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  1. Multiple mechanisms contribute to impairment of type 1 interferon production during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lian Ni; Burke, Shannon; Montoya, Maria; Borrow, Persephone

    2009-06-01

    Type 1 IFNs, innate cytokines with important effector and immunomodulatory properties, are rapidly induced in the acute phase of many virus infections; however, this is generally a transient response that is not sustained during virus persistence. To gain insight into mechanisms that can contribute to down-regulation of type 1 IFN production during virus persistence, we analyzed type 1 IFN production during acute and chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. High-level type 1 IFN production was transiently up-regulated in cells including plasmacytoid and conventional dendritic cells (DCs) following LCMV infection of mice, but LCMV persistence was associated with only low-level type 1 IFN production. Nonetheless, chronically infected mice were able to up-regulate type 1 IFN production in response to TLR3, 7, and 9 ligands, albeit less efficiently than uninfected mice. Splenic DC numbers in mice chronically infected with LCMV were decreased, and the remaining cells exhibited a reduced response to TLR stimulation. LCMV-infected cell lines efficiently up-regulated type 1 IFN production following TLR ligation and infection with a DNA virus, but exhibited a defect in type 1 IFN induction following infection with Sendai, an RNA virus. This block in type 1 IFN production by infected cells, together with abnormalities in DC numbers and functions, likely contribute to the low-level type 1 IFN production in mice chronically infected with LCMV. Impairment of type 1 IFN production may both promote virus persistence and impact on host immunocompetence. Understanding the mechanisms involved may assist in development of strategies for control of virus persistence and superinfection. PMID:19454715

  2. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of Activated Regulatory T Cells Isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus-infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Jin; Oh, Ji Hoon; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which express Foxp3 as a transcription factor, are subsets of CD4(+) T cells. Treg cells play crucial roles in immune tolerance and homeostasis maintenance by regulating the immune response. The primary role of Treg cells is to suppress the proliferation of effector T (Teff) cells and the production of cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. It has been demonstrated that Treg cells' ability to inhibit the function of Teff cells is enhanced during persistent pathogen infection and cancer development. To clarify the function of Treg cells under resting or inflamed conditions, a variety of in vitro suppression assays using mouse or human Treg cells have been devised. The main aim of this study is to develop a method to compare the differences in phenotype and suppressive function between resting and activated Treg cells. To isolate activated Treg cells, mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13 (CL13), a chronic strain of LCMV. Treg cells isolated from the spleen of LCMV CL13-infected mice exhibited both the activated phenotype and enhanced suppressive activity compared with resting Treg cells isolated from naïve mice. Here, we describe the basic protocol for ex vivo phenotype analysis to distinguish activated Treg cells from resting Treg cells. Furthermore, we describe a protocol for the measurement of the suppressive activity of fully activated Treg cells. PMID:27404802

  3. Uncovering subdominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed Central

    van der Most, R G; Concepcion, R J; Oseroff, C; Alexander, J; Southwood, S; Sidney, J; Chesnut, R W; Ahmed, R; Sette, A

    1997-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) in BALB/c mice is predominantly directed against a single, Ld-restricted epitope in the viral nucleoprotein (residues 118 to 126). To investigate whether any Kd/Dd-restricted responses were activated but did not expand during the primary response, we used a BALB/c mutant, BALB/c-H-2dm2, which does not express the Ld molecule. Splenocytes from LCMV-infected BALB/c mice were transferred into irradiated BALB/c-H-2dm2 mice and rechallenged with LCMV. Thus, they were exposed to an antigenic stimulus without the involvement of the immunodominant Ld-restricted epitope. In this adoptive transfer model, the donor splenocytes protected the recipient mice against chronic LCMV infection by mounting a potent Kd- and/or Dd-restricted secondary antiviral response. Analysis of a panel of Kd binding LCMV peptides revealed that residues 283 to 291 from the viral glycoprotein (GP(283-291)) comprise a major new epitope in the adoptive transfer model. Because the donor splenocytes were first activated during the primary infection in BALB/c mice, the GP(283-291) epitope is a subdominant epitope in BALB/c mice that becomes dominant after rechallenge in BALB/c-H-2dm2 mice. This study makes two points. First, it shows that subdominant CTL responses can be protective, and second, it provides a general experimental approach for uncovering subdominant CTL responses in vivo. This strategy can be used to identify subdominant T-cell responses in other systems. PMID:9188577

  4. Rapid activation of spleen dendritic cell subsets following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection of mice: analysis of the involvement of type 1 IFN.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Maria; Edwards, Matthew J; Reid, Delyth M; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-02-15

    In this study, we report the dynamic changes in activation and functions that occur in spleen dendritic cell (sDC) subsets following infection of mice with a natural murine pathogen, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Within 24 h postinfection (pi), sDCs acquired the ability to stimulate naive LCMV-specific CD8+ T cells ex vivo. Conventional (CD11chigh CD8+ and CD4+) sDC subsets rapidly up-regulated expression of costimulatory molecules and began to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Their tendency to undergo apoptosis ex vivo simultaneously increased, and in vivo the number of conventional DCs in the spleen decreased markedly, dropping approximately 2-fold by day 3 pi. Conversely, the number of plasmacytoid (CD11clowB220+) DCs in the spleen increased, so that they constituted almost 40% of sDCs by day 3 pi. Type 1 IFN production was up-regulated in plasmacytoid DCs by 24 h pi. Analysis of DC activation and maturation in mice unable to respond to type 1 IFNs implicated these cytokines in driving infection-associated phenotypic activation of conventional DCs and their enhanced tendency to undergo apoptosis, but also indicated the existence of type 1 IFN-independent pathways for the functional maturation of DCs during LCMV infection. PMID:15699111

  5. West Nile Virus Infection in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Evandro R.; Luo, Huanle; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a neurotropic single-stranded flavivirus has been the leading cause of arboviral encephalitis worldwide.  Up to 50% of WNV convalescent patients in the United States were reported to have long-term neurological sequelae.  Neither antiviral drugs nor vaccines are available for humans.  Animal models have been used to investigate WNV pathogenesis and host immune response in humans.  In this review, we will discuss recent findings from studies in animal models of WNV infection, and provide new insights on WNV pathogenesis and WNV-induced host immunity in the central nervous system. PMID:26918172

  6. Switch to Raltegravir From Protease Inhibitor or Nonnucleoside Reverse-Transcriptase Inhibitor Does not Reduce Visceral Fat In Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women With Central Adiposity.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jordan E; McComsey, Grace A; Hulgan, Todd; Wanke, Christine A; Mangili, Alexandra; Walmsley, Sharon L; Currier, Judith S

    2015-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with central adiposity switched to raltegravir-based antiretroviral therapy immediately or after 24 weeks. No statistically significant changes in computed tomography-quantified visceral adipose tissue (VAT) or subcutaneous fat were observed, although 48 weeks of raltegravir was associated with a 6.4% VAT decline. Raltegravir for 24 weeks was associated with improvements in lipids. PMID:26380350

  7. HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among hanka injection drug users in central Ukraine: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Dumchev, Kostyantyn V; Soldyshev, Ruslan; Qian, Han-Zhu; Zezyulin, Olexandr O; Chandler, Susan D; Slobodyanyuk, Pavel; Moroz, Larisa; Schumacher, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    Background Ukraine has experienced an increase in injection drug use since the 1990s. An increase in HIV and hepatitis C virus infections has followed, but not measures of prevalence and risk factors. The purposes of this study are to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HCV, and co-infection among injection drug users (IDUs) in central Ukraine and to describe risk factors for HIV and HCV. Methods A sample of 315 IDUs was recruited using snowball sampling for a structured risk interview and HIV/HCV testing (81.9% male, 42% single, average age 28.9 years [range = 18 to 55]). Results HIV and HCV antibodies were detected in 14.0% and 73.0%, respectively, and 12.1% were seropositive for both infections. The most commonly used drug was hanka, home-made from poppy straw and often mixed with other substances including dimedrol, diazepines, and hypnotics. The average period of injecting was 8.5 years; 62.5% reported past-year sharing needles or injection equipment, and 8.0% shared with a known HIV-positive person. More than half (51.1%) reported multiple sexual partners, 12.9% buying or selling sex, and 10.5% exchanging sex and drugs in the past year. Those who shared with HIV positive partners were 3.4 times more likely to be HIV positive than those who did not. Those who front- or back-loaded were 4 times more likely to be HCV positive than those who did not. Conclusion Harm reduction, addiction treatment and HIV prevention programs should address risk factors to stop further spread of both HIV and HCV among IDUs and to the general population in central Ukraine. PMID:19698166

  8. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among recyclable waste collectors in Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Thaís Augusto; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Reis, Nádia Rúbia Silva; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; de Andrade, Andreia Alves; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a population of recyclable waste collectors (n = 431) was assessed using a cross-sectional survey in all 15 cooperatives in the city of Goiânia, Central-West Brazil. The HCV prevalence was 1.6% (95% confidence interval: 0.6-3.6) and a history of sexually transmitted infections was independently associated with this infection. HCV RNA (corresponding to genotype 1; subtypes 1a and 1b) was detected in five/seven anti-HCV-positive samples. Although the study population reported a high rate (47.3%) of sharps and needle accidents, HCV infection was not more frequent in recyclable waste collectors than in the general Brazilian population. PMID:23828009

  9. West Nile virus infection rates and avian serology in east-central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Lampman, Richard L; Krasavin, Nina M; Ward, Mike P; Beveroth, Tara A; Lankau, Emily W; Alto, Barry W; Muturi, Ephantus; Novak, Robert J

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the geographic role of different species of mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts in West Nile virus (WNV) transmission cycles can facilitate the development and implementation of targeted surveillance and control measures. This study examined the relationship between WNV-antibody rates in birds and mosquito infection rates and bloodfeeding patterns in east-central Illinois. The earliest detection of WNV-RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction TaqMan was from Culex restuans; however, amplification typically coincided with an increase in abundance of Cx. pipiens. Trap type influenced annual estimates of infection rates in Culex species, as well as estimation of blood meal source. Bird species with the highest WNV-antibody rates (i.e., Mourning Doves [Zenaida macroura], Northern Cardinals [Cardinalis cardinalis], American Robins [Turdus migratorius], and House Sparrows [Passer domesticus]) were also the common species found in Culex blood meals. Although antibody rates were not directly proportional to estimated avian abundance, the apparent availability of mammal species did influence proportion of mammal to bird blood meals. Antibody prevalence in the American Robin was lower than expected based on the strong attraction of Culex to American Robins for blood meals. Age-related differences in serology were evident, antibody rates increased in older groups of robins and sparrows, whereas 1st-year hatch and older adults of Mourning Doves and Northern Cardinals had equally high rates of antibody-positive serum samples. The vector and host interactions observed in east-central Illinois (Champaign County), an urban area surrounded by agriculture, are compared to studies in the densely population areas of southern Cook County. PMID:23923325

  10. Varicella-zoster virus infections of the central nervous system – Prognosis, diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Anna; Studahl, Marie

    2015-09-01

    Both varicella and herpes zoster that are caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are associated with central nervous system disease. Since the introduction of polymerase chain reaction, the opportunity to detect the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has improved dramatically. As a result VZV is diagnosed as one of the most common viruses causing CNS disease and it has become evident that this disease includes a wide spectrum of different CNS manifestations. The most evaluated CNS manifestations are encephalitis which is associated with both varicella and herpes zoster and, cerebellitis which occurs predominantly in children with varicella. Other manifestations have been less widely investigated. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease caused by VZV has been only scarcely studied and, in addition, some data indicate that vasculitis might also be involved in other VZV CNS manifestations such as herpes zoster-associated encephalitis. For this reason, VZV CNS infection must be suspected in several CNS syndromes and diagnostics should be based on CSF analysis for detection of VZV DNA by PCR and/or intrathecal antibody production. The prognosis is reported as favourable in children but few follow-up studies are available. Moreover, in adults, the prognosis is reported to be good in overall terms, but later studies indicate more serious neurological sequelae including cognition. Despite considerable mortality and morbidity, so far also in vaccinating countries, few treatment studies are available. Further treatment studies including assessments of neurological and cognitive sequelae, are warranted. PMID:26073188

  11. Dengue virus infection-enhancing antibody activities against Indonesian strains in inhabitants of central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Oddgun, Duangjai; Chantawat, Nantarat; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Konishi, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection-enhancing antibodies are a hypothetic factor to increase the dengue disease severity. In this study, we investigated the enhancing antibodies against Indonesian strains of DENV-1-4 in 50 healthy inhabitants of central Thailand (Bangkok and Uthai Thani). Indonesia and Thailand have seen the highest dengue incidence in Southeast Asia. The infection history of each subject was estimated by comparing his/her neutralizing antibody titers against prototype DENV-1-4 strains. To resolve the difficulty in obtaining foreign live viruses for use as assay antigens, we used a recombinant system to prepare single-round infectious dengue viral particles based on viral sequence information. Irrespective of the previously infecting serotype(s), most serum samples showed significantly higher enhancement titers against Indonesian DENV-2 strains than against Thai DENV-2 strains, whereas the opposite effect was observed for the DENV-3 strains. Equivalent enhancing activities were observed against both DENV-1 and DENV-4. These results suggest that the genotype has an impact on enhancing antibody activities against DENV-2 and DENV-3, because the predominant circulating genotypes of each serotype differ between Indonesia and Thailand. PMID:26645957

  12. Reactive oxygen species delay control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P A; Xu, H C; Grusdat, M; McIlwain, D R; Pandyra, A A; Harris, I S; Shaabani, N; Honke, N; Kumar Maney, S; Lang, E; Pozdeev, V I; Recher, M; Odermatt, B; Brenner, D; Häussinger, D; Ohashi, P S; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2013-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation (CD)8+ T cells are like a double edged sword during chronic viral infections because they not only promote virus elimination but also induce virus-mediated immunopathology. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported during virus infections. However, the role of ROS in T-cell-mediated immunopathology remains unclear. Here we used the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus to explore the role of ROS during the processes of virus elimination and induction of immunopathology. We found that virus infection led to elevated levels of ROS producing granulocytes and macrophages in virus-infected liver and spleen tissues that were triggered by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Lack of the regulatory subunit p47phox of the NADPH oxidase diminished ROS production in these cells. While CD8+ T cells exhibited ROS production that was independent of NADPH oxidase expression, survival and T-cell function was elevated in p47phox-deficient (Ncf1−/−) mice. In the absence of p47phox, enhanced T-cell immunity promoted virus elimination and blunted corresponding immunopathology. In conclusion, we find that NADPH-mediated production of ROS critically impairs the immune response, impacting elimination of virus and outcome of liver cell damage. PMID:23328631

  13. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection. PMID:27509655

  14. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Virus Infection among General Population in Central Region of Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Gacche, Rajesh N.; Al-Mohani, Sadiq K.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a major worldwide public health problem. Though several studies from Yemen have provided an estimate of the prevalence of this viral infection, there exist only few studies which reflect the status in the general population. Aim. The present study was designed to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C infection among general population in central region of Yemen. Methods. The study population comprised 2,379 apparently healthy subjects who were screened for hepatitis C antibodies (HCV Abs) status using ELISA quantitative technique. Seroprevalence rate of seropositive subjects was calculated and stratified by age, sex, educational level, and monthly income. Results. The study showed that out of 2,379 subjects, 31 (1.3%) were HCV Abs positive. Higher prevalence of HCV Abs was found among females, 24 (1.01%), than males, 7 (0.29%). The age specific prevalence rose from 00 (0.00%) in subjects aged ≤14 years to a maximum of 9 (0.38%) in subjects aged ≥55 years. The prevalence of HCV Abs was more prevalent in illiterate subjects and increased with decreasing monthly income. Conclusion. It was found that variables including age and educational level were significantly associated with HCV Ab positivity and not associated with gender and monthly income. PMID:23320156

  15. DELAYED DENSITY-DEPENDENT PREVALENCE OF SIN NOMBRE VIRUS INFECTION IN DEER MICE (PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS) IN CENTRAL AND WESTERN MONTANA

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Scott; Trueax, Jeremy T.; Douglass, Richard; Kuenzi, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how transmission of zoonoses takes place within reservoir populations, such as Sin Nombre virus (SNV) among deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), is important in determining the risk of exposure to other hosts, including humans. In this study, we examined the relationship between deer mouse populations and the prevalence of antibodies to SNV, a system where the effect of host population abundance on transmission is debated. We examined the relationship between abundance of deer mice in late summer–early autumn and SNV antibody prevalence the following spring–early summer (termed delayed density-dependent [DDD] prevalence of infection) at both regional and local scales, using 12 live-trapping grids for 11–14 yr, across central and western Montana. When all trapping grids were combined (regional scale), there was a significant DDD relationship for individual months and when months within seasons were averaged. However, within individual grids (local scale), evidence of DDD prevalence of infection was observed consistently at only one location. These findings suggest that, although there is evidence of DDD prevalence of infection at regional scales, it is not always apparent at local scales, possibly because the regional pattern of DDD infection prevalence is driven by differences in abundance and prevalence among sites, rather than in autumn-spring delays. Transmission of SNV may be more complex than the original hypothesis of autumn-spring delayed density dependence suggests. This complexity is also supported by recent modeling studies. Empirical investigations are needed to determine the duration and determinants of time-lagged abundance and antibody prevalence. Our study suggests predicting local, human exposure risk to SNV in spring, based on deer mouse abundance in autumn, is unlikely to be a reliable public health tool, particularly at local scales. PMID:21269997

  16. Viral Infection of the Central Nervous System and Neuroinflammation Precede Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption during Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Wang, Yueyun; Yu, Lan; Cao, Shengbo; Wang, Ke; Yuan, Jiaolong; Wang, Chong; Wang, Kunlun; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis is an acute zoonotic, mosquito-borne disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Japanese encephalitis is characterized by extensive inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the BBB disruption are not known. Here, using a mouse model of intravenous JEV infection, we show that virus titers increased exponentially in the brain from 2 to 5 days postinfection. This was accompanied by an early, dramatic increase in the level of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the brain. Enhancement of BBB permeability, however, was not observed until day 4, suggesting that viral entry and the onset of inflammation in the CNS occurred prior to BBB damage. In vitro studies revealed that direct infection with JEV could not induce changes in the permeability of brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. However, brain extracts derived from symptomatic JEV-infected mice, but not from mock-infected mice, induced significant permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Consistent with a role for inflammatory mediators in BBB disruption, the administration of gamma interferon-neutralizing antibody ameliorated the enhancement of BBB permeability in JEV-infected mice. Taken together, our data suggest that JEV enters the CNS, propagates in neurons, and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which result in the disruption of the BBB. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, resulting in 70,000 cases each year, in which approximately 20 to 30% of cases are fatal, and a high proportion of patients survive with serious neurological and psychiatric sequelae. Pathologically, JEV infection causes an acute encephalopathy accompanied by BBB dysfunction; however, the mechanism is not clear. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of BBB disruption in JEV infection is important

  17. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  18. Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2016-01-01

    A Task Force established by the Brazil Ministry of Health investigated the possible association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and a registry for microcephaly cases among women suspected to have had Zika virus infection during pregnancy. PMID:27004142

  19. Monkeypox Virus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs mostly in central and western Africa. Wild rodents and squirrels carry it, but it is called monkeypox because scientists saw it first in lab monkeys. In 2003, it was reported in prairie dogs and humans in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  20. Mice with different susceptibility to tick-borne encephalitis virus infection show selective neutralizing antibody response and inflammatory reaction in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical course of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a disease caused by TBE virus, ranges from asymptomatic or mild influenza-like infection to severe debilitating encephalitis or encephalomyelitis. Despite the medical importance of this disease, some crucial steps in the development of encephalitis remain poorly understood. In particular, the basis of the disease severity is largely unknown. Methods TBE virus growth, neutralizing antibody response, key cytokine and chemokine mRNA production and changes in mRNA levels of cell surface markers of immunocompetent cells in brain were measured in mice with different susceptibilities to TBE virus infection. Results An animal model of TBE based on BALB/c-c-STS/A (CcS/Dem) recombinant congenic mouse strains showing different severities of the infection in relation to the host genetic background was developed. After subcutaneous inoculation of TBE virus, BALB/c mice showed medium susceptibility to the infection, STS mice were resistant, and CcS-11 mice were highly susceptible. The resistant STS mice showed lower and delayed viremia, lower virus production in the brain and low cytokine/chemokine mRNA production, but had a strong neutralizing antibody response. The most sensitive strain (CcS-11) failed in production of neutralizing antibodies, but exhibited strong cytokine/chemokine mRNA production in the brain. After intracerebral inoculation, all mouse strains were sensitive to the infection and had similar virus production in the brain, but STS mice survived significantly longer than CcS-11 mice. These two strains also differed in the expression of key cytokines/chemokines, particularly interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) in the brain. Conclusions Our data indicate that the genetic control is an important factor influencing the clinical course of TBE. High neutralizing antibody response might be crucial for preventing host fatality, but high

  1. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. PMID:27079865

  2. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary. PMID:24638909

  3. Recurrent neonatal herpes simplex virus infection with central nervous system disease after completion of a 6-month course of suppressive therapy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Koji; Hara, Shinya; Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    A boy at 12 days of age developed neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 infection with central nervous system (CNS) disease. After a 21-day course of high-dose intravenous acyclovir, the patient recovered with negative results for HSV DNA in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Two weeks after a 6-month course of oral valacyclovir suppressive therapy with negative virological assessment, the disease recurred. Another 21-day course of intravenous acyclovir and subsequent 1-year course of oral suppressive therapy were completed. He showed mild developmental delay in language-social skills at 18 months of age. Although recurrences of neonatal HSV infection with CNS disease after suppressive therapy are uncommon, both clinical and virological assessments at the end of the suppressive therapy may be required. Administration of extended long-term suppressive ACV therapy should be considered to reduce the rate of recurrence. PMID:26390826

  4. Early blood profiles of virus infection in a monkey model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Djavani, Mahmoud M; Crasta, Oswald R; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Fei, Zhangjun; Folkerts, Otto; Sobral, Bruno; Swindells, Mark; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Pauza, C David; Lukashevich, Igor S; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Salvato, Maria S

    2007-08-01

    Acute arenavirus disease in primates, like Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, begins with flu-like symptoms and leads to death approximately 2 weeks after infection. Our goal was to identify molecular changes in blood that are related to disease progression. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected intravenously with a lethal dose of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) provide a model for Lassa virus infection of humans. Blood samples taken before and during the course of infection were used to monitor gene expression changes that paralleled disease onset. Changes in blood showed major disruptions in eicosanoid, immune response, and hormone response pathways. Approximately 12% of host genes alter their expression after LCMV infection, and a subset of these genes can discriminate between virulent and non-virulent LCMV infection. Major transcription changes have been given preliminary confirmation by quantitative PCR and protein studies and will be valuable candidates for future validation as biomarkers for arenavirus disease. PMID:17522210

  5. Early Blood Profiles of Virus Infection in a Monkey Model for Lassa Fever▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Crasta, Oswald R.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Fei, Zhangjun; Folkerts, Otto; Sobral, Bruno; Swindells, Mark; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Pauza, C. David; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Salvato, Maria S.

    2007-01-01

    Acute arenavirus disease in primates, like Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, begins with flu-like symptoms and leads to death approximately 2 weeks after infection. Our goal was to identify molecular changes in blood that are related to disease progression. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) infected intravenously with a lethal dose of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) provide a model for Lassa virus infection of humans. Blood samples taken before and during the course of infection were used to monitor gene expression changes that paralleled disease onset. Changes in blood showed major disruptions in eicosanoid, immune response, and hormone response pathways. Approximately 12% of host genes alter their expression after LCMV infection, and a subset of these genes can discriminate between virulent and nonvirulent LCMV infection. Major transcription changes have been given preliminary confirmation by quantitative PCR and protein studies and will be valuable candidates for future validation as biomarkers for arenavirus disease. PMID:17522210

  6. The assessment of risk factors for the Central/East African Genotype of chikungunya virus infections in the state of Kelantan: a case control study in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    cases were treated as outpatient, only 7.5% needed hospitalization. The CHIKV infection was attributable to central/east African genotype CHIKV. Conclusions In this study, cross border activity was not a significant risk factor although Thailand and Malaysia shared the same CHIKV genotype during the episode of infections. PMID:23656634

  7. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English Españ ...

  8. Uveitis Associated with Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Furtado, João M; Espósito, Danillo L; Klein, Taline M; Teixeira-Pinto, Tomás; da Fonseca, Benedito A

    2016-07-28

    An adult patient recovered from acute Zika virus infection, but ocular symptoms subsequently developed. Anterior uveitis was diagnosed, and Zika virus was identified in the aqueous humor. PMID:27332784

  9. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8+ T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso–/–) mice reduced CD8+ T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso–/– DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  10. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso(-/-)) mice reduced CD8(+) T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso(-/-) DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  11. Programmed death 1 protects from fatal circulatory failure during systemic virus infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Frebel, Helge; Nindl, Veronika; Schuepbach, Reto A; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Richter, Kirsten; Vogel, Johannes; Wagner, Carsten A; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Kurrer, Michael; Ludewig, Burkhard; Oxenius, Annette

    2012-12-17

    The inhibitory programmed death 1 (PD-1)-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway contributes to the functional down-regulation of T cell responses during persistent systemic and local virus infections. The blockade of PD-1-PD-L1-mediated inhibition is considered as a therapeutic approach to reinvigorate antiviral T cell responses. Yet previous studies reported that PD-L1-deficient mice develop fatal pathology during early systemic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, suggesting a host protective role of T cell down-regulation. As the exact mechanisms of pathology development remained unclear, we set out to delineate in detail the underlying pathogenesis. Mice deficient in PD-1-PD-L1 signaling or lacking PD-1 signaling in CD8 T cells succumbed to fatal CD8 T cell-mediated immunopathology early after systemic LCMV infection. In the absence of regulation via PD-1, CD8 T cells killed infected vascular endothelial cells via perforin-mediated cytolysis, thereby severely compromising vascular integrity. This resulted in systemic vascular leakage and a consequential collapse of the circulatory system. Our results indicate that the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway protects the vascular system from severe CD8 T cell-mediated damage during early systemic LCMV infection, highlighting a pivotal physiological role of T cell down-regulation and suggesting the potential development of immunopathological side effects when interfering with the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway during systemic virus infections. PMID:23230000

  12. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  13. Zika Virus Infection and Zika Fever: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated: 25 March 2016 ABOUT ZIKA What is Zika virus infection? Zika virus infection is caused by the ... possible to characterize the disease better. How is Zika virus transmitted? Zika virus is transmitted to people through ...

  14. Emerging viral infections of the central nervous system: part 1.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kenneth L

    2009-08-01

    In this 2-part review, I will focus on emerging virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Part 1 will introduce the basic features of emerging infections, including their definition, epidemiology, and the frequency of CNS involvement. Important mechanisms of emergence will be reviewed, including viruses spreading into new host ranges as exemplified by West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, Toscana virus, and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Emerging infections also result from opportunistic spread of viruses into known niches, often resulting from attenuated host resistance to infection. This process is exemplified by transplant-associated cases of viral CNS infection caused by WNV, rabies virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, and lymphocytic choriomeningitis-like viruses and by the syndrome of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6)-associated posttransplantation acute limbic encephalitis. The second part of this review begins with a discussion of JC virus and the occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in association with novel immunomodulatory therapies and then continues with an overview of the risk of infection introduced by imported animals (eg, monkeypox virus) and examples of emerging diseases caused by enhanced competence of viruses for vectors and the spread of vectors (eg, chikungunya virus) and then concludes with examples of novel viruses causing CNS infection as exemplified by Nipah and Hendra viruses and bat lyssaviruses. PMID:19667214

  15. The greasy response to virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Lukas Bahati; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    Previews Virus replication requires lipid metabolism, but how lipids mediate virus infection remains obscure. In this issue, Amini-Bavil-Olyaee et al. (2013) reveal that IFITM proteins disturb cholesterol homeostasis to block virus entry. Previously in Cell, Morita and colleagues (2013) showed the antiviral potency of the lipid mediator protectin D1. PMID:23601099

  16. Mental Status after West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Joseph; Pergam, Steven; Echevarria, Leonor A.; Davis, Larry E.; Goade, Diane; Harnar, Joanne; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Sewel, C. Mack; Ettestad, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Mental status after acute West Nile virus infection has not been examined objectively. We compared Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status scores of 116 patients with West Nile fever or West Nile neuroinvasive disease. Mental status was poorer and cognitive complaints more frequent with West Nile neuroinvasive disease (p = 0.005). PMID:16965710

  17. Life-Threatening Sochi Virus Infections, Russia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Detlev H; Tkachenko, Evgeniy A; Morozov, Vyacheslav G; Yunicheva, Yulia V; Pilikova, Olga M; Malkin, Gennadiy; Ishmukhametov, Aydar A; Heinemann, Patrick; Witkowski, Peter T; Klempa, Boris; Dzagurova, Tamara K

    2015-12-01

    Sochi virus was recently identified as a new hantavirus genotype carried by the Black Sea field mouse, Apodemus ponticus. We evaluated 62 patients in Russia with Sochi virus infection. Most clinical cases were severe, and the case-fatality rate was as high as 14.5%. PMID:26584463

  18. Life-Threatening Sochi Virus Infections, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Evgeniy A.; Morozov, Vyacheslav G.; Yunicheva, Yulia V.; Pilikova, Olga M.; Malkin, Gennadiy; Ishmukhametov, Aydar A.; Heinemann, Patrick; Witkowski, Peter T.; Klempa, Boris; Dzagurova, Tamara K.

    2015-01-01

    Sochi virus was recently identified as a new hantavirus genotype carried by the Black Sea field mouse, Apodemus ponticus. We evaluated 62 patients in Russia with Sochi virus infection. Most clinical cases were severe, and the case-fatality rate was as high as 14.5%. PMID:26584463

  19. Pathogenesis of Machupo virus infection in primates*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, G. A.; Scott, S. K.; Wagner, F. S.; Brand, O. M.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental Machupo virus infection of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys produced a severe illness consisting of an initial clinical phase and a later neurological phase. Cumulative mortality during the two phases was 80% and 95% respectively. Attempts to alter the pathogenesis with decomplementation or immunosuppression resulted in earlier deaths of the monkeys. PMID:182402

  20. Preventing hospitalizations for respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan L; Le Saux, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus infection is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children. Palivizumab has minimal impact on RSV hospitilization rates as it is only practical to offer it to the highest risk groups. The present statement reviews the published literature and provides updated recommendations regarding palivizumab use in children in Canada. PMID:26435673

  1. CD8+ T cells control Ross River virus infection in musculoskeletal tissues of infected mice.

    PubMed

    Burrack, Kristina S; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Homann, Dirk; Morrison, Thomas E

    2015-01-15

    Ross River virus (RRV), chikungunya virus, and related alphaviruses cause debilitating polyarthralgia and myalgia. Mouse models of RRV and chikungunya virus have demonstrated a role for the adaptive immune response in the control of these infections. However, questions remain regarding the role for T cells in viral control, including the magnitude, location, and dynamics of CD8(+) T cell responses. To address these questions, we generated a recombinant RRV expressing the H-2(b)-restricted glycoprotein 33 (gp33) determinant derived from the glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Using tetramers, we tracked gp33-specific CD8(+) T cells during RRV-lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. We found that acute RRV infection induces activation of CD8(+) T cell responses in lymphoid and musculoskeletal tissues that peak from 10-14 d postinoculation, suggesting that CD8(+) T cells contribute to control of acute RRV infection. Mice genetically deficient for CD8(+) T cells or wild-type mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells had elevated RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue, but not joint-associated tissues, at 14 d postinoculation, suggesting that the ability of CD8(+) T cells to control RRV infection is tissue dependent. Finally, adoptively transferred T cells were capable of reducing RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue of Rag1(-/-) mice, indicating that T cells can contribute to the control of RRV infection in the absence of B cells and Ab. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for T cells in the control of RRV infection and suggest that the antiviral capacity of T cells is controlled in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25488988

  2. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Powers, Linda S.; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K.; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  3. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Bethany A; Powers, Linda S; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A; Monick, Martha M; Maury, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  4. Programmed death 1 protects from fatal circulatory failure during systemic virus infection of mice

    PubMed Central

    Frebel, Helge; Nindl, Veronika; Schuepbach, Reto A.; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Richter, Kirsten; Vogel, Johannes; Wagner, Carsten A.; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Kurrer, Michael; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitory programmed death 1 (PD-1)–programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway contributes to the functional down-regulation of T cell responses during persistent systemic and local virus infections. The blockade of PD-1–PD-L1–mediated inhibition is considered as a therapeutic approach to reinvigorate antiviral T cell responses. Yet previous studies reported that PD-L1–deficient mice develop fatal pathology during early systemic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, suggesting a host protective role of T cell down-regulation. As the exact mechanisms of pathology development remained unclear, we set out to delineate in detail the underlying pathogenesis. Mice deficient in PD-1–PD-L1 signaling or lacking PD-1 signaling in CD8 T cells succumbed to fatal CD8 T cell–mediated immunopathology early after systemic LCMV infection. In the absence of regulation via PD-1, CD8 T cells killed infected vascular endothelial cells via perforin-mediated cytolysis, thereby severely compromising vascular integrity. This resulted in systemic vascular leakage and a consequential collapse of the circulatory system. Our results indicate that the PD-1–PD-L1 pathway protects the vascular system from severe CD8 T cell–mediated damage during early systemic LCMV infection, highlighting a pivotal physiological role of T cell down-regulation and suggesting the potential development of immunopathological side effects when interfering with the PD-1–PD-L1 pathway during systemic virus infections. PMID:23230000

  5. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents. 866.3360 Section 866.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents. 866.3360 Section 866.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents. 866.3360 Section 866.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents. 866.3360 Section 866.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents. 866.3360 Section 866.3360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  10. METHODS USED TO STUDY RESPIRATORY VIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Flaño, Emilio; Jewell, Nancy A.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for infecting the mouse respiratory tract, and assaying virus replication and host response in the lung. Respiratory infections are the leading cause of acute illness worldwide, affecting mostly infants and children in developing countries. The purpose of this unit is to provide the readers with a basic strategy and protocols to study the pathogenesis and immunology of respiratory virus infection using the mouse as an animal model. The procedures include: (i) basic techniques for mouse infection, tissue sampling and preservation, (ii) determination of viral titers, isolation and analysis of lymphocytes and dendritic cells using flow-cytometry, and (iii) lung histology, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. PMID:19499505

  11. Update on oral herpes virus infections.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Kuperstein, Arthur S; Stoopler, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    Oral herpes virus infections (OHVIs) are among the most common mucosal disorders encountered by oral health care providers. These infections can affect individuals at any age, from infants to the elderly, and may cause significant pain and dysfunction. Immunosuppressed patients may be at increased risk for serious and potential life-threatening complications caused by OHVIs. Clinicians may have difficulty in diagnosing these infections because they can mimic other conditions of the oral mucosa. This article provides oral health care providers with clinically relevant information regarding etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of OHVIs. PMID:24655522

  12. Cells in Dengue Virus Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2010-01-01

    Dengue has been recognized as one of the most important vector-borne emerging infectious diseases globally. Though dengue normally causes a self-limiting infection, some patients may develop a life-threatening illness, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The reason why DHF/DSS occurs in certain individuals is unclear. Studies in the endemic regions suggest that the preexisting antibodies are a risk factor for DHF/DSS. Viremia and thrombocytopenia are the key clinical features of dengue virus infection in patients. The amounts of virus circulating in patients are highly correlated with severe dengue disease, DHF/DSS. Also, the disturbance, mainly a transient depression, of hematological cells is a critical clinical finding in acute dengue patients. However, the cells responsible for the dengue viremia are unresolved in spite of the intensive efforts been made. Dengue virus appears to replicate and proliferate in many adapted cell lines, but these in vitro properties are extremely difficult to be reproduced in primary cells or in vivo. This paper summarizes reports on the permissive cells in vitro and in vivo and suggests a hematological cell lineage for dengue virus infection in vivo, with the hope that a new focus will shed light on further understanding of the complexities of dengue disease. PMID:22331984

  13. Virus infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Chastain, Emily M. L.; Terry, Rachael L.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a group of disorders, autoimmunity ranks as the third most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. However, the etiology of most autoimmune diseases remains unknown. Although genetic linkage studies support a critical underlying role for genetics, the geographic distribution of these disorders as well as the low concordance rates in monozygotic twins suggest that a combination of other factors including environmental ones are involved. Virus infection is a primary factor that has been implicated in the initiation of autoimmune disease. Infection triggers a robust and usually well-coordinated immune response that is critical for viral clearance. However, in some instances, immune regulatory mechanisms may falter, culminating in the breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in immune-mediated attack directed against both viral and self-antigens. Traditionally, cross-reactive T-cell recognition, known as molecular mimicry, as well as bystander T-cell activation, culminating in epitope spreading, have been the predominant mechanisms elucidated through which infection may culminate in an T-cell-mediated autoimmune response. However, other hypotheses including virus-induced decoy of the immune system also warrant discussion in regard to their potential for triggering autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which virus infection and antiviral immunity contribute to the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23947356

  14. Zika Virus Infection Acquired During Brief Travel to Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jason C.; Druce, Julian D.; Leder, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Zika virus infection closely resembles dengue fever. It is possible that many cases are misdiagnosed or missed. We report a case of Zika virus infection in an Australian traveler who returned from Indonesia with fever and rash. Further case identification is required to determine the evolving epidemiology of this disease. PMID:23878182

  15. Vaccinia virus infections in martial arts gym, Maryland, USA, 2008.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christine M; Blythe, David; Li, Yu; Reddy, Ramani; Jordan, Carol; Edwards, Cindy; Adams, Celia; Conners, Holly; Rasa, Catherine; Wilby, Sue; Russell, Jamaal; Russo, Kelly S; Somsel, Patricia; Wiedbrauk, Danny L; Dougherty, Cindy; Allen, Christopher; Frace, Mike; Emerson, Ginny; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Braden, Zachary; Abel, Jason; Davidson, Whitni; Reynolds, Mary; Damon, Inger K

    2011-04-01

    Vaccinia virus is an orthopoxvirus used in the live vaccine against smallpox. Vaccinia virus infections can be transmissible and can cause severe complications in those with weakened immune systems. We report on a cluster of 4 cases of vaccinia virus infection in Maryland, USA, likely acquired at a martial arts gym. PMID:21470473

  16. Effects of Aging on Influenza Virus Infection Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.; Wilk, Esther; Canini, Laetitia; Toapanta, Franklin R.; Binder, Sebastian C.; Uvarovskii, Alexey; Ross, Ted M.; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The consequences of influenza virus infection are generally more severe in individuals over 65 years of age (the elderly). Immunosenescence enhances the susceptibility to viral infections and renders vaccination less effective. Understanding age-related changes in the immune system is crucial in order to design prophylactic and immunomodulatory strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Here, we propose different mathematical models to provide a quantitative understanding of the immune strategies in the course of influenza virus infection using experimental data from young and aged mice. Simulation results suggested a central role of CD8+ T cells for adequate viral clearance kinetics in young and aged mice. Adding the removal of infected cells by natural killer cells did not improve the model fit in either young or aged animals. We separately examined the infection-resistant state of cells promoted by the cytokines alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The combination of activated CD8+ T cells with any of the cytokines provided the best fits in young and aged animals. During the first 3 days after infection, the basic reproductive number for aged mice was 1.5-fold lower than that for young mice (P < 0.05). IMPORTANCE The fits of our models to the experimental data suggest that the increased levels of IFN-α/β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α (the “inflammaging” state) promote slower viral growth in aged mice, which consequently limits the stimulation of immune cells and contributes to the reported impaired responses in the elderly. A quantitative understanding of influenza virus pathogenesis and its shift in the elderly is the key contribution of this work. PMID:24478442

  17. [Laboratory diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Huber, K R; Kittl, E; Sebesta, C; Bauer, K

    2000-01-01

    In Austria, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infections is 0.7% (17). Exclusion of a putative infection as well as diagnosis and continuous monitoring of HCV-disease produce considerable costs for the health system. How many and which patients with HCV infection will acquire life-threatening complications is by far not clear. Also, the causes for viral persistence and liver-complications remain obscure. For certain, complex interactions of viral and immunological mechanisms will determine the individual outcome of the disease (1). These considerations pose decisive demands on clinical diagnostics for HCV infections to be dealt with in detail: methods for qualitative detection of an infection as well as for analysis of subtypes and for quantitative determination of viral copies; monitoring of therapy; estimation of the progress of the disease and/or efficacy of therapy. PMID:11205177

  18. [A NEW PANDEMIC: ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus is a flavivirus isolated in non human primates in 1647, then in humans 1954 (Uganda). It emerged on Micronesia (island af Yap) in 2007, then in French Polynesia in 2013-2014, in South America (mostly in Brazil and Colombia) in 2015 and in French West Indies in 2016. It is transmitted by the bite of Aedes mosquitoes. Zika virus infection is symptomatic in only 20% of cases and clinical presentation is associated with mild illness. But several neurological complications are reported (as Guillain-Barré syndrome: 48 cases in French Polynesia) and congenital malformations (microcephaly). Laboratory diagnosis is based on virus isolation by PCR. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available against the Zika virs. Prevention is based on measures of protection from mosquitoes bites. PMID:27538321

  19. The immune response to Nipah virus infection.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph; de Wit, Emmie; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J

    2012-09-01

    Nipah virus has recently emerged as a zoonotic agent that is highly pathogenic in humans. Outbreaks have occurred regularly over the last two decades in South and Southeast Asia, where mortality rates reach as high as 100 %. The natural reservoir of Nipah virus has been identified as bats from the Pteropus family, where infection is largely asymptomatic. Human disease is characterized by both respiratory and encephalitic components, and thus far, no effective vaccine or intervention strategies are available. Little is know about how the immune response of either the reservoir host or incidental hosts responds to infection, and how this immune response is either inadequate or might contribute to disease in the dead-end host. Experimental vaccines strategies have given us some insight into the immunological requirements for protection. This review summarizes our current understanding of the immune response to Nipah virus infection and emphasizes the need for further research. PMID:22669317

  20. Systems analysis of West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Mehul S; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-06-01

    Emerging and re-emerging mosquito-borne viruses continue to pose a significant threat to human health throughout the world. Over the past decade, West Nile virus (WNV), Dengue virus (DENV), and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), have caused annual epidemics of virus-induced encephalitis, hemorrhagic fever\\shock syndromes, and arthritis, respectively. Currently, no specific antiviral therapies or vaccines exist for use in humans to combat or prevent these viral infections. Thus, there is a pressing need to define the virus-host interactions that govern immunity and infection outcome. Recent technological breakthroughs in 'omics' resources and high-throughput based assays are beginning to accelerate antiviral drug discovery and improve on current strategies for vaccine design. In this review, we highlight studies with WNV and discuss how traditional and systems biological approaches are being used to rapidly identify novel host targets for therapeutic intervention and develop a deeper conceptual understanding of the host response to virus infection. PMID:24851811

  1. Human papilloma virus infection and psoriasis: Did human papilloma virus infection trigger psoriasis?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sonia P.; Gulhane, Sachin; Pandey, Neha; Bisne, Esha

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease known to be triggered by streptococcal and HIV infections. However, human papilloma virus infection (HPV) as a triggering factor for the development of psoriasis has not been reported yet. We, hereby report a case of plaque type with inverse psoriasis which probably could have been triggered by genital warts (HPV infection) and discuss the possible pathomechanisms for their coexistence and its management. PMID:26692619

  2. Cardiac involvement in dengue virus infections during the 2004/2005 dengue fever season in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Dominic; Kularatne, Senanayake; Ehrhardt, Stephan; Wijesinghe, Sriyal; Brattig, Norbert W; Abel, Walter; Burchard, Gerd D

    2009-07-01

    Sri Lanka experienced a dramatic increase in dengue cases (15,400) in the 2004 - 2005 season. We carried out a prospective study to investigate cardiac involvement in dengue virus infected patients during the 2004 - 2005 season in Peradeniya, Central Province, Sri Lanka. Cardiac involvement was defined as elevated levels of myoglobin, creatine kinase-muscle brain-type, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, heart-type fatty acid-binding protein and troponin T. Twenty-five percent of dengue virus infected patients had one or more of the above tests with abnormal results. PMID:19842405

  3. Double-Stranded RNA Is Detected by Immunofluorescence Analysis in RNA and DNA Virus Infections, Including Those by Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kyung-No; Liang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early biochemical studies of viral replication suggested that most viruses produce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is essential for the induction of the host immune response. However, it was reported in 2006 that dsRNA could be detected by immunofluorescence antibody staining in double-stranded DNA and positive-strand RNA virus infections but not in negative-strand RNA virus infections. Other reports in the literature seemed to support these observations. This suggested that negative-strand RNA viruses produce little, if any, dsRNA or that more efficient viral countermeasures to mask dsRNA are mounted. Because of our interest in the use of dsRNA antibodies for virus discovery, particularly in pathological specimens, we wanted to determine how universal immunostaining for dsRNA might be in animal virus infections. We have detected the in situ formation of dsRNA in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, and Nyamanini virus, which represent viruses from different negative-strand RNA virus families. dsRNA was also detected in cells infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, an ambisense RNA virus, and minute virus of mice (MVM), a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvovirus, but not hepatitis B virus. Although dsRNA staining was primarily observed in the cytoplasm, it was also seen in the nucleus of cells infected with influenza A virus, Nyamanini virus, and MVM. Thus, it is likely that most animal virus infections produce dsRNA species that can be detected by immunofluorescence staining. The apoptosis induced in several uninfected cell lines failed to upregulate dsRNA formation. IMPORTANCE An effective antiviral host immune response depends on recognition of viral invasion and an intact innate immune system as a first line of defense. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a viral product essential for the induction of innate immunity, leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and the activation of hundreds

  4. First Imported Case of Chikungunya Virus Infection in a Travelling Canadian Returning from the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Christian; Jourdan, Guillaume; Holloway, Kimberly; Tremblay, Cécile; Drebot, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first Canadian case of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection reported in a traveller returning from the Caribbean. Following multiple mosquito bites in Martinique Island in January 2014, the patient presented with high fever, headaches, arthralgia on both hands and feet, and a rash on the trunk upon his return to Canada. Initial serological testing for dengue virus infection was negative. Support therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was administered. The symptoms gradually improved 4 weeks after onset with residual arthralgia and morning joint stiffness. This clinical feature prompted the clinician to request CHIKV virus serology which was found to be positive for the presence of IgM and neutralizing antibodies. In 2014, over four hundred confirmed CHIKV infection cases were diagnosed in Canadian travellers returning from the Caribbean and Central America. Clinical suspicion of CHIKV or dengue virus infections should be considered in febrile patients with arthralgia returning from the recently CHIKV endemic countries of the Americas. PMID:27366163

  5. Collapsing glomerulopathy with rare associated coxsackie virus infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, XUEJING; LIU, HONG; YUAN, SHUGUANG; XU, XIANGQING; DONG, ZHEN; LIU, FUYOU

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old Chinese man was admitted to the Second Xiangya Hospital of the Central South University (Changsha, China) with heavy proteinuria and rapidly progressing renal failure with nephrotic syndrome. An initial renal biopsy identified collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) with characteristic segmental collapse of the glomerular tuft and marked hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the visceral epithelial cells. A second renal biopsy showed dilation of glomerular capillary loops as a result of effective treatment with rapamycin and anti-viral therapy. Serology for the coxsackie virus antibody was positive when the collapsing lesion was present, and became negative following treatment, which indicated a strong association between the development of CG and coxsackie virus infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of CG associated with coxsackie virus infection. PMID:27168819

  6. Prevalence of Hepatitis Virus Infections in an Institution for Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Bradley A.; Vazquez, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 1,235 residents of Sonoma Developmental Center found 3 residents had hepatitis C virus infections, and 633 had past or current hepatitis B virus infections. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection rose rapidly with longer residence in institutions. Hepatitis A virus infection had occurred in 494 residents. (Contains…

  7. Development of vaccines for prevention of Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-02-01

    Ebola virus infection causes severe hemorrhagic fevers with high fatality rates up to 90% in humans, for which no effective treatment is currently available. The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa that has caused over 14,000 human infections and over 5000 deaths underscores its serious threat to the public health. While licensed vaccines against Ebola virus infection are still not available, a number of vaccine approaches have been developed and shown to protect against lethal Ebola virus infection in animal models. This review aims to summarize the advancement of different strategies for Ebola vaccine development with a focus on the discussion of their protective efficacies and possible limitations. In addition, the development of animal models for efficacy evaluation of Ebola vaccines and the mechanism of immune protection against Ebola virus infection are also discussed. PMID:25526819

  8. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Transmission and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... school or childcare. They can then transmit the virus to other members of the family. RSV can ...

  10. Adolescents and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1992-12-01

    As of March 31, 1992, individuals 13 to 19 years of age had been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; over one third were diagnosed in the past 2 years alone. Because of the long incubation period from initial infection to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, the majority of young adults with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were probably initially infected as adolescents. In 1991, 34% of adolescents with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were female, and their predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact. Human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence studies of adolescents show a male-to-female ratio approaching 1:1, with many human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescent women identifying none of the standard risk. Factors such as sexual and drug experimentation, risk taking, and sense of invulnerability so characteristic of adolescence put adolescents at special risk for human immunodeficiency virus. There is no published information on if or how clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus disease in adolescents might differ from those seen in adults. Medical care should be broad-based and should include access to clinical trials for new drug treatments. General knowledge levels about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are high among US adolescents, but behavioral changes have lagged behind. All adolescents should be targeted for intensive education about human immunodeficiency virus along with interventions designed to enhance their general coping, communication, and decision-making skills. PMID:1450349

  11. The neurobiology of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, D.; Mahalingam, R.; Nagel, M. A.; Pugazhenthi, S.; Cohrs, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic herpesvirus that infects nearly all humans. Primary infection usually causes chickenpox (varicella), after which virus becomes latent in cranial nerve ganglia, dorsal root ganglia and autonomic ganglia along the entire neuraxis. Although VZV cannot be isolated from human ganglia, nucleic acid hybridization and, later, polymerase chain reaction proved that VZV is latent in ganglia. Declining VZV-specific host immunity decades after primary infection allows virus to reactivate spontaneously, resulting in shingles (zoster) characterized by pain and rash restricted to 1-3 dermatomes. Multiple other serious neurological and ocular disorders also result from VZV reactivation. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the clinical and pathological complications of neurological and ocular disease produced by VZV reactivation, molecular aspects of VZV latency, VZV virology and VZV-specific immunity, the role of apoptosis in VZV-induced cell death, and the development of an animal model provided by simian varicella virus infection of monkeys. PMID:21342215

  12. Diversity of Viruses Infecting the Green Microalga Ostreococcus lucimarinus

    PubMed Central

    Derelle, Evelyne; Monier, Adam; Cooke, Richard; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The functional diversity of eukaryotic viruses infecting a single host strain from seawater samples originating from distant marine locations is unknown. To estimate this diversity, we used lysis plaque assays to detect viruses that infect the widespread species Ostreococcus lucimarinus, which is found in coastal and mesotrophic systems, and O. tauri, which was isolated from coastal and lagoon sites from the northwest Mediterranean Sea. Detection of viral lytic activities against O. tauri was not observed using seawater from most sites, except those close to the area where the host strain was isolated. In contrast, the more cosmopolitan O. lucimarinus species recovered viruses from locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Mediterranean Sea. Six new O. lucimarinus viruses (OlVs) then were characterized and their genomes sequenced. Two subgroups of OlVs were distinguished based on their genetic distances and on the inversion of a central 32-kb-long DNA fragment, but overall their genomes displayed a high level of synteny. The two groups did not correspond to proximity of isolation sites, and the phylogenetic distance between these subgroups was higher than the distances observed among viruses infecting O. tauri. Our study demonstrates that viruses originating from very distant sites are able to infect the same algal host strain and can be more diverse than those infecting different species of the same genus. Finally, distinctive features and evolutionary distances between these different viral subgroups does not appear to be linked to biogeography of the viral isolates. IMPORTANCE Marine eukaryotic phytoplankton virus diversity has yet to be addressed, and more specifically, it is unclear whether diversity is connected to geographical distance and whether differential infection and lysis patterns exist among such viruses that infect the same host strain. Here, we assessed the genetic distance of geographically segregated viruses that infect the

  13. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  14. Influenza virus infection, ozone exposure, and fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jakab, G J; Bassett, D J

    1990-05-01

    Oxidant exposure following chemically induced lung injury exacerbates the tendency to develop pulmonary fibrosis. Influenza virus pneumonitis causes severe acute lung damage that, upon resolution, is followed by a persistent alveolitis and parenchymal changes characterized by patchy interstitial pneumonia and collagen deposition in the affected areas. To determine whether oxidant exposure exacerbates the virus-induced alveolitis and residual lung damage, mice were infected by aerosol inhalation with influenza A virus and continuously exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone or ambient air. Noninfected control mice were exposed to either ambient air or ozone. On various days during the first month after infection, groups of mice were sacrificed and their lungs assessed for acute injury (lung lavage albumin, total and differential cell counts, wet/dry ratios, and morphometry). At 30, 60, 90, and 120 days after infection, groups of mice were sacrificed for total and differential lavage cell counts, lung hydroxyproline content, and morphometric analysis. Ozone exposure did not alter the proliferation of virus in the lungs as quantitated by infectious virus titers of lung homogenates at 1, 4, 7, 10, and 15 days after virus infection but mitigated the virus-induced acute lung injury by approximately 50%. After Day 30 a shift in the character of the pulmonary lesions was observed in that continuous exposure to ozone potentiated the postinfluenzal alveolitis and structural changes in the lung parenchyma. Additional studies suggest that the mechanism for the enhanced postinfluenzal lung damage may be related to the oxidant impairing the repair process of the acute influenzal lung damage. These data demonstrate that ozone exposure mitigates acute virus-induced lung injury and potentiates residual lung damage. PMID:2339849

  15. First Imported Case of Zika Virus Infection into Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hee-Chang; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Uh Jin; Chun, June Young; Choi, Su-Jin; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Jung, Sook-In; Jee, Youngmee; Kim, Nam-Joong; Choi, Eun Hwa; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2016-07-01

    Since Zika virus has been spreading rapidly in the Americas from 2015, the outbreak of Zika virus infection becomes a global health emergency because it can cause neurological complications and adverse fetal outcome including microcephaly. Here, we report clinical manifestations and virus isolation findings from a case of Zika virus infection imported from Brazil. The patient, 43-year-old Korean man, developed fever, myalgia, eyeball pain, and maculopapular rash, but not neurological manifestations. Zika virus was isolated from his semen, and reverse-transcriptase PCR was positive for the virus in the blood, urine, and saliva on the 7th day of the illness but was negative on the 21st day. He recovered spontaneously without any neurological complications. He is the first case of Zika virus infection in Korea imported from Brazil. PMID:27366020

  16. First Imported Case of Zika Virus Infection into Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Youngmee

    2016-01-01

    Since Zika virus has been spreading rapidly in the Americas from 2015, the outbreak of Zika virus infection becomes a global health emergency because it can cause neurological complications and adverse fetal outcome including microcephaly. Here, we report clinical manifestations and virus isolation findings from a case of Zika virus infection imported from Brazil. The patient, 43-year-old Korean man, developed fever, myalgia, eyeball pain, and maculopapular rash, but not neurological manifestations. Zika virus was isolated from his semen, and reverse-transcriptase PCR was positive for the virus in the blood, urine, and saliva on the 7th day of the illness but was negative on the 21st day. He recovered spontaneously without any neurological complications. He is the first case of Zika virus infection in Korea imported from Brazil. PMID:27366020

  17. Antibody producing B lineage cells invade the central nervous system predominantly at the time of and triggered by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection: A hypothesis on the origin of intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Otto, Carolin; Hofmann, Jörg; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), typically have an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Intrathecal IgG is produced by B lineage cells that entered the CNS, but why and when these cells invade the CNS of patients with MS is unknown. The intrathecal IgG response in patients with MS is polyspecific and part of it is directed against different common viruses (e.g. measles virus, rubella virus, varicella zoster virus). Strong and consistent evidence suggests an association of MS and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and EBV seroprevalence in patients with MS is practically 100%. However, intriguingly, despite of the universal EBV seroprevalence, the frequency of intrathecally produced IgG to EBV in patients with MS is much lower than that of intrathecally produced IgG to other common viruses. The acute phase of primary EBV infection is characterized by a strong polyclonal B cell activation. As typical for humoral immune responses against viruses, EBV specific IgG is produced only with a temporal delay after acute EBV infection. Aiming to put the above facts into a logical structure, we here propose the hypothesis that in individuals going on to develop MS antibody producing B lineage cells invade the CNS predominantly at the time of and triggered by acute primary EBV infection. Because at the time of acute EBV infection EBV IgG producing B lineage cells have not yet occurred, the hypothesis could explain the universal EBV seroprevalence and the low frequency of intrathecally produced IgG to EBV in patients with MS. Evidence supporting the hypothesis could be provided by large prospective follow-up studies of individuals with symptomatic primary EBV infection (infectious mononucleosis). Furthermore, the clarification of the molecular mechanism underlying an EBV induced invasion of B lineage cells into the CNS of individuals going on to develop MS could corroborate it, too. If true, our

  18. Analysis of Subcellular Prefoldin 1 Redistribution During Rabies Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyang; Han, Qinqin; Song, Yuzhu; Chen, Qiang; Xia, Xueshan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rabies virus (RABV) is one of the old deadly zoonotic viruses. It attacks the central nervous system and causes acute encephalitis in humans and animals. Host factors are known to be essential for virus infection and replication in cells. The identification of the key host factors required for RABV infection may provide important information on RABV replication and may provide new potential targets for RABV drug discovery. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the change in the subcellular distribution and expression of the host protein Prefoldin subunit 1 (PFDN1) in RABV-infected cells and the viral expression of plasmids in the transfected cells. Materials and Methods: Mouse Neuro-2a (N2a) cells were infected by RABV or transfected with the plasmids of the nucleoprotein (N) and/or phosphoprotein (P) gene of RABV. The subcellular distribution of PFDN1 was analyzed by confocal microscopy, and the transcription levels of PFDN1 in the N and/or P gene of the RABV-transfected or RABV-infected N2a cells were assessed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Confocal microscopy showed that PFDN1 was colocalized with the N protein of RABV in the infected N2a cells and was mainly recruited to the characteristic Negri-Body-Like (NBL) structures in the cytoplasm, as well as the cotransfection of the N and P genes of RABV. The transcription of PFDN1 in the RABV-infected N2a cells was upregulated, whereas the transfection of the N and/or P genes did not result in the upregulation of PFDN1. Conclusions: The results of this work demonstrated that the subcellular distribution of PFDN1 was altered in the RABV-infected N2a cells and colocalized with the N protein of RABV in the NBL structures. PMID:26421138

  19. Hepatitis E Virus Infection among Solid Organ Transplant Recipients, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Suzan D.; de Man, Rob A.; Mulders, Claudia; Balk, Aggie H.M.M.; van Hal, Peter T.W.; Weimar, Willem; Koopmans, Marion P.G.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    We screened 1,200 living heart, lung, liver, and kidney transplant recipients for hepatitis E virus infection by reverse transcription PCR. In 12 (1%) patients, hepatitis E virus infection was identified; in 11 patients, chronic infection developed. This immunocompromised population is at risk for hepatitis E virus infection. PMID:22516170

  20. KINETIC PROFILE OF INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Influenza infection is a respiratory disease of viral origin that can cause major epidemics in man. The influenza virus infects and damages epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and causes pneumonia. Lung lesions of mice infected with influenza virus resembl...

  1. Comparative pathology of select agent influenza A virus infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus infections may spread rapidly in human populations and cause acute respiratory disease with variable mortality. Two of these influenza viruses have been designated as select agents because of the high case fatality rate: 1918 H1N1 virus and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) ...

  2. Susceptibility of mouse macrophage J774 to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Altamirano, María M B; Sánchez-García, F Javier; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Aguilar-Carmona, Israel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the J774 mouse macrophage cell line could be used as an in vitro model for dengue virus infection (DENV). After 3 days, infection in J774 cells was assessed by detecting dengue virus non-structural protein 1 (NSP-1) production either by dot blot or indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) of saponine-permeabilized J774 cells and then confirmed by RT-PCR (171 bp product, corresponding to the DENV-2 core). Based on the presence of NSP-1 in infected but not in non-infected cells by both IFA and dot blot, as well as the amplification of a 171-bp DENV-2-specific RT-PCR product exclusively in the infected cells, the J774 cell line was found to be permissive for dengue virus infection. As far as we know, this is the first report that the J774 mouse macrophage cell line is infected with dengue virus and, thus, that it can be used as an alternative in vitro model for dengue virus infection studies. This finding could help to further elucidate the mechanisms involved in dengue virus infection and pathogenesis. PMID:17356302

  3. Emerging Viral Infections of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    In this 2-part review, I will focus on emerging virus infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Part 1 will introduce the basic features of emerging infections, including their definition, epidemiology, and the frequency of CNS involvement. Important mechanisms of emergence will be reviewed, including viruses spreading into new host ranges as exemplified by West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, Toscana virus, and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Emerging infections also result from opportunistic spread of viruses into known niches, often resulting from attenuated host resistance to infection. This process is exemplified by transplant-associated cases of viral CNS infection caused by WNV, rabies virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis, and lymphocytic choriomeningitis–like viruses and by the syndrome of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6)–associated posttransplantation acute limbic encephalitis. The second part of this review begins with a discussion of JC virus and the occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in association with novel immunomodulatory therapies and then continues with an overview of the risk of infection introduced by imported animals (eg, monkeypox virus) and examples of emerging diseases caused by enhanced competence of viruses for vectors and the spread of vectors (eg, chikungunya virus) and then concludes with examples of novel viruses causing CNS infection as exemplified by Nipah and Hendra viruses and bat lyssaviruses. PMID:19667214

  4. Fatal Case of Polymicrobial Meningitis Caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodas-Rodríguez, Lia; Díaz-Paz, Manuel; Palacios-Rivera, Hilda; Firacative, Carolina; Meyer, Wieland; Alcázar-Castillo, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    We describe a fatal case of polymicrobial meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient from Guatemala caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Central nervous system infections caused concurrently by these species are extremely rare. This is also the first report of disseminated disease caused by C. liquefaciens. PMID:26019205

  5. First case of imported Zika virus infection in Spain.

    PubMed

    Bachiller-Luque, Pablo; Domínguez-Gil González, Marta; Álvarez-Manzanares, Jesús; Vázquez, Ana; De Ory, Fernando; Sánchez-Seco Fariñas, M Paz

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a patient with diarrhea, fever, synovitis, non-purulent conjunctivitis, and with discreet retro-orbital pain, after returning from Colombia in January 2016. The patient referred several mosquito bites. Presence of ZIKV was detected by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in plasma. Rapid microbiological diagnosis of ZIKV infection is needed in European countries with circulation of its vector, in order to avoid autochthonous circulation. The recent association of ZIKV infection with abortion and microcephaly, and a Guillain-Barré syndrome highlights the need for laboratory differentiation of ZIKV from other virus infection. Women with potential risk for Zika virus infection who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant must mention that fact during prenatal visits in order to be evaluated and properly monitored. PMID:26994814

  6. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process. PMID:26906695

  7. [Lopinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women].

    PubMed

    Téllez, María Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are clear sex-related biological differences between men and women. Diseases that affect the two sexes differently are studied separately. However, some diseases affect both men and women, but their incidence or outcome are clearly different. In human immunodeficiency virus infection, the potential differences in the effects of antiretroviral therapy are poorly characterized and few studies have been designed to elucidate these differences. Moreover, women are usually poorly represented in clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:25542872

  8. Neurological Complications of Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Billioux, Bridgette Jeanne; Smith, Bryan; Nath, Avindra

    2016-07-01

    Ebola virus disease is one of the deadliest pathogens known to man, with a mortality rate between 25-90% depending on the species and outbreak of Ebola. Typically, it presents with fever, headache, voluminous vomiting and diarrhea, and can progress to a hemorrhagic illness; neurologic symptoms, including meningoencephalitis, seizures, and coma, can also occur. Recently, an outbreak occurred in West Africa, affecting > 28,000 people, and killing > 11,000. Owing to the magnitude of this outbreak, and the large number (>17,000) of Ebola survivors, the medical and scientific communities are learning much more about the acute manifestations and sequelae of Ebola. A number of neurologic complications can occur after Ebola, such as seizures, memory loss, headaches, cranial nerve abnormalities, and tremor. Ebola may also persist in some immunologically privileged sites, including the central nervous system, and can rarely lead to relapse in disease. Owing to these findings, it is important that survivors are evaluated and monitored for neurologic symptoms. Much is unknown about this disease, and treatment remains largely supportive; however, with ongoing clinical and basic science, the mechanisms of how Ebola affects the central nervous system and how it persists after acute disease will hopefully become more clear, and better treatments and clinical practices for Ebola patients will be developed. PMID:27412684

  9. Role of oxidative stress in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan C; Kammouni, Wafa; Fernyhough, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies in an experimental model of rabies indicated that there are major structural changes in the brain involving neuronal processes that are associated with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are a good in vitro model for studying the mechanisms involved in rabies virus-induced degeneration of neurites (axons) because, unlike other neuronal cell types, these neurons are fairly permissive to rabies virus infection. DRG neurons infected with the challenge virus standard-11 (CVS) strain of rabies virus show axonal swellings and immunostaining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), indicating evidence of lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress, and also reduced axonal growth in comparison with mock-infected DRG neurons. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine prevented the reduction in axonal outgrowth that occurred with CVS infection. The axonal swellings with 4-HNE-labeled puncta were found to be associated with aggregations of actively respiring mitochondria. We postulate that rabies virus infection likely induces mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in oxidative stress and degenerative changes involving neuronal processes. This mitochondrial dysfunction may be the result of either direct or indirect effects of the virus on the mitochondrial electron-transport chain or it may occur through other mechanisms. Further investigations are needed to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in the oxidative damage associated with rabies virus infection. This information may prove helpful in the design of future therapeutic effects for this dreaded ancient disease. PMID:21601046

  10. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  11. Epidemiological and Virological Characterization of Influenza B Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Sivan; Drori, Yaron; Micheli, Michal; Friedman, Nehemya; Orzitzer, Sara; Bassal, Ravit; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Shohat, Tamar; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While influenza A viruses comprise a heterogeneous group of clinically relevant influenza viruses, influenza B viruses form a more homogeneous cluster, divided mainly into two lineages: Victoria and Yamagata. This divergence has complicated seasonal influenza vaccine design, which traditionally contained two seasonal influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain. We examined the distribution of the two influenza B virus lineages in Israel, between 2011-2014, in hospitalized and in non-hospitalized (community) influenza B virus-infected patients. We showed that influenza B virus infections can lead to hospitalization and demonstrated that during some winter seasons, both influenza B virus lineages circulated simultaneously in Israel. We further show that the influenza B virus Yamagata lineage was dominant, circulating in the county in the last few years of the study period, consistent with the anti-Yamagata influenza B virus antibodies detected in the serum samples of affected individuals residing in Israel in the year 2014. Interestingly, we found that elderly people were particularly vulnerable to Yamagata lineage influenza B virus infections. PMID:27533045

  12. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  13. Protective effect of dietary xylitol on influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sun Young; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Xylitol has been used as a substitute for sugar to prevent cavity-causing bacteria, and most studies have focused on its benefits in dental care. Meanwhile, the constituents of red ginseng (RG) are known to be effective in ameliorating the symptoms of influenza virus infection when they are administered orally for 14 days. In this study, we investigated the effect of dietary xylitol on influenza A virus infection (H1N1). We designed regimens containing various fractions of RG (RGs: whole extract, water soluble fraction, saponin and polysaccharide) and xylitol, and combination of xylitol with the RG fractions. Mice received the various combinations orally for 5 days prior to lethal influenza A virus infection. Almost all the mice died post challenge when xylitol or RGs were administered separately. Survival was markedly enhanced when xylitol was administered along with RGs, pointing to a synergistic effect. The effect of xylitol plus RG fractions increased with increasing dose of xylitol. Moreover, dietary xylitol along with the RG water soluble fraction significantly reduced lung virus titers after infection. Therefore, we suggest that dietary xylitol is effective in ameliorating influenza-induced symptoms when it is administered with RG fractions, and this protective effect of xylitol should be considered in relation to other diseases. PMID:24392148

  14. Human Muscle Satellite Cells as Targets of Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Simona; Huerre, Michel; Riviere, Jean-Pierre; Coffey, Lark L.; Afonso, Philippe V.; Mouly, Vincent; de Monredon, Jean; Roger, Jean-Christophe; El Amrani, Mohamed; Yvin, Jean-Luc; Jaffar, Marie-Christine; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Sourisseau, Marion; Schwartz, Olivier; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Desprès, Philippe; Gessain, Antoine; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Background Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells), and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. Conclusions/Significance This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans. PMID:17565380

  15. Epidemiological and Virological Characterization of Influenza B Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Sivan; Drori, Yaron; Micheli, Michal; Friedman, Nehemya; Orzitzer, Sara; Bassal, Ravit; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Shohat, Tamar; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2016-01-01

    While influenza A viruses comprise a heterogeneous group of clinically relevant influenza viruses, influenza B viruses form a more homogeneous cluster, divided mainly into two lineages: Victoria and Yamagata. This divergence has complicated seasonal influenza vaccine design, which traditionally contained two seasonal influenza A virus strains and one influenza B virus strain. We examined the distribution of the two influenza B virus lineages in Israel, between 2011–2014, in hospitalized and in non-hospitalized (community) influenza B virus-infected patients. We showed that influenza B virus infections can lead to hospitalization and demonstrated that during some winter seasons, both influenza B virus lineages circulated simultaneously in Israel. We further show that the influenza B virus Yamagata lineage was dominant, circulating in the county in the last few years of the study period, consistent with the anti-Yamagata influenza B virus antibodies detected in the serum samples of affected individuals residing in Israel in the year 2014. Interestingly, we found that elderly people were particularly vulnerable to Yamagata lineage influenza B virus infections. PMID:27533045

  16. The Aedes aegypti Toll Pathway Controls Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhiyong; Ramirez, Jose L.; Dimopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue viruses, utilizes its innate immune system to ward off a variety of pathogens, some of which can cause disease in humans. To date, the features of insects' innate immune defenses against viruses have mainly been studied in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which appears to utilize different immune pathways against different types of viruses, in addition to an RNA interference–based defense system. We have used the recently released whole-genome sequence of the Ae. aegypti mosquito, in combination with high-throughput gene expression and RNA interference (RNAi)-based reverse genetic analyses, to characterize its response to dengue virus infection in different body compartments. We have further addressed the impact of the mosquito's endogenous microbial flora on virus infection. Our findings indicate a significant role for the Toll pathway in regulating resistance to dengue virus, as indicated by an infection-responsive regulation and functional assessment of several Toll pathway–associated genes. We have also shown that the mosquito's natural microbiota play a role in modulating the dengue virus infection, possibly through basal-level stimulation of the Toll immune pathway. PMID:18604274

  17. Protective Effect of Dietary Xylitol on Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Sun Young; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Xylitol has been used as a substitute for sugar to prevent cavity-causing bacteria, and most studies have focused on its benefits in dental care. Meanwhile, the constituents of red ginseng (RG) are known to be effective in ameliorating the symptoms of influenza virus infection when they are administered orally for 14 days. In this study, we investigated the effect of dietary xylitol on influenza A virus infection (H1N1). We designed regimens containing various fractions of RG (RGs: whole extract, water soluble fraction, saponin and polysaccharide) and xylitol, and combination of xylitol with the RG fractions. Mice received the various combinations orally for 5 days prior to lethal influenza A virus infection. Almost all the mice died post challenge when xylitol or RGs were administered separately. Survival was markedly enhanced when xylitol was administered along with RGs, pointing to a synergistic effect. The effect of xylitol plus RG fractions increased with increasing dose of xylitol. Moreover, dietary xylitol along with the RG water soluble fraction significantly reduced lung virus titers after infection. Therefore, we suggest that dietary xylitol is effective in ameliorating influenza-induced symptoms when it is administered with RG fractions, and this protective effect of xylitol should be considered in relation to other diseases. PMID:24392148

  18. [Dementia and human inmmunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Gray, F

    1998-01-01

    HIV-associated neurological manifestations: dementia, myelopathy, and neuropathy, have become one of the commonest causes of neurological disorders in young people. Cognitive impairment develops in about 30 p. 100 of patients with AIDS and frank dementia in 15 to 20 p. 100 with an annual incidence after AIDS of approximatively 7 p. 100. Typically, the onset of dementia is relatively abrupt over a few weeks or months. The clinical manifestations of the encephalopathy now termed "HIV-dementia", suggest predominant subcortical or frontal involvement. Typical presentation includes apathy and inertia, memory loss and cognitive slowing, minor depressive symptoms and withdrawal from usual activities. Neurological examination may show hypertonia of lower limbs, tremor, clonus, frontal release signs and hyperactive reflexes. Terminally, the patient is bedbound, incontinent, abulic or mute with decorticate posturing leading to death over 3 to 6 months. However, a stabilisation and even a regression of the cognitive disorders have been observed following antiretroviral treatment. Radiological features of HIV dementia include both central and cortical atrophy and white matter rarefaction. However they are neither invariable nor specific. Together with CSF examination, they are more important to exclude opportunistic infections. Indeed, although a completely normal CSF profile may reasonably exclude the diagnosis; at present, no single test or combination of tests can reliably diagnose HIV dementia. Although the clinical characteristics of HIV-dementia are now clearly established, its pathogenesis is unclear and its pathological counterpart remains a matter of debate. A number of "HIV-induced" lesions may be found in the brain of AIDS patients and their causative role in HIV-dementia has been considered. They include HIV encephalitis due to productive CNS infection by the virus, diffuse white matter pallor "HIV-leukoencephalopathy" reflecting an abnormality of the blood brain

  19. Chemokine gene expression in the brains of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Asensio, V C; Campbell, I L

    1997-01-01

    Chemokines are pivotal in the trafficking of leukocytes. In the present study, we examined the expression of multiple chemokine genes during the course of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) in mice. In noninfected mice, no detectable chemokine gene expression was found in the brain; however, by day 3 postinfection, the induction of a number of chemokine mRNAs was observed as follows (in order from the greatest to the least): cytokine responsive gene-2 or interferon-inducible 10-kDa protein (Crg-2/IP-10), RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1beta), and MCP-3. At day 6 postinfection, the expression of these chemokine mRNAs was increased, and low expression of lymphotactin, C10, MIP-2, and MIP-1alpha mRNAs was detectable. Transcript for T-cell activation-3 was not detectable in the brain at any time following LCM virus (LCMV) infection. With some exceptions, a pattern of chemokine gene expression similar to that in the brain was observed in the peripheral organs of LCMV-infected mice. Mice that lacked expression of gamma interferon developed LCM and had a qualitatively similar but quantitatively reduced cerebral chemokine gene expression profile. In contrast, little or no chemokine gene expression was detectable in the brains of LCMV-infected athymic mice which did not develop LCM. Expression of Crg-2/IP-10 RNA was localized to predominantly resident cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and overlapped with sites of viral infection and immune cell infiltration. These findings demonstrate the expression of a number of chemokine genes in the brains of mice infected with LCMV. The pattern of chemokine gene expression in LCM may profoundly influence the characteristic phenotype and response of leukocytes in the brain and contribute to the immunopathogenesis of this fatal CNS infection. PMID:9311871

  20. Recurrent Transcortical Motor Aphasia-Another CNS Infectious Syndrome Associated with Herpes Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Raghav; Salgado, Efrain

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is an acute/subacute illness that causes both general and focal signs of cerebral dysfunction with fever, headache, and confusion as cardinal features. Recurrent herpes simplex meningitis, also known as Mollaret's meningitis, is another manifestation of central nervous system herpetic infection with recurrent episodes of fever, headache, and nuchal rigidity associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evidence of active herpes simplex infection. Bell's palsy is yet another manifestation of a herpes virus infection in at least some reported cases documented by CSF analysis. We report a case of a 70-year-old male who presented with acute transcortical motor aphasia initiating a stroke work-up that was negative. Physical examination revealed genital vesicles, and the CSF was consistent with active herpes simplex infection. PMID:26958155

  1. Virus infection-associated bone marrow B cell depletion and impairment of humoral immunity to heterologous infection mediated by TNF-alpha/LTalpha.

    PubMed

    Borrow, Persephone; Hou, Sam; Gloster, Simone; Ashton, Miranda; Hyland, Lisa

    2005-02-01

    We previously showed that influenza virus infection of mice induces a depletion of bone marrow B lineage cells due to apoptosis of early B cells mediated by a mechanism involving TNF-alpha/LTalpha. Here we demonstrate that this effect is also observed with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection and resulted in a deficiency of both splenic transitional B cells and mature follicular B cells. To determine whether there was an associated impairment of humoral immunity, we infected mice with LCMV and 10 days later at the peak of the B cell depletion, inoculated them with influenza virus. We found that influenza virus-specific antibody titers were dramatically reduced in mice recovering from LCMV infection compared to those in mice infected with influenza virus alone. Further, we showed that there was no reduction of the influenza virus-specific antibody response in LCMV-infected TNF-alpha/LTalpha-deficient mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha/LTalpha-mediated effects on bone marrow and/or peripheral lymphocytes were responsible for the observed impairment in humoral immunity. These results show that the TNF-alpha/LTalpha production induced following infection with diverse viruses has detrimental effects on early B cells in the bone marrow, and may be among the factors that lead to the severely compromised humoral immunity observed to subsequent heterologous infections. PMID:15657949

  2. T Follicular Helper Cell-Dependent Clearance of a Persistent Virus Infection Requires T Cell Expression of the Histone Demethylase UTX.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin D; Shpargel, Karl B; Starmer, Joshua; Whitfield-Larry, Fatima; Conley, Bridget; Allard, Denise E; Rager, Julia E; Fry, Rebecca C; Davenport, Marsha L; Magnuson, Terry; Whitmire, Jason K; Su, Maureen A

    2015-10-20

    Epigenetic changes, including histone methylation, control T cell differentiation and memory formation, though the enzymes that mediate these processes are not clear. We show that UTX, a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase, supports T follicular helper (Tfh) cell responses that are essential for B cell antibody generation and the resolution of chronic viral infections. Mice with a T cell-specific UTX deletion had fewer Tfh cells, reduced germinal center responses, lacked virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), and were unable to resolve chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. UTX-deficient T cells showed decreased expression of interleukin-6 receptor-α and other Tfh cell-related genes that were associated with increased H3K27 methylation. Additionally, Turner Syndrome subjects, who are predisposed to chronic ear infections, had reduced UTX expression in immune cells and decreased circulating CD4(+) CXCR5(+) T cell frequency. Thus, we identify a critical link between UTX in T cells and immunity to infection. PMID:26431949

  3. Trace-Forward Investigation of Mice in Response to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Knust, Barbara; Petersen, Bret; Gabel, Julie; Manning, Craig; Drenzek, Cherie; Ströher, Ute; Rollin, Pierre E.; Thoroughman, Douglas; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2014-01-01

    During follow-up of a 2012 US outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), we conducted a trace-forward investigation. LCMV-infected feeder mice originating from a US rodent breeding facility had been distributed to >500 locations in 21 states. All mice from the facility were euthanized, and no additional persons tested positive for LCMV infection. PMID:24447898

  4. A Case of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Following Chikungunya Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Illya; Laux, Timothy; Kim, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Chikungunya is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has recently become endemic in the Caribbean, including the island of Puerto Rico. We present the case of a 50-year-old Puerto Rican man who traveled to St. Louis for business and was diagnosed with acute chikungunya virus infection with atypical features causing diabetic ketoacidosis. This case highlights the need to keep tropical infectious diseases on the differential diagnosis in appropriate individuals and the ways in which tropical infectious diseases can masquerade as part of common presentations. PMID:26033023

  5. Lessons for tuberculosis vaccines from respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Peter Charles Leonard; Tchilian, Elma Zaven

    2008-10-01

    There is a worldwide epidemic of increasingly drug-resistant TB. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination provides partial protection against disseminated disease in infants but poor protection against later pulmonary TB. Cell-mediated protection against respiratory virus infections requires the presence of T cells in lung tissues, and the most effective prime-boost immunizations for Mycobacterium tuberculosis also induce lung-resident lymphocytes. These observations need to be taken into account when designing future vaccines against M. tuberculosis. PMID:18844591

  6. A conservation law for virus infection kinetics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kakizoe, Yusuke; Morita, Satoru; Nakaoka, Shinji; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Kei; Miura, Tomoyuki; Beauchemin, Catherine A A; Iwami, Shingo

    2015-07-01

    Conservation laws are among the most important properties of a physical system, but are not commonplace in biology. We derived a conservation law from the basic model for viral infections which consists in a small set of ordinary differential equations. We challenged the conservation law experimentally for the case of a virus infection in a cell culture. We found that the derived, conserved quantity remained almost constant throughout the infection period, implying that the derived conservation law holds in this biological system. We also suggest a potential use for the conservation law in evaluating the accuracy of experimental measurements. PMID:25882746

  7. Possible Association Between Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly - Brazil, 2015.

    PubMed

    Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Ribeiro, Erlane M; Feitosa, Ian M L; Horovitz, Dafne D G; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Pessoa, André; Doriqui, Maria Juliana R; Neri, Joao Ivanildo; Neto, Joao Monteiro de Pina; Wanderley, Hector Y C; Cernach, Mirlene; El-Husny, Antonette S; Pone, Marcos V S; Serao, Cassio L C; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa V

    2016-01-01

    In early 2015, an outbreak of Zika virus, a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, was identified in northeast Brazil, an area where dengue virus was also circulating. By September, reports of an increase in the number of infants born with microcephaly in Zika virus-affected areas began to emerge, and Zika virus RNA was identified in the amniotic fluid of two women whose fetuses had been found to have microcephaly by prenatal ultrasound. The Brazil Ministry of Health (MoH) established a task force to investigate the possible association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and a registry for incident microcephaly cases (head circumference ≥2 standard deviations [SD] below the mean for sex and gestational age at birth) and pregnancy outcomes among women suspected to have had Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Among a cohort of 35 infants with microcephaly born during August-October 2015 in eight of Brazil's 26 states and reported to the registry, the mothers of all 35 had lived in or visited Zika virus-affected areas during pregnancy, 25 (71%) infants had severe microcephaly (head circumference >3 SD below the mean for sex and gestational age), 17 (49%) had at least one neurologic abnormality, and among 27 infants who had neuroimaging studies, all had abnormalities. Tests for other congenital infections were negative. All infants had a lumbar puncture as part of the evaluation and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were sent to a reference laboratory in Brazil for Zika virus testing; results are not yet available. Further studies are needed to confirm the association of microcephaly with Zika virus infection during pregnancy and to understand any other adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with Zika virus infection. Pregnant women in Zika virus-affected areas should protect themselves from mosquito bites by using air conditioning, screens, or nets when indoors, wearing long sleeves and pants, using permethrin-treated clothing and gear

  8. Care of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Menopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Cejtin, Helen E.

    2012-01-01

    More women than ever before are both Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected and menopausal, because of increased survival and more frequent diagnosis in older women. Such a woman has the combined burden of her infection, its treatment, comorbid conditions, and aging. Thus she is at risk for a variety of problems such as disorders of bone mineral density and deficiencies in cognitive functioning. In addition to this, she experiences menopause in a unique fashion, with more symptoms and perhaps at an earlier age. The clinician caring for her must take a proactive approach to this multitude of factors that may affect her health and well-being. PMID:22284959

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial-Associated ER Membranes (MAM) during RNA Virus Infection Reveals Dynamic Changes in Protein and Organelle Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; Wilkins, Courtney; Badil, Samantha; Iskarpatyoti, Jason; Gale, Michael

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I pathway signaling of innate immunity against RNA virus infection is organized between the ER and mitochondria on a subdomain of the ER called the mitochondrial-associated ER membrane (MAM). The RIG-I adaptor protein MAVS transmits downstream signaling of antiviral immunity, with signaling complexes assembling on the MAM in association with mitochondria and peroxisomes. To identify components that regulate MAVS signalosome assembly on the MAM, we characterized the proteome of MAM, ER, and cytosol from cells infected with either chronic (hepatitis C) or acute (Sendai) RNA virus infections, as well as mock-infected cells. Comparative analysis of protein trafficking dynamics during both chronic and acute viral infection reveals differential protein profiles in the MAM during RIG-I pathway activation. We identified proteins and biochemical pathways recruited into and out of the MAM in both chronic and acute RNA viral infections, representing proteins that drive immunity and/or regulate viral replication. In addition, by using this comparative proteomics approach, we identified 3 new MAVS-interacting proteins, RAB1B, VTN, and LONP1, and defined LONP1 as a positive regulator of the RIG-I pathway. Our proteomic analysis also reveals a dynamic cross-talk between subcellular compartments during both acute and chronic RNA virus infection, and demonstrates the importance of the MAM as a central platform that coordinates innate immune signaling to initiate immunity against RNA virus infection. PMID:25734423

  10. Drug repurposing of minocycline against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Leela, Shilpa Lekshmi; Srisawat, Chatchawan; Sreekanth, Gopinathan Pillai; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus infection is one of the most common arthropod-borne viral diseases. A complex interplay between host and viral factors contributes to the severity of infection. The antiviral effects of three antibiotics, lomefloxacin, netilmicin, and minocycline, were examined in this study, and minocycline was found to be a promising drug. This antiviral effect was confirmed in all four serotypes of the virus. The effects of minocycline at various stages of the viral life cycle, such as during viral RNA synthesis, intracellular envelope protein expression, and the production of infectious virions, were examined and found to be significantly reduced by minocycline treatment. Minocycline also modulated host factors, including the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). The transcription of antiviral genes, including 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 3 (OAS3), and interferon α (IFNA), was upregulated by minocycline treatment. Therefore, the antiviral activity of minocycline may have a potential clinical use against Dengue virus infection. PMID:27396621

  11. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  12. Analysis of resistance and tolerance to virus infection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Merkling, Sarah H; van Rij, Ronald P

    2015-07-01

    Host defense to virus infection involves both resistance mechanisms that reduce viral burden and tolerance mechanisms that limit detrimental effects of infection. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a model for identifying and characterizing the genetic basis of resistance and tolerance. This protocol describes how to analyze host responses to virus infection in Drosophila, and it covers the preparation of virus stocks, experimental inoculation of flies and assessment of host survival and virus production, which are indicative of resistance or tolerance. It also provides guidance on how to account for recently identified confounding factors, including natural genetic variation in the pastrel locus and contamination of fly stocks with persistent viruses and the symbiotic bacterium Wolbachia. Our protocol aims to be accessible to newcomers to the field and, although optimized for virus research using Drosophila, some of the techniques could be adapted to other host organisms and/or other microbial pathogens. Preparation of fly stocks requires ∼1 month, virus stock preparation requires 17-20 d, virus injection and survival assays require 10-15 d and virus titration requires 14 d. PMID:26110714

  13. Senescence affects endothelial cells susceptibility to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Shu, Meng-Hooi; Johari, Jefree; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability contributes to plasma leakage seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An earlier study showed that senescent endothelial cells (ECs) altered the ECs permeability. Here we investigated the susceptibility of senescing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to dengue virus infection and determined if dengue virus infection induces HUVECs senescence. Our results suggest that DENV type-2 (DENV-2) foci forming unit (FFU) and extracellular virus RNA copy number were reduced by at least 35% and 85% in infection of the intermediate young and early senescent HUVECs, respectively, in comparison to infection of young HUVECs. No to low infectivity was recovered from infection of late senescent HUVECs. DENV infection also increases the percentage of HUVECs expressing senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal, cells arrested at the G2/M phase or 4N DNA content stage and cells with enlarged morphology, indicative of senescing cells. Alteration of HUVECs morphology was recorded using impedance-based real-time cell analysis system following DENV-2 infection. These results suggest that senescing HUVECs do not support DENV infection and DENV infection induces HUVECs senescence. The finding highlights the possible role of induction of senescence in DENV infection of the endothelial cells. PMID:24782642

  14. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others. PMID:27323550

  15. Global Reprogramming of Host SUMOylation during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patricia; Golebiowski, Filip; Tatham, Michael H.; Lopes, Antonio M.; Taggart, Aislynn; Hay, Ronald T.; Hale, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dynamic nuclear SUMO modifications play essential roles in orchestrating cellular responses to proteotoxic stress, DNA damage, and DNA virus infection. Here, we describe a non-canonical host SUMOylation response to the nuclear-replicating RNA pathogen, influenza virus, and identify viral RNA polymerase activity as a major contributor to SUMO proteome remodeling. Using quantitative proteomics to compare stress-induced SUMOylation responses, we reveal that influenza virus infection triggers unique re-targeting of SUMO to 63 host proteins involved in transcription, mRNA processing, RNA quality control, and DNA damage repair. This is paralleled by widespread host deSUMOylation. Depletion screening identified ten virus-induced SUMO targets as potential antiviral factors, including C18orf25 and the SMC5/6 and PAF1 complexes. Mechanistic studies further uncovered a role for SUMOylation of the PAF1 complex component, parafibromin (CDC73), in potentiating antiviral gene expression. Our global characterization of influenza virus-triggered SUMO redistribution provides a proteomic resource to understand host nuclear SUMOylation responses to infection. PMID:26549460

  16. Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Rollé, Amélie; Schepers, Kinda; Cassadou, Sylvie; Curlier, Elodie; Madeux, Benjamin; Hermann-Storck, Cécile; Fabre, Isabelle; Lamaury, Isabelle; Tressières, Benoit; Thiery, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    During a 2014 outbreak, 450 patients with confirmed chikungunya virus infection were admitted to the University Hospital of Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. Of these, 110 were nonpregnant adults; 42 had severe disease, and of those, 25 had severe sepsis or septic shock and 12 died. Severe sepsis may be a rare complication of chikungunya virus infection. PMID:27088710

  17. Influenza virus infections in the tropics during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Libraty, Daniel H; Zhang, Lei; Caponpon, Mercydina; Capeding, Rosario Z

    2015-08-01

    Pediatric influenza virus infections in the tropics, particularly during infancy, are not well described. We identified influenza virus infections among infants with non-dengue acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in San Pablo, Laguna, Philippines, as part of an ongoing clinical study of dengue virus infections during infancy. We found that 31% of infants with non-dengue acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in San Pablo, Laguna, Philippines, had influenza virus infections. The majority were influenza A virus infections and outpatient cases. The infant ages were 11.1 [9.8-13.0] months (median [95% confidence interval]), and the cases clustered between June and December. Influenza episodes are a common cause of non-dengue acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in the tropics during the first year of life. PMID:25828834

  18. Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes are vital contributors to membrane bound replication and movement complexes during plant RNA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2012-01-01

    Cellular chaperones and folding enzymes play central roles in the formation of positive-strand and negative-strand RNA virus infection. This article examines the key cellular chaperones and discusses evidence that these factors are diverted from their cellular functions to play alternative roles in virus infection. For most chaperones discussed, their primary role in the cell is to ensure protein quality control. They are system components that drive substrate protein folding, complex assembly or disaggregation. Their activities often depend upon co-chaperones and ATP hydrolysis. During plant virus infection, Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins play central roles in the formation of membrane-bound replication complexes for certain members of the tombusvirus, tobamovirus, potyvirus, dianthovirus, potexvirus, and carmovirus genus. There are several co-chaperones, including Yjd1, RME-8, and Hsp40 that associate with the bromovirus replication complex, pomovirus TGB2, and tospovirus Nsm movement proteins. There are also examples of plant viruses that rely on chaperone systems in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to support cell-to-cell movement. TMV relies on calreticulin to promote virus intercellular transport. Calreticulin also resides in the plasmodesmata and plays a role in calcium sequestration as well as glycoprotein folding. The pomovirus TGB2 interacts with RME-8 in the endosome. The potexvirus TGB3 protein stimulates expression of ER resident chaperones via the bZIP60 transcription factor. Up-regulating factors involved in protein folding may be essential to handling the load of viral proteins translated along the ER. In addition, TGB3 stimulates SKP1 which is a co-factor in proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins. Such chaperones and co-factors are potential targets for antiviral defense. PMID:23230447

  19. Total knee arthroplasty in human immunodeficiency virus-infected hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Unger, A S; Kessler, C M; Lewis, R J

    1995-08-01

    Twenty-six knee arthroplasties were performed in 15 patients with hemophilia A and human immunodeficiency virus infection from 1984 to 1991. Patient age range was 27 to 48 years. After an average follow-up period of 6.4 years (range, 1-9 years) all patients were alive and none of the implants had become infected. T4 lymphocyte counts showed some deterioration, which was not clinically significant. All of the patients were improved following surgery. Nineteen implants were rated excellent, four good, and three fair. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus did not adversely affect the clinical outcome of knee arthroplasty at follow-up periods up to 9 years. PMID:8523002

  20. Neutralizing antibodies in Borna disease virus-infected rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hatalski, C G; Kliche, S; Stitz, L; Lipkin, W I

    1995-01-01

    Borna disease is a neurologic syndrome caused by infection with a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, Borna disease virus. Infected animals have antibodies to two soluble viral proteins, p40 and p23, and a membrane-associated viral glycoprotein, gp18. We examined the time course for the development of neutralization activity and the expression of antibodies to individual viral proteins in sera of infected rats. The appearance of neutralizing activity correlated with the development of immunoreactivity to gp18, but not p40 or p23. Monospecific and monoclonal antibodies to native gp18 and recombinant nonglycosylated gp18 were also found to have neutralizing activity and to immunoprecipitate viral particles or subparticles. These findings suggest that gp18 is likely to be present on the surface of the viral particles and is likely to contain epitopes important for virus neutralization. PMID:7815538

  1. Influenza A Virus Infection, Innate Immunity, and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Bria M.; Staricha, Kelly L.; Wiese, Kristin M.; Ridge, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A virus is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. While it is apparent that adequate activation of the innate immune system is essential for pathogen clearance and host survival, an excessive inflammatory response to infection is detrimental to the young host. A review of the literature indicates that innate immune responses change throughout childhood. Whether these changes are genetically programmed or triggered by environmental cues is unknown. The objectives of this review are to summarize the role of innate immunity in influenza A virus infection in the young child and to highlight possible differences between children and adults that may make children more susceptible to severe influenza A infection. A better understanding of age-related differences in innate immune signaling will be essential to improve care for this high-risk population. PMID:26237589

  2. Genetic variation of occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-Lan; Li, Xu; Li, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI), characterized as the persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) seronegativity and low viral load in blood or liver, is a special form of HBV infection. OBI may be related mainly to mutations in the HBV genome, although the underlying mechanism of it remains to be clarified. Mutations especially within the immunodominant “α” determinant of S protein are “hot spots” that could contribute to the occurrence of OBI via affecting antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBsAg or replication and secretion of virion. Clinical reports account for a large proportion of previous studies on OBI, while functional analyses, especially those based on full-length HBV genome, are rare. PMID:27053845

  3. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001–2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children. PMID:27088268

  4. The Impact of Wolbachia on Virus Infection in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue, West Nile and chikungunya viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in human populations. Since current methods are not sufficient to control disease occurrence, novel methods to control transmission of arboviruses would be beneficial. Recent studies have shown that virus infection and transmission in insects can be impeded by co-infection with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a maternally inherited endosymbiont that is commonly found in insects, including a number of mosquito vector species. In Drosophila, Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection against a broad range of RNA viruses. This discovery pointed to a potential strategy to interfere with mosquito transmission of arboviruses by artificially infecting mosquitoes with Wolbachia. This review outlines research on the prevalence of Wolbachia in mosquito vector species and the impact of antiviral effects in both naturally and artificially Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. PMID:26556361

  5. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey; Kellam, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA 'off-target' effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host-virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host-virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  6. Background review for diagnostic test development for Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Charrel, Rémi N; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Pas, Suzan; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the state of knowledge about diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection and identify areas of research needed to address the current gaps in knowledge. Methods We made a non-systematic review of the published literature about Zika virus and supplemented this with information from commercial diagnostic test kits and personal communications with researchers in European preparedness networks. The review covered current knowledge about the geographical spread, pathogen characteristics, life cycle and infection kinetics of the virus. The available molecular and serological tests and biosafety issues are described and discussed in the context of the current outbreak strain. Findings We identified the following areas of research to address current knowledge gaps: (i) an urgent assessment of the laboratory capacity and capability of countries to detect Zika virus; (ii) rapid and extensive field validation of the available molecular and serological tests in areas with and without Zika virus transmission, with a focus on pregnant women; (iii) monitoring the genomic diversity of circulating Zika virus strains; (iv) prospective studies into the virus infection kinetics, focusing on diagnostic sampling (specimen types, combinations and timings); and (v) developing external quality assessments for molecular and serological testing, including differential diagnosis for similar viruses and symptom clusters. The availability of reagents for diagnostic development (virus strains and antigens, quantified viral ribonucleic acid) needs to be facilitated. Conclusion An international laboratory response is needed, including preparation of protocols for prospective studies to address the most pressing information needs. PMID:27516635

  7. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  8. Quantifying homologous and heterologous antibody titre rises after influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Freeman, G; Perera, R A P M; Ngan, E; Fang, V J; Cauchemez, S; Ip, D K M; Peiris, J S M; Cowling, B J

    2016-08-01

    Most influenza virus infections are associated with mild disease. One approach to estimate the occurrence of influenza virus infections in individuals is via repeated measurement of humoral antibody titres. We used baseline and convalescent antibody titres measured by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and viral neutralization (VN) assays against influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and B viruses to investigate the characteristics of antibody rises following virologically confirmed influenza virus infections in participants in a community-based study. Multivariate models were fitted in a Bayesian framework to characterize the distribution of changes in antibody titres following influenza A virus infections. In 122 participants with PCR-confirmed influenza A virus infection, homologous antibody titres rose by geometric means of 1·2- to 10·2-fold after infection with A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09. Significant cross-reactions were observed between A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal A(H1N1). Antibody titre rises for some subtypes and assays varied by age, receipt of oseltamivir treatment, and recent receipt of influenza vaccination. In conclusion, we provided a quantitative description of the mean and variation in rises in influenza virus antibody titres following influenza virus infection. The multivariate patterns in boosting of antibody titres following influenza virus infection could be taken into account to improve estimates of cumulative incidence of infection in seroepidemiological studies. PMID:27018720

  9. Parainfluenza Virus 5 Expressing the G Protein of Rabies Virus Protects Mice after Rabies Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Chen, Zhenhai; Huang, Junhua

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major public health threat around the world. Once symptoms appear, there is no effective treatment to prevent death. In this work, we tested a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) strain expressing the glycoprotein (G) of rabies (PIV5-G) as a therapy for rabies virus infection: we have found that PIV5-G protected mice as late as 6 days after rabies virus infection. PIV5-G is a promising vaccine for prevention and treatment of rabies virus infection. PMID:25552723

  10. Seroepidemiology of Asymptomatic Dengue Virus Infection in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Ghazi A.; Azhar, Esam I.; Kao, Moujahid A.; Radadi, Raja M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although virologically confirmed dengue fever has been recognized in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, since 1994, causing yearly outbreaks, no proper seroepidemiologic studies on dengue virus have been conducted in this region. Such studies can define the extent of infection by this virus and estimate the proportion that may result in disease. The aim of this study was to measure the seroprevalence of past dengue virus infection in healthy Saudi nationals from different areas in the city of Jeddah and to investigate demographic and environmental factors that may increase exposure to infection. METHODS Sera were collected from 1984 Saudi subjects attending primary health care centers in six districts of Jeddah. These included general patients of various ages seeking routine vaccinations, antenatal care or treatment of different illnesses excluding fever or suspected dengue. A number of blood donors were also tested. Serum samples were tested by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for IgG antibodies to dengue viruses 1, 2, 3, 4. A questionnaire was completed for each patient recording various anthropometric data and factors that may indicate possible risk of exposure to mosquito bites and dengue infection. Patients with missing data and those who reported a history of dengue fever were excluded from analysis, resulting in a sample of 1939 patients to be analyzed. RESULTS The overall prevalence of dengue virus infection as measured by anti-dengue IgG antibodies from asymptomatic residents in Jeddah was 47.8% (927/1939) and 37% (68/184) in blood donors. Infection mostly did not result in recognizable disease, as only 19 of 1956 subjects with complete information (0.1%) reported having dengue fever in the past. Anti dengue seropositivity increased with age and was higher in males than females and in residents of communal housing and multistory buildings than in villas. One of the six districts showed significant increase in exposure rate as compared to the others. Availability of

  11. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Redfield, D.C.; Richman, D.D.; Oxman, M.N.; Kronenberg, L.H.

    1981-06-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays.

  12. Gibberellins and the break of bud dormancy in virus-infected stem cuttings of Euphorbia pulcherrima.

    PubMed

    Nath, S; Mandahar, C L; Gulati, A

    1979-10-15

    Break in bud dormancy in virus-infected stem cuttings of Euphorbia pulcherrima occurs because of the higher quantity of gibberellins present in them than in healthy cuttings in the dormant period of the plant. PMID:499409

  13. Dengue and hepatitis E virus infection in pregnant women in Eastern Sudan, a challenge for diagnosis in an endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Elduma, Adel Hussein; Osman, Waleed Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever and hepatitis E virus infection are both a public health problem in developing countries due to poor sanitation. Infection with viral hepatitis and dengue fever can present with similar clinical such and fever, headache and abortion. This study was conducted in Port-Sudan city in the eastern part of the country. ELISA and Real Time PCR tests were used to detect the infection. A total number of 39 pregnant women with a mean age 26 ±7.8 were included in the study. All of them had fever, 32 (92.3%) admitted with headache, 11 (28.2%) of them had vomiting, and abortion was reported in two cases (5.1%). The study showed that 4 (10.3%) of pregnant women were positive for the Hepatitis E virus, 5 (12.8%) positive for Dengue virus IgG, and only one sample (2.6%) was positive for IgM capture ELISA and real time PCR. Death due to hepatitis E infection was reported in one case with 7th month of pregnancy. Most of hepatitis cases were reported in the central sector of the Portsudan city. The diagnosis of hepatitis E virus and dengue virus in an endemic area is a great challenge for health care staff working in these areas. Both Dengue virus and Hepatitis E virus infection should be considered in pregnant women especially in similar settings. PMID:25995787

  14. Zika virus infection spread through saliva--a truth or myth?

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Walter Luiz; Moffa, Eduardo Buozi; Mussi, Maria Carolina Martins; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira

    2016-01-01

    In this Point-of-view article we highlighted some features related to saliva and virus infection, in special for zika virus. In addition, we pointed out the potential oral problems caused by a microcephaly originated by a zika virus infection. In the end the, we demonstrated the importance of a more comprehensive exploration of saliva and their components as a fluid for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on oral and systemic diseases. PMID:26981761

  15. Resistance/susceptibility to lethal Sendai virus infection genetically linked to a mucociliary transport polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, D G

    1987-01-01

    Linkage was tested between a mucociliary transport polymorphism and resistance/susceptibility to lethal Sendai virus infection in segregant hybrid mice of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J parents. The distribution of paired phenotypes for tracheal mucociliary transport rates and susceptibility to lethal Sendai virus infection in 171 F1 X DBA/2J mice showed strong interaction of the parental phenotypes. PMID:3033294

  16. [IMMUNE SYSTEM DATA IN PATIENTS WITH PERSISTENT RECURENT HERPES VIRUS INFECTIONS IN DYNAMICS OF COMPLEX THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The positive clinical, serolgical and immunological effects of Glutamyl-Triptophan in patients on persistent herpes virus infections are shown. Treatment resulted in the increase of avidity on HSV 1, HSV 2, CMV, EBV antibody, the levels of CD3+-, ICD8+-, CD16+-, CD3+HLA-DR+- (%, abs) and.CD3+CD25t-cells (%), that indicates the optimization of the immune systemdata. The data received allow to recommend Bestim for patients with persistent herpes virus infections. PMID:27089710

  17. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M.; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs. PMID:27053240

  18. Quantification of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Jieanu, CF; Ungureanu, BS; Săndulescu, DL; Gheonea, IA; Tudorașcu, DR; Ciurea, ME; Purcărea, VL

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) is considered a global public issue with more than 78.000 people per year dying of its evolution. With liver transplantation as the only viable therapeutic option but only in end-stage disease, hepatitis B progression may generally be influenced by various factors. Assessing fibrosis stage plays an important part in future decisions on the patients’ wealth with available antiviral agents capable of preventing fibrosis passing to an end-stage liver disease. Several methods have been taken into consideration as an alternative for HBV quantification status, such as imaging techniques and serum based biomarkers. Magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and elastography are considered non-invasive imaging techniques frequently used to quantify disease progression as well as patients future prognostic. Consequently, both direct and indirect biomarkers have been studied for differentiating between fibrosis stages. This paper reviews the current standings in HBV non-invasive liver fibrosis quantification, presenting the prognostic factors and available assessment procedures that might eventually replace liver biopsy. PMID:26351528

  19. [Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection in Spain].

    PubMed

    Echevarría, José Manuel; Fogeda, Marta; Avellón, Ana

    2015-04-01

    The general features of the epidemiology and ecology of hepatitis E virus in Spain are already known after 20 years of investigations. Genotype 3 strains, mainly from sub-genotype 3f, circulated among swine livestock and certain wild mammals, and would be sporadically transmitted to humans through direct contact with the reservoirs or by consumption of foods derived from them. Bivalve shellfish contaminated by hepatitis E virus from sewage could also play a role in transmission. Although the interpretation of results from seroprevalence studies in low endemic settings is still controversial, antibody to hepatitis E virus displays an overall prevalence less than 10% among the population of Spain, increasing significantly with age. From the, approximately, 150 cases of acute hepatitis E recorded in the international literature, males older than 40 years, suffering a mild, locally acquired disease predominate. In addition, hepatitis E might be more frequent in the North of the country than in other regions. Although the disease does not usually have a great clinical relevance, the occasional finding of cases of fulminant hepatitis, and of ribavirin-resistant, chronic hepatitis E virus infections among the immunocompromised would recommend the surveillance of the infection by the public health authority and a better implementation of specific diagnostic procedures in clinical laboratories. PMID:24447919

  20. Ultrastructural studies on dengue virus infection of human lymphoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Sriurairatna, S; Bhamarapravati, N; Diwan, A R; Halstead, S B

    1978-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies of dengue-2 virus-infected lymphoblastoid Raji cells showed that the virus induced an increase in the size of the rough endoplasmic reticula (RER) and that the replication of the virus was confined to the cisternae of these RER. The proliferating RER formed cytoplasmic inclusions that could be seen by light microscopy. This observation could be used as evidence of a cytopathogenic effect of dengue virus on infected Rajii cells in routine cultures. Accumulation of virions in the infected cells was minimal in comparison with other cell systems, however. Sporadic clusters of mature virions were often seen on the plasma membrane. These extracellular virions were distributed adjacent to the virus-bearing RER and were presumably released virions. Vertical transmission of the virus was evident in mitotic lymphoblasts. The replication pattern of dengue virus in lymphoblastoid cells suggests that efforts should be made to determine whether blast-transformed lymphocytes, numerous in secondary dengue infections, support dengue virus replication in vivo. Images PMID:669791

  1. Inhibition of Mayaro virus infection by bovine lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos A M; Sousa, Ivanildo P; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C; Gonçalves, Rafael B; Gomes, Andre M O

    2014-03-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an arbovirus linked to several sporadic outbreaks of a highly debilitating febrile illness in many regions of South America. MAYV is on the verge of urbanization from the Amazon region and no effective antiviral intervention is available against human infections. Our aim was to investigate whether bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein, could hinder MAYV infection. We show that bLf promotes a strong inhibition of virus infection with no cytotoxic effects. Monitoring the effect of bLf on different stages of infection, we observed that virus entry into the cell is the heavily compromised event. Moreover, we found that binding of bLf to the cell is highly dependent on the sulfation of glycosaminoglycans, suggesting that bLf impairs virus entry by blocking these molecules. Our findings highlight the antiviral potential of bLf and reveal an effective strategy against one of the major emerging human pathogens in the neotropics. PMID:24606707

  2. Rabies virus infects mouse and human lymphocytes and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Thoulouze, M I; Lafage, M; Montano-Hirose, J A; Lafon, M

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated and highly neurovirulent rabies virus strains have distinct cellular tropisms. Highly neurovirulent strains such as the challenge virus standard (CVS) are highly neurotropic, whereas the attenuated strain ERA also infects nonneuronal cells. We report that both rabies virus strains infect activated murine lymphocytes and the human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell line in vitro. The lymphocytes are more permissive to the attenuated ERA rabies virus strain than to the CVS strain in both cases. We also report that in contrast to that of the CVS strain, ERA viral replication induces apoptosis of infected Jurkat T cells, and cell death is concomitant with viral glycoprotein expression, suggesting that this protein has a role in the induction of apoptosis. Our data indicate that (i) rabies virus infects lymphocytes, (ii) lymphocyte infection with the attenuated rabies virus strain causes apoptosis, and (iii) apoptosis does not hinder rabies virus production. In contrast to CVS, ERA rabies virus and other attenuated rabies virus vaccines stimulate a strong immune response and are efficient live vaccines. The paradoxical finding that a rabies virus triggers a strong immune response despite the fact that it infects lymphocytes and induces apoptosis is discussed in terms of the function of apoptosis in the immune response. PMID:9311815

  3. Neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza B virus infection: efficacy and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Baranovich, Tatiana; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of the biology and epidemiology of influenza B viruses are far less studied than for influenza A viruses, and one of these aspects is effectiveness and resistance to the clinically available antiviral drugs, the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Acute respiratory infections are one of the leading causes of death in children and adults, and influenza is among the few respiratory infections that can be prevented and treated by vaccination and antiviral treatment. Recent data has suggested that influenza B virus infections are of specific concern to pediatric patients because of the increased risk of severe disease. Treatment of influenza B is a challenging task for the following reasons: NAIs (e.g., oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the only FDA-approved class of antivirals available for treatment;the data suggest that oseltamivir is less effective than zanamivir in pediatric patients;zanamivir is not prescribed to patients younger than 7;influenza B viruses are less susceptible than influenza A viruses to NAIs in vitro;although the level of resistance to NAIs is low, the number of different molecular markers of resistance is higher than for influenza A viruses, and they are not well defined;the relationship between levels of NAI phenotypic resistance and known molecular markers, frequency of emergence, transmissibility, and fitness of NAI-resistant variants are not well established. This review presents current knowledge of the effectiveness of NAIs for influenza B virus and antiviral resistance in clinical, surveillance, and experimental studies. PMID:24013000

  4. Hepatitis during respiratory syncytial virus infection – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kirin, Branka Kristić; Topić, Renata Zrinski; Dodig, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the most common cause of hospitalization in infants and small children. The aim was to present a 13-months old boy diagnosed with acute airway infection, acute otitis media (AOM) and hepatitis during the RSV-infection. Material and methods: Serum catalytic activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotranspherase (AST), alanine aminotranspherase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transpherase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), and concentrations of bilirubin were monitored during hospitalization and at control examination. Results: The child had clinical signs and symptoms of respiratory failure, AOM, and laboratory findings of virus infection and liver disease. On admission, catalytic activities of enzymes were markedly increased, especially the activity of ALP (10333 U/L, i.e. 24-fold increase in comparison with the upper reference limit). The highest increased in AST (339 U/L, 4.5-fold), ALT (475 U/L, 10.3-fold) and LD (545 U/L, 1.5-fold) were registered on the 3rd day, and the highest increase in GGT (68 U/L, 3.1-fold) occurred on the 11th day. Seven weeks after discharge AST, ALT, GGT and LD decreased into reference range, and ALP remain mildly increased (478 U/L, 1.1 fold increase). RSV was confirmed in nasal lavage fluid. Conclusion: Laboratory results in patient with RSV infection needs to be interpreted in the light of both, respiratory and extrapulmonary manifestations of the infection, respectively. PMID:23457772

  5. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  6. Hepatitis B virus infection and metabolic syndrome: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus infection is known to be linked with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis, the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and metabolic factors remains unclear. HBV infection is a health problem worldwide, especially in endemic regions such as Asia and Africa. It induces liver decompensation, cirrhosis, hepatocellualr carcinoma, and premature mortality. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome continues to increase in parallel with the epidemic of obesity, which is closely associated with the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or even cancer. The systemic review shows that chronic HBV infection protects against instead of promotes fatty liver. The mechanism is possibly due to a lower frequency of dyslipidemia profile in patients with chronic HBV infection. The association of HBV with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and the risk of arteriosclerosis is still inconclusive. In addition, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome may accelerate the progression of liver disease in patients with chronic HBV infection and synergistically induce cirrhosis or even hepatocellualr carcinoma development. PMID:25092429

  7. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    PubMed

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  8. Possible FDA-approved drugs to treat Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shu

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for the Ebola virus (EBOV) thus far. Most drugs and vaccines developed to date have not yet been approved for human trials. Two FDA-approved c-AbI1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors Gleevec and Tasigna block the release of viral particles; however, their clinical dosages are much lower than the dosages required for effective EBOV suppression. An α-1,2-glucosidase inhibitor Miglustat has been shown to inhibit EBOV particle assembly and secretion. Additionally, the estrogen receptor modulators Clomiphene and Toremifene prevent membrane fusion of EBOV and 50-90% of treated mice survived after Clomiphene/Toremifene treatments. However, the uptake efficiency of Clomiphene by oral administration is very low. Thus, I propose a hypothetical treatment protocol to treat Ebola virus infection with a cumulative use of both Miglustat and Toremifene to inhibit the virus effectively and synergistically. EBOV infection induces massive apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes. Also, cytolysis of endothelial cells triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and subsequent multiple organ failures. Therefore, blood transfusions and active treatments with FDA-approved drugs to treat DIC are also recommended. PMID:25984303

  9. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M.; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs.

  10. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs. PMID:27053240

  11. Role of natural killer cells in innate protection against lethal ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Perkins, Jeremy G; Swenson, Dana L; Deal, Emily M; Bosio, Catharine M; Aman, M Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Young, Howard A; Bavari, Sina

    2004-07-19

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1-3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell-mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-gamma secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding of Ebola virus pathogenesis and direct the development of immunotherapeutics, which target the innate immune system, for treatment of Ebola virus infection. PMID:15249592

  12. The role of shrimp miR-965 in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shu, Le; Li, Changrun; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-07-01

    RNAi, mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs), has attracted increasing attention for its important role in cross-talk between host and virus. However, the role of host miRNA in the virus infection in vivo has not been intensively investigated. In this study, the effects of a shrimp miRNA (miR-965) on the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection were characterized. The results indicated that the expression of miR-965 was significantly upregulated in shrimp in response to the WSSV challenge, suggesting its involvement in the virus infection. The miR-965 silencing led to significant increases of WSSV copies and virus-infected shrimp mortality, while the miR-965 overexpression resulted in the decreased WSSV copies and virus-infected shrimp mortality, indicating that miR-965 played a negative role in the WSSV infection. The further data revealed that miR-965 inhibited the virus infection by targeting the viral wsv240 gene, an important gene required for the WSSV infection in shrimp. The results demonstrated that miR-965 could promote the shrimp phagocytosis against virus infection by targeting the shrimp ATG5 (autophagy related 5) gene. Therefore, our findings presented novel evidence to better understand the anfractuous host-virus interactions in vivo. PMID:27134077

  13. Quantitative Subcellular Proteome and Secretome Profiling of Influenza A Virus-Infected Human Primary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lietzén, Niina; Julkunen, Ilkka; Aittokallio, Tero; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens that cause acute respiratory diseases and annual epidemics in humans. Macrophages recognize influenza A virus infection with their pattern recognition receptors, and are involved in the activation of proper innate immune response. Here, we have used high-throughput subcellular proteomics combined with bioinformatics to provide a global view of host cellular events that are activated in response to influenza A virus infection in human primary macrophages. We show that viral infection regulates the expression and/or subcellular localization of more than one thousand host proteins at early phases of infection. Our data reveals that there are dramatic changes in mitochondrial and nuclear proteomes in response to infection. We show that a rapid cytoplasmic leakage of lysosomal proteins, including cathepsins, followed by their secretion, contributes to inflammasome activation and apoptosis seen in the infected macrophages. Also, our results demonstrate that P2X7 receptor and src tyrosine kinase activity are essential for inflammasome activation during influenza A virus infection. Finally, we show that influenza A virus infection is associated with robust secretion of different danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) suggesting an important role for DAMPs in host response to influenza A virus infection. In conclusion, our high-throughput quantitative proteomics study provides important new insight into host-response against influenza A virus infection in human primary macrophages. PMID:21589892

  14. Evaluation of monkeypox virus infection of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) using in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Londoño-Navas, Angela M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Pussini, Nicola; Lopera, Juan G.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2014-01-01

    Monkeypox (MPX) is a re-emerging zoonotic disease that is endemic in Central and West Africa, where it can cause a smallpox-like disease in humans. Despite many epidemiologic and field investigations of MPX, no definitive reservoir species has been identified. Using recombinant viruses expressing the firefly luciferase (luc) gene, we previously demonstrated the suitability of in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to study the pathogenesis of MPX in animal models. Here, we evaluated BLI as a novel approach for tracking MPX virus infection in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Prairie dogs were affected during a multistate outbreak of MPX in the US in 2003 and have since been used as an animal model of this disease. Our BLI results were compared with PCR and virus isolation from tissues collected postmortem. Virus was easily detected and quantified in skin and superficial tissues by BLI before and during clinical phases, as well as in subclinical secondary cases, but was not reliably detected in deep tissues such as the lung. Although there are limitations to viral detection in larger wild rodent species, BLI can enhance the use of prairie dogs as an animal model of MPX and can be used for the study of infection, disease progression, and transmission in potential wild rodent reservoirs.

  15. Possible Zika Virus Infection Among Pregnant Women - United States and Territories, May 2016.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Regina M; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Petersen, Emily E; Galang, Romeo R; Oduyebo, Titilope; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda; Valencia-Prado, Miguel; Newsome, Kimberly B; Pérez-Padilla, Janice; Williams, Tonya R; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Jamieson, Denise J; Honein, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and it is the first known mosquito-borne infection to cause congenital anomalies in humans. The establishment of a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor pregnant women with Zika virus infection will provide data to further elucidate the full range of potential outcomes for fetuses and infants of mothers with asymptomatic and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. In February 2016, Zika virus disease and congenital Zika virus infections became nationally notifiable conditions in the United States (2). Cases in pregnant women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection who have either 1) symptomatic infection or 2) asymptomatic infection with diagnosed complications of pregnancy can be reported as cases of Zika virus disease to ArboNET* (2), CDC's national arboviral diseases surveillance system. Under existing interim guidelines from the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), asymptomatic Zika virus infections in pregnant women who do not have known pregnancy complications are not reportable. ArboNET does not currently include pregnancy surveillance information (e.g., gestational age or pregnancy exposures) or pregnancy outcomes. To understand the full impact of infection on the fetus and neonate, other systems are needed for reporting and active monitoring of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Thus, in collaboration with state, local, tribal, and territorial health departments, CDC established two surveillance systems to monitor pregnancies and congenital outcomes among women with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection(†) in the United States and territories: 1) the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR),(§) which monitors pregnant women residing in U.S. states and all U.S. territories except Puerto Rico, and 2) the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System (ZAPSS), which monitors pregnant women

  16. Isolation and characterization of a new strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus from rodents in southwestern France.

    PubMed

    Yama, Ines N; Cazaux, Benoite; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Moureau, Grégory; Thirion, Laurence; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Dobigny, Gauthier; Charrel, Rémi N

    2012-10-01

    A total of 821 tissue samples from rodents trapped during field campaigns organized in Europe and Africa were screened for the presence of arenaviruses by molecular methods and cell culture inoculation when feasible. Two Mus musculus domesticus trapped in the southwestern part of France were infected with a potentially new strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), here referred to as LCMV strain HP65-2009, which was isolated and genetically characterized by whole genome sequencing. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses comparing LCMV HP65-2009 with 26 other LCMV strains showed that it represents a novel highly-divergent strain within the group of Mus musculus-associated LCMV. PMID:22651393

  17. Influenza A virus infections in marine mammals and terrestrial carnivores.

    PubMed

    Harder, Timm C; Siebert, Ursula; Wohlsein, Peter; Vahlenkamp, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV), members of the Orthomyxoviridae, cover a wide host spectrum comprising a plethora of avian and, in comparison, a few mammalian species. The viral reservoir and gene pool are kept in metapopulations of aquatic wild birds. The mammalian-adapted IAVs originally arose by transspecies transmission from avian sources. In swine, horse and man, species-adapted IAV lineages circulate independently of the avian reservoir and cause predominantly respiratory disease of highly variable severity. Sporadic outbreaks of IAV infections associated with pneumonic clinical signs have repeatedly occurred in marine mammals (harbour seals [Phoca vitulina]) off the New England coast of the U.S.A. due to episodic transmission of avian IAV. However, no indigenous marine mammal IAV lineages are described. In contrast to marine mammals, avian- and equine-derived IAVs have formed stable circulating lineages in terrestrial carnivores: IAVs of subtype H3N2 and H3N8 are found in canine populations in South Korea, China, and the U.S.A. Experimental infections revealed that dogs and cats can be infected with an even wider range of avian IAVs. Cats, in particular, also proved susceptible to native infection with human pandemic H1N1 viruses and, according to serological data, may be vulnerable to infection with further human-adapted IAVs. Ferrets are susceptible to a variety of avian and mammalian IAVs and are an established animal model of human IAV infection. Thus, a potential role of pet cats, dogs and ferrets as mediators of avian-derived viruses to the human population does exist. A closer observation for influenza virus infections and transmissions at this animal-human interface is indicated. PMID:24511825

  18. Impact of dengue virus infection and its control.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, A

    1997-08-01

    Dengue virus infection has been counted among emerging and re-emerging diseases because of (1) the increasing number of patients, (2) the expansion of epidemic areas, and (3) the appearance of severe clinical manifestation of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS), which is often fatal if not properly treated. In the meantime, there are no effective dengue control measures: a dengue vaccine is still under development and vector control does not provide a long-lasting effect. In order to obtain direct evidence for the virulent virus theory concerning the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS, type 2 dengue virus strains isolated from patients with different clinical severities in the same epidemic area in northeast Thailand, during the same season, were comparatively sequenced. The result revealed a DF strain specific amino acid substitution from I to R in the PrM, and a DSS strain specific amino acid substitution from D to G in the NS1 gene regions, which could significantly alter the nature of these proteins. Moreover, DF strain specific nucleotide substitutions in the 3' noncoding region were predicted to alter its secondary structure. These amino acid and nucleotide substitutions in other strains isolated in different epidemic areas during other seasons, together with their biological significance, remain to be confirmed. In order to innovate dengue vector control, field tests were carried out in dengue epidemic areas in Vietnam to examine the efficacy of Olyset Net screen, which is a wide-mesh net made of polyethylene thread impregnated with permethrin. The results show that Olyset Net (1) reduced the number of principal dengue vector species, Aedes aegypti, (2) interrupted the silent transmission of dengue viruses and (3) was highly appreciated by the local people as a convenient and comfortable vector control method. This encouraging evaluation of the Olyset Net screen should be confirmed further by other tests under different settings. PMID:9348165

  19. Clinical aspects on Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Andersson, J P

    1991-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus infection (EBV) was discovered 25 years ago in tumour cells from Burkitt's lymphoma. Extensive virological studies have relieved that EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal cancer. Atypical courses of the primary infection may induce meningoencephalitis or hepatitis and are attracting increasing attention. Antiviral treatment with acyclovir has been administered for 7 days, intravenously or orally, in the early stages of infectious mononucleosis, in 2 placebo controlled trials. An inhibition of oropharyngeal EBV replication was verified but minimal effects on clinical symptoms was observed. A combination of intravenous acyclovir and prednisolone treatment for 10 days was therefore tried in 15 patients with fulminant mononucleosis in a pilot study. A transient cessation of virus shedding was noticed in all patients, and a substantial clinical effect on pharyngeal symptoms and on fever was seen in 12/15 patients within 3 days. Treatment with chemotherapy or irradiation is recommended in EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas seen in immunosuppressed, transplanted, or human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients. No effect of acyclovir has been reported, but such therapy may be considered in the early stage when EBV induces a polyclonal B cell activation. Acyclovir treatment is effective in the EBV-genome positive hairy leukoplakia noticed in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients. However, no effect of any antiviral therapy has been reported in the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome affecting in particular 2-7 year old boys. Prophylactic use of immunoglobulin or acyclovir has been suggested in susceptible children. These results indicate that the variety of clinical manifestations induced by EBV at least partly depend on the immune response elicited in the host and not of virus replication per se. Therefore, treatment of these various disorders cannot be

  20. PRRSV receptors and their roles in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chongxu; Liu, Yali; Ding, Yaozhong; Zhang, Yongguang; Zhang, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a restricted cell tropism and prefers to invade well-differentiated cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, such as pulmonary alveolar macrophages and African green monkey kidney cell line MA-104 and its derivatives, such as Marc-145, Vero and CL-2621. PRRSV infection of the host cells actually is a receptor-mediated endocytosis and replication process. The presence and absence of the cellular receptors decide whether the cell lines are permissive or non-permissive to PRRSV infection. Several PRRSV non-permissive cell lines, such as BHK-21, PK-15 and CHO-K1, have been shown to become sensitive to the virus infection upon expression of the recombinant receptor proteins. Up to now, heparin sulfate, sialoadhesin, CD163, CD151 and vimentin have been identified as the important PRRSV receptors via their involvement in virus attachment, internalization or uncoating. Each receptor is characterized by the distribution in different cells, the function in virus different infection stages and the interaction model with the viral proteins or genes. Joint forces of the receptors recently attract attentions due to the specific function. PRRSV receptors have become the targets for designing the new anti-viral reagents or the recombinant cell lines used for isolating the viruses or developing more effective vaccines due to their more conserved sequences compared with the genetic variation of the virus. In this paper, the role of PRRSV receptors and the molecular mechanism of the interaction between the virus and the receptors are reviewed. PMID:25666932

  1. Active NF-kappaB signalling is a prerequisite for influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Dudziak, Diana; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hobom, Gerd; Riedel, Alexander; Schlee, Martin; Staudt, Louis M; Rosenwald, Andreas; Behrends, Uta; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2004-08-01

    Influenza virus still poses a major threat to human health. Despite widespread vaccination programmes and the development of drugs targeting essential viral proteins, the extremely high mutation rate of influenza virus still leads to the emergence of new pathogenic virus strains. Therefore, it has been suggested that cellular cofactors that are essential for influenza virus infection might be better targets for antiviral therapy. It has previously been reported that influenza virus efficiently infects Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells, whereas Burkitt's lymphoma cells are virtually resistant to infection. Using this cellular system, it has been shown here that an active NF-kappaB signalling pathway is a general prerequisite for influenza virus infection of human cells. Cells with low NF-kappaB activity were resistant to influenza virus infection, but became susceptible upon activation of NF-kappaB. In addition, blocking of NF-kappaB activation severely impaired influenza virus infection of otherwise highly susceptible cells, including the human lung carcinoma cell lines A549 and U1752 and primary human cells. On the other hand, infection with vaccinia virus was not dependent on an active NF-kappaB signalling pathway, demonstrating the specificity of this pathway for influenza virus infection. These results might be of major importance for both the development of new antiviral therapies and the understanding of influenza virus biology. PMID:15269376

  2. Transcriptional Profiling of the Immune Response to Marburg Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Judy; Caballero, Ignacio S.; Garamszegi, Sara; Malhotra, Shikha; Lin, Kenny; Hensley, Lisa; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus is a genetically simple RNA virus that causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The mechanism of pathogenesis of the infection is not well understood, but it is well accepted that pathogenesis is appreciably driven by a hyperactive immune response. To better understand the overall response to Marburg virus challenge, we undertook a transcriptomic analysis of immune cells circulating in the blood following aerosol exposure of rhesus macaques to a lethal dose of Marburg virus. Using two-color microarrays, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were collected throughout the course of infection from 1 to 9 days postexposure, representing the full course of the infection. The response followed a 3-stage induction (early infection, 1 to 3 days postexposure; midinfection, 5 days postexposure; late infection, 7 to 9 days postexposure) that was led by a robust innate immune response. The host response to aerosolized Marburg virus was evident at 1 day postexposure. Analysis of cytokine transcripts that were overexpressed during infection indicated that previously unanalyzed cytokines are likely induced in response to exposure to Marburg virus and further suggested that the early immune response is skewed toward a Th2 response that would hamper the development of an effective antiviral immune response early in disease. Late infection events included the upregulation of coagulation-associated factors. These findings demonstrate very early host responses to Marburg virus infection and provide a rich data set for identification of factors expressed throughout the course of infection that can be investigated as markers of infection and targets for therapy. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus causes a severe infection that is associated with high mortality and hemorrhage. The disease is associated with an immune response that contributes to the lethality of the disease. In this study, we investigated how the

  3. Callithrix penicillata: a feasible experimental model for dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Milene Silveira; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes; Silva, Gilmara Abreu; Casseb, Samir Mansur Moraes; Dias Júnior, Antônio Gregório; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiros; Azevedo, Raimunda do Socorro da Silva; Costa e Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2014-01-01

    , a protective axes TNF-alpha/Lymphocytes/Platelets, and a pathological IL-2/IL-6/Viremia/Monocyte/PT bond. Later on, the biomarker network highlighted the interaction IFN-gamma/PLT/DENV-3(IgM;HAI)/PT, and the involvement of type-2 cytokines (IL-4; IL-5). Our findings demonstrated that C. penicillata is a feasible experimental model for dengue virus infection, which could be useful to pathogenesis studies, discovery of novel antiviral drugs as well as to evaluate vaccine candidates against DENV. PMID:24361035

  4. Factors predicting kidney damage in Puumala virus infected patients in Southern Denmark.

    PubMed

    Skarphedinsson, S; Thiesson, H C; Shakar, S A; Tepel, M

    2015-10-01

    In Europe, infections with Puumala hantavirus cause nephropathia epidemica. Presently the risk factors predicting severe kidney damage after Puumala virus infection are not well known. The objective of the study was to investigate environmental and individual factors predicting severe kidney damage caused by serologically established Puumala infections. In a nationwide cohort study we investigated all serologically established Puumala infections in Southern Denmark from 1996 to 2012. A total of 184 patients had serologically verified Puumala virus infection. In patients with Puumala virus infections the decrease of platelet counts preceded acute kidney failure. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that recent activities in the forest, platelet counts, and flu-like symptoms predicted estimated glomerular filtration rates less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m(²), but not age, gender, fever, nor abdominal pain. Severe kidney damage in Puumala infections in Southern Denmark is associated with the risk of recent activities in the forest. PMID:26205664

  5. Hunting in the Rainforest and Mayaro Virus Infection: An emerging Alphavirus in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this report were to document the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and to examine potential risk factors for Mayaro virus infection among the personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of the personnel of a garrison located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews and seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to Mayaro virus infection was assessed by evaluating IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies using ELISA. Results: Of 338 subjects studied, 174 were from the Coastal zone of Ecuador, 73 from Andean zone, and 91 were native to the Amazonian rainforest. Seroprevalence of Mayaro virus infection was more than 20 times higher among Amazonian natives (46%) than among subjects born in other areas (2%). Conclusions: Age and hunting in the rainforest were significant predictors of Mayaro virus infection overall and among Amazonian natives. The results provide the first demonstration of the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and a systematic evaluation of risk factors for the transmission of this alphavirus. The large difference in prevalence rates between Amazonian natives and other groups and between older and younger natives suggest that Mayaro virus is endemic and enzootic in the rainforest, with sporadic outbreaks that determine differences in risk between birth cohorts of natives. Deep forest hunting may selectively expose native men, descendants of the Shuar and Huaronai ethnic groups, to the arthropod vectors of Mayaro virus in areas close to primate reservoirs. PMID:22223990

  6. Noninvasive and label-free determination of virus infected cells by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin. B.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the detection of virus-infected cells. Adenovirus infection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells was successfully detected at 12, 24, and 48 h after initiating the infection. The score plot of principal component analysis discriminated the spectra of the infected cells from those of the control cells. The viral infection was confirmed by the conventional immunostaining method performed 24 h after the infection. The newly developed method provides a fast and label-free means for the detection of virus-infected cells.

  7. Bilateral optic neuritis in a child following Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Dusica

    2005-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral optic neuritis is presented in a child with no light perception. Ophthalmic examination revealed dilated pupils without reaction to the light, swollen optic discs with small peripapillary hemorrhages in both eyes. Serology revealed evidence of recent Epstein-Barr virus infection. After treatment with high dose of corticosteroid visual acuity gradually improved. After four months visual acuity was normal despite complete pallor of the optic disc. Ebstein-Barr virus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bilateral optic neuritis in a child with severe bilateral visual loss. PMID:16193695

  8. Predicted pattern of Zika virus infection distribution with reference to rainfall in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus infection is the present global medical problem. The disease appears in several countries around the world. The relationship between rainfall and occurrence of Zika virus infection was previously mentioned. Here, the authors use the mathematical modeling technique to reappraise on the previous data on immunoreactivity rate of Zika virus, dengue virus and Ckikungunya virus in Thailand and the reported interrelationship between arboviral infections and rainfall in Thailand for constructing of the predicted pattern of Zika virus distribution in Thailand. This data can be a useful tool for further disease surveillance in this area. PMID:27393105

  9. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, S.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons.

  10. Pathology of experimental Machupo virus infection, Chicava strain, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by intramuscular and aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Robinson, C G; Wilkinson, E R; Hensley, L E; Cashman, K A

    2015-01-01

    Machupo virus, the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever of which little is known and for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics are available. This study evaluated the cynomolgus macaque as an animal model using the Machupo virus, Chicava strain, via intramuscular and aerosol challenge. The incubation period was 6 to 10 days with initial signs of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, mild fever, and a petechial skin rash. These were often followed by neurologic signs and death within an average of 18 days. Complete blood counts revealed leukopenia as well as marked thrombocytopenia. Serum chemistry values identified a decrease in total protein, marked increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and moderate increases in alkaline phosphatase. Gross pathology findings included a macular rash extending across the axillary and inguinal regions beginning at approximately 10 days postexposure as well as enlarged lymph nodes and spleen, enlarged and friable liver, and sporadic hemorrhages along the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and necrosis/apoptosis in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system (nonsuppurative encephalitis) was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection in cynomolgus macaques and supports the usefulness of cynomolgus macaques as a viable model of human Machupo virus infection. PMID:24990481

  11. Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in Employees and Mice at Multipremises Feeder-Rodent Operation, United States, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ströher, Ute; Edison, Laura; Albariño, César G.; Lovejoy, Jodi; Armeanu, Emilian; House, Jennifer; Cory, Denise; Horton, Clayton; Fowler, Kathy L.; Austin, Jessica; Poe, John; Humbaugh, Kraig E.; Guerrero, Lisa; Campbell, Shelley; Gibbons, Aridth; Reed, Zachary; Cannon, Deborah; Manning, Craig; Petersen, Brett; Metcalf, Douglas; Marsh, Bret; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the extent of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection in employees and rodents at 3 commercial breeding facilities. Of 97 employees tested, 31 (32%) had IgM and/or IgG to LCMV, and aseptic meningitis was diagnosed in 4 employees. Of 1,820 rodents tested in 1 facility, 382 (21%) mice (Mus musculus) had detectable IgG, and 13 (0.7%) were positive by reverse transcription PCR; LCMV was isolated from 8. Rats (Rattus norvegicus) were not found to be infected. S-segment RNA sequence was similar to strains previously isolated in North America. Contact by wild mice with colony mice was the likely source for LCMV, and shipments of infected mice among facilities spread the infection. The breeding colonies were depopulated to prevent further human infections. Future outbreaks can be prevented with monitoring and management, and employees should be made aware of LCMV risks and prevention. PMID:24447605

  12. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christopher M.; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A.; Weir, Marion E.; King, Benjamin R.; Klaus, Joseph P.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Shirley, David J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI) particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT) pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation. PMID:27010636

  13. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  14. Intraoral herpes simplex virus infection in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alessandro; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2013-10-01

    We report a challenging case of an atypical presentation of recrudescent herpes simplex virus infection in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency. Oral infections in immunosuppressed patients may present with unusual clinical features that can mimic non-infectious diseases. This report discusses the diagnostic steps necessary for definitive diagnosis and to guide appropriate and effective management. PMID:23933299

  15. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production.

  16. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors.

    PubMed

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Powell, Kevin S; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J; Yen, Alan L; Fitzgerald, Glenn J; Luck, Jo E

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production. PMID:26941044

  17. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  18. MiRNA expression signatures induced by Marek disease virus infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that differential miRNA expression is associated with viral infection and cancer. Marek's disease virus infection induces lymphoma in chickens. However, the host...

  19. Syphilis? An Unusual Cause of Surgical Emergency in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Man

    PubMed Central

    Bender Ignacio, Rachel A.; Koch, Lisa L.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Charmie Godornes, B.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a human immunodeficiency virus-infected man undergoing urgent anorectal surgery, with multi-centimeter fungating masses discovered inside the anus. Initial pathology was inconclusive. After the patient developed a disseminated rash postoperatively determined to be secondary syphilis, the anorectal pathology was reviewed and Treponema pallidum DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the mass. PMID:26213693

  20. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production. PMID:26941044

  1. Virus Infection and Titration of SARS-CoV in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Fett, Craig; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Two critical steps when investigating an animal model of a virus infection are consistently successfully infecting animals and accurately determining viral titers in tissue throughout the course of infection. Here we discuss in detail how to infect mice with SARS-CoV and then quantify the titer of virus in the lung.

  2. Association Between Antibody Titers and Protection Against Influenza Virus Infection Within Households

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Tim K.; Cauchemez, Simon; Perera, Ranawaka A. P. M.; Freeman, Guy; Fang, Vicky J.; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Malik Peiris, Joseph Sriyal; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have established that antibody titer measured by the hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) assay is correlated with protection against influenza virus infection, with an HAI titer of 1:40 generally associated with 50% protection. Methods. We recruited index cases with confirmed influenza virus infection from outpatient clinics, and followed up their household contacts for 7–10 days to identify secondary infections. Serum samples collected from a subset of household contacts were tested by HAI and microneutralization (MN) assays against prevalent influenza viruses. We analyzed the data using an individual hazard-based transmission model that adjusted for age and vaccination history. Results. Compared to a reference group with antibody titers <1:10, we found that HAI titers of 1:40 against influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) were associated with 31% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%–46%) and 31% (CI, 1%–53%) protection against polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–confirmed A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) virus infection, respectively, while an MN titer of 1:40 against A(H3N2) was associated with 49% (95% CI, 7%–81%) protection against PCR-confirmed A(H3N2) virus infection. Conclusions. An HAI titer of 1:40 was associated with substantially less than 50% protection against PCR-confirmed influenza virus infection within households, perhaps because of exposures of greater duration or intensity in that confined setting. PMID:24676208

  3. Variation Between Strains of Hamsters in the Lethality of Pichinde Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Buchmeier, Michael J.; Rawls, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Infection by Pichinde virus, a member of the arenavirus group, was studied in Golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) with regard to possible mechanisms of resistance to virus infection in adult hamsters. Two hamster strains were found to differ in their susceptibility to lethal Pichinde virus infection. LVG/Lak randomly bred hamsters were found to be 100% susceptible to low doses of Pichinde virus during the first 6 days of life, but after 8 days of life, mortality was uncommon. Peak virus titers in the serum of animals infected at 3 days of life were 4 logs greater than in animals infected at 12 days. MHA/Lak inbred hamsters, in contrast, were found to be susceptible to lethal virus infection both as newborns and as adults. Peak virus titers of greater than 108 plaque-forming units/ml were observed in serum 8 days after infection of adult MHA hamsters as compared with less than 103 plaque-forming units/ml in the serum of adult LVG hamsters. Cultured primary kidney cells and peritoneal macrophages from either hamster strain supported Pichinde virus replication equally well in vitro. Antibodies to the complement-fixing antigens and to antigens at the surface of virus-infected cells were produced by both strains of hamsters. Cyclophosphamide immunosuppression rendered adult LVG animals susceptible to lethal infections, and virus grew to high titers in the treated animals. These findings suggest that immunological factors that appear early in life in LVG hamsters and are deficient in MHA hamsters limit Pichinde virus infection. Unlike previously reported arenavirus diseases, the observations suggest that death is produced by a direct viral effect and not through immunopathological mechanisms. PMID:193786

  4. Outbreak of Chikungunya Virus Infection, Vanimo, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Lisa J.; Dagina, Rosheila; Susapu, Melinda; Bande, Grace; Katusele, Michelle; Koimbu, Gussy; Jimmy, Stella; Ropa, Berry; Siba, Peter M.; Pavlin, Boris I.

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, health authorities in Papua New Guinea detected an increase in febrile illnesses in Vanimo. Chikungunya virus of the Eastern/Central/Southern African genotype harboring the E1:A226V mutation was identified. This ongoing outbreak has spread to ≥8 other provinces and has had a harmful effect on public health. PMID:23965757

  5. Patterns of Multi-Virus Infections in Florida Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whitefly-transmitted viruses Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) and Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV) have had serious impact on watermelon production in west-central and southwest Florida in recent years. We collected plants randomly from a commercial watermelon field in southwest Florida s...

  6. Immunobiology of cytotoxic T-cell escape mutants of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Moskophidis, D; Zinkernagel, R M

    1995-01-01

    Infection with virus variants exhibiting changes in the peptide sequences defining immunodominant determinants that abolish recognition by antiviral cytotoxic T cells (CTL) presents a considerable challenge to the antiviral T-cell immune system and may enable some viruses to persist in hosts. The potential importance of such variants with respect to mechanisms of viral persistence and disease pathogenesis was assessed by infecting adult mice with variants of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strain WE. These variants were selected in vivo or in vitro for resistance to lysis by CD8+ H-2b-restricted antiviral CTL. The majority of anti-LCMV CTL in infected H-2b mice recognize epitopes defined by residues 32 to 42 and 275 to 289 (epitopes 32-42 and 275-289) of the LCMV glycoprotein or 397 to 407 of the viral nucleoprotein. The 8.7 variant exhibits a change in the epitope 32-42 (Val-35-->Leu), and variant CL1.2 exhibits a change in the epitope 275-289 (Asn-280-->Asp) of the wild-type LCMV-WE. The double-mutated 8.7-B23 variant had the variation of 8.7 and an additional change located in the epitope 275-289 (Asn-280-->Ser). The 8.7 variant peptide with unchanged anchor positions bound efficiently to H-2Db and H-2Kb molecules but induced only a very weak CTL response. CTL epitope 275-289 of CL1.2 and 8.7-B23 altered at predicted anchor residues were unable to bind Db molecules and were also not recognized by antiviral CTL. Infection of C57BL/6 mice (H-2b) with the variants exhibiting mutations of one of the CTL epitopes, i.e., 8.7 or CL1.2, induced CTL responses specific for the unmutated epitopes comparable with those induced by infection with WE, and these responses were sufficient to eliminate virus from the host. In contrast, infection with the double-mutated variant 8.7-B23 induced CTL activity that was reduced by a factor of about 50-fold compared with wild-type LCMV. Consequently, high doses (10(7) PFU intravenously) of this virus were eliminated slowly and

  7. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010: A cross sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Raghavendhar, B Siva; Ray, Pratima; Ratagiri, Vinod H; Sharma, B S; Kabra, Sushil K; Lodha, Rakesh

    2016-06-01

    . Maximum positive cases were from KIMS center, Hubli. Seasonally, positivity varied with number of enrolled cases at KIMS and SMS. Joint pain was significantly associated with CHIKV positivity (P = 0.0156). Presence/absence of certain clinical features varied with age (P < 0.05). Sequence analysis revealed four amino acid changes. Phylogenetic analysis with partial sequences of E1 gene from KIMS (n = 12) and SMS (n = 5) showed that the study isolates clustered with Indian Ocean Lineage strains (IOL) of East, Central and South African (ECSA) type. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010 showed high proportion of CHIKV infection in Southern region of India compared to Northern region. The circulating CHIKV strains were of Indian Ocean Lineage (IOL) group within the East, Central, and South African (ECSA) genotype. However few amino acid changes were observed in E1 polypeptide with reference to African strain S-27 (AF369024). Further studies are needed to know the implications of these changes in vector-pathogen compatibility and host-pathogen interactivity. As a whole, this study highlighted the proportion of CHIKV cases, lineage of causative strain and evolutionary pattern of circulating strain in terms of amino acid changes in the structural protein. J. Med. Virol. 88:923-930, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26581026

  8. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. PMID:27434148

  9. Susceptibility to virus infection with exposure to nitrogen dioxide. Research report, January 1984-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Clements, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) exposure and human susceptibility to respiratory virus infection was investigated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, blinded trial conducted in an environmentally controlled research chamber. Healthy, nonsmoking volunteers, 18 to 35 years old, who were seronegative to influenza A/Korea/82 (H/sub 3/N/sub 2/) virus, breathed either filtered air or NO/sub 2/ for two hours a day for three consecutive days. Live, attenuated cold-adapted influenza A/Korea/82 reassortant virus was administered intranasally to all subjects after the second day of exposure. No adverse changes in pulmonary function or nonspecific airway reaction to methacholine were observed after NO/sub 2/ exposure, virus infection, or both. Although the differences were not statistically significant, the groups exposed to NO/sub 2/ in year 3 became infected more often (91%) than those exposed only to air (71%).

  10. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  11. Vitamin D-Regulated MicroRNAs: Are They Protective Factors against Dengue Virus Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, John F.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, an increasing body of evidence has highlighted the critical participation of vitamin D in the regulation of proinflammatory responses and protection against many infectious pathogens, including viruses. The activity of vitamin D is associated with microRNAs, which are fine tuners of immune activation pathways and provide novel mechanisms to avoid the damage that arises from excessive inflammatory responses. Severe symptoms of an ongoing dengue virus infection and disease are strongly related to highly altered production of proinflammatory mediators, suggesting impairment in homeostatic mechanisms that control the host's immune response. Here, we discuss the possible implications of emerging studies anticipating the biological effects of vitamin D and microRNAs during the inflammatory response, and we attempt to extrapolate these findings to dengue virus infection and to their potential use for disease management strategies. PMID:27293435

  12. Imported zika virus infection from the cook islands into australia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Pyke, Alyssa T; Daly, Michelle T; Cameron, Jane N; Moore, Peter R; Taylor, Carmel T; Hewitson, Glen R; Humphreys, Jan L; Gair, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A female resident of Townsville, Queensland, Australia has been diagnosed with Zika virus infection following a recent trip to the Cook Islands. An initial serum sample collected in March, 2014 was positive by two separate Zika virus TaqMan real-time RT-PCRs and a pan-Flavivirus RT-PCR. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetics of the complete Cook Islands Zika virus envelope gene revealed 99.1% homology with a previous Cambodia 2010 sequence within the Asian lineage. In addition, IgG and IgM antibody seroconversions were detected between paired acute and convalescent phase sera using recombinant Zika virus serology assays. This is the first known imported case of Zika virus infection into northern Queensland where the potential mosquito vector Aedes aegypti is present and only the second such reported case diagnosed within Australia. PMID:24944843

  13. Antiviral drugs other than zidovudine and immunomodulating therapies in human immunodeficiency virus infection. An overview.

    PubMed

    Clumeck, N; Hermans, P

    1988-08-29

    Although the management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infections has focused on the treatment of opportunistic infections, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related cancers in end stages of the disease, therapies now aim at preventing the natural progression of the underlying disease. In addition to zidovudine many investigational drugs are proposed to treat AIDS-related complex patients. Most of these therapies can be divided into two major groups: (1) The first group includes agents with antiretroviral properties: nucleoside analogues, such as 2'-3'-dideoxycytidine and ribavirin, suramin, antimoniotungstate (heteropolyanion-23), foscarnet (phosphonoformate), interferons, peptide T, castanospermine, dextran sulfate, AL721, or ampligen. (2) The second group aims to restore the defective immune system; it includes thymosin (thymopentin), interleukin-2, cyclosporine, plasmapheresis, bone marrow transplantation, inosine, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, methionine-enkephalin and carrisyn. At present, no drug other than zidovudine has proved as monotherapy to lengthen survival of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. PMID:2457313

  14. Worldwide occurrence of virus-infections in filamentous marine brown algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D. G.; Stache, B.

    1992-03-01

    Virus infections were detected in Ectocarpus siliculosus and Ectocarpus fasciculatus on the coasts of Ireland, California, Peru, southern South America, Australia and New Zealand; in three Feldmannia species on the coasts of Ireland, continental Chile and Archipelago Juan Fernandez (Chile); and in Leptonematella from Antarctica. Natural populations on the Irish coast contained 3% infected plants in E. fasciculatus, and less than 1% in Feldmannia simplex. On the Californian coast, 15 to 25% of Ectocarpus isolates were infected. Virus symptoms were absent in E. siliculosus from Peru, but appeared after meiosis in laboratory cultures. The virus particles in E. fasciculatus are identical in size and capsid structure to those reported for E. siliculosus, while the virus in F. simplex is smaller and has a different envelope. Our findings suggest that virus infections are a common and worldwide phenomenon in filamentous brown algae.

  15. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  16. CNS Recruitment of CD8+ T Lymphocytes Specific for a Peripheral Virus Infection Triggers Neuropathogenesis during Polymicrobial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Matullo, Christine M.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Curtis, Mark; Rall, Glenn F.

    2011-01-01

    Although viruses have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) diseases of unknown etiology, including multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the reproducible identification of viral triggers in such diseases has been largely unsuccessful. Here, we explore the hypothesis that viruses need not replicate in the tissue in which they cause disease; specifically, that a peripheral infection might trigger CNS pathology. To test this idea, we utilized a transgenic mouse model in which we found that immune cells responding to a peripheral infection are recruited to the CNS, where they trigger neurological damage. In this model, mice are infected with both CNS-restricted measles virus (MV) and peripherally restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). While infection with either virus alone resulted in no illness, infection with both viruses caused disease in all mice, with ∼50% dying following seizures. Co-infection resulted in a 12-fold increase in the number of CD8+ T cells in the brain as compared to MV infection alone. Tetramer analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (>35%) of these infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes were LCMV-specific, despite no detectable LCMV in CNS tissues. Mechanistically, CNS disease was due to edema, induced in a CD8-dependent but perforin-independent manner, and brain herniation, similar to that observed in mice challenged intracerebrally with LCMV. These results indicate that T cell trafficking can be influenced by other ongoing immune challenges, and that CD8+ T cell recruitment to the brain can trigger CNS disease in the apparent absence of cognate antigen. By extrapolation, human CNS diseases of unknown etiology need not be associated with infection with any particular agent; rather, a condition that compromises and activates the blood-brain barrier and adjacent brain parenchyma can render the CNS susceptible to pathogen-independent immune attack. PMID:22216008

  17. Loss of transformed phenotype upon senescence of Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken neuroretinal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Seigel, G M; Notter, M F

    1992-01-01

    Success in obtaining permanent Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken cell lines has been limited because of a senescence phenomenon. We show that a diminished, transformed phenotype, followed by dramatic morphological changes, precedes senescence. These changes are associated with continued expression of pp60v-src, as well as specific alterations in expression of two possible phosphorylated substrates of pp60v-src. Images PMID:1326672

  18. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,
    C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  19. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gillian M.; Nicol, Marlynne Q.; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J.; Nash, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  20. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  1. Chronic hepatitis virus infection in patients with multiple myeloma: clinical characteristics and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Liu, Han-Tsung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Hsih, Chi-Hsiu; Pai, Jih-Tung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chen, Po-Min; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Yu, Yuan-Bin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cytotoxic agents and steroids are used to treat lymphoid malignancies, but these compounds may exacerbate chronic viral hepatitis. For patients with multiple myeloma, the impact of preexisting hepatitis virus infection is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics and outcomes of myeloma patients with chronic hepatitis virus infection. METHODS: From 2003 to 2008, 155 myeloma patients were examined to determine their chronic hepatitis virus infection statuses using serologic tests for the hepatitis B (HBV) and C viruses (HCV). Clinical parameters and outcome variables were retrieved via a medical chart review. RESULTS: The estimated prevalences of chronic HBV and HCV infections were 11.0% (n = 17) and 9.0% (n = 14), respectively. The characteristics of patients who were hepatitis virus carriers and those who were not were similar. However, carrier patients had a higher prevalence of conventional cytogenetic abnormalities (64.3% vs. 25.0%). The cumulative incidences of grade 3-4 elevation of the level of alanine transaminase, 30.0% vs. 12.0%, and hyperbilirubinemia, 20.0% vs. 1.6%, were higher in carriers as well. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, carrier patients had worse overall survival (median: 16.0 vs. 42.4 months). The prognostic value of carrier status was not statistically significant in the multivariate analysis, but an age of more than 65 years old, the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities, a beta-2-microglobulin level of more than 3.5 mg/L, and a serum creatinine level of more than 2 mg/dL were independent factors associated with poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Myeloma patients with chronic hepatitis virus infections might be a distinct subgroup, and close monitoring of hepatic adverse events should be mandatory. PMID:22189730

  2. T-cell memory: lessons from Epstein-Barr virus infection in man.

    PubMed Central

    Rickinson, A B; Callan, M F; Annels, N E

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus offers an ideal opportunity to follow the human T-cell response to a virus infection over time from its acute primary phase, as seen in infectious mononucleosis patients, into the memory phase that accompanies life-long virus persistence. Here we review recent evidence on the development and maturation of cytotoxic T-cell memory using this viral system. PMID:10794060

  3. [Severe thrombocytopenia associated with simultaneous cytomegalovirus and Epstein-barr virus infection in an immunocompetence patient].

    PubMed

    Bober, Grazyna; Krawczyk-Kuliś, Małgorzata; Kopera, Małgorzata; Hołowiecki, Jerzy

    2003-06-01

    A 22 year old woman, without preceeding immunological and hematological disorders was hospitalized because of severe thrombocytopenia. The results of extended workup revealed simultaneous cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection as the most probable causative factor. Both, thrombocytopenia and the symptoms of viral infections resolved after consequent treatment with acyclovir, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulines. Based on this original case report authors suggest the need of virological tests in newly diagnosed idiopatic thrombocytopenia. PMID:14567095

  4. Zika virus infection in a traveller returning to Europe from Brazil, March 2015.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, L; Tappe, D; Fortuna, C; Remoli, M E; Günther, S; Venturi, G; Bartoloni, A; Schmidt-Chanasit, J

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus infection imported into Europe from the Americas. The patient developed fever, rash, and oedema of hands and feet after returning to Italy from Brazil in late March 2015. The case highlights that, together with chikungunya virus and dengue virus, three major arboviruses are now co-circulating in Brazil. These arboviruses represent a burden for the healthcare systems in Brazil and other countries where competent mosquito vectors are present. PMID:26084316

  5. A20 Deficiency in Lung Epithelial Cells Protects against Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vereecke, Lars; Mc Guire, Conor; Sze, Mozes; Schuijs, Martijn J.; Willart, Monique; Itati Ibañez, Lorena; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beyaert, Rudi; Saelens, Xavier; van Loo, Geert

    2016-01-01

    A20 negatively regulates multiple inflammatory signalling pathways. We here addressed the role of A20 in club cells (also known as Clara cells) of the bronchial epithelium in their response to influenza A virus infection. Club cells provide a niche for influenza virus replication, but little is known about the functions of these cells in antiviral immunity. Using airway epithelial cell-specific A20 knockout (A20AEC-KO) mice, we show that A20 in club cells critically controls innate immune responses upon TNF or double stranded RNA stimulation. Surprisingly, A20AEC-KO mice are better protected against influenza A virus challenge than their wild type littermates. This phenotype is not due to decreased viral replication. Instead host innate and adaptive immune responses and lung damage are reduced in A20AEC-KO mice. These attenuated responses correlate with a dampened cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response at later stages during infection, indicating that A20AEC-KO mice are better equipped to tolerate Influenza A virus infection. Expression of the chemokine CCL2 (also named MCP-1) is particularly suppressed in the lungs of A20AEC-KO mice during later stages of infection. When A20AEC-KO mice were treated with recombinant CCL2 the protective effect was abrogated demonstrating the crucial contribution of this chemokine to the protection of A20AEC-KO mice to Influenza A virus infection. Taken together, we propose a mechanism of action by which A20 expression in club cells controls inflammation and antiviral CTL responses in response to influenza virus infection. PMID:26815999

  6. Proliferation of Rous sarcoma virus-infected, but not of normal, chicken fibroblasts in oxygen-enriched environment: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R S; Elgas, R J; Balk, S D

    1976-04-01

    Both normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected chicken fibroblasts proliferate in an incubator containing 95% air, 5% CO2. In an incubator atmosphere enriched with oxygen, however, the normal fibroblasts are maintained without proliferation, while the Rous sarcoma virus-infected fibroblasts continue to proliferate. This suggests that a respiratory function may be involved in the regulation of proliferation of normal cells, and that neoplastic cells may proliferate autonomously because of a deficiency in this regulatory function. PMID:177983

  7. Impaired learning resulting from respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Janyra A; Bohmwald, Karen; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Riquelme, Sebastián A; Cortés, Claudia M; Valenzuela, Javier A; Sandoval, Rodrigo A; Pancetti, Floria C; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2013-05-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of respiratory illness in infants worldwide. Neurologic alterations, such as seizures and ataxia, have been associated with RSV infection. We demonstrate the presence of RSV proteins and RNA in zones of the brain--such as the hippocampus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and brainstem--of infected mice. One month after disease resolution, rodents showed behavioral and cognitive impairment in marble burying (MB) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Our data indicate that the learning impairment caused by RSV is a result of a deficient induction of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of infected animals. In addition, immunization with recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) expressing RSV nucleoprotein prevented behavioral disorders, corroborating the specific effect of RSV infection over the central nervous system. Our findings provide evidence that RSV can spread from the airways to the central nervous system and cause functional alterations to the brain, both of which can be prevented by proper immunization against RSV. PMID:23650398

  8. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus uses a novel endocytic pathway for infectious entry via late endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Quirin, Katharina; Eschli, Bruno; Scheu, Isabella; Poort, Linda; Kartenbeck, Juergen; Helenius, Ari

    2008-08-15

    The endocytic entry of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) into host cells was compared to the entry of viruses known to exploit clathrin or caveolae/raft-dependent pathways. Pharmacological inhibitors, expression of pathway-specific dominant-negative constructs, and siRNA silencing of clathrin together with electron and light microscopy provided evidence that although a minority population followed a classical clathrin-mediated mechanism of entry, the majority of these enveloped RNA viruses used a novel endocytic route to late endosomes. The pathway was clathrin, dynamin-2, actin, Arf6, flotillin-1, caveolae, and lipid raft independent but required membrane cholesterol. Unaffected by perturbation of Rab5 or Rab7 and apparently without passing through Rab5/EEA1-positive early endosomes, the viruses reached late endosomes and underwent acid-induced penetration. This membrane trafficking route between the plasma membrane and late endosomes may function in the turnover of a select group of surface glycoproteins such as the dystroglycan complex, which serves as the receptor of LCMV.

  9. Peptide motif analysis predicts lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as trigger for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hogeboom, Charissa

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) involves both genetic and environmental factors. Genetically, the strongest link is with HLA DRB1*1501, but the environmental trigger, probably a virus, remains uncertain. This investigation scans a panel of proteins from encephalitogenic viruses for peptides homologous to the primary autoantigen from myelin basic protein (MBP), then evaluates candidate peptides against a motif required for T cell cross-reactivity and compares viral prevalence patterns to epidemiological characteristics of MS. The only peptide meeting criteria for cross-reactivity with MBP was one from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), a zoonotic agent. In contrast to current candidates such as Epstein-Barr virus, the distribution of LCMV is consistent with epidemiological features of MS, including concentration in the temperate zone, higher prevalence farther from the equator, and increased prevalence in proximity to regions of peak MS incidence, while lack of person-to-person transmission is consistent with low MS concordance across monozygotic twins. Further, LCMV blocks induction of type I interferon (IFN). Hypothetically this would dysregulate immune processes in favor of proinflammatory pathways as well as upregulating HLA class II and providing more binding sites for autoantigen. The combination of molecular mimicry with virally-induced immune dysregulation has the potential to explain aspects of autoimmunity not addressed by either mechanism alone. PMID:26319106

  10. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  11. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  12. Effect of Host Cell on Distribution of a Lysosomal Enzyme During Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kosaburo; Righthand, Fay; Karzon, David T.

    1971-01-01

    The time of appearance of a lysosomal enzyme, β-glucuronidase, in the medium of cells infected with either measles virus or echovirus 6 varied with the host cell system. Replication and release of virus preceded leakage of β-glucuronidase from green monkey kidney cells. In contrast, extracellular enzyme appeared before replication and release of virus in human amnion cells. Hydrocortisone depressed enzyme leakage but did not retard replication of measles virus or viral-induced cytopathology. The intracellular distribution of β-glucuronidase in uninfected and measles virus-infected cells was also studied. Measles virus infection altered the position of particulate-bound β-glucuronidase in linear sucrose gradients prior to substantial release of this enzyme intra- and extracellularly. At early stages in infection, most of the cell-associated virus banded with particulate-bound enzyme in the middle of the gradient. As infection progressed, separation of measles virus infectivity from enzyme activity occurred, and intracellular virus was recovered near the meniscus of sucrose gradients. PMID:5000115

  13. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  14. Dietary lactosucrose suppresses influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    KISHINO, Eriko; TAKEMURA, Naho; MASAKI, Hisaharu; ITO, Tetsuya; NAKAZAWA, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lactosucrose (4G-β-D-galactosylsucrose) on influenza A virus infections in mice. First, the effects of lactosucrose on fermentation in the cecum and on immune function were investigated. In female BALB/c mice, lactosucrose supplementation for 6 weeks promoted cecal fermentation and increased both secretory IgA (SIgA) levels in feces and total IgA and IgG2a concentrations in serum. Both the percentage of CD4+ T cells in Peyer’s patches and the cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells increased significantly in response to lactosucrose. Next, we examined the effects of lactosucrose on low-dose influenza A virus infection in mice. After 2 weeks of dietary supplementation with lactosucrose, the mice were infected with low-dose influenza A virus. At 7 days post infection, a comparison with control mice showed that weight loss was suppressed, as were viral titers in the lungs. In the spleens of lactosucrose-fed mice, there was an increase in the percentage of NK cells. Lastly, mice fed lactosucrose were challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. The survival rate of these mice was significantly higher than that of mice fed a control diet. These results suggested that lactosucrose supplementation suppresses influenza A virus infection by augmenting innate immune responses and enhancing cellular and mucosal immunity. PMID:26594606

  15. High rate of unrecognized dengue virus infection in parts of the rainforest region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Onoja, A B; Adeniji, J A; Olaleye, O D

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks and sporadic dengue virus infections continue to occur in Africa. Several reports of dengue among travellers returning from some African countries to Europe and North America have raised concerns about the epidemiological situation in Africa. We investigated recent dengue infections in febrile patients during the rainy season in various urban centres in the rainforest region of Nigeria, West Africa. This cross-sectional study was conducted for 8 months in 2014 with study participants from Adeoyo Hospital Yemetu - Ibadan, Nigeria. Plasma were collected from 274 febrile patients residing in 11 Local Government Areas of Oyo State. IgM antibodies were determined using semi-quantitative sandwich ELISA. Data was analyzed using Chi - Square and Fisher's exact test with SPSS 16.0. An overall prevalence of 23.4% dengue virus infection was found among study participants. Highest monthly prevalence of 40% was in April and August. The monthly distribution pattern of dengue virus infection indicates efficient virus transmission. Routine diagnosis will enhance dengue virus surveillance and improve patient care in West Africa. PMID:27140859

  16. Bovine lactoferrin inhibits Toscana virus infection by binding to heparan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-02-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  17. Mechanisms of Immunity in Post-Exposure Vaccination against Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Anthony, Scott M.; Stuthman, Kelly S.; Ayithan, Natarajan; Tailor, Prafullakumar; Shaia, Carl I.; Bray, Mike; Ozato, Keiko; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25785602

  18. Airway Epithelial Orchestration of Innate Immune Function in Response to Virus Infection. A Focus on Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Andrew I; Jackson, David J; Edwards, Michael R; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a very common respiratory condition with a worldwide prevalence predicted to increase. There are significant differences in airway epithelial responses in asthma that are of particular interest during exacerbations. Preventing exacerbations is a primary aim when treating asthma because they often necessitate unscheduled healthcare visits and hospitalizations and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of asthma exacerbations is a respiratory virus infection, of which the most likely type is rhinovirus infection. This article focuses on the role played by the epithelium in orchestrating the innate immune responses to respiratory virus infection. Recent studies show impaired bronchial epithelial cell innate antiviral immune responses, as well as augmentation of a pro-Th2 response characterized by the epithelial-derived cytokines IL-25 and IL-33, crucial in maintaining the Th2 cytokine response to virus infection in asthma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of these abnormal immune responses has the potential to lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for virus-induced exacerbations. The aim of this article is to highlight current knowledge regarding the role of viruses and immune modulation in the asthmatic epithelium and to discuss exciting areas for future research and novel treatments. PMID:27027954

  19. Mechanisms of immunity in post-exposure vaccination against Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bradfute, Steven B; Anthony, Scott M; Stuthman, Kelly S; Ayithan, Natarajan; Tailor, Prafullakumar; Shaia, Carl I; Bray, Mike; Ozato, Keiko; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25785602

  20. Viewpoint: factors involved in type I interferon responses during porcine virus infections.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur

    2012-07-15

    Since type I interferon (IFN-I) is considered a potent antiviral defence mechanism, it is not surprising that during evolution viruses have development of various mechanisms to counteract IFN-I induction or release. Despite this, certain virus infections are associated with very high levels of systemic IFN-I. One explanation for this observation is the presence of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), which are able to produce high levels of IFN-I despite the presence of viral IFN-I antagonists. Examples of virus infection in pigs including classical swine fever virus, influenza virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and porcine circo virus type 2 highlight factors involved in controlling such responses and illustrate potential negative and positive effects for the host. Based on published data, we propose that in addition to the ability to activate pDC, the ability to spread systemically, and the tropism for lymphoid tissue also represent important factors contributing to strong systemic IFN-I responses during certain virus infections. PMID:21458079

  1. Pathogenesis of Hendra and Nipah virus infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Rockx, Barry

    2013-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are emerging zoonotic viruses that cause severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. Henipaviruses can infect a wide range of species and human-to-human transmission has been observed for NiV. While the exact route of transmission in humans is not known, experimental infection in different animal species suggests that infection can be efficiently initiated after respiratory challenge. The limited data on histopathological changes in fatal human cases of HeV and NiV suggest that endothelial cells are an important target during the terminal stage of infection; however, it is unknown where these viruses initially establish infection and how the virus disseminates from the respiratory tract to the central nervous system and other organs. Here we review the current concepts in henipavirus pathogenesis in humans. PMID:23592639

  2. Immunofluorescence studies of disseminated Hantaan virus infection of suckling mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, T; Tsai, T F; Bauer, S P; McCormick, J B

    1983-01-01

    Hantaan virus, the etiological agent of Korean hemorrhagic fever, was inoculated intracerebrally or intraperitoneally into suckling mice, and the course of the infection was followed by infectivity titration and immunofluorescence studies. Mice became ill and were moribund by 13 to 14 days postinfection. In mice inoculated either intracerebrally or intraperitoneally, virus antigen was present in brain, heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. Less consistently, specific fluorescence was observed in spleen, pituitary gland, thymus, lymph nodes, adrenal, pancreas, salivary glands, trigeminal ganglia, adipose tissue, intestine, and muscle. In all of these tissues, the primary target of infection was the capillary endothelium. In mice inoculated intracerebrally, virus antigen was present mainly in choroid plexus, hippocampal nuclei, and meninges, but in mice inoculated intraperitoneally, central nervous system infection was marked by antigen accumulation in cortical nuclei and thalamus. Images PMID:6134678

  3. Epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection: multinucleated epithelial giant cells in the epidermis of lesional skin biopsies from patients with acantholytic dermatoses can histologically mimic a herpes virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.; Paravar, Taraneh; Lee, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can either be epithelial or histiocytic. Epithelial multinucleated giant cells are most often associated with herpes virus infections. Purpose: To review the histologic differential diagnosis of conditions with epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cells—since multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis are not always pathognomonic of a cutaneous herpes virus infection—and to summarize dermatoses in which herpes virus infection has been observed to coexist. Methods: Two individuals with acantholytic dermatoses whose initial lesional skin biopsies showed multinucleated epithelial giant cells suggestive of a herpes virus infection are reported. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on multinucleated giant cell (and epidermis, epithelial, and histiocytic) and herpes virus infection. Relevant papers were reviewed to discover the skin conditions with either multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis or coincident cutaneous herpes virus infection. Results: Initial skin biopsies from patients with either pemphigus vulgaris or transient acantholytic dermatosis mimicked herpes virus infection; however, laboratory studies and repeat biopsies established the correct diagnosis of their acantholytic dermatosis. Hence, epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection. Indeed, epithelial multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed not only in the presence of infection (herpes virus), but also acantholytic dermatoses and tumors (trichoepithelioma and pleomorphic basal cell carcinoma). Histiocytic multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed in patients with either giant cell lichenoid dermatitis or lichen nitidus of the palms. Conclusions: Epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cell can occur in the epidermis. Keratinocyte-derived multinucleated giant cells are most commonly associated

  4. Evaluation of monkeypox virus infection of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) using in vivo bioluminescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Falendysz, Elizabeth A; Londoño-Navas, Angela M; Meteyer, Carol U; Pussini, Nicola; Lopera, Juan G; Osorio, Jorge E; Rocke, Tonie E

    2014-07-01

    Monkeypox (MPX) is a re-emerging zoonotic disease that is endemic in Central and West Africa, where it can cause a smallpox-like disease in humans. Despite many epidemiologic and field investigations of MPX, no definitive reservoir species has been identified. Using recombinant viruses expressing the firefly luciferase (luc) gene, we previously demonstrated the suitability of in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to study the pathogenesis of MPX in animal models. Here, we evaluated BLI as a novel approach for tracking MPX virus infection in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Prairie dogs were affected during a multistate outbreak of MPX in the US in 2003 and have since been used as an animal model of this disease. Our BLI results were compared with PCR and virus isolation from tissues collected postmortem. Virus was easily detected and quantified in skin and superficial tissues by BLI before and during clinical phases, as well as in subclinical secondary cases, but was not reliably detected in deep tissues such as the lung. Although there are limitations to viral detection in larger wild rodent species, BLI can enhance the use of prairie dogs as an animal model of MPX and can be used for the study of infection, disease progression, and transmission in potential wild rodent reservoirs. PMID:24779460

  5. Theiler's Virus Infection: Pathophysiology of Demyelination and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasanovic, Faris; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been suggested to be an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), whose primary target is either myelin itself, or myelin-forming cells, the oligodendrocytes. Although axonal damage occurs in MS, it is regarded as a secondary event to the myelin damage. Here, the lesion develops from the myelin (outside) to the axons (inside) “Outside-In model”. The Outside-In model has been supported by an autoimmune model for MS, experimental autoimmune (allergic) encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, recently, 1) EAE-like disease has also been shown to be induced by immune responses against axons, and 2) immune responses against axons and neurons as well as neurodegeneration independent of inflammatory demyelination have been reported in MS, which can not be explained by the Outside-In model. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is a viral model for MS. In TMEV infection, axonal injury precedes demyelination, where the lesion develops from the axons (inside) to the myelin (outside) “Inside-Out model”. The initial axonal damage could result in the release of neuroantigens, inducing autoimmune responses against myelin antigens, which potentially attack the myelin from outside the nerve fiber. Thus, the Inside-Out and Outside-In models can make a “vicious” immunological cycle or initiate an immune cascade. PMID:20537875

  6. Natural Bagaza virus infection in game birds in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In late summer 2010 a mosquito born flavivirus not previously reported in Europe called Bagaza virus (BAGV) caused high mortality in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). We studied clinical findings, lesions and viral antigen distribution in naturally BAGV infected game birds in order to understand the apparently higher impact on red-legged partridges. The disease induced neurologic signs in the two galliform species and, to a lesser extent, in common wood pigeons (Columba palumbus). In red-legged partridges infection by BAGV caused severe haemosiderosis in the liver and spleen that was absent in pheasants and less evident in common wood pigeons. Also, BAGV antigen was present in vascular endothelium in multiple organs in red-legged partridges, and in the spleen in common wood pigeons, while in ring-necked pheasants it was only detected in neurons and glial cells in the brain. These findings indicate tropism of BAGV for endothelial cells and a severe haemolytic process in red-legged partridges in addition to the central nervous lesions that were found in all three species. PMID:22966904

  7. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Comarmond, Cloe; Domont, Fanny; Savey, Léa; Desbois, Anne C.; Saadoun, David

    2016-01-01

    During hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection, extrahepatic manifestations are frequent and polymorphous. This article reports on a large cohort of patients with HCV-related autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders, from mixed cryoglobulinemia vasculitis to frank lymphomas. The relationship between HCV infection and such immune-related diseases has been formally demonstrated by epidemiological, clinical, immunological and pathological data, and results of therapeutic trials. More recently, other nonliver-related HCV disorders have been reported, including cardiovascular (i.e. stroke, ischemic heart disease), renal, metabolic and central nervous system diseases. For these manifestations, most evidence comes from large epidemiological studies; there is a need for mechanistic studies and therapeutic trials for confirmation. Beyond the risk of developing liver complications, that is, cirrhosis and liver cancer, patients with HCV infection have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality related to nonliver diseases. HCV chronic infection should be analyzed as a systemic disease in which extrahepatic consequences increase the weight of its pathological burden. The need for effective viral eradication measures is underlined. PMID:26862398

  8. Theiler's Virus Infection: a Model for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Oleszak, Emilia L.; Chang, J. Robert; Friedman, Herman; Katsetos, Christos D.; Platsoucas, Chris D.

    2004-01-01

    Both genetic background and environmental factors, very probably viruses, appear to play a role in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Lessons from viral experimental models suggest that many different viruses may trigger inflammatory demyelinating diseases resembling MS. Theiler's virus, a picornavirus, induces in susceptible strains of mice early acute disease resembling encephalomyelitis followed by late chronic demyelinating disease, which is one of the best, if not the best, animal model for MS. During early acute disease the virus replicates in gray matter of the central nervous system but is eliminated to very low titers 2 weeks postinfection. Late chronic demyelinating disease becomes clinically apparent approximately 2 weeks later and is characterized by extensive demyelinating lesions and mononuclear cell infiltrates, progressive spinal cord atrophy, and axonal loss. Myelin damage is immunologically mediated, but it is not clear whether it is due to molecular mimicry or epitope spreading. Cytokines, nitric oxide/reactive nitrogen species, and costimulatory molecules are involved in the pathogenesis of both diseases. Close similarities between Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease in mice and MS in humans, include the following: major histocompatibility complex-dependent susceptibility; substantial similarities in neuropathology, including axonal damage and remyelination; and paucity of T-cell apoptosis in demyelinating disease. Both diseases are immunologically mediated. These common features emphasize the close similarities of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease in mice and MS in humans. PMID:14726460

  9. [Acute encephalitis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations as expression of influenza virus infection].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Flagge, Noris; Bayard, Vicente; Quirós, Evelia; Alonso, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    The aim is to review the encephalitis in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestation, epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment, and the neuropsyquiatric signs appearing an influenza epidemy. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) which involves the brain. The clinical manifestations usually are: headache, fever and confusional stage. It could also be manifested as seizures, personality changes, or psiqyiatric symptoms. The clinical manifestations are related to the virus and the cell type affected in the brain. A meningitis or encephalopathy need to be ruled out. It could be present as an epidemic or isolated form, beeing this the most frequent form. It could be produced by a great variety of infections agents including virus, bacterias, fungal and parasitic. Viral causes are herpesvirus, arbovirus, rabies and enterovirus. Bacterias such as Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia and Mycoplasma neumoniae. Some fungal causes are: Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. More than 100 agents are related to encephalitis. The diagnosis of encephalitis is a challenge for the clinician and its infectious etiology is clear in only 40 to 70% of all cases. The diagnosis of encephalitis can be established with absolute certainty only by the microscopic examination of brain tissue. Epidemiology is related to age of the patients, geographic area, season, weather or the host immune system. Early intervention can reduce the mortality rate and sequels. We describe four patients with encephalitis and neuropsychiatric symptoms during an influenza epidemic. PMID:19240010

  10. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavez-Ramírez, J.; Fuentes-Allen, J. L.; López-Estrada, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002), with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells), is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number) is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements. PMID:21331263

  11. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection of Spiny Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Anne-Sophie; Gonzales, Marta; Ferro, Cristina; Tamayo, Margarita; Aronson, Judith; Paessler, Slobodan; Anishchenko, Michael; Boshell, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Enzootic strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) circulate in forested habitats of Mexico, Central, and South America, and spiny rats (Proechimys spp.) are believed to be the principal reservoir hosts in several foci. To better understand the host-pathogen interactions and resistance to disease characteristic of many reservoir hosts, we performed experimental infections of F1 progeny from Proechimys chrysaeolus collected at a Colombian enzootic VEEV focus using sympatric and allopatric virus strains. All animals became viremic with a mean peak titer of 3.3 log10 PFU/mL, and all seroconverted with antibody titers from 1:20 to 1:640, which persisted up to 15 months. No signs of disease were observed, including after intracerebral injections. The lack of detectable disease and limited histopathologic lesions in these animals contrast dramatically with the severe disease and histopathologic findings observed in other laboratory rodents and humans, and support their role as reservoir hosts with a long-term coevolutionary relationship to VEEV. PMID:15890116

  12. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cacoub, Patrice; Comarmond, Cloe; Domont, Fanny; Savey, Léa; Desbois, Anne C; Saadoun, David

    2016-02-01

    During hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection, extrahepatic manifestations are frequent and polymorphous. This article reports on a large cohort of patients with HCV-related autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders, from mixed cryoglobulinemia vasculitis to frank lymphomas. The relationship between HCV infection and such immune-related diseases has been formally demonstrated by epidemiological, clinical, immunological and pathological data, and results of therapeutic trials. More recently, other nonliver-related HCV disorders have been reported, including cardiovascular (i.e. stroke, ischemic heart disease), renal, metabolic and central nervous system diseases. For these manifestations, most evidence comes from large epidemiological studies; there is a need for mechanistic studies and therapeutic trials for confirmation. Beyond the risk of developing liver complications, that is, cirrhosis and liver cancer, patients with HCV infection have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality related to nonliver diseases. HCV chronic infection should be analyzed as a systemic disease in which extrahepatic consequences increase the weight of its pathological burden. The need for effective viral eradication measures is underlined. PMID:26862398

  13. Natural Bagaza virus infection in game birds in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Gamino, Virginia; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Ana-Valeria; Fernández-de-Mera, Isabel G; Ortíz, José-Antonio; Durán-Martín, Mauricio; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian; Höfle, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    In late summer 2010 a mosquito born flavivirus not previously reported in Europe called Bagaza virus (BAGV) caused high mortality in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). We studied clinical findings, lesions and viral antigen distribution in naturally BAGV infected game birds in order to understand the apparently higher impact on red-legged partridges. The disease induced neurologic signs in the two galliform species and, to a lesser extent, in common wood pigeons (Columba palumbus). In red-legged partridges infection by BAGV caused severe haemosiderosis in the liver and spleen that was absent in pheasants and less evident in common wood pigeons. Also, BAGV antigen was present in vascular endothelium in multiple organs in red-legged partridges, and in the spleen in common wood pigeons, while in ring-necked pheasants it was only detected in neurons and glial cells in the brain. These findings indicate tropism of BAGV for endothelial cells and a severe haemolytic process in red-legged partridges in addition to the central nervous lesions that were found in all three species. PMID:22966904

  14. [Border disease: a persistent virus infection in sheep (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Terpstra, C

    1980-08-15

    Border disease (BD) is a congenital infection of sheep characterised by still-birth, abortion and the birth of weak lambs with nervous symptoms and sometimes an abnormally hairy birthcoat. The lambs are almost constantly trembling or shaking, they often have an erratic gait and in severe cases are unable to rise. The nervous signs are due to a defective myelinogensis of the central nervous system and tend to disappear at a later age. Many affected lambs die shortly after birth and those which survive usually show retarded growth. The disease is caused by a virus which is closely related to the virus of bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD). The virus may be isolated from every organ and is excreted with saliva, nasal discharge, urine and faeces. Clinically the diagnosis can be made with high probability when nervous signs and hairy birthcoat are both present. Laboratory diagnosis is based on the detection of antigen by immunofluorescence or virus isolation. In addition ewes of BD-affected lambs usually possess antibodies against BVD-virus. In some lambs, an immune response starts during prenatal life, others show a transient or lasting low level response at a later age, whereas still others remained serologically negative for at least 2 1/2 years. Asymptomatic virus carriers occur among lambs as well as among adult sheep. The persistently infected animals are continously shedding virus and thus maintain the infection in the flock. PMID:6252652

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alehan, Füsun K; Kahveci, Suat; Uslu, Yasemin; Yildirim, Tülin; Yilmaz, Başak

    2004-06-01

    We describe the case of a 30-month-old boy who developed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection and ultimately died. As far as we know, this is only the second case of HAV-associated ADEM to be reported in the literature. The child was brought to hospital with fever, lethargy and weakness of 2 days duration. He had developed jaundice, abdominal pain and malaise 2 weeks beforehand and these problems had resolved within 2 days. Neurological examination revealed lethargy, generalised weakness and positive Babinski's signs bilaterally. Cerebrospinal fluid examination showed mild lymphocytic pleocytosis, increased protein and elevated anti-HAV IgM and IgG titres. Serum HAV IgM and IgG titres were also elevated. Despite aggressive treatment with ceftriaxone, acyclovir and anti-oedema measures, he developed papilloedema and coma within 24 hours of admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed diffuse cerebral oedema and multifocal hyperintensities on T2-weighted images, with most lesions in the white matter of both cerebral hemispheres. The diagnosis of ADEM was established and high-dose steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin were added to the treatment regimen. However, his clinical condition continued to deteriorate and he died on the 20th day in hospital. This case shows that HAV infection can be linked with ADEM. Patients with HAV infection should be examined carefully for central nervous system symptoms during follow-up. Likewise, the possibility of HAV infection should be investigated in cases of ADEM. PMID:15186542

  16. Impact of simian immunodeficiency virus infection on chimpanzee population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rudicell, Rebecca S; Holland Jones, James; Wroblewski, Emily E; Learn, Gerald H; Li, Yingying; Robertson, Joel D; Greengrass, Elizabeth; Grossmann, Falk; Kamenya, Shadrack; Pintea, Lilian; Mjungu, Deus C; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Mosser, Anna; Lehman, Clarence; Collins, D Anthony; Keele, Brandon F; Goodall, Jane; Hahn, Beatrice H; Pusey, Anne E; Wilson, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    . Together, these results suggest that the decline of the Kalande community was caused, at least in part, by high levels of SIVcpz infection. However, population extinction is not an inevitable consequence of SIVcpz infection, but depends on additional variables, such as migration, that promote survival. These findings are consistent with the uneven distribution of SIVcpz throughout central Africa and explain how chimpanzees in Gombe and elsewhere can be at equipoise with this pathogen. PMID:20886099

  17. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  18. Congenital Viral Infections of the Brain: Lessons Learned from Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Perlman, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    The fetal brain is highly vulnerable to teratogens, including many infectious agents. As a consequence of prenatal infection, many children suffer severe and permanent brain injury and dysfunction. Because most animal models of congenital brain infection do not strongly mirror human disease, the models are highly limited in their abilities to shed light on the pathogenesis of these diseases. The animal model for congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, however, does not suffer from this limitation. LCMV is a well-known human pathogen. When the infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus can infect the fetus, and the developing brain is particularly vulnerable. Children with congenital LCMV infection often have substantial neurological deficits. The neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV is a superb model system of human congenital LCMV infection. Virtually all of the neuropathologic changes observed in humans congenitally infected with LCMV, including microencephaly, encephalomalacia, chorioretinitis, porencephalic cysts, neuronal migration disturbances, periventricular infection, and cerebellar hypoplasia, are reproduced in the rat model. Within the developing rat brain, LCMV selectively targets mitotically active neuronal precursors. Thus, the targets of infection and sites of pathology depend on host age at the time of infection. The rat model has further shown that the pathogenic changes induced by LCMV infection are both virus-mediated and immune-mediated. Furthermore, different brain regions simultaneously infected with LCMV can undergo widely different pathologic changes, reflecting different brain region–virus–immune system interactions. Because the neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV so faithfully reproduces the diverse neuropathology observed in the human counterpart, the rat model system is a highly valuable tool for the study of congenital LCMV infection and of all prenatal brain infections In addition, because LCMV induces delayed

  19. Systematic CpT (ApG) Depletion and CpG Excess Are Unique Genomic Signatures of Large DNA Viruses Infecting Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Neha; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the relative abundance of dinucleotides, if any may provide important clues on host-driven evolution of viruses. We studied dinucleotide frequencies of large DNA viruses infecting vertebrates (n = 105; viruses infecting mammals = 99; viruses infecting aves = 6; viruses infecting reptiles = 1) and invertebrates (n = 88; viruses infecting insects = 84; viruses infecting crustaceans = 4). We have identified systematic depletion of CpT(ApG) dinucleotides and over-representation of CpG dinucleotides as the unique genomic signature of large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates. Detailed investigation of this unique genomic signature suggests the existence of invertebrate host-induced pressures specifically targeting CpT(ApG) and CpG dinucleotides. The depletion of CpT dinucleotides among large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates is at least in part, explained by non-canonical DNA methylation by the infected host. Our findings highlight the role of invertebrate host-related factors in shaping virus evolution and they also provide the necessary framework for future studies on evolution, epigenetics and molecular biology of viruses infecting this group of hosts. PMID:25369195

  20. Systematic CpT (ApG) depletion and CpG excess are unique genomic signatures of large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Neha; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the relative abundance of dinucleotides, if any may provide important clues on host-driven evolution of viruses. We studied dinucleotide frequencies of large DNA viruses infecting vertebrates (n = 105; viruses infecting mammals = 99; viruses infecting aves = 6; viruses infecting reptiles = 1) and invertebrates (n = 88; viruses infecting insects = 84; viruses infecting crustaceans = 4). We have identified systematic depletion of CpT(ApG) dinucleotides and over-representation of CpG dinucleotides as the unique genomic signature of large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates. Detailed investigation of this unique genomic signature suggests the existence of invertebrate host-induced pressures specifically targeting CpT(ApG) and CpG dinucleotides. The depletion of CpT dinucleotides among large DNA viruses infecting invertebrates is at least in part, explained by non-canonical DNA methylation by the infected host. Our findings highlight the role of invertebrate host-related factors in shaping virus evolution and they also provide the necessary framework for future studies on evolution, epigenetics and molecular biology of viruses infecting this group of hosts. PMID:25369195

  1. Update: Interim Guidance for the Evaluation and Management of Infants with Possible Congenital Zika Virus Infection - United States, August 2016.

    PubMed

    Russell, Kate; Oliver, Sara E; Lewis, Lillianne; Barfield, Wanda D; Cragan, Janet; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Staples, J Erin; Fischer, Marc; Peacock, Georgina; Oduyebo, Titilope; Petersen, Emily E; Zaki, Sherif; Moore, Cynthia A; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (1). Laboratory testing is recommended for 1) infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy and 2) infants who have abnormal clinical or neuroimaging findings suggestive of congenital Zika syndrome and a maternal epidemiologic link suggesting possible transmission, regardless of maternal Zika virus test results. Congenital Zika syndrome is a recently recognized pattern of congenital anomalies associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy that includes microcephaly, intracranial calcifications or other brain anomalies, or eye anomalies, among others (2). Recommended infant laboratory evaluation includes both molecular (real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR]) and serologic (immunoglobulin M [IgM]) testing. Initial samples should be collected directly from the infant in the first 2 days of life, if possible; testing of cord blood is not recommended. A positive infant serum or urine rRT-PCR test result confirms congenital Zika virus infection. Positive Zika virus IgM testing, with a negative rRT-PCR result, indicates probable congenital Zika virus infection. In addition to infant Zika virus testing, initial evaluation of all infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy should include a comprehensive physical examination, including a neurologic examination, postnatal head ultrasound, and standard newborn hearing screen. Infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection should have a comprehensive ophthalmologic exam and hearing assessment by auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing before 1 month of age. Recommendations for follow-up of infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection depend on whether abnormalities consistent with congenital Zika syndrome

  2. Pulmonary immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice increases survival after pneumococcal superinfection.

    PubMed

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  3. The Flavonoid Isoliquiritigenin Reduces Lung Inflammation and Mouse Morbidity during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Traboulsi, Hussein; Cloutier, Alexandre; Boyapelly, Kumaraswamy; Bonin, Marc-André; Marsault, Éric; Cantin, André M.

    2015-01-01

    The host response to influenza virus infection is characterized by an acute lung inflammatory response in which intense inflammatory cell recruitment, hypercytokinemia, and a high level of oxidative stress are present. The sum of these events contributes to the virus-induced lung damage that leads to high a level of morbidity and mortality in susceptible infected patients. In this context, we identified compounds that can simultaneously reduce the excessive inflammatory response and the viral replication as a strategy to treat influenza virus infection. We investigated the anti-inflammatory and antiviral potential activities of isoliquiritigenin (ILG). Interestingly, we demonstrated that ILG is a potent inhibitor of influenza virus replication in human bronchial epithelial cells (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 24.7 μM). In addition, our results showed that this molecule inhibits the expression of inflammatory cytokines induced after the infection of cells with influenza virus. We demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory activity of ILG in the context of influenza virus infection is dependent on the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma pathway. Interestingly, ILG phosphate (ILG-p)-treated mice displayed decreased lung inflammation as depicted by reduced cytokine gene expression and inflammatory cell recruitment. We also demonstrated that influenza virus-specific CD8+ effector T cell recruitment was reduced up to 60% in the lungs of mice treated with ILG-p (10 mg/kg) compared to that in saline-treated mice. Finally, we showed that administration of ILG-p reduced lung viral titers and morbidity of mice infected with the PR8/H1N1 virus. PMID:26248373

  4. Neuropsychological Impact of West Nile Virus Infection: An Extensive Neuropsychiatric Assessment of 49 Cases in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Zainab; McDermid Vaz, Stephanie; Bawor, Monica; Potter, Tammy Hlywka; Eskandarian, Sasha; Loeb, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background West Nile virus emerged as an important human pathogen in North America and continues to pose a risk to public health. It can cause a highly variable range of clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to severe illness. Neuroinvasive disease due to West Nile virus can lead to long-term neurological deficits and psychological impairment. However, these deficits have not been well described. The objective of this study was to characterize the neuropsychological manifestations of West Nile virus infection with a focus on neuroinvasive status and time since infection. Methods Patients from Ontario Canada with a diagnosis of neuroinvasive disease (meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis) and non-neuroinvasive disease who had participated in a cohort study were enrolled. Clinical and laboratory were collected, as well as demographics and medical history. Cognitive functioning was assessed using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Results Data from 49 individuals (32 with West Nile fever and 17 with West Nile neuroinvasive disease) were included in the present cross-sectional analysis. Patterns of neuropsychological impairment were comparable across participants with both neuroinvasive and non-neuroinvasive West Nile virus infection on all cognitive measures. Neuropsychiatric impairment was also observed more frequently at two to four years post-infection compared to earlier stages of illness. Conclusions Our data provide objective evidence for cognitive difficulties among patients who were infected with West Nile virus; these deficits appear to manifest regardless of severity of West Nile virus infection (West Nile fever vs. West Nile neuroinvasive disease), and are more prevalent with increasing illness duration (2–4 years vs. 1 month). Data from this study will help inform patients and healthcare providers about the expected course of recovery, as well as the need to implement effective treatment strategies that

  5. Characterization of host microRNAs that respond to DNA virus infection in a crustacean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression that are implicated in many processes of eukaryotic cells. It is known that the expression profiles of host miRNAs can be reshaped by viruses. However, a systematic investigation of marine invertebrate miRNAs that respond to virus infection has not yet been performed. Results In this study, the shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus was challenged by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Small RNA sequencing of WSSV-infected shrimp at different time post-infection (0, 6, 24 and 48 h) identified 63 host miRNAs, 48 of which were conserved in other animals, representing 43 distinct families. Of the identified host miRNAs, 31 were differentially expressed in response to virus infection, of which 25 were up-regulated and six down-regulated. The results were confirmed by northern blots. The TargetScan and miRanda algorithms showed that most target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were related to immune responses. Gene ontology analysis revealed that immune signaling pathways were mediated by these miRNAs. Evolutionary analysis showed that three of them, miR-1, miR-7 and miR-34, are highly conserved in shrimp, fruit fly and humans and function in the similar pathways. Conclusions Our study provides the first large-scale characterization of marine invertebrate miRNAs that respond to virus infection. This will help to reveal the molecular events involved in virus-host interactions mediated by miRNAs and their evolution in animals. PMID:22545795

  6. Effect of host age on experimental K virus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, J E

    1981-01-01

    Mice were inoculated by the oral route with K virus at 4, 8, 12, and 23 days and at 4 months of age. The effect of host age on the pathogenesis of infection was studied by immunofluorescence, virus assay, and histopathology. K virus produced a systemic infection in all animals, although the infection because progressively more limited as animals matured. In mice inoculated at 4 days of age, K virus infection resulted in a fatal interstitial pneumonia identical to that seen in newborn animals and was characterized by the presence of virus and viral antigen in pulmonary and extrapulmonary vascular endothelia, reticuloendothelial organs, and brains. In older animals, K virus infection was clinically inapparent; organ involvement was similar in distribution to that seen in fatally infected suckling ice, but cells exhibiting specific viral fluorescence were fewer in number and viral titers were lower. Although animals surviving K virus infection developed high titers of hemagglutination inhibition antibody to the virus, positive cells and infectious virus could still be detected in intestines 2 months after inoculation. In animals inoculated at 8 and 12 days of age, in which K virus produced an extensive initial infection, virus could also be detected 56 days after inoculation in lungs, livers, spleens, and brains. The present study indicates that murine K virus produces a systemic infection throughout the life of its host and that the maturation of host defenses and the development of specific humoral immunity, although they limit dissemination of virus during acute infection, may not eliminate viral persistence in intestines or other organs once infection has occurred. Images PMID:7263066

  7. Zika Virus Infection Among U.S. Pregnant Travelers - August 2015-February 2016.

    PubMed

    Meaney-Delman, Dana; Hills, Susan L; Williams, Charnetta; Galang, Romeo R; Iyengar, Preetha; Hennenfent, Andrew K; Rabe, Ingrid B; Panella, Amanda; Oduyebo, Titilope; Honein, Margaret A; Zaki, Sherif; Lindsey, Nicole; Lehman, Jennifer A; Kwit, Natalie; Bertolli, Jeanne; Ellington, Sascha; Igbinosa, Irogue; Minta, Anna A; Petersen, Emily E; Mead, Paul; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-03-01

    After reports of microcephaly and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in infants of mothers infected with Zika virus during pregnancy, CDC issued a travel alert on January 15, 2016, advising pregnant women to consider postponing travel to areas with active transmission of Zika virus. On January 19, CDC released interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with travel to an affected area, and an update was released on February 5. As of February 17, CDC had received reports of nine pregnant travelers with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease; 10 additional reports of Zika virus disease among pregnant women are currently under investigation. No Zika virus-related hospitalizations or deaths among pregnant women were reported. Pregnancy outcomes among the nine confirmed cases included two early pregnancy losses, two elective terminations, and three live births (two apparently healthy infants and one infant with severe microcephaly); two pregnancies (approximately 18 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation) are continuing without known complications. Confirmed cases of Zika virus infection were reported among women who had traveled to one or more of the following nine areas with ongoing local transmission of Zika virus: American Samoa, Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Samoa. This report summarizes findings from the nine women with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy, including case reports for four women with various clinical outcomes. U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure during pregnancy should follow CDC guidelines for patient evaluation and management. Zika virus disease is a nationally notifiable condition. CDC has developed a voluntary registry to collect information about U.S. pregnant women with confirmed Zika virus infection and their infants. Information about the registry is in preparation and will be available on the CDC website. PMID

  8. Tissue-Protective Effects of NKG2A in Immune-Mediated Clearance of Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeBerge, Matthew P.; Ruby, Jessica A.; Liu, Jun; Schneider, Mark J.; Wang, Yan; Hahn, Young S.; Enelow, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection triggers a CD8+ T cell response that aids in virus clearance, but also expresses effector functions that may result in tissue injury. CD8+ T cells express a variety of activating and inhibiting ligands, though regulation of the expression of inhibitory receptors is not well understood. The ligand for the inhibitory receptor, NKG2A, is the non-classical MHC-I molecule Qa1b, which may also serve as a putative restricting element for the T cell receptors of purported regulatory CD8+ T cells. We have previously shown that Qa1b-null mice suffer considerably enhanced immunopathologic lung injury in the context of CD8+ T cell-mediated clearance of influenza infection, as well as evidence in a non-viral system that failure to ligate NKG2A on CD8+ effector T cells may represent an important component of this process. In this report, we examine the requirements for induction of NKG2A expression, and show that NKG2A expression by CD8+ T cells occurs as a result of migration from the MLN to the inflammatory lung environment, irrespective of peripheral antigen recognition. Further, we confirmed that NKG2A is a mediator in limiting immunopathology in virus infection using mice with a targeted deletion of NKG2A, and infecting the mutants with two different viruses, influenza and adenovirus. In neither infection is virus clearance altered. In influenza infection, the enhanced lung injury was associated with increased chemoattractant production, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, and significantly enhanced alveolar hemorrhage. The primary mechanism of enhanced injury was the loss of negative regulation of CD8+ T cell effector function. A similar effect was observed in the livers of mutant mice infected intravenously with adenovirus. These results demonstrate the immunoregulatory role of CD8+ NKG2A expression in virus infection, which negatively regulates T cell effector functions and contributes to protection of tissue integrity during virus clearance

  9. Pulmonary Immunostimulation with MALP-2 in Influenza Virus-Infected Mice Increases Survival after Pneumococcal Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D.; Suttorp, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  10. African Swine Fever Virus Infection in the Argasid Host, Ornithodoros porcinus porcinus

    PubMed Central

    Kleiboeker, S. B.; Burrage, T. G.; Scoles, G. A.; Fish, D.; Rock, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection in Ornithodoros porcinus porcinus was examined in nymphal ticks infected with the ASFV isolate Chiredzi/83/1. At times postinfection (p.i.) ranging from 6 h to 290 days, ticks or dissected tick tissues were titrated for virus and examined ultrastructurally for evidence of virus replication. The ASFV infection rate in ticks was 100% in these experiments, and virus infection was not associated with a significant increase in tick mortality. Initial ASFV replication occurred in phagocytic digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. Subsequent infection and replication of ASFV in undifferentiated midgut cells was observed at 15 days p.i. Generalization of virus infection from midgut to other tick tissues required 2 to 3 weeks and most likely involved virus movement across the basal lamina of the midgut into the hemocoel. Secondary sites of virus replication included hemocytes (type I and II), connective tissue, coxal gland, salivary gland, and reproductive tissue. Virus replication was not observed in the nervous tissue of the synganglion, Malpighian tubules, and muscle. Persistent infection, characterized by active virus replication, was observed for all involved tick tissues. After 91 days p.i., viral titers in salivary gland and reproductive tissue were consistently the highest detected. Successful tick-to-pig transmission of ASFV at 48 days p.i. correlated with high viral titers in salivary and coxal gland tissue and their secretions. A similar pattern of virus infection and persistence in O. porcinus porcinus was observed for three additional ASFV tick isolates in their associated ticks. PMID:9499019