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Sample records for chondrosarcoma cell invasion

  1. Fluid shear promotes chondrosarcoma cell invasion by activating matrix metalloproteinase 12 via IGF-2 and VEGF signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Chen, S-H; Hung, W-C; Paul, C; Zhu, F; Guan, P-P; Huso, D L; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, A; Konstantopoulos, K

    2015-08-27

    Interstitial fluid flow in and around the tumor tissue is a physiologically relevant mechanical signal that regulates intracellular signaling pathways throughout the tumor. Yet, the effects of interstitial flow and associated fluid shear stress on the tumor cell function have been largely overlooked. Using in vitro bioengineering models in conjunction with molecular cell biology tools, we found that fluid shear (2 dyn/cm(2)) markedly upregulates matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP-12) expression and its activity in human chondrosarcoma cells. MMP-12 expression is induced in human chondrocytes during malignant transformation. However, the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 expression and its potential role in human chondrosarcoma cell invasion and metastasis have yet to be delineated. We discovered that fluid shear stress induces the synthesis of insulin growth factor-2 (IGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) B and D, which in turn transactivate MMP-12 via PI3-K, p38 and JNK signaling pathways. IGF-2-, VEGF-B- or VEGF-D-stimulated chondrosarcoma cells display markedly higher migratory and invasive potentials in vitro, which are blocked by inhibiting MMP-12, PI3-K, p38 or JNK activity. Moreover, recombinant human MMP-12 or MMP-12 overexpression can potentiate chondrosarcoma cell invasion in vitro and the lung colonization in vivo. By reconstructing and delineating the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 activation, potential therapeutic strategies that interfere with chondrosarcoma cell invasion may be identified. PMID:25435370

  2. Involvement of the Soluble Urokinase Receptor in Chondrosarcoma Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Bifulco, Katia; Longanesi-Cattani, Immacolata; Masucci, Maria Teresa; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Fazioli, Flavio; Di Carluccio, Gioconda; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Gallo, Michele; La Rocca, Antonello; Apice, Gaetano; Rocco, Gaetano; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2011-01-01

    High levels of urokinase receptor (uPAR) in tissue and serum of patients with chondrosarcoma correlate with poor prognosis. First, we analyzed the uPAR levels in tissues and plasma of five patients affected by chondrosarcoma. Interestingly, very high levels of uPAR and its soluble forms (SuPAR) were found on tumor cell surfaces and plasma, respectively, of two patients with lung metastases. Therefore, to investigate the role of SuPAR in chondrosaromas, we generated a primary cell culture from a chondrosarcoma tissue overexpressing uPAR on cell surfaces. We found that chondrosarcoma-like primary culture cells release a large amount of SuPAR in the medium. In vitro, SuPAR elicits chondrosarcoma cell migration likely through its uPAR88-92 sequence, since the DII88-183 or DIIDIIR88-284 uPAR domains retain motogen effect whereas DI1-87 or DIII184-284 domains, both lacking the uPAR88-92 sequence, are ineffective. Chondrosarcoma cells cross matrigel in response to SuPAR, and their invasion capability is abrogated by RERF peptide which inhibits uPAR88-92 signalling. These findings assign a role to uPAR in mobilizing chondrosarcoma cells and suggest that RERF peptide may be regarded as a prototype to generate new therapeutics for the chondrosarcoma treatment. PMID:21253510

  3. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  4. Curcumin Blocks Interleukin-1 Signaling in Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalinski, Thomas; Sel, Saadettin; Hütten, Heiko; Röpke, Martin; Roessner, Albert; Nass, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1 signaling plays an important role in inflammatory processes, but also in malignant processes. The essential downstream event in IL-1 signaling is the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which leads to the expression of several genes that are involved in cell proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis, among them VEGF-A. As microenvironment-derived IL-1β is required for invasion and angiogenesis in malignant tumors, also in chondrosarcomas, we investigated IL-1β-induced signal transduction and VEGF-A expression in C3842 and SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. We additionally performed in vitro angiogenesis assays and NF-κB-related gene expression analyses. Curcumin is a substance which inhibits IL-1 signaling very early by preventing the recruitment of IL-1 receptor associated kinase (IRAK) to the IL-1 receptor. We demonstrate that IL-1 signaling and VEGF-A expression are blocked by Curcumin in chondrosarcoma cells. We further show that Curcumin blocks IL-1β-induced angiogenesis and NF-κB-related gene expression. We suppose that IL-1 blockade is an additional treatment option in chondrosarcoma, either by Curcumin, its derivatives or other IL-1 blocking agents. PMID:24901233

  5. Malignant transformation in human chondrosarcoma cells supported by telomerase activation and tumor suppressor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; Forest, Erin; Block, Joel A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Whited, Brent; Gitelis, Steven; Wilkey, Andrew; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2002-09-01

    Human chondrosarcomas do not respond to current chemotherapies or radiation therapy, and their size and histological appearance do not reliably predict the risk of local recurrence and metastases, making selection of surgical treatment difficult. Identifying mechanisms responsible for the proliferation and invasive behavior of these tumors would be of immense clinical value. We hypothesized that telomerase expression is one of these mechanisms. We detected telomerase expression in 7 of 16 chondrosarcomas, but cells cultured from telomerase-negative chondrosarcomas acquired strong telomerase activity and lost tumor suppressor activity after their establishment in culture. These changes were associated with accelerated indefinite cell proliferation, morphological transition, and increased invasive activity, indicating that telomerase activation and loss of cell cycle control leads to the emergence of aggressive cells from chondrosarcoma cell populations. These observations may lead to better understanding of the factors responsible for malignant transformation, local recurrence, and metastases of cartilage neoplasms. PMID:12354749

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. PMID:25150213

  7. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chen-Ming; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Tzeng, Wen-Pei; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Liu, Shih-Chia; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  8. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field on MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels in chondrosarcoma cells stimulated with IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Serife Gokce; Bilgin, Mehmet Dincer; Kozaci, Leyla Didem

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma, the second most common type of bone malignancy, is characterized by distant metastasis and local invasion. Previous studies have shown that treatment by pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has beneficial effects on various cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of PEMF applied for 3 and 7 days on the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in chondrosarcoma SW1353 cells stimulated with two different doses of IL-1β. SW1353 cells were treated with (0.5 and 5 ng/ml) IL-1β and PEMF exposure was applied either 3 or 7 days. MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels were measured in conditioned media by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results were relative to protein levels. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). P<0.05 was considered significant. PEMF treatment significantly decreased MMP-9 protein levels in human chondrosarcoma cells stimulated with 0.5 ng/ml IL-1β at day 7, whereas it did not show any effect on cells stimulated with 5 ng/ml IL-1β. There was no significant change in TIMP-1 protein levels either by IL-1β stimulation or by PEMF treatment. The results of this study showed that PEMF treatment suppressed IL-1β-mediated upregulation of MMP-9 protein levels in a dual effect manner. This finding may offer new perspectives in the therapy of bone cancer. PMID:25854350

  9. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 promotes the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cell via activating Notch-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fengqin; Zhang, Zhi-qiang; Fang, Yong-chao; Li, Xiao-lei; Sun, Yu; Xiong, Chuan-zhi; Yan, Lian-qi; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1) is identified to be overexpressed in several cancers. However, the role of MALAT-1 in chondrosarcoma is poorly understood. Methods The expression of MALAT-1 and Notch-1 signaling pathway was detected in chondrosarcoma tissues and chondrosarcoma cells by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to examine the cell viability of chondrosarcoma cells transfected with si-MALAT-1 or pcDNA-MALAT-1. Then the expression of Notch-1 signaling pathway was detected when MALAT-1 was upregulated or downregulated in chondrosarcoma cells. A subcutaneous chondrosarcoma cells xenograft model was used to confirm the effect of MALAT-1 on tumor growth in vivo. Results We found the increased expression of MALAT-1 and Notch-1 signaling pathway in chondrosarcoma tissue and cells. MALAT-1 promoted the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, MALAT-1 activated the Notch-1 signaling pathway at posttranscriptional level in chondrosarcoma cells. Meanwhile, overexpression of Notch-1 reversed the effect of si-MALAT-1 on the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cells. Finally, we found that MALAT-1 promoted the tumor growth in a subcutaneous chondrosarcoma cells xenograft model, which confirmed the promoted effect of MALAT-1 on the tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion Taken together, our study demonstrated that MALAT-1 promoted the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cell via activating Notch-1 signaling pathway. PMID:27110130

  10. The Investigation of ADAMTS16 in Insulin-Induced Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Comertoglu, Ismail; Firat, Ridvan; Erdemli, Haci Kemal; Kursunlu, S. Fatih; Akyol, Sumeyya; Ugurcu, Veli; Altuntas, Aynur; Adam, Bahattin; Demircan, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: A disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) is a group of proteins that have enzymatic activity secreted by cells to the outside extracellular matrix. Insulin induces proteoglycan biosynthesis in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes. The purpose of the present in vitro study is to assess the time course effects of insulin on ADAMTS16 expression in OUMS-27 (human chondrosarcoma) cell line to examine whether insulin regulates ADAMTS16 expression as well as proteoglycan biosynthesis with multifaceted properties or not. Methods: Chondrosarcoma cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium having either 10 μg/mL insulin or not. While the experiment was going on, the medium containing insulin had been changed every other day. Cells were harvested at 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 11th days; subsequently, RNA and proteins were isolated in every experimental group according to their time interval. RNA expression of ADAMTS was estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) by using primers. Immunoreactive protein levels were encountered by the western blot protein detection technique by using proper anti-ADAMTS16 antibodies. Results: ADAMTS16 mRNA expression level of chondrosarcoma cells was found to be insignificantly decreased in chondrosarcoma cells induced by insulin detected by the qRT-PCR instrument. On the other hand, there was a gradual decrease in immune-reactant ADAMTS16 protein amount by the time course in insulin-treated cell groups when compared with control cells. Conclusion: It has been suggested that insulin might possibly regulate ADAMTS16 levels/activities in OUMS-27 chondrosarcoma cells taking a role in extracellular matrix turnover. PMID:26181853

  11. Effect of insulin on the mRNA expression of procollagen N-proteinases in chondrosarcoma OUMS-27 cells

    PubMed Central

    AKYOL, SUMEYYA; CÖMERTOĞLU, İSMAIL; FIRAT, RIDVAN; ÇAKMAK, ÖZLEM; YUKSELTEN, YUNUS; ERDEN, GÖNÜL; UGURCU, VELI; DEMIRCAN, KADIR

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is one of the most common bone tumors, and at present, there is no non-invasive treatment option for this cancer. The chondrosarcoma OUMS-27 cell line produces proteoglycan and type II, IX, and XI collagens, which constitutes cartilage tissue. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) proteases are a group of secreted proteases, which include the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS-2, -3 and -14. These procollagen N-proteinases perform a role in the processing of procollagens to collagen and the maturation of type I collagen. The present study aimed to improve the understanding of the causes of metastasis, local invasion and resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy in chondrosarcoma, as well as the effect of insulin on cancer cells. The present study was designed to reveal the effects of insulin on procollagen N-proteinases in chondrosarcoma OUMS-27 cells. The cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) alone or in DMEM containing 10 µg/ml insulin. The medium was changed every other day for 11 days. The cells were harvested on days 1, 3, 7 and 11, and total RNA isolation was performed immediately following harvesting. The expression levels of ADAMTS2, ADAMTS3 and ADAMTS14 mRNA were estimated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction using appropriate primers. ADAMTS2 mRNA expression was found to be decreased on day 7 (P=0.028) and increased at day 11 compared with the control group (P=0.016). The increase in mRNA concentration at day 11 was significantly different compared to the concentrations on days 3 (P=0.047) and 7 (P=0.008). The expression of ADAMTS3 mRNA decreased immediately subsequent to insulin induction on day 1 compared with the control group (P=0.008). The most evident decrease in mRNA concentration was seen at day 7 subsequent to insulin induction (P=0.008). The present results demonstrated that ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS3 may perform a role in the invasion and metastasis of

  12. Leptin promotes VEGF-C production and induces lymphangiogenesis by suppressing miR-27b in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Hung; Chang, An-Chen; Wang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Shoou-Jyi; Chang, Yung-Sen; Chang, Tzu-Ming; Hsu, Shao-Keh; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequently occurring type of bone malignancy that is characterized by the distant metastasis propensity. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is the chief lymphangiogenic mediator, and makes crucial contributions to tumor lymphangiogenesis. Leptin is an adipocytokine and has been indicated to facilitate tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. However, the effect of leptin on VEGF-C regulation and lymphangiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma has hugely remained a mystery. Our results showed a clinical correlation between leptin and VEGF-C as well as tumor stage in human chondrosarcoma tissues. We further demonstrated that leptin promoted VEGF-C production and secretion in human chondrosarcoma cells. The conditioned medium from leptin-treated chondrosarcoma cells induced lymphangiogenesis of human lymphatic endothelial cells. We also found that leptin-induced VEGF-C is mediated by the FAK, PI3K and Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, the expression of microRNA-27b was negatively regulated by leptin via the FAK, PI3K and Akt cascade. Our study is the first to describe the mechanism of leptin-promoted lymphangiogenesis by upregulating VEGF-C expression in chondrosarcomas. Thus, leptin could serve as a therapeutic target in chondrosarcoma metastasis and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27345723

  13. Leptin promotes VEGF-C production and induces lymphangiogenesis by suppressing miR-27b in human chondrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei-Hung; Chang, An-Chen; Wang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Shoou-Jyi; Chang, Yung-Sen; Chang, Tzu-Ming; Hsu, Shao-Keh; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequently occurring type of bone malignancy that is characterized by the distant metastasis propensity. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is the chief lymphangiogenic mediator, and makes crucial contributions to tumor lymphangiogenesis. Leptin is an adipocytokine and has been indicated to facilitate tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. However, the effect of leptin on VEGF-C regulation and lymphangiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma has hugely remained a mystery. Our results showed a clinical correlation between leptin and VEGF-C as well as tumor stage in human chondrosarcoma tissues. We further demonstrated that leptin promoted VEGF-C production and secretion in human chondrosarcoma cells. The conditioned medium from leptin-treated chondrosarcoma cells induced lymphangiogenesis of human lymphatic endothelial cells. We also found that leptin-induced VEGF-C is mediated by the FAK, PI3K and Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, the expression of microRNA-27b was negatively regulated by leptin via the FAK, PI3K and Akt cascade. Our study is the first to describe the mechanism of leptin-promoted lymphangiogenesis by upregulating VEGF-C expression in chondrosarcomas. Thus, leptin could serve as a therapeutic target in chondrosarcoma metastasis and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27345723

  14. Oral squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla, a second malignancy after a right ethmoido-maxillary chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Mircea; Morariu, Silviu Horia; Ormenişan, Alina; Grigoraş, Radu Ionuţ; Bostan, Radu Horia; Mocanu, Simona; Vartolomei, Mihai Dorin; Cotoi, Ovidiu Simion

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is defined as an invasive epithelial neoplasm, with variable degrees of squamous differentiation, with or without keratinization. It is origins stand at the level of the keratinized stratified squamous epithelium (skin) or non-keratinized (oral mucosa, esophageal mucosa, uterine exocervical mucosa), but it can also be found in squamous metaplasia areas (uterine endocervix or trachea-bronchial tree). This report presents the case of an oral squamous cell carcinoma as a second malignancy in the same anatomical territory, in a patient with prior treatment for chondrosarcoma, both surgical and radiotherapy. The tumor had appeared 5-6 months prior and had undergone a relatively rapid growth, this being the patient's main motive for addressing the doctors. The tumor was greyish, with imprecisely demarcated margins, of firm consistency, bleeding and with local necrotic deposits. The tumor extended from the incisive region to the maxillary tuberosity, towards the cheek mucosa and the soft palate. After a large excision, the histopathological diagnosis was infiltrative keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, with moderate differentiation, with origins in the oral mucosa, infiltrating the whole of the maxilla and the maxillary sinus mucosa. Approximately three months after the surgery, a new tumor appeared in the oral cavity, on superior and inferior mucosa of the right cheek, extending towards the right buccal commissure, implying a relapse of the primary tumor. Postoperative oncological therapy included standard chemotherapy, which resulted in favorable postoperative evolution. This case is interesting by the association, of two metachronous malignant tumors, of different histological origin: a chondrosarcoma and a squamous cell carcinoma, at an interval of 25 years. PMID:25607415

  15. BL-038, a Benzofuran Derivative, Induces Cell Apoptosis in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells through Reactive Oxygen Species/Mitochondrial Dysfunction and the Caspases Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Fang; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chen, Hsien-Te; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a highly malignant cartilage-forming bone tumor that has the capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. Moreover, chondrosarcoma is intrinsically resistant to conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The novel benzofuran derivative, BL-038 (2-amino-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)benzofuran-4-yl acetate), has been evaluated for its anticancer effects in human chondrosarcoma cells. BL-038 caused cell apoptosis in two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and SW1353, but not in primary chondrocytes. Treatment of chondrosarcoma with BL-038 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, BL-038 decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and changed mitochondrial-related apoptosis, by downregulating the anti-apoptotic activity members (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL) and upregulating pro-apoptotic members (Bax, Bak) of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins, key regulators of the apoptotic machinery in cells. These results demonstrate that in human chondrosarcoma cells, the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of BL-038 are mediated by the intrinsic mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which in turn causes the release of cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), to elicit apoptosis response. Our results show that the benzofuran derivative BL-038 induces apoptosis in chondrosarcoma cells. PMID:27618007

  16. Inhibition of mutant IDH1 decreases D-2-HG levels without affecting tumorigenic properties of chondrosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Suijker, Johnny; Oosting, Jan; Koornneef, Annemarie; Struys, Eduard A.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Schaap, Frank G.; Waaijer, Cathelijn J.F.; Wijers-Koster, Pauline M.; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H.; Haazen, Lizette; Riester, Scott M.; Dudakovic, Amel; Danen, Erik; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are found in a subset of benign and malignant cartilage tumors, gliomas and leukaemias. The mutant enzyme causes the production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), affecting CpG island and histone methylation. While mutations in IDH1/2 are early events in benign cartilage tumors, we evaluated whether these mutations play a role in malignant chondrosarcomas. Compared to IDH1/2 wildtype cell lines, chondrosarcoma cell lines harboring an endogenous IDH1 (n=3) or IDH2 mutation (n=2) showed up to a 100-fold increase in intracellular and extracellular D-2-HG levels. Specific inhibition of mutant IDH1 using AGI-5198 decreased levels of D-2-HG in a dose dependent manner. After 72 hours of treatment one out of three mutant IDH1 cell lines showed a moderate decrease in viability, while D-2-HG levels decreased >90%. Likewise, prolonged treatment (up to 20 passages) did not affect proliferation and migration. Furthermore, global gene expression, CpG island methylation as well as histone H3K4, -9, and -27 trimethylation levels remained unchanged. Thus, while IDH1/2 mutations cause enchondroma, malignant progression towards central chondrosarcoma renders chondrosarcoma growth independent of these mutations. Thus, monotherapy based on inhibition of mutant IDH1 appears insufficient for treatment of inoperable or metastasized chondrosarcoma patients. PMID:25895133

  17. Biological Effects of the Plant-derived Polyphenol Resveratrol in Human Articular Cartilage and Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hee-Jeong; Li, Xin; Chen, Di; Yan, Dongyao; Kim, Jaesung; Ellman, Michael B; Stein, Gary S.; Cole, Brian; Ranjan, KC; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2012-01-01

    The natural phytoestrogen resveratrol (RSV) may have therapeutic potential for arthritic conditions. RSV is chondroprotective for articular cartilage in rabbit models for arthritis, but its biological effects on human articular cartilage and chondrosarcoma cells are unknown. Effects of RSV on human articular cartilage homeostasis were studied by assessing production of matrix-degrading enzymes (MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5), as well as proteoglycan production and synthesis. The counteractions of RSV against catabolic factors (e.g., FGF-2 or IL-1β) were examined by in vitro and ex vivo using monolayer, three-dimensional alginate beads and cartilage explants cultures, respectively. RSV improves cell viability of articular chondrocytes and effectively antagonizes cartilage-degrading protease production that was initiated by catabolic and/or anti-anabolic cytokines in human articular chondrocytes. RSV significantly also enhances BMP7-promoted proteoglycan synthesis as assessed by 35S-sulfate incorporation. Protein-DNA interaction arrays suggest that RSV inhibits the activation of transcription factors involved in inflammation and cartilage catabolic signaling pathways, including direct downstream regulators of MAPK (e.g., AP-1, PEA3) and NFκB. RSV selectively compromises survival of human chondrosarcoma cells, but not primary articular chondrocytes, revealing cell-specific activity of RSV on non-tumorigenic versus tumor-derived cells. We propose that RSV exerts its chondroprotective functions, in part, by deactivating p53-induced apoptosis in human primary chondrocytes, but not human chondrosarcoma. Our findings suggest that RSV has potential as a unique biologic treatment for both prevention and treatment of cartilage degenerative diseases. PMID:22252971

  18. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  19. Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Larynx.

    PubMed

    Fidai, Shiraz S; Ginat, Daniel T; Langerman, Alexander J; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2016-09-01

    Primary dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma occurring in the larynx is a rare head and neck malignancy. The cases reported in the literature suggest male gender predilection and variable clinical outcomes ranging from disease-free survival to disease-related death. Although a calcified matrix is suggestive of chondrosarcoma, the dedifferentiated component is not readily appreciated on conventional imaging modalities and thorough tissue sampling is necessary for confirming the diagnosis. Histologically, there is an abrupt transition from a well-differentiated chondrosarcoma to a high-grade spindle cell component, which can show focal heterologous differentiation. These features are exemplified in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. PMID:26718693

  20. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C; Wilky, Breelyn A; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  1. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C.; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  2. Amphiregulin enhances alpha6beta1 integrin expression and cell motility in human chondrosarcoma cells through Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chih-Yang; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Su, Jen-Liang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-05-10

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor that produces cartilage matrix. The most lethal aspect is its metastatic property. We demonstrated that amphiregulin (AR) is significantly upregulated in highly aggressive cells. AR silencing markedly suppressed cell migration. Exogenous AR markedly increased cell migration by transactivation of α6β1 integrin expression. A neutralizing α6β1 integrin antibody can abolish AR-induced cell motility. Knockdown of AR inhibits metastasis of cells to the lung in vivo. Furthermore, elevated AR expression is positively correlated with α6β1 integrin levels and higher grades in patients. These findings can potentially serve as biomarker and therapeutic approach for controlling chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:25825984

  3. Retrobulbar chondrosarcoma in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Ralić, M.; Vasić, J.; Jovanović, M.; Cameron, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review of a dog, with a retrobulbar chondrosarcoma, which was admitted for surgery for visible changes in his eye during inspection. Orbital neoplasia in dogs may be primary and secondary. Sixty percent of orbital neoplasia in dogs are primary, ninety percent of which are malignant. Retrobulbar neoplasms are rare and in their early stage represent a diagnostic challenge. Chondrosarcoma of the skull is a slow-progressing malignant disease which occurs locally, aggressive with invasion into the surrounding tissues. Dogs with chondrosarcoma of the skull have life expectancy between 210 and 580 days - in our case it was 180 days - after the first alterations on the eye of the dog occurred. PMID:26623338

  4. ETV5 as a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in human chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Power, Patricia F; Mak, Isabella W Y; Singh, Shalini; Popovic, Snezana; Gladdy, Rebecca; Ghert, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a unique type of bone cancer in that it does not respond to chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and therefore many affected patients die from metastatic disease. Metastasis has been correlated with the upregulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases, which can degrade extracellular components. ETV5 is a transcription factor which has shown to be overexpressed in various types of invasive tumors. We hypothesized that ETV5 regulates MMP2 in human chondrosarcoma with the protease acting as a downstream effector. Gene knock-down of ETV5 in human chondrosarcoma cells reduces MMP2 mRNA expression as well as decreased protein production and significantly decreased MMP2 activity. With plasmid transfected ETV5 upregulation, MMP2 expression is similarly upregulated at the gene expression and protein levels. Data from our bone resorption studies revealed that when a matrix metalloproteinase-2 inhibitor is added to the growth media of chondrosarcoma cells, collagen released from bone chips incubated with the cells decreased by 27%. This data suggests that ETV5 has a significant role in regulating MMP2 expression and therefore matrix resorption in human chondrosarcoma, and thus may be a targetable upstream effector of the metastatic cascade in this cancer. PMID:22968857

  5. Adiponectin promotes VEGF-C-dependent lymphangiogenesis by inhibiting miR-27b through a CaMKII/AMPK/p38 signaling pathway in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Chang, An-Chen; Chen, Hsien-Te; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lo, Yuan-Shun; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequently occurring type of bone malignancy characterized by distant metastatic propensity. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is the major lymphangiogenic factor, and makes crucial contributions to tumour lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted predominantly by differentiated adipocytes. In recent years, adiponectin has also been indicated as facilitating tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. However, the effect of adiponectin on VEGF-C regulation and lymphangiogenesis in chondrosarcoma has remained largely a mystery. In the present study, we have shown a clinical correlation between adiponectin and VEGF-C, as well as tumour stage, in human chondrosarcoma tissues. We further demonstrated that adiponectin promoted VEGF-C expression and secretion in human chondrosarcoma cells. The conditioned medium from adiponectin-treated cells significantly induced tube formation and migration of human lymphatic endothelial cells. In addition, adiponectin knock down inhibited lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo We also found that adiponectin-induced VEGF-C is mediated by the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and p38 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the expression of miR-27b was negatively regulated by adiponectin via the CaMKII, AMPK and p38 cascade. The present study is the first to describe the mechanism of adiponectin-promoted lymphangiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF-C expression in chondrosarcomas. Thus, adiponectin could serve as a therapeutic target in chondrosarcoma metastasis and lymphangiogenesis. PMID:27252405

  6. miR-125b acts as a tumor suppressor in chondrosarcoma cells by the sensitization to doxorubicin through direct targeting the ErbB2-regulated glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xian-ye; Zheng, Wei; Ding, Min; Guo, Kai-jin; Yuan, Feng; Feng, Hu; Deng, Bin; Sun, Wei; Hou, Yang; Gao, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common type of primary bone malignancy in the United States after osteosarcoma. Surgical resections of these tumors are the only effective treatment to chondrosarcoma patients due to their resistance to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy. In this study, miR-125b was found to perform its tumor-suppressor function to inhibit glucose metabolism via the direct targeting of oncogene, ErbB2. We report miR-125b was downregulated in both chondrosarcoma patient samples and cell lines. The total 20 Asian chondrosarcoma patients showed significantly downregulated miR-125b expression compared with normal tissues. Meanwhile, miR-125 was downregulated in chondrosarcoma cells and doxorubicin resistant cells. Overexpression of miR-125 enhanced the sensitivity of both parental and doxorubicin resistant cells to doxorubicin through direct targeting on the ErbB2-mediated upregulation of glycolysis in chondrosarcoma cells. Moreover, restoration of the expression of ErbB2 and glucose metabolic enzymes in miR-125 pretransfected cells recovered the susceptibility to doxorubicin. Our study will provide a novel aspect on the overcoming chemoresistance in human chondrosarcoma cells and may help in the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatments of patients. PMID:26966351

  7. Synovial chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Confalonieri, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Synovial chondrosarcoma (SCH) is a very rare tumor arising in the intra-articular cavity. In the majority of literature reports it is described as a malignant transformation of a pre-existing synovial chondromatosis (SC). We reported a systematic review of primary and secondary SCH described in the literature with the aim to recollect data from different case-reports and case-series, trying to summarize general aspects of this very rare disease. Methods We collected 42 abstracts in the form of case series and case reports, which reported 67 cases of SCH. Studies were taken into account only if they proved a histological diagnosis of SCH, either primary or secondary, with or without evidence of pre-existing SC. Results The average age of SCH was 56.9 years, with prevalence for male sex. The average time of malignant transformation was 11.2 years. The most affected joint was the knee (47.7%), followed by hip (34.3%) and ankle (5.9%). SCH was described as de novo sarcoma only in 13 cases (19%). Surgery ended up with amputation in 59.7% of cases. Local recurrence rate was 28.3%. Conclusions We concluded that prognosis of SCH is worse than conventional one and we speculated this is due to the difficult site of the tumor (intraarticular), diagnostic delay and inappropriate previous treatments. We consider that a rapid deterioration of a SC or rapid recurrence after synoviectomy should be considered suspicious of malignant transformation and should be treated in a reference center.

  8. [Secondary chondrosarcoma: radiopathological correlation].

    PubMed

    Lozano Martínez, G A; Llauger Rosselló, J

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors originating in cartilage. Chondrosarcoma is the third most common malignant bone tumor after multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma. About 75% of chondrosarcomas are primary lesions. The remaining 25% belong to special categories such as histologic variants and secondary forms. A secondary chondrosarcoma is one that appears in a pre-existing benign chondral lesion; the different types of secondary chondrosarcomas include solitary osteochondroma, multiple osteochondromatosis, enchondroma, the different types of enchondromatosis, and primary synovial chondromatosis. The incidence of this malignant transformation varies widely in function of the type of lesion. In this article, we discuss and illustrate the different types of secondary chondrosarcomas, placing special emphasis on the imaging findings that should alert to these lesions and give radiologists a key role in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of these patients. PMID:25002353

  9. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells and zoledronate mediate antitumor activity in an orthotopic mouse model of human chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Li, Y; Jiang, Z; Zhang, J; Li, H; Li, B; Ye, Z

    2016-06-01

    Chondrosarcoma (CS) is a cartilaginous malignant neoplasm characterized by resistance to conventional adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of unresectable or metastatic CS is poor. Therefore, it is imperative to explore novel therapeutic approaches to improve the treatment efficacy for those CS patients. Emerging data has implicated the synergistic antitumor activity of zoledronate (ZOL) and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. However, whether ZOL-stimulated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells could infiltrate bone sarcoma and inhibit tumor growth has not been thoroughly answered yet. In this study, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells from healthy donors and CS patients were expanded in the presence of ZOL (1 μM) and IL-2 (400 IU/ml). The antitumor activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to ZOL-pretreated human CS was examined both in vitro and in vivo. ZOL pretreatment substantially enhanced the cytotoxicity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to SW1353 and primary CS cells. ZOL potentiated the migration and cytotoxicity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to SW1353 in dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, weekly intravenous ZOL followed by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells inhibited subcutaneous xenograft growth. Thus, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were able to infiltrate bone tumor and significantly suppressed the development of orthotopic SW1353 xenografts. Altogether, the study raises the possibility of combining ZOL with Vγ9Vδ2 T cells for CS treatment. PMID:26676633

  10. [Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of lateral abdominal wall (case report)].

    PubMed

    Akfirat, Murat; Kayaoğlu, Hüseyin Ayhan

    2004-12-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcomas are very rare in comparison to the conventional types. They can occur from any location containing mesenchymal cells, but most arise in the lower extremities, leptomeninges and in the orbits. Other sites are very uncommon. We present a case of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the lateral abdominal wall, and this is the first report of the tumor localized in this region. PMID:15611919

  11. Epigenetic regulation of embryonic stem cell marker miR302C in human chondrosarcoma as determinant of antiproliferative activity of proline-rich polypeptide 1.

    PubMed

    Galoian, Karina; Qureshi, Amir; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Schiller, Paul C; Molinari, Marco; Johnstone, Andrea L; Brothers, Shaun P; Paz, Ana C; Temple, H T

    2015-08-01

    Metastatic chondrosarcoma of mesenchymal origin is the second most common bone malignancy and does not respond either to chemotherapy or radiation; therefore, the search for new therapies is relevant and urgent. We described recently that tumor growth inhibiting cytostatic proline-rich polypeptide 1, (PRP-1) significantly upregulated tumor suppressor miRNAs, downregulated onco-miRNAs in human chondrosarcoma JJ012 cell line, compared to chondrocytes culture. In this study we hypothesized the existence and regulation of a functional marker in cancer stem cells, correlated to peptides antiproliferative activity. Experimental results indicated that among significantly downregulated miRNA after PRP-1treatment was miRNAs 302c*. This miRNA is a part of the cluster miR302‑367, which is stemness regulator in human embryonic stem cells and in certain tumors, but is not expressed in adult hMSCs and normal tissues. PRP-1 had strong inhibitory effect on viability of chondrosarcoma and multilineage induced multipotent adult cells (embryonic primitive cell type). Unlike chondrosarcoma, in glioblastoma, PRP-1 does not have any inhibitory activity on cell proliferation, because in glioblastoma miR-302-367 cluster plays an opposite role, its expression is sufficient to suppress the stemness inducing properties. The observed correlation between the antiproliferative activity of PRP-1 and its action on downregulation of miR302c explains the peptides opposite effects on the upregulation of proliferation of adult mesenchymal stem cells, and the inhibition of the proliferation of human bone giant-cell tumor stromal cells, reported earlier. PRP-1 substantially downregulated the miR302c targets, the stemness markers Nanog, c-Myc and polycomb protein Bmi-1. miR302c expression is induced by JMJD2-mediated H3K9me2 demethylase activity in its promoter region. JMJD2 was reported to be a positive regulator for Nanog. Our experimental results proved that PRP-1 strongly inhibited H3K9 activity

  12. Epigenetic regulation of embryonic stem cell marker miR302C in human chondrosarcoma as determinant of antiproliferative activity of proline-rich polypeptide 1

    PubMed Central

    GALOIAN, KARINA; QURESHI, AMIR; D’IPPOLITO, GIANLUCA; SCHILLER, PAUL C.; MOLINARI, MARCO; JOHNSTONE, ANDREA L.; BROTHERS, SHAUN P.; PAZ, ANA C.; TEMPLE, H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic chondrosarcoma of mesenchymal origin is the second most common bone malignancy and does not respond either to chemotherapy or radiation; therefore, the search for new therapies is relevant and urgent. We described recently that tumor growth inhibiting cytostatic proline-rich polypeptide 1, (PRP-1) significantly upregulated tumor suppressor miRNAs, downregulated onco-miRNAs in human chondrosarcoma JJ012 cell line, compared to chondrocytes culture. In this study we hypothesized the existence and regulation of a functional marker in cancer stem cells, correlated to peptides antiproliferative activity. Experimental results indicated that among significantly downregulated miRNA after PRP-1treatment was miRNAs 302c*. This miRNA is a part of the cluster miR302-367, which is stemness regulator in human embryonic stem cells and in certain tumors, but is not expressed in adult hMSCs and normal tissues. PRP-1 had strong inhibitory effect on viability of chondrosarcoma and multilineage induced multipotent adult cells (embryonic primitive cell type). Unlike chondrosarcoma, in glioblastoma, PRP-1 does not have any inhibitory activity on cell proliferation, because in glioblastoma miR-302-367 cluster plays an opposite role, its expression is sufficient to suppress the stemness inducing properties. The observed correlation between the antiproliferative activity of PRP-1 and its action on downregulation of miR302c explains the peptides opposite effects on the upregulation of proliferation of adult mesenchymal stem cells, and the inhibition of the proliferation of human bone giant-cell tumor stromal cells, reported earlier. PRP-1 substantially downregulated the miR302c targets, the stemness markers Nanog, c-Myc and polycomb protein Bmi-1. miR302c expression is induced by JMJD2-mediated H3K9me2 demethylase activity in its promoter region. JMJD2 was reported to be a positive regulator for Nanog. Our experimental results proved that PRP-1 strongly inhibited H3K9 activity

  13. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 8q in a human chondrosarcoma cell line and in a tumor that developed in a man with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME)

    SciTech Connect

    Raskind, W.H.; Conrad, E.U.; Robbins, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    HME is an autosomal dominant disorder in which multiple benign cartilage-capped lesions develop on otherwise histologically normal bones. The majority of chondrosarcomas are sporadic, but the presence of HME greatly increases the risk to develop this tumor. Sarcoma may also arise in sporadically-occurring exostoses. The study of inherited disorders that predispose to malignant diseases has led to discoveries regarding molecular changes involved in carcinogenesis in general. In an analogous manner, somatic mutations in HME genes may be responsible for sporadic exostoses and/or chondrosarcomas. HME is genetically heterogeneous; EXT genes have been assigned to 8q24, the pericentromeric region of 11 and 19p11-p13. We compared chondrosarcoma cell DNA to DNA from white blood cells for LOH at polymorphic loci in these 3 regions. LOH for 4 of 5 markers in 8q24 was detected in a chondrosarcoma that arose in a man with HME. Heterozygosity was retained for markers and chromosomes 11 and 19. We then evaluated cultured cells from 10 sporadic chondrosarcomas. LOH for multiple markers in 8q24 was detected in a cell line, Ch-1, established from an aggressive tumor, but not in 9 other tumors. Of the 9 tumors studied, only the Ch-1 line exhibited LOH for chromosome 11 markers. LOH for a 19p marker was not detected in any of 6 tumors examined, including Ch-1. The karyotype of Ch-1 contains many structurally rearranged chromosomes. The two chromosome 11s appear normal but both chromosome 8 homologues have been replaced by der(8)t(5;8)(q22;q21.2). LOH at 8q24 was also detected in the uncultured tumor. These results suggest that genes responsible for HME may have tumor suppressor functions whose loss may be related to the development of a subset of chondrosarcomas.

  14. The cucurbitacins E, D and I: investigation of their cytotoxicity toward human chondrosarcoma SW 1353 cell line and their biotransformation in man liver.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Suzanne; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Habib, Lamice; Netter, Patrick; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Magdalou, Jacques

    2013-02-01

    Cucurbitacins are a class of natural compounds known for their numerous potential pharmacological effects. The purpose of this work was to compare the cytotoxicity of three cucurbitacins I, D, E on the chondrosarcoma SW 1353 cancer cell line and to investigate their biotransformation in man. Cucurbitacins I and D showed a very strong cytotoxicity, which was higher than that of cytochalasin D, used as a drug reference. Almost 100% of the cells were apoptotic as observed by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay) after 12 h with cucurbitacins I and D (1 μM) and cucurbitacin E (10 μM). In terms of IC(50) values, cucurbitacins I and E presented a higher toxicity compared to that of cucurbitacin D (MTT assay). Cucurbitacin E was readily hydrolyzed by human hepatic microsomes, leading to cucurbitacin I (K(m) 22 μM, V(max) 571 nmol/mg proteins/min). On the other hand, the three cucurbitacins were hydroxylated at a very low extent, but they were sulfated and glucuronidated. In terms of V(max)/K(m), the cucurbitacin E was the best substrate of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. This study shows that cucurbitacins I, D and E present a potent cytotoxic activity toward the chondrosarcoma SW 1353 cell line and are metabolized as sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. PMID:23194827

  15. In vitro cytotoxic screening of 31 crude extracts of Thai herbs on a chondrosarcoma cell line and primary chondrocytes and apoptotic effects of selected extracts.

    PubMed

    Ruamrungsri, Napat; Siengdee, Puntita; Sringarm, Korawan; Chomdej, Siriwadee; Ongchai, Siriwan; Nganvongpanit, Korakot

    2016-04-01

    Thirty-one dichloromethane and methanol crude extracts of 16 herb species used in Thai traditional folk medicine were studied for their cytotoxic activities on the SW 1353 chondrosarcoma cell line and primary chondrocytes. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) cell viability assay and flow cytometric method were used as screening tools for cytotoxicity testing. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was measured and reported for each crude extract. Apoptosis, necrosis, and cell viability were measured by flow cytometry at IC50. Two out of 31 herbal extracts, methanol extracts of Paris polyphylla var. chinensis and Ficus thailandica C.C. Berg & S. Gardner, showed potent anticancer activity. They demonstrated high apoptosis induction activity in SW 1353 cells but had less effect on percentage of viability and necrosis of normal chondrocyte cells. Cytotoxic screening and apoptosis assays suggest the potential anticancer activity of some plants used in Thai traditional medicine and provide information concerning their direct effects. PMID:26857828

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This irregular red nodule is an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers ...

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers can metastasize (spread) and should be removed surgically ...

  18. Chondrosarcoma in the mental foramen region of the mandible: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Xiuhong; Wan, Teng; Li, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor that is characterized by the formation of cartilage by tumor cells. The tumor is commonly observed in regions where cartilage is already present. In total, 5–12% of chondrosarcomas occur in the head and neck region. However, the occurrence of chondrosarcoma in the mental foramen region is extremely rare. The aim of the present study was to report a case of chondrosarcoma in the mental foramen region. An 18-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of a painless mass over the labial aspect of the right mandible, which was associated with the patient feeling unwell and the loosening of the lower anterior teeth. The patient underwent segmental mandibulectomy and the final pathological diagnosis was chondrosarcoma. Following mandibulectomy, the patient continued to receive routine follow-up. In addition, the present study reviewed the literature concerning chondrosarcomas in the head and neck region. PMID:27602143

  19. Targeting survivin as a potential new treatment for chondrosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Y; van Oosterwijk, J G; Kruisselbrink, A B; Briaire-de Bruijn, I H; Agrogiannis, G; Baranski, Z; Cleven, A H G; Cleton-Jansen, A-M; van de Water, B; Danen, E H J; Bovée, J V M G

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage-forming bone tumors, which are intrinsically resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, leaving surgical removal as the only curative treatment option. Therefore, our aim was to identify genes involved in chondrosarcoma cell survival that could serve as a target for therapy. siRNA screening for 51 apoptosis-related genes in JJ012 chondrosarcoma cells identified BIRC5, encoding survivin, as essential for chondrosarcoma survival. Using immunohistochemistry, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic survivin expression was analyzed in 207 chondrosarcomas of different subtypes. Nuclear survivin has been implicated in cell-cycle regulation while cytoplasmic localization is important for its anti-apoptotic function. RT-PCR was performed to determine expression of the most common survivin isoforms. Sensitivity to YM155, a survivin inhibitor currently in phase I/II clinical trial for other tumors, was examined in 10 chondrosarcoma cell lines using viability assay, apoptosis assay and cell-cycle analysis. Survivin expression was found in all chondrosarcoma patient samples. Higher expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was observed with increasing histological grade in central chondrosarcomas. Inhibition of survivin using YM155 showed that especially TP53 mutant cell lines were sensitive, but no caspase 3/7 or PARP cleavage was observed. Rather, YM155 treatment resulted in a block in S phase in two out of three chondrosarcoma cell lines, indicating that survivin is more involved in cell-cycle regulation than in apoptosis. Thus, survivin is important for chondrosarcoma survival and chondrosarcoma patients might benefit from survivin inhibition using YM155, for which TP53 mutational status can serve as a predictive biomarker. PMID:27159675

  20. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ihab Shafek; AlQahtani, Fahd Nasser

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner's, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A. PMID:27087812

  1. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Ihab Shafek; AlQahtani, Fahd Nasser

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner's, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A. PMID:27087812

  2. OCULAR CHONDROSARCOMAS IN RIVULUS MARMORATUS POEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Only one documented case of a malignant cartilaginous tumor has been previously reported from fish, a large cranial chondrosarcoma from the paddlefish, Polyodon spathula (Walbaum). escribed here are two chondrosarcomas diagnosed from adult laboratory-reared Rivulus marmoratus Poe...

  3. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  4. Chondrosarcoma of the maxilla: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aarti M; Ganvir, SM; Hazarey, VK; Mahajan, Mahendra C

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent chondrosarcoma of the maxilla in a 29 yr old male patient. The lesion presented as a small diffuse swelling on the left maxillary anterior region which had progressed over a period of one year. On aspiration, a chondromyxoid matrix was noted with cells arranged singly or in groups. Bi and tri-nucleation was noted with a moderate degree of nuclear pleomorphism. A diagnosis of well differentiated chondrosarcoma was made which was confirmed on histopathology. The clinicopathological findings of this case and a review of chondrosarcoma is presented and discussed. PMID:24250092

  5. Inhibition of Chondrosarcoma Growth by mTOR Inhibitor in an In Vivo Syngeneic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jennifer; Decouvelaere, Anne Valérie; Pointecouteau, Thomas; Pissaloux, Daniel; Michot, Jean Philippe; Besse, Anthony; Blay, Jean Yves; Dutour, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcomas are the second most frequent primary malignant type of bone tumor. No effective systemic treatment has been identified in advanced or adjuvant phases for chondrosarcoma. The aim of the present study was to determine the antitumor effects of doxorubicin and everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor on chondrosarcoma progression. Methods and Findings Doxorubin and/or everolimus were tested in vivo as single agent or in combination in the rat orthotopic Schwarm chondrosarcoma model, in macroscopic phase, as well as with microscopic residual disease. Response to everolimus and/or doxorubicin was evaluated using chondrosarcoma volume evolution (MRI). Histological response was evaluated with % of tumor necrosis, tumor proliferation index, metabolism quantification analysis between the treated and control groups. Statistical analyses were performed using chi square, Fishers exact test. Doxorubicin single agent has no effect of tumor growth as compared to no treatment; conversely, everolimus single agent significantly inhibited tumor progression in macroscopic tumors with no synergistic additive effect with doxorubicin. Everolimus inhibited chondrosarcoma proliferation as evaluated by Ki67 expression did not induce the apoptosis of tumor cells; everolimus reduced Glut1 and 4EBP1 expression. Importantly when given in rats with microscopic residual diseases, in a pseudo neoadjuvant setting, following R1 resection of the implanted tumor, everolimus significantly delayed or prevented tumor recurrence. Conclusions MTOR inhibitor everolimus blocks cell proliferation, Glut1 expression and HIF1a expression, and prevents in vivo chondrosarcoma tumor progression in both macroscopic and in adjuvant phase post R1 resection. Taken together, our preclinical data indicate that mTOR inhibitor may be effective as a single agent in treating chondrosarcoma patients. A clinical trial evaluating mTOr inhibitor as neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapy in chondrosarcoma patients is

  6. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma with telangiectatic osteosarcoma‐like features

    PubMed Central

    Okada, K; Hasegawa, T; Tateishi, U; Endo, M; Itoi, E

    2006-01-01

    A 35‐year‐old Japanese man was admitted to the National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan, in December 2000, with a 2‐month history of pain around the left thigh. Radiographs showed a poorly demarcated osteolytic lesion with focal mineralisation and endosteal scalloping in the left proximal femur. Biopsy showed a proliferation of highly anaplastic cells without any cartilaginous component. A wide excision of the left proximal femur with a replacement by endoprosthesis was carried out in February 2001 after treatment with methotrexate and 20 Gy radiation therapy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed a focus of low‐grade chondrosarcoma and the coexistence of telangiectatic osteosarcoma‐like features. The patient was diagnosed with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma with telangiectatic osteosarcoma‐like features. Lung metastasis appeared in July 2001 despite an adjuvant chemotherapy including methotrexate, cis‐platinum and doxorubicin. The latest follow‐up study in June 2004 showed multiple lung metastases. Establishing a definitive diagnosis of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma may be difficult with limited small biopsy specimens. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of osteolytic tumours with focal calcification and endosteal scalloping even if an extraosseous tumour component is not identified. PMID:17071806

  7. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  8. Resveratrol inhibits phosphorylation within the signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway by activating sirtuin 1 in SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haidong; Chen, Hui; Yu, Kehe; Zhang, Jingdong; Li, Bin; Cai, Ningyu; Pan, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The present study assessed the mechanism by which resveratrol (Res) inhibits the growth of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells and examined whether sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) activation affects phosphorylation within the signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. The present study used SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells in the logarithmic phase of growth (control and treatment groups). The latter group was treated with Res at 25 and 50 µmol/l for 24 h, and cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed using the cell counting kit‑8 assay, colony counting and Hoechst staining, respectively. The expression levels of caspase‑3, cleaved caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (BCL‑2), BCL-2 associated X protein (Bax), STAT3 and phosphorylated (p‑)STAT3) were measured by Western blotting. SW1353 cells were transfected with small interfering (si)RNA targeting Sirt1 and the expression levels of Sirt1, STAT3 and p-STAT3 were assessed. Exposure of SW1353 cells to Res reduced cell viability in a dose‑dependent manner (P<0.01). Additionally, cell proliferation was significantly inhibited and the cell nuclei exhibited apoptotic characteristics. Cleaved caspase‑3, Sirt1 and Bax levels were upregulated. The expression levels of BCL‑2 and p‑STAT3 were downregulated. Additionally, the BCL‑2/Bax ratio was reduced compared with the control group. The total STAT3 level was unaffected. Res treatment activated Sirt1, however, in cells transfected with Sirt1‑siRNA, the ability of resveratrol to suppress p‑STAT3 expression was compromised. Overall, it was revealed that Res treatment induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation and affected phosphorylation within the STAT3 signaling pathway by activating Sirt1 in SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. PMID:27484919

  9. Inhibition of medulloblastoma cell invasion by Slit.

    PubMed

    Werbowetski-Ogilvie, T E; Seyed Sadr, M; Jabado, N; Angers-Loustau, A; Agar, N Y R; Wu, J; Bjerkvig, R; Antel, J P; Faury, D; Rao, Y; Del Maestro, R F

    2006-08-24

    Invasion of brain tumor cells has made primary malignant brain neoplasms among the most recalcitrant to therapeutic strategies. We tested whether the secreted protein Slit2, which guides the projection of axons and developing neurons, could modulate brain tumor cell invasion. Slit2 inhibited the invasion of medulloblastoma cells in a variety of in vitro models. The effect of Slit2 was inhibited by the Robo ectodomain. Time-lapse videomicroscopy indicated that Slit2 reduced medulloblastoma invasion rate without affecting cell direction or proliferation. Both medulloblastoma and glioma tumors express Robo1 and Slit2, but only medulloblastoma invasion is inhibited by recombinant Slit2 protein. Downregulation of activated Cdc42 may contribute to this differential response. Our findings reinforce the concept that neurodevelopmental cues such as Slit2 may provide insights into brain tumor invasion. PMID:16636676

  10. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation.

  11. Chondrosarcoma of the Laryngeal Thyroid Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Righi, Stefano; Boffano, Paolo; Pateras, Dimitrios; Chiodo, Domenico; Zanardi, Fabio; Patetta, Roberta

    2015-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the larynx is a rare tumor, accounting for 0.07% to 2% of all laryngeal cancers. Nevertheless, it represents the most frequent nonepithelial neoplasm of the laryngeal region.Laryngeal chondrosarcomas are usually characterized by slow growth and low metastatic potential.The exact etiopathogenesis of chondrosarcoma is still debated. Diagnosis can be difficult given the slow rate of growth and nonspecific patient symptoms at presentation.Because of its rarity, literature about laryngeal chondrosarcoma is mainly made up of case reports and small case series.Therefore, it is important to add any information regarding this pathology.The aim of this article was to present and discuss a new case of chondrosarcoma located in the thyroid cartilage in a 63-year-old woman. PMID:26267570

  12. Chondrosarcoma of the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Tadashi; Sasaki, Tomio; Takakura, Kintomo; Ishida, Tsuyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Five patients with chondrosarcoma, grade I or II, and one with mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the skull base were treated at our clinic between 1967 and 1991. The patients were three men and three women who ranged in age from 21 to 39 years. The presenting symptoms were diplopia, decreased visual acuity, or symptoms of involvement of VIIIth and lower cranial nerves. The duration of the symptoms ranged from 18 months to 14 years. A plain skull x-ray and tomography of the skull, computed tomographic (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed a calcified mass. Angiograms showed an occlusion of the arteries or venous sinuses, or both, in four patients, and a distinct tumor stain in one. The tumors were subtotally removed in all six cases. Two patients received postoperative irradiation for the residual tumor. In one patient, extraocular movement was compromised postoperatively, although in the other five patients there was no aggravation of the neurologic signs. Follow-up CT scans and MRI demonstrated no recurrent tumors nor any enlargement of residual tumors. Based on these findings, we advocate aggressive surgical removal of these tumors, which should be augmented by radiation therapy if the postoperative CT scans or MRI reveal residual tumors. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17170863

  13. Diagnostic pitfall in the diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma arising in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lisa; Varikatt, Winny; Dexter, Mark; Ng, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm typically affecting the bones of young adults. It may also arise in somatic soft tissue, the CNS and other organs. It has a characteristic biphasic histological pattern composed of highly undifferentiated small round cells and islands of well-differentiated hyaline cartilage. We report a case of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma arising from the right tentorium cerebelli in a 21-year-old woman with symptoms relating to mass effect. Histological examination demonstrated a purely small round cell appearance in a specimen obtained during partial resection at an outside institution, leading to an erroneous diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). The diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma was made only after tissue obtained during a definitive complete macroscopic removal involving the regional tentorium cerebelli, transverse and sigmoid dural venous sinuses which showed a prominent cartilaginous component. We discuss the features of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma arising in the CNS, the important differential diagnoses of small round-cell tumors within the CNS, and the differentiating features of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma from Ewing sarcoma/PNET, medulloblastoma, hemangiopericytoma, monophasic synovial sarcoma and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour. PMID:21615516

  14. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  15. Chondrosarcoma

    MedlinePlus

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  16. In vitro Cell Migration and Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V.

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup. PMID:24962652

  17. Lymphatic endothelial cells actively regulate prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tariq; Wildes, Flonne; Kakkad, Samata; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels serve as the primary route for metastatic spread to lymph nodes. However, it is not clear how interactions between cancer cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), especially within hypoxic microenvironments, affect the invasion of cancer cells. Here, using an MR compatible cell perfusion assay, we investigated the role of LEC-prostate cancer (PCa) cell interaction in the invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by two human PCa cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, under normoxia and hypoxia, and determined the metabolic changes that occurred under these conditions. We observed a significant increase in the invasion of ECM by invasive PC-3 cells, but not poorly invasive DU-145 cells when human dermal lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-dlys) were present. Enhanced degradation of ECM by PC-3 cells in the presence of HMVEC-dlys identified interactions between HMVEC-dlys and PCa cells influencing cancer cell invasion. The enhanced ECM degradation was partly attributed to increased MMP-9 enzymatic activity in PC-3 cells when HMVEC-dlys were in close proximity. Significantly higher uPAR and MMP-9 expression levels observed in PC-3 cells compared to DU-145 cells may be one mechanism for increased invasion and degradation of matrigel by these cells irrespective of the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Hypoxia significantly decreased invasion by PC-3 cells, but this decrease was significantly attenuated when HMVEC-dlys were present. Significantly higher phosphocholine was observed in invasive PC-3 cells, while higher glycerophosphocholine was observed in DU-145 cells. These metabolites were not altered in the presence of HMVEC-dlys. Significantly increased lipid levels and lipid droplets were observed in PC-3 and DU-145 cells under hypoxia reflecting an adaptive survival response to oxidative stress. These results suggest that in vivo, invasive cells in or near lymphatic endothelial cells are likely to be more invasive and degrade the ECM

  18. MR-Guided Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of the Infratemporal Fossa and Orbit in Malignant Chondrosarcoma via a Modified Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Mack, Martin G.; Straub, Ralf; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan

    2001-12-15

    A 76-year-old patient presented with a recurrent mass of a malignant chondrosarcoma in the right infratemporal fossa and in the left maxillary sinus with orbital invasion. The patient was treated with a palliative intention with MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy using a modified applicator technique. Following treatment clinical symptoms improved and MRI revealed complete laser-induced tumor necrosis.

  19. Regulation of lamellipodia formation and cell invasion by CLIP-170 in invasive human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuo; Takahashi, Kazuhide

    2008-04-01

    Lamellipodia formation necessary for cell invasion is regulated by Rac1. We report here that lamellipodia formation and three-dimensional invasion were significantly promoted by HGF and serum, respectively, in invasive human breast cancer cells. Rac1 formed a complex with CLIP-170, IQGAP1, and kinesin in serum-starved cells, and stimulation of the cells with HGF and serum caused the partial release of IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1-CLIP-170 complex. The HGF-induced release of the proteins and promotion of lamellipodia formation were inhibited by an inhibitor of PI3K. Moreover, downregulation of CLIP-170 by siRNA released IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1 and promoted lamellipodia formation and invasion, independent of HGF and serum. The results suggest that promotion of lamellipodia formation and invasion by HGF or serum requires PI3K-dependent release of IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1-CLIP-170 complex and that CLIP-170 prevents cells from the extracellular stimulus-independent lamellipodia formation and invasion by tethering IQGAP1 and kinesin to Rac1. PMID:18237546

  20. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  1. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  2. Telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit expression is associated with chondrosarcoma malignancy.

    PubMed

    Martin, James A; DeYoung, Barry R; Gitelis, Steven; Weydert, Jamie A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Kurriger, Gail; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2004-09-01

    Expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase gene is associated with most human malignancies. Because telomerase reverse transcriptase is rarely expressed in normal tissue, its presence in pathologic specimens is considered a marker of transformed cells. Moreover, high levels of expression have been correlated with poor prognosis in many cancers. Although telomerase activity has been found in chondrosarcomas, its prognostic significance in these malignant cartilage tumors is unknown. Malignancy in cartilage-derived tumors is assessed routinely by histomorphologic grading, but even well differentiated, low-grade lesions can metastasize. This unpredictable behavior greatly complicates the clinical treatment of cartilage tumors, making better prognostic indicators desirable. To address this issue we used immunohistochemistry to compare telomerase reverse transcriptase expression in a collection of 61 tumors consisting of malignant chondrosarcomas of varying grade and benign enchondromas. Associated case histories were reviewed to test the hypothesis that telomerase reverse transcriptase expression levels correlated with subsequent tumor recurrence. We found that the relative abundance of telomerase reverse transcriptase-expressing cells correlated significantly with grade and recurrence. These findings indicate that telomerase reverse transcriptase immunostaining may be a useful adjunct to the conventional three-level grading system. PMID:15346061

  3. Excision of Thoracic Chondrosarcoma: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Le, Hai V; Wadhwa, Rishi; Theodore, Pierre; Mummaneni, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-matrix-forming tumors that make up 20-27% of primary malignant bone tumors and are the third most common primary bone malignancy after multiple myelomas and osteosarcomas. Radiographic assessment of this condition includes plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor characterization and delineation of intraosseous and extraosseous involvement. Most chondrosarcomas are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation therapy; therefore, wide en bloc surgical excision offers the best chance for cure. Chondrosarcomas frequently affect the pelvis and upper and lower extremities. In rare instances, the chest wall can be involved, with chondrosarcomas occurring in the ribs, sternum, anterior costosternal junction, and posterior costotransverse junction. In this article, we present a patient with thoracic chondrosarcoma centered at the left T7 costotransverse joint with effacement of the left T7-T8 neuroforamen. We also detail our operative technique of wide en bloc chondrosarcoma excision and review current literature on this topic. PMID:27588229

  4. Chondrosarcoma in Childhood: The Radiologic and Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Susan M.; Patel, Tanvi; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Less than 10% of chondrosarcomas occur in children. In addition, as little as 0.5% of low-grade chondrosarcomas arise secondarily from benign chondroid lesions. The presence of focal pain is often used to crudely distinguish a chondrosarcoma (which is usually managed with wide surgical excision), from a benign chondroid lesion (which can be followed by clinical exams and imaging surveillance). Given the difficulty of localizing pain in the pediatric population, initial radiology findings and short-interval follow-up, both imaging and clinical, are critical to accurately differentiate a chondrosarcoma from a benign chondroid lesion. To our knowledge, no case in the literature discusses a chondrosarcoma possibly arising secondarily from an enchondroma in a pediatric patient. We present a clinicopathologic and radiology review of conventional chondrosarcomas. We also attempt to further the understanding of how to manage a chondroid lesion in the pediatric patient with only vague or bilateral complaints of pain. PMID:23365701

  5. Chondrosarcoma in childhood: the radiologic and clinical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Susan M; Patel, Tanvi; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D

    2012-12-01

    Less than 10% of chondrosarcomas occur in children. In addition, as little as 0.5% of low-grade chondrosarcomas arise secondarily from benign chondroid lesions. The presence of focal pain is often used to crudely distinguish a chondrosarcoma (which is usually managed with wide surgical excision), from a benign chondroid lesion (which can be followed by clinical exams and imaging surveillance). Given the difficulty of localizing pain in the pediatric population, initial radiology findings and short-interval follow-up, both imaging and clinical, are critical to accurately differentiate a chondrosarcoma from a benign chondroid lesion. To our knowledge, no case in the literature discusses a chondrosarcoma possibly arising secondarily from an enchondroma in a pediatric patient. We present a clinicopathologic and radiology review of conventional chondrosarcomas. We also attempt to further the understanding of how to manage a chondroid lesion in the pediatric patient with only vague or bilateral complaints of pain. PMID:23365701

  6. Excision of Thoracic Chondrosarcoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Rishi; Theodore, Pierre; Mummaneni, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are cartilage-matrix-forming tumors that make up 20-27% of primary malignant bone tumors and are the third most common primary bone malignancy after multiple myelomas and osteosarcomas. Radiographic assessment of this condition includes plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor characterization and delineation of intraosseous and extraosseous involvement. Most chondrosarcomas are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation therapy; therefore, wide en bloc surgical excision offers the best chance for cure. Chondrosarcomas frequently affect the pelvis and upper and lower extremities. In rare instances, the chest wall can be involved, with chondrosarcomas occurring in the ribs, sternum, anterior costosternal junction, and posterior costotransverse junction. In this article, we present a patient with thoracic chondrosarcoma centered at the left T7 costotransverse joint with effacement of the left T7-T8 neuroforamen. We also detail our operative technique of wide en bloc chondrosarcoma excision and review current literature on this topic.

  7. Target selection: invasion, mapping and cell choice.

    PubMed

    Holt, C E; Harris, W A

    1998-02-01

    Recent research has shown that changes in the concentration of particular molecules lead axons to invade their target, and that concentration changes in other molecules at the borders of the target prevent axons from leaving the target area. After invasion, topographic and lamina-specific cues guide axons to the correct location within the target field. At the level of a single cell or part of a cell, the evidence raises the possibility that axon targeting might be a combinatorial affair whereby specific axons compare the relative concentrations of several molecules on the surface of postsynaptic cells in order to choose a particular target. Both proteins and carbohydrates of various classes play major roles in these processes. PMID:9568397

  8. Sublethal irradiation promotes invasiveness of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigerer, Lothar; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hecht, Monica . E-mail: monica.hecht@med.uni-goettingen.de

    2005-05-13

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Despite multiple clinical efforts, clinical outcome has remained poor. Neuroblastoma is considered to be radiosensitive, but some clinical studies including the German trial NB90 failed to show a clinical benefit of radiation therapy. The mechanisms underlying this apparent discrepancy are still unclear. We have therefore investigated the effects of radiation on neuroblastoma cell behaviour in vitro. We show that sublethal doses of irradiation up-regulated the expression of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met in some neuroblastoma cell lines. The increase in HGF/c-Met expression was correlated with enhanced invasiveness and activation of proteases degrading the extracellular matrix. Thus, irradiation at sublethal doses may promote the metastatic dissemination of neuroblastoma cells through activating the HGF/c-Met pathway and triggering matrix degradation.

  9. The utility of SATB2 immunohistochemical expression in distinguishing between osteosarcomas and their malignant bone tumor mimickers, such as Ewing sarcomas and chondrosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Machado, Isidro; Navarro, Samuel; Picci, Piero; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    SATB2 is commonly expressed in osteosarcomas. Although apparently being a valuable diagnostic marker for differentiating between small cell osteosarcoma (SCO) and other small round cell tumors of bone, for instance Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT), it has not been tested in a large series of ESFT and chondrosarcomas so far. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of SATB2 in 42 osteosarcomas, 31 chondrosarcomas, and 371 genetically confirmed ESFT. SATB2 positivity was detected in 90.4% of osteosarcomas, 87.5% of SCO, 91.3% of osteoblastic osteosarcomas, and in all chondroblastic and parosteal osteosarcomas. The osteoblastic and SCO subtypes expressed SATB2 more intensely than other histological types. SATB2 was expressed in 46.6% of chondrosarcomas, and in 1.3% of ESFT. Sensitivity and specificity of SATB2 immunoexpression were 90.4% and 95.3%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values in osteosarcoma diagnosis were 66.6% and 98.9%, respectively. In chondrosarcoma, SATB2 immunoexpression was more frequent and intense in high-grade chondrosarcoma (Grade III) and uncommon in chondrosarcoma grade I. SATB2 positivity was detected in 55.6% of chondrosarcomas grade II. SATB2 apparently cannot distinguish between chondroblastic osteosarcoma and high-grade chondrosarcoma. Nevertheless, SATB2 is frequently expressed in osteogenic tumors, but is rarely positive in ESFT, and with the support of CD99 expression and specific molecular studies, it is very useful for distinguishing between these two lesions. Although SATB2 immunoexpression helps to distinguish osteosarcoma from their mimickers, the identification of malignant osteoid matrix formation and the integration of clinical and radiological data remain the corner stone of osteosarcoma diagnosis and as yet no antibody has equalled the diagnostic value of this important morphologic hallmark. PMID:27465835

  10. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells. PMID:26329158

  11. Adiponectin promotes VEGF-A-dependent angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma through PI3K, Akt, mTOR, and HIF-α pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Jhao-Sheng; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Li, Te-Mao; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a type of highly malignant tumor with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted predominantly by differentiated adipocytes. On the other hand, angiogenesis is a critical step in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the relationship of adiponectin with vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma is mostly unknown. In this study we first demonstrated that the expression of adiponectin was correlated with tumor stage of human chondrosarcoma tissues. In addition, we also found that adiponectin increased VEGF-A expression in human chondrosarcoma cells and subsequently induced migration and tube formation in human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Adiponectin promoted VEGF-A expression through adiponectin receptor (AdipoR), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF)-1α signaling cascades. Knockdown of adiponectin decreased VEGF-A expression and also abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated tube formation in EPCs in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mice model in vivo. Therefore, adiponectin is crucial for tumor angiogenesis and growth, which may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy in human chondrosarcoma. PMID:26468982

  12. Response of conventional chondrosarcoma to gemcitabine alone: a case report.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Morosi, Carlo; Ghilardi, Mara; Collini, Paola; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Conventional skeletal chondrosarcoma is a bone neoplasm, which is poorly sensitive to anthracyclines-based chemotherapy. We report on an 18-month-long tumour response to gemcitabine as single agent in a young patient with an advanced secondary peripheral conventional chondrosarcoma, previously treated unsuccessfully with anthracyclines, ifosfamide, platinum, etoposide. PMID:25793102

  13. Rapid malignant transformation of primary synovial chondromatosis into chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, J; Shahabpour, M; Willekens, I; Pouliart, N; Dezillie, M; Vanhoenacker, F; De Mey, J

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the synovium is rare. It may arise de novo from the synovium or pre-existing synovial chondro- matosis may undergo malignant transformation into chondrosarcoma. Diagnosing a malignant transformation of the synovium remains a big challenge. It is based on the correlation of clinical findings, imaging and histology, as illustrated in this case report. PMID:25597214

  14. Cell-ECM Interactions During Cancer Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), a fibrous material that forms a network in a tissue, significantly affects many aspects of cellular behavior, including cell movement and proliferation. Transgenic mouse tumor studies indicate that excess collagen, a major component of ECM, enhances tumor formation and invasiveness. Clinically, tumor associated collagen signatures are strong markers for breast cancer survival. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear since the properties of ECM are complex, with diverse structural and mechanical properties depending on various biophysical parameters. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic fiber network model, and parameterized it with in vitro collagen mechanics. Using this model, we study ECM remodeling as a result of local deformation and cell migration through the ECM as a network percolation problem. We have also developed a three-dimensional, multiscale model of cell migration and interaction with ECM. Our model reproduces quantitative single cell migration experiments. This model is a first step toward a fully biomechanical cell-matrix interaction model and may shed light on tumor associated collagen signatures in breast cancer. This work was partially supported by NIH-U01CA143069.

  15. Role for different cell proteinases in cancer invasion and cytolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, S.; Beck, G.; DiStefano, J. F.; Lysik, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The crucial role of non-plasminogen dependent serine proteinases is tissue invasive and cytolytic functions of Walker 256 cancer cells has been documented using a rat urinary bladder invasion and a 125I-labelled fibroblast cytolysis assay. The invasive capacity of these cancer cells was abrogated by non toxic concentrations of the serine proteinase inhibitors, diisopropylfluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, but not by metallo or cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Although tumour cell collagenase activity and plasminogen activator were demonstrated, these proteolytic enzymes were not essential in these in vitro assays. These results suggest that different categories of proteinases play specific roles in the complicated process of cancer invasion. PMID:2992566

  16. Glandular differentiation in dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma: molecular evidence of a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Jour, George; Liu, Yajuan; Ricciotti, Robert; Pritchard, Colin; Hoch, Benjamin L

    2015-09-01

    Epithelial glandular differentiation in dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma has not been described. Our patient was a 64-year-old man with a history of prostate cancer status post-radiation and hormonal therapy. On screening bone scan, he was found to have increased uptake in his right femoral shaft. Biopsy revealed intermediate-grade conventional chondrosarcoma. Subsequent femoral resection was remarkable for an intermediate-grade chondrosarcomatous component juxtaposed to an area composed of anastomosing nests and cords of malignant epithelial cells showing nuclear atypia and increased mitotic activity. A fibroblastic-appearing spindle cell population was intimately associated with the epithelial cells. The epithelial cells labeled with 34bE12, AE1/AE3, EMA, and Vimentin (both spindled and epithelial components) while being negative for prostate-specific antigen, prostate specific acid phosphatase, cytokeratin 20, thyroid transcription factor-1, and CDX2. The patient developed local recurrence 9 months after the initial resection but has had no metastatic disease and consistently undetectable prostate-specific antigen levels. Deep parallel sequencing of the dedifferentiated component showed a nonsynonymous mutation at exon 4 of IDH1 gene at codon R132 leading to a substitution of arginine, with serine confirming glandular differentiation in dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. PMID:26198745

  17. Carbon ion radiotherapy of skull base chondrosarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela . E-mail: Daniela.Ertner@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Hof, Holger; Didinger, Bernd; Combs, Stephanie E.; Jaekel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of carbon ion radiotherapy in chondrosarcomas of the skull base. Patients and Methods: Between November 1998 and September 2005, 54 patients with low-grade and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base have been treated with carbon ion radiation therapy (RT) using the raster scan technique at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. All patients had gross residual tumors after surgery. Median total dose was 60 CGE (weekly fractionation 7 x 3.0 CGE). All patients were followed prospectively in regular intervals after treatment. Local control and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE v.3.0) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) score. Results: Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 3-84 months). Only 2 patients developed local recurrences. The actuarial local control rates were 96.2% and 89.8% at 3 and 4 years; overall survival was 98.2%at 5 years. Only 1 patient developed a mucositis CTCAE Grade 3; the remaining patients did not develop any acute toxicities >CTCAE Grade 2. Five patients developed minor late toxicities (RTOG/EORTC Grades 1-2), including bilateral cataract (n = 1), sensory hearing loss (n = 1), a reduction of growth hormone (n = 1), and asymptomatic radiation-induced white matter changes of the adjacent temporal lobe (n = 2). Grade 3 late toxicity occurred in 1 patient (1.9%) only. Conclusions: Carbon ion RT is an effective treatment for low- and intermediate-grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base offering high local control rates with low toxicity.

  18. Chondrosarcoma of larynx; computerized tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, B.; Nussbaum, M.; Smulewicz, J.J.

    1982-02-01

    A case of chondrosarcoma of the larynx has been presented. CT (computed tomography), a noninvasive technique, offers visualization of the larynx in a transaxial plane not possible by any other radiologic procedure. The combination of transaxial, coronal, and sagittal planes accurately delineates the origin, extension of the tumor, the presence of calcifications, and involvement of regional nodes. This information is very important both prognostically and preoperatively, particularly in cases of cartilaginous lesions of the larynx where conservative surgery is necessary to maintain laryngeal function.

  19. Cancer Cell Invasion: Treatment and Monitoring Opportunities in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Cell invasion is an intrinsic cellular pathway whereby cells respond to extracellular stimuli to migrate through and modulate the structure of their extracellular matrix (ECM) in order to develop, repair, and protect the body’s tissues. In cancer cells this process can become aberrantly regulated and lead to cancer metastasis. This cellular pathway contributes to the vast majority of cancer related fatalities, and therefore has been identified as a critical therapeutic target. Researchers have identified numerous potential molecular therapeutic targets of cancer cell invasion, yet delivery of therapies remains a major hurdle. Nanomedicine is a rapidly emerging technology which may offer a potential solution for tackling cancer metastasis by improving the specificity and potency of therapeutics delivered to invasive cancer cells. In this review we examine the biology of cancer cell invasion, its role in cancer progression and metastasis, molecular targets of cell invasion, and therapeutic inhibitors of cell invasion. We then discuss how the field of nanomedicine can be applied to monitor and treat cancer cell invasion. We aim to provide a perspective on how the advances in cancer biology and the field of nanomedicine can be combined to offer new solutions for treating cancer metastasis. PMID:21295093

  20. Radionuclide bone scanning of medullary chondrosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.; Chew, F.S.; Manaster, B.J.

    1982-12-01

    /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans of 18 medullary chondrosarcomas of bone were correlated with pathologic macrosections of the resected tumors. There was increased scan uptake by all 18 tumors, and the uptake in 15 scans corresponded accurately to the anatomic extent of the tumors. Only three scans displayed increased uptake beyond the true tumor margins; thus, the extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor extent is much less common in medullary chondrosarcomas than in many other primary bone tumors. Therefore, increased uptake beyond the apparent radiographic margin of the tumor suggests possible occult tumor spread. Pathologically, there was intense reactive new bone formation and hyperemia around the periphery of all 18 tumors, and there were foci of enchondral ossification, hyperemia, or calcification within the tumor itself in nearly every tumor. Three scans displayed less uptake in the center of the tumors than around their peripheries. One of these tumors was necrotic in the center, but the other two were pathologically no different from tumors that displayed homogeneous uptake on the scan.

  1. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  2. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  3. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  4. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M.; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  5. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Lead the Invasion of Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Cells by Creating an Invasive Track

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Jia, Zhuqiang; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Fuyin; Fang, Shimeng; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Wuwei; Yang, Xuesong; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Liu, Tingjiao

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are critical in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. However the role of CAFs in the invasion of salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is poorly understood. In this study, we isolated primary CAFs from two ACC patients. ACC-derived CAFs expressed typical CAF biomarkers and showed increased migration and invasion activity. Conditioned medium collected from CAFs significantly promoted ACC cell migration and invasion. Co-culture of CAFs with ACC cells in a microfluidic device further revealed that CAFs localized at the invasion front and ACC cells followed the track behind the CAFs. Interfering of both matrix metalloproteinase and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway inhibited ACC invasion promoted by CAFs. Overall, our study demonstrates that ACC-derived CAFs exhibit the most important defining feature of CAFs by promoting cancer invasion. In addition to secretion of soluble factors, CAFs also lead ACC invasion by creating an invasive track in the ECM. PMID:26954362

  6. Conservative cricoid surgery for chondrosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaio, Elena; Maggiore, Giandomenico; Canesso, Alessandra; Artico, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    We present the case of a 39-year-old man who presented with hoarseness and progressively worsening dyspnea. Findings on laryngoscopy and computed tomography strongly suggested the presence of a chondrosarcoma. The patient underwent open surgery for removal of the lesion with wide margins. Reconstruction was carried out with two segments of costal cartilage. Laryngeal chondrosarcomas are rare, malignant, usually well-differentiated neoplasms that should be treated with conservative surgery. Recurrences should be treated more aggressively. PMID:24526490

  7. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  8. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges. PMID:6593035

  9. Common pathways regulate Type III TGFβ receptor-dependent cell invasion in epicardial and endocardial cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia R; Robinson, Jamille Y; Sanchez, Nora S; Townsend, Todd A; Arrieta, Julian A; Merryman, W David; Trykall, David Z; Olivey, Harold E; Hong, Charles C; Barnett, Joey V

    2016-06-01

    Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation (EMT) and the subsequent invasion of epicardial and endocardial cells during cardiac development is critical to the development of the coronary vessels and heart valves. The transformed cells give rise to cardiac fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells or valvular interstitial cells, respectively. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβR3) receptor regulates EMT and cell invasion in both cell types, but the signaling mechanisms downstream of TGFβR3 are not well understood. Here we use epicardial and endocardial cells in in vitro cell invasion assays to identify common mechanisms downstream of TGFβR3 that regulate cell invasion. Inhibition of NF-κB activity blocked cell invasion in epicardial and endocardial cells. NF-κB signaling was found to be dysregulated in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells which also show impaired cell invasion in response to ligand. TGFβR3-dependent cell invasion is also dependent upon Activin Receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) 2, ALK3, and ALK5 activity. A TGFβR3 mutant that contains a threonine to alanine substitution at residue 841 (TGFβR3-T841A) induces ligand-independent cell invasion in both epicardial and endocardial cells in vitro. These findings reveal a role for NF-κB signaling in the regulation of epicardial and endocardial cell invasion and identify a mutation in TGFβR3 which stimulates ligand-independent signaling. PMID:26970186

  10. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Invasion through Ear Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Julie; Malone, C. Helen; Kelly, Brent; Wagner, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the ear represents a high-risk tumor location with an increased risk of metastasis and local tissue invasion. However, it is uncommon for these cancers to invade through nearby cartilage. Cartilage invasion is facilitated by matrix metalloproteases, specifically collagenase 3. We present the unusual case of a 76-year-old man with an auricular squamous cell carcinoma that exhibited full-thickness perforation of the scapha cartilage. Permanent sections through the eroded cartilage confirmed tumor invasion extending to the posterior ear skin. PMID:27293916

  11. Invasion of Ureaplasma diversum in Hep-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding mollicutes is challenging due to their variety and relationship with host cells. Invasion has explained issues related to their opportunistic role. Few studies have been done on the Ureaplasma diversum mollicute, which is detected in healthy or diseased bovine. The invasion in Hep-2 cells of four clinical isolates and two reference strains of their ureaplasma was studied by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and gentamicin invasion assay. Results The isolates and strains used were detected inside the cells after infection of one minute without difference in the arrangement for adhesion and invasion. The adhesion was scattered throughout the cells, and after three hours, the invasion of the ureaplasmas surrounded the nuclear region but were not observed inside the nuclei. The gentamicin invasion assay detected that 1% of the ATCC strains were inside the infected Hep-2 cells in contrast to 10% to the clinical isolates. A high level of phospholipase C activity was also detected in all studied ureaplasma. Conclusions The results presented herein will help better understand U. diversum infections, aswell as cellular attachment and virulence. PMID:20236540

  12. Invasion of Aortic and Heart Endothelial Cells by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajashri G.; Khan, Mahfuz B.; Attardo Genco, Caroline

    1998-01-01

    Invasion of host cells is believed to be an important strategy utilized by a number of pathogens, which affords them protection from the host immune system. The connective tissues of the periodontium are extremely well vascularized, which allows invading microorganisms, such as the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, to readily enter the bloodstream. However, the ability of P. gingivalis to actively invade endothelial cells has not been previously examined. In this study, we demonstrate that P. gingivalis can invade bovine and human endothelial cells as assessed by an antibiotic protection assay and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. P. gingivalis A7436 was demonstrated to adhere to and to invade fetal bovine heart endothelial cells (FBHEC), bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Invasion efficiencies of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% were obtained with BAEC, HUVEC, and FBHEC, respectively. Invasion of FBHEC and BAEC by P. gingivalis A7436 assessed by electron microscopy revealed the formation of microvillus-like extensions around adherent bacteria followed by the engulfment of the pathogen within vacuoles. Invasion of BAEC by P. gingivalis A7436 was inhibited by cytochalasin D, nocodazole, staurosporine, protease inhibitors, and sodium azide, indicating that cytoskeletal rearrangements, protein phosphorylation, energy metabolism, and P. gingivalis proteases are essential for invasion. In contrast, addition of rifampin, nalidixic acid, and chloramphenicol had little effect on invasion, indicating that bacterial RNA, DNA, and de novo protein synthesis are not required for P. gingivalis invasion of endothelial cells. Likewise de novo protein synthesis by endothelial cells was not required for invasion by P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis 381 was demonstrated to adhere to and to invade BAEC (0.11 and 0.1% efficiency, respectively). However, adherence and invasion of the corresponding fimA mutant DPG3, which

  13. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Hauptman, Jason S.; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael; De Salles, Antonio A.F.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  14. Microfluidic cytometric analysis of cancer cell transportability and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Lee, Yeonju; Jang, Joon hee; Li, Ying; Han, Xin; Yokoi, Kenji; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhou, Ledu; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    The extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of cancer cells plays an important role in tumor progression and therapeutic resistance. Characterizing this heterogeneity and identifying invasive phenotype may provide possibility to improve chemotherapy treatment. By mimicking cancer cell perfusion through circulatory system in metastasis, we develop a unique microfluidic cytometry (MC) platform to separate cancer cells at high throughput, and further derive a physical parameter ‘transportability’ to characterize the ability to pass through micro-constrictions. The transportability is determined by cell stiffness and cell-surface frictional property, and can be used to probe tumor heterogeneity, discriminate more invasive phenotypes and correlate with biomarker expressions in breast cancer cells. Decreased cell stiffness and cell-surface frictional force leads to an increase in transportability and may be a feature of invasive cancer cells by promoting cell perfusion through narrow spaces in circulatory system. The MC-Chip provides a promising microfluidic platform for studying cell mechanics and transportability could be used as a novel marker for probing tumor heterogeneity and determining invasive phenotypes. PMID:26404901

  15. The cytoskeleton significantly impacts invasive behavior of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Käs, Josef; Seltman, Kristin; Magin, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is a key determinant of cancer metastasis and nerve regeneration. The role of the cytoskeleton for the epithelial-meschenymal transition (EMT), i.e, for invasive behavior of cells, is only partially understood. Here, we address this issue in cells lacking all keratins upon genome engineering. In contrast to prediction, keratin-free cells show a 60% higher deformability compared to less pronounced softening effects for actin depolymerization. To relate these findings with functional consequences, we use invasion and three-dimensional growth assays. These reveal higher invasiveness of keratin-free cells. This study supports the view that downregulation of keratins observed during EMT directly contributes to the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells. Cancer cells that effectively move through tissues are softer and more contractile than cells that stay local in tissues. Soft and contractile avoids jamming. Naturally, softness has to have its limits. So neuronal growth cones are too soft to carry large loads to move efficiently through scar tissue, which is required for nerve regeneration. In synopsis, the physical bounds that the functional modules of a moving cell experience in tissues may provide an overarching motif for novel approaches in diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Inactivation of Rb in stromal fibroblasts promotes epithelial cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Adam; Cichon, Ann-Christin; Barry, Anna; Kieran, Declan; Patel, Daksha; Hamilton, Peter; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; James, Jacqueline; McCance, Dennis J

    2012-07-18

    Stromal-derived growth factors are required for normal epithelial growth but are also implicated in tumour progression. We have observed inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), through phosphorylation, in cancer-associated fibroblasts in oro-pharyngeal cancer specimens. Rb is well known for its cell-autonomous effects on cancer initiation and progression; however, cell non-autonomous functions of Rb are not well described. We have identified a cell non-autonomous role of Rb, using three-dimensional cultures, where depletion of Rb in stromal fibroblasts enhances invasive potential of transformed epithelia. In part, this is mediated by upregulation of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is produced by the depleted fibroblasts. KGF drives invasion of epithelial cells through induction of MMP1 expression in an AKT- and Ets2-dependent manner. Our data identify that stromal fibroblasts can alter the invasive behaviour of the epithelium, and we show that altered expression of KGF can mediate these functions. PMID:22643222

  17. Requirement of cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandins for human prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Isbell, Marilyn A; Lindholm, Paul F; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Kaul, Sushma; Campell, William B

    2002-01-01

    The PC-3 Low Invasive cells and the PC-3 High Invasive cells were used to investigate the correlation of the COX-2 expression and its arachidonic acid metabolites, prostaglandins, with their invasiveness through Matrigel using a Boyden chamber assay. The COX-2 expression in PC-3 High Invasive cells was approximately 3-fold higher than in PC-3 Low Invasive cells while the COX-1 expression was similar in both cell sublines. When incubated with arachidonic acid, PGE2 was the major prostaglandin produced by these cells. PC-3 High Invasive cells produced PGE2 approximately 2.5-fold higher than PC-3 Low Invasive cells. PGD2 was the second most abundant prostaglandin produced by these cells. Both indomethacin (a nonspecific COX inhibitor) and NS-398 (a specific COX-2 inhibitor) inhibited the production of prostaglandins and the cell invasion. PGE2 alone did not induce the cell invasion of PC-3 Low Invasive cells. However, PGE2 reversed the inhibition of cell invasion by NS-398 and enhanced the cell invasion of the PC-3 High Invasive cells. In contrast, PGD2 slightly inhibited the cell invasion. These results suggest that in the PC-3 Low Invasive cells, COX-2-derived PGE2 may not be sufficient to induce cell invasion while in the PC-3 High Invasive cells, PGE2 may be sufficient to act as an enhancer for the cell invasion. Further, PGD2 may represent a weak inhibitor and counteracts the effect of PGE2 in the cell invasion. PMID:12498388

  18. Chondrosarcoma of the radius with distant metastasis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Boudrieau, R J; Schelling, S H; Pisanelli, E R

    1994-08-15

    A 9-year-old castrated male Doberman Pinscher was admitted for evaluation of lameness of the left forelimb. Radiography and examination of biopsy specimens revealed a moderately differentiated chondrosarcoma of the proximal portion of the radius. The dog was treated by local excision of the neoplasm, which involved resection of the radial head and proximal portion of the radius. Despite the large size of the dog and the weight-bearing forces exerted on the cubital joint, major problems with ambulation did not develop after surgery. Functional use of the limb returned slowly; however, substantial limb use was observed despite the development of mild degenerative changes of the joint and migration of the humeroulnar articulation. Six months after surgery, metastasis of a widely disseminated, poorly differentiated chondrosarcoma to the subcutaneous tissues and thoracic and abdominal cavities was diagnosed. Local redevelopment of the chondrosarcoma in the area of the cubital joint was not detected. Resection of the radial head and proximal portion of the radius may be considered a viable, alternative, limb-sparing technique. The biologically aggressive nature of this chondrosarcoma of the appendicular skeleton indicated that additional information was needed before a reliable prognosis could be established for this dog with this tumor type. Reports of low rates of metastasis have been based on insufficient numbers of dogs to adequately or accurately determine the long-term prognosis of dogs with chondrosarcoma of the appendicular skeleton. PMID:7961094

  19. Cell growth density modulates cancer cell vascular invasion via Hippo pathway activity and CXCR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharif, G M; Schmidt, M O; Yi, C; Hu, Z; Haddad, B R; Glasgow, E; Riegel, A T; Wellstein, A

    2015-11-26

    Metastasis of cancer cells involves multiple steps, including their dissociation from the primary tumor and invasion through the endothelial cell barrier to enter the circulation and finding their way to distant organ sites where they extravasate and establish metastatic lesions. Deficient contact inhibition is a hallmark of invasive cancer cells, yet surprisingly the vascular invasiveness of commonly studied cancer cell lines is regulated by the density at which cells are propagated in culture. Cells grown at high density were less effective at invading an endothelial monolayer than cells grown at low density. This phenotypic difference was also observed in a zebrafish model of vascular invasion of cancer cells after injection into the yolk sac and extravasation of cancer cells into tissues from the vasculature. The vascular invasive phenotypes were reversible. A kinome-wide RNA interference screen was used to identify drivers of vascular invasion by panning small hairpin RNA (shRNA) library-transduced noninvasive cancer cell populations on endothelial monolayers. The selection of invasive subpopulations showed enrichment of shRNAs targeting the large tumor suppressor 1 (LATS1) kinase that inhibits the activity of the transcriptional coactivator yes-associated protein (YAP) in the Hippo pathway. Depletion of LATS1 from noninvasive cancer cells restored the invasive phenotype. Complementary to this, inhibition or depletion of YAP inhibited invasion in vitro and in vivo. The vascular invasive phenotype was associated with a YAP-dependent upregulation of the cytokines IL6, IL8 and C-X-C motif ligand 1, 2 and 3. Antibody blockade of cytokine receptors inhibited invasion and confirmed that they are rate-limiting drivers that promote cancer cell vascular invasiveness and could provide therapeutic targets. PMID:25772246

  20. Fat cell invasion in long-term denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rosa, Geraldo Marco; dos Santos, Nícolas Bertolaccini; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Lauris, José Roberto P

    2007-01-01

    There are several differences between red and white muscles submitted to different experimental conditions, especially following denervation: a) denervation atrophy is more pronounced in red than white muscles; b) the size of the fibers in the red muscles does not vary between different parts of the muscle before and after denervation, when compared to white muscles; c) the regional difference in the white muscles initially more pronounced after denervation than red muscle; d) red muscle fibers and fibers of the deep white muscle present degenerative changes such as disordered myofibrils and sarcolemmal folds after long-term denervation; e) myotube-like fibers with central nuclei occur in the red muscle more rapidly than white after denervation. Denervation of skeletal muscles causes, in addition to fibers atrophy, loss of fibers with subsequent regeneration, but the extent of fat cell percentage invasion is currently unknown. The present article describes a quantitative study on fat cell invasion percentage in red m. soleus and white m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL) rat muscles at 7 weeks for up to 32 weeks postdenervation. The results indicate that the percentage of fat cells increase after denervation and it is steeper than the age-related fat invasion in normal muscles. The fat percentage invasion is more pronounced in red compared with white muscle. All experimental groups present a statistically significant difference as regard fat cell percentage invasion. PMID:17941108

  1. Neuropeptide Y inhibits cholangiocarcinoma cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    DeMorrow, Sharon; Onori, Paolo; Venter, Julie; Invernizzi, Pietro; Frampton, Gabriel; White, Mellanie; Franchitto, Antonio; Kopriva, Shelley; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Francis, Heather; Coufal, Monique; Glaser, Shannon; Fava, Giammarco; Meng, Fanyin; Alvaro, Domenico; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    No information exists on the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cholangiocarcinoma growth. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and secretion of NPY and its subsequent effects on cholangiocarcinoma growth and invasion. Cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and nonmalignant cholangiocytes were used to assess NPY mRNA expression and protein secretion. NPY expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in human liver biopsies. Cell proliferation and migration were evaluated in vitro by MTS assays and matrigel invasion chambers, respectively, after treatment with NPY or a neutralizing NPY antibody. The effect of NPY or NPY depletion on tumor growth was assessed in vivo after treatment with NPY or the neutralizing NPY antibody in a xenograft model of cholangiocarcinoma. NPY secretion was upregulated in cholangiocarcinoma compared with normal cholangiocytes. Administration of exogenous NPY decreased proliferation and cell invasion in all cholangiocarcinoma cell lines studied and reduced tumor cell growth in vivo. In vitro, the effects of NPY on proliferation were blocked by specific inhibitors for NPY receptor Y2, but not Y1 or Y5, and were associated with an increase in intracellular d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and PKCα activation. Blocking of NPY activity using a neutralizing antibody promoted cholangiocarcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo and increased the invasiveness of cholangiocarcinoma in vitro. Increased NPY immunoreactivity in human tumor tissue occurred predominantly in the center of the tumor, with less expression toward the invasion front of the tumor. We demonstrated that NPY expression is upregulated in cholangiocarcinoma, which exerts local control on tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Modulation of NPY secretion may be important for the management of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:21270292

  2. Chondrosarcoma of the tibial head during pregnancy: a challenging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, Philip P; Schmitt, Jan; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Efe, Turgay

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is one of the most common malignant bone tumours in adults. However, it rarely occurs during pregnancy. Therefore, reports on surgical and medical management of this entity are hard to find. Different studies suggest a possible growth-enhancing effect of altered hormone levels on various bone tumours. The effect of pregnancy on growth characteristics of chondrosarcomas however remains unclear. We report a case of a 32-year-old pregnant woman with a newly occurred chondrosarcoma of the tibial head. Intense clinical monitoring and repeated MRI scans showed a tumour progression during pregnancy followed by the need of above-knee amputation after 30 weeks gestation. Spontaneous vaginal delivery after 38 weeks gestation was complicated by an amniotic infection syndrome and finally stopped, necessitating a caesarean section. Despite this there were no further complications to be mentioned. No local tumour recurrence or metastases could be detected in the staging CT scans following pregnancy. PMID:24981001

  3. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion. PMID:25881025

  4. Milk Modulates Campylobacter Invasion into Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Louwen, Rogier; van Neerven, R J Joost

    2015-09-01

    Raw milk is a recognized source of Campylobacter outbreaks, but pasteurization is an effective way to eliminate the causative agent of Campylobacteriosis. Whereas breastfeeding is protective against infectious diseases, consumption of formula milk is thought to be not. However, in relation to Campylobacter, such data is currently unavailable. Although both pasteurized and formula milk are pathogen free and prepared in a quality controlled manner, the effect they have on the virulence of Campylobacter species is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of cow, goat, horse, and formula milk on Campylobacter invasion into intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, a pathogenic feature of this bacterial species, using a gentamicin exclusion invasion assay. We found that all milk products modulated the invasion of Campylobacter species into the Caco-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Control experiments showed that the milks were not toxic for the Caco-2 cells and that the effect on invasion is caused by heat labile (e.g., milk proteins) or heat stable (e.g., sugar/lipids) components depending on the Campylobacter species studied. This in vitro study shows for the first time that pasteurized and formula milk affect the invasion of Campylobacter. We recommend a prospective study to examine whether pasteurized and formula milk affect Campylobacteriosis. PMID:26495128

  5. Milk Modulates Campylobacter Invasion into Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Louwen, Rogier; van Neerven, R. J. Joost

    2015-01-01

    Raw milk is a recognized source of Campylobacter outbreaks, but pasteurization is an effective way to eliminate the causative agent of Campylobacteriosis. Whereas breastfeeding is protective against infectious diseases, consumption of formula milk is thought to be not. However, in relation to Campylobacter, such data is currently unavailable. Although both pasteurized and formula milk are pathogen free and prepared in a quality controlled manner, the effect they have on the virulence of Campylobacter species is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of cow, goat, horse, and formula milk on Campylobacter invasion into intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, a pathogenic feature of this bacterial species, using a gentamicin exclusion invasion assay. We found that all milk products modulated the invasion of Campylobacter species into the Caco-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Control experiments showed that the milks were not toxic for the Caco-2 cells and that the effect on invasion is caused by heat labile (e.g., milk proteins) or heat stable (e.g., sugar/lipids) components depending on the Campylobacter species studied. This in vitro study shows for the first time that pasteurized and formula milk affect the invasion of Campylobacter. We recommend a prospective study to examine whether pasteurized and formula milk affect Campylobacteriosis. PMID:26495128

  6. Review of therapeutic strategies for osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing’s sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Ma, Wei; He, Xijing; Jha, Rajiv Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most prevalent forms of bone cancer are osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing’s sarcoma. Although chemotherapy and radiotherapy have replaced traditional surgical treatments, survival rates have undergone only marginal improvements. Current knowledge of the molecular pathways involved in each type of cancer has led to better approaches in cancer treatment. A number of cell signaling molecules are involved in tumorigenesis, and specific targets have been identified based on these signal transducers. This review highlights some of the important cellular pathways and potential therapeutic targets, tumor site-specific irradiation techniques, and novel drug delivery systems used to administer these drugs. PMID:21804475

  7. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Valencia, Angela M; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-12-22

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix. PMID:26528856

  8. Iron, inflammation and invasion of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER-FODOR, EVA; MIKLASOVA, NATALIA; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; SAHA, BHASKAR

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with the metastasis of tumor cells evolving from a benign tumor to disseminating cancer. Such a metastatic progression is fostered by the angiogenesis propelled by various mediators interacting at the site of tumor growth. Angiogenesis causes two major changes that are assisted by altered glycosylation and neo-antigen presentation by the cancer cells. The angiogenesis-promoted pathological changes include enhanced inflammation and degradation of tissue matrices releasing tumor cells from the site of its origin. The degraded tumor cells release the neo-antigens resulting from altered glycosylation. Presentation of neo-antigens to T cells escalates metastasis and inflammation. Inflammasome activation and inflammation in several infections are regulated by iron. Based on the discrete reports, we propose a link between iron, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor growth. Knowing the link better may help us formulate a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26609256

  9. Non-Invasive Optical Biosensor for Probing Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling mediated through a cellular target is encoded by spatial and temporal dynamics of downstream signaling networks. The coupling of temporal dynamics with spatial gradients of signaling activities guides cellular responses upon stimulation. Monitoring the integration of cell signaling in real time, if realized, would provide a new dimension for understanding cell biology and physiology. Optical biosensors including resonant waveguide grating (RWG) biosensor manifest a physiologically relevant and integrated cellular response related to dynamic redistribution of cellular matters, thus providing a non-invasive means for cell signaling study. This paper reviews recent progresses in biosensor instrumentation, and theoretical considerations and potential applications of optical biosensors for whole cell sensing.

  10. Biventricular metastatic invasion from cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Karan; Evans, Matthew C; Shkullaku, Melsjan; Schillinger, Rachel; White, Charles S; Roque, Dana M

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the heart has been previously described with primary lung and breast carcinoma, lymphoma, leukaemia, mesothelioma and melanoma. However, left-ventricular cardiac metastasis from primary cervical squamous cell carcinoma is poorly described. This report describes the clinical presentation of a patient with cardiac metastatic invasion from cervical cancer. PMID:27371746

  11. Epithelial cell invasion by bovine septicemic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Korth, M J; Lara, J C; Moseley, S L

    1994-01-01

    Little is known regarding the pathogenesis of Escherichia coli-induced septicemic colibacillosis of calves. To understand the mechanism by which these strains penetrate the intestinal epithelium and gain access to the bloodstream, we examined the potential of bovine septicemic E. coli to invade cultured epithelial cells. By using a gentamicin survival assay, we demonstrated bacterial invasion of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Transcytosis of polarized MDCK cell monolayers was also observed, but only when bacteria were added to the basolateral surface. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of intracellular organisms which appeared to be within membrane-bound vacuoles. The bovine septicemic isolate used in this study expressed the fimbrial adhesion CS31A. To examine the role of CS31A-mediated adherence in invasion and transcytosis of MDCK cell monolayers, a CS31A-deficient mutant was constructed by suicide vector-mediated insertional mutagenesis. Although nonadherent, the mutant showed a level of invasion similar to that of the wild-type parent. E. coli DH5 alpha carrying the cloned CS31A determinant was noninvasive. These findings suggest that expression of CS31A is neither required nor sufficient to mediate invasion. Images PMID:7903284

  12. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder with intravesical cervical invasion.

    PubMed

    Marchalik, Daniel; Krishnan, Jayashree; Verghese, Mohan; Venkatesan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a complicated urological and gynecological history with uterine didelphys with bilaterally inserting intravesical cervical oses presented with cyclical haematuria. Work up revealed a mass in the ectopic cervical os and adjacent bladder wall. Subsequent resection confirmed a clear cell adenocarcinoma of urological origin with invasion into neighbouring os. PMID:26109625

  13. The cell surface GRP78 facilitates the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Xiu; Li, Hong-Dan; Zhao, Song; Zhao, Liang; Song, Hui-Juan; Wang, Guan; Guo, Qing-Jun; Luan, Zhi-Dong; Su, Rong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Invasion is a major characteristic of hepatocellular carcinoma and one of the main causes of refractory to treatment. We have previously reported that GRP78 promotes the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma although the mechanism underlying this change remains uncertain. In this paper, we explored the role of the cell surface GRP78 in the regulation of cancer cell invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We found that neutralization of the endogenous cell surface GRP78 with the anti-GRP78 antibody inhibited the adhesion and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines Mahlavu and SMMC7721. However, forced expression of the cell surface GRP78 facilitated the adhesion and invasion in SMMC7721. We further demonstrated that inhibition of the endogenous cell surface GRP78 specifically inhibited the secretion and activity of MMP-2 but did not affect the secretion and activity of MMP-9. We also found that inhibition of the cell surface GRP78 increased E-Cadherin expression and decreased N-Cadherin level. On the contrary, forced expression of the cell surface GRP78 increased N-Cadherin expression and decreased E-Cadherin level, suggesting that the cell surface GRP78 plays critical role in the regulation of EMT process. These findings suggest that the cell surface GRP78 plays a stimulatory role in the invasion process and may be a potential anti-invasion target for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24383061

  14. Mechanical compression drives cancer cells toward invasive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Janet M.; Cheng, Gang; Tyrrell, James A.; Wilcox-Adelman, Sarah A.; Boucher, Yves; Jain, Rakesh K.; Munn, Lance L.

    2012-01-01

    Uncontrolled growth in a confined space generates mechanical compressive stress within tumors, but little is known about how such stress affects tumor cell behavior. Here we show that compressive stress stimulates migration of mammary carcinoma cells. The enhanced migration is accomplished by a subset of “leader cells” that extend filopodia at the leading edge of the cell sheet. Formation of these leader cells is dependent on cell microorganization and is enhanced by compressive stress. Accompanied by fibronectin deposition and stronger cell–matrix adhesion, the transition to leader-cell phenotype results in stabilization of persistent actomyosin-independent cell extensions and coordinated migration. Our results suggest that compressive stress accumulated during tumor growth can enable coordinated migration of cancer cells by stimulating formation of leader cells and enhancing cell–substrate adhesion. This novel mechanism represents a potential target for the prevention of cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:22203958

  15. TIMP3 regulates osteosarcoma cell migration, invasion, and chemotherapeutic resistances.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiu-Guo; Li, Yan; Mo, Hui-Min; Li, Kang; Lin, Du; Zhao, Chang-Qing; Zhao, Jie; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to limit degradation of the extracellular matrix. Low levels of TIMP3 have been demonstrated in cancer tissues at advanced clinical stages, with positive distant metastasis and chemotherapeutic resistance. We examined the role of TIMP3 in osteosarcoma (OS) cell invasiveness and chemoresistance. TIMP3 was overexpressed or knocked down in the human OS cell lines Saos2 and MG63. Cell migration and invasion capacities were then evaluated using Transwell assays, and resistance to cisplatin was assessed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to investigate activation of signaling pathways downstream of TIMP3. Overexpression of TIMP3 inhibited the migration and invasion of Saos2 and MG63 cells, while knockdown of TIMP3 had the opposite effect. Cell survival after exposure to cisplatin was inhibited by TIMP3 overexpression in both Saos2 and MG63 cells. Consistently, downregulation of TIMP3 gene expression significantly decreased the sensitivity of OS cells to cisplatin treatment. MMP1, MMP2, Bcl-2, and Akt1 were all downregulated following TIMP3 overexpression, while Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were upregulated. TIMP3 knockdown had opposite effects on the regulation of these genes. Taken together, our findings suggest TIMP3 as a new target for inhibition of OS progression and chemotherapeutic resistance. PMID:26749283

  16. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  17. Cathepsin B promotes colorectal tumorigenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Benjamin; Mongrain, Sébastien; Cagnol, Sébastien; Langlois, Marie‐Josée; Boulanger, Jim; Bernatchez, Gérald; Carrier, Julie C.; Boudreau, François

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a cysteine proteinase that primarily functions as an endopeptidase within endolysosomal compartments in normal cells. However, during tumoral expansion, the regulation of cathepsin B can be altered at multiple levels, thereby resulting in its overexpression and export outside of the cell. This may suggest a possible role of cathepsin B in alterations leading to cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intracellular and extracellular cathepsin B in growth, tumorigenesis, and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Results show that mRNA and activated levels of cathepsin B were both increased in human adenomas and in CRCs of all stages. Treatment of CRC cells with the highly selective and non‐permeant cathepsin B inhibitor Ca074 revealed that extracellular cathepsin B actively contributed to the invasiveness of human CRC cells while not essential for their growth in soft agar. Cathepsin B silencing by RNAi in human CRC cells inhibited their growth in soft agar, as well as their invasion capacity, tumoral expansion, and metastatic spread in immunodeficient mice. Higher levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 were observed in cathepsin B‐deficient tumors as well as an increase in cyclin B1. Finally, cathepsin B colocalized with p27Kip1 within the lysosomes and efficiently degraded the inhibitor. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that cathepsin B is a significant factor in colorectal tumor development, invasion, and metastatic spreading and may, therefore, represent a potential pharmacological target for colorectal tumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808857

  18. The Identification of Prognostic Factors and Survival Statistics of Conventional Central Chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nota, Sjoerd P. F. T.; Braun, Yvonne; Schwab, Joseph H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Bramer, Jos A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that are characterized by the production of chondroid tissue. Since radiation therapy and chemotherapy have limited effect on chondrosarcoma, treatment of most patients depends on surgical resection. We conducted this study to identify independent predictive factors and survival characteristics for conventional central chondrosarcoma and dedifferentiated central chondrosarcoma. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed in September 2014 using the Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Subsequent to a beforehand-composed selection procedure we included 13 studies, comprising a total of 1114 patients. Results. The prognosis of central chondrosarcoma is generally good for the histologically low-grade tumors. Prognosis for the high-grade chondrosarcoma and the dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma is poor with lower survival rates. Poor prognostic factors in conventional chondrosarcoma for overall survival are high-grade tumors and axial/pelvic tumor location. In dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma the percentage of dedifferentiated component has significant influence on disease-free survival. Conclusion. Despite the fact that there are multiple prognostic factors identified, as shown in this study, there is a need for prospective and comparative studies. The resulting knowledge about prognostic factors and survival can give direction in the development of better therapies. This could eventually lead to an evidence-based foundation for treating chondrosarcoma patients. PMID:26633939

  19. Non-invasive microsensors for studying cell/tissue physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Taguchi, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Burrs, S.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive tools that allow real-time quantification of molecules relevant to metabolism, homeostasis, and cell signaling in cells and tissue are of great importance for studying physiology. Several microsensor technologies have been developed to monitor concentration of molecules such as ions, oxygen, electroactive molecules (e.g., nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide), and biomolecules (e.g., sugars, hormones). The major challenges for microsensors are overcoming relatively low sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio. Modern approaches for enhancing microsensor performance focus on the incorporation of catalytic nanomaterials to increase sensitivity, reduce response time, and increase operating range. To improve signal-to-noise ratio, a non-invasive microsensor modality called self-referencing (SR) is being applied. The SR technique allows measurement of temporal and spatial transport dynamics at the cell, tissue, organ, and organismal level.

  20. Curcumin suppresses migration and invasion of human endometrial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QIAN; GAO, QING; CHEN, KUNLUN; WANG, YIDONG; CHEN, LIJUAN; LI, XU

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has historically been used in anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and molecular mechanism of curcumin in endometrial carcinoma (EC) are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin and the associated mechanism(s) in EC. Based on assays carried out in EC cell lines, it was observed that curcumin inhibited EC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, following treatment with curcumin for 24 h, there was a decrease in the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 as well as proteinase activity in EC cells. Moreover, curcumin treatment significantly decreased the levels of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. MEK1 overexpression partially blocked the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin. Combined treatment with ERK inhibitor U0126 and curcumin resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP-2/-9 expression; the invasive capabilities of HEC-1B cells were also inhibited. In conclusion, curcumin inhibits tumor cell migration and invasion by reducing the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 via the suppression of the ERK signaling pathway, suggesting that curcumin is a potential therapeutic agent for EC. PMID:26622667

  1. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  2. Migrastatin Analogues Inhibit Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V.; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. Results Our results showed that two of six fully synthetic analogues of migrastatin: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Conclusion Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in

  3. Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Bieri, Andrej; Brand, Françoise; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-23

    The fight against most infectious diseases, including malaria, is often hampered by the emergence of drug resistance and lack or limited efficacies of vaccines. Therefore, new drugs, vaccines, or other strategies to control these diseases are needed. Here, we present an innovative nanotechnological strategy in which the nanostructure itself represents the active substance with no necessity to release compounds to attain therapeutic effect and which might act in a drug- and vaccine-like dual function. Invasion of Plasmodium falciparum parasites into red blood cells was selected as a biological model for the initial validation of this approach. Stable nanomimics-polymersomes presenting receptors required for parasite attachment to host cells-were designed to efficiently interrupt the life cycle of the parasite by inhibiting invasion. A simple way to build nanomimics without postformation modifications was established. First, a block copolymer of the receptor with a hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and then mixed with a polymersome-forming block copolymer. The resulting nanomimics bound parasite-derived ligands involved in the initial attachment to host cells and they efficiently blocked reinvasion of malaria parasites after their egress from host cells in vitro. They exhibited efficacies of more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than the soluble form of the receptor, which can be explained by multivalent interactions of several receptors on one nanomimic with multiple ligands on the infective parasite. In the future, our strategy might offer interesting treatment options for severe malaria or a way to modulate the immune response. PMID:25435059

  4. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  5. TGFβ loss activates ADAMTS-1-mediated EGF-dependent invasion in a model of esophageal cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bras, Grégoire F.; Taylor, Chase; Koumangoye, Rainelli B.; Revetta, Frank; Loomans, Holli A.; Andl, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is essential to epithelial homeostasis and is often inhibited during progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Recently, an important role for TGFβ signaling has been described in the crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating squamous tumor cell invasion in mouse models of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Loss of TGFβ signaling, in either compartment, leads to HNSCC however, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Using organotypic reconstruct cultures (OTC) to model the interaction between epithelial and stromal cells that occur in dysplastic lesions, we show that loss of TGFβ signaling promotes an invasive phenotype in both fibroblast and epithelial compartments. Employing immortalized esophageal keratinocytes established to reproduce common mutations of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, we show that treatment of OTC with inhibitors of TGFβ signaling (A83-01 or SB431542) enhances invasion of epithelial cells into a fibroblast-embedded Matrigel/collagen I matrix. Invasion induced by A83-01 is independent of proliferation but relies on protease activity and expression of ADAMTS-1 and can be altered by matrix density. This invasion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1 and EGFR ligands HB-EGF and TGFα. Altering EGF signaling prevented or induced epithelial cell invasion in this model. Loss of expression of the TGFβ target gene ROBO1 suggested that chemorepulsion may regulate keratinocyte invasion. Taken together, our data show increased invasion through inhibition of TGFβ signaling altered epithelial-fibroblasts interactions, repressing markers of activated fibroblasts, and altering integrin-fibronectin interactions. These results suggest that inhibition of TGFβ signaling modulates an array of pathways that combined promote multiple aspects of tumor invasion. - Highlights: • Chemical inhibition of TGFβ signaling advances collective invasion

  6. BMPR2-pSMAD1/5 signaling pathway regulates RUNX2 expression and impacts the progression of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kang; Tang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiao-Long; Ren, Ting-Ting; Ren, Cong-Min; Wang, Shi-Dong; Bao, Xing; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Kun-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein receptors (BMPRs) are multifunctional proteins; they have indispensible roles in the process of BMP signaling. However, their function in dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma is uncertain. It has been reported that BMPR2 is associated with chondrosarcoma. Moreover, the detection of BMPR2 is more frequent in dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas (DDCS) than in conventional chondrosarcomas (CCS). BMPR2, phospho-SMAD1/5 (pSMAD1/5), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) expressions were found to be associated with the pathological grades of chondrosarcoma and could be a promising target of treatment outcome. Moreover, BMPR2 was found to induce the RUNX2 expression via pSmad1/5. Knockdown of BMPR2 and pSmad1/5 results in the downregulation of RUNX2 expression in DDCS cells, while the upregulation of BMPR2 and Smad1/5 in CCS cells leads to increased RUNX2 expression. The luciferase reporter gene assay suggested that BMPR2 can induce the RUNX2 expression at the transcriptional level. By chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), it was found that pSmad1/5 combined directly to RUNX2. The in vivo tumorigenicity assay in mice showed that the inhibition of BMPR2 or Smad1/5 in DDCS cell line reduced tumor growth, while the upregulation of BMPR2 or Smad1/5 in CCS cell line increased tumor growth. Furthermore, a BMPR signaling inhibitor, LDN-193189, was introduced to investigate its role as a potential drug to treat DDCS. Taken together, the present-study results suggest that BMPR2-pSmad1/5 signaling pathway has an important role in regulating not only the RUNX2 expression but also the tumorigenesis of DDCS. PMID:27429845

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  8. SENP1 regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang-Ming, Yan; Zhi-Qiang, Xu; Ting, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan; Li-Qun, Yuan; Ming-Cui, Fu; Hong-Liang, Xia; Xu, Cao; Yun, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is an embryonic solid tumor derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and accounts for 11% of childhood cancers and around 15% of cancer deaths in children. SUMOylation and deSUMOylation are dynamic mechanisms regulating a spectrum of protein activities. The SUMO proteases (SENP) remove SUMO conjugate from proteins, and their expression is deregulated in diverse cancers. However, nothing is known about the role of SENPs in NBL. In the present study, we found that SENP1 expression was significantly high in metastatic NB tissues compared with primary NB tissues. Overexpression of SENP1 promoted NB cells migration and invasion. Inhibition of SENP1 could significantly suppress NB cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that SENP1 could regulate the expression of CDH1, MMP9, and MMP2. In summary, the data presented here indicate a significant role of SENP1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in NB and suppress SENP1 expression as promising candidates for novel treatment strategies of NB. PMID:25816890

  9. Adhesion and invasion of bovine endothelial cells by Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A; Gottstein, B; Kaufmann, H

    1996-02-01

    Neospora caninum is a recently identified coccidian parasite which was, until 1988, misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. It causes paralysis and death in dogs and neonatal mortality and abortion in cattle, sheep, goats and horses. The life-cycle of Neospora has not yet been elucidated. The only two stages identified so far are tissue cysts and intracellularly dividing tachyzoites. Very little is known about the biology of this species. We have set up a fluorescence-based adhesion/invasion assay in order to investigate the interaction of N. caninum tachyzoites with bovine aorta endothelial (BAE) cells in vitro. Treatment of both host cells and parasites with metabolic inhibitors determined the metabolic requirements for adhesion and invasion. Chemical and enzymatic modifications of parasite and endothelial cell surfaces were used in order to obtain information on the nature of cell surface components responsible for the interaction between parasite and host. Electron microscopical investigations defined the ultrastructural characteristics of the adhesion and invasion process, and provided information on the intracellular development of the parasites. PMID:8851858

  10. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of collective cell invasion: tuning by ECM density and organization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kapoor, Aastha; Desai, Sejal; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Sen, Shamik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells manoeuvre through extracellular matrices (ECMs) using different invasion modes, including single cell and collective cell invasion. These modes rely on MMP-driven ECM proteolysis to make space for cells to move. How cancer-associated alterations in ECM influence the mode of invasion remains unclear. Further, the sensitivity of the two invasion modes to MMP dynamics remains unexplored. In this paper, we address these open questions using a multiscale hybrid computational model combining ECM density-dependent MMP secretion, MMP diffusion, ECM degradation by MMP and active cell motility. Our results demonstrate that in randomly aligned matrices, collective cell invasion is more efficient than single cell invasion. Although increase in MMP secretion rate enhances invasiveness independent of cell–cell adhesion, sustenance of collective invasion in dense matrices requires high MMP secretion rates. However, matrix alignment can sustain both single cell and collective cell invasion even without ECM proteolysis. Similar to our in-silico observations, increase in ECM density and MMP inhibition reduced migration of MCF-7 cells embedded in sandwich gels. Together, our results indicate that apart from cell intrinsic factors (i.e., high cell–cell adhesion and MMP secretion rates), ECM density and organization represent two important extrinsic parameters that govern collective cell invasion and invasion plasticity. PMID:26832069

  11. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Kristy A; Miyazawa, Marta; Cordeiro, Mabel M R; Love, William J; Pinsky, Matthew S; Neiva, Kathleen G; Spalding, Aaron C; Nör, Jacques E

    2008-01-01

    Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK) show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2), compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN). Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells. PMID:18283335

  12. Control of melanoma cell invasion by type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Sylvie; Brassart, Bertrand; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from diseases of the skin. This review summarizes the data from the literature and our laboratory addressing the effects of type IV collagen on melanoma progression. Many different sequences from type IV collagen promote melanoma cell adhesion, migration and invasion. The triple helical conformation of the collagenous domain plays a critical role in some of these interactions. However, recent studies from our group demonstrated that a sequence from the alpha3(IV) NC1 domain inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MMP production and activation. Peptide sequences from the alpha1(IV), alpha2(IV) and alpha3(IV) chains named arresten, canstatin and tumstatin, respectively were shown to inhibit angiogenesis. Further investigations regarding the inhibitory effects of the alpha(IV) NC1 domains will have a paramount relevance for the design of efficient strategies to limit melanoma development. PMID:15936594

  13. Overexpression of engulfment and cell motility 1 promotes cell invasion and migration of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiarui; Liu, Guoqing; Miao, Xiongying; Hua, Songwen; Zhong, Dewu

    2011-05-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1 (Elmo1) has been linked to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells. The use of Elmo1 inhibitors is currently being evaluated in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the molecular mechanisms of their therapeutic effect have yet to be determined. Elmo1 expression in HCC tissue samples from 131 cases and in 5 HCC cell lines was determined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. To functionally characterize Elmo1 in HCC, Elmo1 expression in the HCCLM3 cell line was blocked by siRNA. Cell migration was measured by wound healing and transwell migration assays in vitro. Elmo1 overexpression was significantly correlated with cell invasion and the poor prognosis of HCC. Elmo1-siRNA-treated HCCLM3 cells demonstrated a reduction in cell migration. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the suppression of Elmo1 expression inhibits cell invasion in HCC. PMID:22977532

  14. Role of ATF5 in the invasive potential of diverse human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nukuda, Akihiro; Endoh, Hiroki; Yasuda, Motoaki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2016-06-01

    Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein family. Our research group recently revealed that ATF5 expression increases the invasiveness of human lung carcinoma cells. However, the effects of ATF5 on the invasive potential of other cancer cells lines remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of ATF5 in the invasive activity of diverse human cancer cell lines. Invasiveness was assessed using Matrigel invasion assays. ATF5 knockdown resulted in decreased invasiveness in seven of eight cancer cell lines tested. These results suggest that ATF5 promotes invasiveness in several cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the roles of ATF5 in the invasiveness were evaluated in three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. In 3D collagen gel, HT-1080 and MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited high invasiveness, with spindle morphology and high invasion speed. In both cell lines, knockdown of ATF5 resulted in rounded morphology and decreased invasion speed. Next, we showed that ATF5 induced integrin-α2 and integrin-β1 expression and that the depletion of integrin-α2 or integrin-β1 resulted in round morphology and decreased invasion speed. Our results suggest that ATF5 promotes invasion by inducing the expression of integrin-α2 and integrin-β1 in several human cancer cell lines. PMID:27125458

  15. Positive association of long telomeres with the invasive capacity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyong; Jung, Guhung

    2014-05-01

    Invasion, the representative feature of malignant tumors, leads to an increase in mortality. The malignant liver tumor - hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - has an enhanced invasive capacity that results in increased patient mortality. Moreover, this enhanced invasive capacity is due to the up-regulation of invasion promoters such as zinc finger protein SNAI1 (Snail) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the down-regulation of invasion suppressor molecules such as E-cadherin. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), which encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is highly expressed in a variety of invasive cancers, including HCC. Telomerase activation induces telomere elongation, thereby leading to cell immortalization during malignant tumor progression. However, the relationship between telomere length and invasion is yet to be experimentally corroborated. In this paper, we revealed that invasive HCC cells passing through the Matrigel display significantly longer telomeres than non-invasive HCC cells. Moreover, we established a method that can distinguish and sort cells containing long telomeres and short telomeres. Using this system, we observed that the HCC cells containing long telomeres had a high-level expression of invasion-promoting genes and a low-level expression of invasion-suppressing E-cadherin. Furthermore, HCC cells containing long telomeres exhibited a higher invasive capacity than HCC cells containing short telomeres. Taken together, our findings suggest that long telomeres are positively associated with the invasive capacity of HCC cells and may be a potent target for malignant liver cancer treatment. PMID:24732358

  16. Biophysical regulation of tumor cell invasion: moving beyond matrix stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-04-01

    Invasion of cancer cells into the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key step in tumor infiltration and metastasis. While the strong influence of ECM stiffness in governing tumor cell migration has been well established in two-dimensional culture paradigms, investigation of this parameter in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs has proven considerably more challenging, in part because perturbations that change 3D ECM stiffness often concurrently change microscale matrix parameters that critically regulate cell migration, such as pore size, fiber architecture, and local material deformability. Here we review the potential importance of these parameters in the context of tumor cell migration in 3D ECMs. We begin by discussing biophysical mechanisms of cell motility in 3D ECMs, with an emphasis on the cell-matrix mechanical interactions that underlie this process and key signatures of mesenchymal and amoeboid modes of motility. We then consider microscale matrix physical properties that are particularly relevant to 3D culture and would be expected to regulate motility, including matrix microstructure and nonlinear elasticity. We also discuss how changes in 3D matrix properties might be expected to trigger transitions in subcellular mechanisms, which in turn contribute to mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) by imposing restrictions on 3D motility. We expect that the field will gain valuable insight into invasion and metastasis by deepening its understanding of microscale, biophysical interactions between tumor cells and matrix elements and by creating new 3D scaffolds that permit orthogonal manipulation of specific matrix parameters. PMID:21210057

  17. Gene expression profiles of human melanoma cells with different invasive potential reveal TSPAN8 as a novel mediator of invasion

    PubMed Central

    Berthier-Vergnes, O; Kharbili, M El; de la Fouchardière, A; Pointecouteau, T; Verrando, P; Wierinckx, A; Lachuer, J; Le Naour, F; Lamartine, J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Metastatic melanoma requires early detection, being treatment resistant. However, the earliest events of melanoma metastasis, and especially of dermal invasion, remain ill defined. Results and methods: Gene expression profiles of two clonal subpopulations, selected from the same human melanoma cell line, but differing in ability to cross the dermal–epidermal junction in skin reconstructs, were compared by oligonucleotide microarray. Of 26 496 cDNA probes, 461 were differentially expressed (>2-fold; P< 0.001), only 71 genes being upregulated in invasive cells. Among them, TSPAN8, a tetraspanin not yet described in melanoma, was upregulated at mRNA and protein levels in melanoma cells from the invasive clone, as assessed by RT–PCR, flow cytometry and western blot analysis. Interestingly, TSPAN8 was the only tetraspanin in which overexpression correlated with invasive phenotype. Flow cytometry of well-defined melanoma cell lines confirmed that TSPAN8 was exclusively expressed by invasive, but not non-invasive melanoma cells or normal melanocytes. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TSPAN8 was expressed by melanoma cells in primary melanomas and metastases, but not epidermal cells in healthy skin. The functional role of TSPAN8 was demonstrated by silencing endogenous TSPAN8 with siRNA, reducing invasive outgrowth from tumour spheroids within matrigel without affecting cell proliferation or survival. Conclusion: TSPAN8 expression may enable melanoma cells to cross the cutaneous basement membrane, leading to dermal invasion and progression to metastasis. TSPAN8 could be a promising target in early detection and treatment of melanoma. PMID:21081927

  18. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  19. The interplay between invasion and proliferation in tumor cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-03-01

    Tumor cells can employ different cellular and molecular modes of invasion. The two main phenotypic mechanisms are: 1. Amoeboid (or ``path finder'') cells that can squeeze through small gaps in the ECM (extracellular matrix). 2. Mesenchymal (or ``path generator'') cells that are more rigid and can decompose the ECM to pass through. In addition there is interplay between energy directed to more rapid motility vs. energy used for proliferation. Understanding the relative contributions of these distinct mechanisms and the balance between motility and proliferation to the efficiency of metastatic cancer migration is fundamental to the therapeutic targeting of cancer. We present a conceptual and modeling framework for the analysis and assessment of the success rate, time-to-target, and survival probability of amoeboid vs. mesenchymal modes. Similarly, we contrast invasion with and without proliferation. We treat the complex ECM geometry as a maze and employ semi-realistic modeling of cell motility. Our approach includes metabolic and timing degrees of freedom. The theoretical studies were compared with experimental efforts of cell navigation in specially designed microfluidic devices. Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-0822283) Rice University, The Tauber Family Foundation and the Maguy-Glass Chair in Physics of Complex Systems at Tel Aviv University.

  20. Successful management of an arytenoid chondrosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Muraro, L; Aprea, F; White, R A S

    2013-01-01

    An eight-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with a four-week history of inspiratory stridor, dysphonia, inappetence and weight loss. Inspiratory stridor was apparent and became more pronounced during gentle compression of the larynx. Previous investigations, including laryngoscopy, had revealed the presence of a left-sided arytenoid mass. Histological examination of pinch biopsies was not diagnostic. The mass was removed by resection of the arytenoid cartilage through a ventral laryngotomy allowing salvage of the cuneiform process. Histological examination of the laryngeal mass was consistent with a chondrosarcoma, grade I, infiltrating the arytenoid cartilage. Re-examination at 12 months showed complete resolution of the clinical signs and no signs of metastatic disease. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of successful surgical intervention for laryngeal chondrosarcoma. This case demonstrates that resection via a ventral laryngotomy may be a viable and curative therapeutic option for some sarcomas of the larynx. PMID:23039786

  1. Diagnosis and Outcome of Periosteal Chondrosarcoma in Two Cats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth; Fauber, Amy E; Pool, Roy R

    2016-01-01

    Two cats, both over 10 yr old, were presented for evaluation of non-painful bony proliferations on the appendicular skeleton. These proliferations were identifiable via palpation. Radiographs showed a smooth, proliferative bony lesion of the distal femur (case 1) and tarsus (case 2) with mild soft tissue swelling. Surgical debulking with incomplete resection was performed in each cat. Subsequent histopathology resulted in a diagnosis of periosteal chondrosarcoma (PC). Although both cats have experienced local recurrence, both are still alive more than 2.5 yr after mass debulking. Periosteal chondrosarcoma is a differential diagnosis in proliferative cortical bony lesions near an articular surface in older cats. Partial resection of these masses can lead to an excellent quality of life, and proper diagnosis can avoid amputation or even euthanasia. PMID:27487347

  2. Liver epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and invasiveness of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Jeng, Chi-Juei; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Sheen, I-Shyan; Li, Shih-Yun; Hung, Zih-Hang; Hsiau, Hsin-I; Yu, Ming-Che; Chang, Chiung-Fang

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a worldwide malignancy with poor prognosis. Liver progenitors or stem cells could be a potential therapy for HCC treatment since they migrate toward tumors. Rat liver epithelial (RLE) cells have both progenitor and stem cell-like properties. Therefore, our study elucidated the therapeutic effect of RLE cells in rat hepatoma cells. RLE cells were isolated from 10-day old rats and characterized for stem cell marker expression. RLE cells and rat hepatoma cells (H4-IIE-C3 cells) were co-cultured and divided into four groups with different ratios of RLE and hepatoma cells. Group A had only rat hepatoma cells as a control group. The ratios of rat hepatoma and RLE cells in group B, C and D were 5:1, 1:1 and 1:5, respectively. Effective inhibition of cell proliferation and migration was found in group D when compared to group A. There was a significant decrease in Bcl2 expression and increase in late apoptosis of rat hepatoma cells when adding more RLE cells. RLE cells reduced cell proliferation and migration of rat hepatoma cells. These results suggested that RLE cells could be used as a potential cell therapy. PMID:26647726

  3. Bacterial invasion of vascular cell types: vascular infectology and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kozarov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    To portray the chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis, leukocytic cell types involved in the immune response to invading pathogens are often the focus. However, atherogenesis is a complex pathological deterioration of the arterial walls, where vascular cell types are participants with regards to deterioration and disease. Since other recent reviews have detailed the role of both the innate and adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, herein we will summarize the latest developments regarding the association of bacteria with vascular cell types: infections as a risk factor for atherosclerosis; bacterial invasion of vascular cell types; the atherogenic sequelae of bacterial presence such as endothelial activation and blood clotting; and the identification of the species that are able to colonize this niche. The evidence of a polybacterial infectious component of the atheromatous lesions opens the doors for exploration of the new field of vascular infectology and for the study of atherosclerosis microbiome. PMID:22185451

  4. Schwann Cells Increase Prostate and Pancreatic Tumor Cell Invasion Using Laminin Binding A6 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Sroka, Isis C.; Chopra, Harsharon; Das, Lipsa; Gard, Jaime M.C.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Cress, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Human pancreatic and prostate cancers metastasize along nerve axons during perineural invasion. The extracellular matrix laminin class of proteins is an abundant component of both myelinated and non-myelinated nerves. Analysis of human pancreatic and prostate tissue revealed both perineural and endoneural invasion with Schwann cells surrounded or disrupted by tumor, respectively. Tumor and nerve cell co-culture conditions were used to determine if myelinating or non-myelinating Schwann cell (S16 and S16Y, respectively) phenotype was equally likely to promote integrin-dependent cancer cell invasion and migration on laminin. Conditioned medium from S16 cells increased tumor cell (DU145, PC3, and CFPAC1) invasion into laminin approximately 1.3–2.0 fold compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) treated cells. Integrin function (e.g., ITGA6p formation) increased up to 1.5 fold in prostate (DU145, PC3, RWPE-1) and pancreatic (CFPAC1) cells, and invasion was dependent on ITGA6p formation and ITGB1 as determined by function-blocking antibodies. In contrast, conditioned medium isolated from S16Y cells (non-myelinating phenotype) decreased constitutive levels of ITGA6p in the tumor cells by 50% compared to untreated cells and decreased ITGA6p formation 3.0 fold compared to S16 treated cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis revealed loss of ITGA6p formation as reversible and independent of overall loss of ITGA6 expression. These results suggest that the myelinating phenotype of Schwann cells within the tumor microenvironment increased integrin-dependent tumor invasion on laminin. PMID:26239765

  5. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  6. Tumor cell invasion of von Hippel Lindau renal cell carcinoma cells is mediated by membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Brenda L; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2006-01-01

    Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains the leading cause of mortality in patients with clear cell RCC arising from mutations in the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. Successful RCC tumor suppression by VHL requires the negative regulation of hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIF alpha) protein and its downstream targets. Thus, identification of HIF target genes responsible for RCC tumor progression will aid in the development of therapies for this disease. We previously identified membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) as a transcriptional target of HIF-2alpha in RCC cells null for VHL and showed that MT1-MMP is overexpressed in these cells. MT1-MMP is a key regulator of tumor progression through its functions as a matrix-degrading enzyme, as well as its ability to cleave factors, such as adhesion molecules and other MMPs. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of MT1-MMP to the invasive potential of RCC cells using in vitro type I collagen degradation and invasion assays. Results We evaluated RCC cells wild-type (WT8) and null (pRc-9) for VHL for invasive characteristics and showed that the pRc-9 cells demonstrated a greater propensity for both invasion and degradation of a type I collagen matrix. Furthermore, overexpression of either HIF-2alpha or MT1-MMP in the poorly invasive cell line, WT8, promoted collagen degradation and invasion of these cells. Finally, using RNAi, we show that inhibition of MT1-MMP suppresses tumor cell invasion of RCC cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that MT1-MMP is a major mediator of tumor cell invasiveness and type I collagen degradation by VHL RCC cells that express either MT1-MMP or HIF-2alpha. As such, MT1-MMP may represent a novel target for anti-invasion therapy for this disease. PMID:17140440

  7. Ion channels and transporters in tumour cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a central component of the metastatic cascade requiring a concerted action of ion channels and transporters (migration-associated transportome), cytoskeletal elements and signalling cascades. Ion transport proteins and aquaporins contribute to tumour cell migration and invasion among other things by inducing local volume changes and/or by modulating Ca2+ and H+ signalling. Targeting cell migration therapeutically bears great clinical potential, because it is a prerequisite for metastasis. Ion transport proteins appear to be attractive candidate target proteins for this purpose because they are easily accessible as membrane proteins and often overexpressed or activated in cancer. Importantly, a number of clinically widely used drugs are available whose anticipated efficacy as anti-tumour drugs, however, has now only begun to be evaluated. PMID:24493750

  8. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research. PMID:27150137

  9. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research. PMID:27150137

  10. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  11. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  12. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  13. Valve Interstitial Cells Act in a Pericyte Manner Promoting Angiogensis and Invasion by Valve Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Arevalos, C Alexander; Berg, Jonathan M; Nguyen, Jacqueline M V; Godfrey, Elizabeth L; Iriondo, Claudia; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-09-01

    Neovascularization is an understudied aspect of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). Within diseased valves, cells along the neovessels' periphery stain for pericyte markers, but it is unclear whether valvular interstitial cells (VICs) can demonstrate a pericyte-like phenotype. This investigation examined the perivascular potential of VICs to regulate valve endothelial cell (VEC) organization and explored the role of Angiopoeitin1-Tie2 signaling in this process. Porcine VECs and VICs were fluorescently tracked and co-cultured in Matrigel over 7 days. VICs regulated early VEC network organization in a ROCK-dependent manner, then guided later VEC network contraction through chemoattraction. Unlike vascular control cells, the valve cell cultures ultimately formed invasive spheroids with 3D angiogenic-like sprouts. VECs co-cultured with VICs displayed significantly more invasion than VECs alone; with VICs generally leading and wrapping around VEC invasive sprouts. Lastly, Angiopoietin1-Tie2 signaling was found to regulate valve cell organization during VEC/VIC spheroid formation and invasion. VICs demonstrated pericyte-like behaviors toward VECs throughout sustained co-culture. The change from a vasculogenic network to an invasive sprouting spheroid suggests that both cell types undergo phenotypic changes during long-term culture in the model angiogenic environment. Valve cells organizing into spheroids and undergoing 3D invasion of Matrigel demonstrated several typical angiogenic-like phenotypes dependent on basal levels of Angiopoeitin1-Tie2 signaling and ROCK activation. These results suggest that the ectopic sustained angiogenic environment during the early stages of valve disease promotes organized activity by both VECs and VICs, contributing to neovessel formation and the progression of CAVD. PMID:26905695

  14. Primary Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nipple

    PubMed Central

    Pendse, Avani A.; O'Connor, Siobhan M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cutaneous cancers; however, primary squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple is extremely rare. Among the few reported cases, the majority have occurred in older women with rare cases seen in younger women and male patients. Our patient presented with an exophytic mass of the right nipple while pregnant. A superficial biopsy was reviewed at an outside institution and then at our institution and diagnosed as squamous papilloma and then as hyperkeratosis of the nipple, respectively. The subsequent excisional biopsy revealed multiple nests of tumor cells extending into the dermis with associated chronic inflammatory infiltrate, and the lesion was diagnosed as a primary invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple. Following that, a wide local excision of the excision site and sampling of the regional lymph nodes were negative for carcinoma. Due to the rarity of this diagnosis, it is not known whether prognosis and response to therapy differ from cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma at other sites. Therefore, risk stratification and therapy have been based on those for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26798535

  15. Retrograde venous invasion in renal cell carcinoma: a complication of sinus vein and main renal vein invasion.

    PubMed

    Bonsib, Stephen M; Bhalodia, Ami

    2011-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma, especially clear cell, gains access to the venous system as the initial route of extrarenal spread. Intravenous growth can involve extrarenal veins or renal veins in other portions of the kidney, referred to herein as retrograde venous invasion. This study investigates the incidence and defines the pathological features of retrograde venous invasion. Retrograde venous invasion is defined as rounded nodules of tumor separated from the primary tumor and in a location that conforms to the venous outflow. Nine cases of retrograde venous invasion were identified in a series of 115 renal cell carcinomas (8%). Two blocks from each case were stained with elastic van Gieson, Masson trichrome, CD31 and desmin to evaluate intravenous involvement. All cases were staged using the 2010 TNM staging schema. The tumors ranged in size from 4.2 to 17 cm. All cases showed sinus vein and main renal vein invasion (pT3a); three cases involved the vena cava (pT3b). Direct continuity between the primary tumor and tumor in the main renal vein was grossly evident in every case. Involved sinus veins could be followed retrograde to the cortex between renal pyramids with tumor nodules arrayed along the pyramid-cortex interface. Histologically, the involved parenchymal veins lacked a smooth muscle media and elastica. CD31 demonstrated an endothelial cell lining around many nodules. As intravenous nodules enlarged endothelium was lost, extra-venous invasion occurred and nodules coalesced and merged with the primary tumor. In conclusion, retrograde venous invasion occurred only with main renal vein involvement. Gross evaluation allowed detection in every case. Histological confirmation of intravenous nature is challenging due to the absence of smooth muscle in parenchymal veins. As retrograde growth becomes extensive nodules coalesce and merge with the primary tumor and may be included in measurement of primary tumor size if this process is unrecognized. PMID:21822202

  16. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  17. SRCIN1 Suppressed Osteosarcoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Hu; Li, Xiaotao; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Chengbin; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    SRCIN1 (SRC kinase signalling inhibitor 1) is a new tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies showed that SRCIN1 played a tumor suppressor role in the development of lung cancer and breast cancer. However, the role of SRCIN1 in osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma cell lines compared with osteoblastic cell line. Moreover, SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues compared with the adjacent tissues. Further investigation revealed that overexpression of SRCIN1 inhibited the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 proliferation. This effect was confirmed by measuring the ki-67 and PCNA expression. SRCIN1 overexpression promoted E-cadherin expression and suppressed N-cadherin, Vimentin and Snail expression, suggesting that SRCIN1 overexpression inhibited EMT of the osteosarcoma cell. In addition, ectopic expression of SRCIN1 inhibited the MG-63 cell colony formation and invasion. These data suggested that SRCIN1 acted as a tumor suppressor gene in the development of osteosarcoma. PMID:27513473

  18. SRCIN1 Suppressed Osteosarcoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Hu; Li, Xiaotao; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Chengbin; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    SRCIN1 (SRC kinase signalling inhibitor 1) is a new tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies showed that SRCIN1 played a tumor suppressor role in the development of lung cancer and breast cancer. However, the role of SRCIN1 in osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma cell lines compared with osteoblastic cell line. Moreover, SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues compared with the adjacent tissues. Further investigation revealed that overexpression of SRCIN1 inhibited the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 proliferation. This effect was confirmed by measuring the ki-67 and PCNA expression. SRCIN1 overexpression promoted E-cadherin expression and suppressed N-cadherin, Vimentin and Snail expression, suggesting that SRCIN1 overexpression inhibited EMT of the osteosarcoma cell. In addition, ectopic expression of SRCIN1 inhibited the MG-63 cell colony formation and invasion. These data suggested that SRCIN1 acted as a tumor suppressor gene in the development of osteosarcoma. PMID:27513473

  19. Diagnostic utility of molecular investigation in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Benini, Stefania; Cocchi, Stefania; Gamberi, Gabriella; Magagnoli, Giovanna; Vogel, Daniela; Ghinelli, Cristina; Righi, Alberto; Picci, Piero; Alberghini, Marco; Gambarotti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is characterized by the reciprocal chromosomal translocation t(9;22) and the resultant fused gene EWS RNA-binding protein 1 and nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3 (EWSR1-NR4A3). A second cytogenetic rearrangement t(9;17) involves the genes NR4A3 and TAF 15 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (TAF15). Less frequent fusion transcript variants of the NR4A3 gene, transcription factor 12 (TCF12)-NR4A3 and TRK-fused gene (TFG)-NR4A3, are associated with t(9;15) and t(9;3) respectively. The samples from 42 patients with extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma were examined for the presence of EWSR1-NR4A3, TAF15-NR4A3, TCF12-NR4A3, and TFG-NR4A3 fusion transcripts by using RT-PCR. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to analyze the status of EWSR1 and NR4A3 genes. The fusion transcripts were detected in 34 of 42 samples (81%); the presence of an EWSR1 or NR4A3 gene rearrangements were detected in 8 of 42 samples (19%) which had tested negative for all fusion transcripts detected by RT-PCR. Of the 34 samples evaluable for fusion transcripts, 23 yielded positive results for EWSR1-NR4A3, 10 for TAF15-NR4A3, and 1 for TCF12-NR4A3. The combination of RT-PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization on frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue is a sensitive and specific method for molecular detection of recurrent translocations and is an important ancillary method to establish the diagnosis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. PMID:24508382

  20. Current Status of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary L

    2016-06-01

    Over the last three decades, the incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has continuously risen, generally attributed to the increased use of cross-sectional imaging across all medical disciplines. Fortunately, despite this rising incidence, the estimated 5-year relative survival rate has improved. This survival improvement likely parallels the stage migration of the last two decades toward an increased incidence of small renal masses (SRMs). However, this survival improvement may be secondary to improved surgical techniques and medical therapies for these malignancies. The increased incidence of SRMs has led to an expected evolution in the treatment of RCC. Minimally invasive surgical applications for the treatment of RCC have gained widespread popularity, and now these approaches to renal malignancies have surpassed open techniques in frequency of utilization. Laparoscopic and robotic-assisted techniques have now been applied to both radical and partial nephrectomy procedures of varying complexity. Additionally, percutaneous ablative procedures have been applied to the treatment of some SRMs, increasing the urologist's armamentarium further. Below, we provide a review of these minimally invasive surgical (MIS) procedures for the treatment of RCC. PMID:27021911

  1. Ceramide 1-phosphate regulates cell migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gangoiti, Patricia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Trueba, Miguel; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive and devastating disease characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Despite years of intense investigation, the prognosis of this type of cancer is poor and there is no efficacious treatment to overcome the disease. Using human PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, we demonstrate that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) increases pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. Treatment of these cells with selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt1, or mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTOR1), or with specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding these kinases, resulted in potent inhibition of C1P-induced cell migration and invasion. Likewise, the extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1-2), and the small GTPase RhoA, which regulates cytoskeleton reorganization, were also found to be implicated in C1P-stimulated ROCK1-dependent cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, pre-treatment of the cancer cells with pertussis toxin abrogated C1P-induced cell migration, suggesting the intervention of a Gi protein-coupled receptor in this process. Pancreatic cancer cells engineered to overexpress ceramide kinase (CerK), the enzyme responsible for C1P biosynthesis in mammalian cells, showed enhanced spontaneous cell migration that was potently blocked by treatment with the selective CerK inhibitor NVP-231, or by treatment with specific CerK siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of CerK with concomitant elevations in C1P enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C1P is a key regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, and suggest that targeting CerK expression/activity and C1P may be relevant factors for controlling pancreatic cancer cell dissemination. PMID:26707801

  2. Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Jiang, Feng; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Kalina; Zheng, Xuguang; Cai, Yizhong; Katakowski, Mark; Chopp, Michael; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid, an organic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is cytotoxic against certain cancer cells, without harming normal cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether gallic acid can inhibit glioma cell viability, proliferation, invasion and reduce glioma cell mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of U87 and U251n glioma cells with gallic acid inhibited cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BrdU and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation and tube formation in mouse brain endothelial cells, respectively. In addition, gallic acid decreased U87 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis showed that expression of ADAM17, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in both U87 and U251n cell lines. These data suggest that suppression of ADAM17 and downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to gallic acid-induced decrease of invasiveness. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for treatment of brain tumor. PMID:20553913

  3. Laryngeal Chondrosarcoma as a Rare Cause of Subglottic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kökoğlu, Kerem; Canöz, Özlem; Doğan, Serap; Gülmez, Emrah; Yüce, İmdat; Çağlı, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma (CS) is a very rare entity. It is usually seen in 50–80-year olds. It is developed from cricoid cartilage largely. Patients have laryngeal CS complaint of respiratuvar distress, dysphonia, and dysphagia generally. A submucous mass is usually seen in physical examination with an intact mucosa. Distant metastasis is rare in CSs. Main treatment is surgical excision. An 82-year-old patient who has respiratuvar distress is presented in this paper and laryngeal CS is reviewed in the light of the literature. PMID:25197601

  4. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B H; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL's osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  5. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  6. α-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) expression in chordomas differentiates them from chondrosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Zadok, Oranit; Vituri, Aya; Nass, Dvora; Schwartz, Ignat; Avivi, Camila; Barshack, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Chordomas and chondrosarcomas are malignant mesenchymal tumours with overlapping morphological and immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. Our aim was to evaluate the IHC expression of α-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR/P504S), β-catenin and E-cadherin in chordomas relative to chondrosarcomas and assess the utility of these markers for differential diagnosis. Methods: Archival sections of 18 chordomas, 19 chondrosarcomas and 10 mature cartilage samples were immunostained and scored for AMACR, β-catenin and E-cadherin and the relative differential capacity of each marker was calculated. In addition, AMACR mRNA level was assessed in 5 chordomas by RT-PCR and evaluated by comparative CT method. Results: AMACR and β-catenin stained 88.9% and 94.1% of the chordomas respectively, 21.1% and 10.5% of the chondrosarcomas correspondingly and none of the mature cartilage samples. E-cadherin stained positively 82.4% of the chordomas, 36.8% of the chondrosarcomas and 42.9% of the mature cartilage cases. Both AMACR and β-catenin showed statistically significant difference between chordomas and chondrosarcomas (p < 0.001 for both), unlike E-cadherin. AMACR was detected at the mRNA level. Conclusions: AMACR is expressed in most of the chordomas but only in a minority of chondrosarcomas. AMACR may serve as IHC marker of chordoma with differentiating ability comparable to that of β-catenin. PMID:26888362

  7. Enhancement of invasiveness of Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli in HEp-2 cells by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Vesikari, T; Bromirska, J; Mäki, M

    1982-01-01

    Centrifugation enhanced the infectivity of invasive Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica for HEp-2 cells. Noninvasive bacteria were not endocytosed after centrifugation. The centrifugation procedure may increase the sensitivity of testing for bacterial invasiveness in cell culture without causing false-positive results. PMID:7044978

  8. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy. PMID:25647359

  9. Paraneoplastic vasculitis associated to pelvic chondrosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arvinius, Camilla; González-Pérez, Ana; García-Coiradas, Javier; García-Maroto, Roberto; Cebrián-Parra, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Vasculopathic syndromes have been associated with hematological and solid organ malignancies. The pathogenesis of these syndromes remains largely unknown and there are no biologic markers identified. Whether it is or is not a paraneoplastic syndrome is under discussion, the close temporal relationship of cancer and vasculitis suggests that these vasculitides are a paraneoplastic condition. We report a case of a 45-year-old female patient with pelvic chondrosarcoma who underwent surgical treatment and started to present visual loss, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SRIS), cardiac insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis as well as pulmonary bleeding suggesting a sarcoma-associated vasculitis. All antibodies were negative as in secondary vasculitis. After corticoideal therapy the vasculitis resolved and at 3-year follow-up the patient had not showed any further medical complications or recurrences of the vasculitis. The parallel evolution of the vasculitis and the solid tumor combined with the resolution of the vasculitis after corticotherapy enhances the likelihood of a paraneoplastic vasculitis associated with a chondrosarcoma according to literature review. PMID:27163097

  10. Surmounting Chemotherapy and Radioresistance in Chondrosarcoma: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Anne C.; Hincker, Alexander M.; Lee, Francis Y.

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma, a primary malignancy of bone, has eluded successful treatment with modern chemotherapeutic and radiation regimens. To date, surgical resection of these tumors remains the only curative treatment offered to patients with this diagnosis. Understanding and exploring the nature of chemotherapy and radiation resistance in chondrosarcoma could lead to new molecular targets and more directed therapy for these notoriously difficult-to-treat tumors. Here we review the most current hypotheses regarding the molecular mechanisms mediating chemotherapy and radiation resistance and the future direction of chondrosarcoma therapy research. PMID:21234363

  11. Combined effects of zoledronic acid and doxorubicin on breast cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julia K L; Neville-Webbe, Helen L; Coleman, Robert E; Holen, Ingunn

    2005-09-01

    The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid and the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin induce synergistic levels of apoptosis in breast cancer cells. As zoledronic acid and doxorubicin have been shown to reduce cell invasion and migration, we have investigated if these drugs also act synergistically on breast cancer invasion in vitro. MCF7 cells were treated with 0.05 microM doxorubicin/4 h followed by 1 or 10 microM zoledronic acid/24 h (or the reverse sequence). To study invasion, MCF7 cells were either grown on Transwell membranes coated with Matrigel or in a 24-well plate. Cells were treated sequentially using the above drug combinations, prior to starting the invasion assays for 48 h. Cell growth and death were also assessed under the same conditions. We found that invasion of MCF7 cells treated with zoledronic acid and doxorubicin was significantly reduced when compared with control, but the effect was dependent on drug sequence. At 1 microM, zoledronic acid significantly reduced invasion only if cells were pre-treated with doxorubicin, but cell growth was unaffected. For 10 microM zoledronic acid, invasion was reduced when administered before or after the doxorubicin, but this dose of zoledronic acid caused a significant reduction in MCF7 growth. Apoptosis was not induced by any of the drug doses and combinations. We conclude that pre-treatment with 0.05 microM doxorubicin followed by 1 microM zoledronic acid reduces invasion when cells were grown on Matrigel. For 10 microM zoledronic acid, pre- or post-doxorubicin also reduces invasion, but for this combination inhibition of cell growth may contribute to the reduction in invasion observed. PMID:16096432

  12. Human invasive trophoblasts transformed with simian virus 40 provide a new tool to study the role of PPARgamma in cell invasion process.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Laëtitia; Tarrade, Anne; Hermouet, Axelle; Delouis, Claude; Titeux, Mattias; Vidaud, Michel; Thérond, Patrice; Evain-Brion, Daniele; Fournier, Thierry

    2003-08-01

    Invasive cytotrophoblasts play a key role in the development of human placenta and is therefore essential for subsequent development of the embryo. Human implantation is characterized by a major trophoblastic invasion that offers a unique model of a controlled and oriented tumor-like process. The ligand-activated nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) modulates cell growth and differentiation and might be therefore considered as a tumor suppressor. We have recently reported that PPARgamma, in synergy with its dimerization partner retinoid X receptor (RXR)alpha, controls the invasion of human primary cytotrophoblasts. Because these cells are unable to replicate in culture, we have, in the present study, transformed these primary cells with the simian virus 40 large T antigen for studying the role of PPARgamma in cell invasion process. Our results show that the cell line human invasive proliferative extravillous cytotrophoblast (HIPEC) 65 expressed markers of human invasive primary cytotrophoblast as determined by immunocytochemistry, immunobloting and real-time RT-PCR, and were highly invasive in vitro. We have next studied the role of PPARgamma/RXRalpha heterodimers in cell proliferation and invasion. Our results show that PPARgamma and RXRalpha are co-expressed by HIPEC 65 and that, as commonly observed, activation of PPARgamma/RXRalpha heterodimers with the specific PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone induced lipid droplet accumulation as revealed by oil red O staining. Treatment with rosiglitazone or with the natural PPARgamma agonist 15-deoxy-delta-(12,14) PGJ2 did not modify cell growth, but interestingly, activation of PPARgamma by this synthetic (rosiglitazone) or natural (15d-PGJ2) ligand markedly inhibited cell invasion in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, we showed that other potential natural PPARgamma ligand such as oxidized-but not native-low-density lipoprotein inhibited cell invasion. This proliferative and

  13. A Toxoplasma gondii Ortholog of Plasmodium GAMA Contributes to Parasite Attachment and Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Vern B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii and its Plasmodium kin share a well-conserved invasion process, including sequential secretion of adhesive molecules for host cell attachment and invasion. However, only a few orthologs have been shown to be important for efficient invasion by both genera. Bioinformatic screening to uncover potential new players in invasion identified a previously unrecognized T. gondii ortholog of Plasmodium glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored micronemal antigen (TgGAMA). We show that TgGAMA localizes to the micronemes and is processed into several proteolytic products within the parasite prior to secretion onto the parasite surface during invasion. TgGAMA from parasite lysate bound to several different host cell types in vitro, suggesting a role in parasite attachment. Consistent with this function, tetracycline-regulatable TgGAMA and TgGAMA knockout strains showed significant reductions in host cell invasion at the attachment step, with no defects in any of the other stages of the parasite lytic cycle. Together, the results of this work reveal a new conserved component of the adhesive repertoire of apicomplexan parasites. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is a successful human pathogen in the same phylum as malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites. Invasion of a host cell is an essential process that begins with secretion of adhesive proteins onto the parasite surface for attachment and subsequent penetration of the host cell. Conserved invasion proteins likely play roles that were maintained through the divergence of these parasites. Here, we identify a new conserved invasion protein called glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored micronemal antigen (GAMA). Tachyzoites lacking TgGAMA were partially impaired in parasite attachment and invasion of host cells, yielding the first genetic evidence of a specific role in parasite entry into host cells. These findings widen our appreciation of the repertoire of conserved proteins that apicomplexan parasites employ for

  14. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R.; Blebea, Catherine A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  15. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R; Blebea, Catherine A; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  16. SPAG9 controls the cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis of human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAORONG; ZHOU, WENLAI; LIU, SHIQING

    2016-01-01

    Sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) is an oncoprotein involved in the progression of various human malignancies; however, its role in osteosarcoma (OS) remains poorly evaluated. The present study used Matrigel™ cell migration and invasion assays, tube formation assay, Cell Counting kit-8, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to investigate the role of SPAG9 in OS cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. The results of the present study demonstrated that SPAG9 expression was upregulated in OS tissues, as compared with adjacent normal tissues, and knockdown of SPAG9 in an OS cell line inhibited cell motility and invasion via inactivation of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that silencing of SPAG9 in OS cells inhibited tube formation, the proliferation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion, contributing to a reduction in angiogenesis. The results of the present study indicated that SPAG9 may be an important regulator in OS and may be involved in metastasis. Therefore SPAG9 may be a promising target for the treatment of metastatic OS. PMID:26893659

  17. Diagnostic investigations of DKK-1 and PDCD5 expression levels as independent prognostic markers of human chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zarea, Mojtaba; Mohammadian Bajgiran, Amirhossein; Sedaghati, Farnoush; Hatami, Negin; Taheriazam, Afshin; Yahaghi, Emad; Shakeri, Mohammadreza

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the expression levels of Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) by using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in patients with chondrosarcoma. The DKK-1 mRNA levels were significantly higher in chondrosarcoma when compared with the corresponding nontumor tissues (mean ± SD: 4.23 ± 1.54; 1.54 ± 0.87; P = 0.001). PDCD5 mRNA levels were remarkably deceased in tumor tissues when compared with corresponding nontumor tissues (mean ± SD: 1.94 ± 0.73; 5.42 ± 1.73; P = 0.001). The high and moderate DKK-1 expressions were observed for 60% of chondrosarcoma samples in comparison with 27.5% of corresponding nontumor tissues (P  =  0.001). Moreover, low expression of PDCD5 was found in 67.5% of the tumor tissues when compared with the nontumor tissues (32.5%; P = 0.002). The results of this study showed that high DKK-1 expression levels were strongly related to MSTS stage (P = 0.011) and the advancement of histological grade (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the PDCD5 expression levels were correlated with histological grade (P < 0.001), MSTS stage (P = 0.016), and distant metastasis (P = 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival and log-rank survival showed that patients with high DKK-1 levels and low PDCD5 levels were correlated with shorter overall survival (log-rank test P < 0.001). PDCD5 levels, histological grade, and tumor stage were independent predictors of overall survival. In conclusion, DKK-1 and PDCD5 can be independent predictors of overall survival in patients suffering from chondrosarcoma. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(7):597-601, 2016. PMID:27255549

  18. Kisspeptin regulation of genes involved in cell invasion and angiogenesis in first trimester human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, Víctor A; Abera, Aron B; Matjila, Mushi; Millar, Robert P; Katz, Arieh A

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of extravillous trophoblast invasion of the uterine wall is a key process in successful pregnancies. Kisspeptin (KP) has been shown to inhibit cancer cell metastasis and placental trophoblast cell migration. In this study primary cultures of first trimester human trophoblast cells have been utilized in order to study the regulation of invasion and angiogenesis-related genes by KP. Trophoblast cells were isolated from first trimester placenta and their identity was confirmed by immunostaining for cytokeratin-7. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that primary trophoblast cells express higher levels of GPR54 (KP receptor) and KP mRNA than the trophoblast cell line HTR8Svneo. Furthermore, trophoblast cells also expressed higher GPR54 and KP protein levels. Treating primary trophoblast cells with KP induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, while co-treating the cells with a KP antagonist almost completely blocked the activation of ERK1/2 and demonstrated that KP through its cognate GPR54 receptor can activate ERK1/2 in trophoblast cells. KP reduced the migratory capability of trophoblast cells in a scratch-migration assay. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that KP treatment reduced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10, 14 and VEGF-A, and increased the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 1 and 3. These results suggest that KP can inhibit first trimester trophoblast cells invasion via inhibition of cell migration and down regulation of the metalloproteinase system and VEGF-A. PMID:24923321

  19. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Yijing; Tang, Huijuan; Guo, Yan; Guo, Jing; Huang, Bangxing; Fang, Fang; Cai, Jing Wang, Zehua

    2015-09-10

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs.

  20. Active invasion of bacteria into living fungal cells

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Nadine; Üzüm, Zerrin; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Lackner, Gerald; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The rice seedling blight fungus Rhizopus microsporus and its endosymbiont Burkholderia rhizoxinica form an unusual, highly specific alliance to produce the highly potent antimitotic phytotoxin rhizoxin. Yet, it has remained a riddle how bacteria invade the fungal cells. Genome mining for potential symbiosis factors and functional analyses revealed that a type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of the bacterial endosymbiont is required for the formation of the endosymbiosis. Comparative proteome analyses show that the T2SS releases chitinolytic enzymes (chitinase, chitosanase) and chitin-binding proteins. The genes responsible for chitinolytic proteins and T2SS components are highly expressed during infection. Through targeted gene knock-outs, sporulation assays and microscopic investigations we found that chitinase is essential for bacteria to enter hyphae. Unprecedented snapshots of the traceless bacterial intrusion were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy. Beyond unveiling the pivotal role of chitinolytic enzymes in the active invasion of a fungus by bacteria, these findings grant unprecedented insight into the fungal cell wall penetration and symbiosis formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03007.001 PMID:25182414

  1. Cells activated for wound repair have the potential to direct collective invasion of an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bleaken, Brigid M.; Menko, A. Sue; Walker, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating how groups of cells are signaled to move collectively from their original site and invade surrounding matrix are poorly understood. Here we develop a clinically relevant ex vivo injury invasion model to determine whether cells involved in directing wound healing have invasive function and whether they can act as leader cells to direct movement of a wounded epithelium through a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) environment. Similar to cancer invasion, we found that the injured cells invade into the ECM as cords, involving heterotypical cell–cell interactions. Mesenchymal cells with properties of activated repair cells that typically locate to a wound edge are present in leader positions at the front of ZO-1–rich invading cords of cells, where they extend vimentin intermediate filament–enriched protrusions into the 3D ECM. Injury-induced invasion depends on both vimentin cytoskeletal function and MMP-2/9 matrix remodeling, because inhibiting either of these suppressed invasion. Potential push and pull forces at the tips of the invading cords were revealed by time-lapse imaging, which showed cells actively extending and retracting protrusions into the ECM. This 3D injury invasion model can be used to investigate mechanisms of leader cell–directed invasion and understand how mechanisms of wound healing are hijacked to cause disease. PMID:26658613

  2. CRKL promotes lung cancer cell invasion through ERK-MMP9 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu; Chengyao, Xie; Qingchang, Li; Qianze, Dong; Enhua, Wang; Yan, Wang

    2015-06-01

    CRKL is recently defined as a new oncogene, which plays a role in the lung cancer progression. However, the potential mechanism of CRKL in human non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion is obscure. We investigated the potential mechanism of CRKL in lung cancer cell invasion using immunohistochemistry, plasmid transfection, Western blotting, real-time PCR, matrigel invasion assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, and luciferase reporter assay. CRKL expression is higher in lymph node metastatic tumor compared with primary tumor. CRKL overexpression enhanced cell invasion and MMP9 expression in both HBE and H1299 cell lines. There was a significant correlation between CRKL overexpression and high MMP9 expression in primary tumors. MMP-9 antibody treatment significantly blocked cell invasion. CRKL overexpression also activated AP-1 luciferase reporter activity, ERK phosphorylation and association of c-fos to MMP9 promoter. Treatment with ERK inhibitor PD98059 in cells with CRKL transfection inhibited ERK activity, cell invasion, and MMP9 expression. These results suggested that overexpression of CRKL promoted cell invasion through upregulation of MMP9 expression and activation of ERK pathway. PMID:24664993

  3. 3D Traction Stresses Activate Protease-Dependent Invasion of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Aereas; Seo, Young N.; Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao; Jamora, Colin; del Álamo, Juan C.; Varghese, Shyni

    2014-01-01

    Cell invasion and migration that occurs, for example, in cancer metastasis is rooted in the ability of cells to navigate through varying levels of physical constraint exerted by the extracellular matrix. Cancer cells can invade matrices in either a protease-independent or a protease-dependent manner. An emerging critical component that influences the mode of cell invasion is the traction stresses generated by the cells in response to the physicostructural properties of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we have developed a reference-free quantitative assay for measuring three-dimensional (3D) traction stresses generated by cells during the initial stages of invasion into matrices exerting varying levels of mechanical resistance. Our results show that as cells encounter higher mechanical resistance, a larger fraction of them shift to protease-mediated invasion, and this process begins at lower values of cell invasion depth. On the other hand, the compressive stress generated by the cells at the onset of protease-mediated invasion is found to be independent of matrix stiffness, suggesting that 3D traction stress is a key factor in triggering protease-mediated cancer cell invasion. At low 3D compressive traction stresses, cells utilize bleb formation to indent the matrix in a protease independent manner. However, at higher stress values, cells utilize invadopodia-like structures to mediate protease-dependent invasion into the 3D matrix. The critical value of compressive traction stress at the transition from a protease-independent to a protease-dependent mode of invasion is found to be ∼165 Pa. PMID:25468332

  4. Sohlh2 inhibits human ovarian cancer cell invasion and metastasis by transcriptional inactivation of MMP9.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyu; Hao, Chunyan; Wang, Yang; Ji, Shufang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wenfang; Zhao, Qinghao; Sun, Jinhao; Hao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Identifying key mediators of cancer invasion and metastasis is crucial to the development of new and more effective therapies. We previously identified Sohlh2 as an important inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell proliferation. However, the function of Sohlh2 in cell migration and invasion remains unknown. In this paper, we report a novel Sohlh2 to MMP9 signaling pathway in the invasive ovarian cancer. Using immunohistochemistry staining, we revealed Sohlh2 expression was inversely correlated with the invasive human ovarian cancers. In vitro experiments, forced expression of Sohlh2 led to a significant reduction in cancer cell migration and invasion. Conversely, silencing of Sohlh2 enhanced ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion. Experiments using nude mice demonstrated that the ectopic Sohlh2 expression inhibited the HO8910 cell capability of the metastasis to the lungs and livers. Ectopic overexpression of Sohlh2 in the invasive HO8910 cells reduced the MMP9 expression, whereas Sohlh2 knockdown from the non-invasive, SKOV3 cells increased the MMP9 expression. Promoter activation and binding analyses indicated that Sohlh2 repressed the MMP9 expression by directly acting on the MMP9 gene promoter. Inhibition of MMP9 dramatically blocked the Sohlh2 knockdown-enhanced SKOV3 cell invasion, and ectopic expression of MMP9 compensated for the anti-invasive activity of Sohlh2 in HO8910 cells. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that Sohlh2 functions as a tumor metastasis suppressor. Modulation of Sohlh2 expression has the potential to be a target for cancer therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26153894

  5. Saracatinib Impairs Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion by Disrupting Invadopodia Function

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Kelley, Laura C.; Hayes, Karen E.; Evans, Jason V.; Lopez-Skinner, Lesly Ann; Martin, Karen H.; Frederick, Barbara; Rothschild, Brian L.; Raben, David; Elvin, Paul; Green, Tim P.; Weed, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated Src kinase activity is linked to the progression of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Src regulates HNSCC proliferation and tumor invasion, with the Src-targeted small molecule inhibitor saracatinib displaying potent anti-invasive effects in preclinical studies. However, the pro-invasive cellular mechanism(s) perturbed by saracatinib are unclear. The anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of saracatinib on HNSCC cell lines were therefore investigated in pre-clinical cell and mouse model systems. Saracatinib treatment inhibited growth, cell cycle progression and transwell Matrigel invasion in HNSCC cell lines. Dose-dependent decreases in Src activation and phosphorylation of the invasion-associated substrates focal adhesion kinase, p130 CAS and cortactin were also observed. While saracatinib did not significantly impact HNSCC tumor growth in a mouse orthotopic model of tongue squamous cell carcinoma, impaired perineural invasion and cervical lymph node metastasis was observed. Accordingly, saracatinib treatment displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on invadopodia formation, extracellular matrix degradation and matrix metalloprotease 9 activation. These results suggest that inhibition of Src kinase by saracatinib impairs the pro-invasive activity of HNSCC by inhibiting Src substrate phosphorylation important for invadopodia formation and associated matrix metalloprotease activity. PMID:20505783

  6. Management of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arslanoğlu, Seçil; Eren, Erdem; Özkul, Yılmaz; Ciğer, Ejder; Kopar, Aylin; Önal, Kazım; Etit, Demet; Tütüncü, G Yazgı

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma; and the association between clinicopathological parameters and thyroid gland invasion. Medical records of 75 patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent total laryngectomy with thyroidectomy were reviewed, retrospectively. Preoperative computed tomography scans, clinical and operative findings, and histopathological data of the specimens were evaluated. There were 73 male and two female patients with an age range of 41-88 years (mean 60.4 years). Hemithyroidectomy was performed in 62 (82.7 %) and total thyroidectomy was performed in 13 patients (17.3 %). Four patients had histopathologically proven thyroid gland invasion (5.3 %). In three patients, thyroid gland involvement was by means of direct invasion. Thyroid gland invasion was significantly correlated with thyroid cartilage invasion. Therefore, prophylactic thyroidectomy should not be a part of the treatment policy for these tumors. PMID:26547312

  7. Plasticity of Cancer Cell Invasion-Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Te Boekhorst, V; Friedl, P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is a plastic and adaptive process integrating cytoskeletal dynamics, cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion, as well as tissue remodeling. In response to molecular and physical microenvironmental cues during metastatic dissemination, cancer cells exploit a versatile repertoire of invasion and dissemination strategies, including collective and single-cell migration programs. This diversity generates molecular and physical heterogeneity of migration mechanisms and metastatic routes, and provides a basis for adaptation in response to microenvironmental and therapeutic challenge. We here summarize how cytoskeletal dynamics, protease systems, cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion pathways control cancer cell invasion programs, and how reciprocal interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment contributes to plasticity of invasion and dissemination strategies. We discuss the potential and future implications of predicted "antimigration" therapies that target cytoskeletal dynamics, adhesion, and protease systems to interfere with metastatic dissemination, and the options for integrating antimigration therapy into the spectrum of targeted molecular therapies. PMID:27613134

  8. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  9. Multiplex profiling of cellular invasion in 3D cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  10. Multiplex Profiling of Cellular Invasion in 3D Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  11. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gang; Chen, Jiawei; Deng, Yanqiu; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong; Zhao, Zheng

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  12. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  13. Knockdown of hTERT and Treatment with BIBR1532 Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weimin; Lv, Nenan; Wysham, Weiya Z; Roque, Dario R; Zhang, Tongqing; Jiao, Simeng; Song, Dan; Chen, Jiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase activity and expression of the catalytic protein hTERT are associated with cell proliferation and advanced stage in endometrial cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of inhibition of hTERT by siRNA and BIBR1532 on cell growth, apoptosis and invasion in endometrial cancer cells. Knockdown of hTERT or treatment of the cells with BIBR1532 decreased telomerase activity, inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and reduced cell invasion in Ishikawa and ECC-1 cells. Either hTERT siRNA or BIBR1532 in combination with paclitaxel promoted a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth through induction of Annexin V expression and a remarkable reduction in cell invasion through reduction of protein expression of MMP9, MMP2, and MMP3. Increased telomerase activity and hTERT protein expression by transfections enhanced the protein expression of MMPs and increased the cell invasion ability. BIBR1532 significantly antagonized cell invasion induced by increased hTERT expression. These findings suggest that telomerase and hTERT facilitate cell invasion via MMP family in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:26640594

  14. Knockdown of hTERT and Treatment with BIBR1532 Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weimin; Lv, Nenan; Wysham, Weiya Z.; Roque, Dario R.; Zhang, Tongqing; Jiao, Simeng; Song, Dan; Chen, Jiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase activity and expression of the catalytic protein hTERT are associated with cell proliferation and advanced stage in endometrial cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of inhibition of hTERT by siRNA and BIBR1532 on cell growth, apoptosis and invasion in endometrial cancer cells. Knockdown of hTERT or treatment of the cells with BIBR1532 decreased telomerase activity, inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and reduced cell invasion in Ishikawa and ECC-1 cells. Either hTERT siRNA or BIBR1532 in combination with paclitaxel promoted a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth through induction of Annexin V expression and a remarkable reduction in cell invasion through reduction of protein expression of MMP9, MMP2, and MMP3. Increased telomerase activity and hTERT protein expression by transfections enhanced the protein expression of MMPs and increased the cell invasion ability. BIBR1532 significantly antagonized cell invasion induced by increased hTERT expression. These findings suggest that telomerase and hTERT facilitate cell invasion via MMP family in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:26640594

  15. Propentofylline inhibits glioblastoma cell invasion and survival by targeting the TROY signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dhruv, Harshil D; Roos, Alison; Tomboc, Patrick J; Tuncali, Serdar; Chavez, Ashley; Mathews, Ian; Berens, Michael E; Loftus, Joseph C; Tran, Nhan L

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary tumor of the CNS and carries a dismal prognosis. The aggressive invasion of GBM cells into the surrounding normal brain makes complete resection impossible, significantly increases resistance to the standard therapy regimen, and virtually assures tumor recurrence. Median survival for newly diagnosed GBM is 14.6 months and declines to 8 months for patients with recurrent GBM. New therapeutic strategies that target the molecular drivers of invasion are required for improved clinical outcome. We have demonstrated that TROY (TNFRSF19), a member of the TNFR super-family, plays an important role in GBM invasion and resistance. Knockdown of TROY expression inhibits GBM cell invasion, increases sensitivity to temozolomide, and prolongs survival in an intracranial xenograft model. Propentofylline (PPF), an atypical synthetic methylxanthine compound, has been extensively studied in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia where it has demonstrated blood-brain permeability and minimal adverse side effects. Here we showed that PPF decreased GBM cell expression of TROY, inhibited glioma cell invasion, and sensitized GBM cells to TMZ. Mechanistically, PPF decreased glioma cell invasion by modulating TROY expression and downstream signaling, including AKT, NF-κB, and Rac1 activation. Thus, PPF may provide a pharmacologic approach to target TROY, inhibit cell invasion, and reduce therapeutic resistance in GBM. PMID:26559543

  16. Type III TGFβ receptor and Src direct hyaluronan-mediated invasive cell motility.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patrick; Espiritu, Daniella; Barnett, Joey V; Camenisch, Todd D

    2015-03-01

    During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. This process requires epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and directed cellular invasion. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and coronary vessel development. Using primary epicardial cells derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, high-molecular weight hyaluronan (HMWHA) stimulated cellular invasion and filamentous (f-actin) polymerization are detected in Tgfbr3(+/+) cells, but not in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. Furthermore, HMWHA-stimulated cellular invasion and f-actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(+/+) epicardial cells are dependent on Src kinase. Src activation in HMWHA-stimulated Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells is not detected in response to HMWHA. RhoA and Rac1 also fail to activate in response to HMWHA in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. These events coincide with defective f-actin formation and deficient cellular invasion. Finally, a T841A activating substitution in TGFβR3 drives ligand-independent Src activation. Collectively, these data define a TGFβR3-Src-RhoA/Rac1 pathway that is essential for hyaluronan-directed cell invasion in epicardial cells. PMID:25499979

  17. Vital fluorescent labeling for confocal scanning microscopic study of living cell invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Allan Z.; Chen, Jian M.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Wang, Jane C.

    1997-07-01

    Invasion by cells with malignant or transformed phenotypes precedes destruction of adjacent tissue and fatal cell metastasis. State-of-the-art confocal laser scanning technology facilitates both in vitro and in vivo research into cell invasion and metastasis. In particular, studies performed with living cells yield more precise information than those with fixed cells, giving new insight into cell invasion and metastasis. We have tested a variety of vital florescent dyes and fluorogenic protease substrates in our studies of invasion of cartilage by transformed synoviocytes or osteosarcoma cells. The fluorescent dyes tested include Calcein acetoxy methyl-FITC (Calcein), Hoechst 33342 (Hoechst), CellTracker, DiI, DiO, DiD, and ethidium bromide (EB). The fluorogenic protease substrate used Meoxysuccinyl-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-AFC (MOS-GPLGP-AFC) for detection of collagenase activity. We found that Calcein-FITC labeling permitted the clearest direct observation of the penetration of transformed synoviocytes and osteosarcoma cells into cartilage. Even better results were obtained when chondrocyte nuclei were counter-stained with Hoechst 33342. During the invasion process, collagenase activity was observed around the synoviocyte in the cartilage matrix labeled with the fluorogenic collagenase substrate. We concluded that of the vital fluorescent dyes tested, a combined application of Calcein-FITC, Hoechst 23223, and MOS- GPLGP-AFC is most appropriate for the study of the cell invasion process.

  18. CCN3 (NOV) regulates proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SHUAI; LIU, ZHENG; BI, DONGBIN; YUAN, XAODONG; LIU, XIAOWEN; DING, SENTAI; LU, JIAJU; NIU, ZHIHONG

    2012-01-01

    The CCN3/nephroblastoma overexpressed gene belongs to the CCN family of genes that encode secreted proteins involved in a variety of processes including tumorigenesis. Altered expression of CCN3 has been observed in human nephroblastoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), suggesting that CCN3 plays a role in kidney tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of CCN3 in clear cell RCC biology. In particular, we studied the expression of CCN3 in 32 pairs of RCC tissues and corresponding normal kidney tissues using immunohistochemistry. The CCN3 gene was transfected into the 786-O cell line and the behaviors of stably transfected clones were analyzed. Results showed the expression of CCN3 was lower in RCC tissues compared to corresponding normal kidney tissues and the expression of CCN3 was inversely correlated with the Ki67 index. CCN3-expressing clones exhibited significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Furthermore, CCN3-transfected 786-O cells exhibited increased adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins, migration and invasion in Matrigel. Our data indicated that CCN3 plays an anti-proliferative role in clear cell RCC cells and promotes the adhesion, migration and invasion of clear cell RCC cells. PMID:22783399

  19. Loss of P53 facilitates invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Y X; Kong, C Z; Zhang, Z; Zhu, Y Y

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a lethal cancer for the invasion and metastasis in its earlier period. P53 is a tumor suppressor gene which plays a critical role on safeguarding the integrity of genome. However, loss of P53 facilitates or inhibits the invasion and metastasis of tumor is still suspended. In this study, we are going to explain whether loss of P53 affect the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells. To explore whether loss of P53 influences the invasion and metastasis ability of prostate cancer cells, we first compared the invasion ability of si-P53 treated cells and control cells by wound healing, transwell assay, and adhesion assay. We next tested the activity of MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 by western blot and gelatin zymography. Moreover, we employed WB and IF to identify the EMT containing E-cad, N-cad, vimentin, etc. We also examined the expression of cortactin, cytoskeleton, and paxillin by immunofluorescence, and tested the expression of ERK and JNK by WB. Finally, we applied WB to detect the expression of FAK, Src, and the phosphorylation of them to elucidate the mechanism of si-P53 influencing invasion and metastasis. According to the inhibition rate of si-P53, we choose the optimized volume of si-P53. With the volume, we compare the invasion and metastasis ability of Du145 and si-P53 treated cells. We find si-P53 promotes the invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells, increases the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 and MMP-14. Also, si-P53 promotes EMT and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Further analyses explain that this effect is associated with FAK-Src signaling pathway. Loss of P53 promotes the invasion and metastasis ability of prostate cancer cells and the mechanism is correlated with FAK-Src signaling pathway. P53 is involved in the context of invasion and metastasis. PMID:23982184

  20. In vitro irradiation of basement membrane enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, B; Baptiste, C; Therriault, H; Arguin, G; Plouffe, B; Lemay, R

    2007-01-01

    Following removal of the primary breast tumour by conservative surgery, patients may still have additional malignant foci scattered throughout the breast. Radiation treatments are not designed to eliminate all these residual cancer cells. Rather, the radiation dose is calculated to optimise long-term results with minimal complications. In a tumour, cancer cells are surrounded by a basement membrane, which plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Using an invasion chamber, we have shown that irradiation before cell plating of a reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel; Becton Dickinson, Bedford, MA, USA) increased the invasiveness of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. This radiation enhancement of invasion was associated with the upregulation of the pro-invasive gene matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. The expression of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP), which are required to activate the MMP-2, were also increased. Confirming the role of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, radiation enhancement of cancer cell invasion was prevented by an MMP-2 inhibitor and an anti-MT1-MMP antibody. This study also demonstrated that radiation can potentially enhance the invasion ability by inducing the release of pro-invasive factors stored in the Matrigel. Conversely, no enhancement of invasiveness was observed with the low metastatic cell line MCF-7. This lack of invasiveness correlated with the absence of the MMP-2 activator MT1-MMP in the MCF-7 cells. Radiotherapy is an efficient modality to treat breast cancer which could be further improved by inhibiting the pro-invasive gene upregulated by radiation. PMID:17987037

  1. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Halle, Bo; Rosager, Ann Mari; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Kruse, Torben A.; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Aims Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account. Methods Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. Results We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo. Conclusion The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery. PMID:27454178

  2. Decoding the regulatory landscape of melanoma reveals TEADS as regulators of the invasive cell state

    PubMed Central

    Verfaillie, Annelien; Imrichova, Hana; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Dewaele, Michael; Rambow, Florian; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Luciani, Flavie; Van den Mooter, Laura; Claerhout, Sofie; Fiers, Mark; Journe, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem-Elias; Herrmann, Carl; Halder, Georg; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming of proliferative melanoma cells into a phenotypically distinct invasive cell subpopulation is a critical event at the origin of metastatic spreading. Here we generate transcriptome, open chromatin and histone modification maps of melanoma cultures; and integrate this data with existing transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles from tumour biopsies to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying this key reprogramming event. This shows thousands of genomic regulatory regions underlying the proliferative and invasive states, identifying SOX10/MITF and AP-1/TEAD as regulators, respectively. Knockdown of TEADs shows a previously unrecognized role in the invasive gene network and establishes a causative link between these transcription factors, cell invasion and sensitivity to MAPK inhibitors. Using regulatory landscapes and in silico analysis, we show that transcriptional reprogramming underlies the distinct cellular states present in melanoma. Furthermore, it reveals an essential role for the TEADs, linking it to clinically relevant mechanisms such as invasion and resistance. PMID:25865119

  3. Evaluation of Eukaryotic Cell Invasion on a Library of Genetically Diverse Campylobacter spp. Isolates.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are the largest cause of sporadic bacterial gastrointestinal infection in the industrialized world. Epithelial cell invasion is thought to be necessary to bring about infection in humans. Invasion studies have shown that different Campylobacter jejuni isolates may differ in thei...

  4. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. [Osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma of the pelvis and lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Guder, W K; Hardes, J; Gosheger, G; Nottrott, M; Streitbürger, A

    2015-10-01

    A wide tumor resection is essential in the therapy of primary malignant bone tumors to minimize the risk of local recurrence and ensure long-term survival. While chondrosarcoma is mainly treated surgically, osteosarcoma therapy consists of both chemotherapy and surgical resection of the tumor. While endoprosthetic replacement after hemipelvectomy tends to be associated with high infection rates and has been superseded by hip transposition and composite osteosynthetic replacements, the use of megaendoprosthetic tumor prostheses is the most common reconstruction technique when the extremities are affected. Biological reconstruction or ablative procedures are reserved for special indications. Overall, the reconstruction techniques presented in this article manage to ensure limb salvage in most patients. Functional outcome, however, greatly depends on the tumor size and site as well as postoperative residual soft tissue coverage. PMID:26385887

  6. Epigenetic modification suppresses proliferation, migration and invasion of urothelial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic approaches offer additional therapeutic options, including apoptosis induction, modification of cell cycle regulating proteins and the re-expression of pharmaceutical targets, such as hormone receptors. The present study analyzed the effect of the epigenetic modifiers 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and Trichostatin A on the proliferative, migratory and invasive behavior of four urinary bladder cancer cell lines (RT-4, RT-112, VMCUB-1 and T-24), and the expression of various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays revealed that treatment with the two epigenetic modifiers resulted in proliferation inhibition in all cell lines, and migration and invasion inhibition in RT-4, RT-112 and T-24 cell lines. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the mRNA expression of a broad selection of MMPs and their TIMPs was induced in all cell lines, and MMP-14 mRNA expression was suppressed in all cell lines, with the exception of RT-4. In conclusion, epigenetic modifications suppressed the motility and invasiveness of three out of four urothelial cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect on cell motility appears to be crucial for reduced invasive properties. However, even a broad spectrum of mRNA analysis does not sufficiently explain the loss of invasiveness, as it does not allow for functional conclusions. Further complex urothelial tumour models should be applied to investigate whether epigenetic therapeutic approaches may be an option in urothelial cancer. PMID:27602104

  7. Normal mammary epithelial cells promote carcinoma basement membrane invasion by inducing microtubule-rich protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Gilkes, Daniele; Aifuwa, Ivie; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dissemination of tumor cells may occur in parallel with, and even preceed, tumor growth. The mechanism for this early invasion is largely unknown. Here, we find that mammary epithelial cells (MECs) induce neighboring breast carcinoma cells (BCCs) to cross the basement membrane by secreting soluble laminin. Laminin continuously produced by MECs induce long membrane cellular protrusions in BCCs that promote their contractility and invasion into the surrounding matrix. These protrusions depend on microtubule bundles assembled de novo through laminin-integrin β1 signaling. These results describe how non-cancerous MECs can actively participate in the invasive process of BCCs. PMID:26334095

  8. Cell-surface GRP78 facilitates colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Yarui; Li, Hanqing; Xiao, Hong; Fu, Rong; Zhao, Chao; Wu, Haili; Li, Zhuoyu

    2013-05-01

    Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum as a molecular chaperone. It has also been found on the membranes of some cancer cells, acting as a receptor for a wide variety of ligands. However, its presence on colorectal cancer (CRC) cell surface and its role in CRC metastatic progression remain elusive. Here we reported that GRP78 was predominantly present in the form of clustering aggregates on CRC cell surfaces, and its surface abundance was strongly correlated with CRC differentiation stage. Interestingly, we observed that cell-surface GRP78 had an interaction with the ECM adhesion molecule β1-integrin and was involved in cell-matrix adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Moreover, the present data also implicated that surface GRP78 promoted the cell invasion process, and this effect was at least partly mediated through its association with uPA-uPAR protease system. Together, our data suggests that surface GRP78 promotes CRC cell migration and invasion by regulating cell-matrix adhesion and ECM degradation, which is independent of its signaling receptor function. PMID:23485528

  9. High extracellular pressure promotes gastric cancer cell adhesion, invasion, migration and suppresses gastric cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Su, Changlei; Zhang, Bomiao; Liu, Wenzhi; Zheng, Hongqun; Sun, Lingyu; Tong, Jinxue; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Liang, Hongyan; Xue, Li; Zhang, Qifan

    2016-08-01

    Slightly increased pressure stimulates tumor cell adhesion and proliferation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of high pressure on gene expression and the biological behavior of gastric cancer cells. After incubation for 30 min at 37˚C under ambient and increased pressure, one portion of SGC7901 cells was used for cell proliferation and apoptosis assays, cell cycle analysis, adhesion invasion or migration assays. The other portion of cells was harvested for detection of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID1), sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and E-cadherin expression by western blotting or RT-PCR. In addition, we investigated the effects of high pressure on SGC7901 cell ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy. We found that the adhesion fold under increased pressure of 760 and 1,520 mmHg was 2.39±1.05 (P<0.05) and 2.47±0.85 (P<0.01) as compared with the control, respectively. The invasion fold was 3.42±2.06 (P<0.05) and 5.13±2.49 (P<0.01) as compared with the control, respectively. The migration was 1.65±0.20 (P<0.001) and 2.53±0.50 (P<0.001) as compared with the control, respectively. At increased pressure, MMP-2 and ID1 expression increased significantly, while the expression of SHH decreased significantly. However, we did not find significant change in proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle or ultrastructure of the SGC7901 cells under high pressure. In conclusion, high pressure promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of SGC7901 cells. Moreover, the present study suggests that the pressure-augmented invasion and migration may be related to the increase in MMP-2 expression. Moreover, high pressure may suppress SGC7901 cell differentiation, which may result from the change in SHH and ID1 expression. PMID:27278077

  10. Pilus phase variation switches gonococcal adherence to invasion by caveolin-1-dependent host cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Faulstich, Michaela; Böttcher, Jan-Peter; Meyer, Thomas F; Fraunholz, Martin; Rudel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria cause local infections but occasionally invade into the blood stream, often with fatal outcome. Very little is known about the mechanism underlying the switch from local to invasive infection. In the case of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, phase variable type 4 pili (T4P) stabilize local infection by mediating microcolony formation and inducing anti-invasive signals. Outer membrane porin PorB(IA), in contrast, is associated with disseminated infection and facilitates the efficient invasion of gonococci into host cells. Here we demonstrate that loss of pili by natural pilus phase variation is a prerequisite for the transition from local to invasive infection. Unexpectedly, both T4P-mediated inhibition of invasion and PorB(IA)-triggered invasion utilize membrane rafts and signaling pathways that depend on caveolin-1-Y14 phosphorylation (Cav1-pY14). We identified p85 regulatory subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K) and phospholipase Cγ1 as new, exclusive and essential interaction partners for Cav1-pY14 in the course of PorBIA-induced invasion. Active PI3K induces the uptake of gonococci via a new invasion pathway involving protein kinase D1. Our data describe a novel route of bacterial entry into epithelial cells and offer the first mechanistic insight into the switch from local to invasive gonococcal infection. PMID:23717204

  11. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:22074556

  12. Effect of Bisphenol A on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Yuan-Zhen; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Teng; Qu, Xin-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a kind of environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) that interfere embryo implantation. Trophoblast invasion plays a crucial role during embryo implantation. In this study, the effects of BPA on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo and its possible mechanism were investigated. BeWo cells were exposed to BPA and co-cultured with human endometrial cells to mimic embryo implantation in transwell model. The proliferation and invasion capability of BeWo cells were detected. The expression of E-cadherin, DNMT1, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were also analyzed. The results showed that the invasion capability of BeWo was reduced after daily exposure to BPA. BPA had biphasic effect on E-cadherin expression level in BeWo cells and expression level of DNMT1 was decreased when treated with BPA. Moreover, BPA treatment also changed the balance of MMPs/TIMPs in BeWo cells by down-regulating MMP-2, MMP-9 and up-regulating TIMP-1, TIMP-2 with increasing BPA concentration. Taken together, these results showed that BPA treatment could reduce the invasion ability of BeWo cells and alter the expression level of E-cadherin, DNMT1, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Our study would help us to understand the possible mechanism of BPA effect on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo. PMID:26823751

  13. Oral bacteria modulate invasion and induction of apoptosis in HEp-2 cells by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yaping; Teng, Di; Burke, Andrew C; Haase, Elaine M; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2009-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic bacterial pathogen, causing infections of the respiratory and other organ systems in susceptible hosts. P. aeruginosa infection is initiated by adhesion to and invasion of mucosal epithelial cells. The failure of host defenses to eliminate P. aeruginosa from mucosal surfaces results in P. aeruginosa proliferation, sometimes followed by overt infection and tissue destruction. There is growing evidence that associates poor oral health and respiratory infection. An in vitro model system for bacterial invasion of respiratory epithelial cells was used to investigate the influence of oral bacteria on P. aeruginosa epithelial cell invasion. Oral pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans increased invasion of P. aeruginosa into HEp-2 cells from one- to threefold. In contrast, non-pathogenic oral bacteria such as Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii showed no significant influence on P. aeruginosa invasion. P. aeruginosa together with oral bacteria stimulated greater cytokine production from HEp-2 cells than did P. aeruginosa alone. P. aeruginosa in combination with periodontal pathogens also increased apoptosis of HEp-2 cells and induced elevated caspase-3 activity. These results suggest that oral bacteria, especially periodontal pathogens, may foster P. aeruginosa invasion into respiratory epithelial cells to enhance host cell cytokine release and apoptosis. PMID:19041936

  14. DNA From Dead Cancer Cells Induces TLR9-Mediated Invasion and Inflammation In Living Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Kaakinen, Mika; Patel, Ankita; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Chen, Dongquan; Harris, Kevin W.; Graves, David; Selander, Katri S.

    2014-01-01

    TLR9 is a cellular DNA-receptor, which is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. Although synthetic TLR9-ligands induce cancer cell invasion in vitro, the role of TLR9 in cancer pathophysiology has remained unclear. We show here that living cancer cells uptake DNA from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells. We discovered that such DNA induces TLR9- and cathepsin-mediated invasion in living cancer cells. To study whether this phenomenon contributes to treatment responses, triple negative, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells stably expressing control or TLR9 siRNA were inoculated orthotopically into nude mice. The mice were treated with vehicle or doxorubicin. The tumor groups exhibited equal decreases in size in response to doxorubicin. However, while the weights of vehicle-treated mice were similar, mice bearing control siRNA tumors became significantly more cachectic in response to doxorubicin, as compared with similarly treated mice bearing TLR9 siRNA tumors, suggesting a TLR9-mediated inflammation at the site of the tumor. In conclusion, our findings propose that DNA released from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells has significant influence on TLR9-mediated biological effects in living cancer cells. Through these mechanisms, tumor TLR9 expression may affect treatment responses to chemotherapy. PMID:24212717

  15. Progesterone Inhibits Leptin-Induced Invasiveness of BeWo Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Gui Se Ra; Nam, Sun Young; Kim, Sa Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the roles of progesterone and leptin in placenta invasion, which is closely related to pregnancy prognosis. We examined the effects of leptin and progesterone on the invasion of BeWo cells, a human trophoblastic cell line, and the effect of concurrent treatment. Methods: Cells were treated with leptin (0, 5, 50, or 500 ng/mL) or progesterone (0, 2, 20, or 200 µM) and cultured in an invasion assay. Cells treated with 500 ng/mL leptin were also treated with progesterone (0, 2, 20, or 200 µM) in the invasion assay for 48 h. The number of cells that invaded the lower surface was counted in five randomly chosen fields using a light microscope with a 200× objective. The mRNA expression levels of MMP-9, TIMP1, TIMP2, and E-cadherin were detected by semi-quantitative PCR. Results: Invasion of BeWo cells was promoted by leptin and influenced by both leptin concentration and treatment duration. Invasion was most effective at 500 ng/mL leptin and 48 h culture. Leptin-induced invasiveness was suppressed by progesterone in a dose-dependent manner. Leptin significantly decreased the expression levels of TIMP1 and E-cadherin, whereas progesterone significantly decreased expression of MMP-9 and significantly increased levels of TIMP1, TIMP2, and E-cadherin. Conclusions: Leptin promotes invasion of BeWo cells, and progesterone suppresses leptin-induced invasion by regulating the expressions of MMP-9, TIMP1, TIMP2, and E-cadherin. The balance between leptin and progesterone may play an important role in human placenta formation during early pregnancy. PMID:26516305

  16. Urotensin II receptor determines prognosis of bladder cancer regulating cell motility/invasion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Transitional Cancer (NMIBC) and Muscle Invasive Bladder Transitional Cancer (MIBC)/invasive have different gene profile and clinical course. NMIBC prognosis is not completely predictable, since the relapse rate is higher than 20%, even in the form of MIBC. The aim of this study is to evaluate if UTR expression can discriminate between NMIBC and MIBC and predict the risk of relapses in NMIBCs. Methods We have investigated upon urotensin-II (UII) receptor (UTR) expression in vivo in 159 patients affected by NMIBC. The biological role of UTR was also investigated in vitro. UTR expression was evaluated in a tissue-micro-array, consisting of normal, NMIBC and invasive bTCC samples. Results UTR discriminated between NMIBC and MIBC and showed a significant correlation between low UTR expression and shorter disease free survival in NMIBC. The superagonist UPG84 induced growth suppression at nM concentrations on 3/4 cell lines. Bladder cancer cell treatment with the antagonist urantide or the knock-down of UTR with a specific shRNA significantly blocked both the motility and invasion of bladder cancer cells. Conclusions The evaluation of UTR expression can discriminate between NMIBC at high and low risk of relapse. Moreover, our data suggest that UTR is involved in the regulation of motility, invasion and proliferation of bladder cancer cells. High UTR expression is an independent prognostic factor of good prognosis for NMIBC regulating motility and invasion of bladder cancer cells. PMID:24893613

  17. Differential DNA methylome profiling of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas suggesting tumour invasion is correlated with cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ye; Zhou, Xinyao; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Xie, Tao; Huang, Yuying; Zhao, Xinzhi; Zhang, Xiaobiao

    2016-08-01

    Global and gene-specific changes to the epigenome are hallmarks of most tumours including those of pituitary origin, and this fact might offer important clues about diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We performed global DNA methylation screening with 6 invasive and 6 noninvasive nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (PA) to investigate whether DNA methylation was associated with the invasion of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. An additional seven PAs were included as an independent cohort to validate the initial results. Five thousand nine hundred thirty-one CpGs were selected (△β ≥0.15 and p value ≤0.01) as differentially methylated sites (DMSs). The hypomethylated DMSs in the invasive PAs were significantly more than the hypermethylated sites. Cluster analysis of 339 CpGs (△β ≥0.25 and p value ≤0.001) demonstrated a complete distinction between the invasive and noninvasive nonfunctioning groups. GO analysis of the three hundred seven corresponding genes shown they were involved in homophilic cell adhesion, cell-cell adhesion, cell adhesion and biological adhesion. The mRNA expression of GALNT9 which contain a validated DMS was significantly downregulated in invasive group. Our findings indicate that the differential DNA methylome profiling of invasive and noninvasive nonfunctioning PAs suggesting tumour invasion is correlated with cell adhesion. PMID:27168190

  18. Cortactin phosphorylation regulates cell invasion through a pH-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Larson, Daniel R.; Mader, Christopher C.; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Gil-Henn, Hava; Oser, Matthew; Chen, Xiaoming; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Invadopodia are invasive protrusions with proteolytic activity uniquely found in tumor cells. Cortactin phosphorylation is a key step during invadopodia maturation, regulating Nck1 binding and cofilin activity. The precise mechanism of cortactin-dependent cofilin regulation and the roles of this pathway in invadopodia maturation and cell invasion are not fully understood. We provide evidence that cortactin–cofilin binding is regulated by local pH changes at invadopodia that are mediated by the sodium–hydrogen exchanger NHE1. Furthermore, cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation mediates the recruitment of NHE1 to the invadopodium compartment, where it locally increases the pH to cause the release of cofilin from cortactin. We show that this mechanism involving cortactin phosphorylation, local pH increase, and cofilin activation regulates the dynamic cycles of invadopodium protrusion and retraction and is essential for cell invasion in 3D. Together, these findings identify a novel pH-dependent regulation of cell invasion. PMID:22105349

  19. Bone marrow stromal cells enhance prostate cancer cell invasion through type I collagen in an MMP-12 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nabha, Sanaa M.; dos Santos, Emanuel Burck; Yamamoto, Hamilto A.; Belizi, Abdelfettah; Dong, Zhong; Meng, Hong; Saliganan, Allen; Sabbota, Aaron; Bonfil, R. Daniel; Cher, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    At the cellular level, the process of bone metastasis involves many steps. Circulating cancer cells enter the marrow, proliferate, induce neovascularization, and ultimately expand into a clinically detectable, often symptomatic, metastatic deposit. Although the initial establishment and later expansion of the metastatic deposit in bone require tumor cells to possess invasive capability, the exact proteases responsible for this phenotype are not well known. The objective of our study was to take an unbiased approach to determine which proteases were expressed and functional during the initial interactions between prostate cancer cells and bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. We found that the combination of human prostate cancer PC3 and BMS cells stimulates the invasive ability of cancer cells through type I collagen. The use of inhibitors for each of the major protease families indicated that 1 or more MMPs was/were responsible for the BMS-induced invasion. Gene profiling and semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increased expression of several MMP genes because of PC3/BMS cell interaction. However, only MMP-12 showed an increase in protein expression. Downregulation of MMP-12 expression in PC3 cells by siRNA inhibited the enhanced invasion induced by PC3/BMS cell interaction. In vivo, MMP-12 was found to be primarily expressed by prostate cancer cells growing in bone. Our data suggest that BMS cells induce MMP-12 expression in prostate cancer cells, which results in invasive cells capable of degradation of type I collagen. PMID:18324629

  20. Salmonella enterica Invasion of Polarized Epithelial Cells Is a Highly Cooperative Effort

    PubMed Central

    Lorkowski, Martin; Felipe-López, Alfonso; Danzer, Claudia A.; Hansmeier, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of polarized epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica requires the cooperative activity of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and the SPI4-encoded adhesin SiiE. The invasion of polarized cells is more efficient than that of nonpolarized cells, and we observed the formation of clusters of bacteria on infected cells. Here we demonstrate that the invasion of polarized cells is a highly cooperative activity. Using a novel live-cell imaging approach, we visualized the cooperative entry of multiple bacteria into ruffles induced on the apical surfaces of polarized cells. The induction of membrane ruffles by activity of Salmonella enables otherwise noninvasive mutant strains to enter polarized host cells. Bacterial motility and chemotaxis were of lower importance for cooperativity in polarized-cell invasion. We propose that cooperative invasion is a key factor for the very efficient entry into polarized cells and a factor contributing to epithelial damage and intestinal inflammation. PMID:24711567

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis increases the invasiveness of oral cancer cells by upregulating IL-8 and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Ha, Na Hee; Park, Dae Gun; Woo, Bok Hee; Kim, Da Jeong; Choi, Jeom Il; Park, Bong Soo; Kim, Yong Deok; Lee, Ji Hye; Park, Hae Ryoun

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that chronic inflammation promotes the aggressiveness of cancers. However, the direct molecular mechanisms underlying a functional link between chronic periodontitis, the most common form of oral inflammatory diseases, and the malignancy of oral cancer remain unknown. To elucidate the role of chronic periodontitis in progression of oral cancer, we examined the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a major pathogen that causes chronic periodontitis, on the invasiveness of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells, including SCC-25, OSC-20 and SAS cells. Exposures to P. gingivalis promoted the invasive ability of OSC-20 and SAS cells via the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-1 and MMP-2. However, P. gingivalis-infected SCC-25 cells did not exhibit changes in their invasive properties or the low expression levels of MMPs. In an effort to delineate the molecular players that control the invasiveness, we first assessed the level of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a well-known inflammatory cytokine, in P. gingivalis-infected OSCC cells. IL-8 secretion was substantially increased in the OSC-20 and SAS cells, but not in the SCC-25 cells, following P. gingivalis infection. When IL-8 was directly applied to SCC-25 cells, their invasive ability and MMP level were significantly increased. Furthermore, the downregulation of IL-8 in P. gingivalis-infected OSC-20 and SAS cells attenuated their invasive potentials and MMP levels. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that P. gingivalis infection plays an important role in the promotion of the invasive potential of OSCC cells via the upregulation of IL-8 and MMPs. PMID:27468958

  2. Actin-associated protein palladin promotes tumor cell invasion by linking extracellular matrix degradation to cell cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Gucciardo, Erika; Lohi, Jouko; Li, Rui; Sugiyama, Nami; Carpen, Olli; Lehti, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast carcinomas, characterized by unfavorable prognosis and frequent metastases, are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. During this process, cancer cells undergo cytoskeletal reorganization and up-regulate membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP; MMP14), which functions in actin-based pseudopods to drive invasion by extracellular matrix degradation. However, the mechanisms that couple matrix proteolysis to the actin cytoskeleton in cell invasion have remained unclear. On the basis of a yeast two-hybrid screen for the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail-binding proteins, we identify here a novel Src-regulated protein interaction between the dynamic cytoskeletal scaffold protein palladin and MT1-MMP. These proteins were coexpressed in invasive human basal-like breast carcinomas and corresponding cell lines, where they were associated in the same matrix contacting and degrading membrane complexes. The silencing and overexpression of the 90-kDa palladin isoform revealed the functional importance of the interaction with MT1-MMP in pericellular matrix degradation and mesenchymal tumor cell invasion, whereas in MT1-MMP–negative cells, palladin overexpression was insufficient for invasion. Moreover, this invasion was inhibited in a dominant-negative manner by an immunoglobulin domain–containing palladin fragment lacking the dynamic scaffold and Src-binding domains. These results identify a novel protein interaction that links matrix degradation to cytoskeletal dynamics and migration signaling in mesenchymal cell invasion. PMID:24989798

  3. FAK competes for Src to promote migration against invasion in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolli-Bouhafs, K; Sick, E; Noulet, F; Gies, J-P; De Mey, J; Rondé, P

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most deadly cancers because of its high propensity to metastasis, a process that requires migration and invasion of tumor cells driven by the regulated formation of adhesives structures like focal adhesions (FAs) and invasive structures like invadopodia. FAK, the major kinase of FAs, has been implicated in many cellular processes, including migration and invasion. In this study, we investigated the role of FAK in the regulation of invasion. We report that suppression of FAK in B16F10 melanoma cells led to increased invadopodia formation and invasion through Matrigel, but impaired migration. These effects are rescued by FAK WT but not by FAKY397F reexpression. Invadopodia formation requires local Src activation downstream of FAK and in a FAK phosphorylation-dependant manner. FAK deletion correlates with increased phosphorylation of Tks-5 (tyrosine kinase substrate with five SH3 domain) and reactive oxygen species production. In conclusion, our data show that FAK is able to mediate opposite effects on cell migration and invasion. Accordingly, beneficial effects of FAK inhibition are context dependent and may depend on the cell response to environmental cues and/or on the primary or secondary changes that melanoma experienced through the invasion cycle. PMID:25118939

  4. Invasion of HeLa 229 cells by virulent Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Ewanowich, C A; Melton, A R; Weiss, A A; Sherburne, R K; Peppler, M S

    1989-01-01

    Phase-dependent invasive behavior of Bordetella pertussis was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated HeLa cell monolayers and by transmission electron microscopy. Several mutants of B. pertussis with Tn5 or Tn5 lac inserted into various vir-regulated genes were evaluated for differences in their invasive abilities. Mutants lacking filamentous hemagglutinin, pertussis toxin, and two as yet uncharacterized vir-regulated products had levels of invasion significantly lower than that of the parent strain BP338. In contrast, invasion by mutants lacking adenylate cyclase toxin was significantly increased compared with that of wild-type B. pertussis. This increase in invasion was eliminated when concentrations of intracellular cyclic 3'-5' AMP were stimulated by treating HeLa cells with cholera toxin or forskolin. Entry of B. pertussis occurred through a microfilament-dependent phagocytic process, as evidenced by the marked reduction in uptake following treatment of HeLa cells with cytochalasin D. Invasion was inhibited with polyclonal anti-B. pertussis and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antisera. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against lipooligosaccharide A reduced uptake by 65.5%. The preservation of HeLa cell integrity and the limited replication of intracellular bacteria suggest that invasion may represent a means by which B. pertussis evades an active host immune response. Images PMID:2547718

  5. CXCR4 receptor positive spheroid forming cells are responsible for tumor invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Alexander; Song, Yao-Hua; Muehlberg, Fabian; Droll, Lilly; Beckmann, Christoph; Alt, Eckhard

    2009-07-18

    Stem cells have been found to be involved in breast cancer growth, but the specific contribution of cancer stem cells in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still uncertain. We found that murine breast cancer cell lines 4T1, 4TO7, 167Farn and 67NR contains cancer stem cells defined by CXCR4 expression and their capability of forming spheroids in suspension culture. Importantly, we showed that CXCR4 expression is essential for tumor invasiveness because both CXCR4 neutralizing antibody and shRNA knockdown of the CXCR4 receptor significantly reduced tumor cell invasion. PMID:19286309

  6. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CAO, JINGYI; WANG, HAINAN; CHEN, FEIFEI; FANG, JIANZHENG; XU, AIMING; XI, WEI; ZHANG, SHENGLI; WU, GANG; WANG, ZENGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786-0 and Caki-1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:27035542

  7. Axl Phosphorylates Elmo Scaffold Proteins To Promote Rac Activation and Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Thuraia, Afnan; Gauthier, Rosemarie; Chidiac, Rony; Fukui, Yoshinori; Screaton, Robert A.; Gratton, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl contributes to cell migration and invasion. Expression of Axl correlates with metastatic progression in cancer patients, yet the specific signaling events promoting invasion downstream of Axl are poorly defined. Herein, we report Elmo scaffolds to be direct substrates and binding partners of Axl. Elmo proteins are established to interact with Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors to control Rac-mediated cytoskeletal dynamics. Proteomics and mutagenesis studies reveal that Axl phosphorylates Elmo1/2 on a conserved carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Upon Gas6-dependent activation of Axl, endogenous Elmo2 becomes phosphorylated on Tyr-713 and enters into a physical complex with Axl in breast cancer cells. Interfering with Elmo2 expression prevented Gas6-induced Rac1 activation in breast cancer cells. Similarly to blocking of Axl, Elmo2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Dock1 abolishes breast cancer cell invasion. Interestingly, Axl or Elmo2 knockdown diminishes breast cancer cell proliferation. Rescue of Elmo2 knockdown cells with the wild-type protein but not with Elmo2 harboring Tyr-713-Phe mutations restores cell invasion and cell proliferation. These results define a new mechanism by which Axl promotes cell proliferation and invasion and identifies inhibition of the Elmo-Dock pathway as a potential therapeutic target to stop Axl-induced metastases. PMID:25332238

  8. Axl phosphorylates Elmo scaffold proteins to promote Rac activation and cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Abu-Thuraia, Afnan; Gauthier, Rosemarie; Chidiac, Rony; Fukui, Yoshinori; Screaton, Robert A; Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl contributes to cell migration and invasion. Expression of Axl correlates with metastatic progression in cancer patients, yet the specific signaling events promoting invasion downstream of Axl are poorly defined. Herein, we report Elmo scaffolds to be direct substrates and binding partners of Axl. Elmo proteins are established to interact with Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors to control Rac-mediated cytoskeletal dynamics. Proteomics and mutagenesis studies reveal that Axl phosphorylates Elmo1/2 on a conserved carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Upon Gas6-dependent activation of Axl, endogenous Elmo2 becomes phosphorylated on Tyr-713 and enters into a physical complex with Axl in breast cancer cells. Interfering with Elmo2 expression prevented Gas6-induced Rac1 activation in breast cancer cells. Similarly to blocking of Axl, Elmo2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Dock1 abolishes breast cancer cell invasion. Interestingly, Axl or Elmo2 knockdown diminishes breast cancer cell proliferation. Rescue of Elmo2 knockdown cells with the wild-type protein but not with Elmo2 harboring Tyr-713-Phe mutations restores cell invasion and cell proliferation. These results define a new mechanism by which Axl promotes cell proliferation and invasion and identifies inhibition of the Elmo-Dock pathway as a potential therapeutic target to stop Axl-induced metastases. PMID:25332238

  9. Role of Phosphodiesterase 2 in Growth and Invasion of Human Malignant Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Kenichi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Inui, Madoka; Manganiello, Vincent C.; Tagawa, Toshiro; Arai, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate the intracellular concentrations and effects of adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The role of PDEs in malignant tumor cells is still uncertain. The role of PDEs, especially PDE2, in human malignant melanoma PMP cell line was examined in this study. In PMP cells, 8-bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analog, inhibited cell growth and invasion. However, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cGMP analog, had little or no effect. PDE2 and PDE4, but not PDE3, were expressed in PMP cells. Growth and invasion of PMP cells were inhibited by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a specific PDE2 inhibitor, but not by rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor. Moreover, cell growth and invasion were inhibited by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for PDE2A and a catalytically-dead mutant of PDE2A. After treating cells with EHNA or rolipram, intracellular cAMP concentrations were increased. Growth and invasion were stimulated by PKA14-22, a PKA inhibitor, and inhibited by N6-benzoyl-c AMP, a PKA specific cAMP analogue, whereas 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2’-O-methyl-cAMP, an Epac specific cAMP analogue, did not. Invasion, but not growth, was stimulated by A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP) St-Ht31 inhibitory peptide. Based on these results, PDE2 appears to play an important role in growth and invasion of the human malignant melanoma PMP cell line. Selectively suppressing PDE2 might possibly inhibit growth and invasion of other malignant tumor cell lines. PMID:24705027

  10. Role of phosphodiesterase 2 in growth and invasion of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Kenichi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Inui, Madoka; Manganiello, Vincent C; Tagawa, Toshiro; Arai, Naoya

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate the intracellular concentrations and effects of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The role of PDEs in malignant tumor cells is still uncertain. The role of PDEs, especially PDE2, in human malignant melanoma PMP cell line was examined in this study. In PMP cells, 8-bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analog, inhibited cell growth and invasion. However, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cGMP analog, had little or no effect. PDE2 and PDE4, but not PDE3, were expressed in PMP cells. Growth and invasion of PMP cells were inhibited by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a specific PDE2 inhibitor, but not by rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor. Moreover, cell growth and invasion were inhibited by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for PDE2A and a catalytically-dead mutant of PDE2A. After treating cells with EHNA or rolipram, intracellular cAMP concentrations were increased. Growth and invasion were stimulated by PKA14-22, a PKA inhibitor, and inhibited by N(6)-benzoyl-c AMP, a PKA specific cAMP analog, whereas 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP, an Epac specific cAMP analog, did not. Invasion, but not growth, was stimulated by A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP) St-Ht31 inhibitory peptide. Based on these results, PDE2 appears to play an important role in growth and invasion of the human malignant melanoma PMP cell line. Selectively suppressing PDE2 might possibly inhibit growth and invasion of other malignant tumor cell lines. PMID:24705027

  11. CRP2, a new invadopodia actin bundling factor critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dieterle, Monika; Moreau, Flora; Al Absi, Antoun; Steinmetz, André; Oudin, Anaïs; Berchem, Guy; Janji, Bassam; Thomas, Clément

    2016-01-01

    A critical process underlying cancer metastasis is the acquisition by tumor cells of an invasive phenotype. At the subcellular level, invasion is facilitated by actin-rich protrusions termed invadopodia, which direct extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Here, we report the identification of a new cytoskeletal component of breast cancer cell invadopodia, namely cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2). We found that CRP2 was not or only weakly expressed in epithelial breast cancer cells whereas it was up-regulated in mesenchymal/invasive breast cancer cells. In addition, high expression of the CRP2 encoding gene CSRP2 was associated with significantly increased risk of metastasis in basal-like breast cancer patients. CRP2 knockdown significantly reduced the invasive potential of aggressive breast cancer cells, whereas it did not impair 2D cell migration. In keeping with this, CRP2-depleted breast cancer cells exhibited a reduced capacity to promote ECM degradation, and to secrete and express MMP-9, a matrix metalloproteinase repeatedly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In turn, ectopic expression of CRP2 in weakly invasive cells was sufficient to stimulate cell invasion. Both GFP-fused and endogenous CRP2 localized to the extended actin core of invadopodia, a structure primarily made of actin bundles. Purified recombinant CRP2 autonomously crosslinked actin filaments into thick bundles, suggesting that CRP2 contributes to the formation/maintenance of the actin core. Finally, CRP2 depletion significantly reduced the incidence of lung metastatic lesions in two xenograft mouse models of breast cancer. Collectively, our data identify CRP2 as a new cytoskeletal component of invadopodia that critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26883198

  12. Dysregulation of cell polarity proteins synergize with oncogenes or the microenvironment to induce invasive behavior in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Samit; Seifried, Laurie; Feigin, Michael E; Gibbons, Don L; Scuoppo, Claudio; Lin, Wei; Rizvi, Zain H; Lind, Evan; Dissanayake, Dilan; Kurie, Jonathan; Ohashi, Pam; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2012-01-01

    Changes in expression and localization of proteins that regulate cell and tissue polarity are frequently observed in carcinoma. However, the mechanisms by which changes in cell polarity proteins regulate carcinoma progression are not well understood. Here, we report that loss of polarity protein expression in epithelial cells primes them for cooperation with oncogenes or changes in tissue microenvironment to promote invasive behavior. Activation of ErbB2 in cells lacking the polarity regulators Scribble, Dlg1 or AF-6, induced invasive properties. This cooperation required the ability of ErbB2 to regulate the Par6/aPKC polarity complex. Inhibition of the ErbB2-Par6 pathway was sufficient to block ErbB2-induced invasion suggesting that two polarity hits may be needed for ErbB2 to promote invasion. Interestingly, in the absence of ErbB2 activation, either a combined loss of two polarity proteins, or exposure of cells lacking one polarity protein to cytokines IL-6 or TNFα induced invasive behavior in epithelial cells. We observed the invasive behavior only when cells were plated on a stiff matrix (Matrigel/Collagen-1) and not when plated on a soft matrix (Matrigel alone). Cells lacking two polarity proteins upregulated expression of EGFR and activated Akt. Inhibition of Akt activity blocked the invasive behavior identifying a mechanism by which loss of polarity promotes invasion of epithelial cells. Thus, we demonstrate that loss of polarity proteins confers phenotypic plasticity to epithelial cells such that they display normal behavior under normal culture conditions but display aggressive behavior in response to activation of oncogenes or exposure to cytokines. PMID:22529912

  13. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  14. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    2015-10-01

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  15. Embryonic Chicken Transplantation is a Promising Model for Studying the Invasive Behavior of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Aparna; McKeown, Sonja J.; Woods, Briannyn L.; Prithviraj, Prashanth; Cebon, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is a hallmark event in the metastatic cascade conferring invasive ability to tumor cells. There are ongoing efforts to replicate the physiological events occurring during mobilization of tumor cells in model systems. However, few systems are able to capture these complex in vivo events. The embryonic chicken transplantation model has emerged as a useful system to assess melanoma cells including functions that are relevant to the metastatic process, namely invasion and plasticity. The chicken embryo represents an accessible and economical 3-dimensional in vivo model for investigating melanoma cell invasion as it exploits the ancestral relationship between melanoma and its precursor neural crest cells. We describe a methodology that enables the interrogation of melanoma cell motility within the developing avian embryo. This model involves the injection of melanoma cells into the neural tube of chicken embryos. Melanoma cells are labeled using fluorescent tracker dye, Vybrant DiO, then cultured as hanging drops for 24 h to aggregate the cells. Groups of approximately 700 cells are placed into the neural tube of chicken embryos prior to the onset of neural crest migration at the hindbrain level (embryonic day 1.5) or trunk level (embryonic day 2.5). Chick embryos are reincubated and analyzed after 48 h for the location of melanoma cells using fluorescent microscopy on whole mounts and cross-sections of the embryos. Using this system, we compared the in vivo invasive behavior of epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like melanoma cells. We report that the developing embryonic microenvironment confers motile abilities to both types of melanoma cells. Hence, the embryonic chicken transplantation model has the potential to become a valuable tool for in vivo melanoma invasion studies. Importantly, it may provide novel insights into and reveal previously unknown mediators of the metastatic steps of invasion and dissemination in melanoma

  16. A study on the interfacial effect on cancer-cell invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linan; Song, Jihwan; Kim, Dongchoul

    2011-04-01

    Cancer-cell invasion is a complex biological process involving cell migration through the extracellular matrix, which is driven by haptotaxis, and the interactions between cancer cells and the surrounding matrix. In this paper, a three-dimensional haptotaxis model that simulates the migration of a cancer cell population, including cell-cell adhesion and cell-matrix adhesion, is proposed. We employ a diffuse interface model that incorporates the mechanism of haptotaxis and the interface energy of cancer cells as well as that between cancer cells and the matrix. The semi-implicit Fourier spectral scheme is applied for high efficiency and numerical stability. The simulations systematically reveal the dynamics of cancer-cell migration and the effect of interface energy on the invasion of cancer cells.

  17. Regulated expression of ADAMTS-12 in human trophoblastic cells: a role for ADAMTS-12 in epithelial cell invasion?

    PubMed

    Beristain, Alexander G; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C K

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma cells exploit the same molecular machinery that allows human placental cytotrophoblasts to develop an invasive phenotype. As altered expression levels of ADAMTS (ADisintegrin And Metalloproteinase with ThromboSpondin repeats) subtypes have been associated with cancer progression, we have examined the function and regulation of members of this gene family in epithelial cell invasion using cultures of highly invasive extravillous cytotrophoblasts and the poorly invasive JEG-3 cytotrophoblast cell line as model systems. Of the multiple ADAMTS subtypes identified in first trimester human placenta and these two trophoblastic cell types, only ADAMTS-12 was preferentially expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblasts. Transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukin-1β, two cytokines that promote and restrain cytotrophoblast invasion in vitro, were also found to differentially regulate trophoblastic ADAMTS-12 mRNA levels. Loss- or gain-of-function studies confirmed that ADAMTS-12, independent of its proteolytic activity, plays a specific, non-redundant role in trophoblast invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ADAMTS-12 regulated cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and invasion through a mechanism involving the αvβ3 integrin heterodimer. This study identifies a novel biological role for ADAMTS-12, and highlights the importance and complexity of its non-proteolytic domain(s) pertaining to its function. PMID:21494557

  18. Regulated Expression of ADAMTS-12 in Human Trophoblastic Cells: A Role for ADAMTS-12 in Epithelial Cell Invasion?

    PubMed Central

    Beristain, Alexander G.; Zhu, Hua; Leung, Peter C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma cells exploit the same molecular machinery that allows human placental cytotrophoblasts to develop an invasive phenotype. As altered expression levels of ADAMTS (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with ThromboSpondin repeats) subtypes have been associated with cancer progression, we have examined the function and regulation of members of this gene family in epithelial cell invasion using cultures of highly invasive extravillous cytotrophoblasts and the poorly invasive JEG-3 cytotrophoblast cell line as model systems. Of the multiple ADAMTS subtypes identified in first trimester human placenta and these two trophoblastic cell types, only ADAMTS-12 was preferentially expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblasts. Transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukin-1β, two cytokines that promote and restrain cytotrophoblast invasion in vitro, were also found to differentially regulate trophoblastic ADAMTS-12 mRNA levels. Loss- or gain-of-function studies confirmed that ADAMTS-12, independent of its proteolytic activity, plays a specific, non-redundant role in trophoblast invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ADAMTS-12 regulated cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and invasion through a mechanism involving the αvβ3 integrin heterodimer. This study identifies a novel biological role for ADAMTS-12, and highlights the importance and complexity of its non-proteolytic domain(s) pertaining to its function. PMID:21494557

  19. Cytoplasmic Accumulation of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K Strongly Promotes Tumor Invasion in Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Otoshi, Taiyo; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Morimoto, Kazuya; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a part of the ribonucleoprotein complex which regulates diverse biological events. While overexpression of hnRNP K has been shown to be related to tumorigenesis in several cancers, both the expression patterns and biological mechanisms of hnRNP K in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells remain unclear. In this study, we showed that hnRNP K protein was strongly expressed in selected RCC cell lines (ACHN, A498, Caki-1, 786–0), and knock-down of hnRNP K expression by siRNA induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Based on immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of hnRNP K expression in human clear cell RCC specimens, we demonstrated that there was a significant positive correlation between hnRNP K staining score and tumor aggressiveness (e.g., Fuhrman grade, metastasis). Particularly, the rate of cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP K in primary RCC with distant metastasis was significantly higher than that in RCC without metastasis. Additionally, our results indicated that the cytoplasmic distribution of hnRNP K induced by TGF-β stimulus mainly contributed to TGF-β-triggered tumor cell invasion in RCC cells. Dominant cytoplasmic expression of ectopic hnRNP K markedly suppressed the inhibition of invasion by knock-down of endogenous hnRNP K. The expression level of matrix metalloproteinase protein-2 was decreased by endogenous hnRNP K knock-down, and restored by ectopic hnRNP K. Therefore, hnRNP K may be a key molecule involved in cell motility in RCC cells, and molecular mechanism associated with the subcellular localization of hnRNP K may be a novel target in the treatment of metastatic RCC. PMID:26713736

  20. TRPV2 Mediates Adrenomedullin Stimulation of Prostate and Urothelial Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Lehen’kyi, V’yacheslav; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. AM is expressed in a variety of malignant tissues and cancer cell lines and was shown to be a mitogenic factor capable of stimulating growth of several cancer cell types. In addition, AM is a survival factor for certain cancer cells. Some data suggest that AM might be involved in the progression cancer metastasis via angiogenesis and cell migration and invasion control. The Transient Receptor Potential channel TRPV2 is known to promote in prostate cancer cell migration and invasive phenotype and is correlated with the stage and grade of bladder cancer. In this work we show that AM induces prostate and urothelial cancer cell migration and invasion through TRPV2 translocation to plasma membrane and the subsequent increase in resting calcium level. PMID:23741410

  1. Clonorchis sinensis Infestation Promotes Three-Dimensional Aggregation and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jihee; Ju, Jung-Won; Kim, Sun Min; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Pak, Jhang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Numerous experimental and epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) infestation and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). However, the role of C. sinensis in the increased invasiveness and proliferation involved in the malignancy of CCA has not been addressed yet. Here, we investigated the possibility that C. sinensis infestation promotes expression of focal and cell-cell adhesion proteins in CCA cells and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Adhesion proteins help maintain cell aggregates, and MMPs promote the three-dimensional invasion of cells into the neighboring extracellular matrix (ECM). Using a novel microfluidic assay, we quantitatively addressed the role of excretory-secretory products (ESPs) gradients from C. sinensis in promoting the invasion of cells into the neighboring ECM. PMID:25340585

  2. Immunotherapy of invasive fungal infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Schmidt, Stanislaw; Tramsen, Lars; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of new antifungal compounds, invasive fungal infection remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Allogeneic HSCT recipients suffer from a long lasting defect of different arms of the immune system, which increases the risk for and deteriorates the prognosis of invasive fungal infections. In turn, advances in understanding these immune deficits have resulted in promising strategies to enhance or restore critical immune functions in allogeneic HSCT recipients. Potential approaches include the administration of granulocytes, since neutropenia is the single most important risk factor for invasive fungal infection, and preliminary clinical results suggest a benefit of adoptively transferred donor-derived antifungal T cells. In vitro data and animal studies demonstrate an antifungal effect of natural killer cells, but clinical data are lacking to date. This review summarizes and critically discusses the available data of immunotherapeutic strategies in allogeneic HSCT recipients suffering from invasive fungal infection. PMID:23404543

  3. Effects of osthole on migration and invasion in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dapeng; Gu, Tianwei; Wang, Ting; Tang, Qingjiu; Ma, Changyan

    2010-01-01

    Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, is extracted from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri Cusson. Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and the leading cause of death in women. Recent studies have shown that Osthole has anti-tumor activity. However, the effects of Osthole on the migration and invasion of cancer cells have not yet been reported. Here, we found that Osthole is effective in inhibiting the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells by wound healing and transwell assays. Luciferase and zymography assays revealed that Osthole effectively inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-2 promoter and enzyme activity, which might be one of the causes that lead to the inhibition of migration and invasion by Osthole. This is the first report on the inhibitory function of Osthole in migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Our findings indicate a need for further evaluation of Osthole in breast cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention. PMID:20622464

  4. Furin inhibition results in absent or decreased invasiveness and tumorigenicity of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Daniel E.; Lopez De Cicco, Ricardo; Mahloogi, Haleh; Zucker, Stanley; Thomas, Gary; Klein-Szanto, Andres J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Pro-protein convertases such as furin are expressed in many human tumor lines and primary tumors. Furin processes stromelysin-3, membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) involved in tumor cell invasiveness, as well as growth factors such as transforming growth factor β1. Evaluation of furin expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells exhibiting different invasive ability showed that furin overexpression correlated with their respective invasiveness. The use of a selective furin inhibitor, alpha 1-PDX (PDX) was studied in three furin-expressing invasive HNSCC cell lines. The effects of PDX transfection were evaluated in vivo and in vitro to determine changes in the malignant phenotype. Transfection of HNSCC cell lines with PDX resulted in significant decrease or absence of tumorigenicity after s.c. inoculation into severe combined immunodeficient mice. Likewise, in vitro invasiveness was reduced ≈50%. The in vivo invasion assay using tracheal xenotransplants showed even more drastic reductions of the invasive ability of PDX-transfected cells (up to an 80% decrease). PDX-transfected cells did not invade or penetrated less into the tracheal wall tissues than their vector alone-transfected counterparts. In addition, the former cells showed a remarkable decrease in MMP-2 processing and activity. After PDX transfection the cells were less efficient in processing the tumor progression-associated furin substrates transforming growth factor β1 and pro-membrane type 1-MMP. These findings indicate that furin inhibition is a feasible approach to attenuate and even abolish certain critical attributes of the advanced malignant phenotype. Thus, furin should be considered as a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:11517338

  5. Invasive cells in animals and plants: searching for LECA machineries in later eukaryotic life

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cell growth and migration is usually considered a specifically metazoan phenomenon. However, common features and mechanisms of cytoskeletal rearrangements, membrane trafficking and signalling processes contribute to cellular invasiveness in organisms as diverse as metazoans and plants – two eukaryotic realms genealogically connected only through the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LECA). By comparing current understanding of cell invasiveness in model cell types of both metazoan and plant origin (invadopodia of transformed metazoan cells, neurites, pollen tubes and root hairs), we document that invasive cell behavior in both lineages depends on similar mechanisms. While some superficially analogous processes may have arisen independently by convergent evolution (e.g. secretion of substrate- or tissue-macerating enzymes by both animal and plant cells), at the heart of cell invasion is an evolutionarily conserved machinery of cellular polarization and oriented cell mobilization, involving the actin cytoskeleton and the secretory pathway. Its central components - small GTPases (in particular RHO, but also ARF and Rab), their specialized effectors, actin and associated proteins, the exocyst complex essential for polarized secretion, or components of the phospholipid- and redox- based signalling circuits (inositol-phospholipid kinases/PIP2, NADPH oxidases) are aparently homologous among plants and metazoans, indicating that they were present already in LECA. Reviewer: This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Valerian Dolja and Purificacion Lopez-Garcia. PMID:23557484

  6. Quantitative FRET Imaging to Visualize the Invasiveness of Live Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yi; Huang, He; Pan, Yijia; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Ozer, Howard; Strongin, Alex Y.; Wang, Yingxiao

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) remodel tumor microenvironment and promote cancer metastasis. Among the MMP family proteases, the proteolytic activity of the pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic membrane-type 1 (MT1)-MMP constitutes a promising and targetable biomarker of aggressive cancer tumors. In this study, we systematically developed and characterized several highly sensitive and specific biosensors based on fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET), for visualizing MT1-MMP activity in live cells. The sensitivity of the AHLR-MT1-MMP biosensor was the highest and five times that of a reported version. Hence, the AHLR biosensor was employed to quantitatively profile the MT1-MMP activity in multiple breast cancer cell lines, and to visualize the spatiotemporal MT1-MMP activity simultaneously with the underlying collagen matrix at the single cell level. We detected a significantly higher level of MT1-MMP activity in invasive cancer cells than those in benign or non-invasive cells. Our results further show that the high MT1-MMP activity was stimulated by the adhesion of invasive cancer cells onto the extracellular matrix, which is precisely correlated with the cell’s ability to degrade the collagen matrix. Thus, we systematically optimized a FRET-based biosensor, which provides a powerful tool to detect the pro-invasive MT1-MMP activity at single cell levels. This readout can be applied to profile the invasiveness of single cells from clinical samples, and to serve as an indicator for screening anti-cancer inhibitors. PMID:23516511

  7. The flavonoid tangeretin inhibits invasion of MO4 mouse cells into embryonic chick heart in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bracke, M E; Vyncke, B M; Van Larebeke, N A; Bruyneel, E A; De Bruyne, G K; De Pestel, G H; De Coster, W J; Espeel, M F; Mareel, M M

    1989-01-01

    Tangeretin, a flavonoid from citrus plants, was found to inhibit the invasion of MO4 cells (Kirsten murine sarcoma virus transformed fetal mouse cells) into embryonic chick heart fragments in vitro. The flavonoid appeared to be chemically stable in tissue culture medium, and the anti-invasive effect was reversible on omission of the molecule from the medium. Unlike (+)-catechin, another anti-invasive flavonoid, tangeretin bound poorly to extracellular matrix. It did not alter fucosylated surface glycopeptides of MO4 cells. Tangeretin seemed not to act as a microtubule inhibitor, as immunocytochemistry revealed no disturbance of the cytoplasmic microtubule complex. However, at anti-invasive concentrations of tangeretin, cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation appeared to be inhibited. When cultured on an artificial substrate, treated MO4 cells were less elongated, covered a larger surface area and exhibited a slower directional migration than untreated cells. From the decrease in ATP content in MO4 cells after tangeretin treatment, we deduce that this flavonoid inhibits a number of intracellular processes, which leads to an inhibition of cell motility and hence of invasion. PMID:2924447

  8. Targeting of surface alpha-enolase inhibits the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chattaragada, Michelle S.; Rolla, Simona; Conti, Laura; Bestagno, Marco; Zentilin, Lorena; Yang, Sheng-Hui; Migliorini, Paola; Cappello, Paola; Burrone, Oscar; Novelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy characterized by rapid progression, invasiveness and resistance to treatment. We have previously demonstrated that most PDAC patients have circulating antibodies against the glycolytic enzyme alpha-enolase (ENO1), which correlates with a better response to therapy and survival. ENO1 is a metabolic enzyme, also expressed on the cell surface where it acts as a plasminogen receptor. ENO1 play a crucial role in cell invasion and metastasis by promoting plasminogen activation into plasmin, a serine-protease involved in extracellular matrix degradation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ENO1 in PDAC cell invasion. We observed that ENO1 was expressed on the cell surface of most PDAC cell lines. Mouse anti-human ENO1 monoclonal antibodies inhibited plasminogen-dependent invasion of human PDAC cells, and their metastatic spreading in immunosuppressed mice was inhibited. Notably, a single administration of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-expressing cDNA coding for 72/1 anti-ENO1 mAb reduced the number of lung metastases in immunosuppressed mice injected with PDAC cells. Overall, these data indicate that ENO1 is involved in PDAC cell invasion, and that administration of an anti-ENO1 mAb can be exploited as a novel therapeutic option to increase the survival of metastatic PDAC patients. PMID:25860938

  9. Metallothionein-3 Increases Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Invasiveness via Induction of Metalloproteinase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Olbromski, Mateusz; Gomulkiewicz, Agnieszka; Owczarek, Tomasz; Kruczak, Anna; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Rys, Janusz; Ugorski, Maciej; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    It has been recently found that metallothionein-3 (MT3) enhances the invasiveness and tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. This finding is in contrast to those of earlier studies, which indicated that overexpression of MT3 in breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines inhibits their growth in vitro. Therefore, to clarify the role of MT3 in breast cancer progression, we analyzed the effect of MT3-overexpression on proliferation, invasiveness, migration, and tumorigenesis of breast cancer MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells overexpressing MT3 were characterized by increased invasiveness in vitro, compared to the control cells. Interestingly, this increased invasiveness correlated with a highly increased concentration of MMP3 in the culture supernatants (p<0.0001). Our data suggest that MT3 may regulate breast cancer cell invasiveness by modulating the expression of MMP3. These experimental results, obtained using triple-negative MDA-MB-231/BO2 cells, were further supported by clinical data. It was found that, in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), nuclear MT3 immunoreactivity in cancer cells tended to be associated with patients’ shorter disease-specific survival, suggesting that nuclear MT3 expression may be a potential marker of poor prognosis of triple-negative TNBC cases. PMID:25933064

  10. KIF1B promotes glioma migration and invasion via cell surface localization of MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songyu; Han, Mingzhi; Chen, Weiliang; He, Ying; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Peng; Huang, Qibing; Gao, Liang; Qu, Xun; Li, Xingang

    2016-02-01

    Malignant glioma is notorious for its aggressiveness and poor prognosis, and the invasiveness of glioma cells is the major obstacle. Accumulating evidence indicates that kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) may play key roles in tumor invasiveness, but the mechanisms remained unresolved. Our previous study demonstrated that membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) was involved in Kinesin family member 1B (KIF1B)-modulated invasion of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, the role of KIF1B in glioma cell invasion and its relationship with MT1-MMP were explored in the present study. We found that aberrantly increased expression of KIF1B was associated with worse WHO pathological classification and Karnofsky performance status (KPS), which also showed a trend towards worse prognosis. In the transwell assay, knockdown of KIF1B using siRNA repressed U87MG and A172 glioma cell migration and invasion. Silencing KIF1B inhibited expression of membranal MT1-MMP; however, the amount of MT1-MMP in the whole cell lysate was not affected. In conclusion, targeting KIF1B may be an option for anti-invasive therapies targeting glioma. PMID:26576027