Science.gov

Sample records for chorus giganteus lesson

  1. Music: Chorus, Junior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Joan; And Others

    A music course of instruction in junior chorus, to develop students' performance skills individually and in ensemble, is described. A prerequisite for pupils is the ability to read music. Outlined are: the course description; enrollment guidelines; study objectives; course content; procedures; resources for pupils and teachers; and the assessment.…

  2. Indopithecus giganteus distinct from Sivapithecus indicus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madden, C.T.; Lewis, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The very large Eurasian Miocene ape Indopithecus giganteus is distinct from contemporanious Sivapithecus (non-Dryopithecus)indicus. The probabilities that length and width for the only specimen of I. giganteus could be sampled from populations similar or identical to those of S. indicus are less than six chances in 100,000 for both parameters. ?? 1980 Japan Monkey Centre.

  3. Miscanthus × giganteus xylooligosaccharides: Purification andfermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A procedure was developed to recover xylooligosaccharides (XOS) from Miscanthus x giganteus (MxG) hydrolyzates. MxG hydrolyzates were prepared using autohydrolysis, and XOS rich fractions were acquired using activated carbon adsorption and stepwise ethanol elution. The combined XOS fractions were pu...

  4. Miscanthus x giganteus xylooligosaccharides: Purification andfermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A procedure was developed to recover xylooligosaccharides (XOS) from Miscanthus x giganteus (MxG) hydrolyzates. MxG hydrolyzates were prepared using autohydrolysis, and XOS rich fractions were acquired using activated carbon adsorption and stepwise ethanol elution. The combined XOS fractions were pu...

  5. Analysis of chorus emissions at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Scarf, F. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Kurth, W. S.

    1984-06-01

    The emissions in the chorus frequency band which were detected on the Voyager 1 inbound pass between about ten and six Jupiter radii are surveyed. An overview of the plasma and wave observations during the inbound pass is presented and the spatial regions in which chorus band signals were observed are discussed. A series of wide-band frequency-time frames which characterize the onset of two observed intervals of chorus band activity is displayed. A detailed examination is made of the spectra for rising chorus which sweeps upward in frequency from 0.2 to 0.5 times the electron cyclotron frequency f(c). Two temporally successive wide-band frames in which several types of chorus band emissions were observed are discussed. The spatial morphology of chorus is discussed in terms of the electron energies which resonate with whistler mode waves. A recent theory of chorus generation is reviewed along with theories and a model explaining the narrow-band emissions above f(c)/2.

  6. Relationship between Chorus and Plasmaspheric Hiss Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Chen, L.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on the origin of the plasmaspheric hiss (PH) emission, and in particular, considers whether chorus could be the embryonic source of PH. It describes the ray-tracing model used to study chorus wave propagation. The chapter mainly focuses on more recent observations that still raise puzzling questions regarding the origin of PH. It then shows that PH has a lower frequency boundary, and that, at least in some instances, chorus could not be the source of the PH power and that it would necessarily need to be excited locally. The chapter also shows a coincident observation between THEMIS-E and one of the newly launched Van Allen Probes (RB-B) that showed simultaneous chorus and hiss emissions. These emissions were very well correlated but occurred at much higher L-shells than predicted by our ray-tracing model.

  7. Precedence effects and the evolution of chorusing

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, M. D.; Tourtellot, M. K.; Snedden, W. A.

    1997-01-01

    The structured choruses produced by rhythmically signalling males in many species of acoustic animals have long-captured the imagination of evolutionary biologists. Though various hypotheses have been forwarded to explain the adaptive significance of such chorusing, none have withstood empirical scrutiny. We suggest instead that alternating and synchronous choruses represent collective epiphenomena resulting from individual males competing to jam each other's signals. These competitions originate in psychoacoustic precedence effects wherein females only orient toward the first call of a sequence, thus selectively favouring males who produce leading calls. Given this perceptual bias, our modelling confirms that a resetting of signal rhythm by neighbours' signals, which generates either alternation or synchrony, is evolutionarily stable provided that resetting includes a relativity adjustment for the velocity of signal transmission and selective attention toward only a subset of signalling neighbours. Signalling strategies in chorusing insects and anurans are consistent with these predicted features.

  8. Wave normal analysis of chorus at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2006-05-01

    Whistler mode chorus has been detected by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument during most of Cassini's first 21 orbits of Saturn. The emission is detected primarily between L shells of 5 to 8 and the occurrence of the emission shows no correlation with Saturn latitude or local time. High resolution wideband measurements from the Wideband Receiver (WBR) shows fine structure in the chorus similar to fine structure of chorus observed at the Earth, but on a longer time scale. Wave normal and Poynting vector analysis using the simultaneous waveforms of the two-axis electric antenna and the three-axis magnetic search coil obtained by the RPWS Five-Channel Waveform Receiver (WFR) has been performed on the chorus emission. This analysis shows that the chorus propagates away from the Saturnian magnetic equator, similar to chorus propagation at the Earth, suggesting a source region near the magnetic equator. The variation of the wave normal angle with location of the spacecraft will be presented.

  9. Latitudinal variation of chorus frequency observed in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondoh, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Murakami, T.

    1982-07-01

    Latitudinal variations of chorus band frequency have been obtained from frequency-time VLF spectrograms of relatively long ISIS passes received at Syowa station, Antarctica, in 1977 and 1978. The upper and lower limit frequencies of the dayside chorus decrease with L value, and their latitudinal variations roughly agree with a latitudinal variation of one half of the equatorial gyrofrequency. This result is consistent with the dayside magnetospheric chorus model in which the chorus generated near the equatorial magnetosphere propagates along the field lines in the ducted mode or inwards from the original field line in the nonducted model. Nightside choruses were observed in geomagnetically disturbed periods; thus the generation mechanism for the nightside chorus seems to be different from that of the dayside chorus. A new case was found in which the chorus band frequencies at latitudes beyond the plasmapause are higher than those at latitudes inside the plasmapause.

  10. Postmidnight chorus - A substorm phenomenon. [outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The ELF emissions were detected in the midnight sector of the magnetosphere in conjunction with magnetospheric substorms. The emissions were observed at local midnight and early morning hours and are accordingly called 'post-midnight chorus.' The characteristics of these emissions such as their frequency time structure, emission frequency with respect to the local equatorial electron gyrofrequency, intensity-time variation, and the average intensity were investigated. The occurrence of the chorus in the nightside magnetosphere was investigated as a function of local time, L shell, magnetic latitude, and substorm activity, and the results of this analysis are presented. Specific features of postmidnight chorus are discussed in the context of possible wave-particle interactions occurring during magnetospheric substorms.

  11. Analyzing Acoustic Interactions in Natural Bullfrog Choruses

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Andrea Megela; Simmons, James A.; Bates, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of acoustic interactions between animals in active choruses is complex because of the large numbers of individuals present, their high calling rates, and the considerable numbers of vocalizations that either overlap or show close temporal alternation. The authors describe a methodology for recording chorus activity in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) using multiple, closely-spaced acoustic sensors that provide simultaneous estimates of sound direction and sound characteristics. This method provides estimates of location of individual callers, even under conditions of call overlap. This is a useful technique for understanding the complexity of the acoustic scene faced by animals vocalizing in groups. PMID:18729655

  12. Chorus and chorus-like emissions seen by the ionospheric satellite DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, Michel; Santolík, Ondřej; Němec, František

    2016-04-01

    A lot of different emissions have been detected by the low-altitude satellite DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions), and the aim of this paper is to study extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with elements drifting in frequency. It is shown that only some of them can be considered as usual chorus. These chorus elements are emitted in the equatorial plane, and their propagation analysis indicates that they are going downward at low altitudes in the ionosphere to be detected by the satellite. The study of one remarkable event recorded along the same orbit in both the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres on 8 May 2008 indicates that this propagation mechanism is reinforced at the location of the ionospheric trough, which corresponds to the plasmapause at higher altitudes. It has been observed that usual chorus elements at low frequencies are always in a frequency band which overlaps with a hiss band limited by a frequency cutoff close to the proton gyrofrequency. Other drifting elements can be attributed to emissions triggered by PLHR (power line harmonic radiation). It means that without a high-resolution spectral analysis, chorus-like elements triggered by PLHR can be wrongly considered as natural chorus. These drifting elements can also appear as filamentary structures emerging at the upper frequencies of a hiss band or quasiperiodic emissions. There are events where the elements even have certain similarities to quasiperiodic emissions. The difference between these elements and the chorus emissions will be emphasized.

  13. Bursty Precipitation Driven by Chorus Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Telnikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    The electron precipitation bursts have been shown to be a major sink for the radiation belt relativistic electrons. As underlying mechanism of such bursts, we propose particle scattering into the loss cone due to nonlinear resonance interaction between electrons and chorus. Stochastic heating due to the coupling leads to diffusion in pitch angle, and the rate of diffusion would be sufficient to account for the emptying of the Earth's radiation belt over the time of the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The results obtained in the present paper account for a strong energy dependence in the electron precipitation event and the correlation between the energization and loss processes on macroscopic timescales, which is primarily attributed to the cooperative effects of the coupling. This mechanism of chorus scattering should produce pitch angle distributions that are energy-dependent and butterfly-shaped. The calculated timescales and the total energy input to the atmosphere from precipitating relativistic electrons are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  14. A generation mechanism for chorus emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhtengerts, V. Y.

    1999-01-01

    A chorus generation mechanism is discussed, which is based on interrelation of ELF/VLF noise-like and discrete emissions under the cyclotron wave-particle interactions. A natural ELF/VLF noise radiation is excited by the cyclotron instability mechanism in ducts with enhanced cold plasma density or at the plasmapause. This process is accompanied by a step-like deformation of the energetic electron distribution function in the velocity space, which is situated at the boundary between resonant and nonresonant particles. The step leads to the strong phase correlation of interacting particles and waves and to a new backward wave oscillator (BWO) regime of wave generation, when an absolute cyclotron instability arises at the central cross section of the geomagnetic trap, in the form of a succession of discrete signals with growing frequency inside each element. The dynamical spectrum of a separate element is formed similar to triggered ELF/VLF emission, when the strong wavelet starts from the equatorial plane. The comparison is given of the model developed using some satellite and ground-based data. In particular, the appearance of separate groups of chorus signals with a duration 2-10 s can be connected with the preliminary stage of the step formation. BWO regime gives a succession period smaller than the bounce period of energetic electrons between the magnetic mirrors and can explain the observed intervals between chorus elements.

  15. A model for chorus associated electrostatic bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    The linear theory of the generation of electrostatic bursts of noise by electrons trapped in chorus wave packets is developed for a finite temperature electron beam and a Maxwellian elecron and ion background. The growth rates determined qualitatively in good agreement with those obtained by previous authors from a more idealized model. Two connected instability mechanisms seem to be occurring: a beam plasma (electron-ion two-stream) instability commonly associated with intensification of the chorus power levels, and a transitional or borderline resistive medium instability commonly associated with chorus hooks. The physical reasons for the two mechanisms is discussed. In the second case electron beams are difficult to identify in the particle data. An expression is obtained for the maximum growth rate in terms of the ratios of the beam and electron thermal velocities to the beam velocity, and of the beam density to plasma density. It is anticipated that this may allow the observed peak in the electrostatic noise spectrum to be used as a diagnostic for the beam characteristics. Previously announced in STAR as N84-12832

  16. Comparison of different transformation methods for Aspergillus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Vera; Mueller, Dirk; Strowig, Till; Stahl, Ulf

    2003-08-01

    Four different transformation methods were tested and compared in an attempt to facilitate the genetic transformation of Aspergillus giganteus, the producer of an antifungal protein (AFP). The fungus was transformed to hygromycin B resistance, using the hph gene of Escherichia coli by protoplast transformation, electroporation, biolistic transformation, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Electroporation and biolistic transformation were found to be inappropriate for transforming A. giganteus, due to a low transformation yield. The conventional transformation technique based on protoplasts yielded up to 55 transformants in 10(8) protoplasts/microg DNA and was enhanced to 140-fold by A. tumefaciens-mediated transfer of its T-DNA. Here, the germination time prior to cocultivation and the fungus:bacterium ratio were found to alter the transformation efficiency. Southern blot analysis revealed that the A. giganteus transformants contained a randomly integrated single T-DNA copy, whereas multiple integration events were frequent in transformants obtained by the protoplast method. PMID:12756496

  17. Breeding chorus indices are weakly related to estimated abundance of boreal chorus frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, P.S.; Muths, E.; Kissel, A.M.; Scherer, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Call surveys used to monitor breeding choruses of anuran amphibians generate index values that are frequently used to represent the number of male frogs present, but few studies have quantified this relationship. We compared abundance of male Boreal Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris maculata), estimated using capture–recapture methods in two populations in Colorado, to call index values derived from automated recordings. Single index values, such as might result from large monitoring efforts, were unrelated to population size. A synthetic call saturation index (CSI), the daily proportion of the maximum possible sum of index values derived from multiple recordings, was greater in larger populations, but the relationship was not highly predictive.

  18. A surfactant tolerant laccase of Meripilus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gunnar; Krings, Ulrich; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-04-01

    A laccase (Lcc1) from the white-rot fungus Meripilus giganteus was purified with superior yields of 34% and 90% by conventional chromatography or by foam separation, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) yielded a molecular mass of 55 kDa. The enzyme possessed an isoelectric point of 3.1 and was able to oxidize the common laccase substrate 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) at a pH of 2.0, whereas the enzyme was still able to oxidize ABTS and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) at pH 6.0. Lcc1 exhibited low K ( m ) values of 8 μM (ABTS) and 80 μM (DMP) and remarkable catalytic efficiency towards the non-phenolic substrate ABTS of 37,437 k (cat)/k (m) (s(-1) mM(-1)). The laccase showed a high stability towards high concentrations of various metal ions, EDTA and surfactants indicating a considerable biotechnological potential. Furthermore, Lcc1 exhibited an increased activity as well as a striking boost of stability in the presence of surfactants. Degenerated primers were deduced from peptide fragments. The complete coding sequence of lcc1 was determined to 1,551 bp and confirmed via amplification of the 2,214 bp genomic sequence which included 12 introns. The deduced 516 amino acid (aa) sequence of the lcc1 gene shared 82% identity and 90% similarity with a laccase from Rigidoporus microporus. The sequence data may aid theoretical studies and enzyme engineering efforts to create laccases with an improved stability towards metal ions and bipolar compounds. PMID:22805944

  19. Observations of Whistler-Mode Chorus with Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Van Allen Probes mission provides an excellent opportunity to observe whistler-mode chorus and its role in the radiation belts. The plasma wave instrument on the two probes, called Waves, includes six identical waveform receivers covering the frequency range from 10 Hz to 12 kHz. The instrument measures three orthogonal magnetic field components and three orthogonal electric field components of waves. This complement supports wave-normal and Poynting flux analyses of chorus as well as other wave modes that interact with radiation belt particles. Extensive use of burst modes provides multicomponent waveforms enabling the study of individual chorus elements, including their substructure. The early-mission publications confirm the importance of chorus to the local acceleration of electrons in the outer radiation belts. The orbital precession of the twin Van Allen Probes through a complete range of local times now allows for a new survey of the distribution of chorus emissions. Hence, we now have the tools to study chorus from the nonlinear growth in chorus element substructures through synoptic studies of the near-equatorial occurrence of chorus out to a distance of approximately 5.8 Earth radii.

  20. Production of xylooligosaccharide (XOS) coproducts from Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus x giganteus (MG), a perennial grass, has potential as a new bioenergy crop due to its cellulose and hemicellulose content. Currently, MG has been tested in central Illinois and has been reported to attain an average yield of 36 MT/ha/year (1). The process for converting MG to ethanol on...

  1. Purification and characterization of xylooligosaccharides (XOS) from Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous investigation showed that xylooligosaccharides (XOS) could be produced effectively from Miscanthus x giganteus (MxG). Using autohydrolysis, an XOS yield of to 13.5% (w/w) of initial biomass and xylan yield of 69.2% (w/w) was observed. In this study, we investigated the purification of X...

  2. The Chorus and Contemporary Youth Theatre: A Model from the Past Teaches Actors of Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Jo Beth

    1995-01-01

    Describes how many technical and casting problems in young adult theater may be solved by using a Greek chorus. Defines a Greek chorus and its role. Discusses applications of Greek choruses to conventional scripts, including representation of abstract images and characterization. Concludes that incorporating a Greek chorus into a traditional…

  3. Shabansky Orbits and High Latitude Chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, J. P.; Elkington, S. R.; Malaspina, D.; Spasojevic, M.

    2013-12-01

    High latitude chorus is a whistler-mode VLF emission that is observed on the dayside at high L-shells. Recent observations show presence of these waves in off- equatorial regions. In the presence of off-equatorial magnetic field minima, trapped par- ticles undergo so-called Shabansky orbits, which can lead to temperature anisotropies ooff the equator. Additionally, drift shell splitting (DSS) can produce anisotropies in a compressed dipole. We use a 3D particle tracing code in a tunable analytic compressed- dipole field to study the role of Shabansky orbits on generating a temperature anisotropy in relativistic electrons. By adjusting the dependence on L of the phase space density, we can distinguish between DSS and effects from Shabansky orbits. We use the computed anisotropy for both cases along with a cold plasma model to compute a linear convec- tive wave growth rate for waves in off-equatorial regions. By performing these simula- tions without energizing processes, we can definitively determine what roles Shabansky orbits DSS have in high latitude chorus wave growth. Comparisons of realistic field results with observations will be presented.

  4. The origin and propagation of chorus in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. K.; Holzer, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Wave normals of chorus in the outer magnetosphere have been determined for the first time from data obtained with the Ogo 5 search coil magnetometer. These measurements combined with simultaneous information concerning geomagnetic field, plasma density, and the electron energy and pitch angle distributions provide a consistent picture of the generation, propagation, and subsequent damping of chorus in agreement with theory. Specifically, the data are consistent with chorus generation within 25 deg of the equatorial plane on the dayside and within 2 deg on the nightside. Chorus is generated by a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with electrons between 5 and 150 keV but only when the pitch angle distribution is peaked at 90 deg to the local magnetic field and the anisotropy exceeds a critical value.

  5. Development and feeding of fall armyworm, on Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observations of fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)] larvae infesting plots of Miscanthus x giganteus Greef and Deuter ex Hodkinson and Renvoize prompted laboratory-based tests of survival, development and feeding preferences on leaf tissue from M. x giganteus and switchgrass (Panicum ...

  6. Hepatoprotective Effects of Panus giganteus (Berk.) Corner against Thioacetamide- (TAA-) Induced Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wei-Lun; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Chua, Kek-Heng; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Tan, Yee-Shin; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2012-01-01

    Panus giganteus, a culinary and medicinal mushroom consumed by selected indigenous communities in Malaysia, is currently being considered for large scale cultivation. This study was undertaken to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of P. giganteus against thioacetamide- (TAA-) induced liver injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were injected intraperitoneally with TAA thrice weekly and were orally administered freeze-dried fruiting bodies of P. giganteus (0.5 or 1 g/kg) daily for two months, while control rats were given vehicle or P. giganteus only. After 60 days, rats administered with P. giganteus showed lower liver body weight ratio, restored levels of serum liver biomarkers and oxidative stress parameters comparable to treatment with the standard drug silymarin. Gross necropsy and histopathological examination further confirmed the hepatoprotective effects of P. giganteus. This is the first report on hepatoprotective effects of P. giganteus. The present study showed that P. giganteus was able to prevent or reduce the severity of TAA-induced liver injury. PMID:22649470

  7. Source extension of chorus waves in the equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, M.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.

    2009-04-01

    We use measurements of the Cluster spacecraft and a ray tracing simulation to estimate the location and size of the global source of whistler-mode chorus emissions. In this study we use the data provided simultaneously by the STAFF-SA instruments on the four Cluster spacecraft on 19 August, 2003. To determine the direction of propagation of chorus we calculate Poynting vector whereas a ray-tracing method is used to estimate the chorus source extension. For the first time this analysis has been made along whole particular Cluster orbit in both hemispheres. Our study shows that minimum size of the global chorus source region in the equatorial plane is between 1-3 Earth's radii. The resulting location of the chorus source region is at radial distances between 3 and 8 Earth radii. This result is in agreement with previous analysis of Cluster data by Parrot et al., 2003, 2004 and with the study of Santolik et al., 2005 who analyzed data from the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft.

  8. Multipoint observations of chorus and plasmaspheric hiss waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Chen, L.; Nishimura, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a wideband, incoherent, whistler-mode plasma wave that is found predominantly in inner magnetospheric high-density plasma regions such as the plasmasphere or plasmaspheric drainage plume. The origin of plasmaspheric hiss has been a topic of intense study and some controversy ever since its discovery in the late 1960's. A recent set of modeling studies has shown that a different plasma wave, namely whistler-mode chorus, could be responsible for creating plasmaspheric hiss by propagating from its source region in the equatorial plasmatrough, and into the plasmasphere. Early coordinated observations made simultaneously on multiple THEMIS probes have shown excellent consistency between models and data, but later results concerning the nature of chorus waves and its relation to pulsating aurora, the discovery of low-frequency hiss, and coincident observations between high L-shell chorus and hiss have shown that there are facets of the chorus-hiss connection that are still a puzzle. In this talk, we briefly review the chorus-hiss connection mechanism and focus on recent results and open questions.

  9. Avian cholera in Southern Great Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leotta, G.A.; Rivas, M.; Chinen, I.; Vigo, G.B.; Moredo, F.A.; Coria, N.; Wolcott, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) was found dead at Potter Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland, Antarctica. The adult male was discovered approximately 48 hr after death. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were compatible with avian cholera and the bacterium Pasteurella multocida subsp. gallicida, serotype A1 was isolated from lung, heart, liver, pericardial sac, and air sacs. In addition, Escherichia coli was isolated from pericardial sac and air sacs. This is the first known report of avian cholera in a southern giant petrel in Antarctica.

  10. Nonlinear whistler-mode Chorus Amplification: a lasing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-chavez, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-12-01

    A mechanism for chorus wave amplification is presented. We show [1] that the whistler-mode chorus dynamical equations can be put in a form similar to the ones describing the physics of Free-electron lasers (underscoring the well known observational fact that the intensity of whistler-mode chorus demand a quasi-coherent mechanism [2]). We solve these dynamical equations numerically in the nonlinear regime [3]. In this regime our numerical results exhibit strong amplitude modulation and particle trapping, consistent with observations and numerical results previously obtained in the literature. Finally, our model gives simplified analytical expressions of wave growth rate in terms of a few measurable plasma parameters that can be used by observers without further simplification. 1. A. R. Soto-Chavez et al. Phys. Plasmas, 19, 010701, (2012). 2. P. A. Isenberg et al. J. Geophys. Res., 87, 1495, (1982). 3. A. R. Soto-Chavez and A. Bhattacharjee, JGR, (2013) submitted.

  11. Competition and cooperation in a synchronous bushcricket chorus

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, M.; Haitzinger, L.; Kainz, M.; Römer, H.

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous signalling within choruses of the same species either emerges from cooperation or competition. In our study on the katydid Mecopoda elongata, we aim to identify mechanisms driving evolution towards synchrony. The increase of signal amplitude owing to synchronous signalling and the preservation of a conspecific signal period may represent cooperative mechanisms, whereas chorus synchrony may also result from the preference of females for leading signals and the resulting competition for the leader role. We recorded the timing of signals and the resulting communal signal amplitudes in small choruses and performed female choice experiments to identify such mechanisms. Males frequently timed their signals either as leader or follower with an average time lag of about 70 ms. Females selected males in such choruses on the basis of signal order and signal duration. Two-choice experiments revealed a time lag of only 70 ms to bias mate choice in favour of the leader. Furthermore, a song model with a conspecific signal period of 2 s was more attractive than a song model with an irregular or longer and shorter than average signal period. Owing to a high degree of overlap and plasticity of signals produced in ‘four male choruses’, peak and root mean square amplitudes increased by about 7 dB relative to lone singers. Modelling active space of synchronous males and solo singing males revealed a strongly increased broadcast area of synchronous signallers, but a slightly reduced per capita mating possibility compared with lone singers. These results suggest a strong leader preference of females as the ultimate causation of inter-male competition for timing signals as leader. The emerging synchrony increases the amplitude of signals produced in a chorus and has the potential to compensate a reduction of mating advantage in a chorus. We discuss a possible fitness benefit of males gained through a beacon effect and the possibility that signalling as follower is

  12. Chorusing, synchrony, and the evolutionary functions of rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Ravignani, Andrea; Bowling, Daniel L.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of biomusicology is to understand the biological basis of human musicality. One approach to this problem has been to compare core components of human musicality (relative pitch perception, entrainment, etc.) with similar capacities in other animal species. Here we extend and clarify this comparative approach with respect to rhythm. First, whereas most comparisons between human music and animal acoustic behavior have focused on spectral properties (melody and harmony), we argue for the central importance of temporal properties, and propose that this domain is ripe for further comparative research. Second, whereas most rhythm research in non-human animals has examined animal timing in isolation, we consider how chorusing dynamics can shape individual timing, as in human music and dance, arguing that group behavior is key to understanding the adaptive functions of rhythm. To illustrate the interdependence between individual and chorusing dynamics, we present a computational model of chorusing agents relating individual call timing with synchronous group behavior. Third, we distinguish and clarify mechanistic and functional explanations of rhythmic phenomena, often conflated in the literature, arguing that this distinction is key for understanding the evolution of musicality. Fourth, we expand biomusicological discussions beyond the species typically considered, providing an overview of chorusing and rhythmic behavior across a broad range of taxa (orthopterans, fireflies, frogs, birds, and primates). Finally, we propose an “Evolving Signal Timing” hypothesis, suggesting that similarities between timing abilities in biological species will be based on comparable chorusing behaviors. We conclude that the comparative study of chorusing species can provide important insights into the adaptive function(s) of rhythmic behavior in our “proto-musical” primate ancestors, and thus inform our understanding of the biology and evolution of rhythm in human

  13. Chorusing, synchrony, and the evolutionary functions of rhythm.

    PubMed

    Ravignani, Andrea; Bowling, Daniel L; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of biomusicology is to understand the biological basis of human musicality. One approach to this problem has been to compare core components of human musicality (relative pitch perception, entrainment, etc.) with similar capacities in other animal species. Here we extend and clarify this comparative approach with respect to rhythm. First, whereas most comparisons between human music and animal acoustic behavior have focused on spectral properties (melody and harmony), we argue for the central importance of temporal properties, and propose that this domain is ripe for further comparative research. Second, whereas most rhythm research in non-human animals has examined animal timing in isolation, we consider how chorusing dynamics can shape individual timing, as in human music and dance, arguing that group behavior is key to understanding the adaptive functions of rhythm. To illustrate the interdependence between individual and chorusing dynamics, we present a computational model of chorusing agents relating individual call timing with synchronous group behavior. Third, we distinguish and clarify mechanistic and functional explanations of rhythmic phenomena, often conflated in the literature, arguing that this distinction is key for understanding the evolution of musicality. Fourth, we expand biomusicological discussions beyond the species typically considered, providing an overview of chorusing and rhythmic behavior across a broad range of taxa (orthopterans, fireflies, frogs, birds, and primates). Finally, we propose an "Evolving Signal Timing" hypothesis, suggesting that similarities between timing abilities in biological species will be based on comparable chorusing behaviors. We conclude that the comparative study of chorusing species can provide important insights into the adaptive function(s) of rhythmic behavior in our "proto-musical" primate ancestors, and thus inform our understanding of the biology and evolution of rhythm in human music and

  14. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, D.; Santolik, O.; Rycroft, M.; Trakhtengerts, V.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS) computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms) of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz). Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, and L-shell, observed chorus signals are reproduced with remarkable fidelity and, in particular, sweep rates in the range 1-10 kHz result as observed. Further, we find that the sweep rate is a falling function of increasing cold plasma density, again in accord with observations. Finally, we have satisfactorily simulated the rather rare falling frequency elements of chorus which are sometimes observed aboard Cluster in the generation region. For both rising and falling chorus we have presented detailed structural analyses of the generation regions. The main contributor to the frequency sweep rate is primarily the establishment of wave number/frequency gradients across the generation region by the out of phase component of the resonant particle current. The secondary contributor is the shortening of the wavelength of resonant particle current relative to that of the wave field. In view of the close agreement between observation and simulation, we conclude that nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance is indeed the mechanism underlying the generation of chorus signals just outside the plasmasphere.

  15. Autumnal leaf senescence in Miscanthus × giganteus and leaf [N] differ by stand age.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Nicholas N; Dohleman, Frank G; Miguez, Fernando E; Heaton, Emily A

    2015-07-01

    Poor first winter survival in Miscanthus × giganteus has been anecdotally attributed to incomplete first autumn senescence, but these assessments never paired first-year with older M. × giganteus in side-by-side trials to separate the effect of weather from stand age. Here CO2 assimilation rate (A), photosystem II efficiency (ΦPSII), and leaf N concentration ([N]) were used to directly compare senescence in first, second, and third-year stands of M. × giganteus. Three M. × giganteus fields were planted with eight plots, one field each in 2009, 2010, and 2011. To quantify autumnal leaf senescence of plants within each stand age, photosynthetic and leaf [N] measurements were made twice weekly from early September until a killing frost. Following chilling events (daily temperature averages below 10 °C), photosynthetic rates in first year plants rebounded to a greater degree than those in second- and third-year plants. By the end of the growing season, first-year M. × giganteus had A and ΦPSII rates up to 4 times greater than third-year M. × giganteus, while leaf [N] was up to 2.4 times greater. The increased photosynthetic capability and leaf N status in first-year M. × giganteus suggests that the photosynthetic apparatus was not dismantled before a killing frost, thus potentially limiting nutrient translocation, and may explain why young M. × giganteus stands do not survive winter when older stands do. Because previous senescence research has primarily focused on annual or woody species, our results suggest that M. × giganteus may be an interesting herbaceous perennial system to investigate the interactive effects of plant ageing and nutrient status on senescence and may highlight management strategies that could potentially increase winter survival rates in first-year stands. PMID:25873682

  16. Modeling the Evolution of Chorus Waves into Hiss Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yihua; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Xiaoping; Liu, Si; Tang, Lijun; Xiao, Fuliang

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we analyze Cluster observations of whistler-mode chorus and hiss waves during the event of August 19-21, 2006. Chorus is present outside the plasmasphere and hiss occurs inside the plasmasphere. Using a recently constructed plasma boundary layer model, we perform a ray-tracing study on the propagation of chorus. Numerical results show that chorus can penetrate into the plasmasphere through the plasma boundary layer, evolving into hiss. The current data analysis and modeling provide a further observational support for the previous findings that chorus is the origin of plasmaspheric hiss.

  17. Generation of multiband chorus by lower band cascade in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Bortnik, Jacob; Li, Wen; Chen, Lunjin; Wang, Shui

    2016-03-01

    Chorus waves are intense electromagnetic whistler mode emissions in the magnetosphere, typically falling into two distinct frequency bands: a lower band (0.1-0.5fce) and an upper band (0.5-0.8fce) with a power gap at about 0.5fce. In this letter, with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite, we observed two special chorus events, which are called as multiband chorus because upper band chorus is located at harmonics of lower band chorus. We propose a new potential generation mechanism for multiband chorus, which is called as lower band cascade. In this scenario, a density mode with a frequency equal to that of lower band chorus is generated by the ponderomotive effect (inhomogeneity of the electric amplitude) along the wave vector, and then upper band chorus with the frequency twice that of lower band chorus is generated through wave-wave couplings between lower band chorus and the density mode. The mechanism provides a new insight into the evolution of whistler mode chorus in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  18. The Chorus Conflict and Loss of Separation Resolution Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Hagen, George E.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    The Chorus software is designed to investigate near-term, tactical conflict and loss of separation detection and resolution concepts for air traffic management. This software is currently being used in two different problem domains: en-route self- separation and sense and avoid for unmanned aircraft systems. This paper describes the core resolution algorithms that are part of Chorus. The combination of several features of the Chorus program distinguish this software from other approaches to conflict and loss of separation resolution. First, the program stores a history of state information over time which enables it to handle communication dropouts and take advantage of previous input data. Second, the underlying conflict algorithms find resolutions that solve the most urgent conflict, but also seek to prevent secondary conflicts with the other aircraft. Third, if the program is run on multiple aircraft, and the two aircraft maneuver at the same time, the result will be implicitly co-ordinated. This implicit coordination property is established by ensuring that a resolution produced by Chorus will comply with a mathematically-defined criteria whose correctness has been formally verified. Fourth, the program produces both instantaneous solutions and kinematic solutions, which are based on simple accel- eration models. Finally, the program provides resolutions for recovery from loss of separation. Different versions of this software are implemented as Java and C++ software programs, respectively.

  19. Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Moose, Steve

    2011-04-25

    Steve Moose from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  20. Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Moose, Steve

    2010-03-25

    Steve Moose from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  1. Generation mechanism of whistler-mode chorus emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, Yoshiharu

    2012-07-01

    Whistler-mode chorus emissions are coherent waves with rising frequencies due to the nonlinear wave growth mechanism [1,2] driven by formation of electromagnetic electron hole in the velocity phase space. The nonlinear wave growth is induced by a triggering wave that is either naturally growing or artificially injected at a constant frequency. The frequency increase is induced by gradual formation of the symmetric electron hole near the equator. The increase of the frequency breaks the symmetry of the electron hole, resulting in the negative resonant current parallel to the wave electric field [3]. The negative resonant current causes the wave growth with the progressively increasing frequency. The process is an absolute instability near the equator, generating seeds of chorus emissions. The nonlinear wave growth also takes place through propagation from the equator because the asymmetry of the electron hole is maintained by the inhomogeneous magnetic field. As the chorus wave packet propagates away from the equator, the wavenormal direction deviates from the parallel direction, resulting in a parallel electric field that appears as an electrostatic potential in the frame of reference moving with the phase velocity. Stable nonlinear trapping of electrons takes place because the group velocity is nearly equal to the phase velocity at half the cyclotron frequency as far as the wavenormal angle is small. The trapped electrons are accelerated in the parallel direction, while the wave packet undergoes the nonlinear damping at half the cyclotron frequency [2], being separated into the lower-band and upper-band chorus emissions. [1] Omura, Y., Y. Katoh, and D. Summers (2008), Theory and simulation of the generation of whistler-mode chorus, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A04223, doi:10.1029/2007JA012622. [2] Omura, Y., , M. Hikishima, Y. Katoh, D. Summers, and S. Yagitani (2009), Nonlinear mechanisms of lower band and upper band VLF chorus emissions in the magnetosphere, Journal

  2. Chorus Wave Scattering Responsible for the Dayside Diffuse Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, B.; Nishimura, T.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Li, W.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ebihara, Y.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis on the conjunction measurements of dayside diffuse aurora and whistler-mode chorus waves by the South Pole all-sky imager and THEMIS spacecraft at 16 -18 UT on August 13, 2009. A high correlation is identified between the intensities of the diffuse aurora at 557.7 nm near the THEMIS ionospheric footprints and chorus emissions. Using the simultaneous wave, plasma density and particle datasets of THEMIS observations, we compute the matrices of bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients due to chorus wave scattering in the realistic magnetosphere at a series of representative time stamps, which are subsequently utilized to quantitatively compare with the rate of strong diffusion for evaluating the energy dependent loss cone filling index associated with chorus-induced pitch angle scattering. Fits of Maxwellian-type energy spectrum to the modeled electron differential fluxes inside the loss cone produce a temporal variation of the total energy flux and characteristic energy of precipitating electrons. The obtained dominant precipitation energies are within 2 - 5 keV, which agrees well with the major electron population for the dayside green-line aurora excitation. The modeled change of the total precipitation energy flux is remarkably consistent with that of the observed green-line diffuse aurora intensity. The trend of decreases and increases in the aurora luminosity is also reasonably reproduced in a time consistent manner. Through a systematic combination of quasi-linear theory, realistic non-dipolar magnetic field mapping, and the concept of strong diffusion on the basis of conjugated space and ground observations, we have demonstrated that dayside chorus scattering can dominantly account for the dayside green-line diffuse aurora activity, while variations in electron differential flux also play a role. In addition, changes in the ambient density can affect the portion of diffuse auroral electrons that

  3. Transverse Dimensions of Chorus in the Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santolik, O.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report measurement of whistler-mode chorus by the four Cluster spacecraft at close separations. We focus our analysis on the generation region close to the magnetic equatorial plane at a radial distance of 4.4 Earth's radii. We use both linear and rank correlation analysis to define perpendicular dimensions of the sources of chorus elements below one half of the electron cyclotron frequency. Correlation is significant throughout the range of separation distances of 60-260 km parallel to the field line and 7-100 km in the perpendicular plane. At these scales, the correlation coefficient is independent for parallel separations, and decreases with perpendicular separation. The observations are consistent with a statistical model of the source region assuming individual sources as gaussian peaks of radiated power with a common half-width of 35 km perpendicular to the magnetic field. This characteristic scale is comparable to the wavelength of observed waves.

  4. The unexpected origin of plasmaspheric hiss from discrete chorus emissions.

    PubMed

    Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M; Meredith, Nigel P

    2008-03-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a type of electromagnetic wave found ubiquitously in the dense plasma region that encircles the Earth, known as the plasmasphere. This important wave is known to remove the high-energy electrons that are trapped along the Earth's magnetic field lines, and therefore helps to reduce the radiation hazards to satellites and humans in space. Numerous theories to explain the origin of hiss have been proposed over the past four decades, but none have been able to account fully for its observed properties. Here we show that a different wave type called chorus, previously thought to be unrelated to hiss, can propagate into the plasmasphere from tens of thousands of kilometres away, and evolve into hiss. Our new model naturally accounts for the observed frequency band of hiss, its incoherent nature, its day-night asymmetry in intensity, its association with solar activity and its spatial distribution. The connection between chorus and hiss is very interesting because chorus is instrumental in the formation of high-energy electrons outside the plasmasphere, whereas hiss depletes these electrons at lower equatorial altitudes. PMID:18322528

  5. Augmentation and Maximization of Per-Capita Call Active Space Through Chorusing in Anuran Amphibians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, James Henderson

    It is poorly understood why anuran males form choruses. Although various reasons have been proposed, empirical support is lacking. This study proposed, developed, and evaluated the chorus active space (CAS) augmentation theory, which states that anuran choruses are formed and organized so as to augment and maximize per-capita CAS beyond that which could be achieved by an isolated male. This study involved three phases. First, computer models of hypothetical choruses indicated that CAS, as defined, is necessarily augmented for chorusing males. These models provided the necessary information from which optimal interindividual distances (IIDs), corresponding to maximal CASs, could be estimated differentially for linear and planar chorus configurations. The second phase examined Acris crepitans and Hyla cinerea choruses for optimal intermale spacing. A. crepitans, which utilizes mixed chorus geometries (either linear or planar, depending on available resources), cannot optimize IID within any observed pond-type breeding site; however, observed spacing would be optimal along a stream bank, where chorusing often occurs, for a chorus population of 61, approximately the minimum value at which CAS characteristics are stabile. H. cinerea males, which form only planar choruses, space orders of magnitude closer than optimal. Suboptimal spacing in this species is understandable, considering the would-be size of an optimally spaced chorus. In the final phase of this study, a database of CAS-related data was compiled mostly from published sources and was examined for variable relationships predicted on the basis of CAS augmentation theory. The findings suggest that very few planar geometry species may maximize CAS; whereas, a much larger number of mixed geometry species, perhaps as well as linear geometry species, may maximize CAS. These findings loosely agree with the field study findings and suggest that CAS augmentation theory applies to at least a subset of anuran species and

  6. Miscanthus×giganteus xylooligosaccharides: Purification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsu; Bowman, Michael J; Cotta, Michael A; Dien, Bruce S; Iten, Loren B; Whitehead, Terence R; Rausch, Kent D; Tumbleson, M E; Singh, Vijay

    2016-04-20

    A procedure was developed to recover xylooligosaccharides (XOS) from Miscanthus×giganteus (M×G) hydrolyzate. M×G hydrolyzate was prepared using autohydrolysis, and XOS rich fractions were acquired using activated carbon adsorption and stepwise ethanol elution. The combined XOS fractions were purified using a series of ion exchange resin treatments. The end product, M×G XOS, had 89.1% (w/w) total substituted oligosaccharides (TSOS) composed of arabinose, glucose, xylose and acetyl group. Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium catenulatum (health promoting bacteria) were cultured in vitro on M×G XOS and a commercial XOS source, which was used as a comparison. B. adolescentis grew to a higher cell density than B. catenulatum in both XOS cultures. Total xylose consumption for B. adolescentis was 84.1 and 84.8%, respectively for M×G and commercial XOS cultures; and for B. catenulatum was 76.6 and 73.6%, respectively. The xylobiose (X2), xylotriose (X3) and xylotetraose (X4) were almost utilized for both strains. Acetic and lactic acids were the major fermentation products of the XOS cultures. PMID:26876832

  7. Development and feeding of fall armyworm on Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Prasifka, J R; Bradshaw, J D; Meagher, R L; Nagoshi, R N; Steffey, K L; Gray, M E

    2009-12-01

    Observations of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), larvae infesting plots of Miscanthus x giganteus Greef and Deuter ex Hodkinson and Renvoize prompted laboratory-based tests of survival, development, and feeding preferences on leaf tissue from M. x giganteus and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L. Survival from hatch to pupation was >70 and 50% for fall armyworms reared on switchgrass and M. x giganteus, respectively, although survival of the S. frugiperda rice strain was significantly greater than the corn strain on both crops. Developmental times from hatch to pupation or adult emergence showed effects of crop and S. frugiperda host strain, but analysis of an interaction revealed developmental times for the rice strain were similar on both crops, whereas corn strain larvae showed delayed development on M. x giganteus relative to switchgrass. Analysis of larval (10 d) and pupal masses showed a similar pattern, with effects of crop and an interaction (at 10 d), but only the mass of corn strain larvae feeding on M. x giganteus was reduced relative to the other crop and strain combinations. In choice tests, neonates of both corn and rice strains showed a strong preference for feeding on young tissues rather than mature leaves of M. x giganteus or switchgrass, but they also clearly favored corn, Zea mays L., leaves over either of the perennial grasses. Results indicate both plants are potential hosts for S. frugiperda, but additional information is needed to understand under which scenarios and to what degree fall armyworms may damage perennial grasses grown for biofuel production. PMID:20069844

  8. Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Wygant, J. R.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ˜300-1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10-5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhile, hiss emissions are confined inside the plasmasphere, with a higher intensity and a broader area at a lower frequency. A sum of bi-Maxwellian distribution is used to model the observed anisotropic electron distributions and to evaluate the instability of waves. A three-dimensional ray tracing simulation shows that a portion of chorus emission outside the plasmasphere can propagate into the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. Moreover, hiss waves below 1 kHz are more intense and propagate over a broader area than those above 1 kHz, consistent with the observation. The current results can explain distributions of the observed hiss emission and provide a further support for the mechanism of evolution of chorus into hiss emissions.

  9. Confronting Homophobia at School: High School Students and the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, Greg; Gregorio, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    This study discusses student responses to curriculum taught by the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles to choral students in local high schools. The Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles's A-LIVE Music Project brings live music and standards-driven curriculum to high school youth with the express purpose of teaching content in innovative ways and…

  10. An empirical model of magnetospheric chorus amplitude using solar wind and geomagnetic indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. I.; Spasojevic, M.; Li, W.; Nishimura, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetospheric chorus is an Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF, 0.3-30 kHz) electromagnetic wave phenomenon which plays an important role in the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. One must therefore possess accurate estimates of chorus amplitudes in order to model radiation belt dynamics. The goal of this study is to design an empirical model of chorus amplitude, the output of which can be used as input to models of radiation belt dynamics. In pursuit of this goal, we compare two related empirical models of chorus amplitude that we have developed based on THEMIS data from June 2008 through December 2011 which use multiple regression to predict equatorial chorus amplitudes as a function of L and MLT. One model uses only AE* and Kp as model inputs, and the other model utilizes solar wind measurements and geomagnetic indices. The models perform similarly, with each one achieving a median RMS prediction error of 0.39 log10 pT (a factor of 2.5 in amplitude). The coefficients of determination of chorus amplitude for the full model and the AE*/Kp model are 0.034 and 0.026, respectively, meaning that these models explain 3.4 and 2.6 percent of the variance of chorus amplitude. We present a parametric analysis, showing the expected effects on chorus amplitude from a modeled substorm and solar wind pressure pulse, as well as modeled chorus amplitude over the course of the month of September 2008. The model outputs give important insight into the global evolution of equatorial chorus amplitude as a function of geomagnetic storm and substorm phase.

  11. Genetic and developmental studies of albino chorus frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Albino (amelanic) adult chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) occurred with frequencies of 7 percent in 1981 and 12 percent in 1982 in breeding aggregations at a pond in the foothills of the Colorado Front Range. Laboratory matings and examination of albino egg masses suggest that the absence of melanin is due to a recessive allele. The albino phenotype displayed no deficiencies in survival of embryos, rates of embryo or larval development, or rates of growth of juvenile frogs. The absence of abnormalities in development or growth suggests that the a allele in P. triseriata has an action different from albino alleles studied previously in anurans.

  12. A Telepresence Learning Environment for Opera Singing: Distance Lessons Implementations over Internet2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpiste Penalba, Francisco; Rojas-Rajs, Teresa; Lorente, Pedro; Iglesias, Francisco; Fernández, Joaquín; Monguet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The Opera eLearning project developed a solution for opera singing distance lessons at the graduate level, using high bandwidth to deliver a quality audio and video experience that has been evaluated by singing teachers, chorus and orchestra directors, singers and other professional musicians. Prior to finding a technological model that suits the…

  13. Autohydrolysis of Miscanthus x giganteus for the production of xylooligosaccharides (XOS): Kinetics, characterization and recovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optima conditions of production and purification of xylooligosaccharides (XOS) from Miscanthus x giganteus (MxG) were investigated. Using autohydrolysis, XOS were produced at 160, 180 and 200°C at 60, 20 and 5 min, respectively. XOS yield up to 13.5% (w/w) of initial biomass and 69.2% (w/w) of x...

  14. Potential biomass reductions to Miscanthus × giganteus by stem-boring caterpillars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Injury from stem-boring caterpillars has been observed on the perennial grass Miscanthus × giganteus Greef and Deuter ex Hodkinson and Renvoize in both its native and introduced ranges. Because some species causing stem injury in the United States have not been identified, potential biomass reducti...

  15. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1±0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80±0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  16. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1 ± 0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80 ± 0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  17. Magnetic and Electric Field Polarizations of Oblique Magnetospheric Chorus Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Lakhina, Gurbax S.

    2012-01-01

    A theory was developed to explain the properties of the chorus magnetic and electric field components in the case of an arbitrary propagation angle. The new theory shows that a whistler wave has circularly polarized magnetic fields for oblique propagation. This theoretical result is verified by GEOTAIL observations. The wave electric field polarization plane is not orthogonal to the wave vector, and in general is highly elliptically polarized. A special case of the whistler wave called the Gendrin mode is also discussed. This will help to construct a detailed and realistic picture of wave interaction with magnetosphere electrons. It is the purpose of this innovation to study the magnetic and electric polarization properties of chorus at all frequencies, and at all angles of propagation. Even though general expressions for electromagnetic wave polarization in anisotropic plasma are derived in many textbooks, to the knowledge of the innovators, a detailed analysis for oblique whistler wave mode is lacking. Knowledge of the polarization properties is critical for theoretical calculations of resonant wave-particle interactions.

  18. Miscanthus x giganteus production: Meta-analysis, field study and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguez, Fernando E.

    This is a comprehensive study of the potential of M. x giganteus as a biomass crop for energy production. The study looks at the past, present and future of M. x giganteus for its potential for dry biomass production. In Chapter 1 the published M. x giganteus literature, including 31 European studies, was analyzed using non-linear mixed models. This quantitative review of the literature (i.e. meta-analysis) revealed patterns across and within growing seasons. This analysis not only revealed the effects of the growing season, planting density and nitrogen (N) fertilizer but also provided a measure of uncertainty about these effects. More importantly, it provided statistical models which are essentially testable hypotheses. These models were used in Chapter 2 to predict dry biomass considering effects of growing season, planting density and N fertilizer in Illinois. In Chapter 2 M. x giganteus and P. virgatum were investigated in a field study at two locations at Savoy and Perry, IL in 2006. This field study evaluated the performance of M. x giganteus and P. virgatum with respect to their response to N fertilizer and hairy vetch (a winter legume). Variables analyzed included light interception, greenness and dry biomass. In Chapter 3 a mechanistic model, WIMOVAC, was descried and parameterized for simulating M. x giganteus production. The model showed great potential at predicting photosynthesis, leaf area index and dry biomass partitioning in M. x giganteus European experiments. HE Chapter 4, the model described in Chapter 3 was re-implemented and improved, termed BIOCRO with the objective of rigorously estimating key parameters related to dry biomass partitioning. The Bayesian statistical framework for parameter estimation was achieved through the use of Markey chain Monte Carlo methods. The algorithm proposed can be used to estimate parameters in large complex models as the one proposed here. The future of this research points to novel ways in which current

  19. Signal interactions and interference in insect choruses: singing and listening in the social environment.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic insects usually sing amidst conspecifics, thereby creating a social environment-the chorus-in which individuals communicate, find mates, and avoid predation. A temporal structure may arise in a chorus because of competitive and cooperative factors that favor certain signal interactions between neighbors. This temporal structure can generate significant acoustic interference among singers that pose problems for communication, mate finding, and predator detection. Acoustic insects can reduce interference by means of selective attention to only their nearest neighbors and by alternating calls with neighbors. Alternatively, they may synchronize, allowing them to preserve call rhythm and also to listen for predators during the silent intervals between calls. Moreover, males singing in choruses may benefit from reduced per capita predation risk as well as enhanced vigilance. They may also enjoy greater per capita attractiveness to females, particularly in the case of synchronous choruses. In many cases, however, the overall temporal structure of the chorus is only an emergent property of simple, pairwise interactions between neighbors. Nonetheless, the chorus that emerges can impose significant selection pressure on the singing of those individual males. Thus, feedback loops may occur and potentially influence traits at both individual and group levels in a chorus. PMID:25236356

  20. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Vicente; López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  1. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  2. Physiological and growth responses to water deficit in the bioenergy crop Miscanthus x giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Ings, Jennifer; Mur, Luis A. J.; Robson, Paul R. H.; Bosch, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    High yielding perennial biomass crops of the species Miscanthus are widely recognized as one of the most promising lignocellulosic feedstocks for the production of bioenergy and bioproducts. Miscanthus is a C4 grass and thus has relatively high water use efficiency. Cultivated Miscanthus comprises primarily of a single clone, Miscanthus x giganteus, a sterile hybrid between M. sacchariflorus and M. sinensis. M. x giganteus is high yielding and expresses desirable combinations of many traits present in the two parental species types; however, it responds poorly to low water availability. To identify the physiological basis of the response to water stress in M. x giganteus and to identify potential targets for breeding improvements we characterized the physiological responses to water-deficit stress in a pot experiment. The experiment has provided valuable insights into the temporal aspects of drought-induced responses of M. x giganteus. Withholding water resulted in marked changes in plant physiology with growth-associated traits among the first affected, the most rapid response being a decline in the rate of stem elongation. A reduction in photosynthetic performance was among the second set of changes observed; indicated by a decrease in stomatal conductance followed by decreases in chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll content. Measures reflecting the plant water status were among the last affected by the drought treatment. Metabolite analysis indicated that proline was a drought stress marker in M. x giganteus, metabolites in the proline synthesis pathway were more abundant when stomatal conductance decreased and dry weight accumulation ceased. The outcomes of this study in terms of drought-induced physiological changes, accompanied by a proof-of-concept metabolomics investigation, provide a platform for identifying targets for improved drought-tolerance of the Miscanthus bioenergy crop. PMID:24324474

  3. Global Distribution of Chorus Wave Intensity Directly Measured By Van Allen Probes and Themis and Inferred from Poes Electron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves play a fundamental role in accelerating seed electrons to highly relativistic energies, as well as causing energetic electron precipitation into the upper atmosphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data and THEMIS high-resolution wave data, which provide extensive coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we construct an empirical global model of chorus wave intensity categorized by various levels of geomagnetic activity. Recently, we have developed a physics-based technique of linking chorus wave intensity and two-directional electron fluxes (30-100 keV) measured at the conjugate low altitudes by POES satellites to show that the inferred chorus wave intensity provides reasonable estimates on the averaged chorus wave intensity. We apply these two different methods, namely (1) the empirical chorus wave model dependent on geomagnetic activity, and (2) the inferred chorus wave intensity from two-directional POES electron measurements, to a few interesting events and evaluate their performance by comparing against in-situ observations of chorus wave intensity from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. The developed global chorus wave model is critical in quantitatively evaluating the role of chorus waves in radiation belt and ring current electron dynamics.

  4. A decade of innovation in pharmaceutical R&D: the Chorus model.

    PubMed

    Owens, Paul K; Raddad, Eyas; Miller, Jeffrey W; Stille, John R; Olovich, Kenneth G; Smith, Neil V; Jones, Rosie S; Scherer, Joel C

    2015-01-01

    Chorus is a small, operationally independent clinical development organization within Eli Lilly and Company that specializes in drug development from candidate selection to clinical proof of concept. The mission of Chorus is to achieve proof of concept rapidly and at a low cost while positioning successful projects for 'pharma-quality' late-stage development. Chorus uses a small internal staff of experienced drug developers and a network of external vendors to design and implement chemistry, manufacturing and control processes, preclinical toxicology and biology, and Phase I/II clinical trials. In the decade since it was established, Chorus has demonstrated substantial productivity improvements in both time and cost compared to traditional pharmaceutical research and development. Here, we describe its development philosophy, organizational structure, operational model and results to date. PMID:25503514

  5. Non-territorial nightingales prospect territories during the dawn chorus.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Valentin; Kunc, Hansjoerg P; Naguib, Marc

    2004-05-01

    Male songbirds usually sing when they have occupied a territory, but the territory prospecting of non-territorial males is more elusive and has been rarely studied. Here, we simulated newly arriving, non-territorial males by translocating unmated male nightingales (Luscinia megarhynchos) to our study site. We show that territory prospecting of translocated males was largely confined to the hour before sunrise. The radio-tagged males made extensive excursions visiting several singing males at dawn, but after dawn they remained stationary outside occupied territories. As in many other songbird species, dawn was also the time when resident males sang the most. These results suggest that nonterritorial male nightingales use the dawn chorus to assess singing residents or territory occupancy. For resident males, dawn singing may be important to announce territory occupancy to prospecting males and may thus play a role in territory maintenance. PMID:15252973

  6. Non-territorial nightingales prospect territories during the dawn chorus.

    PubMed Central

    Amrhein, Valentin; Kunc, Hansjoerg P; Naguib, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Male songbirds usually sing when they have occupied a territory, but the territory prospecting of non-territorial males is more elusive and has been rarely studied. Here, we simulated newly arriving, non-territorial males by translocating unmated male nightingales (Luscinia megarhynchos) to our study site. We show that territory prospecting of translocated males was largely confined to the hour before sunrise. The radio-tagged males made extensive excursions visiting several singing males at dawn, but after dawn they remained stationary outside occupied territories. As in many other songbird species, dawn was also the time when resident males sang the most. These results suggest that nonterritorial male nightingales use the dawn chorus to assess singing residents or territory occupancy. For resident males, dawn singing may be important to announce territory occupancy to prospecting males and may thus play a role in territory maintenance. PMID:15252973

  7. Intensity variation of ELF hiss and chorus during isolated substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Fiske, K. F.; Church, S. R.; Smith, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Electromagnetic ELF emissions (100-1000 Hz) observed on the polar-orbiting OGO-6 satellite within three hours of the dawn-dusk meridian consistently exhibit a predictable response to isolated substorm activity. Near dawn, the emissions intensify during the substorm and then subside following the magnetic activity; the waves are most intense at L greater than 4, exhibit considerable structure and have been primarily identified as chorus. At dusk the response is entirely different; the wave intensity falls to background levels during substorm activity but subsequently intensifies, usually reaching levels well in excess of that before the disturbance. The emissions near dusk extend to low L, are relatively featureless, and have been identified as plasmaspheric hiss. These features are interpreted in terms of changes in the drift orbits of outer-zone electrons which cyclotron resonate with ELF waves.

  8. Modeling the evolution of chorus waves into plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Chen, L.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Horne, R. B.

    2011-08-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss (PH) is a band-limited, incoherent whistler mode emission found predominantly in the plasmasphere or high-density plasma regions in the near-Earth space environment. Since its discovery in the late 1960s, PH has been recognized as playing an important role in shaping the structure and dynamics of the Earth's electron radiation belts and creating the slot region that separates the inner and outer belts. However, the origin of PH has been a topic of intense debate for over four decades. Here we present a model for the origin of PH that involves the evolution of chorus waves into the PH spectrum. We perform extensive ray tracing using the HOTRAY code and calculate Landau damping using newly developed suprathermal flux maps from THEMIS observations, that are L and magnetic local time dependent, for both inside and outside the plasmasphere. Our results show remarkable consistency with the observed statistical characteristics of hiss, including the day/night asymmetry in wave power, frequency spectrum, geomagnetic control of PH, quasi-parallel equatorial wave normal angles, and confinement within the plasmasphere. Our model also reproduces ancillary features such as exohiss and extremely low frequency (ELF) hiss and might be related to a previously reported phenomenon called lower hybrid resonance duct trapping in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis of ray morphologies shows a separation into four distinct groups, which correspond to (1) rays that are trapped at the plasmapause, (2) PH rays, (3) ELF hiss rays, and (4) rays that represent the bulk of the chorus ray power.

  9. Simulation of Whistler Chorus in a Compressed Dipole Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Denton, R. E.; Hudson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's dipole magnetic field is constantly compressed by the solar wind and the compression is enhanced during magnetic storm. We simulate whistler chorus in a compressed dipole field using a hybrid code. The hybrid code uses the particle-in-cell technique in generalized orthogonal coordinates. In the hybrid code, a small fraction of electrons are treated as particles with anisotropic temperature that leads to the whistler instability. Other electrons are treated as a cold fluid without mass. The density of the fluid electrons is large such that the plasma frequency exceeds the electron gyro frequency. Ions serve as a fixed background. We model the compressed dipole field by adding a constant magnetic field component to the dipole field. The direction of the compressed component is the same as that of the dipole field at the equator. This model of the compressed dipole field yields a magnetic field with off-equator minima and smaller inhomogeneity than the dipole field near the equator. The distribution of hot anisotropic electrons along the magnetic field is a function of adiabatic invariants that satisfies MHD force balance. In the compressed dipole field, the hot electron anisotropy, hot electron density and plasma beta in the direction parallel to the background magnetic field are the maximum at the minimum magnetic field. In our simulation, whistler chorus are generated at the minimum magnetic field with a peak frequency in agreement with the prediction by WHAMP, a local dispersion relation solver. The waves propagate in both directions along the magnetic field. Waves that propagate to higher magnetic latitude are damped at the boundary by the artificial resistive layers, while waves that propagate to lower latitude towards the equator continue to grow.

  10. The chorus environment and the shape of communication systems in frogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Vince

    2003-04-01

    Many species of frogs breed in dense and structurally complex aggregations of calling males termed choruses. Females entering a chorus are faced with the tasks of recognizing and locating mates on the basis of their advertisement calls. The chorus environment poses particular challenges for communication as signalers and receivers will face high levels of background noise and interference between signals. For females, such conditions may decrease the efficiency of communication, with the consequences of increasing the time required to find a mate or errors in mate choice. For males, it will give rise to intense competition for the attention of females. Additionally, the chorus environment for a species is not static, and will vary over both spatial and temporal scales. This complex and dynamic environment has shaped the signals and signaling behaviors of frogs in sometimes surprising ways. In this talk, some of the implications of the chorus environment for both receivers and signalers is discussed. In particular, examples from North American hylid frogs are drawn upon and research on the role of signal timing in influencing the responses of females and plasticity in aggressive behavior between neighbors in choruses are discussed.

  11. Excitation of dayside chorus waves due to magnetic field line compression in response to interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; An, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-jia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-10-01

    The excitation of magnetospheric whistler-mode chorus in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks is investigated using wave data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. As an example, we show a typical chorus wave excitation following an IP shock event that was observed by THEMIS in the postnoon sector near the magnetopause on 3 August 2010. We then analyze characteristic changes during this event and perform a survey of similar events during the period 2008-2014 using the THEMIS and OMNI data set. Our statistical analysis demonstrates that the chorus wave excitation/intensification in response to IP shocks occurs only at high L shells (L > 8) on the dayside. We analyzed the variations of magnetic curvature following the arrival of the IP shock and found that IP shocks lead to more homogeneous background magnetic field configurations in the near-equatorial dayside magnetosphere; and therefore, the threshold of nonlinear chorus wave growth is likely to be reduced, favoring chorus wave generation. Our results provide the observational evidence to support the concept that the geomagnetic field line configuration plays a key role in the excitation of dayside chorus.

  12. SmartMusicKIOSK: Music-playback interface based on chorus-section detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masataka

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes SmartMusicKIOSK, a new music-playback interface for trial listening. Traditionally in music stores, customers often search out the chorus or ``hook'' of a song by repeatedly pressing the fast-forward button, rather than passively listening to the music. This activity is not well-supported by current technology. This research achieves a function for jumping to the chorus section and other key parts of a song, plus a function for visualizing song structure. These functions eliminate the hassle of searching for the chorus and make it easier for a listener to find desired parts of a song, thereby facilitating an active listening experience. This interface, which enables a listener to look for a section of interest by interactively changing the playback position, is useful not only for trial listening but also for more general purposes in selecting and using music. The proposed functions are achieved through an automatic audio-based chorus-section detection method that can detect all the chorus sections by analyzing relationships between various repeated sections in a song. It can also detect modulated chorus sections by introducing an acoustic similarity that enables modulated repetition to be judged correctly. The results of implementing this method in SmartMusicKIOSK have demonstrated its usefulness.

  13. Van Allen Probes observations linking radiation belt electrons to chorus waves during 2014 multiple storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; He, Yihua; Zhou, Qinghua; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    During 18 February to 2 March 2014, the Van Allen Probes encountered multiple geomagnetic storms and simultaneously observed intensified chorus and hiss waves. During this period, there were substantial enhancements in fluxes of energetic (53.8-108.3 keV) and relativistic (2-3.6 MeV) electrons. Chorus waves were excited at locations L = 4-6.2 after the fluxes of energetic were greatly enhanced, with a lower frequency band and wave amplitudes ˜20-100 pT. Strong hiss waves occurred primarily in the main phases or below the location L = 4 in the recovery phases. Relativistic electron fluxes decreased in the main phases due to the adiabatic (e.g., the magnetopause shadowing) or nonadiabatic (hiss-induced scattering) processes. In the recovery phases, relativistic electron fluxes either increased in the presence of enhanced chorus or remained unchanged in the absence of strong chorus or hiss. The observed relativistic electron phase space density peaked around L∗ = 4.5, characteristic of local acceleration. This multiple-storm period reveals a typical picture that chorus waves are excited by the energetic electrons at first and then produce efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons. This further demonstrates that the interplay between both competing mechanisms of chorus-driven acceleration and hiss-driven scattering often occurs in the outer radiation belts.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Dodt, William G; McComish, Bennet J; Nilsson, Maria A; Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David; Phillips, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genome (accession number: LK995454) of an iconic Australian species, the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The mitogenomic organization is consistent with other marsupials, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, an origin of light strand replication and a control region or D-loop. No repetitive sequences were detected in the control region. The M. giganteus mitogenome exemplifies a combination of tRNA gene order and structural peculiarities that appear to be unique to marsupials. We present a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial protein and RNA coding sequences that confirms the phylogenetic position of the grey kangaroo among macropodids. PMID:25103427

  15. Detection of Nipah virus RNA in fruit bat (Pteropus giganteus) from India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pragya D; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Shete, Anita M; Mishra, Akhilesh C; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T; Mourya, Devendra T

    2012-09-01

    The study deals with the survey of different bat populations (Pteropus giganteus, Cynopterus sphinx, and Megaderma lyra) in India for highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV), Reston Ebola virus, and Marburg virus. Bats (n = 140) from two states in India (Maharashtra and West Bengal) were tested for IgG (serum samples) against these viruses and for virus RNAs. Only NiV RNA was detected in a liver homogenate of P. giganteus captured in Myanaguri, West Bengal. Partial sequence analysis of nucleocapsid, glycoprotein, fusion, and phosphoprotein genes showed similarity with the NiV sequences from earlier outbreaks in India. A serum sample of this bat was also positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for NiV-specific IgG. This is the first report on confirmation of Nipah viral RNA in Pteropus bat from India and suggests the possible role of this species in transmission of NiV in India. PMID:22802440

  16. Lipid constituents of the edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus demonstrate anti-Candida activity.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; Lee, Guan-Serm; Macreadie, Ian G; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd; Pamela, David; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2013-12-01

    Different solvent extracts of Pleurotus giganteus fruiting bodies were tested for antifungal activities against Candida species responsible for human infections. The lipids extracted from the ethyl acetate fraction significantly inhibited the growth of all the Candida species tested. Analysis by GC/MS revealed lipid components such as fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, ergosterol, and ergosterol derivatives. The sample with high amounts of fatty acid methyl esters was the most effective antifungal agent. The samples were not cytotoxic to a mammalian cell line, mouse embryonic fibroblasts BALB/c 3T3 clone A31. To our knowledge, this is the first report of antifungal activity of the lipid components of Pleurotus giganteus against Candida species. PMID:24555294

  17. Effect of fire on a monodominant floating mat of Cyperus giganteus Vahl in a neotropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M; Santos Júnior, C C; Damasceno-Júnior, G A; Pott, V J; Pott, A

    2015-01-01

    The rhizomatous Cyperus giganteus, abundant in the Pantanal wetland, can dominate extense floodable areas as monodominant communities. The Jacadigo lake has a large area of C. giganteus, where we performed an evaluation on community structure during two months in 2010, before it was hit by a wildfire which top-killed the vegetation, compared to ten months post-fire. We utilized 40 plots of 1m × 1m, along permanent trails, assessing two strata: the upper, near the inflorescence of adult plants, and the lower, close to the water level. Our results show that fire does not affect dominance of C. giganteus, as it maintained the same cover as before fire; species richness is not much altered either - 28 before fire and 34 thereafter. Fire changed the floristic composition, due to the annual variation of species and the ability of some plants to colonize gaps and to regrow after fire from underground organs and seeds. The stratification of the vegetation with characteristic species of upper and lower strata was similar after fire. PMID:25945628

  18. Global model of lower band and upper band chorus from multiple satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Sicard-Piet, Angélica; Boscher, Daniel; Yearby, Keith H.; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    Gyroresonant wave particle interactions with whistler mode chorus play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts and inner magnetosphere, affecting both the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. Knowledge of the variability of chorus wave power as a function of both spatial location and geomagnetic activity, required for the computation of pitch angle and energy diffusion rates, is thus a critical input for global radiation belt models. Here we present a global model of lower band (0.1fce < f < 0.5fce) and upper band (0.5fce < f < fce) chorus, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency, using data from five satellites, extending the coverage and improving the statistics of existing models. From the plasmapause out to L* = 10 the chorus emissions are found to be largely substorm dependent with the largest intensities being seen during active conditions. Equatorial lower band chorus is strongest during active conditions with peak intensities of the order 2000 pT2 in the region 4 < L* < 9 between 2300 and 1200 MLT. Equatorial upper band chorus is both weaker and less extensive with peak intensities of the order a few hundred pT2 during active conditions between 2300 and 1100 MLT from L* = 3 to L* = 7. Moving away from the equator midlatitude chorus is strongest in the lower band during active conditions with peak intensities of the order 2000 pT2 in the region 4 < L* < 9 but is restricted to the dayside between 0700 and 1400 MLT.

  19. Chorus intensity modulation driven by time-varying field-aligned low-energy plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Liang, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Le Contel, O.; Auster, U.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that chorus waves are responsible for scattering and precipitating the energetic electrons that drive the pulsating aurora. While some of the chorus intensity modulation events are correlated with <~100 eV electron density modulation, most of the chorus intensity modulation events in the postmidnight sector occur without apparent density changes. Although it is generally difficult to measure evolution of low-energy (<~20 eV) electron fluxes due to constraints imposed by the spacecraft potential and electrostatic analyzer (ESA) energy range limit, we identified using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite data that low-energy ions of ~100 eV show density modulation that is correlated with chorus intensity modulation. Those low-energy ions and electrons are field-aligned with major peaks in 0° (for northern hemisphere winter event) and 180° (for northern hemisphere summer event) pitch angle, indicating that outflowing plasma from the sunlit hemisphere is the source of the low-energy plasma density modulation near the equator. Plasma sheet plasma density, and ambient electric and magnetic fields do not show modulations that are correlated with the chorus intensity modulation. Assuming charge neutrality, the low-energy ions can be used to represent cold plasma density in wave growth rate calculations, and the enhancements of the low-energy plasma density are found to contribute most effectively to chorus linear growth rates. These results suggest that chorus intensity modulation is driven by a feedback process where outflowing plasma due to energetic electron precipitation increases the equatorial density that drives further electron precipitation.

  20. Statistical study of chorus wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere using Ae and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryan, Homayon; Yearby, Keith; Balikhin, Michael; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boynton, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Energetic electrons within the Earth's radiation belts represent a serious hazard to geostationary satellites. The interactions of electrons with chorus waves play an important role in both the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. The common approach is to present model wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere under different values of geomagnetic activity as expressed by the geomagnetic indices. However, it has been shown that only around 50% of geomagnetic storms increase flux of relativistic electrons at geostationary orbit while 20% causes a decrease and the remaining 30% has relatively no effect. This emphasizes the importance of including solar wind parameters such as bulk velocity (V), density (n), flow pressure (P), and the vertical interplanetary magnetic field component (Bz) that are known to be predominately effective in the control of high energy fluxes at the geostationary orbit. Therefore, in the present study the set of parameters of the wave distributions is expanded to include the solar wind parameters in addition to the geomagnetic activity. The present study examines almost 4 years (1 January 2004 to 29 September 2007) of Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation data from Double Star TC1 combined with geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters from OMNI database in order to present a comprehensive model of wave magnetic field intensities for the chorus waves as a function of magnetic local time, L shell (L), magnetic latitude (λm), geomagnetic activity, and solar wind parameters. Generally, the results indicate that the intensity of chorus emission is not only dependent upon geomagnetic activity but also dependent on solar wind parameters with velocity and southward interplanetary magnetic field Bs (Bz < 0), evidently the most influential solar wind parameters. The largest peak chorus intensities in the order of 50 pT are observed during active conditions, high solar wind velocities, low solar wind densities, high

  1. An increase in expression of Pyruvate Pi Dikinase and its high activation energy correspond to cold-tolerant C4 photosynthesis of Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus x giganteus is exceptional among C4 plants in its ability to produce leaves and photosynthesize at low temperature. While the most cold-adapted Zea mays lines show loss of photosynthetic capacity when transferred to 14 deg C, M. x giganteus shows no loss and can continue photosynthesis do...

  2. An increase in expression of Pyruvate Pi Dikinase and its high activation energy correspond to cold-tolerant C4 photosynthesis of Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus x giganteus is exceptional among C4 plants in its ability to produce leaves and photosynthesize at low temperature. While the most cold-adapted Zea mays lines show loss of photosynthetic capacity when transferred to 14 oC, M. x giganteus shows no loss and can continue photosynthesis down ...

  3. The Latitudinal Extent of Chorus as Observed by the Polar Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The statistical distribution of chorus wave power in the off-equatorial region is evaluated using data from the Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI) Sweep Frequency Receiver (SFR) onboard the Polar spacecraft. Maps of average wave power in the meridional plane divided into four local time sectors are presented. The geomagnetic dependence of wave power is examined, where substorm activity and enhanced solar wind speed are found to result in distinctly different wave distributions. These results are consistent with enhancement of dayside chorus during elevated solar wind conditions, while substorm activity produces enhancement on both the morning and day-sides. The maximum latitudinal extent of chorus as function of latitude and L* is estimated within the orbital constraints of the spacecraft. Based on this, the corresponding maximum resonant energy for first-order relativistic cyclotron resonance is calculated using a realistic magnetic field model. This results in the apparently most favorable region for interaction of chorus with MeV electrons appears to be ~4-10 MLT for L*<7, noting that Polar observations here are limited to L*<5. This is the result of the high latitudinal extent of chorus waves combined with low plasma density and a more dipolar field geometry in the late morning sector. This result is consistent with the current picture for MeV microburst precipitation.

  4. Rhythm Generation and Rhythm Perception in Insects: The Evolution of Synchronous Choruses

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Römer, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Insect sounds dominate the acoustic environment in many natural habitats such as rainforests or meadows on a warm summer day. Among acoustic insects, usually males are the calling sex; they generate signals that transmit information about the species-identity, sex, location, or even sender quality to conspecific receivers. Males of some insect species generate signals at distinct time intervals, and other males adjust their own rhythm relative to that of their conspecific neighbors, which leads to fascinating acoustic group displays. Although signal timing in a chorus can have important consequences for the calling energetics, reproductive success and predation risk of individuals, still little is known about the selective forces that favor the evolution of insect choruses. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the neuronal network responsible for acoustic pattern generation of a signaler, and pattern recognition in receivers. We also describe different proximate mechanisms that facilitate the synchronous generation of signals in a chorus and provide examples of suggested hypotheses to explain the evolution of chorus synchrony in insects. Some hypotheses are related to sexual selection and inter-male cooperation or competition, whereas others refer to the selection pressure exerted by natural predators. In this article, we summarize the results of studies that address chorus synchrony in the tropical katydid Mecopoda elongata, where some males persistently signal as followers although this reduces their mating success. PMID:27303257

  5. Radiation belt electron acceleration by chorus waves during the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Green, J. C.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2014-06-01

    Local acceleration driven by whistler-mode chorus waves is fundamentally important for accelerating seed electron populations to highly relativistic energies in the outer radiation belt. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate chorus-driven electron acceleration during the 17 March 2013 storm, when the Van Allen Probes observed very rapid electron acceleration up to several MeV within ~12 hours. A clear radial peak in electron phase space density (PSD) observed near L* ~4 indicates that an internal local acceleration process was operating. We construct the global distribution of chorus wave intensity from the low-altitude electron measurements made by multiple Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) satellites over a broad region, which is ultimately used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics driven by chorus waves. Our simulation results show remarkable agreement in magnitude, timing, energy dependence, and pitch angle distribution with the observed electron PSD near its peak location. However, radial diffusion and other loss processes may be required to explain the differences between the observation and simulation at other locations away from the PSD peak. Our simulation results, together with previous studies, suggest that local acceleration by chorus waves is a robust and ubiquitous process and plays a critical role in accelerating injected seed electrons with convective energies (~100 keV) to highly relativistic energies (several MeV).

  6. On the origin of falling-tone chorus elements in Earth's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Le Contel, O.; Cully, C. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Rolland, G.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of extremely/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) chorus waves in Earth's inner magnetosphere has received increased attention recently because of their significance for radiation belt dynamics. Though past theoretical and numerical models have demonstrated how rising-tone chorus elements are produced, falling-tone chorus element generation has yet to be explained. Our new model proposes that weak-amplitude falling-tone chorus elements can be generated by magnetospheric reflection of rising-tone elements. Using ray tracing in a realistic plasma model of the inner magnetosphere, we demonstrate that rising-tone elements originating at the magnetic equator propagate to higher latitudes. Upon reflection there, they propagate to lower L-shells and turn into oblique falling tones of reduced power, frequency, and bandwidth relative to their progenitor rising tones. Our results are in good agreement with comprehensive statistical studies of such waves, notably using magnetic field measurements from THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) spacecraft. Thus, we conclude that the proposed mechanism can be responsible for the generation of weak-amplitude falling-tone chorus emissions.

  7. Global model of low-frequency chorus (fLHR

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Nigel P; Horne, Richard B; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M; Sicard-Piet, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Whistler mode chorus is an important magnetospheric emission, playing a dual role in the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Chorus is typically generated in the equatorial region in the frequency range 0.1–0.8 fce, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency. However, as the waves propagate to higher latitudes, significant wave power can occur at frequencies below 0.1fce. Since this wave power is largely omitted in current radiation belt models, we construct a global model of low-frequency chorus, fLHRchorus is strongest, with an average intensity of 200 pT2, in the prenoon sector during active conditions at midlatitudes (20°<|λm|<50°) from 4chorus wave power will contribute to the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons and should be taken into account in radiation belt models. Key Points Strong chorus waves can extend below 0.1 times local electron gyrofrequency Low frequency chorus strongest at mid-latitudes in pre-noon sector for L*=4 to 8 Low frequency chorus should be included in radiation belt models PMID:25821274

  8. Different types of whistler mode chorus in the equatorial source region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolík, Ondrej; Graham, Daniel B.; Fu, Huishan; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.; Le Contel, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms-D spacecraft crossed an active equatorial source region of whistler mode chorus rising tones on 23 October 2008. Rising tones are analyzed in terms of spectral and polarization characteristics, with special emphasis on wave normal angles. The latter exhibit large variations from quasi-parallel to oblique, even within single bursts, but seem to follow a definite pattern, which enables an unambiguous classification into five different groups. Furthermore, we discuss the frequently observed splitting of chorus bursts into a lower and an upper band around one half of the local electron cyclotron frequency. At chorus frequencies close to the gap, we find significantly lowered wave planarities and a tendency of wave normal angles to approach the Gendrin angle.

  9. Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yihua; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-08-01

    We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst≈-45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst≈-18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8-6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1-0.5fce and a peak spectral density ˜10-4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (˜10-300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations to show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation approximately between 0.3fce and 0.4fce, at latitude <7°. Moreover, chorus waves launched with initial normal angles either θ<90° or >90° propagate along the field either northward or southward and then bounce back either away from Earth for a lower frequency or toward Earth for higher frequencies. The current results indicate that nightside chorus waves can be excited even during weak geomagnetic activities in cases of continuous injection associated with negative Bz. Moreover, we examine a dayside event during a small storm C on 8 May 2014 (Dst≈-45) and find that the observed anisotropic energetic electron distributions potentially contribute to the generation of dayside chorus waves, but this requires more thorough studies in the future.

  10. Field-aligned chorus wave spectral power in Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Kronberg, E. A.; Haaland, S. E.; Daly, P. W.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Boscher, D.; Bourdarie, S.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Rolland, G.

    2015-05-01

    Chorus-type whistler waves are one of the most intense electromagnetic waves generated naturally in the magnetosphere. These waves have a substantial impact on the radiation belt dynamics as they are thought to contribute to electron acceleration and losses into the ionosphere through resonant wave-particle interaction. Our study is devoted to the determination of chorus wave power distribution on frequency in a wide range of magnetic latitudes, from 0 to 40°. We use 10 years of magnetic and electric field wave power measured by STAFF-SA onboard Cluster spacecraft to model the initial (equatorial) chorus wave spectral power, as well as PEACE and RAPID measurements to model the properties of energetic electrons (~ 0.1-100 keV) in the outer radiation belt. The dependence of this distribution upon latitude obtained from Cluster STAFF-SA is then consistently reproduced along a certain L-shell range (4 ≤ L ≤ 6.5), employing WHAMP-based ray tracing simulations in hot plasma within a realistic inner magnetospheric model. We show here that, as latitude increases, the chorus peak frequency is globally shifted towards lower frequencies. Making use of our simulations, the peak frequency variations can be explained mostly in terms of wave damping and amplification, but also cross-L propagation. These results are in good agreement with previous studies of chorus wave spectral extent using data from different spacecraft (Cluster, POLAR and THEMIS). The chorus peak frequency variations are then employed to calculate the pitch angle and energy diffusion rates, resulting in more effective pitch angle electron scattering (electron lifetime is halved) but less effective acceleration. These peak frequency parameters can thus be used to improve the accuracy of diffusion coefficient calculations.

  11. Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Yihua; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst ≈ –45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst ≈ –18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8 – 6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1–0.5fce and a peak spectral density ~10–4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (~10–300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations tomore » show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation approximately between 0.3fce and 0.4fce, at latitude <7°. Moreover, chorus waves launched with initial normal angles either θ < 90° or > 90° propagate along the field either northward or southward and then bounce back either away from Earth for a lower frequency or toward Earth for higher frequencies. The current results indicate that nightside chorus waves can be excited even during weak geomagnetic activities in cases of continuous injection associated with negative Bz. Furthermore, we examine a dayside event during a small storm C on 8 May 2014 (Dst ≈ –45) and find that the observed anisotropic energetic electron distributions potentially contribute to the generation of dayside chorus waves, but this requires more thorough studies in the future.« less

  12. Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yihua; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-08-20

    We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst ≈ –45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst ≈ –18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8 – 6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1–0.5fce and a peak spectral density ~10–4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (~10–300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations to show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation approximately between 0.3fce and 0.4fce, at latitude <7°. Moreover, chorus waves launched with initial normal angles either θ < 90° or > 90° propagate along the field either northward or southward and then bounce back either away from Earth for a lower frequency or toward Earth for higher frequencies. The current results indicate that nightside chorus waves can be excited even during weak geomagnetic activities in cases of continuous injection associated with negative Bz. Furthermore, we examine a dayside event during a small storm C on 8 May 2014 (Dst ≈ –45) and find that the observed anisotropic energetic electron distributions potentially contribute to the generation of dayside chorus waves, but this requires more thorough studies in the future.

  13. GENERAL: A Possible Population-Driven Phase Transition in Cicada Chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Si-Yuan; Jin, Yu-Liang; Zhao, Xiao-Xue; Huang, Ji-Ping

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the collective synchronization of cicada chirping. Using both experimental and phenomenological numerical techniques, here we show that the onset of a periodic two-state acoustic synchronous behavior in cicada chorus depends on a critical size of population Nc = 21, above which a typical chorus state appears periodically with a 30 second-silence state in between, and further clarify its possibility concerning a new class of phase transition, which is unusually driven by population. This work has relevance to acoustic synchronization and to general physics of phase transition.

  14. Preliminary Assessment of Tecplot Chorus for Analyzing Ensemble of CTH Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agelastos, Anthony Michael; Stevenson, Joel O.; Attaway, Stephen W.; Peterson, David

    2015-04-01

    The exploration of large parameter spaces in search of problem solution and uncertainty quantifcation produces very large ensembles of data. Processing ensemble data will continue to require more resources as simulation complexity and HPC platform throughput increase. More tools are needed to help provide rapid insight into these data sets to decrease manual processing time by the analyst and to increase knowledge the data can provide. One such tool is Tecplot Chorus, whose strengths are visualizing ensemble metadata and linked images. This report contains the analysis and conclusions from evaluating Tecplot Chorus with an example problem that is relevant to Sandia National Laboratories.

  15. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  16. Roosting behaviour and habitat selection of Pteropus giganteus reveals potential links to Nipah virus epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Micah B; Epstein, Jonathan H; Gurley, Emily S; Islam, Mohammad S; Luby, Stephen P; Daszak, Peter; Patz, Jonathan A

    2014-04-01

    1. Flying foxes Pteropus spp. play a key role in forest regeneration as seed dispersers and are also the reservoir of many viruses, including Nipah virus in Bangladesh. Little is known about their habitat requirements, particularly in South Asia. Identifying Pteropus habitat preferences could assist in understanding the risk of zoonotic disease transmission broadly, and in Bangladesh, could help explain the spatial distribution of human Nipah virus cases. 2. We analysed characteristics of Pteropus giganteus roosts and constructed an ecological niche model to identify suitable habitat in Bangladesh. We also assessed the distribution of suitable habitat in relation to the location of human Nipah virus cases. 3. Compared to non-roost trees, P. giganteus roost trees are taller with larger diameters, and are more frequently canopy trees. Colony size was larger in densely forested regions and smaller in flood-affected areas. Roosts were located in areas with lower annual precipitation and higher human population density than non-roost sites. 4. We predicted that 2-17% of Bangladesh's land area is suitable roosting habitat. Nipah virus outbreak villages were 2.6 times more likely to be located in areas predicted as highly suitable habitat for P. giganteus compared to non-outbreak villages. 5. Synthesis and applications. Habitat suitability modelling may help identify previously undocumented Nipah outbreak locations and improve our understanding of Nipah virus ecology by highlighting regions where there is suitable bat habitat but no reported human Nipah virus. Conservation and public health education is a key component of P. giganteus management in Bangladesh due to the general misunderstanding and fear of bats that are a reservoir of Nipah virus. Affiliation between Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and people is common throughout their range, and in order to conserve these keystone bat species and prevent emergence of zoonotic viruses, it is imperative that we

  17. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC CORRELATES OF FASCIOLIASIS IN TWO EASTERN GREY KANGAROOS (MACROPUS GIGANTEUS).

    PubMed

    Portas, Timothy J; Taylor, David

    2015-12-01

    Infection with the introduced trematode Fasciola hepatica was associated with anemia, mild to moderate azotemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated liver enzymes and creatine kinase values in two free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). Both kangaroos were euthanized because of the severity of clinical signs associated with infection. Histopathologic changes included severe cholangiohepatitis, biliary hyperplasia, and fibrosis. Hepatic, splenic, and intestinal amyloidosis was present in one kangaroo and hepatic abscessation in the other; neither histologic change has been reported in macropodids with fascioliasis previously. PMID:26667560

  18. Neurologic amebiasis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in an Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Crossland, Nicholas A; Ali, Ibne; Higbie, Christine; Jackson, Jonathan; Pirie, Gordon; Bauer, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    A 4-5-month-old intact male Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus) was presented to the Baton Rouge Zoo's veterinary hospital with an acute onset of obtundation that was diagnosed with amebic encephalitis. Histologic examination revealed numerous amebic trophozoites within necrotic foci, affecting the occipital cerebrum and surrounding the mesencephalic aqueduct. The etiologic agent, Balamuthia mandrillaris, was determined by multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and indirect fluorescent antibody test. The current report documented a case of amebic encephalitis within the order Chiroptera. PMID:26762405

  19. Roosting behaviour and habitat selection of Pteropus giganteus reveals potential links to Nipah virus epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Micah B.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Gurley, Emily S.; Islam, Mohammad S.; Luby, Stephen P.; Daszak, Peter; Patz, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary 1. Flying foxes Pteropus spp. play a key role in forest regeneration as seed dispersers and are also the reservoir of many viruses, including Nipah virus in Bangladesh. Little is known about their habitat requirements, particularly in South Asia. Identifying Pteropus habitat preferences could assist in understanding the risk of zoonotic disease transmission broadly, and in Bangladesh, could help explain the spatial distribution of human Nipah virus cases. 2. We analysed characteristics of Pteropus giganteus roosts and constructed an ecological niche model to identify suitable habitat in Bangladesh. We also assessed the distribution of suitable habitat in relation to the location of human Nipah virus cases. 3. Compared to non-roost trees, P. giganteus roost trees are taller with larger diameters, and are more frequently canopy trees. Colony size was larger in densely forested regions and smaller in flood-affected areas. Roosts were located in areas with lower annual precipitation and higher human population density than non-roost sites. 4. We predicted that 2–17% of Bangladesh's land area is suitable roosting habitat. Nipah virus outbreak villages were 2.6 times more likely to be located in areas predicted as highly suitable habitat for P. giganteus compared to non-outbreak villages. 5. Synthesis and applications. Habitat suitability modelling may help identify previously undocumented Nipah outbreak locations and improve our understanding of Nipah virus ecology by highlighting regions where there is suitable bat habitat but no reported human Nipah virus. Conservation and public health education is a key component of P. giganteus management in Bangladesh due to the general misunderstanding and fear of bats that are a reservoir of Nipah virus. Affiliation between Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and people is common throughout their range, and in order to conserve these keystone bat species and prevent emergence of zoonotic viruses, it is imperative that

  20. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  1. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, D P; Chen, Y; Kletzing, C A; Denton, M H; Kurth, W S

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10−3 nT2, using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons. PMID:26167444

  2. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  3. Intense low-frequency chorus waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine structures and potential effect on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhonglei; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    Frequency distribution is a vital factor in determining the contribution of whistler mode chorus to radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus is usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8fce_eq (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce_eq). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1fce_eq observed by Van Allen Probe A on 27 August 2014. This emission propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field and exhibited hiss-like signatures most of the time. The low-frequency chorus can produce the rapid loss of low-energy (˜0.1 MeV) electrons, different from the normal chorus. For high-energy (≥0.5 MeV) electrons, the low-frequency chorus can yield comparable momentum diffusion to that of the normal chorus but much stronger (up to 2 orders of magnitude) pitch angle diffusion near the loss cone.

  4. Crowd Control: Classroom Management and Effective Teaching for Chorus, Band, and Orchestra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugland, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a nuts-and-bolts manual for teachers of middle and high school performance-based classes such as band, orchestra, and chorus. This practical "how-to" guide shows teachers--pre-serviced or experienced--efficient ways to manage large performance-based classrooms. With wit and sage tried-and-true advice, Haugland provides a complete…

  5. Student Voice Use and Vocal Health during an All-State Chorus Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, James F.; Manternach, Jeremy N.; Price, Kathy K.

    2011-01-01

    This field-based case study documented students' (N = 256) voice use and voice health perceptions during a 3-day all-state high school chorus event through daily surveys, phonation duration data, analysis of rehearsal voice use behaviors, and field notes. Among the primary results are the following: (a) First and final day survey comparisons…

  6. Restrictions on the Quasi-Linear Description of Electron-Chorus Interaction in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Sibeck, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of electrons with coherent chorus waves in the random phase approximation can be described as quasi-linear diffusion for waves with amplitudes below some limit. The limit is calculated for relativistic and non-relativistic electrons. For stronger waves, the friction force should be taken into account.

  7. Chorus wave-normal statistics in the Earth's radiation belts from ray tracing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Rolland, G.

    2012-08-01

    Discrete ELF/VLF (Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency) chorus emissions are one of the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in radiation belts and in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere. These waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. The objective of our study is to reconstruct the realistic distribution of chorus wave-normals in radiation belts for all magnetic latitudes. To achieve this aim, the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the wave-vector distribution of the chorus signal around the equator region. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using three-dimensional ray tracing technique, which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to solve hot plasma dispersion relation along the wave packet trajectory. The observed chorus wave distributions close to waves source are first fitted to form the initial conditions which then propagate numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. Ray tracing technique allows one to reconstruct wave packet properties (electric and magnetic fields, width of the wave packet in k-space, etc.) along the propagation path. The calculations show the spatial spreading of the signal energy due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma. Comparison of wave-normal distribution obtained from ray tracing technique with Cluster observations up to 40° latitude demonstrates the reliability of our approach and applied numerical schemes.

  8. High Resolution Spectral Analysis of Hiss and Chorus Emissions in Ground Based Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Aliabad, S. P.; Golkowski, M.; Gibby, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. Although whistler mode chorus has been extensively studied since the first reports by Storey in 1953, the source mechanism and properties are still subjects of active research. Moreover, the origin of plasmaspheric hiss, the electromagnetic emission believed to be responsible for the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts, has been debated for over four decades. Although these waves can be observed in situ on spacecraft, ground-based observing stations can provide orders of magnitude higher data volumes and decades long data coverage essential for certain long-term and statistical studies of wave properties. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. Application of the classic Fourier (FFT) technique unfortunately yields a tradeoff between time and frequency resolution. In additional to Fourier spectra, we employ novel methods to make spectrograms with high time and frequency resolutions, independently using minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR). These techniques are applied to ground based data observations of hiss and chorus made in Alaska. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structure less, incoherent emission. We quantify the extent to which plasmaspheric hiss can be a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Likewise, to date, researchers have differentiated between hiss and chorus coherency primarily using qualitative "naked eye" approaches to amplitude spectra. Using a quantitative approach to observed amplitude and we present more rigorous classification criteria for these emissions.

  9. Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Murilo de Melo; Lee, D. K.; Sage, Rowan F.

    2015-01-01

    Miscanthus × giganteus grown in cool temperate regions of North America and Europe can exhibit severe mortality in the year after planting, and poor frost tolerance of leaves. Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass), a productive C4 perennial grass native to North America, has been suggested as an alternative biofuel feedstock for colder regions; however, its cold tolerance relative to M. × giganteus is uncertain. Here, we compare the cold tolerance thresholds for winter-dormant rhizomes and spring/summer leaves of M. × giganteus and three accessions of S. pectinata. All genotypes were planted at a field site in Ontario, Canada. In November and February, the temperatures corresponding to 50% rhizome mortality (LT50) were near −24°C for S. pectinata and −4°C for M. × giganteus. In late April, the LT50 of rhizomes rose to −10°C for S. pectinata but remained near −4°C for M. × giganteus. Twenty percent of the M. × giganteus rhizomes collected in late April were dead while S. pectinata rhizomes showed no signs of winter injury. Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field. For example, S. pectinata leaves remained viable above −9°C while the mortality threshold was near −5°C for M. × giganteus. These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved. By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop. PMID:25873680

  10. Solar Wind Compression Generation of Coincident EMIC and Whistler Mode Chorus and Hiss Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Alexa; Mann, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Electron radiation belt dynamics are controlled by the competition of multiple acceleration and loss mechanisms. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC), chorus, and hiss waves have all been implicated as potential loss mechanisms of radiation belt electrons along with Chorus waves proposed as a mechanism for accelerating the lower energy source population to MeV energies. Understanding the relative importance of these waves as well as where and under what conditions they are generated is vital to predicting radiation belt dynamics. Although the size of the solar wind compression on 9 January 2014 event discussed here was modest, it has given us an opportunity to observe clearly how a magnetospheric compression can lead to the generation of EMIC, chorus, and hiss waves. The ICME generated shock encountered the Earth's magnetosphere on 9 January 2014 at ~20:11 UT, and the Van Allen Probes observe the coincident excitation of EMIC and Chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and hiss weaves inside the plasmasphere. As the shock encountered the magnetosphere, an electric field impulse was observed to generate an increase in temperature anisotropy for both ions and electrons. This increased temperature anisotropy led to increased wave growth on both the ion and electron cyclotron branches. The simultaneous generation of multiple types of waves may lead to significant impacts on the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic compressions observed during the substorms, and the storm sudden commencement and main phases of geomagnetic storms, as well as during quiet time sudden impulse events. For example, the excitation of both EMIC and chorus waves at the same place, and at the same time, may complicate studies seeking a causal connection between specific individual plasma wave bursts and observations of particle precipitation into the atmosphere. During this relatively small event BARREL had three payloads in conjunction with the Van

  11. Evaluation of Mucor indicus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae capability to ferment hydrolysates of rape straw and Miscanthus giganteus as affected by the pretreatment method.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Szymańska, Karolina; Kordala, Natalia; Dąbrowska, Aneta; Bednarski, Włodzimierz; Juszczuk, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Rape straw and Miscanthus giganteus was pretreated chemically with oxalic acid or sodium hydroxide. The pretreated substrates were hydrolyzed with enzymatic preparations of cellulase, xylanase and cellobiase. The highest concentration of reducing sugars was achieved after hydrolysis of M. giganteus pretreated with NaOH (51.53gdm(-3)). In turn, the highest yield of enzymatic hydrolysis determined based on polysaccharides content in the pretreated substrates was obtained in the experiments with M. giganteus and oxalic acid (99.3%). Rape straw and M. giganteus hydrolysates were fermented using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 7, NRRL 978 or filamentous fungus Mucor rouxii (Mucor indicus) DSM 1191. The highest ethanol concentration was determined after fermentation of M. giganteus hydrolysate pretreated with NaOH using S. cerevisiae (1.92% v/v). Considering cellulose content in the pretreated solid, the highest degree of its conversion to ethanol (86.2%) was achieved after fermentation of the hydrolysate of acid-treated M. giganteus using S. cerevisiae. PMID:27107482

  12. New Holocene refugia of giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus Blum.) in Siberia: updated extinction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plicht, J.; Molodin, V. I.; Kuzmin, Y. V.; Vasiliev, S. K.; Postnov, A. V.; Slavinsky, V. S.

    2015-04-01

    We obtained new data on the existence of giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus Blum.) in Siberia during the Holocene. Bones and antler of giant deer from new localities in western (Baraba forest steppe) and eastern (Angara River basin) Siberia are dated by radiocarbon, ranging 7900-10,300 BP (ca 8800-12,200 cal BP). Based on these data, we can extend the 'Siberian' Early Holocene habitat of giant deer at least 2400 km to the east compared to previous works. The final extinction of giant deer turned out to be more complex than it was previously thought, with perhaps relatively large refugium in Western Siberia at 7900-7000 BP (ca 8800-7900 cal BP) which was reduced to the Trans-Urals region at 7000-6800 BP (ca 7900-7600 cal BP).

  13. Fluorosis as a probable cause of chronic lameness in free ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Emily; Beveridge, Ian; Slocombe, Ron; Coulson, Graeme

    2006-12-01

    A population of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) inhabiting heathland and farmland surrounding an aluminum smelter at Portland, Victoria, Australia, exhibited clinical signs of lameness. An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of this lameness. Hematology, necropsy, histopathology, fecal egg count, total worm count, reproductive status, and the population age range were examined and failed to reveal any additional underlying disease state. The specific problem of lameness was addressed with bone histopathology, radiography, quantitative ultrasonography, microradiography, and multielement analysis of bone ash samples. The significant lesions observed were: osteophytosis of the distal tibia and fibula, tarsal bones, metatarsus IV, and proximal coccygeal vertebrae; osteopenia of the femur, tibia, and metatarsus IV; incisor enamel hypoplasia; stained, uneven, and abnormal teeth wear; abnormal bone matrix mineralization and mottling; increased bone density; and elevated bone fluoride levels. Microradiography of affected kangaroos exhibited "black osteons," which are a known manifestation of fluorosis. Collectively, these lesions were consistent with a diagnosis of fluorosis. PMID:17315432

  14. Pleurotus giganteus (Berk.) Karunarathna & K.D. Hyde: Nutritional value and in vitro neurite outgrowth activity in rat pheochromocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs dedicated to alleviate neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s have always been associated with debilitating side effects. Medicinal mushrooms which harness neuropharmacological compounds offer a potential possibility for protection against such diseases. Pleurotus giganteus (formerly known as Panus giganteus) has been consumed by the indigenous people in Peninsular Malaysia for many years. Domestication of this wild mushroom is gaining popularity but to our knowledge, medicinal properties reported for this culinary mushroom are minimal. Methods The fruiting bodies P. giganteus were analysed for its nutritional values. Cytotoxicity of the mushroom’s aqueous and ethanolic extracts towards PC12, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line was assessed by using 3-[4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Neurite outgrowth stimulation assay was carried out with nerve growth factor (NGF) as control. To elucidate signaling mechanisms involved by mushroom extract-induced neurite outgrowth, treatment of specific inhibitor for MEK/ERK and PI3K signalling pathway was carried out. Results The fruiting bodies of P. giganteus were found to have high carbohydrate, dietary fibre, potassium, phenolic compounds and triterpenoids. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in a dose- and time-dependant manner with no detectable cytotoxic effect. At day 3, 25 μg/ml of aqueous extract and 15 μg/ml of ethanolic extract showed the highest percentage of neurite-bearing cells, i.e. 31.7 ± 1.1% and 33.3 ± 0.9%; respectively. Inhibition treatment results suggested that MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt are responsible for neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells stimulated by P. giganteus extract. The high potassium content (1345.7 mg/100 g) may be responsible for promoting neurite extension, too. Conclusions P. giganteus contains bioactive compounds that mimic NGF and are responsible for neurite

  15. Computer simulation of chorus wave generation in the Earth's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yuto; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2007-02-01

    A self-consistent particle simulation with a dipole magnetic field model is carried out, reproducing chorus emissions with rising tones successfully. We assume energetic electrons forming a highly anisotropic velocity distribution in the equatorial region. No initial wave is assumed except for electromagnetic thermal noise induced by the energetic electrons. In the early stage of the simulation, coherent whistler-mode waves are generated from the equator through an instability driven by the temperature anisotropy of the energetic electrons. During the propagation of the whistler-mode waves, we find formation of a narrowband emission with negative frequency gradient (NEWNFG) in the spatial distribution of the frequency spectrum in the simulation system. The trailing edge of NEWNFG is continuously created at increasing frequencies in the region close to the equator. Observed at a fixed point, the NEWNFG shows a frequency variation of a typical chorus emission.

  16. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  17. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  18. Wave normal angles of whistler mode chorus rising and falling tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V.; Santolík, Ondrej; Vaivads, Andris; Cully, Christopher M.; Contel, Olivier Le; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-12-01

    We present a study of wave normal angles (θk) of whistler mode chorus emission as observed by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) during the year 2008. The three inner THEMIS satellites THA, THD, and THE usually orbit Earth close to the dipole magnetic equator (±20°), covering a large range of L shells from the plasmasphere out to the magnetopause. Waveform measurements of electric and magnetic fields enable a detailed polarization analysis of chorus below 4 kHz. When displayed in a frequency-θk histogram, four characteristic regions of occurrence are evident. They are separated by gaps at f/fc,e≈0.5 (f is the chorus frequency, fc,e is the local electron cyclotron frequency) and at θk˜40°. Below θk˜40°, the average value for θk is predominantly field aligned, but slightly increasing with frequency toward half of fc,e (θk up to 20°). Above half of fc,e, the average θk is again decreasing with frequency. Above θk˜40°, wave normal angles are usually close to the resonance cone angle. Furthermore, we present a detailed comparison of electric and magnetic fields of chorus rising and falling tones. Falling tones exhibit peaks in occurrence solely for θk>40° and are propagating close to the resonance cone angle. Nevertheless, when comparing rising tones to falling tones at θk>40°, the ratio of magnetic to electric field shows no significant differences. Thus, we conclude that falling tones are generated under similar conditions as rising tones, with common source regions close to the magnetic equatorial plane.

  19. Chorus wave amplification: A free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Soto-Chavez, A. R.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Ng, C. S.

    2012-01-15

    A new theoretical model for whistler-mode chorus amplification in the Earth's magnetosphere is presented. We derive, based on the free-electron laser mechanism in a high-gain amplifier, a new closed set of self-consistent relativistic equations that couple the Hamiltonian equations for particles with Maxwell's equations. We demonstrate that these equations predict, through a cubic equation, whistler amplification levels in good agreement with those observed in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  20. Effects of chorus, hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves on radiation belt dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions are known to play an important role in the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, and in the heating and loss of ring current ions. The effectiveness of each wave type on radiation belt dynamics depends on the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere and the properties of the waves which vary considerably with magnetic local time, radial distance and latitude. Furthermore the interaction of the waves with the particles is usually nonlinear. These factors present a major challenge to test and verify the theories. Here we discuss the role of several types of waves, including whistler mode chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, in relation to radiation belt and ring current dynamics. We present simulations of the radiation belts using the BAS radiation belt model which includes the effects of chorus, hiss and EMIC waves along with radial diffusion. We show that chorus waves are required to form the peaks in the electron phase space density during storms, and that this occurs inside geostationary orbit. We compare simulations against observations in medium Earth orbit and the new results from Van Allen probes mission that shows conclusive evidence for a local electron acceleration process near L=4.5. We show the relative importance of plasmaspheric hiss and chorus and the location of the plasmapause for radiation belt dynamics near L=4.5 and demonstrate the losses due to EMIC waves that should occur at high energies. Finally we show how improving our basic physical understanding through missions such as Van Allen probes go to improve space weather forecasting in projects such as SPACECAST and have a direct benefit to society.

  1. Failure of androgenesis in Miscanthus × giganteus in vitro culture of cytologically unbalanced microspores.

    PubMed

    Żur, Iwona; Dubas, Ewa; Słomka, Aneta; Dubert, Franciszek; Kuta, Elżbieta; Płażek, Agnieszka

    2013-09-01

    Miscanthus × giganteus is a popular energy crop, which due to its hybrid origin is only vegetatively reproduced. Asexual embryogenesis in anther and microspore culture leading to double haploids production could allow to regain the ability for sexual reproduction and to increase the biodiversity of the species. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to investigate the requirements of androgenesis in Miscanthus. The standard protocols used for monocotyledonous plants were applied with many modifications regarding the developmental stage of the explants at the time of culture initiation, stress treatment applied to panicles and isolated anthers as well as various chemical and physical parameters of in vitro culture conditions. Our results indicated that the induction of androgenesis in M. × giganteus is possible. However, the very low efficiency of the process and the lack of regeneration ability of the androgenic structures presently prevent the use of this technique. PMID:23824237

  2. Digestion of cellulose and xylan by symbiotic bacteria in the intestine of the Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Prem Anand, A Alwin; Sripathi, K

    2004-09-01

    Bats (Order Chiroptera) are a widely distributed group of mammals. Pteropus giganteus belongs to the Suborder Megachiroptera. This bat consumes fruits and leaves as their major food. Cellulose and xylan are the major composition of leaves. As they consume leaves in their diet, their digestive tract must contain cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria which help in the digestion of cellulose and xylan. The cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria were isolated and screened on Berg's agar containing cellulose and xylan. The bacteria isolated were characterized biochemically and found to be Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia liquefaciens and Klebsiella oxytoca. These bacteria help in digestion of cellulose and xylan in the diet of the bat, P. giganteus. Here we show that leaves are also used as a carbohydrate source by these bats. An insectivorous bat, Hipposideros fulvus, was used as a control and does not possess cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. PMID:15471682

  3. Scattering by chorus waves as the dominant cause of diffuse auroral precipitation.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Richard M; Ni, Binbin; Tao, Xin; Horne, Richard B; Meredith, Nigel P

    2010-10-21

    Earth's diffuse aurora occurs over a broad latitude range and is primarily caused by the precipitation of low-energy (0.1-30-keV) electrons originating in the central plasma sheet, which is the source region for hot electrons in the nightside outer magnetosphere. Although generally not visible, the diffuse auroral precipitation provides the main source of energy for the high-latitude nightside upper atmosphere, leading to enhanced ionization and chemical changes. Previous theoretical studies have indicated that two distinct classes of magnetospheric plasma wave, electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves and whistler-mode chorus waves, could be responsible for the electron scattering that leads to diffuse auroral precipitation, but it has hitherto not been possible to determine which is the more important. Here we report an analysis of satellite wave data and Fokker-Planck diffusion calculations which reveals that scattering by chorus is the dominant cause of the most intense diffuse auroral precipitation. This resolves a long-standing controversy. Furthermore, scattering by chorus can remove most electrons as they drift around Earth's magnetosphere, leading to the development of observed pancake distributions, and can account for the global morphology of the diffuse aurora. PMID:20962841

  4. Self-to-other ratios measured in an opera chorus in performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternström, Sten; Cabrera, Densil; Davis, Pamela

    2005-12-01

    Four volunteer members of the chorus of Opera Australia, representing four different voice categories, wore binaural pairs of wireless microphones during a penultimate dress rehearsal on the Opera Theater stage of the Sydney Opera House. From the recordings, data were obtained on sound levels and on the self-to-other ratios (SORs). The sound levels were comparable to those found in loud music in chamber choir performance. The average SOR ranged from +10 to +15 dB. Compared to chamber choirs in other types of room, the SOR values were high. On a separate occasion, the stage support parameters ST1 (early reflections) and ST2 (late reflections) were measured over the whole stage area. ST1 was about -16 dB, which is typical for opera stages, and -20 dB for ST2, which is unusually low. It is concluded that the SOR in the opera chorus depends mostly on choir formation, which is highly variable, and that an opera chorus artist generally can hear his or her own voice very well, but little of the others and of the orchestra. This was confirmed by informal listening to the recordings.

  5. Self-to-other ratios measured in an opera chorus in performance.

    PubMed

    Ternström, Sten; Cabrera, Densil; Davis, Pamela

    2005-12-01

    Four volunteer members of the chorus of Opera Australia, representing four different voice categories, wore binaural pairs of wireless microphones during a penultimate dress rehearsal on the Opera Theater stage of the Sydney Opera House. From the recordings, data were obtained on sound levels and on the self-to-other ratios (SORs). The sound levels were comparable to those found in loud music in chamber choir performance. The average SOR ranged from +10 to +15 dB. Compared to chamber choirs in other types of room, the SOR values were high. On a separate occasion, the stage support parameters ST1 (early reflections) and ST2 (late reflections) were measured over the whole stage area. ST1 was about -16 dB, which is typical for opera stages, and -20 dB for ST2, which is unusually low. It is concluded that the SOR in the opera chorus depends mostly on choir formation, which is highly variable, and that an opera chorus artist generally can hear his or her own voice very well, but little of the others and of the orchestra. This was confirmed by informal listening to the recordings. PMID:16419832

  6. Rapid local acceleration of relativistic radiation-belt electrons by magnetospheric chorus.

    PubMed

    Thorne, R M; Li, W; Ni, B; Ma, Q; Bortnik, J; Chen, L; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Henderson, M G; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Hospodarsky, G B; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Kanekal, S G

    2013-12-19

    Recent analysis of satellite data obtained during the 9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm identified the development of peaks in electron phase space density, which are compelling evidence for local electron acceleration in the heart of the outer radiation belt, but are inconsistent with acceleration by inward radial diffusive transport. However, the precise physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration on 9 October was not identified. Previous modelling has indicated that a magnetospheric electromagnetic emission known as chorus could be a potential candidate for local electron acceleration, but a definitive resolution of the importance of chorus for radiation-belt acceleration was not possible because of limitations in the energy range and resolution of previous electron observations and the lack of a dynamic global wave model. Here we report high-resolution electron observations obtained during the 9 October storm and demonstrate, using a two-dimensional simulation performed with a recently developed time-varying data-driven model, that chorus scattering explains the temporal evolution of both the energy and angular distribution of the observed relativistic electron flux increase. Our detailed modelling demonstrates the remarkable efficiency of wave acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt, and the results presented have potential application to Jupiter, Saturn and other magnetized astrophysical objects. PMID:24352287

  7. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon giganteus essential oils alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Bassolé, I H N; Lamien-Meda, A; Bayala, B; Obame, L C; Ilboudo, A J; Franz, C; Novak, J; Nebié, R C; Dicko, M H

    2011-09-15

    As part of ongoing research on the chemical composition and the antimicrobial properties of Burkinabe plants essential oils alone and in combination, essential oils (EOs) from leaves of Cymbopogon citratus and Cymbopogon giganteus from Burkina Faso were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Five constituents, which accounted for 96.3% of the oil, were identified in the EO of C. citratus. Geranial (48.1%), neral (34.6%) and myrcene (11.0%) were the major constituents. For C. giganteus a total of eight compounds were identified which represented 86.0% of the oils extracted. The dominant compounds were limonene (42%) and a set of monoterpene alcohols: trans-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol (14.2%), cis-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol (12%), trans-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (5.6%) and cis-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (5.2%). The EOs were tested against nine bacteria by using disc diffusion and microdilution methods. C. giganteus EO showed antimicrobial effects against all microorganisms tested whereas C. citratus EO failed to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of combinations of the two EOs was quantified by the checkerboard method. Combinations of the two EOs exerted synergistic, additive and indifferent antimicrobial effects. Results of the present investigation provide evidence that the combinations of plant EOs could be assessed for synergistic activity in order to reduce their minimum effective dose. PMID:21665450

  8. The Role of Landscape Composition and Configuration on Pteropus giganteus Roosting Ecology and Nipah Virus Spillover Risk in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Micah B.; Gurley, Emily S.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Islam, Mohammad S.; Patz, Jonathan A.; Daszak, Peter; Luby, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Nipah virus has caused recurring outbreaks in central and northwest Bangladesh (the “Nipah Belt”). Little is known about roosting behavior of the fruit bat reservoir, Pteropus giganteus, or factors driving spillover. We compared human population density and ecological characteristics of case villages and control villages (no reported outbreaks) to understand their role in P. giganteus roosting ecology and Nipah virus spillover risk. Nipah Belt villages have a higher human population density (P < 0.0001), and forests that are more fragmented than elsewhere in Bangladesh (0.50 versus 0.32 patches/km2, P < 0.0001). The number of roosts in a village correlates with forest fragmentation (r = 0.22, P = 0.03). Villages with a roost containing Polyalthia longifolia or Bombax ceiba trees were more likely case villages (odds ratio [OR] = 10.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3–90.6). This study suggests that, in addition to human population density, composition and structure of the landscape shared by P. giganteus and humans may influence the geographic distribution of Nipah virus spillovers. PMID:24323516

  9. The role of landscape composition and configuration on Pteropus giganteus roosting ecology and Nipah virus spillover risk in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Micah B; Gurley, Emily S; Epstein, Jonathan H; Islam, Mohammad S; Patz, Jonathan A; Daszak, Peter; Luby, Stephen P

    2014-02-01

    Nipah virus has caused recurring outbreaks in central and northwest Bangladesh (the "Nipah Belt"). Little is known about roosting behavior of the fruit bat reservoir, Pteropus giganteus, or factors driving spillover. We compared human population density and ecological characteristics of case villages and control villages (no reported outbreaks) to understand their role in P. giganteus roosting ecology and Nipah virus spillover risk. Nipah Belt villages have a higher human population density (P < 0.0001), and forests that are more fragmented than elsewhere in Bangladesh (0.50 versus 0.32 patches/km(2), P < 0.0001). The number of roosts in a village correlates with forest fragmentation (r = 0.22, P = 0.03). Villages with a roost containing Polyalthia longifolia or Bombax ceiba trees were more likely case villages (odds ratio [OR] = 10.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-90.6). This study suggests that, in addition to human population density, composition and structure of the landscape shared by P. giganteus and humans may influence the geographic distribution of Nipah virus spillovers. PMID:24323516

  10. Global model of low-frequency chorus (fLHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Sicard-Piet, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Whistler mode chorus is an important magnetospheric emission, playing a dual role in the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Chorus is typically generated in the equatorial region in the frequency range 0.1-0.8 fce, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency. However, as the waves propagate to higher latitudes, significant wave power can occur at frequencies below 0.1fce. Since this wave power is largely omitted in current radiation belt models, we construct a global model of low-frequency chorus, fLHRchorus is strongest, with an average intensity of 200 pT2, in the prenoon sector during active conditions at midlatitudes (20°<|λm|<50°) from 4chorus wave power will contribute to the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons and should be taken into account in radiation belt models.

  11. Ray tracing of whistler-mode chorus elements: implications for generation mechanisms of rising and falling tone emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, K.; Matsumuro, T.; Omura, Y.; Nunn, D.

    2013-04-01

    Using a well-established magnetospheric very-low-frequency (VLF) ray tracing method, in this work we trace the propagation of individual rising- and falling-frequency elements of VLF chorus from their generation point in the equatorial region of the magnetosphere through to at least one reflection at the lower-hybrid resonance point. Unlike recent work by Bortnik and co-workers, whose emphasis was on demonstrating that magnetospheric hiss has its origins in chorus, we here track the motion in the equatorial plane of the whole chorus element, paying particular regard to movement across field lines, rotation, and compression or expansion of the wave pulse. With a generation point for rising chorus at the equator, it was found the element wave pulse remained largely field aligned in the generation region. However, for a falling tone generation point at 4000 km upstream from the equator, by the time the pulse crosses the equator the wavefield had substantial obliquity, displacement, and compression, which has substantial implications for the theory of falling chorus generation.

  12. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M; Friedel, Reinhard H; Funsten, Herbert O; Gary, S Peter; Hospodarsky, George B; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Skoug, Ruth M; Winske, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr<Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr≃Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ∼Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties. PMID:26167433

  13. A direct link between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora on timescales from milliseconds to minutes: A case study at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Mitsunori; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sawai, Kaoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Ieda, Akimasa; Ebihara, Yusuke; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; Katoh, Yuto; Otsuka, Yuichi; Sunagawa, Naoki; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-11-01

    A correlation was observed between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora (PA) from observations at Athabasca (L≈4.3) in Canada at 9:00-9:20 UT on 7 February 2013, using an electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera and a VLF loop antenna with sampling rates of 110 Hz and 100 kHz, respectively. Pulsating aurora having a quasiperiodic variation in luminosity and a few hertz modulation was observed together with chorus emissions consisting of a group of successive rising-tone elements. The repetition period and modulation frequency of the PA are in good agreement with those of the modulated chorus. After 9:11 UT, the temporal features of the aurora became aperiodic PA of indistinct modulation. Simultaneously, the rising-tone chorus turned into chorus emissions consisting of numerous rising-tone elements. The equatorial geomagnetic field inhomogeneity calculated using the Tsyganenko 2002 model shows a decreasing trend during the period. This result is consistent with nonlinear wave growth theory having a small geomagnetic field inhomogeneity, which contributes to a decrease in the threshold amplitude to trigger discrete chorus elements. These observations show a close connection between chorus emissions and PA on timescales from milliseconds for generation of discrete chorus elements on the microphysics of wave-particle interaction to minutes for the variations of the geomagnetic field inhomogeneity related with the substorm activity.

  14. A direct link between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora on timescales from milliseconds to minutes: A case study at subauroral latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Mitsunori; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sawai, Kaoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Ieda, Akimasa; Ebihara, Yusuke; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; Katoh, Yuto; Otsuka, Yuichi; Sunagawa, Naoki; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-11-27

    A correlation was observed between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora (PA) from observations at Athabasca (L ≈ 4.3) in Canada at 9:00–9:20 UT on 7 February 2013, using an electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera and a VLF loop antenna with sampling rates of 110 Hz and 100 kHz, respectively. Pulsating aurora having a quasiperiodic variation in luminosity and a few hertz modulation was observed together with chorus emissions consisting of a group of successive rising-tone elements. The repetition period and modulation frequency of the PA are in good agreement with those of the modulated chorus. After 9:11 UT, the temporal features of the aurora became aperiodic PA of indistinct modulation. Simultaneously, the rising-tone chorus turned into chorus emissions consisting of numerous rising-tone elements. The equatorial geomagnetic field inhomogeneity calculated using the Tsyganenko 2002 model shows a decreasing trend during the period. This result is consistent with nonlinear wave growth theory having a small geomagnetic field inhomogeneity, which contributes to a decrease in the threshold amplitude to trigger discrete chorus elements. As a result, these observations show a close connection between chorus emissions and PA on timescales from milliseconds for generation of discrete chorus elements on the microphysics of wave-particle interaction to minutes for the variations of the geomagnetic field inhomogeneity related with the substorm activity.

  15. A direct link between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora on timescales from milliseconds to minutes: A case study at subauroral latitudes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ozaki, Mitsunori; Yagitani, Satoshi; Sawai, Kaoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Ieda, Akimasa; Ebihara, Yusuke; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; et al

    2015-11-27

    A correlation was observed between chorus emissions and pulsating aurora (PA) from observations at Athabasca (L ≈ 4.3) in Canada at 9:00–9:20 UT on 7 February 2013, using an electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera and a VLF loop antenna with sampling rates of 110 Hz and 100 kHz, respectively. Pulsating aurora having a quasiperiodic variation in luminosity and a few hertz modulation was observed together with chorus emissions consisting of a group of successive rising-tone elements. The repetition period and modulation frequency of the PA are in good agreement with those of the modulated chorus. After 9:11 UT, the temporalmore » features of the aurora became aperiodic PA of indistinct modulation. Simultaneously, the rising-tone chorus turned into chorus emissions consisting of numerous rising-tone elements. The equatorial geomagnetic field inhomogeneity calculated using the Tsyganenko 2002 model shows a decreasing trend during the period. This result is consistent with nonlinear wave growth theory having a small geomagnetic field inhomogeneity, which contributes to a decrease in the threshold amplitude to trigger discrete chorus elements. As a result, these observations show a close connection between chorus emissions and PA on timescales from milliseconds for generation of discrete chorus elements on the microphysics of wave-particle interaction to minutes for the variations of the geomagnetic field inhomogeneity related with the substorm activity.« less

  16. First evidence for chorus at a large geocentric distance as a source of plasmaspheric hiss: Coordinated THEMIS and Van Allen Probes observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Chen, L.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-01-01

    ray tracing suggests that plasmaspheric hiss can originate from chorus observed outside of the plasmapause. Although a few individual events have been reported to support this mechanism, the number of reported conjugate events is still very limited. Using coordinated observations between Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes, we report on an interesting event, where chorus was observed at a large L shell (~9.8), different from previously reported events at L < 6, but still exhibited a remarkable correlation with hiss observed in the outer plasmasphere (L ~ 5.5). Ray tracing indicates that a subset of chorus can propagate into the observed location of hiss on a timescale of ~5-6 s, in excellent agreement with the observed time lag between chorus and hiss. This provides quantitative support that chorus from large L shells, where it was previously considered unable to propagate into the plasmasphere, can in fact be the source of hiss.

  17. Dominance, body size and internal relatedness influence male reproductive success in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily J; Eldridge, Mark D B; Cooper, Desmond W; Herbert, Catherine A

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the determinants of reproductive success is essential for understanding the adaptive significance of particular traits. The present study examined whether particular behavioural, morphological, physiological or genetic traits were correlated with male dominance and reproductive success using three semi-free-ranging captive populations (n = 98) of the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The morphological traits measured included bodyweight, head, forearm, tail, pes and leg length, forearm and bicep circumference, and testis size. Blood samples were collected to determine serum testosterone concentrations. All individuals were typed for 10 microsatellite loci and paternity determined for each pouch young. To determine the influence of relatedness and genetic diversity on male reproductive success, internal relatedness, standardised heterozygosity and mean d(2) were calculated. Dominant males sired a significantly higher proportion of offspring than smaller, lower-ranked males and had higher testosterone concentrations. Males that sired offspring were significantly heavier and had larger body size. Sires were significantly more heterozygous and genetically dissimilar to breeding females than non-sires. Despite the wealth of knowledge on the social organisation of kangaroos, this is the first study to assign parentage and male reproductive success using molecular evidence. PMID:20188027

  18. Anthelmintic Treatment Does Not Change Foraging Strategies of Female Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Jemma K.; Martin, Jennifer K.; Coulson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Large mammalian herbivores are commonly infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Heavily parasitised hosts are likely to have increased nutritional requirements and would be predicted to increase their food intake to compensate for costs of being parasitised, but experimental tests of the impacts of these parasites on the foraging efficiency of hosts are lacking, particularly in free-ranging wildlife. We conducted a field experiment on a population of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) to test this prediction, removing nematodes from one group of adult females using an anthelmintic treatment. We then carried out observations before and following treatment to assess the influence of parasites on foraging behaviour. Contrary to our predictions, the manipulation of parasite burdens did not result in changes in any of the key foraging variables we measured. Our results suggest that despite carrying large burdens of gastrointestinal parasites, the foraging strategy of female kangaroos is likely be driven by factors unrelated to parasitism, and that kangaroos in high nutritional environments may be able acquire sufficient nutrients to offset the costs of parasitism. We conclude that the drivers of forage intake likely differ between domesticated and free-ranging herbivores, and that free-ranging hosts are likely more resilient to parasitism. PMID:26784582

  19. Feruloyl esterase from the edible mushroom Panus giganteus: a potential dietary supplement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Ma, Zengqiang; Du, Fang; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-08-01

    A novel 61 kDa feruloyl esterase (FAE) was purified to homogeneity from freshly collected fruiting bodies of Panus giganteus. The isolation procedure involved chromatography on the ion exchangers DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose, followed by size exclusion chromatography on Superdex 75, which produced a purified enzyme with a high specific activity (170.0 U/mg) which was 130-fold higher than that of crude extract. The purified FAE exhibited activity toward synthetic methyl esters and short-chain fatty acid nitrophenyl esters. The Km and Vmax for this enzyme on methyl ferulate were 0.36 mM and 18.97 U/mg proteins, respectively. FAE activity was attained at a maximum at pH 4 and 40 °C, respectively. The FAE activity was inhibited by metal ions to various degrees. The purified FAE could bring about the release of ferulic acid from wheat bran and corn bran under the action of the single purified FAE, and the amount released from wheat bran rose to 51.9% (of the total amount) by the synergistic action of xylanase. PMID:25065258

  20. Cunnilingus apparently increases duration of copulation in the Indian flying fox, Pteropus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Maruthupandian, Jayabalan; Marimuthu, Ganapathy

    2013-01-01

    We observed a total of 57 incidences of copulation in a colony of the Indian flying fox, Pteropus giganteus, over 13 months under natural conditions. The colony consisted of about 420 individuals, roosting in a Ficus religiosa tree. Copulations occurred between 07.00 h and 09.30 h from July to January, with more occurring in October and November. Initially males groomed their penis before approaching a nearby female. Females typically moved away and males followed. When the female stopped moving, the male started licking her vagina (cunnilingus). Typically each bout of cunnilingus lasted for about 50 s. In 57 out of 69 observations, the male mounted the female and copulated. The duration of copulation varied from 10 to 20 sec. After completion of copulation, the male continued cunnilingus for 94 to 188 sec. The duration of pre-copulatory cunnilingus and copulation was positively correlated whereas, the duration of pre- and post-copulatory cunnilingus was negatively correlated. Apart from humans, oral sex as foreplay prior to copulation is uncommon in mammals. Another pteropodid bat, Cynopterus sphinx exhibits fellatio with females licking the penis of males during copulation. It appears that bats, especially pteropodids perform oral sex, either cunnilingus or fellatio, possibly for achieving longer copulation. PMID:23544092

  1. Gasification of torrefied Miscanthus × giganteus in an air-blown bubbling fluidized bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Xue, G; Kwapinska, M; Horvat, A; Kwapinski, W; Rabou, L P L M; Dooley, S; Czajka, K M; Leahy, J J

    2014-05-01

    Torrefaction is suggested to be an effective method to improve the fuel properties of biomass and gasification of torrefied biomass should provide a higher quality product gas than that from unprocessed biomass. In this study, both raw and torrefied Miscanthus × giganteus (M×G) were gasified in an air-blown bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) gasifier using olivine as the bed material. The effects of equivalence ratio (ER) (0.18-0.32) and bed temperature (660-850°C) on the gasification performance were investigated. The results obtained suggest the optimum gasification conditions for the torrefied M × G are ER 0.21 and 800°C. The product gas from these process conditions had a higher heating value (HHV) of 6.70 MJ/m(3), gas yield 2m(3)/kg biomass (H2 8.6%, CO 16.4% and CH4 4.4%) and cold gas efficiency 62.7%. The comparison between raw and torrefied M × G indicates that the torrefied M × G is more suitable BFB gasification. PMID:24681300

  2. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Brett A; Goldizen, Anne W; Thomson, Vicki A; Seddon, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales) experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation. PMID:26024370

  3. Cutaneous and diphtheritic avian poxvirus infection in a nestling Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Green, David Earl; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Thiel, T.; Geisz, H.N.; Fraser, William R.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) is declining over much of its range and currently is listed as vulnerable to extinction by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Island-specific breeding colonies near Palmer Station, Antarctica, have been monitored for over 30 years, and because this population continues to increase, it is critically important to conservation. In austral summer 2004, six diseased giant petrel chicks were observed in four of these colonies. Diseased chicks were 6a??9 weeks old and had multiple proliferative nodules on their bills and skin. One severely affected chick was found dead on the nest and was salvaged for necropsy. Histopathological examination of nodules from the dead chick revealed epithelial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with numerous eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions (B??llinger bodies). A poxvirus was isolated from multiple nodules. Poxviral infection has not been reported in this species, and the reason for its emergence and its potential impact on the population are not yet known.

  4. Tissue specific response of Miscanthus×giganteus to dilute acid pretreatment for enhancing cellulose digestibility.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhe; Zhang, Xun; Ling, Zhe; Sun, Run-Cang; Xu, Feng

    2016-12-10

    The recalcitrance in grasses varies according to cell type and tissue. In this study, dilute acid pretreatment was performed on Miscanthus×giganteus internodes that include rind and pith regions which showing heterogeneous structural and chemical changes. Pretreatment on pith effectively hydrolyzed 73.33% hemicelluloses and separated cohesive cell walls from the compound middle lamella due to lignin migration. Lignin droplets with an average diameter of 49.5±29.3nm were concurrently coalesced on wall surface, that in turn exposed more microfibrils deep in walls to be enzymatically hydrolyzed reaching 82.55%. By contrast, the rind with a relatively intergrated cell structure was covered by larger lignin droplets (101.2±44.1nm) and filled with inaccessible microfibrils limiting enzymatic sacchrification (31.50%). Taken together, the cellulose digestibility of biomass was not majorly influenced by cellulose crystallinity, while it was strongly correlated with the positive effects of hemicelluloses degradation, lignin redistribution, cellulose exposure and loosening cell wall structure. PMID:27577916

  5. Spatio-Temporal Variation of Core and Satellite Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Communities in Miscanthus giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Christopher J.; Burns, Caitlin A.; van der Gast, Christopher J.; McNamara, Niall P.; Bending, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a group of obligate plant symbionts which can promote plant nutrition. AMF communities are diverse, but the factors which control their assembly in space and time remain unclear. In this study, the contributions of geographical distance, environmental heterogeneity and time in shaping AMF communities associated with Miscanthus giganteus (a perennial grass originating from south-east Asia) were determined over a 13 months period. In particular, the community was partitioned into core (abundant and persistent taxa) and satellite (taxa with low abundance and persistence) constituents and the drivers of community assembly for each determined. β-diversity was exceptionally low across the 140 m line transects, and there was limited evidence of geographical scaling effects on the composition of the core, satellite or combined communities. However, AMF richness and community composition changed over time associated with fluctuation within both the core and satellite communities. The degree to which AMF community variation was explained by soil properties was consistently higher in the core community than the combined and satellite communities, suggesting that the satellite community had considerable stochasticity associated with it. We suggest that the partitioning of communities into their core and satellite constituents could be employed to enhance the variation explained within microbial community analyses. PMID:27597844

  6. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales) experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation. PMID:26024370

  7. Spatio-Temporal Variation of Core and Satellite Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Communities in Miscanthus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Christopher J; Burns, Caitlin A; van der Gast, Christopher J; McNamara, Niall P; Bending, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a group of obligate plant symbionts which can promote plant nutrition. AMF communities are diverse, but the factors which control their assembly in space and time remain unclear. In this study, the contributions of geographical distance, environmental heterogeneity and time in shaping AMF communities associated with Miscanthus giganteus (a perennial grass originating from south-east Asia) were determined over a 13 months period. In particular, the community was partitioned into core (abundant and persistent taxa) and satellite (taxa with low abundance and persistence) constituents and the drivers of community assembly for each determined. β-diversity was exceptionally low across the 140 m line transects, and there was limited evidence of geographical scaling effects on the composition of the core, satellite or combined communities. However, AMF richness and community composition changed over time associated with fluctuation within both the core and satellite communities. The degree to which AMF community variation was explained by soil properties was consistently higher in the core community than the combined and satellite communities, suggesting that the satellite community had considerable stochasticity associated with it. We suggest that the partitioning of communities into their core and satellite constituents could be employed to enhance the variation explained within microbial community analyses. PMID:27597844

  8. Anthelmintic Treatment Does Not Change Foraging Strategies of Female Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Jemma K; Martin, Jennifer K; Coulson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Large mammalian herbivores are commonly infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Heavily parasitised hosts are likely to have increased nutritional requirements and would be predicted to increase their food intake to compensate for costs of being parasitised, but experimental tests of the impacts of these parasites on the foraging efficiency of hosts are lacking, particularly in free-ranging wildlife. We conducted a field experiment on a population of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) to test this prediction, removing nematodes from one group of adult females using an anthelmintic treatment. We then carried out observations before and following treatment to assess the influence of parasites on foraging behaviour. Contrary to our predictions, the manipulation of parasite burdens did not result in changes in any of the key foraging variables we measured. Our results suggest that despite carrying large burdens of gastrointestinal parasites, the foraging strategy of female kangaroos is likely be driven by factors unrelated to parasitism, and that kangaroos in high nutritional environments may be able acquire sufficient nutrients to offset the costs of parasitism. We conclude that the drivers of forage intake likely differ between domesticated and free-ranging herbivores, and that free-ranging hosts are likely more resilient to parasitism. PMID:26784582

  9. Catalytic pyrolysis of miscanthus × giganteus in a spouted bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Du, Shoucheng; Sun, Yijia; Gamliel, David P; Valla, Julia A; Bollas, George M

    2014-10-01

    A conical spouted bed reactor was designed and tested for fast catalytic pyrolysis of miscanthus × giganteus over Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) catalyst, in the temperature range of 400-600 °C and catalyst to biomass ratios 1:1-5:1. The effect of operating conditions on the lumped product distribution, bio-oil selectivity and gas composition was investigated. In particular, it was shown that higher temperature favors the production of gas and bio-oil aromatics and results in lower solid and liquid yields. Higher catalyst to biomass ratios increased the gas yield, at the expense of liquid and solid products, while enhancing aromatic selectivity. The separate catalytic effects of ZSM-5 catalyst and its Al2O3 support were studied. The support contributes to increased coke/char formation, due to the uncontrolled spatial distribution and activity of its alumina sites. The presence of ZSM-5 zeolite in the catalyst enhanced the production of aromatics due to its proper pore size distribution and activity. PMID:25058293

  10. In Vitro Fermentation of Xylooligosaccharides Produced from Miscanthus × giganteus by Human Fecal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsu; Swanson, Kelly S; Fahey, George C; Dien, Bruce S; Beloshapka, Alison N; Bauer, Laura L; Rausch, Kent D; Tumbleson, M E; Singh, Vijay

    2016-01-13

    Purified xylooligosaccharides from Miscanthus × giganteus (M×G XOS) were used in an in vitro fermentation experiment inoculated with human fecal microbiota. A commercial XOS product and pectin were used as controls. Decreases in pH by 2.3, 2.4, and 2.0 units and production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; acetic acid, 7764.2, 6664.1, and 6387.9 μmol/g; propionic acid, 1006.7, 1089.5, and 661.5 μmol/g; and butyric acid, 955.5, 1252.9, and 917.7 μmol/g) were observed in M×G XOS, commercial XOS, and pectin medium after 12 h of fermentation, respectively. Titers of Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Escherichia coli increased when fed all three substrates as monitored by qPCR. There was no significant trend for Clostridium perfringens. During fermentation, M×G XOS was statistically equivalent in performance to the commercial XOS sample as measured by culture acidification and growth of health-promoting bacteria and resulted in the highest SCFA production among the three substrates. PMID:26648520

  11. Pseudacris triseriata (western chorus frog) and Rana sylvatica (wood frog) chytridiomycosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rittman, S.E.; Muths, E.; Green, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a known pathogen of anuran amphibians, and has been correlated with amphibian die-offs worldwide (Daszak et. al. 1999. Emerging Infectious Diseases 5:735-748). In Colorado, B. dendrobatidis has infected Boreal toads (Bufo boreas) (Muths et. al., in review) and has been identified on museum specimens of northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) (Carey et. al. 1999. Develop. Comp. Immunol. 23:459-472). We report the first verified case of chytrid fungus in chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) and wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) in the United States. We collected seven P. triseriata, and two adult and two juvenile R. sylvatica in the Kawuneeche Valley in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) during June 2001. These animals were submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) as part of an amphibian health evaluation in RMNP. Chorus frogs were shipped in one container. Wood frog adults and juveniles were shipped in two separate containers. Histological examinations of all chorus frogs and 3 of 4 wood frogs were positive for chytrid fungus infection. The fourth (adult) wood frog was too decomposed for meaningful histology. Histological findings consisted of multifocally mild to diffusely severe infections of the epidermis of the ventrum and hindlimb digital skin. Chytrid thalli were confined to the thickened epidermis (hyperkeratosis), were spherical to oval, and occasional thalli contained characteristic discharge pores or zoospores (Green and Kagarise Sherman 1999. J. Herpetol 35:92-103; Fellers et al. 2001. Copeia 2001:945-953). We cannot confirm that all specimens carried the fungus at collection, because infection may have spread from one individual to all other individuals in each container during transport. Further sampling of amphibians in Kawuneeche Valley is warranted to determine the rate of infection and mortality in these populations.

  12. Equatorial electron loss by double resonance with oblique and parallel intense chorus waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Puzzling satellite observations of butterfly pitch angle distributions and rapid dropouts of 30-150 keV electrons are widespread in the Earth's radiation belts. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these observations, such as enhanced outward radial diffusion combined with magnetopause shadowing or scattering by intense magnetosonic waves, but their effectiveness is mainly limited to storm times. Moreover, the scattering of 30-150 keV electrons via cyclotron resonance with intense parallel chorus waves should be limited to particles with equatorial pitch angle smaller than 70°-75°, leaving unaffected a large portion of the population. In this paper, we investigate the possible effects of oblique whistler mode waves, noting, in particular, that Landau resonance with very oblique waves can occur up to ˜89°. We demonstrate that such very oblique chorus waves with realistic amplitudes can very efficiently nonlinearly transport nearly equatorially mirroring electrons toward smaller pitch angles where nonlinear scattering (phase bunching) via cyclotron resonance with quasi-parallel waves can take over and quickly send them to much lower pitch angles <40°. The proposed double resonance mechanism could therefore explain the formation of butterfly pitch angle distributions as well as contribute to some fast dropouts of 30-150 keV electrons occurring during moderate geomagnetic disturbances at L = 4-6. Since 30-150 keV electrons represent a seed population for a further acceleration to relativistic energies by intense parallel chorus waves during storms or substorms, the proposed mechanism may have important consequences on the dynamics of 100 keV to MeV electron fluxes in the radiation belts.

  13. Characteristics of banded chorus-like emission measured by the TC-1 Double Star spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macúšová, Eva; Santolík, Ondřej; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, Nicole; Yearby, Keith

    2013-04-01

    We present a study of the spatio-temporal characteristics of banded whistler-mode emissions. It covers the full operational period of the TC-1 spacecraft, between January 2004 and the end of September 2007. The analyzed data set has been visually selected from the onboard-analyzed time-frequency spectrograms of magnetic field fluctuations below 4 kHz measured by the STAFF/DWP wave instrument situated onboard the TC-1 spacecraft with a low inclination elliptical equatorial orbit. This orbit covers magnetic latitudes between -39o and 39o. The entire data set has been collected between L=2 and L=12. Our results show that almost all intense emissions (above a threshold of 10-5nT2Hz-1) occur at L-shells from 6 to 12 and in the MLT sector from 2 to 11 hours. This is in a good agreement with previous observations. We determine the bandwidth of the observed emission by an automatic procedure based on the measured spectra. This allows us to reliably calculate the integral amplitudes of the measured signals. The majority of the largest amplitudes of chorus-like emissions were found closer to the Earth. The other result is that the upper band chorus-like emissions (above one half of the electron cyclotron frequency) are much less intense than the lower band chorus-like emissions (below one half of the electron cyclotron frequency) and are usually observed closer to the Earth than the lower band. This work has received EU support through the FP7-Space grant agreement n 284520 for the MAARBLE collaborative research project.

  14. Limited dispersal in an ectoparasitic mite, Laelaps giganteus, contributes to significant phylogeographic congruence with the rodent host, Rhabdomys.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Adriaan; Matthee, Sonja; du Toit, Nina; Matthee, Conrad A

    2016-02-01

    To explore how biogeography, parasite life history and host vagility influences evolutionary codivergences, we followed a comparative phylogeography approach using a host-specific nonpermanent mite, Laelaps giganteus, that occurs on four rodent species within the genus Rhabdomys. A mtDNA COI haplotype network derived for 278 parasite specimens showed marked phylogeographic congruence with host distributions. Analysis of the less variable nuclear intron Tropomyosin was in part consistent with these results. Although distance-based cophylogenetic analyses in axparafit failed to support significant mtDNA codivergences (P ≥ 0.02), event-based analyses revealed significant cophylogeny between sampling localities of Rhabdomys and Laelaps using core-pa (P = 0.046) and jane (P = 0.026; P = 0.00). These findings, in conjunction with the weak congruence previously reported among the permanent ectoparasitic lice Polyplax and Rhabdomys, suggest that host-parasite intimacy is not the most important driver of significant codivergence in our study system. Instead, the more restricted dispersal ability of L. giganteus, when compared to Polyplax, resulted in stronger spatial structuring and this could have resulted in significant codivergence. Host switching occurred predominantly on the edges of host distributions and was probably facilitated by climate-induced range shifts. When host ranges shift, the phylogeographic structure of L. giganteus is not reflecting the host movements as most of the nest bound parasites do not disperse with the host (they miss the boat) and the genetic contribution of the few dispersing mite individuals is often overwhelmed by the large number of individuals already present in nests within the new environment (causing them to drown on arrival). PMID:26756310

  15. Local time distributions of repetition periods for rising tone lower band chorus waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, Jih-Hong; Hsieh, Yi-Kai; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wang, Kaiti; Fu, Hui Shan; Bortnik, Jacob; Tao, Xin; Hsieh, Wen-Chieh; Pi, Gilbert

    2015-10-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves generally occur outside the plasmapause in the magnetosphere. The most striking feature of the waves is their occurrence in discrete elements. One of the parameters that describe the discrete elements is the repetition period (Trp), the time between consecutive elements. The Trp has not been studied statistically before. We use high-resolution waveform data to derive distributions of Trp for different local times. We find that the average Trp for the nightside (0.56 s) and dawnside (0.53 s) are smaller than those for the dayside (0.81 s) and duskside (0.97 s). Through a comparison with the background plasma and magnetic fields, we also find that the total magnetic field and temperature are the main controlling factors that affect the variability of Trp. These results are important for understanding the generation mechanism of chorus and choosing parameters in simulations that model the acceleration and loss of electrons by wave-particle interactions.

  16. Simulation of radiation belt electron dynamics using in-situ global model of chorus waves inferred from the low-altitude electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Ma, Q.; Chen, L.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Green, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The global evolution of chorus wave intensity is crucial to evaluate the electron local acceleration by chorus waves, which is fundamentally important for radiation belt electron dynamics. Based on the fact that chorus waves play a dominant role in scattering 30-100 keV electrons, we adopt a physics-based technique of inferring chorus wave amplitudes from the low-altitude electron population (30-100 keV) measured by multiple POES/MetOp satellites, which provide extensive coverage over a broad L-MLT region. This technique is validated through analyzing conjunction events with the Van Allen Probes measuring chorus wave amplitudes near the equator and POES/MetOp satellites measuring the 30-100 keV electron population at the conjugate low altitudes. We adopt this technique to construct chorus wave intensity distributions, which are then used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics during the 09 October 2012 storm. The simulation results show that the pronounced electron acceleration to relativistic energies with a peak in phase space density observed by the Van Allen probes was primarily caused by chorus-driven local acceleration. Our numerical simulation of local stochastic acceleration not only accounts for the timescale and energy dependence of the rapid increase in electron flux in the heart of the outer radiation belt, but also reproduces the evolution of the observed electron pitch angle distribution.

  17. A regional comparison of water-use efficiency for Miscanthus x giganteus and Panicum virgatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanloocke, A. D.; Twine, T. E.; Zeri, M.; Arundale, R.; Bernacchi, C.

    2010-12-01

    The production of second generation bioenergy feedstocks is likely to increase significantly over the coming decades. A key factor dictating the environmental impact/services of production is the trade-off between water-use and productivity (e.g., harvestable yield (HY) and net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE)). For this study we focus on two candidate second generation feedstocks with marked differences in water use and productivity, Miscanthus x giganteus (miscanthus) and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass). The efficiency of water-use is compared using two metrics: harvestable water-use efficiency (HWUE = evapotranspiration (ET) ET/HY), and ecosystem water-use efficiency (EWUE = ET/NEE). We developed and tested a new version of Agro-IBIS (Integrated Biosphere Simulator - agricultural version). Simulations were evaluated against several key observed variables, from leaf to canopy scales at locations across Illinois. Then simulations were run with historic climate data to produce 30 year means for each land cover type for the Midwest U.S. Our analysis indicates that over the Midwest U.S. miscanthus has the highest HWUE (~25 kg ha-1 mm-1), followed by current crops (e.g. maize, soybean, and wheat; ~18 kg ha-1 mm-1) and switchgrass (~15 kg ha-1 mm-1). Miscanthus and switchgrass both have a higher EWUE than current crops; however, miscanthus has the potential to disrupt the hydrologic cycle as a result of higher evapotranspiration in drier areas (~700 mm yr-1), whereas switchgrass may have a smaller impact. The results of this analysis can be used to suggest locations for test plots and they highlight the need for observations of water-use by potential feedstocks throughout the region.

  18. The Effect of Speech Rate on Stuttering Frequency, Phonated Intervals, Speech Effort, and Speech Naturalness during Chorus Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidow, Jason H.; Ingham, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effect of speech rate on phonated intervals (PIs), in order to test whether a reduction in the frequency of short PIs is an important part of the fluency-inducing mechanism of chorus reading. The influence of speech rate on stuttering frequency, speaker-judged speech effort, and listener-judged naturalness was also…

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation protects Miscanthus × giganteus against trace element toxicity in a highly metal-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Firmin, Stéphane; Labidi, Sonia; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Frédéric; Tisserant, Benoit; Nsanganwimana, Florian; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dalpé, Yolande; Grandmougin, Anne; Douay, Francis; Shirali, Pirouz; Verdin, Anthony; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2015-09-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)-assisted phytoremediation could constitute an ecological and economic method in polluted soil rehabilitation programs. The aim of this work was to characterize the trace element (TE) phytoremediation potential of mycorrhizal Miscanthus × giganteus. To understand the mechanisms involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis tolerance to TE toxicity, the fatty acid compositions and several stress oxidative biomarkers were compared in the roots and leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus cultivated under field conditions in either TE-contaminated or control soils. TEs were accumulated in greater amounts in roots, but the leaves were the organ most affected by TE contamination and were characterized by a strong decrease in fatty acid contents. TE-induced oxidative stress in leaves was confirmed by an increase in the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA). TE contamination decreased the GSSG/GSH ratio in the leaves of exposed plants, while peroxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in leaves and in whole plants, respectively. AMF inoculation also increased root colonization in the presence of TE contamination. The mycorrhizal colonization determined a decrease in SOD activity in the whole plant and PO activities in leaves and induced a significant increase in the fatty acid content in leaves and a decrease in MDA formation in whole plants. These results suggested that mycorrhization is able to confer protection against oxidative stress induced by soil pollution. Our findings suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation could be used as a bioaugmentation technique, facilitating Miscanthus cultivation on highly TE-contaminated soil. PMID:25958358

  20. Intrastrain comparison of the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of an edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus, and its potent neuritogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Tan, Yee-Shin; Naidu, Murali; Wong, Kah-Hui; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2014-01-01

    Two strains of Pleurotus giganteus (commercial and wild) were tested for their ability to induce neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) and mouse neuroblastoma-2a (N2a) cells. Treatment with the mushroom extracts resulted in neuronal differentiation and neuronal elongation, but not nerve growth factor (NGF) production. Linoleic acid (4.5-5.0%, w/w) which is a major fatty acid present in the ethanol extract promoted NGF biosynthesis when augmented with low concentration of NGF (5 ng/mL). The two strains of mushroom were found to be high in protein (154-192 g kg(-1)), total polysaccharides, phenolics, and flavonoids as well as vitamins B1, B2, and B3. The total phenolics present in the mushroom extracts were positively correlated to the antioxidant activity (free radical scavenging, ferric reducing power, and lipid peroxidation inhibition). To conclude, P. giganteus could potentially be used in well-balanced diet and as a source of dietary antioxidant to promote neuronal health. PMID:25121118

  1. Intrastrain Comparison of the Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activity of an Edible Mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus, and Its Potent Neuritogenic Properties

    PubMed Central

    David, Pamela; Tan, Yee-Shin; Wong, Kah-Hui; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2014-01-01

    Two strains of Pleurotus giganteus (commercial and wild) were tested for their ability to induce neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) and mouse neuroblastoma-2a (N2a) cells. Treatment with the mushroom extracts resulted in neuronal differentiation and neuronal elongation, but not nerve growth factor (NGF) production. Linoleic acid (4.5–5.0%, w/w) which is a major fatty acid present in the ethanol extract promoted NGF biosynthesis when augmented with low concentration of NGF (5 ng/mL). The two strains of mushroom were found to be high in protein (154–192 g kg−1), total polysaccharides, phenolics, and flavonoids as well as vitamins B1, B2, and B3. The total phenolics present in the mushroom extracts were positively correlated to the antioxidant activity (free radical scavenging, ferric reducing power, and lipid peroxidation inhibition). To conclude, P. giganteus could potentially be used in well-balanced diet and as a source of dietary antioxidant to promote neuronal health. PMID:25121118

  2. The Dusk Chorus from an Owl Perspective: Eagle Owls Vocalize When Their White Throat Badge Contrasts Most

    PubMed Central

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, Maria del Mar

    2009-01-01

    Background An impressive number of studies have investigated bird vocal displays, and many of them have tried to explain the widespread phenomenon of the so-called dawn and dusk chorus, the sunrise and sunset peaks in bird song output. As many as twelve non-exclusive hypotheses have been proposed to explain why twilight peaks in vocal display might be advantageous; but, even after more than two decades of study, the basis underlying the dusk and dawn chorus is still unclear. Moreover, to date, the majority of studies on this topic have focused on songbirds. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigate here a novel hypothesis on why nocturnal birds with patches of white feathers call at twilight. We propose that white plumage patches and the timing of visual signaling have co-evolved to maximize the effectiveness of social communication such as the dusk chorus. This hypothesis centers on the recent discovery that eagle owls can adopt specific forms of visual signaling and is supported by the observation that adult eagle owls possess a white throat badge that is only visible during vocal displays. By monitoring the calling of eagle owls at dusk, a peak time for bird call output, we found that white throat badges contrasted most with the surrounding background during the owls' twilight chorusing. Conclusions/Significance Crepuscular and nocturnal species appear to have evolved white patches that, shown in association with vocal displays, allow them to communicate in dark surroundings. The evolution of a white badge that operates jointly with call displays at dawn and dusk may be relevant to the eagle owls' social dynamics. Our explanation for the dusk chorus may possibly represent an overlooked but common pattern of signaling among crepuscular and nocturnal birds that combine patches of white feathers with twilight displays. Furthermore, our findings could be relevant to songbirds that breed in dark forest habitats and have contrasting white badges, as well as birds

  3. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  4. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; et al

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  5. Comparative Biogeochemical Cycles of Bioenergy Crops Reveal Nitrogen-Fixation and Low GHG Emissions in a Miscanthus x giganteus Agro-ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the relative greenhouse gas mitigation potential of plant species considered as biofuel feedstock crops by simulating the biogeochemical processes associated with Miscanthus x giganteus, Panicum virgatum, Zea mays, and a mixed prairie community. DayCent model simulations for Miscanthus ...

  6. Cool C4 Photosynthesis - Pyruvate Pi dikinase expression and activity corresponds to the exceptional cold tolerance of carbon assimilation in Miscanthus x giganteus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biofuel feedstock grass Miscanthus x giganteus is exceptional among C4 species in its high productivity in cold climates. It can maintain photosynthetically active leaves at temperatures 6°C below the minimum for Zea mays (maize), which allows it a longer growing season in cool climates. Underst...

  7. Transcriptional responses indicate maintenance of photosynthetic proteins as key to the exceptional chilling tolerance of C4 photosynthesis in Miscanthus × giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Ashley K.; Boddu, Jay; Wang, Dafu; James, Brandon; Swaminathan, Kankshita; Moose, Stephen P.; Long, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Miscanthus × giganteus is exceptional among C4 plants in its ability to acclimate to chilling (≤14 °C) and maintain a high photosynthetic capacity, in sharp contrast to maize, leading to very high productivity even in cool temperate climates. To identify the mechanisms that underlie this acclimation, RNA was isolated from M × giganteus leaves in chilling and nonchilling conditions and hybridized to microarrays developed for its close relative Zea mays. Among 21 000 array probes that yielded robust signals, 723 showed significant expression change under chilling. Approximately half of these were for annotated genes. Thirty genes associated with chloroplast membrane function were all upregulated. Increases in transcripts for the lhcb5 (chlorophyll a/b-binding protein CP26), ndhF (NADH dehydrogenase F, chloroplast), atpA (ATP synthase alpha subunit), psbA (D1), petA (cytochrome f), and lhcb4 (chlorophyll a/b-binding protein CP29), relative to housekeeping genes in M. × giganteus, were confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. In contrast, psbo1, lhcb5, psbA, and lhcb4 were all significantly decreased in Z. mays after 14 days of chilling. Western blot analysis of the D1 protein and LHCII type II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein also showed significant increases in M. × giganteus during chilling and significant decreases in Z. mays. Compared to other C4 species, M. × giganteus grown in chilling conditions appears to counteract the loss of photosynthetic proteins and proteins protecting photosystem II typically observed in other species by increasing mRNA levels for their synthesis. PMID:24958895

  8. Seasonal reproduction and feeding ecology of giant isopods Bathynomus giganteus from the continental slope of the Yucatán peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barradas-Ortiz, Cecilia; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia; Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique

    2003-04-01

    The reproduction and feeding habits of giant isopods Bathynomus giganteus [range in body length (BL): 43-363 mm] from the continental slope of the Yucatán Peninsula, México, were studied from samples collected at depths of 359-1050 m during three research cruises conducted in winter, spring, and summer of different years. Samples taken in winter and spring yielded a large proportion of mancas and juveniles, as well as high percentages of adult females with functional oostegites and males with appendices masculinae, suggesting a peak in reproductive activity during these seasons. In contrast, the virtual absence in the summer samples of (a) mancas and small juveniles, (b) females with functional oostegites, and (c) small adult males (210-290 mm BL) with appendices masculinae, suggests a low reproductive activity of B. giganteus during summer. Stomach contents analyses were conducted on five life phases (mancas, small juveniles, large juveniles, adult females and adult males) in winter and summer. Mancas and juveniles had fuller stomachs than adults during winter, and all isopods had emptier stomachs during summer than during winter. The diet of B. giganteus was broad, but the most important food categories in all life phases were fish and squid remains, underlining the main scavenging habits of B. giganteus. However, the remaining food categories show that this species is a facultative rather than a strict scavenger and suggest some ontogenetic dietary shifts. These results were further supported by diet (Horn's) overlap indices. In the winter, high diet overlap occurred between all life phases. In the summer, adult males had a low diet overlap with adult females and large juveniles. Adult males also had a low diet overlap between summer and winter. Results from this and other studies suggest that the main reproductive activity of B. giganteus in the Yucatán slope occurs during winter and spring, when the food supply on the upper-slope is highest, particularly

  9. Properties of electron flux spectra around the plasmapause in the chorus and hiss regions using POES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian; Rodger, Craig; Clilverd, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The European FP7 PLASMON project aims to provide observations of plasmaspheric densities, and link the plasmaspheric variations to relativistic electron precipitation from the radiation belts. This is intended to assist in the estimation and prevent damage of space assets from space weather events as well as to improve forecasting (http://plasmon.elte.hu). As part of the PLASMON project, electron fluxes from the POES series of satellites are being used to determine the link between energetic electron precipitation energy spectra and magnitude to the position of the plasmapause. The MEPED instrument onboard POES measures electron flux from 90° (trapped particles) and 0° (losscone) telescopes, in 3 integral energy channels (>30, >100 and >300 keV). These fluxes have been compared to the DEMETER/IDP instrument to confirm that published geometric factor corrections (Yando et al. 2011) can be accurately applied to the POES data to produce as accurate as possible fluxes. These global fluxes have then been separated into regions in which Chorus (23:00-11:00 MLT) and Hiss (11:00-16:00 MLT) whistler mode waves are expected to occur, in 0.2 L-shell bins with a 20 minute temporal resolution. The plasmapause locations have been determined from the O'Brien and Moldwin (2003) models based on Kp, Ae and Dst peaks. We are currently comparing the POES spectral gradient and flux magnitude with plasmapause location and geomagnetic activity for the locations in which chorus and hiss are known to occur. This presentation will focus on the electron flux spectral gradient behaviour either side of the plasmapause, a value that is difficult to measure from ground based techniques.

  10. Correlated Pc4-5 ULF waves, whistler-mode chorus, and pulsating aurora observed by the Van Allen Probes and ground-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Lessard, M. R.; Takahashi, K.; Ali, A. F.; Malaspina, D. M.; Michell, R. G.; Spanswick, E. L.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Cully, C.; Donovan, E. F.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.; Samara, M.; Spence, H. E.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Theory and observations have linked equatorial VLF waves with pulsating aurora for decades, invoking the process of pitch angle scattering of tens of keV electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere. Recently published satellite studies have strengthened this argument, by showing strong correlation between pulsating auroral patches and both lower-band chorus and tens of keV electron modulation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit. Additionally, a previous link has been made between Pc4-5 compressional pulsations and modulation of whistler-mode chorus using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms. In the current study, we present simultaneous in situ observations of structured chorus waves and an apparent field line resonance (in the Pc4-5 range) as a result of a substorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes, along with ground-based observations of pulsating aurora. We demonstrate the likely scenario being one of substorm-driven Pc4-5 ULF pulsations modulating chorus waves, and thus providing the driver for pulsating particle precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere. Interestingly, the modulated chorus wave and ULF wave periods are well correlated, with chorus occurring at half the periodicity of the ULF waves. We also show, for the first time, a particular few-Hz modulation of individual chorus elements that coincides with the same modulation in a nearby pulsating aurora patch. Such modulation has been noticed as a high-frequency component in ground-based camera data of pulsating aurora for decades and may be a result of nonlinear chorus wave interactions in the equatorial region.

  11. Correlated Pc4-5 ULF waves, whistler-mode chorus, and pulsating aurora observed by the Van Allen Probes and ground-based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jaynes, A. N.; Lessard, M. R.; Takahashi, K.; Ali, A. F.; Malaspina, D. M.; Michell, R. G.; Spanswick, E. L.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Cully, C.; Donovan, E. F.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.; Samara, M.; Spence, H. E.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-10-28

    Theory and observations have linked equatorial VLF waves with pulsating aurora for decades, invoking the process of pitch angle scattering of tens of keV electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere. Recently published satellite studies have strengthened this argument, by showing strong correlation between pulsating auroral patches and both lower-band chorus and tens of keV electron modulation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit. Additionally, a previous link has been made between Pc4–5 compressional pulsations and modulation of whistler-mode chorus using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms. In the current study, we present simultaneous in situ observations of structured chorus waves and an apparent field line resonance (in the Pc4–5 range) as a result of a substorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes, along with ground-based observations of pulsating aurora. We demonstrate the likely scenario being one of substorm-driven Pc4–5 ULF pulsations modulating chorus waves, and thus providing the driver for pulsating particle precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere. Interestingly, the modulated chorus wave and ULF wave periods are well correlated, with chorus occurring at half the periodicity of the ULF waves. We also show, for the first time, a particular few-Hz modulation of individual chorus elements that coincides with the same modulation in a nearby pulsating aurora patch. As a result, such modulation has been noticed as a high-frequency component in ground-based camera data of pulsating aurora for decades and may be a result of nonlinear chorus wave interactions in the equatorial region.

  12. Lesson on Demand. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Sue

    This lesson plan helps students understand the role consumer demand plays in the market system, i.e., how interactions in the marketplace help determine pricing. Students will participate in an activity that demonstrates the concepts of demand, demand schedule, demand curve, and the law of demand. The lesson plan provides student objectives;…

  13. A novel technique to construct the global distribution of whistler mode chorus wave intensity using low-altitude POES electron data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Green, Janet C.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Kurth, William S.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Soria-Santacruz Pich, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Although magnetospheric chorus plays a significant role in the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons, its global evolution during any specific time period cannot be directly obtained by spacecraft measurements. Using the low-altitude NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) electron data, we develop a novel physics-based methodology to infer the chorus wave intensity and construct its global distribution with a time resolution of less than an hour. We describe in detail how to apply the technique to satellite data by performing two representative analyses, i.e., (i) for one specific time point to visualize the estimation procedure and (ii) for a particular time period to validate the method and construct an illustrative global chorus wave model. We demonstrate that the spatiotemporal evolution of chorus intensity in the equatorial magnetosphere can be reasonably estimated from electron flux measurements made by multiple low-altitude POES satellites with a broad coverage of L shell and magnetic local time. Such a data-based, dynamic model of chorus waves can provide near-real-time wave information on a global scale for any time period where POES electron data are available. A combination of the chorus wave spatiotemporal distribution acquired using this methodology and the direct spaceborne wave measurements can be used to evaluate the quantitative scattering caused by resonant wave-particle interactions and thus model radiation belt electron variability.

  14. Skeletal Pathology of Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Fluoride Levels in South-Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hufschmid, J; Beveridge, I; Coulson, G; Walker, G; Shen, P; Reynolds, E; Charles, J

    2015-01-01

    Significantly elevated bone fluoride concentrations have been reported in a population of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) resident near a fluoride-emitting aluminum smelter in southeastern Australia. This paper describes the skeletal and synovial joint lesions observed post mortem in the same sample of kangaroos (n = 76). The prevalence and severity of skeletal lesions, specifically the formation of multiple, large, smooth exostoses over the diaphysis of long bones (especially, but not exclusively, on the tibia, fibula and metatarsi), were positively associated with bone fluoride concentration. So too were lesions of degenerative joint disease, including periarticular osteophytosis, articular cartilage erosion/ulceration, synovial hyperplasia and joint capsular fibrosis. Joint lesions were most commonly seen in the knee, hock and metatarsophalangeal joints. This is the first study to describe in detail the full range of lesions induced by chronic fluorosis in a marsupial species. PMID:26186808

  15. Elucidating and alleviating impacts of lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitors on Clostridium beijerinckii during fermentation of Miscanthus giganteus to butanol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-10-01

    Fermentation of liquid hot water (LHW) pretreated Miscanthus giganteus (MG) by Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was investigated towards understanding the toxicity of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors to solventogenic Clostridium species vis-à-vis butanol production. While C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 did not grow in undiluted MG hydrolysate-based fermentation medium, supplementation of this medium with Calcium carbonate enabled the growth of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and production of butanol. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectrophotometric assays, LHW-pretreated MG was found to contain lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds; some of which were transformed by exponentially growing C. beijerinckii to less inhibitory compounds during fermentation. Contrary to all expectations, the reduction product of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, inhibited butanol production by C. beijerinckii by more than 16 %. Collectively, these results provide new insights into why lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates are recalcitrant to fermentation to biofuels and chemicals. PMID:25085743

  16. Hatching success in salamanders and chorus frogs at two sites in Colorado, USA: Effects of acidic deposition and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Campbell, D.H.; Corn, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The snowpack in the vicinity of the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area is among the most acidic in the western United States. We analyzed water chemistry and examined hatching success in tiger salamanders and chorus frogs at ponds there and at nearby Rabbit Ears Pass (Dumont) to determine whether acid deposition affects amphibians or their breeding habitats at these potentially sensitive locations. We found a wide range of acid neutralizing capacity among ponds within sites; the minimum pH recorded during the experiment was 5.4 at one of 12 ponds with all others at pH ??? 5.7. At Dumont, hatching success for chorus frogs was greater in ponds with low acid neutralizing capacity; however, lowest pHs were >5.8. At current levels of acid deposition, weather and pond characteristics are likely more important than acidity in influencing hatching success in amphibian larvae at these sites.

  17. Arthromitus (Bacillus cereus) symbionts in the cockroach Blaberus giganteus: dietary influences on bacterial development and population density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, L.; Jorgensen, J.; Haselton, A.; Pitt, A.; Rudner, R.; Margulis, L.

    1999-01-01

    The filamentous spore-forming bacterium Arthromitus, discovered in termites, millipedes, sow bugs and other soil-dwelling arthropods by Leidy (1850), is the intestinal stage of Bacillus cereus. We extend the range of Arthromitus habitats to include the hindgut of Blaberus giganteus, the large tropical American cockroach. The occurrence and morphology of the intestinal form of the bacillus were compared in individual cockroaches (n=24) placed on four different diet regimes: diurnally maintained insects fed (1) dog food, (2) soy protein only, (3)purified cellulose only, and (4) a dog food-fed group maintained in continuous darkness. Food quality exerted strong influence on population densities and developmental stages of the filamentous bacterium and on fecal pellet composition. The most dramatic rise in Arthromitus populations, defined as the spore-forming filament intestinal stage, occurred in adult cockroaches kept in the dark on a dog food diet. Limited intake of cellulose or protein alone reduced both the frequency of Arthromitus filaments and the rate of weight gain of the insects. Spores isolated from termites, sow bugs, cockroaches and moths, grown on various hard surfaces display a branching mobility and resistance to antibiotics characteristic to group I Bacilli whose members include B. cereus, B. circulans, B. alvei and B. macerans. DNA isolated from pure cultures of these bacilli taken from the guts of Blaberus giganteus (cockroach), Junonia coenia (moth), Porcellio scaber (sow bug) and Cryptotermes brevis (termite) and subjected to Southern hybridization with a 23S-5S B. subtilis ribosomal sequence probe verified that they are indistinguishable from laboratory strains of Bacillus cereus.

  18. Arthromitus (Bacillus cereus) symbionts in the cockroach Blaberus giganteus: dietary influences on bacterial development and population density.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, L; Jorgensen, J; Haselton, A; Pitt, A; Rudner, R; Margulis, L

    1999-01-01

    The filamentous spore-forming bacterium Arthromitus, discovered in termites, millipedes, sow bugs and other soil-dwelling arthropods by Leidy (1850), is the intestinal stage of Bacillus cereus. We extend the range of Arthromitus habitats to include the hindgut of Blaberus giganteus, the large tropical American cockroach. The occurrence and morphology of the intestinal form of the bacillus were compared in individual cockroaches (n=24) placed on four different diet regimes: diurnally maintained insects fed (1) dog food, (2) soy protein only, (3)purified cellulose only, and (4) a dog food-fed group maintained in continuous darkness. Food quality exerted strong influence on population densities and developmental stages of the filamentous bacterium and on fecal pellet composition. The most dramatic rise in Arthromitus populations, defined as the spore-forming filament intestinal stage, occurred in adult cockroaches kept in the dark on a dog food diet. Limited intake of cellulose or protein alone reduced both the frequency of Arthromitus filaments and the rate of weight gain of the insects. Spores isolated from termites, sow bugs, cockroaches and moths, grown on various hard surfaces display a branching mobility and resistance to antibiotics characteristic to group I Bacilli whose members include B. cereus, B. circulans, B. alvei and B. macerans. DNA isolated from pure cultures of these bacilli taken from the guts of Blaberus giganteus (cockroach), Junonia coenia (moth), Porcellio scaber (sow bug) and Cryptotermes brevis (termite) and subjected to Southern hybridization with a 23S-5S B. subtilis ribosomal sequence probe verified that they are indistinguishable from laboratory strains of Bacillus cereus. PMID:11762374

  19. Movements of the mandibles and tongue during mastication and swallowing in Pteropus giganteus (megachiroptera): a cineradiographical study.

    PubMed

    Greet, D G; de Vree, F

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative lateral and dorsoventral cineradiography shows that the masticatory movements of the mandible, condyles, tongue, and hyoid of Pteropus giganteus (Chiroptera) move along highly regular paths that are characteristic for each of the three food types tested. Mandibular movements are predominantly orthal, although a small forward translation occurs early in opening and small lateral deflections occur in both opening and closing phases. These deflections are related to the existence of active (bolus bearing) and balancing sides of the jaws, chewing being not truly bilateral. The deflections are associated with a shift of both condyles toward one side. In consequence the active condyle is located in a lateral part of the associated fossa, the inactive condyle in a medial part. Food transfer from side to side involves a reversal of the chewing direction during opening. Such reversals are especially frequent near the end of a chewing sequence. The fore, middle, and hind parts of the tongue differ in their movement patterns. Movements of the fore part, and to a lesser extent of the middle part, follow the open-close movements of the lower jaw. The hind part of the tongue moves predominantly dorsally during slow closing and ventrally during fast opening and fast closing. All three parts move forward during slow closing and slow opening, and backward during fast opening and fast closing. Movements of the hyoid are closely synchronized with those of the hind part of the tongue. Furthermore, tongue and hyoid movements are synchronized with jaw movements. All cycles of Pteropus giganteus are transport cycles, and the synchrony appears to reflect the consistency of the food (soft pulp, juices). Food consistency also accounts for the high swallowing rate and the absence of any significant difference between nonswallowing and swallowing cycles. PMID:6708112

  20. Bandwidths and amplitudes of chorus-like banded emissions measured by the TC-1 Double Star spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macúšová, E.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Yearby, K. H.

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of banded whistler-mode emissions are derived from a database of chorus-like events obtained from the complete data set of the wave measurements provided by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation-Digital Wave Processing (STAFF-DWP) wave instrument on board the TC-1 Double Star spacecraft. Our study covers the full operational period of this spacecraft (almost 4 years). Our entire data set has been collected within 30° of geomagnetic latitude at L shells between 2 and 12 and below 4 kHz. All events have been processed automatically to accurately determine their power spectral density (PSD), bandwidth, and amplitude. We found most cases of chorus-like banded emissions at L≤10 on the dawnside and dayside. The upper band emissions (above one half of the equatorial electron cyclotron frequency) occur almost 20 times less often than the lower band, and their average amplitude is almost 3 times smaller than for the lower band. Intense upper band emissions cover smaller L shell, magnetic local time (MLT), and magnetic latitudes regions than intense lower band emissions. The intense nightside and dawnside chorus-like banded emissions were observed at low magnetic latitudes, while the intense dayside and duskside emissions were mostly found at higher magnetic latitudes. The amplitudes of dayside lower band waves slightly increase as they propagate away from the geomagnetic equator and are smaller than chorus amplitudes on nightside and dawnside. The PSD, the amplitude of the lower band, its frequency bandwidth, and its occurrence rate significantly increase with increasing geomagnetic activity, while all these parameters for the upper band are not so strongly dependent on the geomagnetic activity.

  1. The effects of call-like masking diminish after nightly exposure to conspecific choruses in green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea).

    PubMed

    Gall, Megan D; Wilczynski, Walter

    2016-05-01

    One of the major difficulties encountered by animals that select mates using acoustic signals is discriminating individual calls from the background noise generated by other conspecifics. Reducing the effects of conspecific masking could improve discrimination of individual calls from background noise. We used auditory evoked potentials to investigate the effects of forward masking on the responses to artificial calls in male and female treefrogs (Hyla cinerea), as well as whether hearing advertisement calls over several nights, as happens in natural frog choruses, could modify the effects of masking. We found that response amplitude decreased with decreasing interstimulus interval when the masker was equal in amplitude to the stimulus. We also found evidence of a priming effect, whereby response amplitude at lower masker amplitudes was greater than when the target stimulus was not preceded by a masker. Finally, we found that the effect of masking was diminished by 10 nights of chorus exposure (i.e. responses were stronger to target stimuli), whereas there was no change in response in the control group. Our results show that hearing dynamic social stimuli, such as frog choruses, can alter the responses of the auditory periphery in a way that could enhance the detection of and response to conspecific acoustic communication signals. PMID:26944493

  2. Urea is not a universal cryoprotectant among hibernating anurans: evidence from the freeze-tolerant boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata).

    PubMed

    Higgins, Steven A; Swanson, David L

    2013-02-01

    Freeze-tolerant organisms accumulate a diversity of low molecular weight compounds to combat negative effects of ice formation. Previous studies of anuran freeze tolerance have implicated urea as a cryoprotectant in the wood frog (Lithobates sylvatica). However, a cryoprotective role for urea has been identified only for wood frogs, though urea accumulation is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for coping with osmotic stress in amphibians. To identify whether multiple solutes are involved in freezing tolerance in the boreal chorus frog (Pseudacris maculata), we examined seasonal and freezing-induced variation in several potential cryoprotectants. We further tested for a cryoprotective role for urea by comparing survival and recovery from freezing in control and urea-loaded chorus frogs. Tissue levels of glucose, urea, and glycerol did not vary significantly among seasons for heart, liver, or leg muscle. Furthermore, no changes in urea or glycerol levels were detected with exposure to freezing temperatures in these tissues. Urea-loading increased tissue urea concentrations, but failed to enhance freezing survival or facilitate recovery from freezing in chorus frogs in this study, suggesting little role for urea as a natural cryoprotectant in this species. These data suggest that urea may not universally serve as a primary cryoprotectant among freeze-tolerant, terrestrially hibernating anurans. PMID:23142424

  3. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolik, O.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons for the pulsating aurora (PsA) observed by the low-altitude Reimei satellite. The Reimei satellite achieved simultaneous observations of the optical images and precipitating electrons of the PsA from satellite altitude (~620 km) with resolution of 40 ms. The main modulation of precipitation, with a few seconds, and the internal modulations, with a few hertz, that are embedded inside the main modulations are identified above ~3 keV. Moreover, stable precipitations at ~1 keV are found for the PsA. A "precipitation gap" is discovered between two energy bands. We identify the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum for the precipitating electrons using the computer simulation on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and chorus waves. The lower band chorus (LBC) bursts cause the main modulation of energetic electrons, and the generation and collapse of the LBC bursts determines on-off switching of the PsA. A train of rising tone elements embedded in the LBC bursts drives the internal modulations. A close set of upper band chorus (UBC) waves causes the stable precipitations at ~1 keV. We show that a wave power gap around the half gyrofrequency at the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere between LBC and UBC reduces the loss rate of electrons at the intermediate energy range, forming a gap of precipitating electrons in the ionosphere.

  4. Correlated Pc4-5 ULF waves, whistler-mode chorus, and pulsating aurora observed by the Van Allen Probes and ground-based systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jaynes, A. N.; Lessard, M. R.; Takahashi, K.; Ali, A. F.; Malaspina, D. M.; Michell, R. G.; Spanswick, E. L.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Cully, C.; et al

    2015-10-28

    Theory and observations have linked equatorial VLF waves with pulsating aurora for decades, invoking the process of pitch angle scattering of tens of keV electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere. Recently published satellite studies have strengthened this argument, by showing strong correlation between pulsating auroral patches and both lower-band chorus and tens of keV electron modulation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit. Additionally, a previous link has been made between Pc4–5 compressional pulsations and modulation of whistler-mode chorus using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms. In the current study, we present simultaneous in situ observations of structured chorusmore » waves and an apparent field line resonance (in the Pc4–5 range) as a result of a substorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes, along with ground-based observations of pulsating aurora. We demonstrate the likely scenario being one of substorm-driven Pc4–5 ULF pulsations modulating chorus waves, and thus providing the driver for pulsating particle precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere. Interestingly, the modulated chorus wave and ULF wave periods are well correlated, with chorus occurring at half the periodicity of the ULF waves. We also show, for the first time, a particular few-Hz modulation of individual chorus elements that coincides with the same modulation in a nearby pulsating aurora patch. As a result, such modulation has been noticed as a high-frequency component in ground-based camera data of pulsating aurora for decades and may be a result of nonlinear chorus wave interactions in the equatorial region.« less

  5. Factors influencing survival and mark retention in postmetamorphic boreal chorus frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Jennifer E; Bailey, Larissa L.; Muths, Erin L.; Funk, W. Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ability to track individual animals is crucial in many field studies and often requires applying marks to captured individuals. Toe clipping has historically been a standard marking method for wild amphibian populations, but more recent marking methods include visual implant elastomer and photo identification. Unfortunately, few studies have investigated the influence and effectiveness of marking methods for recently metamorphosed individuals and as a result little is known about this life-history phase for most amphibians. Our focus was to explore survival probabilities, mark retention, and mark migration in postmetamorphic Boreal Chorus Frogs (Psuedacris maculata) in a laboratory setting. One hundred forty-seven individuals were assigned randomly to two treatment groups or a control group. Frogs in the first treatment group were marked with visual implant elastomer, while frogs in the second treatment group were toe clipped. Growth and mortality were recorded for one year and resulting data were analyzed using known-fate models in Program MARK. Model selection results suggested that survival probabilities of frogs varied with time and showed some variation among marking treatments. We found that frogs with multiple toes clipped on the same foot had lower survival probabilities than individuals in other treatments, but individuals can be marked by clipping a single toe on two different feet without any mark loss or negative survival effects. Individuals treated with visual implant elastomer had a mark migration rate of 4% and mark loss rate of 6%, and also showed very little negative survival impacts relative to control individuals.

  6. Impact of the chorus environment on temporal processing of advertisement calls by gray treefrogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Joshua; Huth, Kenneth; Lasker, Jeffrey

    2001-05-01

    Male gray treefrogs advertise for mates using calls that consist of a series of pulses. Pulse duration, interpulse interval, and pulse shape determine whether a call is recognized as a conspecific signal by females. Females use call rate and call pulse number to assess relative calling performance by males, and prefer males that display high calling efforts. However, within choruses call overlap among males and background noise can compromise the ability of females to detect and correctly interpret temporal information in calls. Phonotaxis tests using calls suffering from different patterns of overlap or with internal gaps were used to investigate specific consequences of interference and masking as well as mechanisms that might alleviate such problems. Our data indicate that females do not employ a process analogous to phonemic restoration to ``fill in'' missing call segments; however, if a sufficient percent of call elements fall within species-specific ranges, females may ignore call anomalies. Additional findings are generally consistent with those from a recent study on anuran auditory midbrain neurons that count and indicate that inappropriate pulse intervals can reset the pulse counting process. [Work supported by NSF and a Pace University Eugene M. Lang Research Fellowship.

  7. Contact zone dynamics during early stages of speciation in a chorus frog (Pseudacris crucifer).

    PubMed

    Stewart, K A; Austin, J D; Zamudio, K R; Lougheed, S C

    2016-02-01

    Characterizing the genetic and behavioural consequences of contact between previously geographically isolated lineages provides insights into the mechanisms underlying diversification and ultimately speciation. The spring peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) is a widespread Nearctic chorus frog with six divergent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages, many of which came into secondary contact during the Holocene. We examined genetics, morphology, advertisement calls and female preference for two lineages that began diverging in allopatry in the Pliocene and now overlap in southwestern Ontario, Canada. We found non-coincident clines in mtDNA and nuclear DNA, mirroring directionality of premating isolation barriers. We also found divergence in a range of traits between these two lineages, displacement in male call attributes and female preference for calls of their natal lineage in sympatry. Hybrids were morphologically distinct from both parental lineages, but hybrid male calls were acoustically intermediate. Female hybrids showed asymmetrical preference for Eastern male calls. These results considered together provide evidence of either unidirectional hybridization or selection against hybrids, potentially implying reproductive character displacement. Our work demonstrates the utility of integrated, multi-character approaches to understanding the processes of divergence and the nature of speciation. PMID:26626576

  8. Fat frogs, mobile genes: unexpected phylogeographic patterns for the ornate chorus frog (Pseudacris ornata).

    PubMed

    Degner, Jacob F; Silva, Diana M; Hether, Tyler D; Daza, Juan M; Hoffman, Eric A

    2010-06-01

    The southeastern coastal plain of the United States is a region marked by extraordinary phylogeographic congruence that is frequently attributed to the changing sea levels that occurred during the glacial-interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene epoch. A phylogeographic break corresponding to the Apalachicola River has been suggested for many species studied to date that are endemic to this region. Here, we used this pattern of phylogeographic congruence to develop and test explicit hypotheses about the genetic structure in the ornate chorus frog (Pseudacris ornata). Using 1299 bp of mtDNA sequence and seven nuclear microsatellite markers in 13 natural populations of P. ornata, we found three clades corresponding to geographically distinct regions; one spans the Apalachicola River (Southern Clade), one encompasses Georgia and South Carolina (Central Clade) and a third comprises more northerly individuals (Northern Clade). However, it does not appear that typical phylogeographic barriers demarcate these clades. Instead, isolation by distance across the range of the entire species explained the pattern of genetic variation that we observed. We propose that P. ornata was historically widespread in the southeastern United States, and that a balance between genetic drift and migration was the root of the genetic divergence among populations. Additionally, we investigated fine-scale patterns of genetic structure and found the spatial scale at which there was significant genetic structure varied among the regions studied. Furthermore, we discuss our results in light of other phylogeographic studies of southeastern coastal plain organisms and in relation to amphibian conservation and management. PMID:20497321

  9. Deadly Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    In Fox River Grove, Illinois, 7 teenagers were killed the morning of October 25, 1995, when a 620-ton commuter train crashed into the rear end of their school bus. School, transportation, and safety officials have focused on three areas: train crossings and signals, bus-driver training, and school-bus construction. Lists 10 vital lessons for…

  10. Worldly Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Board Journal, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reports on an elementary school in Tokyo, Japan; an apprenticeship program in Germany; and a magnet school in Evanston, Illinois. Suggests some lessons U.S educators might learn from these nations in the areas of national curriculum, length of school year, tracking, and school-to-work transition. (MLF)

  11. Modeling Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    As teachers learn new pedagogical strategies, they crave explicit demonstrations that show them how the new strategies will work with their students in their classrooms. Successful instructional coaches, therefore, understand the importance of modeling lessons to help teachers develop a vision of effective instruction. The author, an experienced…

  12. Effect of plasma density on diffusion rates due to wave particle interactions with chorus and plasmaspheric hiss: extreme event analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, A.; Boscher, D.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Maget, V.

    2014-08-01

    Wave particle interactions play an important role in controlling the dynamics of the radiation belts. The purpose of this study is to estimate how variations in the plasma density can affect diffusion rates resulting from interactions between chorus waves and plasmaspheric hiss with energetic particles and the resulting evolution of the energetic electron population. We perform a statistical analysis of the electron density derived from the plasma wave experiment on the CRRES satellite for two magnetic local time sectors corresponding to near midnight and near noon. We present the cumulative probability distribution of the electron plasma density for three levels of magnetic activity as measured by Kp. The largest densities are seen near L* = 2.5 while the smallest occur near L* = 6. The broadest distribution, corresponding to the greatest variability, occurs near L* = 4. We calculate diffusion coefficients for plasmaspheric hiss and whistler mode chorus for extreme values of the electron density and estimate the effects on the radiation belts using the Salammbô model. At L* = 4 and L* = 6, in the low density case, using the density from the 5th percentile of the cumulative distribution function, electron energy diffusion by chorus waves is strongest at 2 MeV and increases the flux by up to 3 orders of magnitude over a period of 24 h. In contrast, in the high density case, using the density from the 95th percentile, there is little acceleration at energies above 800 keV at L* = 6, and virtually no acceleration at L* = 4. In this case the strongest energy diffusion occurs at lower energies around 400 keV where the flux at L* = 6 increases 3 orders of magnitude.

  13. The longitudinal dependence of whistler and chorus characteristics observed on the ground near L=4

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.J. ); Carpenter, D.L. ); Corcuff, Y. ); Rash, J.P.S. ); Bering, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Whistler activity at L {approx equal} 4 is known to be a function of longitude, peaking in the Weddell Sea sector of Antarctica; a combination of source and propagation factors, the latter possibly partly associated with the South Atlantic geomagnetic anomaly, is believed to be responsible. There is evidence, for example from satellite surveys, that chorus and hiss activity may also be longitude dependent. To investigate this further, the authors have compared VLF data from four L {approx equal} 4 Antarctic stations from a 2-day period in June 1982. Siple, Halley, and Sanae form a closely spaced ({approximately}20 {degree}- 0{degree} geomagnetic longitude) triplet, while Kerguelen is {approximately}120{degrees} (geomagnetic) to the east, on the opposite side of the anomaly. To a large extent there was a repeatable diurnal variation in activity at all stations on the two days. Events observed at Siple tended to be similar to those observed {approximately} 9 hours earlier (the same MLT) at Kerguelen on the same day. There was a very marked drop-off in both whistler and VLF emission activity between Siple and Halley on the one hand and Sanae on the other. The reason for this is not clear; it may be either a source effect such as the lower occurence of lightning over eastern North America compared to the adjacent Atlantic Ocean, or else a wave-particle interaction effect whereby the conditions for wave growth or amplification are more favorable, or substorm particle injections penetrate the magnetosphere more deeply, at the longitude of Siple than further east. Comparison of the spectral forms of whistler mode activity at neighboring stations suggests that wave generation occurs simultaneously over relatively wide longitude (or local time) sectors ({approx gt} 30{degrees} or 2 hours). Individual interaction regions are smaller than this, {approx lt} 5{degrees} in longitude, comparable with the previously inferred sizes of whistler ducts.

  14. MISCANTHUS X GIGANTEUS AS A NEW HIGHLY EFFICIENT PHYTOREMEDIATION AGENT FOR IMPROVING SOILS CONTAMINATED BY PESTICIDES RESIDUES AND SUPPLEMENTED CONTAMINANTS.

    PubMed

    Nurzhanova, A; Pidlisnyuk, V; Kalugin, S; Stefanovska, T; Drimal, M

    2015-01-01

    Soil monitoring was accomplished at 76 former pesticide storehouses in Kazakhstan. Gas chromatography analysis was limited to the organochlorine pesticides DDT (p,p'-dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) and HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane), and their associated metabolites and isomers: 2.4'-DDD (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane); 4.4'-DDD; 4.4'-DDT; 4.4'-DDE (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethylene); α-HCH; β-HCH and γ-HCH. The studies showed exceeding of Maximum Acceptable Concentration (MAC) by 10 times at soil samples taken at 24 former pesticide storehouses, and the basic pollutants were isomers of α-HCH, β-HCH and metabolite of 4.4'-DDE, 4.4'-DDT, supplemented by heavy metals. Monitoring data demonstrated the potential ecological danger and health risk posed by the sites, especially those located near populated areas. In order to eliminate the negative environmental and health effect it was proposed to use phytotechnology with second generation biofuel crop Miscanthus x giganteus. The technology applied directly at the contaminated area (in situ), helping to decrease costs and to reduce exposure from polluted sites. The plant shows good growing at the soil contaminated by pesticides during vegetation season. PMID:27141732

  15. Purification and Characterization of a Unique Pectin Lyase from Aspergillus giganteus Able to Release Unsaturated Monogalacturonate during Pectin Degradation.

    PubMed

    Pedrolli, Danielle Biscaro; Carmona, Eleonora Cano

    2014-01-01

    A pectin lyase, named PLIII, was purified to homogeneity from the culture filtrate of Aspergillus giganteus grown in submerged culture containing orange peel waste as carbon source. PLIII was able to digest apple pectin and citrus pectins with different degrees of methyl esterification. Interestingly, the PLIII activity was stimulated in the presence of some divalent cations including Pb(2+) and was not significantly affected by Hg(2+). Like other pectin lyases, PLIII is stimulated by but is not dependent on Ca(2+). The main soluble product released during the degradation of pectic substances promoted by the PLIII is compatible with an unsaturated monogalacturonate. PLIII is a unique enzyme able to release unsaturated monogalacturonate as the only soluble product during the degradation of pectic substances; therefore, PLIII was classified as an exo-pectin lyase. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of an exo-pectin lyase. The PLIII described in this work is potentially useful for ethanol production from pectin-rich biomass, besides other common applications for alkaline pectinases like preparation of textile fibers, coffee and tea fermentation, vegetable oil extraction, and the treatment of pulp in papermaking. PMID:25610636

  16. Structural characterization of a novel neutral polysaccharide from Lentinus giganteus and its antitumor activity through inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuting; Zhao, Yingting; Zeng, Hongliang; Zhang, Yaling; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-12-10

    A novel neutral polysaccharide (LGPS-1), with a molecular weight of 1.547×10(5)Da, was isolated from Lentinus giganteus by precipitation and purification. The monosaccharides included d-mannose (Man), d-glucose (Glc) and d-galactose (Gal) with a molar ratio of 3.0:4.1:7.1. The backbone of LGPS-1 was composed of 1,6-Galp and 1,3,6-Manp whereas the branches were composed of 1,6-Glcp and 1-Glcp. The anticancer efficacy of LGPS-1 was assessed using HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The results showed that LGPS-1 inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells and also induced the activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that LGSP-1 significantly induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δym), increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, promoted the release of cytochrome c into cytoplasm as well as inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt in HepG2 cells. These findings suggest that LGPS-1 induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells through intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. PMID:27577914

  17. Purification and Characterization of a Unique Pectin Lyase from Aspergillus giganteus Able to Release Unsaturated Monogalacturonate during Pectin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Eleonora Cano

    2014-01-01

    A pectin lyase, named PLIII, was purified to homogeneity from the culture filtrate of Aspergillus giganteus grown in submerged culture containing orange peel waste as carbon source. PLIII was able to digest apple pectin and citrus pectins with different degrees of methyl esterification. Interestingly, the PLIII activity was stimulated in the presence of some divalent cations including Pb2+ and was not significantly affected by Hg2+. Like other pectin lyases, PLIII is stimulated by but is not dependent on Ca2+. The main soluble product released during the degradation of pectic substances promoted by the PLIII is compatible with an unsaturated monogalacturonate. PLIII is a unique enzyme able to release unsaturated monogalacturonate as the only soluble product during the degradation of pectic substances; therefore, PLIII was classified as an exo-pectin lyase. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of an exo-pectin lyase. The PLIII described in this work is potentially useful for ethanol production from pectin-rich biomass, besides other common applications for alkaline pectinases like preparation of textile fibers, coffee and tea fermentation, vegetable oil extraction, and the treatment of pulp in papermaking. PMID:25610636

  18. Endothelial Lessons.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    This essay focuses on nine important lessons learned during more than thirty years of endothelial research. They include: the danger of hiding behind a word, the confusion generated by abbreviations, the need to define the physiological role of the response studied, the local role of endothelium- dependent responses, the strength of pharmacological analyses, endothelial dysfunction as consequence and cause of disease, the importance of rigorous protocols, the primacy of in vivo studies and the importance of serendipity. PMID:26638800

  19. Swimming Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his experience as an 11-year-old swimmer and shares the lessons he learned as a member of the swim team. In his experience as one of the slowest team members, he discovered that slow and steady does not win the race, and when the focus is only on achievement, one loses the value of failure. As an adult, he…

  20. Model of lifetimes of the outer radiation belt electrons in a realistic magnetic field using realistic chorus wave parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri

    2014-02-01

    The outer radiation belt electrons in the inner magnetosphere show high variability during the geomagnetically disturbed conditions. Quasi-linear diffusion theory provides both a framework for global prediction of particle loss at different energies and an understanding of the dynamics of different particle populations. It has been recently shown that the pitch angle scattering of electrons due to wave-particle interaction with chorus waves modeled in a realistic magnetic field may be significantly different from those estimated in a dipole model. In this work, we present the lifetimes of 1 keV-2 MeV electrons computed in the Tsyganenko 89 magnetic field model for the night, dawn, prenoon, and postnoon magnetic local time (MLT) sectors for different levels of geomagnetic activity and distances. The lifetimes in the realistic field are also compared to those computed in the dipole model. We develop a realistic chorus lower band and upper band wave models for each MLT sector using the recent statistical studies of wave amplitude, wave normal angle, and wave spectral density distributions as functions of magnetic latitude, distance, and Kp index. The increase of plasma trough density with increasing latitude is also included. The obtained in the Tsyganenko 89 field electron lifetimes are parameterized and can be used in 2-D/3-D/4-D convection and particle tracing codes.

  1. Method for direct detection of pitch angle scattering of energetic electrons caused by whistler mode chorus emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA), a new instrument proposed by Fukuhara et al. (2009), measures the relative phase angle between the wave magnetic field vector and the velocity vector of each particle and calculates the energy exchange from waves to particles. In this study, we expand its applicability by proposing a method of using the WPIA to directly detect pitch angle scattering of resonant particles by plasma waves by calculating the g values. The g value is defined as the accumulation value of the Lorentz force acting on each particle and indicates the lost momentum of waves. We apply the proposed method to the results of a one-dimensional electron hybrid simulation reproducing the generation of whistler mode chorus emissions around the magnetic equator. Using the wave and particle data obtained at fixed observation points assumed in the simulation system, we conduct a pseudo-observation of the simulation result using the WPIA and analyze the g values. Our analysis yielded significant values indicating the strong pitch angle scattering for electrons in the kinetic energy and pitch angle ranges satisfying the cyclotron resonance condition with the reproduced chorus emissions. The results of this study demonstrate that the proposed method enables us to directly and quantitatively identify the location at which pitch angle scattering occurs in the simulation system and that the method can be applied to the results of space-based observations by the forthcoming Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite.

  2. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface) enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species. PMID:26895178

  3. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface) enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species. PMID:26895178

  4. Lesson Learning at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  5. Lessons in American Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson Lindsay, Debra Kay

    2006-01-01

    "Lessons in American Music," by Debra Kay Robinson Lindsay, is a collection of lessons covering William Billings, Stephen Foster, Scott Joplin, and "The Star-Spangled Banner." This book is an all-in-one resource for teachers, offering lesson plans, activities, sheet music, and assessments. The set of lessons on William Billings will let your…

  6. Refuge or Reservoir? The Potential Impacts of the Biofuel Crop Miscanthus x giganteus on a Major Pest of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Joseph L.; Raghu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Interest in the cultivation of biomass crops like the C4 grass Miscanthus x giganteus (Miscanthus) is increasing as global demand for biofuel grows. In the US, Miscanthus is promoted as a crop well-suited to the Corn Belt where it could be cultivated on marginal land interposed with maize and soybean. Interactions (direct and indirect) of Miscanthus, maize, and the major Corn Belt pest of maize, the western corn rootworm, (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, WCR) are unknown. Adding a perennial grass/biomass crop to this system is concerning since WCR is adapted to the continuous availability of its grass host, maize (Zea mays). Methodology/Principal Findings In a greenhouse and field study, we investigated WCR development and oviposition on Miscanthus. The suitability of Miscanthus for WCR development varied across different WCR populations. Data trends indicate that WCR populations that express behavioural resistance to crop rotation performed as well on Miscanthus as on maize. Over the entire study, total adult WCR emergence from Miscanthus (212 WCR) was 29.6% of that from maize (717 WCR). Adult dry weight was 75–80% that of WCR from maize; female emergence patterns on Miscanthus were similar to females developing on maize. There was no difference in the mean no. of WCR eggs laid at the base of Miscanthus and maize in the field. Conclusions/Significance Field oviposition and significant WCR emergence from Miscanthus raises many questions about the nature of likely interactions between Miscanthus, maize and WCR and the potential for Miscanthus to act as a refuge or reservoir for Corn Belt WCR. Responsible consideration of the benefits and risks associated with Corn Belt Miscanthus are critical to protecting an agroecosystem that we depend on for food, feed, and increasingly, fuel. Implications for European agroecosystems in which Miscanthus is being proposed are also discussed in light of the WCR's recent invasion into Europe. PMID:20016814

  7. Microclimatological characteristics of a miscanthus (Miscanthus cv. giganteus) stand during stable conditionsat night in the nonvegetative winter period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitzinger, J.; Kössler, Ch.

    Microclimatological data obtained during a field experiment in the nongrowing winter period were used to study the microclimatologically stable night conditions of a 200×150m miscanthus (Miscanthus cv. giganteus) stand and compared to open field conditions. The microclimatological pattern within the miscanthus canopy was characterized by long-wave radiative cooling of the plant stand and by an established temperature inversion within the canopy at calm nights. The results show that there are significant differences in air temperature and energy balance components between the open field and the miscanthus field during calm and clear nights. In general, net radiation difference during the cold and calm nights was relatively constant and about 20Wm-2 less negative in miscanthus (because of lower surface temperatures) than at the open field. Air temperature differences also remained fairly constant and were up to 3°C lower than at the open field (at the height of 1m). Through thermal inversion cold air accumulated in the lower parts of the canopy as shown by the vertical air temperature profiles. They showed a greater amplitude within the diurnal cycle in the miscanthus stand than in the open field. Through the onset of wind, temperature profiles changed rapidly and differences diminished. Vertical katabatic air drainage into the canopy layers was estimated indirectly by using the energy balance approach. It was calculated from the significant energy balance closure gap and showed a mean air exchange rate of up to 22m3m-2h-1, related to a stand volume of 1m2 area and 4m height, during the mostly calm and clear nights, depending on the canopy net radiation and turbulent heat exchange forced by slight wind spells. Quantitative uncertainties in calculated cold air drainage which are introduced by the measurement method and certain assumptions in the calculations, were considered in a sensitivity analysis. In spite of these uncertainties evidence of katabatic cold air

  8. Heterogeneity and Glycan Masking of Cell Wall Microstructures in the Stems of Miscanthus x giganteus, and Its Parents M. sinensis and M. sacchariflorus

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jie; Bosch, Maurice; Knox, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls, being repositories of fixed carbon, are important sources of biomass and renewable energy. Miscanthus species are fast growing grasses with a high biomass yield and they have been identified as potential bioenergy crops. Miscanthus x giganteus is the sterile hybrid between M. sinensis and M. sacchariflorus, with a faster and taller growth than its parents. In this study, the occurrence of cell wall polysaccharides in stems of Miscanthus species has been determined using fluorescence imaging with sets of cell wall directed monoclonal antibodies. Heteroxylan and mixed linkage-glucan (MLG) epitopes are abundant in stem cell walls of Miscanthus species, but their distributions are different in relation to the interfascicular parenchyma and these epitopes also display different developmental dynamics. Detection of pectic homogalacturonan (HG) epitopes was often restricted to intercellular spaces of parenchyma regions and, notably, the high methyl ester LM20 HG epitope was specifically abundant in the pith parenchyma cell walls of M. x giganteus. Some cell wall probes cannot access their target glycan epitopes because of masking by other polysaccharides. In the case of Miscanthus stems, masking of xyloglucan by heteroxylan and masking of pectic galactan by heteroxylan and MLG was detected in certain cell wall regions. Knowledge of tissue level heterogeneity of polysaccharide distributions and molecular architectures in Miscanthus cell wall structures will be important for both understanding growth mechanisms and also for the development of potential strategies for the efficient deconstruction of Miscanthus biomass. PMID:24312403

  9. Reconstruction of Chorus Type Whistler Waves Distribution in the Radiation Belts and Inner Magnetosphere Using Ray Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Agapitov, O.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Rolland, G.

    2011-12-01

    The quasi-monochromatic whistler wave packets are supposed to be formed in the vicinity of the magnetic equator and are frequently observed for example by Cluster spacecraft. The objective of our study is a reconstruction of realistic distribution of chorus emissions in radiation belts and in inner magnetosphere. To achieve this aim the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the major characteristics of the chorus signal around the equator region, namely, its averaged wave vector, wave vector distribution, Poynting flux and polarization. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using ray tracing technique. We developed the original code which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to obtain hot plasma dispersion function values along the wave packet trajectory. The observed (real) whistler wave distributions at the equator are first fitted to reproduce the observed waveform using Cluster observations (initial conditions) and then these rays are propagated numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. The density distribution of the magnetospheric particles is taken from the Gallagher et al. package that is provided by the authors and distributed as free software. Ray tracing allows one to reconstruct the properties of waves such as electric and magnetic fields, and the width of the wavepacket in k-space along the propagation path. The calculations take into account realistic effects of the spreading of the signal due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma, the dependence of signal propagation characteristics upon initial conditions, etc. Our calculations make possible to follow the wave packets and calculate their properties in the desired regions, e.g. the regions where an efficient wave-particle interaction is expected to occur. We present here the comparison between the distributions obtained with the statistical data sets of

  10. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Continuing lessons and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Since June 2011, the ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) is providing 1 kW power, 100 Mbs network communications and PPS timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4728 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated physical and biogeochemical variability of the water column near-monthly since 1988. The abyssal near bottom acoustic Doppler profiler data are showing stronger than expected internal tide flows and turbulence 20-80 m above bottom. In this oligotrophic environment, the video camera has detected significant biological activity. Acoustic data collected on two hydrophones clearly show very high call density of baleen whales during September-May and sperm whale choruses spread throughout the year. Recent Navy exercises provided examples of anthropogenic sounds. We are also monitoring in real time an acoustic "heartbeat" signal from the nearby HOT Profiler mooring (M. Alford et al.). ACO operation over the last year continues to provide valuable lessons. Several failures occurred at or during deployment, including two ground faults that have isolated two CTDs, a fluorometer, and an acoustic modem from the system. Two independent LED light systems failed after 4 and 6 weeks. Most recently, the pressure sensor has failed perhaps due to loss of vacuum in the quartz crystal chamber. The one remaining conductivity/temperature sensor is episodically, but strongly, affected by thermal plume signatures from the nearby power supply. Understanding the reasons for these failures and limitations will be necessary to improve the methodologies for sustained long-term abyssal measurements. This will be well worth the effort, as suggested by the surprisingly rich video, ADCP, and acoustic data sets.

  11. Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    The public health nurses’ scope of practice explicitly includes child protection within their role, which places them in a prime position to identify child protection concerns. This role compliments that of other professions and voluntary agenices who work with children. Public health nurses are in a privileged position as they form a relationship with the child’s parent(s)/guardian(s) and are able to see the child in its own environment, which many professionals cannot. Child protection in Ireland, while influenced by other countries, has progressed through a distinct pathway that streamlined protocols and procedures. However, despite the above serious failures have occurred in the Irish system, and inquiries over the past 20 years persistently present similar contributing factors, namely, the lack of standardized and comprehensive service responses. Moreover, poor practice is compounded by the lack of recognition of the various interactional processes taking place within and between the different agencies of child protection, leading to psychological barriers in communication. This article will explore the lessons learned for public health nurses practice in safeguarding children in the Republic of Ireland. PMID:27335944

  12. Gyroresonant interactions between the radiation belt electrons and whistler mode chorus waves in the radiation environments of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y. Y.; Menietti, J. D.; Gu, X.; Kim, K. C.; Horne, R. B.

    2012-11-01

    In the current study we perform a comparative analysis of the gyroresonant interactions of whistler mode waves with radiation belt electrons in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. Our primary goal is to evaluate the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions with chorus waves and determine whether chorus waves can produce net acceleration or net loss of radiation belt electrons on the outer planets. The ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency is a key parameter that determines the efficiency of the pitch angle and energy resonant scattering. We present a comparison of statistical maps of the ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency for Jupiter, Saturn and Earth in terms of radial distance and latitude. Preliminary maps of the plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio and 2D simulations of pitch angle and energy diffusion using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) indicate that the Kronian plasma environment is not likely to support as efficient gyroresonant interactions with whistler mode chorus waves as in the Terrestrial or Jovian environments. Inefficiency of the local acceleration by whistler mode waves in the Kronian environment raises important questions about the origin of the relativistic electrons in the Saturn's radiation belts. Two-dimensional diffusive simulations of local acceleration and loss to the atmosphere using the VERB code confirm previous suggestions that the acceleration of electrons may be very efficient in the outer radiation belt of Jupiter. However, sensitivity simulations also show that the result of the competition between acceleration and loss in the Jupiter's magnetosphere strongly depends on the currently unknown latitudinal distribution of chorus waves that will be provided by the upcoming Juno mission. If waves extend to high latitudes, it is likely that the loss rates due to whistler mode waves will exceed energization rates.

  13. Gyroresonant interactions between the radiation belt electrons and whistler mode chorus waves in the radiation environments of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri; Horn, Richard; Gu, Xudong; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Menietti, Doug

    2013-04-01

    In the current study we perform a comparative analysis of the gyroresonant interactions of whistler mode waves with radiation belt electrons in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. Our primary goal is to evaluate the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions with chorus waves and determine whether chorus waves can produce net acceleration or net loss of radiation belt electrons on the outer planets. The ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency is a key parameter that determines the efficiency of the pitch angle and energy resonant scattering. We present a comparison of statistical maps of the ratio of plasma frequency to gyrofrequency for Jupiter, Saturn and Earth in terms of radial distance and latitude. Preliminary maps of the plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio and 2D simulations of pitch angle and energy diffusion using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) indicate that the Kronian plasma environment is not likely to support as efficient gyroresonant interactions with whistler mode chorus waves as in the Terrestrial or Jovian environments. Inefficiency of the local acceleration by whistler mode waves in the Kronian environment raises important questions about the origin of the relativistic electrons in the Saturn's radiation belts. Two-dimensional diffusive simulations of local acceleration and loss to the atmosphere using the VERB code confirm previous suggestions that the acceleration of electrons may be very efficient in the outer radiation belt of Jupiter. However, sensitivity simulations also show that the result of the competition between acceleration and loss in the Jupiter's magnetosphere strongly depends on the currently unknown latitudinal distribution of chorus waves that will be provided by the upcoming Juno mission. If waves extend to high latitudes, it is likely that the loss rates due to whistler mode waves will exceed energization rates.

  14. The adhesive protein of Choromytilus chorus (Molina, 1782) and Aulacomya ater (Molina, 1782): a proline-rich and a glycine-rich polyphenolic protein.

    PubMed

    Burzio, L A; Saéz, C; Pardo, J; Waite, J H; Burzio, L O

    2000-06-15

    The adhesive polyphenolic proteins from Aulacomya ater and Choromytilus chorus with apparent molecular masses of 135000 and 105000, respectively, were digested with trypsin and the peptides produced resolved by reversed phase liquid chromatography. About 5 and 12 major peptides were obtained from the protein of A. ater and C. chorus, respectively. The major peptides were purified by reverse-phase chromatography and the amino acid sequence indicates that both polyphenolic proteins consisted of repeated sequence motifs in their primary structure. The major peptides of A. ater contain seven amino acids corresponding to the consensus sequence AGYGGXK, whereas the tyrosine was always found as 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa), the X residue in position 6 was either valine, leucine or isoleucine, and the carboxy terminal was either lysine or hydroxylysine. On the other hand, the major peptides of C. chorus ranged in size from 6 to 21 amino acids and the majority correspond to the consensus sequence AKPSKYPTGYKPPVK. Both proteins differ markedly in the sequence of their tryptic peptides, but they share the common characteristics of other adhesive proteins in having a tandem sequence repeat in their primary structure. PMID:11004549

  15. Mobile Lessons: Lessons Based on Geo-Referenced Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Sylvain; Moulin, Claude; Sanna, Raffaella; Pintus, Antonio

    The term "mobile lessons" is coined for lessons held outside of "artificial" environments, such as classrooms. During these lessons, all actors are mobile and must move to do the required tasks. Themes tackled in such lessons may be as varied as geography, history, ecology, and linguistics. The use of mobile lessons is not a new teaching strategy,…

  16. Lessons on the Northwest Ordinance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    The purpose of this packet of six lessons is to make it easier for teachers to include substantial instruction about the Northwest Ordinance in their secondary school courses. Each lesson includes a lesson plan for teachers and a lesson for students to study. The lessons are concise and can be completed in one or two class meetings. Each lesson…

  17. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  18. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  19. Resonance zones and quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for radiation belt energetic electron interaction with oblique chorus waves in the Dungey magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu Xudong; Zhao Zhengyu; Zhou Chen

    2012-07-15

    The resonance regions for resonant interactions of radiation belt electrons with obliquely propagating whistler-mode chorus waves are investigated in detail in the Dungey magnetic fields that are parameterized by the intensity of uniform southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz or, equivalently, by the values of D=(M/B{sub z,0}){sup 1/3} (where M is the magnetic moment of the dipole and B{sub z,0} is the uniform southward IMF normal to the dipole's equatorial plane). Adoption of background magnetic field model can considerably modify the determination of resonance regions. Compared to the results for the case of D = 50 (very close to the dipole field), the latitudinal coverage of resonance regions for 200 keV electrons interacting with chorus waves tends to become narrower for smaller D-values, regardless of equatorial pitch angle, resonance harmonics, and wave normal angle. In contrast, resonance regions for 1 MeV electrons tend to have very similar spatial lengths along the field line for various Dungey magnetic field models but cover different magnetic field intervals, indicative of a strong dependence on electron energy. For any given magnetic field line, the resonance regions where chorus-electron resonant interactions can take place rely closely on equatorial pitch angle, resonance harmonics, and kinetic energy. The resonance regions tend to cover broader latitudinal ranges for smaller equatorial pitch angles, higher resonance harmonics, and lower electron energies, consistent with the results in Ni and Summers [Phys. Plasmas 17, 042902, 042903 (2010)]. Calculations of quasi-linear bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients for radiation belt electrons due to nightside chorus waves indicate that the resultant scattering rates differ from using different Dungey magnetic field models, demonstrating a strong dependence of wave-induced electron scattering effect on the adoption of magnetic field model. Our results suggest that resonant wave

  20. Effects of hydroperiod duration on survival, developmental rate, and size at metamorphosis in boreal chorus frog tadpoles (Pseudacris maculata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amburgey, Staci; Funk, W. Chris; Murphy, Melanie; Muths, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between climate-driven habitat conditions and survival is key to preserving biodiversity in the face of rapid climate change. Hydroperiod—the length of time water is in a wetland—is a critical limiting habitat variable for amphibians as larvae must metamorphose before ponds dry. Changes in precipitation and temperature patterns are affecting hydroperiod globally, but the impact of these changes on amphibian persistence is poorly understood. We studied the responses of Boreal Chorus Frog (Pseudacris maculata) tadpoles to simulated hydroperiods (i.e., water level reductions) in the laboratory using individuals collected from ponds spanning a range of natural hydroperiods (Colorado Front Range, USA). To assess the effects of experimental hydroperiod reduction, we measured mortality, time to metamorphosis, and size at metamorphosis. We found that tadpoles grew at rates reflecting the hydroperiods of their native ponds, regardless of experimental treatment. Tadpoles from permanent ponds metamorphosed faster than those from ephemeral ponds across all experimental treatments, a pattern which may represent a predation selection gradient or countergradient variation in developmental rates. Size at metamorphosis did not vary across experimental treatments. Mortality was low overall but varied with pond of origin. Our results suggest that adaptation to local hydroperiod and/or predation and temperature conditions is important in P. maculata. Moreover, the lack of a plastic response to reduced hydroperiods suggests that P. maculata may not be able to metamorphose quickly enough to escape drying ponds. These results have important implications for amphibian persistence in ponds predicted to dry more quickly due to rapid climate change.

  1. Lessons of the Narragansetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narraganset Tribal Education Project, Inc., Charleston, RI.

    The curriculum guide presents lesson plans and suggested activities for a six-week mini course for secondary students on the culture and history of the Narragansett Indians. It is part of the Narragansett Tribe Ethnic Heritage Program. An outline of the general format and content suggests a time allotment for each of the 12 lessons. The lessons…

  2. Collaborative Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This collection consists of 41 collaborative lesson plans developed by 99 Virginia teachers at 18 primarily High Schools that Work (HSTW) and tech prep sites. It is divided into three sections: career connection, community connection, and consumer connection. Two types of lesson descriptions which support HSTW key practices, and Virginia's Tech…

  3. The Odyssey. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Homer's "Odyssey," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand literature originally presented in one genre can, with care, be adapted to another genre; and adapters of a literary work into drama must consider dialogue and stage directions. The main activity of the lesson involves students converting a scene…

  4. Don Quixote. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooks, Kristen

    Based on Miguel de Cervantes' novel "Don Quixote," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Quixote's misperceptions are understandable; writers often describe one object to sound as if it were something else; and metaphors help readers see with new eyes. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  5. Mini Lessons from FDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Eight self-contained lessons present information about topics of current interest in the Food and Drug Administration. Multidisciplinary in nature, the lessons can be integrated into ongoing activities in elementary or secondary level reading, math, language arts, social studies, science, art, health, consumer education, and home economics. The…

  6. Lessons in Everyday Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boesch, Kit

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author presents and discusses some of the lessons she has learned in everyday leadership. It's the kind of leadership one learns when he or she doesn't expect it--and the kind of lessons one teaches when he or she doesn't even know he or she is doing it.

  7. Ben Franklin. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Benjamin Franklin's "Poor Richard's Almanac," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Ben Franklin is known, among other things, for his wit and wisdom; that Franklin published an almanac for 25 years; and he scattered aphorisms throughout the almanac. The main activity in the lesson is for students…

  8. Soybean Production Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Keith R.

    These lesson plans for teaching soybean production in a secondary or postsecondary vocational agriculture class are organized in nine units and cover the following topics: raising soybeans, optimum tillage, fertilizer and lime, seed selection, pest management, planting, troubleshooting, double cropping, and harvesting. Each lesson plan contains…

  9. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  10. Great Expectations. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Kelley

    Based on Charles Dickens' novel "Great Expectations," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand the differences between totalitarianism and democracy; and a that a writer of a story considers theme, plot, characters, setting, and point of view. The main activity of the lesson involves students working in groups to…

  11. Ohio Agriscience Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Robert D., II, Comp.; Waidelich, William D., Comp.

    This document, which is intended for Ohio agriculture teachers, contains lesson plans for an eight-unit competency-based course in agriscience. Each lesson plan contains some or all of the following items: (1) unit title; (2) competency/terminal performance objective; (3) competency builders/pupil performance objectives; (4) list of applied…

  12. A Lesson in Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnt, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one classroom's experience integrating a three-part lesson that focused on tolerance. In the lesson, students examined works by American folk-art painter Edward Hicks, researched quotes about tolerance in society, and applied calligraphy skills to an original composition.

  13. Automatic Dance Lesson Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang; Leung, H.; Yue, Lihua; Deng, LiQun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic lesson generation system is presented which is suitable in a learning-by-mimicking scenario where the learning objects can be represented as multiattribute time series data. The dance is used as an example in this paper to illustrate the idea. Given a dance motion sequence as the input, the proposed lesson generation…

  14. Mathematics Lessons without ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Kath; Hibbs, John

    2006-01-01

    In the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) Easter conference, 2006, the authors presented a list of important aspects of mathematics lessons, recommended for students to have a positive attitude to mathematics and for teachers to acquire effective teaching. The following are discussed in detail: (1) Mathematics lessons without good…

  15. How Does a Lesson Plan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This manual for secondary school teachers offers sample lesson plans that may be used to guide and stimulate experimentation and development of creative instructional units. Lesson plan components are defined, and various types of lessons and their significant characteristics are identified. These characteristic types of lessons are illustrated,…

  16. A retrospective study of Babesia macropus associated with morbidity and mortality in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis)

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Shannon L.; Peacock, Christopher S.; Choo, Ace Y.L.; Cook, Roger W.; O'Donoghue, Peter; Crameri, Sandra; Vogelnest, Larry; Gordon, Anita N.; Scott, Jenni L.; Rose, Karrie

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 38 cases of infection by Babesia macropus, associated with a syndrome of anaemia and debility in hand-reared or free-ranging juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from coastal New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland between 1995 and 2013. Infection with B. macropus is recorded for the first time in agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) from far north Queensland. Animals in which B. macropus infection was considered to be the primary cause of morbidity had marked anaemia, lethargy and neurological signs, and often died. In these cases, parasitised erythrocytes were few or undetectable in peripheral blood samples but were sequestered in large numbers within small vessels of visceral organs, particularly in the kidney and brain, associated with distinctive clusters of extraerythrocytic organisms. Initial identification of this piroplasm in peripheral blood smears and in tissue impression smears and histological sections was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and molecular analysis. Samples of kidney, brain or blood were tested using PCR and DNA sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA and heat shock protein 70 gene using primers specific for piroplasms. The piroplasm detected in these samples had 100% sequence identity in the 18S rRNA region with the recently described Babesia macropus in two eastern grey kangaroos from New South Wales and Queensland, and a high degree of similarity to an unnamed Babesia sp. recently detected in three woylies (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi) in Western Australia. PMID:26106576

  17. Potential of the beneficial fungus Trichoderma to enhance ecosystem-service provision in the biofuel grass Miscanthus x giganteus in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Chirino-Valle, Ivan; Kandula, Diwakar; Littlejohn, Chris; Hill, Robert; Walker, Mark; Shields, Morgan; Cummings, Nicholas; Hettiarachchi, Dilani; Wratten, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The sterile hybrid grass Miscanthus x giganteus (Mxg) can produce more than 30 t dry matter/ha/year. This biomass has a range of uses, including animal bedding and a source of heating fuel. The grass provides a wide range of other ecosystem services (ES), including shelter for crops and livestock, a refuge for beneficial arthropods, reptiles and earthworms and is an ideal cellulosic feedstock for liquid biofuels such as renewable (drop-in) diesel. In this study, the effects of different strains of the beneficial fungus Trichoderma on above- and below-ground biomass of Mxg were evaluated in glasshouse and field experiments, the latter on a commercial dairy farm over two years. Other ES benefits of Trichoderma measured in this study included enhanced leaf chlorophyll content as well as increased digestibility of the dried material for livestock. This study shows, for the first time for a biofuel feedstock plant, how Trichoderma can enhance productivity of such plants and complements other recent work on the wide-ranging provision of ES by this plant species. PMID:27117716

  18. Potential of the beneficial fungus Trichoderma to enhance ecosystem-service provision in the biofuel grass Miscanthus x giganteus in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Chirino-Valle, Ivan; Kandula, Diwakar; Littlejohn, Chris; Hill, Robert; Walker, Mark; Shields, Morgan; Cummings, Nicholas; Hettiarachchi, Dilani; Wratten, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The sterile hybrid grass Miscanthus x giganteus (Mxg) can produce more than 30 t dry matter/ha/year. This biomass has a range of uses, including animal bedding and a source of heating fuel. The grass provides a wide range of other ecosystem services (ES), including shelter for crops and livestock, a refuge for beneficial arthropods, reptiles and earthworms and is an ideal cellulosic feedstock for liquid biofuels such as renewable (drop-in) diesel. In this study, the effects of different strains of the beneficial fungus Trichoderma on above- and below-ground biomass of Mxg were evaluated in glasshouse and field experiments, the latter on a commercial dairy farm over two years. Other ES benefits of Trichoderma measured in this study included enhanced leaf chlorophyll content as well as increased digestibility of the dried material for livestock. This study shows, for the first time for a biofuel feedstock plant, how Trichoderma can enhance productivity of such plants and complements other recent work on the wide-ranging provision of ES by this plant species. PMID:27117716

  19. Transgenic rice plants expressing the antifungal AFP protein from Aspergillus giganteus show enhanced resistance to the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Coca, María; Bortolotti, Cristina; Rufat, Mar; Peñas, Gisela; Eritja, Ramón; Tharreau, Didier; del Pozo, Alvaro Martinez; Messeguer, Joaquima; San Segundo, Blanca

    2004-01-01

    The Aspergillus giganteus antifungal protein (AFP), encoded by the afp gene, has been reported to possess in vitro antifungal activity against various economically important fungal pathogens, including the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea. In this study, transgenic rice ( Oryza sativa ) constitutively expressing the afp gene was generated by Agrobacterium -mediated transformation. Two different DNA constructs containing either the afp cDNA sequence from Aspergillus or a chemically synthesized codon-optimized afp gene were introduced into rice plants. In both cases, the DNA region encoding the signal sequence from the tobacco AP24 gene was N-terminally fused to the coding sequence of the mature AFP protein. Transgenic rice plants showed stable integration and inheritance of the transgene. No effect on plant morphology was observed in the afp -expressing rice lines. The inhibitory activity of protein extracts prepared from leaves of afp plants on the in vitro growth of M. grisea indicated that the AFP protein produced by the trangenic rice plants was biologically active. Several of the T(2) homozygous afp lines were challenged with M. grisea in a detached leaf infection assay. Transformants exhibited resistance to rice blast at various levels. Altogether, the results presented here indicate that AFP can be functionally expressed in rice plants for protection against the rice blast fungus M. grisea. PMID:15159626

  20. Comparison of the enzymatic digestibility of physically and chemically pretreated selected line of diploid-Miscanthus sinensis Shiozuka and triploid-M.×giganteus.

    PubMed

    Hideno, Akihiro; Kawashima, Ayato; Anzoua, Kossonou Guillaume; Yamada, Toshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The diploid Miscanthus sinensis "Shiozuka" which was selected as a high-biomass producing line, and the triploid M. × giganteus (M×G) were treated by ball milling (physical treatment) and alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment (AHP; chemical treatment), and their structural sugar compositions and enzymatic digestibility were compared. The structural sugar content of Shiozuka was moderate and lower than that of M×G. The Klason lignin content of Shiozuka was also lower than that of M×G. However, Shiozuka was sensitive to ball milling and AHP treatment; ball milled and AHP-treated Shiozuka had higher enzymatic digestibility than ball milled and AHP-treated M×G. Shiozuka would be promising feedstock to obtain fermentable sugars with low energy consumption. Finally, enzymes for the hydrolysis of chemically treated Miscanthus were isolated from Trichoderma reesei ATCC 66589 and Penicillium pinophilum. The sugar yield could be increased by enzymatic hydrolysis of AHP-treated samples with NaOH and H2O2 and the isolated enzymes. PMID:23954245

  1. A retrospective study of Babesia macropus associated with morbidity and mortality in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis).

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Peacock, Christopher S; Choo, Ace Y L; Cook, Roger W; O'Donoghue, Peter; Crameri, Sandra; Vogelnest, Larry; Gordon, Anita N; Scott, Jenni L; Rose, Karrie

    2015-08-01

    This is a retrospective study of 38 cases of infection by Babesia macropus, associated with a syndrome of anaemia and debility in hand-reared or free-ranging juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from coastal New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland between 1995 and 2013. Infection with B. macropus is recorded for the first time in agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) from far north Queensland. Animals in which B. macropus infection was considered to be the primary cause of morbidity had marked anaemia, lethargy and neurological signs, and often died. In these cases, parasitised erythrocytes were few or undetectable in peripheral blood samples but were sequestered in large numbers within small vessels of visceral organs, particularly in the kidney and brain, associated with distinctive clusters of extraerythrocytic organisms. Initial identification of this piroplasm in peripheral blood smears and in tissue impression smears and histological sections was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and molecular analysis. Samples of kidney, brain or blood were tested using PCR and DNA sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA and heat shock protein 70 gene using primers specific for piroplasms. The piroplasm detected in these samples had 100% sequence identity in the 18S rRNA region with the recently described Babesia macropus in two eastern grey kangaroos from New South Wales and Queensland, and a high degree of similarity to an unnamed Babesia sp. recently detected in three woylies (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi) in Western Australia. PMID:26106576

  2. Lessons on the Cold War. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Susan J.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of the Cold War requires teachers to change their teaching methods and content. Presents six lessons, most with three individual student activities, that trace the Cold War from the pre-World War I era through the end of the Vietnam War. (CFR)

  3. Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer for the Pitch Angle Scattering of Electrons by Whistler-mode Chorus Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Pitch angle scattering of electrons caused by chorus emissions is one of significant wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere. A number of previous studies treat the pitch angle scattering as a diffusion of distribution function and calculate diffusion coefficients from observed wave spectra. However, in the diffusion model, we cannot evaluate the nonlinearity of the pitch angle scattering, while recent theoretical works and observation results have pointed out the importance of nonlinear effects. A concept of Wave-Particle Interaction Analysis (WPIA) is proposed by Fukuhara et al. (2009). In the frame of the WPIA, we can directly detect wave-particle interactions by calculating the energy exchange between waves and particles. In the present study, in addition to the method to detect the energy exchange, we propose a method to directly detect the pitch angle scattering of resonant particles by calculating G. The G is defined as the accumulation value of a pitch angular component of the Lorentz force acting on each particle. We apply the proposed method to results of the one-dimensional electron hybrid simulation (Katoh and Omura, 2007a, b). By using the wave and particle data obtained at fixed points assumed in the simulation system, we conduct the pseudo-observation in the simulation. In the result of the analysis, we obtain significant values of G for electrons in the kinetic energy and pitch angle ranges satisfying the cyclotron resonance condition. We compare the result of the analysis of G with the temporal variation of both the pitch angle distributions and the wave spectra. While the pitch angle distribution varies by a few percent through interactions, we obtain the statistically significant G. Furthermore, we compare the G with diffusion coefficient D. While the D showed the broadband diffusive scattering, the G values indicated the narrowband strong scattering. We note that in deriving Fokker-Planck equation and diffusion coefficient D, we use the

  4. Music lessons enhance IQ.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2004-08-01

    The idea that music makes you smarter has received considerable attention from scholars and the media. The present report is the first to test this hypothesis directly with random assignment of a large sample of children (N = 144) to two different types of music lessons (keyboard or voice) or to control groups that received drama lessons or no lessons. IQ was measured before and after the lessons. Compared with children in the control groups, children in the music groups exhibited greater increases in full-scale IQ. The effect was relatively small, but it generalized across IQ subtests, index scores, and a standardized measure of academic achievement. Unexpectedly, children in the drama group exhibited substantial pre- to post-test improvements in adaptive social behavior that were not evident in the music groups. PMID:15270994

  5. Polychronometry in Lesson Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, William F.

    1976-01-01

    The Polychronometer, the design and mechanism of which is described, is suggested for use in any situation where time variables have to be measured as duration and frequency. Its use in language lesson analysis is discussed. (RM)

  6. Lessons for Introductory Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John S.; Blackburn, Edward V.

    2000-07-01

    These twelve lessons, and an introductory lesson, are tutorials in basic topics of introductory chemistry. They are suitable for school use, individual study, or distance learning. They are particularly valuable as review material for students in more advanced courses who may have been away from the subject for some time. They contain a great variety of problems and exercises driven by random-number generators, so that the same problem never repeats exactly. The lessons are, for the most part, Socratic dialogues in which the student is required to answer questions and perform simulated experiments in order to discover chemical principles. They are organized in an intuitive chapter and page structure. One may move readily around each lesson. There are many on-screen facilities such as help, data tables, and a calculator.

  7. Spotting a Science Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manch, Raimonde

    1989-01-01

    A hands-on science lesson which allows young students to apply stains in the classroom and then try to remove them is presented. Included are a list of materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results. (CW)

  8. Impact of event-specific chorus wave realization for modeling the October 8-9, 2012, event using the LANL DREAM3D diffusion code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, G.; Tu, W.; Chen, Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the interval October 8-9, 2012, the phase-space density (PSD) of high-energy electrons exhibited a dropout preceding an intense enhancement observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. The evolution of the PSD suggests heating by chorus waves, which were observed to have high intensities at the time of the enhancement [1]. Although intense chorus waves were also observed during the first Dst dip on October 8, no PSD enhancement was observed at this time. We demonstrate a quantitative reproduction of the entire event that makes use of three recent modifications to the LANL DREAM3D diffusion code: 1) incorporation of a time-dependent, low-energy, boundary condition from the MagEIS instrument, 2) use of a time-dependent estimate of the chorus wave intensity derived from observations of POES low-energy electron precipitation, and 3) use of an estimate of the last closed drift shell, beyond which electrons are assumed to have a lifetime that is proportional to their drift period around earth. The key features of the event are quantitatively reproduced by the simulation, including the dropout on October 8, and a rapid increase in PSD early on October 9, with a peak near L*=4.2. The DREAM3D code predicts the dropout on October 8 because this feature is dominated by magnetospheric compression and outward radial diffusion-the L* of the last closed drift-shell reaches a minimum value of 5.33 at 1026 UT on October 8. We find that a ';statistical' wave model based on historical CRRES measurements binned in AE* does not reproduce the enhancement because the peak wave amplitudes are only a few 10's of pT, whereas an ';event-specific' model reproduces both the magnitude and timing of the enhancement very well, a s shown in the Figure, because the peak wave amplitudes are 10x higher. [1] 'Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts', G. D. Reeves et al., Science 1237743, Published online 25 July 2013 [DOI:10.1126/science

  9. Phylogeny in Defining Model Plants for Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production: A Comparative Study of Brachypodium distachyon, Wheat, Maize, and Miscanthus x giganteus Leaf and Stem Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Meineke, Till; Manisseri, Chithra; Voigt, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    The production of ethanol from pretreated plant biomass during fermentation is a strategy to mitigate climate change by substituting fossil fuels. However, biomass conversion is mainly limited by the recalcitrant nature of the plant cell wall. To overcome recalcitrance, the optimization of the plant cell wall for subsequent processing is a promising approach. Based on their phylogenetic proximity to existing and emerging energy crops, model plants have been proposed to study bioenergy-related cell wall biochemistry. One example is Brachypodium distachyon, which has been considered as a general model plant for cell wall analysis in grasses. To test whether relative phylogenetic proximity would be sufficient to qualify as a model plant not only for cell wall composition but also for the complete process leading to bioethanol production, we compared the processing of leaf and stem biomass from the C3 grasses B. distachyon and Triticum aestivum (wheat) with the C4 grasses Zea mays (maize) and Miscanthus x giganteus, a perennial energy crop. Lambda scanning with a confocal laser-scanning microscope allowed a rapid qualitative analysis of biomass saccharification. A maximum of 108–117 mg ethanol·g−1 dry biomass was yielded from thermo-chemically and enzymatically pretreated stem biomass of the tested plant species. Principal component analysis revealed that a relatively strong correlation between similarities in lignocellulosic ethanol production and phylogenetic relation was only given for stem and leaf biomass of the two tested C4 grasses. Our results suggest that suitability of B. distachyon as a model plant for biomass conversion of energy crops has to be specifically tested based on applied processing parameters and biomass tissue type. PMID:25133818

  10. Variation in chilling tolerance for photosynthesis and leaf extension growth among genotypes related to the C4 grass Miscanthus ×giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Głowacka, Katarzyna; Adhikari, Shivani; Peng, Junhua; Gifford, Justin; Juvik, John A.; Long, Stephen P.; Sacks, Erik J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify cold-tolerant genotypes within two species of Miscanthus related to the exceptionally chilling-tolerant C4 biomass crop accession: M. ×giganteus ‘Illinois’ (Mxg) as well as in other Mxg genotypes. The ratio of leaf elongation at 10 °C/5 °C to that at 25 °C/25 °C was used to identify initially the 13 most promising Miscanthus genotypes out of 51 studied. Net leaf CO2 uptake (A sat) and the maximum operating efficiency of photosystem II (ФPSII) were measured in warm conditions (25 °C/20 °C), and then during and following a chilling treatment of 10 °C/5 °C for 11 d. Accessions of M. sacchariflorus (Msa) showed the smallest decline in leaf elongation on transfer to chilling conditions and did not differ significantly from Mxg, indicating greater chilling tolerance than diploid M. sinensis (Msi). Msa also showed the smallest reductions in A sat and ФPSII, and greater chilling-tolerant photosynthesis than Msi, and three other forms of Mxg, including new triploid accessions and a hexaploid Mxg ‘Illinois’. Tetraploid Msa ‘PF30153’ collected in Gifu Prefecture in Honshu, Japan did not differ significantly from Mxg ‘Illinois’ in leaf elongation and photosynthesis at low temperature, but was significantly superior to all other forms of Mxg tested. The results suggested that the exceptional chilling tolerance of Mxg ‘Illinois’ cannot be explained simply by the hybrid vigour of this intraspecific allotriploid. Selection of chilling-tolerant accessions from both of Mxg’s parental species, Msi and Msa, would be advisable for breeding new highly chilling-tolerant Mxg genotypes. PMID:25039073