Eight rhesus monkeys, trained to perform Primate Equilibrium Platform (PEP) tasks, were pretreated with FBS AChE or BChE and challenged with a cumulative level of five median lethal doses (LD 50) of soman. All ChE-pretreated monkeys survived the soman challenge and showed no symptoms of soman toxicity. A quantitative linear relation was observed between the soman dose and the neutralization of blood ChE. None of the four AChE-pretreated animals showed PEP task decrements, even though administration of soman irreversibly inhibited nearly all of the exogenously administered AChE. In two of four BChE pretreated animals, a small transient PEP performance decrement occurred when the cumulative soman dose exceeded 4 LD 50. Performance decrements observed under BCh E protection mete modest by the usual standards of organophosphorus compound toxicity. No residual or delayed performance decrements or other untoward effects were observed during 6 weeks of postexposure testing with either ChE.... Cholinesterases, Pretreatment, Soman, AChE, BChE, Toxicity.

  10. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Marjorie A.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J’ and J” clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J’ and J” clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  11. Combination Therapy with Cholinesterase Inhibitors and Memantine for Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Taro; Iwata, Nakao

    2015-01-01

    Background: We performed an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of combination therapy with cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: We reviewed cognitive function, activities of daily living, behavioral disturbance, global assessment, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects. Results: Seven studies (total n=2182) were identified. Combination therapy significantly affected behavioral disturbance scores (standardized mean difference=−0.13), activity of daily living scores (standardized mean difference=−0.10), and global assessment scores (standardized mean difference=−0.15). In addition, cognitive function scores (standardized mean difference=−0.13, P=.06) exhibited favorable trends with combination therapy. The effects of combination therapy were more significant in the moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease subgroup in terms of all efficacy outcome scores. The discontinuation rate was similar in both groups, and there were no significant differences in individual side effects. Conclusions: Combination therapy was beneficial for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease in terms of cognition, behavioral disturbances, activities of daily living, and global assessment was well tolerated. PMID:25548104

  12. The cholinesterase-like domain, essential in thyroglobulin trafficking for thyroid hormone synthesis, is required for protein dimerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaemin; Wang, Xiaofan; Di Jeso, Bruno; Arvan, Peter

    2009-05-01

    The carboxyl-terminal cholinesterase-like (ChEL) domain of thyroglobulin (Tg) has been identified as critically important in Tg export from the endoplasmic reticulum. In a number of human kindreds suffering from congenital hypothyroidism, and in the cog congenital goiter mouse and rdw rat dwarf models, thyroid hormone synthesis is inhibited because of mutations in the ChEL domain that block protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum. We hypothesize that Tg forms homodimers through noncovalent interactions involving two predicted alpha-helices in each ChEL domain that are homologous to the dimerization helices of acetylcholinesterase. This has been explored through selective epitope tagging of dimerization partners and by inserting an extra, unpaired Cys residue to create an opportunity for intermolecular disulfide pairing. We show that the ChEL domain is necessary and sufficient for Tg dimerization; specifically, the isolated ChEL domain can dimerize with full-length Tg or with itself. Insertion of an N-linked glycan into the putative upstream dimerization helix inhibits homodimerization of the isolated ChEL domain. However, interestingly, co-expression of upstream Tg domains, either in cis or in trans, overrides the dimerization defect of such a mutant. Thus, although the ChEL domain provides a nidus for Tg dimerization, interactions of upstream Tg regions with the ChEL domain actively stabilizes the Tg dimer complex for intracellular transport. PMID:19276074

  13. Monitoring exposure of northern cardinals, Cardinalis cardinalis, to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides: enzyme activity, reactivations, and indicators of environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Maul, Jonathan D; Farris, Jerry L

    2005-07-01

    Northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) frequently use agricultural field edges in northeast Arkansas, USA, and may be at risk of exposure to cholinesterase (ChE)-inhibiting pesticides. We monitored northern cardinal exposure to ChE-inhibiting pesticides by comparing plasma total ChE (TChE) activity to reference-derived benchmarks and TChE reactivations. Total ChE and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were measured for 128 plasma samples from 104 northern cardinals from nine study sites. Of birds sampled from sites treated with ChE-inhibiting pesticides, 4.3% of the samples had TChE activities below the diagnostic threshold (2 standard deviations [SD] below the reference mean) and 8.7% of the samples had TChE reactivations. No difference was found in TChE (p = 0.553) and AChE (p = 0.288) activity between treated and reference sites; however, activity varied among treated sites (p = 0.003). These data do not suggest uniform exposure to individuals, but rather exposure was variable and likely influenced by mitigating factors at individual and site scales. Furthermore, monitoring of TChE reactivation appeared to be a more sensitive indicator of exposure than the diagnostic threshold. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) was greater at agricultural sites than reference sites (p = 0.016), supporting the hypothesis that FA may be useful for assessing a combination of habitat- and contaminant-related environmental stress. PMID:16050589

  14. Acute toxicity and cholinesterase inhibition of the nematicide ethoprophos in larvae of gar Atractosteus tropicus (Semionotiformes: Lepisosteidae).

    PubMed

    Mena Torres, Freylan; Pfennig, Sascha; Arias Andrés, María de Jesús; Márquez-Couturier, Gabriel; Sevilla, Adrían; Protti, C Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Biomarkers are a widely applied approach in environmental studies. Analyses of cholinesterase (ChE), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) are biomarkers that can provide information regarding early effects of pollutants at different biochemical levels on an organism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomarker approach on a Costa Rican native and relevant species. For this, larvae of gar (Atractosteus tropicus) were exposed to the organophosphorus nematicide, ethoprophos. Acute (96hr) exposure was conducted with pesticide concentrations ranging from 0.1 microg/L to 1 500 microg/L. The 96hr LC50 calculated was 859.7 microg/L. After exposure, three biomarkers (ChE, GST and LPO) were analyzed in fish that survived the acute test. The lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) regarding ChE activity inhibition was 50 microg/L. This concentration produced a significant inhibition (p<0.05) of the enzyme by 20%. The highest concentration tested without showing any effect on ChE activity and therefore considered as no observed effect concentration (NOEC) was 10 microg/L. Ethoprophos concentration of 400 microg/L caused a ChE inhibition by 79%. In this study, no significant variations (p>0.05) in GST activity and LPO were observed in A. tropicus larvae after exposure to ethoprophos. PMID:22458230

  15. Elevated cholinesterase activity and increased urinary excretion of inorganic fluorides in the workers producing fluorine-containing plastic (polytetrafluoroethylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Baohui Xu |; Jiusun Zhang; Guaogeng Mao; Guifen Yang; Aini Chen; Aoyama, Kohji; Matsushita, Toshio; Ueda, Atsushi

    1992-07-01

    Fluoropolymers are widely used in thermal and electrical industries. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) plastic is a typical one. During its production, workers are occupationally exposed to many organic fluorides, especially tetrafluoroethylene, chlorodifluoromethane, PTFE and its thermal decomposition products. Of these compounds, it has been documented that following inhalation of combustion products of PTFE the focal hemorrhages, edema, fibrin deposition in lungs and renal infarcts were observed in rats. Odum and Green have demonstrated a marked damage to proximal tubule of kidney with no effects on the liver in rats exposed to 6000 ppm tetrafluoroethylene for 6 hr. The investigations of the hazards of these compounds to workers have been mainly focused on acute toxicity. There have been some reports that polymers and its pyrolysis caused polymer fume fever and pulmonary edema. In practice, workers engaged in PTFE manufacture are chronically exposed to the above-mentioned chemicals, but little was known about the hazards ascribed to these chemicals. To clarify the influences of the exposed chemicals on health in PTFE production we conducted a mass survey investigation in a PTFE production factory. As a result, in addition to the nephrotoxicity characterized by elevated ALP and NAG activities in urine, more interestingly, we have also found a reversible increase in cholinesterase (ChE) activity and enhanced urinary excretion of inorganic fluorides in workers engaged in PTFE production. We report here these findings and discuss their physiological significance. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in agricultural waters and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruber, S.J.; Munn, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was used as a biomarker for assessing exposure of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides from irrigated agricultural waters. Carp were collected from a lake (Royal Lake) that receives most of its water from irrigation return flows and from a reference lake (Billy Clapp Lake) outside of the irrigation system. Results indicated that the mean whole-brain ChE activity of carp from Royal Lake (3.47 μmol/min/g tissue) was 34.2% less than that of carp from Billy Clapp Lake (5.27 μmol/min/g tissue) (p = 0.003). The depressed ChE activity in brain tissue of Royal Lake carp was in response to ChE-inhibiting insecticides detected in water samples in the weeks prior to tissue sampling; the most frequently detected insecticides included chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl, carbaryl, and ethoprop. Neither sex nor size appears to be a covariable in the analysis; ChE activity was not correlated with fish length or weight in either lake and there was no significant difference in ChE activity between the two sexes within each lake. Although organophosphate and carbamate insecticides can break down rapidly in the environment, this study suggests that in agricultural regions where insecticides are applied for extended periods of the year, nontarget aquatic biota may be exposed to high levels of ChE-inhibiting insecticides for a period of several months.

  17. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Hoy, Marjorie A

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J' and J" clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J' and J" clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  18. Behavioral dysfunctions correlate to altered physiology in rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) exposed to cholinesterase-inhibiting chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; Little, E.E.; DeLonay, A.J.; Beauvais, S.L.; Jones, S.B.; Ellersieck, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    We selected four metrics of swimming behavior (distance swam, speed, rate of turning, and tortuosity of path) and the commonly used biochemical marker, brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity, to assess (1) the sensitivity and reliability of behavior as a potential biomarker in monitoring work, (2) the potential for these endpoints to be used in automated monitoring, and (3) the linkage between behavior and its underlying biochemistry. Malathion-exposed fish exhibited large decreases in distance and speed and swam in a more linear path than control fish after 24 h exposure. By 96 h exposure, fish still swam slower and traveled less distance; fish fully recovered after 48 h in clean water. Diazinon-exposed fish exhibited decreases in distance, speed, and turning rate compared to controls. After 48 h recovery in clean water, fish exposed to diazinon had not recovered to control levels. The behavioral responses provided measures of neurotoxicity that were easily quantifiable by automated means, implying that the inclusion of behavior in monitoring programs can be successful. Furthermore, correlations between behavior and biochemical endpoints, such as ChE inhibition, suggest that this approach can provide a meaningful link between biochemistry and behavior and can provide useful information on toxicant impacts.

  19. Comparative Effects of Oral Chlorpyrifos Exposure on Cholinesterase Activity and Muscarinic Receptor Binding in Neonatal and Adult Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Marcia D.; Mirajkar, Nikita; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey N.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for inactivating acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses. A number of OP toxicants have also been reported to interact directly with muscarinic receptors, in particular the M2 muscarinic subtype. Parasympathetic innervation to the heart primarily regulates cardiac function by activating M2 receptors in the sinus node, atrial-ventricular node and conducting tissues. Thus, OP insecticides can potentially influence cardiac function in a receptor–mediated manner indirectly by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase and directly by binding to muscarinic M2 receptors. Young animals are generally more sensitive than adults to the acute toxicity of OP insecticides and age related differences in potency of direct binding to muscarinic receptors by some OP toxicants have been reported. We thus compared the effects of the common OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on functional signs of toxicity and cardiac ChE activity and muscarinic receptor binding in neonatal and adult rats. Dosages were based on acute lethality (i.e., 0.5 and 1 × LD10: neonates, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg; adults, 68 and 136 mg/kg). Dose- and time-related changes in body weight and cholinergic signs of toxicity (involuntary movements) were noted in both age groups. With 1 × LD10, relatively similar maximal reductions in ChE activity (95%) and muscarinic receptor binding (≈ 30%) were noted, but receptor binding reductions appeared earlier in adults and were more prolonged in neonates. In vitro inhibition studies indicated that ChE in neonatal tissues was markedly more sensitive to inhibition by the active metabolite of chlorpyrifos (i.e., chlorpyrifos oxon, CPO) than enzyme in adult tissues (IC50 values: neonates, 17 nM; adults, 200 nM). Chelation of free calcium with EDTA had relatively little effect on in vitro cholinesterase inhibition, suggesting that differential A-esterase activity was not

  20. Influence of gender on thermoregulation and cholinesterase inhibition in the long-evans rat exposed to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Mack, Cina M

    2003-02-14

    Diazinon is an organophosphate (OP)-based, anticholinesterase insecticide that irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and produces cholinergic stimulation in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. Our laboratory has found that OPs administered orally in rats induce a transient period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever that persists for several days after exposure. There is little information on the thermoregulatory effects of diazinon. Core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radiotelemetry in male and female rats of the Long-Evans strain dosed orally with diazinon (0 [corn-oil vehicle], 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg in males and 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg in females). There was a dose-dependent decrease in Tc during the first night after treatment, with females exhibiting slightly greater sensitivity than males. MA was unaffected in females exposed to diazinon at doses of 50 to 200 mg/kg; MA of males was reduced during the first night after dosing with 300 mg/kg. There was a delayed elevation in Tc of males dosed with 200 and 300 mg/kg and females dosed with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg diazinon. The elevated Tc was only manifested during d 2 and 3 after diazinon. Administration of 200 mg/kg sodium salicylate to females 48 h after being treated with 200 mg/kg diazinon led to a rapid abatement of the fever. Diazinon doses of 50 to 300 mg/kg led to 40% to 50% inhibition in plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity 4 h after dosing, and females displayed a significantly slower recovery of ChE activity compared to males. When compared on a molar basis, the hypothermic response to diazinon was relatively small compared to other OPs such as chlorpyrifos. The delayed fever and efficacy of sodium salicylate to block diazinon-induced fever are similar to the effects of OPs chlorpyrifos and diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate (DFP). PMID:12521673

  1. AGE-RELATED BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION KINETICS FOLLOWING IN VITRO INCUBATION WITH CHLORPYRIFOS-OXON AND DIAZINON-OXON

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2007-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos and diazinon are two commonly used organophosphorus (OP) insecticides, and their primary mechanism of action involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by their metabolites chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO) and diazinon-oxon (DZO), respectively. The study objectives were to assess the in vitro age-related inhibition kinetics of neonatal rat brain cholinesterase (ChE) by estimating the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki) values for CPO and DZO. Brain ChE inhibition and ki values following CPO and DZO incubation with neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats rat brain homogenates were determined at post natal day (PND) -5, -12 and -17 and compared with the corresponding inhibition and ki values obtained in the adult rat. A modified Ellman method was utilized for measuring the ChE activity. Chlorpyrifos-oxon resulted in greater ChE inhibition than DZO consistent with the estimated ki values of both compounds. Neonatal brain ChE inhibition kinetics exhibited a marked age-related sensitivity to CPO, where the order of ChE inhibition was PND-5 > PND-7 > PND-17 with ki values of 0.95, 0.50 and 0.22 nM-1hr-1, respectively. In contrast, DZO did not exhibit an age-related inhibition of neonatal brain ChE, and the estimated ki value at all PND ages was 0.02 nM-1hr-1. These results demonstrated an age- and chemical-related OP-selective inhibition of rat brain ChE which may be critically important in understanding the potential sensitivity of juvenile humans to specific OP exposures.

  2. Reversible and persistent decreases in cocaine self-administration after cholinesterase inhibition: different effects of donepezil and rivastigmine.

    PubMed

    Grasing, Kenneth; Yang, Yungao; He, Shuangteng

    2011-02-01

    We recently observed that pretreatment with the cholinesterase inhibitor, tacrine can produce long-lasting reductions in cocaine-reinforced behavior, described as persistent attenuation. In addition to inhibiting both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase, tacrine can potentiate actions of dopamine. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of donepezil (which selectively inhibits AChE) and rivastigmine (which inhibits both AChE and butyrylcholinesterase) on cocaine self-administration. High self-administration rats self-administered different doses of cocaine under a fixed ratio-5 schedule. Over a 4-day period, vehicle, donepezil, or rivastigmine was infused as animals were maintained in home cages (21 h per day), with signs of cholinergic stimulation (fasciculation, vacuous jaw movements, yawning, and diarrhea) scored by a blinded observer. Both compounds dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration, but differed in the potency and temporal pattern of their effects. Self-administration of low-dose cocaine was decreased to a greater degree by rivastigmine than donepezil (50% effective doses of 2.33 and 6.21 mg/kg/day, respectively), but this early effect did not continue beyond sessions immediately after treatment with rivastigmine. Group means for cocaine self-administration were decreased at some time points occurring between 1 and 3 days after the treatment with 10 mg/kg/day of donepezil (late effects), with decreases of more than 80% observed in some individual rats that persisted for 1 week or longer. Early, but not late, effects were correlated with signs of cholinergic stimulation. In summary, pretreatment with donepezil, but not rivastigmine produced persistent reductions in cocaine-reinforced behavior, which were not associated with signs of cholinergic stimulation. PMID:22173266

  3. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-08

    An integrated lateral flow test strip with electrochemical sensor (LFTSES) device with rapid, selective and sensitive response for quantification of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents has been developed. The principle of this approach is based on parallel measurements of post-exposure and baseline acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity, where reactivation of the phosphorylated AChE is exploited to enable measurement of total amount of AChE (including inhibited and active) which is used as a baseline for calculation of AChE inhibition. Quantitative measurement of phosphorylated adduct (OP-AChE) was realized by subtracting the active AChE from the total amount of AChE. The proposed LFTSES device integrates immunochromatographic test strip technology with electrochemical measurement using a disposable screen printed electrode which is located under the test zone. It shows linear response between AChE enzyme activity and enzyme concentration from 0.05 to 10 nM, with detection limit of 0.02 nM. Based on this reactivation approach, the LFTSES device has been successfully applied for in vitro red blood cells inhibition studies using chlorpyrifos oxon as a model OP agent. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure because of individual variation of normal AChE values, but also avoids the problem in overlapping substrate specificity with cholinesterases and avoids potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It is baseline free and thus provides a rapid, sensitive, selective and inexpensive tool for in-field and point-of-care assessment of exposures to OP pesticides and nerve agents.

  4. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel dual monoamine-cholinesterase inhibitors as potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lang, Ming; Youdim, Moussa B H; Amit, Tamar; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Zaijun; Wang, Yuqiang; Weinreb, Orly

    2016-10-01

    Current novel therapeutic approach suggests that multifunctional compounds with diverse biological properties and a single bioavailability and pharmacokinetic metabolism, will produce higher significant advantages in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Based on this rational, a new class of cholinesterase (ChE)-monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were designed and synthesized by amalgamating the propargyl moiety of the irreversible selective MAO-B inhibitor, neuroprotective/neurorestorative anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline, into the "N-methyl" position of the ChE inhibitor, anti-AD drug rivastigmine. Initially, we examined the MAO and ChE inhibitory effect of these novel compounds, MT series in vitro and in vivo. Among MT series, MT-031 exhibited higher potency as a dual MAO-A and ChE inhibitor compared to other compounds in acute-treated mice. Additionally, MT-031 was found to increase the striatal levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), and prevent the metabolism of DA and 5-HT. Finally, we have demonstrated that MT-031 exerted neuroprotective effect against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. These findings provide evidence that MT-031 is a potent brain permeable novel multifunctional, neuroprotective and MAO-A/ChE inhibitor, preserves in one molecule entity some of the beneficial properties of its parent drugs, rasagiline and rivastigmine, and thus may be indicated as novel therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27318273

  5. Differences between male and female rhesus monkey erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase activity before and after exposure to sarin

    SciTech Connect

    Woodard, C.L.; Calamaio, C.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Anderson, D.R.; Harris, L.W.

    1993-05-13

    The female rhesus monkey has a menstrual cycle like the human. Additionally, several differences in enzyme levels between males and females and in the female during the menstrual cycle are present. Therefore we quantitated plasma cholinesterase (ChE/BuChE) and erythrocyte (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity before and after exposure to sarin (GB)(1 5 ug/kg, iv; a 0.75 LD50), in male and female rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys. Twenty-eight-day preexposure baseline plasma ChE and RBC AChE values for six male and six female rhesus monkeys were compared for intra-animal, within sex and between sex differences. After these baseline values were obtained, the organophosphorus (OP) compound/Isopropyl methylphosphono-fluoridate (GB) was administered to atropinized monkeys to determine if there was a significant in vivo difference between the sexes in their response to this intoxication in regard to the rate of BuChE /AChE inhibition, pyridine-2-aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM) reactivation of the phosphonylated BuChE and the rate of aging of the phosphonylated:BuChE/AChE. In the pre-exposure portion of the protocol; the intra-animal and intra-group BuChE/AChE variations were found to be minimal; but there were significant differences between the male and female monkeys in both plasma BuChE and RBC AChE levels; although probably clinically insignificant in respect to an OP intoxication. No significant cyclic fluctuations were seen during the 28-day study in either sex.

  6. Integrated lateral flow test strip with electrochemical sensor for quantification of phosphorylated cholinesterase: biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus agents.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    An integrated lateral flow test strip with an electrochemical sensor (LFTSES) device with rapid, selective, and sensitive response for quantification of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents has been developed. The principle of this approach is based on parallel measurements of postexposure and baseline acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity, where reactivation of the phosphorylated AChE is exploited to enable measurement of the total amount of AChE (including inhibited and active) which is used as a baseline for calculation of AChE inhibition. Quantitative measurement of phosphorylated adduct (OP-AChE) was realized by subtracting the active AChE from the total amount of AChE. The proposed LFTSES device integrates immunochromatographic test strip technology with electrochemical measurement using a disposable screen printed electrode which is located under the test zone. It shows a linear response between AChE enzyme activity and enzyme concentration from 0.05 to 10 nM, with a detection limit of 0.02 nM. On the basis of this reactivation approach, the LFTSES device has been successfully applied for in vitro red blood cells inhibition studies using chlorpyrifos oxon as a model OP agent. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure because of individual variation of normal AChE values but also avoids the problem in overlapping substrate specificity with cholinesterases and avoids potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It is baseline free and thus provides a rapid, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive tool for in-field and point-of-care assessment of exposures to OP pesticides and nerve agents. PMID:22243414

  7. Recovery study of cholinesterases and neurotoxic signs in the non-target freshwater invertebrate Chilina gibbosa after an acute exposure to an environmental concentration of azinphos-methyl.

    PubMed

    Cossi, Paula Fanny; Beverly, Boburg; Carlos, Luquet; Kristoff, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    Azinphos-methyl belongs to the class of organophosphate insecticides which are recognized for their anticholinesterase action. It is one of the most frequently used insecticides in the Upper Valley of Río Negro and Río Neuquén in Argentina, where agriculture represents the second most important economic activity. It has been detected in water from this North Patagonian region throughout the year and the maximum concentration found was 22.48 μg L(-1) during the application period. Chilina gibbosa is a freshwater gastropod widely distributed in South America, particularly in Patagonia, Argentina and in Southern Chile. Toxicological studies performed with C. gibbosa in our laboratory have reported neurotoxicity signs and cholinesterase inhibition after exposure to azinphos-methyl for 48 h. Recovery studies together with characterization of the enzyme and sensitivity of the enzyme to pesticides can improve the toxicological evaluation. However, little is known about recovery patterns in organisms exposed to organophosphates. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the recovery capacity (during 21 days in pesticide-free water) of cholinesterase activity and neurotoxicity in C. gibbosa after 48 h of exposure to azinphos-methyl. Also, lethality and carboxylesterase activity were registered during the recovery period. Regarding enzyme activities, after a 48-h exposure to 20 μg L(-1) of azinphos-methyl, cholinesterases showed an inhibition of 85% with respect to control, while carboxylesterases were not affected. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, cholinesterases continued to be inhibited (70%). Severe neurotoxicity signs were observed after exposure: 82% of the snails presented lack of adherence to vessels, 11% showed weak adherence, and 96% exhibited an abnormal protrusion of the head-foot region from shell. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, only 15% of the snails presented severe signs of neurotoxicity. However, during the recovery period significant

  8. Cholinesterase Inhibitor and N-Methyl-D-Aspartic Acid Receptor Antagonist Use in Older Adults with End-Stage Dementia: A Survey of Hospice Medical Directors

    PubMed Central

    Ellner, Lynn; Lau, Denys T.; Maxwell, Terri L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists are Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. As dementia progresses to the end stage and patients become hospice-eligible, clinicians consider whether or not to continue these therapies without the benefit of scientific evidence. We sought to describe hospice medical directors practice patterns and experiences in the use and discontinuation of cholinesterase inhibitors and NMDA receptor antagonists in hospice patients that meet the Medicare hospice criteria for dementia. Study Design Mail survey of hospice medical directors from a random sample from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Results Of the 413 eligible participants, 152 completed surveys were returned, yielding a response rate of 37%. Of the respondents, 75% and 33% reported that at least 20% of their patients were taking a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine, respectively, at the time of hospice admission. The majority of respondents do not consider these therapies effective in persons with end-stage dementia, however, a subset believe that these medications improved patient outcomes including stabilization of cognition (22%), decrease in challenging behaviors (28%), and maintenance of patient function (22%) as well as caregiver outcomes namely reduced caregiver burden (20%) and improved caregiver quality of life (20%). While 80% of respondents recommended discontinuing these therapies to families at the time of hospice enrollment, 72% of respondents reported that families experienced difficulty stopping these therapies. A subset of respondents observed accelerated cognitive (30%) and functional decline (26%) or emergence of challenging behaviors (32%) with medication discontinuation. Conclusions The findings from this survey indicate that cholinesterase inhibitors and/or NMDA receptor antagonists are prescribed for a

  9. One-pot synthesis of tetrazole-1,2,5,6-tetrahydronicotinonitriles and cholinesterase inhibition: Probing the plausible reaction mechanism via computational studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul; Zehra, Syeda Tazeen; Abbas, Saba; Nisa, Riffat Un; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid; Al-Rashida, Mariya; Bajorath, Jürgen; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, one-pot synthesis of 1H-tetrazole linked 1,2,5,6-tetrahydronicotinonitriles under solvent-free conditions have been carried out in the presence of tetra-n-butyl ammonium fluoride trihydrated (TBAF) as catalyst and solvent. Computational studies have been conducted to elaborate two plausible mechanistic pathways of this one-pot reaction. Moreover, the synthesized compounds were screened for cholinesterases (acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase) inhibition which are consider to be major malefactors of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to find lead compounds for further research in AD therapy. PMID:26851737

  10. Oral administration of pyridostigmine bromide and huperzine A protects human whole blood cholinesterases from ex vivo exposure to soman.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard K; Haigh, Julian R; Garcia, Gregory E; Feaster, Shawn R; Riel, Michael A; Lenz, David E; Aisen, Paul S; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2005-12-15

    Cholinesterases (ChEs) are classified as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) according to their substrate specificity and sensitivity to selected inhibitors. The activities of AChE in red blood cells (RBC-AChE) and BChE in serum can be used as potential biomarkers of suppressed and/or heightened activity in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Exposure to organophosphate (OP) chemical warfare agents (CWAs), pesticides, anesthetics, and a variety of drugs such as cocaine, as well as some neurodegenerative and liver disease states, selectively reduces AChE or BChE activity. In humans, the toxicity of pesticides is well documented. Therefore, blood cholinesterase activity can be exploited as a tool for confirming exposure to these agents and possible treatments. Current assays for measurement of RBC-AChE and serum BChE require several labor-intensive processing steps, suffer from wide statistical variation, and there is no inter-laboratory conversion between methods. These methods, which determine only the serum BChE or RBC-AChE but not both, include the Ellman, radiometric, and deltapH (modified Michel) methods. In contrast, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Whole Blood (WRAIR WB, US Patent #6,746,850) cholinesterase assay rapidly determines the activity of both AChE and BChE in unprocessed (uncentrifuged) whole blood, uses a minimally invasive blood sampling technique (e.g., blood from a finger prick), and is semi-automated for high-throughput using the Biomek 2000 robotic system. To date, the WRAIR whole blood assay was used to measure AChE and BChE activities in human blood from volunteers in FDA clinical trials. In the first FDA study, 24 human subjects were given either 30 mg PB orally (n = 19) or placebo (n = 5). Blood samples were obtained pre-dosing and 2.5, 5, 8, and 24 h post-dosing. The samples were analyzed for AChE and BChE activity using the WRAIR WB robotic system, and for PB concentration by HPLC. We found that