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Sample records for chromatin condensation assay

  1. Evaluation of chromatin condensation in human spermatozoa: a flow cytometric assay using acridine orange staining.

    PubMed

    Golan, R; Shochat, L; Weissenberg, R; Soffer, Y; Marcus, Z; Oschry, Y; Lewin, L M

    1997-01-01

    The quality of sperm chromatin is an important factor in fertilization and is especially critical where one spermatozoon is artificially selected for fertilizing an egg (as in intracytoplasmic sperm injection). In this study, flow cytometry after staining of human spermatozoa with Acridine Orange was used to study chromatin structure. A method is described for estimating the percentage of cells in a human sperm sample that have completed epididymal maturation in regard to chromatin condensation. Of the 121 samples of the semen that were examined, nine contained a higher percentage of hypocondensed spermatozoa and six samples contained elevated amounts of hypercondensed spermatozoa. In addition to aberrancies in chromatin condensation other defects showed up as satellite populations of spermatozoa with higher than normal ratios of red/green fluorescence after Acridine Orange staining. Such defects were found in 15 semen samples. The use of swim-up and Percoll gradient centrifugation methods was shown to improve the percentage of spermatozoa with normal chromatin structure in some samples with poor initial quality. PMID:9239707

  2. Genome size and chromatin condensation in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander E

    2005-02-01

    Cell membrane-dependent chromatin condensation was studied by flow cytometry in erythrocytes of 36 species from six classes of vertebrates. A positive relationship was found between the degree of condensation and genome size. The distribution of variances among taxonomic levels is similar for both parameters. However, chromatin condensation varied relatively more at the lower taxonomic levels, which suggests that the degree of DNA packaging might serve for fine-tuning the 'skeletal' and/or 'buffering' function of noncoding DNA (although the range of this fine-tuning is smaller than the range of genome size changes). For two closely related amphibian species differing in genome size, change in chromatin condensation under the action of elevated extracellular salinity was investigated. Condensation was steadier and its reaction to changes in solvent composition was more inertial in the species with a larger genome, which is in agreement with the buffering function postulated for redundant DNA. The uppermost genome size in vertebrates (and in living beings in general) was updated using flow cytometry and was found to be about 80 pg (78,400 Mb). The widespread opinion that the largest genome occurs in unicellular organisms is rejected as being based on artifacts. PMID:15647899

  3. Chromatin condensation modulates access and binding of nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert M; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2010-04-01

    The condensation level of chromatin is controlled by epigenetic modifications and associated regulatory factors and changes throughout differentiation and cell cycle progression. To test whether changes of chromatin condensation levels per se affect access and binding of proteins, we used a hypertonic cell treatment. This shift to hyperosmolar medium increased nuclear calcium concentrations and induced a reversible chromatin condensation comparable to the levels in mitosis. However, this condensation was independent of mitotic histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation. Photobleaching and photoactivation experiments with chromatin proteins-histone H2B-GFP and GFP-HP1alpha-before and after induced chromatin condensation demonstrated that hypercondensation reduced their dissociation rate and stabilized their chromatin binding. Finally, measuring the distribution of nucleoplasmic proteins in the size range from 30 to 230 kDa, we found that even relatively small proteins like GFP were excluded from highly condensed chromatin in living cells. These results suggest that structural changes in condensed chromatin by themselves affect chromatin access and binding of chromatin proteins independent of regulatory histone modifications.-Martin, R. M., Cardoso, M. C. Chromatin condensation modulates access and binding of nuclear proteins. PMID:19897663

  4. Chromatin condensation of Xist genomic loci during oogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    Repression of maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) during preimplantation in mouse embryos is essential for establishing imprinted X chromosome inactivation. Nuclear transplantation (NT) studies using nuclei derived from non-growing (ng) and full-grown (fg) oocytes have indicated that maternal-specific repressive modifications are imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis, as well as on autosomal imprinted genes. Recent studies have revealed that histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) enrichments on Xm-Xist promoter regions are involved in silencing at the preimplantation stages. However, whether H3K9me3 is imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis is not known. Here, we dissected the chromatin states in ng and fg oocytes and early preimplantation stage embryos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments against H3K9me3 revealed that there was no significant enrichment within the Xm-Xist region during oogenesis. However, NT embryos with ng nuclei (ngNT) showed extensive Xm-Xist derepression and H3K9me3 hypomethylation of the promoter region at the 4-cell stage, which corresponds to the onset of paternal Xist expression. We also found that the chromatin state at the Xist genomic locus became markedly condensed as oocyte growth proceeded. Although the condensed Xm-Xist genomic locus relaxed during early preimplantation phases, the extent of the relaxation across Xm-Xist loci derived from normally developed oocytes was significantly smaller than those of paternal-Xist and ngNT-Xist genomic loci. Furthermore, Xm-Xist from 2-cell metaphase nuclei became derepressed following NT. We propose that chromatin condensation is associated with imprinted Xist repression and that skipping of the condensation step by NT leads to Xist activation during the early preimplantation phase. PMID:26459223

  5. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Assay in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sreyoshi; Rai, Laxmi Shanker; Chatterjee, Gautam; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a widely used technique which can determine the in vivo association of a specific protein on a particular DNA locus in the genome. In this method cross-linked chromatin is sheared and immunoprecipitated with antibodies raised against a target protein of interest. The end result of this process is the enrichment of DNA fragments associated with the desired protein. Thus, interactions between proteins and genomic loci in cellular context can be determined by this technique. Here, we are describing a ChIP protocol that is optimized for Candida albicans. The protocol requires 4-5 days for completion of the assay and has been used to produce robust ChIP results for diverse proteins in this organism and its related species including Candida dubliniensis and Candida tropicalis. PMID:26519064

  6. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC ; Guilak, Farshid; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  7. Influence of chromatin condensation on the absorption spectra of nuclei stained with toluidine blue.

    PubMed

    Erenpreisa, J; Freivalds, T; Selivanova, G

    1992-01-01

    To study the influence of chromatin condensation on the absorption spectra of nuclei stained with toluidine blue, DNA staining methods--which favour or prevent dye polymerization--were applied to the imprints of rat tissues that differed greatly in the density of chromatin packing. It is stated that all factors promoting dye polymerization cause a left shift of the spectra while the factors preventing it, a right one. It was found that condensation of the chromatin can raise prerequisites that both enhance and hinder polymerization, and that the final result depends on the staining method, the manner of chromatin folding, and the density of its packing. PMID:1365771

  8. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of ?-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in ?-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  9. The role of chromatin condensation during granulopoiesis in the regulation of gene cluster expression.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, Stanislav; Koutna, Irena; Matula, Pavel; Rucka, Zdenek; Danek, Ondrej; Maska, Martin; Kozubek, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Changes in nuclear architecture play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. The importance of epigenetic changes is observed during granulopoiesis, when changes in the nuclear architecture are considered a major factor that influences the downregulation of genes. We aimed to assess the influence of chromatin condensation on the regulation of gene expression during granulopoiesis. Based on a previously published microarray analysis, we chose loci with different levels of transcriptional activity during granulopoiesis. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and immunofluorescent labelling of RNA polymerase II were used to determine the relationship between the transcriptional activity of gene clusters and their localisation within areas with different levels of chromatin condensation. Although active loci were positioned outside of areas of condensed chromatin, downregulation of genes during granulopoiesis was not accompanied by a shift of the downregulated loci to condensed areas. Only the beta-globin cluster was subjected to chromatin condensation and localised to condensed areas. Our results indicate that granulopoiesis is accompanied by a non-random, tissue-specific pattern of chromatin condensation. Furthermore, we observed that the decrease in the quantity of RNA polymerase II correlates with the differentiation process and likely acts in synergy with chromatin condensation to downregulate total gene expression. PMID:20798609

  10. Histone deacetylase 2 is required for chromatin condensation and subsequent enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts

    E-print Network

    Ji, Peng

    Background: During the final stages of differentiation of mammalian erythroid cells, the chromatin is condensed and enucleated. We previously reported that Rac GTPases and their downstream target, mammalian homolog of ...

  11. Biochemical Assays for Analyzing Activities of ATP-dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Ooi, Soon-Keat; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the SNF2 family of ATPases often function as components of multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complexes that regulate nucleosome dynamics and DNA accessibility by catalyzing ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling. Biochemically dissecting the contributions of individual subunits of such complexes to the multi-step ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling reaction requires the use of assays that monitor the production of reaction products and measure the formation of reaction intermediates. This JOVE protocol describes assays that allow one to measure the biochemical activities of chromatin remodeling complexes or subcomplexes containing various combinations of subunits. Chromatin remodeling is measured using an ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding assay, which monitors the movement of a nucleosome on a DNA molecule using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA)-based method. Nucleosome binding activity is measured by monitoring the formation of remodeling complex-bound mononucleosomes using a similar EMSA-based method, and DNA- or nucleosome-dependent ATPase activity is assayed using thin layer chromatography (TLC) to measure the rate of conversion of ATP to ADP and phosphate in the presence of either DNA or nucleosomes. Using these assays, one can examine the functions of subunits of a chromatin remodeling complex by comparing the activities of the complete complex to those lacking one or more subunits. The human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is used as an example; however, the methods described here can be adapted to the study of other chromatin remodeling complexes. PMID:25407555

  12. Chromatin condensation in the erythrocytes of fish following exposure to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, T.S.; Pant, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Experimental cadmium poisoning in the fishes has been investigated and a variety of hematological changes have been observed. Studies on mammals have also revealed that Cd interferes with basic cellular processes and the metal has been shown to cause chromatin condensation and emptying of interchromatin spaces in cultured hepatocytes. The present work illustrates the effect of chronic Cd poisoning on the erythrocytes of a freshwater fish, Puntius conchonius with reference to chromatin condensation.

  13. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FoxI1 Remains Bound to Condensed Mitotic Chromosomes and Stably Remodels Chromatin Structure†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jizhou; Xu, Lisha; Crawford, Gregory; Wang, Zenfeng; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2006-01-01

    All forkhead (Fox) proteins contain a highly conserved DNA binding domain whose structure is remarkably similar to the winged-helix structures of histones H1 and H5. Little is known about Fox protein binding in the context of higher-order chromatin structure in living cells. We created a stable cell line expressing FoxI1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or FoxI1-V5 fusion proteins under control of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator doxycycline inducible system and found that unlike most transcription factors, FoxI1 remains bound to the condensed chromosomes during mitosis. To isolate DNA fragments directly bound by the FoxI1 protein within living cells, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIPs) with antibodies to either enhanced GFP or the V5 epitope and subcloned the FoxI1-enriched DNA fragments. Sequence analyses indicated that 88% (106/121) of ChIP sequences contain the consensus binding sites for all Fox proteins. Testing ChIP sequences with a quantitative DNase I hypersensitivity assay showed that FoxI1 created stable DNase I sensitivity changes in condensed chromosomes. The majority of ChIP targets and random targets increased in resistance to DNase I in FoxI1-expressing cells, but a small number of targets became more accessible to DNase I. Consistently, the accessibility of micrococcal nuclease to chromatin was generally inhibited. Micrococcal nuclease partial digestion generated a ladder in which all oligonucleosomes were slightly longer than those observed with the controls. On the basis of these findings, we propose that FoxI1 is capable of remodeling chromatin higher-order structure and can stably create site-specific changes in chromatin to either stably create or remove DNase I hypersensitive sites. PMID:16354687

  14. Formation of mammalian erythrocytes: chromatin condensation and enucleation

    E-print Network

    Ji, Peng

    In all vertebrates, the cell nucleus becomes highly condensed and transcriptionally inactive during the final stages of red cell biogenesis. Enucleation, the process by which the nucleus is extruded by budding off from the ...

  15. Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Evgenya Y.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Short, Sarah A.; Lee, Gloria; Villalobos, Jonathan; Etzell, Joan; Koury, Mark J.; Ney, Paul A.; Chasis, Joel Anne; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2008-08-21

    Terminal erythroid differentiation in vertebrates is characterized by progressive heterochromatin formation, chromatin condensation and, in mammals, culminates in nuclear extrusion. To date, although mechanisms regulating avian erythroid chromatin condensation have been identified, little is known regarding this process during mammalian erythropoiesis. To elucidate the molecular basis for mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation, we used Friend virus-infected murine spleen erythroblasts that undergo terminal differentiation in vitro. Chromatin isolated from early and late stage erythroblasts had similar levels of linker and core histones, only a slight difference in nucleosome repeats, and no significant accumulation of known developmentally-regulated architectural chromatin proteins. However, histone H3(K9) dimethylation markedly increased while histone H4(K12) acetylation dramatically decreased and became segregated from the histone methylation as chromatin condensed. One histone deacetylase, HDAC5, was significantly upregulated during the terminal stages of Friend virus-infected erythroblast differentiation. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, blocked both chromatin condensation and nuclear extrusion. Based on our data, we propose a model for a unique mechanism in which extensive histone deacetylation at pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates heterochromatin condensation in vertebrate erythroblasts that would otherwise be mediated by developmentally-regulated architectural proteins in nucleated blood cells.

  16. The Histone Variant H2A.W Defines Heterochromatin and Promotes Chromatin Condensation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yelagandula, Ramesh; Stroud, Hume; Holec, Sarah; Zhou, Keda; Feng, Suhua; Zhong, Xuehua; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Nie, Xin; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Groth, Martin; Luger, Karolin; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Berger, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Summary Histone variants play crucial roles in gene expression, genome integrity and chromosome segregation. However, to what extent histone variants control chromatin architecture remains largely unknown. We report genome-wide profiles of all four types of H2A variants in Arabidopsis and identify that the previously uncharacterized histone variant H2A.W specifically associates with heterochromatin. Genetic analyses show that H2A.W acts in synergy with the heterochromatic marks H3K9me2 and DNA methylation to maintain genome integrity. In vitro, H2A.W enhances chromatin condensation through a higher propensity to promote fiber-to-fiber interactions via its conserved C-terminal motif. In vivo, elimination of H2A.W causes decondensation of heterochromatin and conversely, ectopic expression of H2A.W promotes heterochromatin condensation. These results demonstrate that H2A.W plays critical roles in heterochromatin by promoting higher order chromatin condensation. Since motifs similar to the H2A.W C-terminal motif are present in other histone variants in other organisms, our findings impact our understanding of heterochromatin condensation in eukaryotes. PMID:24995981

  17. A new fractionation assay, based on the size of formaldehyde-crosslinked, mildly sheared chromatin, delineates the chromatin structure at promoter regions

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Satoru; Varma, Rajat; Schwartz, Ronald H.

    2010-01-01

    To explore the higher order structure of transcribable chromatin in vivo, its local configuration was assessed through the accessibility of the chromatin to crosslinking with formaldehyde. The application of crosslinked and mildly sheared chromatin to sedimentation velocity centrifugation followed by size-fractionation of the DNA enabled us to biochemically distinguish between chromatin with heavily versus sparsely crosslinkable structures. The separated fractions showed a good correlation with gene expression profiles. Genes with poor crosslinking around the promoter region were actively transcribed, while transcripts were hardly detected from genes with extensive crosslinking in their promoter regions. For the inducible gene, Il2, the distribution of the promoter shifted in the gradient following T-cell receptor stimulation, consistent with a change in structure at this locus during activation. The kinetics of this switch preceded the chromatin change observed in a DNase I accessibility assay. Thus, this new chromatin fractionation technique has revealed a change in chromatin structure that has not been previously characterized. PMID:20371521

  18. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS BETWEEN ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study?
    This the first assessment of a set of cigarette smoke condensates from a range of cigarette types in a variety (4) of short-term genotoxicity assays.
    Why was it done?
    No such comparative study of cigarette smoke condensates has been reported. H...

  19. Glycolytic metabolism influences global chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Song; Little, John B.; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rewiring, specifically elevated glycolytic metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Global chromatin structure regulates gene expression, DNA repair, and also affects cancer progression. But the interrelationship between tumor metabolism and chromatin architecture remain unclear. Here we show that increased glycolysis in cancer cells promotes an open chromatin configuration. Using complementary methods including Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion assay, electron microscope and immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrate that glycolysis inhibition by pharmacological and genetic approaches was associated with induction of compacted chromatin structure. This condensed chromatin status appeared to result chiefly from histone hypoacetylation as restoration of histone acetylation with an HDAC inhibitor reversed the compacted chromatin state. Interestingly, glycolysis inhibition-induced chromatin condensation impeded DNA repair efficiency leading to increased sensitivity of cancer cells to DNA damage drugs, which may represent a novel molecular mechanism that can be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:25784656

  20. Linker histones are not essential and affect chromatin condensation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Yu, L; Weir, J W; Gorovsky, M A

    1995-07-14

    We have (separately) disrupted all of the expressed macronuclear copies of the HHO gene encoding macronuclear histone H1 and of the micronuclear linker histone (MLH) gene encoding the protein MicLH in Tetrahymena thermophila. These disruptions are shown to eliminate completely the expression of each protein. Strains without either linker histone grow at normal rates and reach near-normal cell densities, demonstrating that linker histones are not essential for cell survival. Histone H1 knockout (delta H1) cells have enlarged DAPI-stained macronuclei and normal-sized micronuclei, while MicLH knockout (delta MicLH) cells have enlarged micronuclei and normal-sized macronuclei. delta MicLH cells undergo mitosis normally. However, the micronuclear mitotic chromosome structure is less condensed. These studies provide evidence that linker histones are nonessential and are involved in chromatin packaging and condensation in vivo. PMID:7606784

  1. Chromatin condensation is confined to the loop and involves an all-or-none structural change.

    PubMed

    Balbi, C; Sanna, P; Barboro, P; Alberti, I; Barbesino, M; Patrone, E

    1999-11-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry in combination with pulsed field gel electrophoresis, we relate here the changes in the thermal profile of rat liver nuclei induced by very mild digestion of chromatin by endogenous nuclease with the chain length distribution of the DNA fragments. The enthalpy of the endotherm at 106 degrees C, which reflects the denaturation of the heterochromatic domains, decreases dramatically after the induction of a very small number of double-strand breaks per chromosome; the thermal transition disappears when the loops have undergone on average one DNA chain scission event. Quantitative analysis of the experimental data shows that the loop behaves like a topologically isolated domain. Also discussed is the process of heterochromatin formation, which occurs according to an all-or-none mechanism. In the presence of spermine, a strong condensation agent, only the loops that have undergone one break are able to refold, in confirmation of the extremely cooperative nature of the transition. Furthermore, our results suggest a relationship between the states that give rise to the endotherms at 90 degrees C and 106 degrees C and the morphologies referred to as class II and class III in a previous physicochemical study of the folding of chromatin fragments (Widom, 1986. J. Mol. Biol. 190:411-424) and support the view that the overall process of condensation follows a sequential (two-step) pathway. PMID:10545372

  2. AMg2+ -dependent class of thick filaments and correlated nuclear chromatin condensation in catfish photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ryan, T; Potter, H D

    1978-06-01

    Photoreceptor cells of excised catfish retinae show morphological differences when incubated in Ringer's solutions of varying ionic composition. Two striking changes were observed in photoreceptor cells incubated in a high Mg2+ (25 mM) Ringer's: (1) Thick filaments appeared in the cytoplasm of receptor terminals and myoids; (2) A pronounced condensation of nuclear chromatin occurred in certain nuclei in the outer nuclear layer. The filaments occurred in lattices or bundles. The bundles had a diameter of approximately 0.05--0.2 micrometer and had either tapered or frayed ends. They were observed with somewhat higher incidence in tissue incubated in a 25 mM Mg2+ Ringer's with EGTA added to chelate Ca2+. A common basis for the cytoplasmic and nuclear changes may lie in a redistribution of fibrous protiens brought about by the increased Mg2+ concentration. PMID:660223

  3. Progressive Chromatin Condensation and H3K9 Methylation Regulate the Differentiation of Embryonic and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte, Fernando; Sousae, Rebekah; Cinquin, Bertrand; Martin, Eric W.; Krietsch, Jana; Sanchez, Gabriela; Inman, Margaux; Tsang, Herman; Warr, Matthew; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Forsberg, E. Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic regulation serves as the basis for stem cell differentiation into distinct cell types, but it is unclear how global epigenetic changes are regulated during this process. Here, we tested the hypothesis that global chromatin organization affects the lineage potential of stem cells and that manipulation of chromatin dynamics influences stem cell function. Using nuclease sensitivity assays, we found a progressive decrease in chromatin digestion among pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), multipotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and mature hematopoietic cells. Quantitative high-resolution microscopy revealed that ESCs contain significantly more euchromatin than HSCs, with a further reduction in mature cells. Increased cellular maturation also led to heterochromatin localization to the nuclear periphery. Functionally, prevention of heterochromatin formation by inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9A resulted in delayed HSC differentiation. Our results demonstrate global chromatin rearrangements during stem cell differentiation and that heterochromatin formation by H3K9 methylation regulates HSC differentiation. PMID:26489895

  4. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay to Identify Genomic Binding Sites of Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Meike; Jung, Johannes; Koslowski, Michael; Türeci, Özlem; Tiwari, Vijay K; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    DNA-protein interactions are vital to fundamental cellular events including transcription, replication, DNA repair, and recombination. Thus, their study holds the key to our understanding of mechanisms underlying normal development and homeostasis as well as disease. Transcriptional regulation is a highly complex process that involves recruitment of numerous factors resulting in formation of multi-protein complexes at gene promoters to regulate gene expression. The studied proteins can be, for example, transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, co-activators, co-repressors, or ligand-activated nuclear receptors as estrogen receptor-? (ER?) bound either directly to the DNA or indirectly by interaction with other DNA-bound factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful method to study interactions of proteins and a specific genomic DNA region. Recruitment of ER? to promoters of estrogen-dependent genes is a common mechanism to activate or enhance gene transcription in breast cancer thus promoting tumor progression. In this chapter, we demonstrate a stepwise protocol for ChIP assay using binding of ER? to its genomic targets after stimulation with 17?-estradiol (E2) in breast cancer cells as an example. PMID:26585127

  5. RBF1 promotes chromatin condensation through a conserved interaction with the Condensin II protein dCAP-D3

    PubMed Central

    Longworth, Michelle S.; Herr, Anabel; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila retinoblastoma family of proteins (RBF1 and RBF2) and their mammalian homologs (pRB, p130, and p107) are best known for their regulation of the G1/S transition via the repression of E2F-dependent transcription. However, RB family members also possess additional functions. Here, we report that rbf1 mutant larvae have extensive defects in chromatin condensation during mitosis. We describe a novel interaction between RBF1 and dCAP-D3, a non-SMC component of the Condensin II complex that links RBF1 to the regulation of chromosome structure. RBF1 physically interacts with dCAP-D3, RBF1 and dCAP-D3 partially colocalize on polytene chromosomes, and RBF1 is required for efficient association of dCAP-D3 with chromatin. dCap-D3 mutants also exhibit chromatin condensation defects, and mutant alleles of dCap-D3 suppress cellular and developmental phenotypes induced by the overexpression of RBF1. Interestingly, this interaction is conserved between flies and humans. The re-expression of pRB into a pRB-deficient human tumor cell line promotes chromatin association of hCAP-D3 in a manner that depends on the LXCXE-binding cleft of pRB. These results uncover an unexpected link between pRB/RBF1 and chromatin condensation, providing a mechanism by which the functional inactivation of RB family members in human tumor cells may contribute to genome instability. PMID:18367646

  6. Sperm chromatin structure assay results in Nigerian men with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kolade, Charles Oluwabukunmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several publications have established a relationship between sperm DNA damage and male factor infertility, based on data from America, Europe, and Asia. This study aimed to compare the extent of sperm DNA damage in sperm samples from Nigerian men with unexplained infertility and in sperm samples from a fertile group composed of sperm donors who had successfully impregnated a female partner naturally or through assisted conception. Methods A total of 404 men underwent male fertility evaluation at Androcare Laboratories and Cryobank participated in this study. Semen analysis and a sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) were performed on all subjects. Results The men in the unexplained infertility group were slightly older than the men in the fertile sperm group (36±10 years vs. 32±6 years, p=0.051). No significant difference was observed between the two groups in semen analysis parameters (p?0.05). Men in the unexplained infertility group with normal semen parameters had a significantly higher DNA fragmentation index (DFI) than men in the fertile sperm group (27.5%±7.0% vs. 14.1%±5.3%, p<0.05). In the unexplained infertility group, 63% of the men had a DFI greater than 20%, compared to 4% in the fertile sperm group. In the unexplained infertility group, 15.2% of the subjects had a DFI greater than 30%, compared to 1% in the fertile sperm group. Conclusion Our study showed that the SCSA may be a more reliable predictor of fertility potential than traditional semen analysis in cases of unexplained infertility. PMID:26473109

  7. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing.

    PubMed

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. PMID:22314931

  8. Early and late effects of Ibuprofen on mouse sperm parameters, chromatin condensation, and DNA integrity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roodbari, Fatemeh; Abedi, Nahid; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are few studies indicating the detrimental effects of ibuprofen on sperm fertility potential and DNA integrity. Objective: To determine the effects of Ibuprofen on sperm parameters, chromatin condensation and DNA integrity of mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 36 adult male mice with average weight 37 gr were divided into three groups, including control (group I, n=12), normal dosage of ibuprofen (group II, n=12) and high dosage (group III, n=12). Ibuprofen with different doses was dissolved in daily water of animals. After 35, 70 and 105 days, the cauda epididymis of mice were cut and incubated in Ham’s F10 media. Sperm samples were analyzed for parameters (motility, morphology and count), DNA integrity (SCD test) and chromatin condensation (chromomycin A3 and Aniline blue staining). Results: After 35 days, in addition to above mentioned sperm parameters, all of the treated mice showed statistically significant increase in spermatozoa with immature chromatin (P<0.05). However, after 70 days, the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation assessed by SCD was increased in group II (66.5±0.7) and the percentage of immature spermatozoa (AB+ and CMA3+) was higher in group III (77.5±0.7 and 49.5±6.3 respectively) than other groups. After 105 days, the AB+ spermatozoa were increased in both normal dose and high dose groups. Conclusion: Ibuprofen may cause a significant reduction in sperm parameters and sperm chromatin/DNA integrity in mice. It should be noted that these deleterious effects are dose-dependent and can be seen in early and late stage of drug treatments.

  9. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA).

    PubMed

    Evenson, Donald P; Wixon, Regina

    2005-09-01

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to approximately 1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for elevated sperm DNA fragmentation. Extensive DNA fragmentation probably cannot be repaired by the egg and the spontaneous abortion rate is approximately 2x higher if a man has more than 30% of sperm showing DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation is an excellent marker for exposure to potential reproductive toxicants and a diagnostic/prognostic tool for potential male infertility. PMID:15987647

  10. Investigation of histone H4 hyperacetylation dynamics in the 5S rRNA genes family by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay.

    PubMed

    Burliba?a, Liliana; Suciu, Ilinca

    2015-12-01

    Oogenesis is a critical event in the formation of female gamete, whose role in development is to transfer genomic information to the next generation. During this process, the gene expression pattern changes dramatically concomitant with genome remodelling, while genomic information is stably maintained. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of H4 acetylation of the oocyte and somatic 5S rRNA genes in Triturus cristatus, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). Our findings suggest that some epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of 5S rRNA gene families. PMID:25315165

  11. Akt phosphorylation of zyxin mediates its interaction with acinus-S and prevents acinus-triggered chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Chan, C-B; Liu, X; Tang, X; Fu, H; Ye, K

    2007-09-01

    Zyxin, a focal adhesion molecule, contains LIM domains and shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Nuclear zyxin promotes cardiomyocyte survival, which is mediated by nuclear-activated Akt. However, the molecular mechanism of how zyxin antagonizes apoptosis remains elusive. Here, we report that zyxin binds to acinus-S, a nuclear speckle protein inducing apoptotic chromatin condensation after cleavage by caspases, and prevents its apoptotic action, which is regulated by Akt. Akt binds and phosphorylates zyxin on serine 142, leading to its association with acinus. Interestingly, 14-3-3gamma, but not zeta isoform selectively, triggers zyxin nuclear translocation, which is Akt phosphorylation dependent. Zyxin is also a substrate of caspases, but Akt phosphorylation is unable to prevent its apoptotic cleavage. Expression of zyxin S142D, a phosphorylation mimetic mutant, diminishes acinus proteolytic cleavage and chromatin condensation; by contrast, wild-type zyxin or unphosphorylated S142A mutant fails. Thus, Akt regulates zyxin/acinus complex formation in the nucleus, contributing to suppression of apoptosis. PMID:17572661

  12. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay for Tissue-specific Genes using Early-stage Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ok Hyun; Rivera-Pérez, Jaime A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a powerful tool to identify protein:chromatin interactions that occur in the context of living cells 1-3. This technique has been widely exploited in tissue culture cells, and to a lesser extent, in primary tissue. The application of ChIP to rodent embryonic tissue, especially at early times of development, is complicated by the limited amount of tissue and the heterogeneity of cell and tissue types in the embryo. Here we present a method to perform ChIP using a dissociated embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) embryo. Sheared chromatin from a single E8.5 embryo can be divided into up to five aliquots, which allows the investigator sufficient material for controls and for investigation of specific protein:chromatin interactions. We have utilized this technique to begin to document protein:chromatin interactions during the specification of tissue-specific gene expression programs. The heterogeneity of cell types in an embryo necessarily restricts the application of this technique because the result is the detection of protein:chromatin interactions without distinguishing whether the interactions occur in all, a subset of, or a single cell type(s). However, examination of tissue-specific genes during or following the onset of tissue-specific gene expression is feasible for two reasons. First, immunoprecipitation of tissue specific factors necessarily isolates chromatin from the cell type where the factor is expressed. Second, immunoprecipitation of coactivators and histones containing post-translational modifications that are associated with gene activation should only be found at genes and gene regulatory sequences in the cell type where the gene is being or has been activated. The technique should be applicable to the study of most tissue-specific gene activation events. In the example described below, we utilized E8.5 and E9.5 mouse embryos to examine factor binding at a skeletal muscle specific gene promoter. Somites, which are the precursor tissues from which the skeletal muscles of the trunk and limbs will form, are present at E8.5-9.54,5. Myogenin is a regulatory factor required for skeletal muscle differentiation 6-9. The data demonstrate that myogenin is associated with its own promoter in E8.5 and E9.5 embryos. Because myogenin is only expressed in somites at this stage of development 6,10, the data indicate that myogenin interactions with its own promoter have already occurred in skeletal muscle precursor cells in E8.5 embryos. PMID:21559006

  13. Etoposide interferes with the process of chromatin condensation during alga Chara vulgaris spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Agnieszka, Wojtczak

    2014-10-01

    DNA topoisomerase II plays an essential role in animal spermiogenesis, where changes of chromatin structure are connected with appearance of transient DNA breaks. Such topo II activity can be curtailed by inhibitors such as etoposide and suramine. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the effect of etoposide on spermatid chromatin remodeling in the green alga Chara vulgaris. This inhibitor prolonged the early spermiogenesis stages and blocked the formation of the phosphorylated form of histone H2AX at stages VI-VII. The lack of transient DSBs at these stages impairs the elimination of supercoils containing nucleosomes which lead to disturbances in nucleoprotein exchange and the pattern of spermatid chromatin fibrils at stages VI-VIII. Immunofluorescent and ultrastructural observations revealed that during C. vulgaris spermiogenesis topo II played an important role similar to that in mammals. Some corresponding features had been pointed out before, the present studies showed further similarities. PMID:25041830

  14. Long-term effects of triethylenemelamine exposure on mouse testis cells and sperm chromatin structure assayed by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, D.P.; Baer, R.K.; Jost, L.K. )

    1989-01-01

    The toxic and potentially mutagenic actions of triethylenemelamine (TEM) on mouse body and testis weights, testicular cell kinetics, sperm production, sperm head morphology, and sperm chromatin structure were assessed in two experiments. The first experiment examined effects of four dose levels of TEM, assayed 1, 4, or 10 wk after toxic exposure. In the second study, effects from five dosage levels were measured at 1, 4, and 10 wk, and the highest dosage level was evaluated over 44 wk. TEM produced an expected dose related loss of spermatogenic activity and subsequent recovery as determined by dual-parameter (DNA, RNA) flow cytometry (FCM) measurements of testicular cells. Both testicular weights and caudal sperm reserves remained generally below controls after 44 wk recovery following exposure to the highest dosage. Chromatin structure alterations, defined as increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ, and sperm head morphology were highly correlated with dose and with each other. Sperm head morphology and sperm chromatic structure remained abnormal at 44 wk for the 1.0 mg/kg TEM dosage, suggesting that the abnormalities, present long after the initial toxic response, may be a result of mutation. This study demonstrates that flow cytometry provides a unique, rapid, and efficient means to measure effects of reproductive toxins and potential mutagens.

  15. Dynamic aspects of spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterning by phase separation during the histone-to-protamine transition in charalean algae and relation to bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Kasinsky, H E; Ellis, S; Martens, G; Ausió, J

    2014-12-01

    During early-to-middle spermiogenesis in multicellular, internally fertilizing charalean green algae (Chara fibrosa, Chara vulgaris, Chara tomentosa, Nitella missouriensis), patterning of chromatin/nucleoplasm in developing spermatid nuclei changes from granules ? fibers ? contorted lamellae ? condensed chromatin. Cytochemical, immunocytochemical, electrophoretic studies on C. vulgaris and C. tomentosa spermatids (Kwiatkowska, Poplonska) and amino acid analysis of protamines in Chara corallina sperm (Reynolds, Wolfe), indicate that more positively charged protamines replace histones directly during spermiogenesis, not indirectly through other intermediate transitional proteins as in internally fertilizing neogastropods and sharks with more ordered spermatid lamellae. We hypothesize that such lamellar-mediated patterning is due to liquid-liquid phase separation by spinodal decomposition. This is a spontaneous thermodynamic process that involves diffusive instability of a lamellar chromatin network, a dominant pattern repeat distance and bicontinuity of chromatin/nucleoplasm phases. C. vulgaris sperm show contorted lamellae in the posterior region, whereas C. corallina sperm display contorted peripheral lamellae and interior fibrils. Among internally fertilizing liverworts, which may have evolved from Zygnematales, mid-spermatid nuclei lack lamellae. Instead they display self-coiled chromatin rods in Blasia pusilla, contain short chromatin tubules in Haplomitrium hookeri resembling those in internally fertilizing mosses and a hornwort and indirectly replace histones with protamines in Marchantia polymorpha. PMID:25262620

  16. A simplified chromatin dispersion (nuclear halo) assay for detecting DNA breakage induced by ionizing radiation and chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Galaz-Leiva, S; Pérez-Rodríguez, G; Blázquez-Castro, A; Stockert, J C

    2012-04-01

    Methods for visualizing DNA damage at the microscopic level are based on treatment of cell nuclei with saline or alkaline solutions. These procedures for achieving chromatin dispersion produce halos that surround the nuclear remnants. We improved the fast halo assay for visualizing DNA breakage in cultured cells to create a simplified method for detection and quantitative evaluation of DNA breakage. Nucleated erythrocytes from chicken blood were selected as a model test system to analyze the production of nuclear halos after treatment with X-rays or H(2)O(2). After staining with ethidium bromide or Wright's methylene blue-eosin solution, nuclear halos were easily observed by fluorescence or bright-field microscopy, respectively, which permits rapid visualization of DNA breakage in damaged cells. By using image processing and analysis with the public domain ImageJ software, X-ray dose and H(2)O(2) concentration could be correlated well with the size of nuclear halos and the halo:nucleus ratio. Our results indicate that this simplified nuclear halo assay can be used as a rapid, reliable and inexpensive procedure to detect and quantify DNA breakage induced by ionizing radiation and chemical agents. A mechanistic model to explain the differences between the formation of saline or alkaline halos also is suggested. PMID:21916782

  17. APPLICATION OF THE SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAY TO THE TEPLICE PROGRAM SEMEN STUDIES: A NEW METHOD FOR EVALUATING SPERM NUCLEAR CHROMATIN DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    A measure of sperm chromatin integrity was added to the routine semen end points evaluated in the Teplice Program male reproductive health studies. To address the hypothesis that exposure to periods of elevated air pollution may be associated with abnormalities in sp...

  18. Validation of a field based chromatin dispersion assay to assess sperm DNA fragmentation in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calabuig, M-J; López-Fernández, C; Martínez-Nevado, E; Pérez-Gutiérrez, J F; de la Fuente, J; Johnston, S D; Blyde, D; Harrison, K; Gosálvez, J

    2014-10-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been significant advances in the use of assisted reproductive technology for genetic and reproductive management of captive dolphin populations, including evaluation of sperm DNA quality. This study validated a customized sperm chromatin dispersion test (SCDt) for the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) as a means of assessing sperm DNA damage both in the field and in the laboratory. After performing the SCDt, two different sperm morphotypes were identified: (i) sperm with fragmented DNA showed large haloes of dispersed DNA fragments emerging from a compact sperm nucleoid core and (ii) sperm containing non-fragmented DNA displayed small compact haloes surrounded by a dense core of non-dispersed DNA and protein complex. Estimates of sperm DNA fragmentation by means of SCDt were directly comparable to results obtained following a two-tailed comet assay and showed a significant degree of correlation (r = 0.961; p < 0.001). This investigation also revealed that the SCDt, with minor modifications to the standard protocol, can be successfully conducted in the field using a LED florescence microscopy obtaining a high correlation (r = 0.993; p = 0.01) between the data obtained in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:25130370

  19. GENOTOXICITY OF TEN CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATES IN FOUR TEST SYSTEMS: COMPARISONS AMONG ASSAYS AND CONDENSATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), is genotoxic in many short-term in vitro tests and carcinogenic in rodents. However, no study has evaluatedd a set of CSCs prepared from a diverse set of cigarettes in a variety of short-term genotoxic...

  20. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  1. Minor Groove Binder Distamycin Remodels Chromatin but Inhibits Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parijat; Banerjee, Amrita; Shandilya, Jayasha; Senapati, Parijat; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Kundu, Tapas K.; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as “chromatin remodeling”. In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance. PMID:23460895

  2. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF TRIETHYLENEMELAMINE EXPOSURE ON MOUSE TESTIS CELLS AND SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAYED BY FLOW CYTOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxic and potentially mutagenic actions of triethylenemelamine (TEM) on mouse body and testis weights, testicular cell kinetics, sperm production, sperm head morphology, and sperm chromatin structure were assessed in two experiments. he first experiment examined effects of fo...

  3. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome condensation induces mechanical stress and triggers shattering and chromothripsis in chromosomes or chromosome arms still undergoing DNA replication or repair in micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells, when primary nuclei enter mitosis. PMID:26520389

  4. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA[reg])

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, Donald P. . E-mail: scsa@brookings.net; Wixon, Regina

    2005-09-01

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to {approx}1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for elevated sperm DNA fragmentation. Extensive DNA fragmentation probably cannot be repaired by the egg and the spontaneous abortion rate is {approx}2x higher if a man has more than 30% of sperm showing DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation is an excellent marker for exposure to potential reproductive toxicants and a diagnostic/prognostic tool for potential male infertility.

  5. Cell cycle regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells: antagonistic effects of nuclear envelope breakdown and chromatin condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Mannioui, Abdelkrim . E-mail: karim.mannioui@chu-stlouis.fr; Schiffer, Cecile . E-mail: cecile.schiffer@voila.fr; Felix, Nathalie . E-mail: nathalie.felix@chu-stlouis.fr

    2004-11-10

    We examined the influence of mitosis on the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells. Single-round infection of cells arrested in G1b or allowed to synchronously proceed through division showed that mitosis delays virus integration until 18-24 h postinfection, whereas integration reaches maximum levels by 15 h in G1b-arrested cells. Subcellular fractionation of metaphase-arrested cells indicated that, while nuclear envelope disassembly facilitates docking of viral DNA to chromatin, chromosome condensation directly antagonizes and therefore delays integration. As a result of the balance between the two effects, virus integration efficiency is eventually up to threefold greater in dividing cells. At the single-cell level, using a green fluorescent protein-expressing reporter virus, we found that passage through mitosis leads to prominent asymmetric segregation of the viral genome in daughter cells without interfering with provirus expression.

  6. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    PubMed Central

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF. PMID:24472778

  7. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF.

  8. Phase Transition in Reconstituted Chromatin

    E-print Network

    Tonau Nakai; Kohji Hizume; Shige. H. Yoshimura; Kunio Takeyasu; Kenichi Yoshikawa

    2004-09-10

    By observing reconstituted chromatin by fluorescence microscopy (FM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that the density of nucleosomes exhibits a bimodal profile, i.e., there is a large transition between the dense and dispersed states in reconstituted chromatin. Based on an analysis of the spatial distribution of nucleosome cores, we deduced an effective thermodynamic potential as a function of the nucleosome-nucleosome distance. This enabled us to interpret the folding transition of chromatin in terms of a first-order phase transition. This mechanism for the condensation of chromatin is discussed in terms of its biological significance.

  9. Acetone enhances the direct analysis of total condensed tannins in plant tissues by the butanol-HCl-iron assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The butanol-HCl spectrophotometric assay is widely used to quantify extractable and insoluble forms of condensed tannin (CT, syn. proanthocyanidin) in foods, feeds, and foliage of herbaceous and woody plants. However, this method underestimates total CT content when applied directly to plant materia...

  10. Evaluation of Direct Phloroglucinolysis and Colorimetric Depolymerization Assays and Their Applicability for Determining Condensed Tannins in Grape Marc.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Josh L; Bindon, Keren A; Smith, Paul A

    2015-11-18

    To determine the optimum methods for determining condensed tannin (CT) content in grape marc, butanol-hydrochloric acid assays and phloroglucinolysis were adapted for use, applied to a range of grape marc types, and the methods compared. Porter's assay (butanol-HCl) was found to give unreliable results due to nonlinear color responses to grape skin and seed tannin concentrations, whereas the modification to include acetone (Grabber's assay) overcame this. Differences between skin and seed tannin responses highlighted the need to adequately select the correct grape tannin standard, and the formation of pH-dependent color was accounted for through acidification of blank samples. For phloroglucinolysis, the inability to remove highly bound tannins from cell wall material was highlighted, although a measure of tannins remaining post-phloroglucinolysis (Grabber's assay) showed a trend with the level of exposure to oxidative storage or processing conditions. The comparison of CT concentrations from phloroglucinolysis and Grabber's assay gave poor correlation coefficients. PMID:26551987

  11. Quantitative investigation of reproduction of gonosomal condensed chromatin during trophoblast cell polyploidization and endoreduplication in the east-european field vole Microtus rossiaemeridionalis

    PubMed Central

    Zybina, Tatiana G; Zybina, Eugenia V; Bogdanova, Margarita S; Stein, Grigory I

    2003-01-01

    Simultaneous determinations of DNA content in cell nuclei and condensed chromatin bodies formed by heterochromatized regions of sex chromosomes (gonosomal chromatin bodies, GCB) have been performed in two trophoblast cell populations of the East-European field vole Microtus rossiaemeridionalis: in the proliferative population of trophoblast cells of the junctional zone of placenta and in the secondary giant trophoblast cells. One or two GCBs have been observed in trophoblast cell nuclei of all embryos studied (perhaps both male and female). In the proliferative trophoblast cell population characterized by low ploidy levels (2–16c) and in the highly polyploid population of secondary giant trophoblast cells (32–256c) the total DNA content in GCB increased proportionally to the ploidy level. In individual GCBs the DNA content also rose proportionally to the ploidy level in nuclei both with one and with two GCBs in both trophoblast cell populations. Some increase in percentage of nuclei with 2–3 GCBs was shown in nuclei of the placenta junctional zone; this may be accounted for by genome multiplication via uncompleted mitoses. In nuclei of the secondary giant trophoblast cells (16–256c) the number of GCBs did not exceed 2, and the fraction of nuclei with two GCBs did not increase, which suggests the polytene nature of sex chromosomes in these cells. In all classes of ploidy the DNA content in trophoblast cell nuclei with the single GCB was lower than in nuclei with two and more GCBs. This can indicate that the single GCB in many cases does not derive from fusion of two GCBs. The measurements in individual GCBs suggest that different heterochromatized regions of the X- and Y-chromosome may contribute in GCB formation. PMID:12725646

  12. Assessment of sperm quality through fluorometry and sperm chromatin structure assay in relation to field fertility of frozen-thawed semen from Swedish AI bulls.

    PubMed

    Januskauska, A; Johannisson, A; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2001-03-01

    We investigated fluorometry to study sperm viability and flow cytometry to study sperm chromatin structure. We also assessed sperm quality after thawing relative to field fertility after AI as shown by 56-day non-return rates (56-d NRR) Frozen-thawed semen samples were obtained from 20 Swedish Red and White bulls (1 to 3 semen batches/bull) and the fertility data were based on 6,369 AIs. Fluorometry enabled simultaneous detection of sperm viability and concentration in Hoechst 33258-stained semen samples. Sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) evaluated denaturability of sperm nuclear DNA in situ after acid treatment. The intensity of fluorescence in non-permeabilized samples was negatively (r = -0.60, P < 0.001) correlated with microscopically-assessed sperm viability, and the fluorescence of permeabilized semen samples significantly (r = 0.67, P < 0.001) correlated with sperm concentration as assessed by hemocytometry. From the fluorescence output, the calculated percentage of damaged cells was negatively (r = -0.71, P < 0.001) correlated with the number of live cells derived from the microscopic assessment of sperm viability and concentration. This variable was significantly correlated with fertility results both at batch (r = -0.39, P < 0.05), and bull (r = -0.57, P < 0.01) levels. The SCSA variables SDalphat and COMPalphat were significantly (r = -0.59-0.64, P < 0.001) correlated with sperm viability variables after thawing but only the COMPalphat correlated significantly (r = -0.53, P < 0.05) with fertility results and solely at the bull level. The results indicate that fluorometric assessment is in good agreement with other practiced procedures and can be performed with sufficient accuracy. The SCSA may be a valuable complement for routinely practiced microscopic evaluation of sperm morphology of AI bull semen PMID:11291917

  13. Reproducibility of 3D chromatin configuration reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Mark R; Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Vazquez, Mariel; Arsuaga, Javier

    2014-07-01

    It is widely recognized that the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of eukaryotic chromatin plays an important role in processes such as gene regulation and cancer-driving gene fusions. Observing or inferring this 3D structure at even modest resolutions had been problematic, since genomes are highly condensed and traditional assays are coarse. However, recently devised high-throughput molecular techniques have changed this situation. Notably, the development of a suite of chromatin conformation capture (CCC) assays has enabled elicitation of contacts-spatially close chromosomal loci-which have provided insights into chromatin architecture. Most analysis of CCC data has focused on the contact level, with less effort directed toward obtaining 3D reconstructions and evaluating the accuracy and reproducibility thereof. While questions of accuracy must be addressed experimentally, questions of reproducibility can be addressed statistically-the purpose of this paper. We use a constrained optimization technique to reconstruct chromatin configurations for a number of closely related yeast datasets and assess reproducibility using four metrics that measure the distance between 3D configurations. The first of these, Procrustes fitting, measures configuration closeness after applying reflection, rotation, translation, and scaling-based alignment of the structures. The others base comparisons on the within-configuration inter-point distance matrix. Inferential results for these metrics rely on suitable permutation approaches. Results indicate that distance matrix-based approaches are preferable to Procrustes analysis, not because of the metrics per se but rather on account of the ability to customize permutation schemes to handle within-chromosome contiguity. It has recently been emphasized that the use of constrained optimization approaches to 3D architecture reconstruction are prone to being trapped in local minima. Our methods of reproducibility assessment provide a means for comparing 3D reconstruction solutions so that we can discern between local and global optima by contrasting solutions under perturbed inputs. PMID:24519450

  14. Phosphorylation of H2AX histones in response to double-strand breaks and induction of premature chromatin condensation in hydroxyurea-treated root meristem cells of Raphanus sativus, Vicia faba, and Allium porrum.

    PubMed

    Rybaczek, Dorota; Maszewski, Janusz

    2007-01-01

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation and hydroxyurea-mediated replication arrest, resulting in the formation of gamma-H2AX foci along megabase chromatin domains nearby the sites of incurred DNA damage. In an attempt to establish a relationship between species-specific nuclear architecture and H2AX phosphorylation in S/G(2) phase-arrested root meristem cells, immunocytochemical comparisons using an antibody raised against human gamma-H2AX were made among three plants differing with respect to DNA contents: Allium porrum, representing a reticulate type of DNA package, Vicia faba, having semireticulate cell nuclei, and Raphanus sativus, characterised by a chromocentric type of chromatin. Another approach was aimed at determining possible correlations between the extent of hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of H2AX histones and the quantities of root meristem cells induced by caffeine to enter aberrant mitotic division (premature chromosome condensation). It was concluded that the higher-order structure of chromatin may contribute to the accessibility of molecular factors engaged in the recognition and repair of genetic lesions. Consequently, in contrast to A. porrum and V. faba, a diffuse chromatin in chromocentric cell nuclei of R. sativus may become more vulnerable both to generate DNA double-strand breaks and to recruit molecular elements needed to arrange the cell cycle checkpoint functions, and thus, more resistant to factors which allow the cells to enter premature chromosome condensation spontaneously. On the other hand, however, caffeine-mediated overriding of the S-M checkpoint control system resulted in the typical appearance of premature chromosome condensation, irrespective of the genomic content of DNA. PMID:17111099

  15. Chromatin Computation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this “chromatin computer” to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal – and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  16. Chromatin computation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this "chromatin computer" to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal--and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  17. Chromatin Hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory—the two-fluid model—in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model—the Maxwell fluid—for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity. PMID:24806919

  18. Residual chromatin breaks as biodosimetry for cell killing by carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Kase, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kanai, T.; Ando, K.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the relationship between cell killing and the induction of residual chromatin breaks on various human cell lines and primary cultured cells obtained by biopsy from patients irradiated with either X-rays or heavy-ion beams to identify potential bio-marker of radiosensitivity for radiation-induced cell killing. The carbon-ion beams were accelerated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Six primary cultures obtained by biopsy from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were irradiated with two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/?m, 76 keV/?m) and 200kV X rays. Residual chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique after a 24 hour post-irradiation incubation period. The induction rate of residual chromatin breaks per cell per Gy was the highest for 76 keV/?m beams on all of the cells. Our results indicated that cell which was more sensitive to the cell killing was similarly more susceptible to induction of residual chromatin breaks. Furthermore there is a good correlation between these two end points in various cell lines and primary cultured cells. This suggests that the detection of residual chromatin breaks by the PCC technique may be useful as a predictive assay of tumor response to cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Acetone enhances the direct analysis of Procyanidin- and Prodelphinidin-based condensed tannins in lotus species by the butanol-HCl-iron assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The butanol-HCl spectrophotometric assay is widely used for quantifying extractable and insoluble condensed tannins (CT, syn. proanthocyanidins) in foods, feeds, and foliage of herbaceous and woody plants, but the method underestimates total CT content when applied directly to plant material. To imp...

  20. Sensitive and selective chemiluminescence assay for hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate using nanoparticle-based catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhujun; Tao, Liang; Gao, Miao

    2013-04-01

    The catalytic properties of cubiform Co3O4 nanoparticles, ?-Fe2O3 nanorods, and NiO nanoparticles were studied using both microarray method and FI-CL method. These nanoarticles exhibit high specific catalytic effects on the chemiluminescence (CL) reaction of the luminol-H2O2 system in alkaline solution compared with other common catalysts. A reaction mechanism is described. It provides new insights into the application of nanoparticle materials. The CL method based on the use of the Co3O4 nanoparticles is ultrasensitive and particularly selective. Therefore, it was applied to the analysis of H2O2 which can be determined in the concentration range from 1.0 nM to 1000 nM, with a detection limit of 0.3 nM. The relative standard deviation is 2.1% at 0.1 ?M of H2O2 (for n = 11). The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace quantities of H2O2 in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) where it is a mediator of oxidative stress and a promising biomarker for diagnosing. The assay requires a small sample and no incubation time, and has an analytical runtime of <1 min. It is timesaving and suitable for larger studies. The levels of H2O2 in EBC are found to be elevated in healthy subjects (average = 0.54 nM), rheum subjects (average = 0.24 nM), and feverish subjects (average = 0.16 nM). Our data suggested that the average H2O2 concentration of EBC from feverish subjects was significantly higher than healthy subjects and rheumatic subjects.

  1. NET23/STING Promotes Chromatin Compaction from the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I.; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  2. Unraveling chromatin structure using magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, John

    2010-03-01

    The compact, yet dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in regulating gene expression. Although the static structure of chromatin fibers has been studied extensively, the controversy about the higher order folding remains. The compaction of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin has been implicated in the regulation of all DNA processes. To understand the relation between gene regulation and chromatin structure it is essential to uncover the mechanisms by which chromatin fibers fold and unfold. We used magnetic tweezers to probe the mechanical properties of individual nucleosomes and chromatin fibers consisting of a single, well-defined array of 25 nucleosomes. From these studies five major features appeared upon forced extension of chromatin fibers: the elastic stretching of chromatin's higher order structure, the breaking of internucleosomal contacts, unwrapping of the first turn of DNA, unwrapping of the second turn of DNA, and the dissociation of histone octamers. These events occur sequentially at the increasing force. Neighboring nucleosomes stabilize DNA folding into a nucleosome relative to isolated nucleosomes. When an array of nucleosomes is folded into a 30 nm fiber, representing the first level of chromatin condensation, the fiber stretched like a Hookian spring at forces up to 4 pN. Together with a nucleosome-nucleosome stacking energy of 14 kT this points to a solenoid as the underlying topology of the 30 nm fiber. Surprisingly, linker histones do not affect the length or stiffness of the fibers, but stabilize fiber folding up to forces of 7 pN. The stiffness of the folded chromatin fiber points at histone tails that mediate nucleosome stacking. Fibers with a nucleosome repeat length of 167 bp instead of 197 bp are significantly stiffer, consistent with a two-start helical arrangement. The extensive thermal breathing of the chromatin fiber that is a consequence of the observed high compliance provides a structural basis for understanding the balance between chromatin condensation and transparency for DNA transactions. The kinetics of force induced nucleosome unstacking was resolved using a Hidden Markov analysis. Overall, our results reveal a highly dynamic structure that combines high level of compaction of DNA with transient accessibility.

  3. Chromatin enrichment for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Wills, Karen L. H.; Furlan, Cristina; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, chromatin hosts fundamental cellular processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. To analyze chromatin on a proteomic scale, we have developed chromatin enrichment for proteomics (ChEP), which is a simple biochemical procedure that enriches interphase chromatin in all its complexity. It enables researchers to take a ‘snapshot’ of chromatin and to isolate and identify even transiently bound factors. In ChEP, cells are fixed with formaldehyde; subsequently, DNA together with all cross-linked proteins is isolated by centrifugation under denaturing conditions. This approach enables the analysis of global chromatin composition and its changes, which is in contrast with existing chromatin enrichment procedures, which either focus on specific chromatin loci (e.g., affinity purification) or are limited in specificity, such as the analysis of the chromatin pellet (i.e., analysis of all insoluble nuclear material). ChEP takes half a day to complete and requires no specialized laboratory skills or equipment. ChEP enables the characterization of chromatin response to drug treatment or physiological processes. Beyond proteomics, ChEP may preclear chromatin for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. PMID:25101823

  4. Acetone Enhances the Direct Analysis of Total Condensed Tannins in Forage Legumes by the Butanol-HCl Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depending on concentration, condensed tannins (CT) in forages have no effect, enhance, or impede protein utilization and performance of ruminants. Defining optimal forage CT levels has been elusive, partly because current methods for estimating total soluble plus insoluble CT are laborious or inaccu...

  5. MUTAGENICITY OF THE FRACTIONATED ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL, CIGARETTE SMOKE CONDENSATE, COKE OVEN, AND ROOFING TAR IN THE AMES ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mobile and stationary sources emit particle-bound organics that have demonstrated mutagenicity. The objective of this study was to measure the mutagenicity of the fractionated organic emissions from diesel, cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), coke oven and roofing tar in the Ames a...

  6. Rapid and unbiased extraction of chromatin associated RNAs from purified native chromatin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Yang, Yi; Konieczny, Stephen F; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-12-24

    An ultra fast and unbiased method that uses salicylic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (SAMNPs) and magnetophoretic chromatography is developed to extract chromatin associated RNAs (CARs). The SAMNPs were first used for enriching cells from the cell culture media and further used for capturing chromatin after cells were lysed. The formed SAMNPs-chromatin complexes were transferred to a viscous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution stored in a 200-?l pipette tip. Due to the difference in viscosities, a bi-layer liquid was formed inside the pipette tip. The SAMNPs-chromatin complexes were separated from the free SAMNPs and free RNA-SAMNPs complexes by applying an external magnetic field. The CARs were further extracted from the SAMNP-chromatin complexes directly. The extracted CARs were reverse transcribed as cDNA and further characterized by real-time qPCR. The total assay time taken for cell separation, chromatin purification and chromatin associated RNAs extraction can be accomplished in less than 2h. PMID:26643718

  7. Relationship Between Chromatin Structure and Sensitivity to Molecularly Targeted Auger Electron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Samantha Y.A.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. Methods and Materials: Chromatin structure was altered in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N human breast cancer cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, or hypertonic treatment. The extent and duration of chromatin structural changes were evaluated using the micrococcal nuclease assay. DNA damage ({gamma}H2AX assay) and clonogenic survival were evaluated after exposure to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, or IR. The intracellular distribution of {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF after chromatin modification was investigated in cell fractionation experiments. Results: Chromatin remained condensed for up to 20 minutes after NaCl and in a relaxed state 24 hours after SAHA treatment. The number of {gamma}H2AX foci per cell was greater in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (0.5 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) compared with IR alone (16 {+-} 0.6 and 14 {+-} 0.3 vs. 12 {+-} 0.4 and 11 {+-} 0.2, respectively). More {gamma}H2AX foci were observed in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells exposed to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF (6 MBq/{mu}g) plus SAHA vs. {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (11 {+-} 0.3 and 12 {+-} 0.7 vs. 9 {+-} 0.4 and 7 {+-} 0.3, respectively). 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine enhanced the DNA damage caused by IR and {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF. Clonogenic survival was reduced in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (6 Gy) plus SAHA (1 {mu}M) vs. IR alone (0.6% {+-} 0.01 and 0.3% {+-} 0.2 vs. 5.8% {+-} 0.2 and 2% {+-} 0.1, respectively) and after {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF plus SAHA compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF alone (21% {+-} 0.4% and 19% {+-} 4.6 vs. 33% {+-} 2.3 and 32% {+-} 3.7). SAHA did not affect {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF nuclear localization. Hypertonic treatment resulted in fewer {gamma}H2AX foci per cell after IR and {sup 111}In-DTPA-hEGF compared to controls but did not significantly alter clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Chromatin structure affects DNA damage and cell survival after exposure to Auger electron radiation.

  8. In Vivo Chromatin Organization of Mouse Rod Photoreceptors Correlates with Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Spehner, Danièle; Devys, Didier; Schultz, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Background The folding of genetic information into chromatin plays important regulatory roles in many nuclear processes and particularly in gene transcription. Post translational histone modifications are associated with specific chromatin condensation states and with distinct transcriptional activities. The peculiar chromatin organization of rod photoreceptor nuclei, with a large central domain of condensed chromatin surrounded by a thin border of extended chromatin was used as a model to correlate in vivo chromatin structure, histone modifications and transcriptional activity. Methodology We investigated the functional relationships between chromatin compaction, distribution of histone modifications and location of RNA polymerase II in intact murine rod photoreceptors using cryo-preparation methods, electron tomography and immunogold labeling. Our results show that the characteristic central heterochromatin of rod nuclei is organized into concentric domains characterized by a progressive loosening of the chromatin architecture from inside towards outside and by specific combinations of silencing histone marks. The peripheral heterochromatin is formed by closely packed 30nm fibers as revealed by a characteristic optical diffraction signal. Unexpectedly, the still highly condensed most external heterochromatin domain contains acetylated histones, which are usually associated with active transcription and decondensed chromatin. Histone acetylation is thus not sufficient in vivo for complete chromatin decondensation. The euchromatin domain contains several degrees of chromatin compaction and the histone tails are hyperacetylated, enriched in H3K4 monomethylation and hypo trimethylated on H3K9, H3K27 and H4K20. The transcriptionally active RNA polymerases II molecules are confined in the euchromatin domain and are preferentially located at the vicinity of the interface with heterochromatin. Conclusions Our results show that transcription is located in the most decondensed and highly acetylated chromatin regions, but since acetylation is found associated with compact chromatin it is not sufficient to decondense chromatin in vivo. We also show that a combination of histone marks defines distinct concentric heterochromatin domains. PMID:20543957

  9. Molecular features of heterochromatin condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamkalo, B.A.; Lundgren, K.; Radic, M.Z.; Saghbini, M.

    1993-12-31

    Differential chromatin condensation is a hallmark of both constitutive (e.g. centromeres and telomeres) and facultative (e.g. inactive X chromosomes or Barr bodies) heterochromatin. Since the higher order organization of eukaryotic chromatin is undoubtedly a consequence of a combination of specific DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions, elucidation of the constituents of these interactions is a first step in understanding the mechanism(s) underlying the differential condensation of heterochromatin as compared to euchromatin. Initial attempts, described in this paper, to determine molecular features and molecular interactions that may be elements of differential chromatin condensation focus on centromere-restricted highly repetitive so-called satellite DNA in mouse and man. Based on these studies we hypothesize that DNA structure, but not primary sequence per se, is a fundamental aspect of heterochromatin and that a collection of nonhistone chromosomal proteins recognize this structure and/or each other to mediate differential condensation.

  10. Multiple modes of chromatin remodeling by Forkhead box proteins.

    PubMed

    Lalmansingh, Avin S; Karmakar, Sudipan; Jin, Yetao; Nagaich, Akhilesh K

    2012-07-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) proteins represent a large family of transcriptional regulators unified by their DNA binding domain (DBD) known as a 'forkhead' or 'winged helix' domain. Over 40 FOX genes have been identified in the mammalian genome. FOX proteins share significant sequence similarities in the DBD which allow them to bind to a consensus DNA response element. However, their modes of action are quite diverse as they regulate gene expression by acting as pioneer factors, transcription factors, or both. This review focuses on the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling with an emphasis on three sub-classes-FOXA, FOXO, and FOXP members. FOXA proteins serve as pioneer factors to open up local chromatin structure and thereby increase accessibility of chromatin to factors regulating transcription. FOXP proteins, in contrast, function as classic transcription factors to recruit a variety of chromatin modifying enzymes to regulate gene expression. FOXO proteins represent a hybrid subclass having dual roles as pioneering factors and transcription factors. A subset of FOX proteins interacts with condensed mitotic chromatin and may function as 'bookmarking' agents to maintain transcriptional competence at specific genomic sites. The overall diversity in chromatin remodeling function by FOX proteins is related to unique structural motifs present within the DBD flanking regions that govern selective interactions with core histones and/or chromatin coregulatory proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space. PMID:22406422

  11. CTCF Binding Polarity Determines Chromatin Looping.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Elzo; Vos, Erica S M; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Verstegen, Marjon J A M; Teunissen, Hans; Splinter, Erik; Wijchers, Patrick J; Krijger, Peter H L; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-11-19

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an architectural protein involved in the three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromatin. In this study, we assayed the 3D genomic contact profiles of a large number of CTCF binding sites with high-resolution 4C-seq. As recently reported, our data also suggest that chromatin loops preferentially form between CTCF binding sites oriented in a convergent manner. To directly test this, we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to delete core CTCF binding sites in three loci, including the CTCF site in the Sox2 super-enhancer. In all instances, CTCF and cohesin recruitment were lost, and chromatin loops with distal, convergent CTCF sites were disrupted or destabilized. Re-insertion of oppositely oriented CTCF recognition sequences restored CTCF and cohesin recruitment, but did not re-establish chromatin loops. We conclude that CTCF binding polarity plays a functional role in the formation of higher-order chromatin structure. PMID:26527277

  12. Isolation of neuronal chromatin from brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Matevossian, Anouch; Huang, Hsien-Sung; Straubhaar, Juerg; Akbarian, Schahram

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA-protein interactions in mature brain are increasingly recognized as key regulators for behavioral plasticity and neuronal dysfunction in chronic neuropsychiatric disease. However, chromatin assays typically lack single cell resolution, and therefore little is known about chromatin regulation of differentiated neuronal nuclei that reside in brain parenchyma intermingled with various types of non-neuronal cells. Results Here, we describe a protocol to selectively tag neuronal nuclei from adult brain – either by (anti-NeuN) immunolabeling or transgene-derived histone H2B-GFP fusion protein – for subsequent fluorescence-activated sorting and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). To illustrate an example, we compared histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 methylation marks at select gene promoters in neuronal, non-neuronal and unsorted chromatin from mouse forebrain and human cerebral cortex, and provide evidence for neuron-specific histone methylation signatures. Conclusion With the modifications detailed in this protocol, the method can be used to collect nuclei from specific subtypes of neurons from any brain region for subsequent ChIP with native/un-fixed or crosslinked chromatin preparations. Starting with the harvest of brain tissue, ChIP-ready neuronal nuclei can be obtained within one day. PMID:18442397

  13. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  14. Chromatin remodelling during male gametophyte development.

    PubMed

    Borg, Michael; Berger, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    The plant life cycle alternates between a diploid sporophytic phase and haploid gametophytic phase, with the latter giving rise to the gametes. Male gametophyte development encompasses two mitotic divisions that results in a simple three-celled structure knows as the pollen grain, in which two sperm cells are encased within a larger vegetative cell. Both cell types exhibit a very different type of chromatin organization - highly condensed in sperm cell nuclei and highly diffuse in the vegetative cell. Distinct classes of histone variants have dynamic and differential expression in the two cell lineages of the male gametophyte. Here we review how the dynamics of histone variants are linked to reprogramming of chromatin activities in the male gametophyte, compaction of the sperm cell genome and zygotic transitions post-fertilization. PMID:25892182

  15. Chromatin dynamics during DNA repair revealed by pair correlation analysis of molecular flow in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangduo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin dynamics modulate DNA repair factor accessibility throughout the DNA damage response. The spatiotemporal scale upon which these dynamics occur render them invisible to live cell imaging. Here we present a believed novel assay to monitor the in vivo structural rearrangements of chromatin during DNA repair. By pair correlation analysis of EGFP molecular flow into chromatin before and after damage, this assay measures millisecond variations in chromatin compaction with submicron resolution. Combined with laser microirradiation we employ this assay to monitor the real-time accessibility of DNA at the damage site. We find from comparison of EGFP molecular flow with a molecule that has an affinity toward double-strand breaks (Ku-EGFP) that DNA damage induces a transient decrease in chromatin compaction at the damage site and an increase in compaction to adjacent regions, which together facilitate DNA repair factor recruitment to the lesion with high spatiotemporal control. PMID:24988341

  16. Chromatin signatures of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Marc A.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the pattern of gene expression play an important role in allowing cancer cells to acquire their hallmark characteristics, while genomic instability enables cells to acquire genetic alterations that promote oncogenesis. Chromatin plays central roles in both transcriptional regulation and the maintenance of genomic stability. Studies by cancer genome consortiums have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin regulatory factors and histone proteins in human cancer, implicating them as major mediators in the pathogenesis of both hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the role of chromatin in cancer, focusing on transcriptional regulatory complexes, enhancer-associated factors, histone point mutations, and alterations in heterochromatin-interacting factors. PMID:25644600

  17. Biophysical Regulation of Chromatin Architecture Instills a Mechanical Memory in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Jin; Thorpe, Stephen D.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Duncan, Randall L.; Lee, David A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical cues direct the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we identified the operative molecular mechanisms through which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates changes in chromatin organization and nuclear mechanics in MSCs. Our data show that, in the absence of exogenous differentiation factors, short term DL elicits a rapid increase in chromatin condensation, mediated by acto-myosin based cellular contractility and the activity of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2. The resulting change in chromatin condensation stiffened the MSC nucleus, making it less deformable when stretch was applied to the cell. We also identified stretch induced ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling as a central mediator of this chromatin condensation process. Further, we showed that DL, through differential stabilization of the condensed chromatin state, established a ‘mechanical memory’ in these cells. That is, increasing strain levels and number of loading events led to a greater degree of chromatin condensation that persisted for longer periods of time after the cessation of loading. These data indicate that, with mechanical perturbation, MSCs develop a mechanical memory encoded in structural changes in the nucleus which may sensitize them to future mechanical loading events and define the trajectory and persistence of their lineage specification. PMID:26592929

  18. Facilitation of base excision repair by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Czaja, Wioletta

    2015-12-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) is a conserved, intracellular DNA repair system that recognizes and removes chemically modified bases to insure genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis. Aberrant BER has been tightly linked with a broad spectrum of human pathologies, such as several types of cancer, neurological degeneration, developmental abnormalities, immune dysfunction and aging. In the cell, BER must recognize and remove DNA lesions from the tightly condensed, protein-coated chromatin. Because chromatin is necessarily refractory to DNA metabolic processes, like transcription and replication, the compaction of the genomic material is also inhibitory to the repair systems necessary for its upkeep. Multiple ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complexes play essential roles in modulating the protein-DNA interactions within chromatin, regulating transcription and promoting activities of some DNA repair systems, including double-strand break repair and nucleotide excision repair. However, it remains unclear how BER operates in the context of chromatin, and if the chromatin remodelling processes that govern transcription and replication also actively regulate the efficiency of BER. In this review we highlight the emerging role of ACR in regulation of BER. PMID:26422134

  19. Chromatin fiber allostery and the epigenetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick; Foray, Nicolas; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry; Wong, Hua; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    The notion of allostery introduced for proteins about fifty years ago has been extended since then to DNA allostery, where a locally triggered DNA structural transition remotely controls other DNA-binding events. We further extend this notion and propose that chromatin fiber allosteric transitions, induced by histone-tail covalent modifications, may play a key role in transcriptional regulation. We present an integrated scenario articulating allosteric mechanisms at different scales: allosteric transitions of the condensed chromatin fiber induced by histone-tail acetylation modify the mechanical constraints experienced by the embedded DNA, thus possibly controlling DNA-binding of allosteric transcription factors or further allosteric mechanisms at the linker DNA level. At a higher scale, different epigenetic constraints delineate different statistically dominant subsets of accessible chromatin fiber conformations, which each favors the assembly of dedicated regulatory complexes, as detailed on the emblematic example of the mouse Igf2-H19 gene locus and its parental imprinting. This physical view offers a mechanistic and spatially structured explanation of the observed correlation between transcriptional activity and histone modifications. The evolutionary origin of allosteric control supports to speak of an ‘epigenetic code’, by which events involved in transcriptional regulation are encoded in histone modifications in a context-dependent way.

  20. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres is characterized by reduced compaction of telomeric chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Episkopou, Harikleia; Draskovic, Irena; Van Beneden, Amandine; Tilman, Gaëlle; Mattiussi, Marina; Gobin, Matthieu; Arnoult, Nausica; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Decottignies, Anabelle

    2014-01-01

    Proper telomeric chromatin configuration is thought to be essential for telomere homeostasis and stability. Previous studies in mouse suggested that loss of heterochromatin marks at telomeres might favor onset of Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway, by promoting homologous recombination. However, analysis of chromatin status at human ALT telomeres has never been reported. Here, using isogenic human cell lines and cellular hybrids, which rely either on telomerase or ALT to maintain telomeres, we show that chromatin compaction is reduced at ALT telomeres and this is associated with a global decrease in telomeric H3K9me3. This, subsequently, leads to upregulation of telomere transcription. Accordingly, restoration of a more condensed telomeric chromatin through telomerase-dependent elongation of short ALT telomeres reduces telomere transcription. We further show that loss of ATRX chromatin remodeler function, a frequent characteristic of ALT cells, is not sufficient to decrease chromatin condensation at telomeres nor to increase the expression of telomeric RNA species. These results offer new insight on telomeric chromatin properties in ALT cells and support the hypothesis that telomeric chromatin decondensation is important for ALT pathway. PMID:24500201

  1. The role of chromatin dynamics in immune cell development.

    PubMed

    Winter, Deborah R; Amit, Ido

    2014-09-01

    In immune cells, as in all mammalian cells, nuclear DNA is wrapped around histones to form nucleosomes. The positioning and modifications of nucleosomes throughout the genome defines the chromatin state of the cell and has a large impact on gene regulation. Chromatin state is dynamic throughout immune cell development and activation. High-throughput open chromatin assays, such as DNase-seq, can be used to find regulatory element across the genome and, when combined with histone modifications, can specify their function. During hematopoiesis, distal regulatory elements, known as enhancers, are established by pioneer factors that alter chromatin state. Some of these enhancers are lost, some are gained, and some are maintained as a memory of the cell's developmental origin. The enhancer landscape is unique to the cell lineage-with different enhancers regulating the same promoter-and determines the mechanism of cell type-specific activation after exposure to stimuli. Histone modification and promoter architecture govern the diverse responses to stimulation. Furthermore, chromatin dynamics may explain the high plasticity of certain tissue-resident immune cell types. Future epigenomic research will depend on the development of more efficient experiments and better methods to associate enhancers with genes. The ultimate goal of mapping genome-wide chromatin state throughout the hematopoietic tree will help illuminate the mechanisms behind immune cell development and function. PMID:25123274

  2. Role of H1 in chromatin folding. A thermodynamic study of chromatin reconstitution by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Russo, I; Barboro, P; Alberti, I; Parodi, S; Balbi, C; Allera, C; Lazzarini, G; Patrone, E

    1995-01-10

    In a series of related papers, we have recently presented the results of a thermodynamic approach to the conformational transitions of bulk chromatin induced in vitro by different structure-perturbing agents, such as the intercalating dye ethidium bromide or the ionic strength. In all these studies, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry to detect the changes in the melting behavior of the structural domains of chromatin (the linker and the core particle) associated with the order-disorder transitions. This technique also revealed that the higher-order structure undergoes a catastrophic decondensation process in the course of the transformation of rat hepatocytes as well as of cultured cells. Therefore, several questions arose concerning the biological function (if any) of the changes in the degree of condensation of bulk chromatin, as well as the mechanism of transition and the nature of the modulating agents. In this paper, we report a thermodynamic analysis of the reconstitution of H1-depleted calf thymus chromatin with the purpose of establishing (1) the binding mode of H1 and (2) the energetics and cooperativity of the transition from the unfolded to the condensed state. When H1 is progressively extracted from calf thymus nuclei by high-salt treatment, the endotherm at 107 degrees C, characteristic of the core particles interacting within condensed domains, converts into the thermal transition at 90 degrees C, resulting from the denaturation of noninteracting core particles. Binding of H1 fully restores the thermal profile of native chromatin. Analysis of H1 association shows that binding occurs at independent sites with KA = (3.67 +/- 0.60) x 10(4) M-1 and each site comprising 180 +/- 10 bp. The experimental dependence of the fraction of condensed chromatin on R, the moles of bound H1 per nucleosome mole, was compared with a simple thermodynamic model for the conformational change. This analysis yields a value of -5 kcal per nucleosome mole for the interaction free energy of nucleosomes within the ordered state. The process of condensation, is not, however, a highly cooperative (all-or-none) one, as expected from a consideration of the solenoidal model for the 30 nm fiber. Rather, nucleation of the helical state involves the face-to-face interaction between consecutive core particles, and the growth is largely determined by the mergence and rearrangement of neighboring clusters of helically arrayed nucleosomes. PMID:7819211

  3. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Cécile M; Chalkley, Gillian E; Voets, Olaf; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A; Moshkin, Yuri M; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2015-11-17

    During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG) box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST)-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin. PMID:26549447

  4. DNA Looping Facilitates Targeting of a Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yadon, Adam N; Singh, Badri Nath; Hampsey, Michael; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes are highly abundant and play pivotal roles regulating DNA-dependent processes. The mechanisms by which they are targeted to specific loci have not been well understood on a genome-wide scale. Here we present evidence that a major targeting mechanism for the Isw2 chromatin remodeling enzyme to specific genomic loci is through sequence-specific transcription factor (TF)-dependent recruitment. Unexpectedly, Isw2 is recruited in a TF-dependent fashion to a large number of loci without TF binding sites. Using the 3C assay, we show that Isw2 can be targeted by Ume6- and TFIIB-dependent DNA looping. These results identify DNA looping as a previously unknown mechanism for the recruitment of a chromatin remodeling enzyme and defines a novel function for DNA looping. We also present evidence suggesting that Ume6-dependent DNA looping is involved in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional repression, revealing a mechanism by which the three-dimensional folding of chromatin affects DNA-dependent processes. PMID:23478442

  5. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Colvin, M E; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2004-01-06

    The DNA in eukaryotic cells is tightly packaged as chromatin through interactions with histone proteins to form nucleosomes. These nucleosomes are themselves packed together through interactions with linker histone and non-histone proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the chromatin fiber must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. The structure of the chromatin fiber beyond the level of the single nucleosome and the structural changes which accompany the remodeling process are poorly understood. We are studying the structures and forces behind the remodeling process through the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This allows both high-resolution imaging of the chromatin, and manipulation of individual fibers. Pulling a single chromatin fiber apart using the AFM tip yields information on the forces which hold the structure together. We have isolated chromatin fibers from chicken erythrocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. AFM images of these fibers will be presented, along with preliminary data from the manipulation of these fibers using the AFM tip. The implications of these data for the structure of chromatin undergoing the remodeling process are discussed.

  6. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  7. A Physical Model for the Condensation and Decondensation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes

    E-print Network

    Julien Mozziconacci; Christophe Lavelle; Maria Barbi; Annick Lesne; Jean-Marc Victor

    2007-09-03

    During the eukaryotic cell cycle, chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, which are believed to play key roles in gene expression regulation during interphase, and in genome replication and division during mitosis. In this paper, we propose a scenario for chromatin structural reorganization during mitosis, which bridges all the different scales involved in chromatin architecture, from nucleosomes to chromatin loops. We build a model for chromatin, based on available data, taking into account both physical and topological constraints DNA has to deal with. Our results suggest that the mitotic chromosome condensation/decondensation process is induced by a structural change at the level of the nucleosome itself.

  8. ATP-Dependent Mobilization of the Glucocorticoid Receptor during Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Xiao, Nianqing; Mautino, Gisele; Baumann, Christopher T.; Wolford, Ronald; Warren, Barbour S.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2002-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is associated with activation of transcription at the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. We reconstituted this nucleoprotein transition with chromatin assembled on MMTV DNA. The remodeling event was ATP dependent and required either a nuclear extract from HeLa cells or purified human Swi/Snf. Through the use of a direct interaction assay (magnetic bead pull-down), we demonstrated recruitment of human Swi/Snf to MMTV chromatin by GR. Unexpectedly, we found that GR is actively displaced from the chromatin template during the remodeling process. ATP-dependent GR displacement was reversed by the addition of apyrase and was specific to chromatin templates. The disengagement reaction could also be induced with purified human Swi/Snf. Although GR apparently dissociated during chromatin remodeling by Swi/Snf, it participated in binding of the secondary transcription factor, nuclear factor 1. These results are paralleled by a recent discovery that the hormone-occupied receptor undergoes rapid exchange between chromatin and the nucleoplasmic compartment in living cells. Both the in vitro and in vivo results are consistent with a dynamic model (hit and run) in which GR first binds to chromatin after ligand activation, recruits a remodeling activity, facilitates transcription factor binding, and is simultaneously lost from the template. PMID:11971959

  9. Profiling of the Chromatin-associated Proteome Identifies HP1BP3 as a Novel Regulator of Cell Cycle Progression *

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Bamaprasad; Ren, Yan; Hao, Piliang; Sim, Kae Hwan; Cheow, Esther; Adav, Sunil; Tam, James P.; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin-associated proteome (chromatome) regulates cellular gene expression by restricting access of transcriptional machinery to template DNA, and dynamic re-modeling of chromatin structure is required to regulate critical cell functions including growth and replication, DNA repair and recombination, and oncogenic transformation in progression to cancer. Central to the control of these processes is efficient regulation of the host cell cycle, which is maintained by rapid changes in chromatin conformation during normal cycle progression. A global overview of chromatin protein organization is therefore essential to fully understand cell cycle regulation, but the influence of the chromatome and chromatin binding topology on host cell cycle progression remains poorly defined. Here we used partial MNase digestion together with iTRAQ-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics to quantify chromatin-associated proteins during interphase progression. We identified a total of 481 proteins with high confidence that were involved in chromatin-dependent events including transcriptional regulation, chromatin re-organization, and DNA replication and repair, whereas the quantitative data revealed the temporal interactions of these proteins with chromatin during interphase progression. When combined with biochemical and functional assays, these data revealed a strikingly dynamic association of protein HP1BP3 with the chromatin complex during different stages of interphase, and uncovered a novel regulatory role for this molecule in transcriptional regulation. We report that HP1BP3 protein maintains heterochromatin integrity during G1–S progression and regulates the duration of G1 phase to critically influence cell proliferative capacity. PMID:24830416

  10. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-07-13

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  11. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-01-01

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  12. Cytomixis doesn’t induce obvious changes in chromatin modifications and programmed cell death in tobacco male meiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mursalimov, Sergey; Permyakova, Natalya; Deineko, Elena; Houben, Andreas; Demidov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Cytomixis is a poorly studied process of nuclear migration between plant cells. It is so far unknown what drives cytomixis and what is the functional state of the chromatin migrating between cells. Using immunostaining, we have analyzed the distribution of posttranslational histone modifications (methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation) that reflect the functional state of chromatin in the tobacco microsporocytes involved in cytomixis. We demonstrate that the chromatin in the cytomictic cells does not differ from the chromatin in intact microsporocytes according to all 14 analyzed histone modification types. We have also for the first time demonstrated that the migrating chromatin contains normal structures of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and lacks any signs of apoptosis. As has been shown, the chromatin migrating between cells in cytomixis is neither selectively heterochromatized nor degraded both before its migration to another cell and after it enters a recipient cell as micronuclei. We also showed that cytomictic chromatin contains marks typical for transcriptionally active chromatin as well as heterochromatin. Moreover, marks typical for chromosome condensation, SC formation and key proteins required for the formation of bivalents were also detected at migrated chromatin. PMID:26528310

  13. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  14. How does the chromatin fiber deal with topological constraints?

    E-print Network

    Maria Barbi; Julien Mozziconacci; Jean-Marc Victor

    2004-05-12

    In the nuclei of eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged through several levels of compaction in an orderly retrievable way that enables the correct regulation of gene expression. The functional dynamics of this assembly involves the unwinding of the so-called 30 nm chromatin fiber and accordingly imposes strong topological constraints. We present a general method for computing both the twist and the writhe of any winding pattern. An explicit derivation is implemented for the chromatin fiber which provides the linking number of DNA in eukaryotic chromosomes. We show that there exists one and only one unwinding path which satisfies both topological and mechanical constraints that DNA has to deal with during condensation/decondensation processes.

  15. Magnetic Tweezers Instrumentation: We have used magnetic tweezers to study chromatin assembly and disassembly and RNA

    E-print Network

    Leuba, Sanford

    Magnetic Tweezers Instrumentation: We have used magnetic tweezers to study chromatin assembly and disassembly and RNA transcription. Magnetic tweezers surface magnetic bead F DNA external magnets F =kBT l/> l F x surface Instrumental set-up video camera beam condenser hollow bearing with magnet 90x oil

  16. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  17. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  18. Structural and functional genome analysis using extended chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Heaf, T.; Ward, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Highly extended linear chromatin fibers (ECFs) produced by detergent and high-salt lysis and stretching of nuclear chromatin across the surface of a glass slide can by hybridized over physical distances of at least several Mb. This allows long-range FISH analysis of the human genome with excellent DNA resolution (<10 kb/{mu}m). The insertion of Alu elements which are more than 50-fold underrepresented in centromeres can be seen within and near long tandem arrays of alpha-satellite DNA. Long tracts of trinucleotide repeats, i.e. (CCA){sub n}, can be localized within larger genomic regions. The combined application of BrdU incorporation and ECFs allows one to study the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA replication sites in finer detail. DNA synthesis occurs at multiple discrete sites within Mb arrays of alpha-satellite. Replicating DNA is tightly associated with the nuclear matrix and highly resistant to stretching out, while ECFs containing newly replicated DNA are easily released. Asynchrony in replication timing is accompanied by differences in condensation of homologous DNA segments. Extended chromatin reveals differential packaging of active and inactive DNA. Upon transcriptional inactivation by AMD, the normally compact rRNA genes become much more susceptible to decondensation procedures. By extending the chromatin from pachytene spermatocytes, meiotic pairing and genetic exchange between homologs can be visualized directly. Histone depletion by high salt and detergent produces loop chromatin surrounding the nuclear matrix in a halo-like fashion. DNA halos can be used to map nuclear matrix attachment sites in somatic cells and in mature sperm. Alpha-satellite containing DNA loops appear to be attached to the sperm-cell matrix by CENP-B boxes, short 17 bp sequences found in a subset of alpha satellite monomers. Sperm telomeres almost always appear as hybridization doublets, suggesting the presence of already replicated chromosome ends.

  19. Isolation of active regulatory elements from eukaryotic chromatin using FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements)

    PubMed Central

    Giresi, Paul G.; Lieb, Jason D.

    2009-01-01

    The binding of sequence-specific regulatory factors and the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities cause nucleosomes to be evicted from chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Traditionally, these active sites have been identified experimentally through their sensitivity to nucleases. Here we describe the details of a simple procedure for the genome-wide isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). We also provide protocols for different methods of detecting FAIRE-enriched DNA, including use of PCR, DNA microarrays, and next-generation sequencing. FAIRE works on all eukaryotic chromatin tested to date. To perform FAIRE, chromatin is crosslinked with formaldehyde, sheared by sonication, and phenol-chloroform extracted. Most genomic DNA is crosslinked to nucleosomes and is sequestered to the interphase, whereas DNA recovered in the aqueous phase corresponds to nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome. The isolated regions are largely coincident with the location of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, transcriptional start sites, enhancers, insulators, and active promoters. Given its speed and simplicity, FAIRE has utility in establishing chromatin profiles of diverse cell types in health and disease, isolating DNA regulatory elements en masse for further characterization, and as a screening assay for the effects of small molecules on chromatin organization. PMID:19303047

  20. Isolation of active regulatory elements from eukaryotic chromatin using FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements).

    PubMed

    Giresi, Paul G; Lieb, Jason D

    2009-07-01

    The binding of sequence-specific regulatory factors and the recruitment of chromatin remodeling activities cause nucleosomes to be evicted from chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Traditionally, these active sites have been identified experimentally through their sensitivity to nucleases. Here we describe the details of a simple procedure for the genome-wide isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). We also provide protocols for different methods of detecting FAIRE-enriched DNA, including use of PCR, DNA microarrays, and next-generation sequencing. FAIRE works on all eukaryotic chromatin tested to date. To perform FAIRE, chromatin is crosslinked with formaldehyde, sheared by sonication, and phenol-chloroform extracted. Most genomic DNA is crosslinked to nucleosomes and is sequestered to the interphase, whereas DNA recovered in the aqueous phase corresponds to nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome. The isolated regions are largely coincident with the location of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, transcriptional start sites, enhancers, insulators, and active promoters. Given its speed and simplicity, FAIRE has utility in establishing chromatin profiles of diverse cell types in health and disease, isolating DNA regulatory elements en masse for further characterization, and as a screening assay for the effects of small molecules on chromatin organization. PMID:19303047

  1. Chromatin structure and gene expression changes associated with loss of MOP1 activity in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Madzima, Thelma F; Huang, Ji; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    Though the mechanisms governing nuclear organization are not well understood, it is apparent that epigenetic modifications coordinately modulate chromatin organization as well as transcription. In maize, MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1) is required for 24 nt siRNA-mediated epigenetic regulation and transcriptional gene silencing via a putative Pol IV- RdDM pathway. To elucidate the mechanisms of nuclear chromatin organization, we investigated the relationship between chromatin structure and transcription in response to loss of MOP1 function. We used a microarray based micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay to identify genome-wide changes in chromatin structure in mop1-1 immature ears and observed an increase in chromatin accessibility at chromosome arms associated with loss of MOP1 function. Within the many genes misregulated in mop1 mutants, we identified one subset likely to be direct targets of epigenetic transcriptional silencing via Pol-IV RdDM. We found that target specificity for MOP1-mediated RdDM activity is governed by multiple signals that include accumulation of 24 nt siRNAs and the presence of specific classes of gene-proximal transposons, but neither of these attributes alone is sufficient to predict transcriptional misregulation in mop1-1 homozygous mutants. Our results suggest a role for MOP1 in regulation of higher-order chromatin organization where loss of MOP1 activity at a subset of loci triggers a broader cascade of transcriptional consequences and genome-wide changes in chromatin structure. PMID:24786611

  2. Impact of Chromatin on HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Agosto, Luis M.; Gagne, Matthew; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin influences Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration and replication. This review highlights critical host factors that influence chromatin structure and organization and that also impact HIV integration, transcriptional regulation and latency. Furthermore, recent attempts to target chromatin associated factors to reduce the HIV proviral load are discussed. PMID:26437430

  3. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  4. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  5. Apoptosis is a mode of cell death in the polykaryon-forming unit assay.

    PubMed

    Manti, L; Bowen, I D; Mason, M D; Court, J B

    2000-01-01

    In the polykaryon-forming unit (PFU) assay, which defines cell survival as the ability to form a cytochalasin-induced polykaryon of predetermined ploidy, the mode of PFU deletion is not known. Incubation of L5178Y-S PFU in cytochalasin resulted in polyploidy (> or =32C) and most polykaryons (>75%) ultimately underwent apoptosis, detected using chromatin condensation and externalised phosphatidylserine. However, large polykaryons carrying terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL)-labelled DNA strand breaks were not observed, presumably due to rapid loss of DNA. Gamma irradiation of PFU prior to cytochalasin exposure caused a reduction in the frequency of highly polyploid cells (>16C), consistent with either a supra-induction of apoptosis or a reduction in the ability of PFU to reach high ploidies. We conclude that L5178Y-S PFU are deleted by apoptosis. PMID:10875889

  6. Ectopic histone H3S10 phosphorylation causes chromatin structure remodeling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huai; Bao, Xiaomin; Cai, Weili; Blacketer, Melissa J; Belmont, Andrew S; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Jørgen; Johansen, Kristen M

    2008-02-01

    Histones are subject to numerous post-translational modifications that correlate with the state of higher-order chromatin structure and gene expression. However, it is not clear whether changes in these epigenetic marks are causative regulatory factors in chromatin structure changes or whether they play a mainly reinforcing or maintenance role. In Drosophila phosphorylation of histone H3S10 in euchromatic chromatin regions by the JIL-1 tandem kinase has been implicated in counteracting heterochromatization and gene silencing. Here we show, using a LacI-tethering system, that JIL-1 mediated ectopic histone H3S10 phosphorylation is sufficient to induce a change in higher-order chromatin structure from a condensed heterochromatin-like state to a more open euchromatic state. This effect was absent when a ;kinase dead' LacI-JIL-1 construct without histone H3S10 phosphorylation activity was expressed. Instead, the 'kinase dead' construct had a dominant-negative effect, leading to a disruption of chromatin structure that was associated with a global repression of histone H3S10 phosphorylation levels. These findings provide direct evidence that the epigenetic histone tail modification of H3S10 phosphorylation at interphase can function as a causative regulator of higher-order chromatin structure in Drosophila in vivo. PMID:18199578

  7. The influence of microwave radiation on the state of chromatin in human cells

    E-print Network

    Y. G. Shckorbatov; V. N. Pasiuga; V. A. Grabina; N. N. Kolchigin; D. O. Batrakov; V. V. Kalashnikov; D. D. Ivanchenko; V. N. Bykov

    2008-09-03

    Isolated human buccal epithelium cell were irradiated by microwaves at frequency f=35 GHz and surface power density E=30 mcW/cm2. The state of chromatin in human cells was determined by methodsof light and electron microscopy. The state of cell membranes was evaluated by the method of vital indigo carmine staining. The microwave-induced condensation of chromatin in human cells was revealed. Left side circulary polarized waves induced less effect than linearly polarized radiation. The linearly polarized electromagnetic waves induced cell membrane damage revealed by the increase of cell stainability. The data obtained are discussed in connection with the mechanisms of biologica effect of electromagnetic waves.

  8. Concentration of elements in mitotic chromatin as measured by x-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Unfixed frozen-dried and uncoated tissue sections of the mouse duodenum were placed on carbon planchets and analyzed in a scanning electron microscope fitted with energy dispersive X-ray equipment. Computer analysis of the X-ray spectra allowed elemental microanalysis of the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitotic chromatin regions in the cryptal and villus enterocytes. The peak to continuum ratio of S, Cl, K, and Ca were higher in mitotic chromatin than any of the other sites measured. The redistribution of Ca at mitosis is postulated to help explain both chromosome condensation and assembly of the mitotic spindle apparatus. PMID:856831

  9. Detecting ATM-dependent chromatin modification in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lopa; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  10. Active chromatin and transcription play a key role in chromosome partitioning into topologically associating domains.

    PubMed

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Flyamer, Ilya M; Kos, Pavel; Mikhaleva, Elena A; Penin, Aleksey A; Logacheva, Maria D; Imakaev, Maxim V; Chertovich, Alexander; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Razin, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances enabled by the Hi-C technique have unraveled many principles of chromosomal folding that were subsequently linked to disease and gene regulation. In particular, Hi-C revealed that chromosomes of animals are organized into topologically associating domains (TADs), evolutionary conserved compact chromatin domains that influence gene expression. Mechanisms that underlie partitioning of the genome into TADs remain poorly understood. To explore principles of TAD folding in Drosophila melanogaster, we performed Hi-C and poly(A)(+) RNA-seq in four cell lines of various origins (S2, Kc167, DmBG3-c2, and OSC). Contrary to previous studies, we find that regions between TADs (i.e., the inter-TADs and TAD boundaries) in Drosophila are only weakly enriched with the insulator protein dCTCF, while another insulator protein Su(Hw) is preferentially present within TADs. However, Drosophila inter-TADs harbor active chromatin and constitutively transcribed (housekeeping) genes. Accordingly, we find that binding of insulator proteins dCTCF and Su(Hw) predicts TAD boundaries much worse than active chromatin marks do. Interestingly, inter-TADs correspond to decompacted inter-bands of polytene chromosomes, whereas TADs mostly correspond to densely packed bands. Collectively, our results suggest that TADs are condensed chromatin domains depleted in active chromatin marks, separated by regions of active chromatin. We propose the mechanism of TAD self-assembly based on the ability of nucleosomes from inactive chromatin to aggregate, and lack of this ability in acetylated nucleosomal arrays. Finally, we test this hypothesis by polymer simulations and find that TAD partitioning may be explained by different modes of inter-nucleosomal interactions for active and inactive chromatin. PMID:26518482

  11. Disruption of human vigilin impairs chromosome condensation and segregation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Junhong; Li, Ran; Shen, Wenyan; Duan, Shuwang; Zhao, Rongce; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Qiuying; Fu, Qiang; Qin, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate packaging and condensation are critical for eukaryotic chromatin's accommodation and separation during cell division. Human vigilin, a multi-KH-domain nucleic acid-binding protein, is associated with alpha satellites of centromeres. DDP1, a vigilin's homolog, is implicated with chromatin condensation and segregation. The expression of vigilin was previously reported to elevate in highly proliferating tissues and increased in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Other studies showed that vigilin interacts with CTCF, contributes to regulation of imprinted genes Igf2/H19, and colocalizes with HP1? on heterochromatic satellite 2 and ?-satellite repeats. These studies indicate that human vigilin might be involved in chromatin remodeling and regular cell growth. To investigate the potential role of human vigilin in cell cycle, the correlations between vigilin and chromosomal condensation and segregation were studied. Depletion of human vigilin by RNA interference in HepG2 cells resulted in chromosome undercondensation and various chromosomal defects during mitotic phase, including chromosome misalignments, lagging chromosomes, and chromosome bridges. Aberrant polyploid nucleus in telophase was also observed. Unlike the abnormal staining pattern of chromosomes, the shape of spindle was normal. Furthermore, the chromatin showed a greater sensitivity to MNase digestion. Collectively, our findings show that human vigilin apparently participates in chromatin condensation and segregation. PMID:26032007

  12. Chromatin architecture reorganization during stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jesse R; Jung, Inkyung; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Shen, Yin; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica E; Lee, Ah Young; Ye, Zhen; Kim, Audrey; Rajagopal, Nisha; Xie, Wei; Diao, Yarui; Liang, Jing; Zhao, Huimin; Lobanenkov, Victor V; Ecker, Joseph R; Thomson, James A; Ren, Bing

    2015-02-19

    Higher-order chromatin structure is emerging as an important regulator of gene expression. Although dynamic chromatin structures have been identified in the genome, the full scope of chromatin dynamics during mammalian development and lineage specification remains to be determined. By mapping genome-wide chromatin interactions in human embryonic stem (ES) cells and four human ES-cell-derived lineages, we uncover extensive chromatin reorganization during lineage specification. We observe that although self-associating chromatin domains are stable during differentiation, chromatin interactions both within and between domains change in a striking manner, altering 36% of active and inactive chromosomal compartments throughout the genome. By integrating chromatin interaction maps with haplotype-resolved epigenome and transcriptome data sets, we find widespread allelic bias in gene expression correlated with allele-biased chromatin states of linked promoters and distal enhancers. Our results therefore provide a global view of chromatin dynamics and a resource for studying long-range control of gene expression in distinct human cell lineages. PMID:25693564

  13. Chromatin Structure in Telomere Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Cacchione, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a specific nucleoprotein structure, the telomere, is required to ensure the protection of chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage sites. Telomere shortening below a critical length triggers a DNA damage response that leads to replicative senescence. In normal human somatic cells, characterized by telomere shortening with each cell division, telomere uncapping is a regulated process associated with cell turnover. Nevertheless, telomere dysfunction has also been associated with genomic instability, cell transformation, and cancer. Despite the essential role telomeres play in chromosome protection and in tumorigenesis, our knowledge of the chromatin structure involved in telomere maintenance is still limited. Here we review the recent findings on chromatin modifications associated with the dynamic changes of telomeres from protected to deprotected state and their role in telomere functions. PMID:23471416

  14. Analysis of Histones and Chromatin in Xenopus laevis Egg and Oocyte Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Banaszynski, Laura A.; Allis, C. David; Shechter, David

    2010-01-01

    Histones are the major protein components of chromatin, the physiological form of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Chromatin is the substrate of information-directed biological processes, such as gene regulation and transcription, replication, and mitosis. A long-standing experimental model system to study many of these processes is the extract made from the eggs of the anuran Xenopus laevis. Since work in recent years has solidified the importance of post-translational modification of histones in directing biological processes, the study of histones in a biochemically dissectible model such as Xenopus is crucial for the understanding of their biological significance. Here we present a rationale and methods for isolating and studying histones and chromatin in different Xenopus egg and oocyte extracts. In particular, we present protocols for the preparation of: cell-free egg and oocyte extract; nucleoplasmic extract (“NPE”); biochemical purification of maternally-deposited, stored histones in the oocyte and the egg; assembly of pronuclei in egg extract and the isolation of pronuclear chromatin and histones; and an extract chromatin assembly assay. We also demonstrate aspects of the variability of the system to be mindful of when working with extract and the importance of proper laboratory temperature in preparing quality extracts. We expect that these methods will be of use in promoting further understanding of embryonic chromatin in a unique experimental system. PMID:20051265

  15. Identification of lamin B–regulated chromatin regions based on chromatin landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaobin; Kim, Youngjo; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Lamins, the major structural components of the nuclear lamina (NL) found beneath the nuclear envelope, are known to interact with most of the nuclear peripheral chromatin in metazoan cells. Although NL–chromatin associations correlate with a repressive chromatin state, the role of lamins in tethering chromatin to NL and how such tether influences gene expression have remained challenging to decipher. Studies suggest that NL proteins regulate chromatin in a context-dependent manner. Therefore understanding the context of chromatin states based on genomic features, including chromatin–NL interactions, is important to the study of lamins and other NL proteins. By modeling genome organization based on combinatorial patterns of chromatin association with lamin B1, core histone modification, and core and linker histone occupancy, we report six distinct large chromatin landscapes, referred to as histone lamin landscapes (HiLands)-red (R), -orange (O), -yellow (Y), -green (G), -blue (B), and -purple (P), in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). This HiLands model demarcates the previously mapped lamin-associated chromatin domains (LADs) into two HiLands, HiLands-B and HiLands-P, which are similar to facultative and constitutive heterochromatins, respectively. Deletion of B-type lamins in mESCs caused a reduced interaction between regions of HiLands-B and NL as measured by emerin–chromatin interaction. Our findings reveal the importance of analyzing specific chromatin types when studying the function of NL proteins in chromatin tether and regulation. PMID:25995381

  16. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako; Okabayashi, Koji; ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency , 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 ; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Murata, Masayuki; Asashima, Makoto; ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency , 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902; Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology , Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  17. Mechanics of Viral Chromatin Reveals the Pressurization of Human Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Condezo, Gabriela N; Pérez-Berná, Ana J; Chillón, Miguel; Flint, S Jane; Reguera, David; San Martín, Carmen; de Pablo, Pedro J

    2015-11-24

    Tight confinement of naked genomes within some viruses results in high internal pressure that facilitates their translocation into the host. Adenovirus, however, encodes histone-like proteins that associate with its genome resulting in a confined DNA-protein condensate (core). Cleavage of these proteins during maturation decreases core condensation and primes the virion for proper uncoating via unidentified mechanisms. Here we open individual, mature and immature adenovirus cages to directly probe the mechanics of their chromatin-like cores. We find that immature cores are more rigid than the mature ones, unveiling a mechanical signature of their condensation level. Conversely, intact mature particles demonstrate more rigidity than immature or empty ones. DNA-condensing polyamines revert the mechanics of mature capsid and cores to near-immature values. The combination of these experiments reveals the pressurization of adenovirus particles induced by maturation. We estimate a pressure of ?30 atm by continuous elasticity, which is corroborated by modeling the adenovirus mini-chromosome as a confined compact polymer. We propose this pressurization as a mechanism that facilitates initiating the stepwise disassembly of the mature particle, enabling its escape from the endosome and final genome release at the nuclear pore. PMID:26491879

  18. Tousled kinase TLK1B mediates chromatin assembly in conjunction with Asf1 regardless of its kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Tousled Like Kinases (TLKs) are involved in chromatin dynamics, including DNA replication and repair, transcription, and chromosome segregation. Indeed, the first two TLK1 substrates were identified as the histone H3 and Asf1 (a histone H3/H4 chaperone), which immediately suggested a function in chromatin remodeling. However, despite the straightforward assumption that TLK1 acts simply by phosphorylating its substrates and hence modifying their activity, TLK1 also acts as a chaperone. In fact, a kinase-dead (KD) mutant of TLK1B is functional in stimulating chromatin assembly in vitro. However, subtle effects of Asf1 phosphorylation are more difficult to probe in chromatin assembly assays. Not until very recently was the Asf1 site phosphorylated by TLK1 identified. This has allowed for probing directly the functionality of a site-directed mutant of Asf1 in chromatin assembly assays. Findings Addition of either wt or non-phosphorylatable mutant Asf1 to nuclear extract stimulates chromatin assembly on a plasmid. Similarly, TLK1B-KD stimulates chromatin assembly and it synergizes in reactions with supplemental Asf1 (wt or non-phosphorylatable mutant). Conclusions Although the actual function of TLKs as mediators of Asf1 activity cannot be easily studied in vivo, particularly since in mammalian cells there are two TLK genes and two Asf1 genes, we were able to study specifically the stimulation of chromatin assembly in vitro. In such assays, clearly the TLK1 kinase activity was not critical, as neither a non-phosphorylatable Asf1 nor use of the TLK1B-KD impaired the stimulation of nucleosome formation. PMID:20222959

  19. Three distinct stages of apoptotic nuclear condensation revealed by time-lapse imaging, biochemical and electron microscopy analysis of cell-free apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tone, Shigenobu Sugimoto, Kenji; Tanda, Kazue; Suda, Taiji; Uehira, Kenzo; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Samejima, Kumiko; Minatogawa, Yohsuke; Earnshaw, William C.

    2007-10-01

    During apoptotic execution, chromatin undergoes a phase change from a heterogeneous, genetically active network to an inert highly condensed form that is fragmented and packaged into apoptotic bodies. We have previously used a cell-free system to examine the roles of caspases or other proteases in apoptotic chromatin condensation and nuclear disassembly. But so far, the role of DNase activity or ATP hydrolysis in this system has not yet been elucidated. Here, in order to better define the stages of nuclear disassembly in apoptosis, we have characterized the apoptotic condensation using a cell-free system and time-lapse imaging. We demonstrated that the population of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in vitro appears to follow a reproducible program of nuclear condensation, suggesting the existence of an ordered biochemical pathway. This enabled us to define three stages of apoptotic chromatin condensation: stage 1 ring condensation; stage 2 necklace condensation; and stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. Electron microscopy revealed that neither chromatin nor detectable subnuclear structures were present inside the stage 1 ring-condensed structures. DNase activity was not essential for stage 1 ring condensation, which could occur in apoptotic extracts depleted of all detectable DNase activity. However, DNase(s) were required for stage 2 necklace condensation. Finally, we demonstrated that hydrolyzable ATP is required for stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. This requirement for ATP hydrolysis further distinguished stage 2 from stage 3. Together, these experiments provide the first steps towards a systematic biochemical characterization of chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

  20. Condensins Exert Force on Chromatin-Nuclear Envelope Tethers to Mediate Nucleoplasmic Reticulum Formation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bozler, Julianna; Nguyen, Huy Q.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Although the nuclear envelope is known primarily for its role as a boundary between the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotes, it plays a vital and dynamic role in many cellular processes. Studies of nuclear structure have revealed tissue-specific changes in nuclear envelope architecture, suggesting that its three-dimensional structure contributes to its functionality. Despite the importance of the nuclear envelope, the factors that regulate and maintain nuclear envelope shape remain largely unexplored. The nuclear envelope makes extensive and dynamic interactions with the underlying chromatin. Given this inexorable link between chromatin and the nuclear envelope, it is possible that local and global chromatin organization reciprocally impact nuclear envelope form and function. In this study, we use Drosophila salivary glands to show that the three-dimensional structure of the nuclear envelope can be altered with condensin II-mediated chromatin condensation. Both naturally occurring and engineered chromatin-envelope interactions are sufficient to allow chromatin compaction forces to drive distortions of the nuclear envelope. Weakening of the nuclear lamina further enhanced envelope remodeling, suggesting that envelope structure is capable of counterbalancing chromatin compaction forces. Our experiments reveal that the nucleoplasmic reticulum is born of the nuclear envelope and remains dynamic in that they can be reabsorbed into the nuclear envelope. We propose a model where inner nuclear envelope-chromatin tethers allow interphase chromosome movements to change nuclear envelope morphology. Therefore, interphase chromatin compaction may be a normal mechanism that reorganizes nuclear architecture, while under pathological conditions, such as laminopathies, compaction forces may contribute to defects in nuclear morphology. PMID:25552604

  1. Overlapping Chromatin Remodeling Systems Collaborate Genome-wide at Dynamic Chromatin Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Stephanie A.; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; John, Sam; Wiench, Malgorzata; Johnson, Thomas A.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Hager, Gordon L.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is an essential process required for the dynamic organization of chromatin structure. Here we describe the genome-wide location and activity of three remodeler proteins with diverse physiological functions in the mouse genome: Brg1, Chd4, and Snf2h. The localization patterns of all three proteins significantly overlap with one another and with regions of accessible chromatin. Furthermore, using inducible mutant variants, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of these proteins contributes to the remodeling of chromatin genome-wide, and that each of these remodelers can independently regulate chromatin reorganization at distinct sites. Many regions require the activity of more than one remodeler to regulate accessibility. These findings provide a dynamic view of chromatin organization, and highlight the differential contributions of remodelers to chromatin maintenance in higher eukaryotes. PMID:24317492

  2. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    E-print Network

    Corces, Victor G.

    Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly B.V.Gurudatta and Victor G.Corces Abstract Chromatin insulators are DNA^protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components

  3. Comparative analysis of metazoan chromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joshua W K; Jung, Youngsook L; Liu, Tao; Alver, Burak H; Lee, Soohyun; Ikegami, Kohta; Sohn, Kyung-Ah; Minoda, Aki; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Appert, Alex; Parker, Stephen C J; Gu, Tingting; Kundaje, Anshul; Riddle, Nicole C; Bishop, Eric; Egelhofer, Thea A; Hu, Sheng'en Shawn; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Asker, Dalal; Belsky, Jason A; Bowman, Sarah K; Chen, Q Brent; Chen, Ron A-J; Day, Daniel S; Dong, Yan; Dose, Andrea C; Duan, Xikun; Epstein, Charles B; Ercan, Sevinc; Feingold, Elise A; Ferrari, Francesco; Garrigues, Jacob M; Gehlenborg, Nils; Good, Peter J; Haseley, Psalm; He, Daniel; Herrmann, Moritz; Hoffman, Michael M; Jeffers, Tess E; Kharchenko, Peter V; Kolasinska-Zwierz, Paulina; Kotwaliwale, Chitra V; Kumar, Nischay; Langley, Sasha A; Larschan, Erica N; Latorre, Isabel; Libbrecht, Maxwell W; Lin, Xueqiu; Park, Richard; Pazin, Michael J; Pham, Hoang N; Plachetka, Annette; Qin, Bo; Schwartz, Yuri B; Shoresh, Noam; Stempor, Przemyslaw; Vielle, Anne; Wang, Chengyang; Whittle, Christina M; Xue, Huiling; Kingston, Robert E; Kim, Ju Han; Bernstein, Bradley E; Dernburg, Abby F; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Noble, William S; Tullius, Thomas D; Kellis, Manolis; MacAlpine, David M; Strome, Susan; Elgin, Sarah C R; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Lieb, Jason D; Ahringer, Julie; Karpen, Gary H; Park, Peter J

    2014-08-28

    Genome function is dynamically regulated in part by chromatin, which consists of the histones, non-histone proteins and RNA molecules that package DNA. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have contributed substantially to our understanding of molecular mechanisms of genome function in humans, and have revealed conservation of chromatin components and mechanisms. Nevertheless, the three organisms have markedly different genome sizes, chromosome architecture and gene organization. On human and fly chromosomes, for example, pericentric heterochromatin flanks single centromeres, whereas worm chromosomes have dispersed heterochromatin-like regions enriched in the distal chromosomal 'arms', and centromeres distributed along their lengths. To systematically investigate chromatin organization and associated gene regulation across species, we generated and analysed a large collection of genome-wide chromatin data sets from cell lines and developmental stages in worm, fly and human. Here we present over 800 new data sets from our ENCODE and modENCODE consortia, bringing the total to over 1,400. Comparison of combinatorial patterns of histone modifications, nuclear lamina-associated domains, organization of large-scale topological domains, chromatin environment at promoters and enhancers, nucleosome positioning, and DNA replication patterns reveals many conserved features of chromatin organization among the three organisms. We also find notable differences in the composition and locations of repressive chromatin. These data sets and analyses provide a rich resource for comparative and species-specific investigations of chromatin composition, organization and function. PMID:25164756

  4. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Längst, Gernot; Manelyte, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development. PMID:26075616

  5. Analysis of Mcm2-7 chromatin binding during anaphase and in the transition to quiescence in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Namdar, Mandana; Kearsey, Stephen E. . E-mail: stephen.kearsey@zoo.ox.ac.uk

    2006-10-15

    Mcm2-7 proteins are generally considered to function as a heterohexameric complex, providing helicase activity for the elongation step of DNA replication. These proteins are loaded onto replication origins in M-G1 phase in a process termed licensing or pre-replicative complex formation. It is likely that Mcm2-7 proteins are loaded onto chromatin simultaneously as a pre-formed hexamer although some studies suggest that subcomplexes are recruited sequentially. To analyze this process in fission yeast, we have compared the levels and chromatin binding of Mcm2-7 proteins during the fission yeast cell cycle. Mcm subunits are present at approximately 1 x 10{sup 4} molecules/cell and are bound with approximately equal stoichiometry on chromatin in G1/S phase cells. Using a single cell assay, we have correlated the timing of chromatin association of individual Mcm subunits with progression through mitosis. This showed that Mcm2, 4 and 7 associate with chromatin at about the same stage of anaphase, suggesting that licensing involves the simultaneous binding of these subunits. We also examined Mcm2-7 chromatin association when cells enter a G0-like quiescent state. Chromatin binding is lost in this transition in a process that does not require DNA replication or the selective degradation of specific subunits.

  6. FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements) isolates active regulatory elements from human chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Giresi, Paul G.; Kim, Jonghwan; McDaniell, Ryan M.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Lieb, Jason D.

    2007-01-01

    DNA segments that actively regulate transcription in vivo are typically characterized by eviction of nucleosomes from chromatin and are experimentally identified by their hypersensitivity to nucleases. Here we demonstrate a simple procedure for the isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). To perform FAIRE, chromatin is crosslinked with formaldehyde in vivo, sheared by sonication, and phenol-chloroform extracted. The DNA recovered in the aqueous phase is fluorescently labeled and hybridized to a DNA microarray. FAIRE performed in human cells strongly enriches DNA coincident with the location of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, transcriptional start sites, and active promoters. Evidence for cell-type–specific patterns of FAIRE enrichment is also presented. FAIRE has utility as a positive selection for genomic regions associated with regulatory activity, including regions traditionally detected by nuclease hypersensitivity assays. PMID:17179217

  7. FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements) isolates active regulatory elements from human chromatin.

    PubMed

    Giresi, Paul G; Kim, Jonghwan; McDaniell, Ryan M; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Lieb, Jason D

    2007-06-01

    DNA segments that actively regulate transcription in vivo are typically characterized by eviction of nucleosomes from chromatin and are experimentally identified by their hypersensitivity to nucleases. Here we demonstrate a simple procedure for the isolation of nucleosome-depleted DNA from human chromatin, termed FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements). To perform FAIRE, chromatin is crosslinked with formaldehyde in vivo, sheared by sonication, and phenol-chloroform extracted. The DNA recovered in the aqueous phase is fluorescently labeled and hybridized to a DNA microarray. FAIRE performed in human cells strongly enriches DNA coincident with the location of DNaseI hypersensitive sites, transcriptional start sites, and active promoters. Evidence for cell-type-specific patterns of FAIRE enrichment is also presented. FAIRE has utility as a positive selection for genomic regions associated with regulatory activity, including regions traditionally detected by nuclease hypersensitivity assays. PMID:17179217

  8. Ultrastructure of transcriptionally competent chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Locklear, L; Ridsdale, J A; Bazett-Jones, D P; Davie, J R

    1990-01-01

    We have examined a salt-soluble, transcriptionally competent gene-enriched fraction of chicken erythrocyte chromatin and compared it to bulk chromatin using the unique microanalytical capabilities of Electron Spectroscopic Imaging (ESI). The salt-soluble fraction is enriched 48 fold in beta-globin gene sequences and is also enriched in histones that are post-synthetically modified, including acetylation and ubiquitination. Differences between the two fractions are also apparent in the distribution of the two major forms of nucleoprotein structures, including (1) particles which present a circular profile and possess protein and DNA content nearly identical to that of the canonical nucleosome and account for 89% of particles in the bulk fraction but account for only 66% of the particles in the competent fraction, and (2) u-shaped particles which possess about 20% less protein mass than particles of circular profile and are about 10x more prevalent in the transcriptionally competent fraction than in the bulk. Additionally, elongated particles with protein and DNA content similar to the u-shaped objects are also seen in the competent fraction. Images PMID:2263461

  9. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  10. Regulation of chromatin accessibility and Zic binding at enhancers in the developing cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher L.; Liu, Fang; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Song, Lingyun; Biegler, Matthew T.; Yang, Marty G.; Vockley, Christopher M.; Safi, Alexias; Gersbach, Charles A.; Crawford, Gregory E.; West, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    To identify chromatin mechanisms of neuronal differentiation, we characterized chromatin accessibility and gene expression in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) of the developing mouse. We used DNase-seq to map accessibility of cis-regulatory elements and RNA-seq to profile transcript abundance across postnatal stages of neuronal differentiation in vivo and in culture. We observed thousands of chromatin accessibility changes as CGNs differentiated and verified by H3K27ac ChIP-seq, reporter gene assays, and CRISPR-mediated activation that many of these regions function as neuronal enhancers. Motif discovery within differentially accessible chromatin regions suggested a novel role for the Zic family of transcription factors in CGN maturation. We confirmed the association of Zic with these elements by ChIP-seq, and demonstrated by knockdown that Zic1/2 are required to coordinate mature neuronal gene expression patterns. Together these data reveal chromatin dynamics at thousands of gene regulatory elements that facilitate gene expression patterns necessary for neuronal differentiation and function. PMID:25849986

  11. Diazinon alters sperm chromatin structure in mice by phosphorylating nuclear protamines

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@mail.cinvestav.mx

    2005-01-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, widely used in agriculture and pest control, are associated with male reproductive effects, including sperm chromatin alterations, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. The main toxic action of OP is related to phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical alterations in sperm nuclear proteins (protamines), which pack DNA during the last steps of spermatogenesis, contribute to male reproductive toxicity. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the ability of diazinon (DZN), an OP compound, to alter sperm chromatin by phosphorylating nuclear protamines. Mice were injected with a single dose of DZN (8.12 mg/kg, i.p.), and killed 8 and 15 days after treatment. Quality of sperm from epididymis and vas deferens was evaluated through standard methods and chromatin condensation by flow cytometry (DNA Fragmented Index parameters: DFI and DFI%) and fluorescence microscopy using chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3}). Increases in DFI (15%), DFI% (4.5-fold), and CMA{sub 3} (2-fold) were observed only at 8 days post-treatment, indicating an alteration in sperm chromatin condensation and DNA damage during late spermatid differentiation. In addition, an increase of phosphorous content (approximately 50%) in protamines, especially in the phosphoserine content (approximately 73%), was found at 8 days post-treatment. Sperm viability, motility, and morphology showed significant alterations at this time. These data strongly suggest that spermatozoa exposed during the late steps of maturation were the targets of DZN exposure. The correlation observed between the phosphorous content in nuclear protamines with DFI%, DFI, and CMA{sub 3} provides evidence that phosphorylation of nuclear protamines is involved in the OP effects on sperm chromatin.

  12. Development of a novel flow cytometric approach to evaluate fish sperm chromatin using fixed samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    The integrity of the paternal DNA is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic information, yet fertilization is not inhibited by chromatin breakage. Some methods are available for the sensitive detection of DNA damage and can be applied in studies of environmental toxicology, carcinogenesis, aging, and assisted reproduction techniques in both clinical and experimental settings. Because semen samples obtained from remote locations undergo chromatin damage prior to laboratory assessment, the present study was undertaken to evaluate treatments for effective chromatin staining in the development of a DNA fragmentation assay using fixed milt from yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Similar to the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), susceptibility of nuclear DNA to acid-induced denaturation was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Use of 10% buffered formalin for milt fixation allowed easier peak discrimination than 4% paraformaldehyde. The effects of time and temperature of incubation in 0.08 N HCl were evaluated in order to determine the ideal conditions for promoting DNA decondensation and making strand breaks more available for staining and detection by FCM. The best results were obtained with incubation at 37°C for 1 minute, followed by cold propidium iodide staining for 30 minutes.

  13. Chromatin Disassembly and Reassembly During DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2008-01-01

    Current research is demonstrating that the packaging of the eukaryotic genome together with histone proteins into chromatin is playing a fundamental role in DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity. As is well established to be the case for transcription, the chromatin structure dynamically changes during DNA repair. Recent studies indicate that the complete removal of histones from DNA and their subsequent reassembly onto DNA accompanies DNA repair. This review will present evidence indicating that chromatin disassembly and reassembly occur during DNA repair and that these are critical processes for cell survival after DNA repair. Concomitantly, candidate proteins utilized for these processes will be highlighted. PMID:17303193

  14. Chromatin Evolution and Molecular Drive in Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Sawamura, Kyoichi

    2012-01-01

    Are there biological generalities that underlie hybrid sterility or inviability? Recently, around a dozen “speciation genes” have been identified mainly in Drosophila, and the biological functions of these genes are revealing molecular generalities. Major cases of hybrid sterility and inviability seem to result from chromatin evolution and molecular drive in speciation. Repetitive satellite DNAs within heterochromatin, especially at centromeres, evolve rapidly through molecular drive mechanisms (both meiotic and centromeric). Chromatin-binding proteins, therefore, must also evolve rapidly to maintain binding capability. As a result, chromatin binding proteins may not be able to interact with chromosomes from another species in a hybrid, causing hybrid sterility and inviability. PMID:22191063

  15. Inactivating mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Nakano, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid and histone proteins form a highly condensed structure known as chromatin. Chromatin remodeling proteins regulate deoxyribonucleic acid transcription, synthesis and repair by changing nucleosomal composition in an adenosine triphosphate-dependent manner and mediate access of deoxyribonucleic acid-binding proteins to deoxyribonucleic acid double strands. Recently, large-scale genome sequencing studies identified somatic mutations in genes encoding chromatin remodeling proteins in a variety of human solid cancers. Notably, inactivating mutations in genes encoding the catalytic and regulatory subunits of the switch/sucrose non-fermenting chromatin remodeling complex have been detected in several solid cancers: sucrose non-fermenting/switch/sucrose non-fermenting-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily b, member 1/Brahma-related gene 1-associated factor 47/integrase interactor 1 mutations in rhabdoid tumors; AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1 A/Brahma-related gene 1-associated factor 250a mutations in ovarian clear cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma; polybromo 1/Brahma-related gene 1-associated factor 180 mutations in renal clear cell carcinoma; Brahma-related gene 1/switch/sucrose non-fermenting-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4 mutations in non-small-cell lung carcinoma and AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 2/Brahma-related gene 1-associated factor 200 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma and malignant melanoma. This suggests that the switch/sucrose non-fermenting complex has a tumor-suppressive function, and that switch/sucrose non-fermenting gene deficiencies may affect the properties of cancer cells, which could be of value for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23904343

  16. Radiation Induced Chromatin Conformation Changes Analysed by Fluorescent Localization Microscopy, Statistical Physics, and Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Krufczik, Matthias; Bach, Margund; Kaufmann, Rainer; Hausmann, Michael; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM). The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of nuclei are investigated. PMID:26042422

  17. Modeling studies of chromatin fiber structure as a function of DNA linker length

    PubMed Central

    Periši?, Ognjen; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin fibers encountered in various species and tissues are characterized by different nucleosome repeat lengths (NRL) of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. While single cellular organisms and rapidly growing cells with high protein production have short NRL ranging from 160 to 189 base pairs (bp), mature cells usually have longer NRL ranging between 190 and 220 bp. Recently, various experimental studies have examined the effect of NRL on the internal organization of chromatin fiber. Here we investigate by mesoscale modeling of oligonucleosomes the folding patterns for different NRL, with and without linker histone, under typical monovalent salt conditions using both one-start solenoid and two-start zigzag starting configurations. We find that short to medium NRL chromatin fibers (173 to 209 bp) with linker histone condense into irregular zigzag structures, and that solenoid-like features are viable only for longer NRL (226 bp). We suggest that medium NRL are more advantageous for packing and various levels of chromatin compaction throughout the cell cycle than their shortest and longest brethren; the former (short NRL) fold into narrow fibers, while the latter (long NRL) arrays do not easily lead to high packing ratios due to possible linker DNA bending. Moreover, we show that the linker histone has a small effect on the condensation of short-NRL arrays but an important condensation effect on medium-NRL arrays which have linker lengths similar to the linker histone lengths. Finally, we suggest that the medium-NRL species, with densely packed fiber arrangements, may be advantageous for epigenetic control because their histone tail modifications can have a greater effect compared to other fibers due to their more extensive nucleosome interaction network. PMID:20709077

  18. A universal description for the experimental behavior of salt-(in)dependent oligocation-induced DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Nikolay; Berezhnoy, Nikolay V; Eom, Khee Dong; Tam, James P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2012-03-01

    We report a systematic study of the condensation of plasmid DNA by oligocations with variation of the charge, Z, from +3 to +31. The oligocations include a series of synthetic linear ?-oligo(L-lysines), (denoted ?Kn, n?=?3–10, 31; n is the number of lysines with the ligand charge Z?=?n+1) and branched ?-substituted homologues of ?K10: ?YK10, ?LK10 (Z?=?+11); ?RK10, ?YRK10 and ?LYRK10 (Z?=?+21). Data were obtained by light scattering, UV absorption monitored precipitation assay and isothermal titration calorimetry in a wide range concentrations of DNA and monovalent salt (KCl, CKCl). The dependence of EC50 (ligand concentration at the midpoint of DNA condensation) on C(KCl) shows the existence of a salt-independent regime at low C(KCl) and a salt-dependent regime with a steep rise of EC50 with increase of C(KCl). Increase of the ligand charge shifts the transition from the salt-independent to salt-dependent regime to higher C(KCl). A novel and simple relationship describing the EC50 dependence on DNA concentration, charge of the ligand and the salt-dependent dissociation constant of the ligand–DNA complex is derived. For the ?-oligolysines ?K6–?K10, the experimental dependencies of EC50 on C(KCl) and Z are well-described by an equation with a common set of parameters. Implications from our findings for understanding DNA condensation in chromatin are discussed. PMID:22563605

  19. Both Chromosome Decondensation and Condensation Are Dependent on DNA Replication in C. elegans Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sonneville, Remi; Craig, Gillian; Labib, Karim; Gartner, Anton; Blow, J. Julian

    2015-01-01

    Summary During cell division, chromatin alternates between a condensed state to facilitate chromosome segregation and a decondensed form when DNA replicates. In most tissues, S phase and mitosis are separated by defined G1 and G2 gap phases, but early embryogenesis involves rapid oscillations between replication and mitosis. Using Caenorhabditis elegans embryos as a model system, we show that chromosome condensation and condensin II concentration on chromosomal axes require replicated DNA. In addition, we found that, during late telophase, replication initiates on condensed chromosomes and promotes the rapid decondensation of the chromatin. Upon replication initiation, the CDC-45-MCM-GINS (CMG) DNA helicase drives the release of condensin I complexes from chromatin and the activation or displacement of inactive MCM-2–7 complexes, which together with the nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS tethers condensed chromatin to the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting chromatin decondensation. Our results show how, in an early embryo, the chromosome-condensation cycle is functionally linked with DNA replication. PMID:26166571

  20. A unique chromatin signature uncovers early developmental enhancers in humans.

    PubMed

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Bajpai, Ruchi; Swigut, Tomek; Brugmann, Samantha A; Flynn, Ryan A; Wysocka, Joanna

    2011-02-10

    Cell-fate transitions involve the integration of genomic information encoded by regulatory elements, such as enhancers, with the cellular environment. However, identification of genomic sequences that control human embryonic development represents a formidable challenge. Here we show that in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), unique chromatin signatures identify two distinct classes of genomic elements, both of which are marked by the presence of chromatin regulators p300 and BRG1, monomethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me1), and low nucleosomal density. In addition, elements of the first class are distinguished by the acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac), overlap with previously characterized hESC enhancers, and are located proximally to genes expressed in hESCs and the epiblast. In contrast, elements of the second class, which we term 'poised enhancers', are distinguished by the absence of H3K27ac, enrichment of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and are linked to genes inactive in hESCs and instead are involved in orchestrating early steps in embryogenesis, such as gastrulation, mesoderm formation and neurulation. Consistent with the poised identity, during differentiation of hESCs to neuroepithelium, a neuroectoderm-specific subset of poised enhancers acquires a chromatin signature associated with active enhancers. When assayed in zebrafish embryos, poised enhancers are able to direct cell-type and stage-specific expression characteristic of their proximal developmental gene, even in the absence of sequence conservation in the fish genome. Our data demonstrate that early developmental enhancers are epigenetically pre-marked in hESCs and indicate an unappreciated role of H3K27me3 at distal regulatory elements. Moreover, the wealth of new regulatory sequences identified here provides an invaluable resource for studies and isolation of transient, rare cell populations representing early stages of human embryogenesis. PMID:21160473

  1. Chromatin supraorganization, DNA fragmentation, and cell death in snake erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Maristela; Vidal, Benedicto C; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2005-02-01

    In nucleate erythrocytes of several vertebrate groups, the frequency and intensity of DNA fragmentation associated with programmed cell death vary considerably. Although hemoglobin efficiency may be related to erythrocyte life span, and hemoglobin types and erythrocyte life spans are assumed to vary in reptiles, no data on DNA fragmentation and chromatin organization as related to cell death exist for snakes. In the present study, chromatin supraorganization, DNA fragmentation, and cell death were investigated in four snake species (Crotalus durissus terrificus, Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops alternatus, and Bothrops neuwiedii), which differ in their geographical distribution and habitats, by using image analysis of Feulgen hydrolysis kinetics, the TUNEL assay, single-cell gel electrophoresis, and transmission electron microscopy. Relatively few circulating erythrocytes were found to be simultaneously committed to cell death, although there was some variation among the snake species. Conspicuous nuclear and cytoplasmic organelles suggestive of metabolic activity were seen ultrastructurally in most snake erythrocytes. The DNA of the snake erythrocyte chromatin was much more resistant to Feulgen acid hydrolysis (DNA depurination and breakdown) than that of young adult bullfrog erythrocytes, which had a high frequency and intensity of DNA fragmentation. Of the species studied, B. neuwiedii and C. d. terrificus showed the greatest resistance to Feulgen acid hydrolysis and to the DNA fragmentation, revealed by the TUNEL assay. Although B. neuwiedii also showed the lowest frequency of cells with more damaged DNA in the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, C. d. terrificus had the highest frequency of damaged cells, possibly because of the abundance of alkaline-sensitive DNA sites. The results for DNA fragmentation and cell death in erythrocytes of B. jararaca and B. alternatus generally differed from those for C. d. terrificus and B. neuwiedii and may reflect differences in the biology of these species selected under different geographical habitats. The differences in erythrocyte cell biology reported here may be related to hemoglobin variants selected in the mentioned snake species and that would lead the cells to different resistances to unfavorable environmental conditions. PMID:15746963

  2. On the chromatin structure of eukaryotic telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I

    2011-01-01

    Telomeres prevent chromosome fusions and degradation by exonucleases and are implicated in DNA repair, homologous recombination, chromosome pairing and segregation. All these functions of telomeres require the integrity of their chromatin structure, which has been traditionally considered as heterochromatic. In agreement with this idea, different studies have reported that telomeres associate with heterochromatic marks. However, these studies addressed simultaneously the chromatin structures of telomeres and subtelomeric regions or the chromatin structure of telomeres and Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITSs). The independent analysis of Arabidopsis telomeres, subtelomeric regions and ITSs has allowed the discovery of euchromatic telomeres. In Arabidopsis, whereas subtelomeric regions and ITSs associate with heterochromatic marks, telomeres exhibit euchromatic features. We think that this scenario could be found in other model systems if the chromatin organizations of telomeres, subtelomeric regions and ITSs are independently analyzed. PMID:21822057

  3. Identifying chromatin interactions at high spatial resolution

    E-print Network

    Reeder, Christopher Campbell

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents two computational approaches for identifying chromatin interactions at high spatial resolution from ChIA-PET data. We introduce SPROUT which is a hierarchical probabilistic model that discovers high ...

  4. Chromatin compaction in Cornelia de Lange syndrome 

    E-print Network

    Pritchard, Emily Helen

    2011-07-05

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by mutations in the cohesin complex. It is believed that cohesin is able to regulate gene expression with CTCF by holding chromatin in topological ...

  5. Poised chromatin in the mammalian germ line.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Bluma J; Page, David C

    2014-10-01

    Poised (bivalent) chromatin is defined by the simultaneous presence of histone modifications associated with both gene activation and repression. This epigenetic feature was first observed at promoters of lineage-specific regulatory genes in embryonic stem cells in culture. More recent work has shown that, in vivo, mammalian germ cells maintain poised chromatin at promoters of many genes that regulate somatic development, and that they retain this state from fetal stages through meiosis and gametogenesis. We hypothesize that the poised chromatin state is essential for germ cell identity and function. We propose three roles for poised chromatin in the mammalian germ line: prevention of DNA methylation, maintenance of germ cell identity and preparation for totipotency. We discuss these roles in the context of recently proposed models for germline potency and epigenetic inheritance. PMID:25249456

  6. Macroautophagy-aided elimination of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Huna, Anda; Salmina, Kristine; Jackson, Thomas R.; Cragg, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    How tumor cells process damaged or unwanted DNA is a matter of much interest. Recently, Rello-Varona et al. (Cell Cycle 2012; 11:170–76) reported the involvement of macroautophagy (hereon autophagy) in the elimination of micronuclei (MN) from osteosarcoma cells. Prior to that, diminution of whole nuclei from multinucleated TP53-mutant tumor cells was described. Here, we discuss these two kinds of chromatin autophagy evoked after genotoxic stress in the context of the various biological processes involved: (1) endopolyploidy and the ploidy cycle; (2) the timing of DNA synthesis; (3) DNA repair; (4) chromatin:nuclear envelope interactions; and (5) cytoplasmic autophagy. We suggest that whereas some MN can be reunited with the main nucleus (through interactions with envelope-limited chromatin sheets) and participate in DNA repair, failure of repair serves as a signal for the chromatin autophagy of MN. In turn, autophagy of whole sub-nuclei in multi-nucleated cells appears to favor de-polyploidization, mitigation of aneuploidy with its adverse effects, thereby promoting the survival fitness of descendents and treatment resistance. Thus, both kinds of chromatin autophagy provide tumor cells with the opportunity to repair DNA, sort and resort chromatin, reduce DNA content, and enhance survival. PMID:22935563

  7. Hyperacetylation in prostate cancer induces cell cycle aberrations, chromatin reorganization and altered gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jenny A; McKenna, Declan J; Maxwell, Perry; Diamond, James; Arthur, Ken; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J; Hamilton, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Histone acetylation is a fundamental mechanism in the regulation of local chromatin conformation and gene expression. Research has focused on the impact of altered epigenetic environments on the expression of specific genes and their pathways. However, changes in histone acetylation also have a global impact on the cell. In this study we used digital texture analysis to assess global chromatin patterns following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA) and have observed significant alterations in the condensation and distribution of higher-order chromatin, which were associated with altered gene expression profiles in both immortalised normal PNT1A prostate cell line and androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Furthermore, the extent of TSA-induced disruption was both cell cycle and cell line dependent. This was illustrated by the identification of sub-populations of prostate cancer cells expressing high levels of H3K9 acetylation in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle that were absent in normal cell populations. In addition, the analysis of enriched populations of G1 cells showed a global decondensation of chromatin exclusively in normal cells. PMID:19583812

  8. Time-Lapse Dynamics of the Mouse Oocyte Chromatin Organisation during Meiotic Resumption

    PubMed Central

    Redi, Carlo Alberto; Zuccotti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian oocyte, distinct patterns of centromeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin localisation correlate with the gamete's developmental competence. Mouse antral oocytes display two main types of chromatin organisation: SN oocytes, with a ring of Hoechst-positive chromatin surrounding the nucleolus, and NSN oocytes lacking this ring. When matured to MII and fertilised, only SN oocytes develop beyond the 2-cell, and reach full term. To give detailed information on the dynamics of the SN or NSN chromatin during meiosis resumption, we performed a 9?hr time-lapse observation. The main significant differences recorded are: (1) reduction of the nuclear area only in SN oocytes; (2) ~17?min delay of GVBD in NSN oocytes; (3) chromatin condensation, after GVBD, in SN oocytes; (4) formation of 4-5 CHCs in SN oocytes; (5) increase of the perivitelline space, ~57?min later in NSN oocytes; (6) formation of a rosette-like disposition of CHCs, ~84?min later in SN oocytes; (7) appearance of the MI plate ~40?min later in NSN oocytes. Overall, we described a pathway of transition from the GV to the MII stage that is punctuated of discrete recordable events showing their specificity and occurring with different time kinetics in the two types of oocytes. PMID:24864231

  9. Stacked thin layers of metaphase chromatin explain the geometry of chromosome rearrangements and banding

    PubMed Central

    Daban, Joan-Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of tightly condensed chromatin within metaphase chromosomes has been one of the most challenging problems in structural biology since the discovery of the nucleosome. This study shows that chromosome images obtained from typical banded karyotypes and from different multicolour cytogenetic analyses can be used to gain information about the internal structure of chromosomes. Chromatin bands and the connection surfaces in sister chromatid exchanges and in cancer translocations are planar and orthogonal to the chromosome axis. Chromosome stretching produces band splitting and even the thinnest bands are orthogonal and well defined, indicating that short stretches of DNA can occupy completely the chromosome cross-section. These observations impose strong physical constraints on models that attempt to explain chromatin folding in chromosomes. The thin-plate model, which consists of many stacked layers of planar chromatin perpendicular to the chromosome axis, is compatible with the observed orientation of bands, with the existence of thin bands, and with band splitting; it is also compatible with the orthogonal orientation and planar geometry of the connection surfaces in chromosome rearrangements. The results obtained provide a consistent interpretation of the chromosome structural properties that are used in clinical cytogenetics for the diagnosis of hereditary diseases and cancers. PMID:26446309

  10. Superresolution imaging reveals structurally distinct periodic patterns of chromatin along pachytene chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Kirti; Fournier, David; Redl, Stefan; Best, Gerrit; Borsos, Máté; Tiwari, Vijay K; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikuë; Ketting, René F; Parekh, Sapun H; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo J

    2015-11-24

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes associate to form the synaptonemal complex (SC), a structure essential for fertility. Information about the epigenetic features of chromatin within this structure at the level of superresolution microscopy is largely lacking. We combined single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with quantitative analytical methods to describe the epigenetic landscape of meiotic?chromosomes at the pachytene stage in mouse oocytes. DNA is found to be nonrandomly distributed along the length of the SC in condensed clusters. Periodic clusters of repressive chromatin [trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine (Lys) 27 (H3K27me3)] are found at 500-nm intervals along the SC, whereas one of the ends of the SC displays a large and dense cluster of centromeric histone mark [trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 (H3K9me3)]. Chromatin associated with active transcription [trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4me3)] is arranged in a radial hair-like loop pattern emerging laterally from the SC. These loops seem to be punctuated with small clusters of H3K4me3 with an average spread larger than their periodicity. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale structure of the pachytene chromosomes is constrained by periodic patterns of chromatin marks, whose function in recombination and higher order genome organization is yet to be elucidated. PMID:26561583

  11. RAS Assays

    Cancer.gov

    The proportion of oncogenic mutants of KRAS proteins that are in the "active" (GTP-bound) form is far higher than that of wild-type RAS proteins. Scientists at the National Lab are developing high-throughput in vitro assays to measure interactions of GTP-loaded KRAS and effectors, such as CRAF and calmodulin, as well as imaging assays that can detect oncogenic KRAS interactions inside cells.

  12. A Computer Lab Exploring Evolutionary Aspects of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics for an Undergraduate Chromatin Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromatin constitutes one of the most active research fields in life sciences, being subject to constant revisions that continuously redefine the state of the art in its knowledge. As every other rapidly changing field, chromatin biology requires clear and straightforward educational strategies able to efficiently translate such a…

  13. Changing Chromatin Fiber Conformation by Nucleosome Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Kepper, Nick; Schöpflin, Robert; Ettig, Ramona; Rippe, Karsten; Wedemann, Gero

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin conformation is dynamic and heterogeneous with respect to nucleosome positions, which can be changed by chromatin remodeling complexes in the cell. These molecular machines hydrolyze ATP to translocate or evict nucleosomes, and establish loci with regularly and more irregularly spaced nucleosomes as well as nucleosome-depleted regions. The impact of nucleosome repositioning on the three-dimensional chromatin structure is only poorly understood. Here, we address this issue by using a coarse-grained computer model of arrays of 101 nucleosomes considering several chromatin fiber models with and without linker histones, respectively. We investigated the folding of the chain in dependence of the position of the central nucleosome by changing the length of the adjacent linker DNA in basepair steps. We found in our simulations that these translocations had a strong effect on the shape and properties of chromatin fibers: i), Fiber curvature and flexibility at the center were largely increased and long-range contacts between distant nucleosomes on the chain were promoted. ii), The highest destabilization of the fiber conformation occurred for a nucleosome shifted by two basepairs from regular spacing, whereas effects of linker DNA changes of ?10 bp in phase with the helical twist of DNA were minimal. iii), A fiber conformation can stabilize a regular spacing of nucleosomes inasmuch as favorable stacking interactions between nucleosomes are facilitated. This can oppose nucleosome translocations and increase the energetic costs for chromatin remodeling. Our computational modeling framework makes it possible to describe the conformational heterogeneity of chromatin in terms of nucleosome positions, and thus advances theoretical models toward a better understanding of how genome compaction and access are regulated within the cell. PMID:25418099

  14. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  15. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  16. PROTOCOLS: Chromatin Immunoprecipitation from Arabidopsis Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Winter, Cara M.; Wu, Miin-Feng; Kwon, Chang Seob; William, Dilusha A.; Wagner, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The ability of proteins to associate with genomic DNA in the context of chromatin is critical for many nuclear processes including transcription, replication, recombination, and DNA repair. Chromatin immunoprecipication (ChIP) is a practical and useful technique for characterizing protein / DNA association in vivo. The procedure generally includes six steps: (1) crosslinking the protein to the DNA; (2) isolating the chromatin; (3) chromatin fragmentation; (4) imunoprecipitation with antibodies against the protein of interest; (5) DNA recovery; and (6) PCR identification of factor associated DNA sequences. In this protocol, we describe guidelines, experimental setup, and conditions for ChIP in intact Arabidopsis tissues. This protocol has been used to study association of histone modifications, of chromatin remodeling ATPases, as well as of sequence-specific transcription factors with the genomic DNA in various Arabidopsis thaliana tissues. The protocol described focuses on ChIP-qPCR, but can readily be adapted for use in ChIP-chip or ChIP-seq experiments. The entire procedure can be completed within 3 days. PMID:24653666

  17. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Veit; Rudnik, Radoslaw; Schubert, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fiber movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns. Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its 10 centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei. PMID:25431580

  18. Effects of acrylamide on sperm parameters, chromatin quality, and the level of blood testosterone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pourentezari, Majid; Talebi, Alireza; Abbasi, Abulghasem; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Mangoli, Esmat; Anvari, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical primarily. AA is also found in carbohydrate-rich foods that are prepared at high temperatures, such as French fries and potato chips. It is demonstrated that AA is a carcinogen and reproductive toxin and has ability to induce sperm damage. Objective: The aim of this study was to observe the effects of AA on sperm parameters and evaluation of sperm chromatin quality and testosterone hormone in mice. Materials and Methods: Totally, 16 adult male mice were divided into two groups. Mice of group A fed on basal diet; group B received basal diet and AA (10 mg/kg, water solution) for 35 days. The right cauda epididymis was incised and then placed in Ham’s F10 culture media at 37oC for 15 min. Released spermatozoa were used to analyze count, motility, morphology and viability. To determine the sperm DNA integrity and chromatin condensation, the cytochemical techniques including Aniline blue, Acridine orange and Chromomycin A3 staining were used. Results: AA-treated mice had poor parameters in comparison with control animals. In sperm chromatin assessments, except TB (p=0.16), significant differences were found in all of the tests between two groups. It was also seen a significant decrease in concentration of blood testosterone in AA-treated animals when compared to controls (p<0.001). Conclusion: According to our results, AA can affect sperm parameters as well as sperm chromatin condensation and DNA integrity in mice. These abnormalities may be related to the reduction in blood testosterone. PMID:25031578

  19. Increased chromatin fragmentation and reduced acrosome integrity in spermatozoa of red deer from lead polluted sites.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Pilar; del Olmo, Enrique; Fernández-Santos, M Rocío; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Garde, J Julián; Mateo, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Vertebrates are constantly exposed to a diffuse pollution of heavy metals existing in the environment, but in some cases, the proximity to emission sources like mining activity increases the risk of developing adverse effects of these pollutants. Here we have studied lead (Pb) levels in spermatozoa and testis, and chromatin damage and levels of endogenous antioxidant activity in spermatozoa of red deer (Cervus elaphus) from a Pb mining area (n=37) and a control area (n=26). Deer from the Pb-polluted area showed higher Pb levels in testis parenchyma, epididymal cauda and spermatozoa, lower values of acrosome integrity, higher activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and higher values of DNA fragmentation (X-DFI) and stainability (HDS) in sperm than in the control area. These results indicate that mining pollution can produce damage on chromatin and membrane spermatozoa in wildlife. The study of chromatin fragmentation has not been studied before in spermatozoa of wildlife species, and the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) has been revealed as a successful tool for this purpose in species in which the amount of sperm that can be collected is very limited. PMID:25306093

  20. Drosophila domino Exhibits Genetic Interactions with a Wide Spectrum of Chromatin Protein-Encoding Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Kaitlyn; Friedman, Chloe; Yedvobnick, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila domino gene encodes protein of the SWI2/SNF2 family that has widespread roles in transcription, replication, recombination and DNA repair. Here, the potential relationship of Domino protein to other chromatin-associated proteins has been investigated through a genetic interaction analysis. We scored for genetic modification of a domino wing margin phenotype through coexpression of RNAi directed against a set of previously characterized and more newly characterized chromatin-encoding loci. A set of other SWI2/SNF2 loci were also assayed for interaction with domino. Our results show that the majority of tested loci exhibit synergistic enhancement or suppression of the domino wing phenotype. Therefore, depression in domino function sensitizes the wing margin to alterations in the activity of numerous chromatin components. In several cases the genetic interactions are associated with changes in the level of cell death measured across the dorsal-ventral margin of the wing imaginal disc. These results highlight the broad realms of action of many chromatin proteins and suggest significant overlap with Domino function in fundamental cell processes, including cell proliferation, cell death and cell signaling. PMID:26555684

  1. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  2. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching Frank Aumann,1

    E-print Network

    Langowski, Jörg

    connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay into chromatin itself, changes in the chromatin structure play a major role in the regulation of gene expression

  4. Biased chromatin signatures around polyadenylation sites and exons

    E-print Network

    Spies, Noah Walter Benjamin

    Core RNA-processing reactions in eukaryotic cells occur cotranscriptionally in a chromatin context, but the relationship between chromatin structure and pre-mRNA processing is poorly understood. We observed strong nucleosome ...

  5. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in adult zebrafish red cells.

    PubMed

    Trompouki, Eirini; Bowman, Teresa V; Dibiase, Anthony; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish has been used for many years as a model to study development and disease. The ability of zebrafish to produce thousand of embryos in a synchronous manner has made zebrafish an invaluable tool for genetic and chemical screens. Since its emergence as an important model organism the molecular tools for studying zebrafish have been limited. In this chapter, we describe a simple method to identify DNA binding sites and chromatin architecture in erythrocytes from adult zebrafish using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next generation sequencing. This technique has been used extensively and successfully in other systems and it will be a useful tool for studying epigenetics in zebrafish. PMID:21924172

  6. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  7. The chromatin remodeling complex NoRC targets HDAC1 to the ribosomal gene promoter and represses RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yonggang; Santoro, Raffaella; Grummt, Ingrid

    2002-09-01

    Mammalian chromatin remodeling complexes are involved in both activation and repression of transcription. Here, we show that NoRC, a SNF2h- containing nucleolar chromatin remodeling complex, represses ribosomal gene transcription. NoRC-mediated rDNA silencing was alleviated by trichostatin A, indicating that histone deacetylation is causally involved in silencing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that overexpression of TIP5, the large subunit of NoRC, mediates deacetylation of nucleosomes in the vicinity of the rDNA promoter. Protein-protein interaction assays reveal association of TIP5 with the histone deacetylase HDAC1 in vivo and in vitro. Deletion of the C-terminal PHD finger and bromodomain abolishes the interaction of TIP5 and HDAC1, and abrogates transcriptional repression. The results suggest that NoRC silences the rDNA locus by targeting the SIN3 corepressor complex to the rDNA promoter, thereby establishing a repressed chromatin structure. PMID:12198165

  8. GENE EXPRESSION & METABOLISM Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    E-print Network

    Winston, Fred

    for H2A.Z in transcription 360 Chromatin-Remodeling Factors 361 Identification of the Swi/Snf and RSC complexes 361 Swi/Snf complexes have chromatin-remodeling activity 362 Regulation of transcription by Swi/Snf 362 RSC plays broad roles in gene expression and chromatin structure 363 Bromodomains in Swi/Snf

  9. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological PathwayUsing 18 In Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity pa...

  10. Chromatin Modifications Associated With Diabetes and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Schones, Dustin E; Leung, Amy; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity across the globe has doubled over the past several decades, leading to escalating rates of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Given this dramatic rise in disease incidence, understanding the cause of these diseases is therefore of paramount importance. Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes mellitus, result from a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. Although the genetic basis of these diseases has been extensively studied, the molecular pathways whereby environmental factors influence disease progression are only beginning to be understood. One manner by which environmental factors can contribute to disease progression is through modifications to chromatin. The highly structured packaging of the genome into the nucleus through chromatin has been shown to be fundamental to tissue-specific gene regulation. Modifications to chromatin can regulate gene expression and are involved in a myriad of biological functions, and hence, disruption of these modifications is central to many human diseases. These modifications can furthermore be epigenetic in nature, thereby contributing to prolonged disease risk. Recent work has demonstrated that modifications to chromatin are associated with the progression of both diabetes mellitus and obesity, which is the subject of this review. PMID:26044585

  11. Direct Evidence for Pitavastatin Induced Chromatin Structure Change in the KLF4 Gene in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanki, Yasuharu; Kohro, Takahide; Li, Guoliang; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Mika; Taguchi, Akashi; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Iwanari, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Shogo; Aruga, Hirofumi; Dong, Shoulian; Stevens, Junko F.; Poh, Huay Mei; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Kawamura, Takeshi; Mimura, Imari; Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Sugiyama, Akira; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Shibata, Haruki; Yoshinaka, Yasunobu; Doi, Takeshi; Asanuma, Akimune; Tanabe, Sohei; Tanaka, Toshiya; Minami, Takashi; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Nozaki, Naohito; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Nangaku, Masaomi; Ruan, Xiaoan; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Ruan, Yijun; Ihara, Sigeo; Endo, Akira; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Wada, Youichiro

    2014-01-01

    Statins exert atheroprotective effects through the induction of specific transcriptional factors in multiple organs. In endothelial cells, statin-dependent atheroprotective gene up-regulation is mediated by Kruppel-like factor (KLF) family transcription factors. To dissect the mechanism of gene regulation, we sought to determine molecular targets by performing microarray analyses of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with pitavastatin, and KLF4 was determined to be the most highly induced gene. In addition, it was revealed that the atheroprotective genes induced with pitavastatin, such as nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) and thrombomodulin (THBD), were suppressed by KLF4 knockdown. Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family activation is reported to be involved in pitavastatin-dependent KLF4 induction. We focused on MEF2C among the MEF2 family members and identified a novel functional MEF2C binding site 148 kb upstream of the KLF4 gene by chromatin immunoprecipitation along with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) followed by luciferase assay. By applying whole genome and quantitative chromatin conformation analysis {chromatin interaction analysis with paired end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET), and real time chromosome conformation capture (3C) assay}, we observed that the MEF2C-bound enhancer and transcription start site (TSS) of KLF4 came into closer spatial proximity by pitavastatin treatment. 3D-Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging supported the conformational change in individual cells. Taken together, dynamic chromatin conformation change was shown to mediate pitavastatin-responsive gene induction in endothelial cells. PMID:24797675

  12. Stable Chromosome Condensation Revealed by Chromosome Conformation Capture.

    PubMed

    Eagen, Kyle P; Hartl, Tom A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-11-01

    Chemical cross-linking and DNA sequencing have revealed regions of intra-chromosomal interaction, referred to as topologically associating domains (TADs), interspersed with regions of little or no interaction, in interphase nuclei. We find that TADs and the regions between them correspond with the bands and interbands of polytene chromosomes of Drosophila. We further establish the conservation of TADs between polytene and diploid cells of Drosophila. From direct measurements on light micrographs of polytene chromosomes, we then deduce the states of chromatin folding in the diploid cell nucleus. Two states of folding, fully extended fibers containing regulatory regions and promoters, and fibers condensed up to 10-fold containing coding regions of active genes, constitute the euchromatin of the nuclear interior. Chromatin fibers condensed up to 30-fold, containing coding regions of inactive genes, represent the heterochromatin of the nuclear periphery. A convergence of molecular analysis with direct observation thus reveals the architecture of interphase chromosomes. PMID:26544940

  13. Polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Snoke, David; Littlewood, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Most students of physics know about the special properties of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) as demonstrated in the two best-known examples: superfluid helium-4, first reported in 1938, and condensates of trapped atomic gases, first observed in 1995. (See the article by Wolfgang Ketterle in PHYSICS TODAY, December 1999, page 30.) Many also know that superfluid {sup 3}He and superconducting metals contain BECs of fermion pairs. An underlying principle of all those condensed-matter systems, known as quantum fluids, is that an even number of fermions with half-integer spin can be combined to make a composite boson with integer spin. Such composite bosons, like all bosons, have the property that below some critical temperature--roughly the temperature at which the thermal de Broglie wavelength becomes comparable to the distance between the bosons--the total free energy is minimized by having a macroscopic number of bosons enter a single quantum state and form a macroscopic, coherent matter wave. Remarkably, the effect of interparticle repulsion is to lead to quantum mechanical exchange interactions that make that state robust, since the exchange interactions add coherently.

  14. Assaying mechanosensation*

    PubMed Central

    Chalfie, Martin; Hart, Anne C.; Rankin, Catharine H.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2015-01-01

    C. elegans detect and respond to diverse mechanical stimuli using neuronal circuitry that has been defined by decades of work by C. elegans researchers. In this WormMethods chapter, we review and comment on the techniques currently used to assess mechanosensory response. This methods review is intended both as an introduction for those new to the field and a convenient compendium for the expert. A brief discussion of commonly used mechanosensory assays is provided, along with a discussion of the neural circuits involved, consideration of critical protocol details, and references to the primary literature. PMID:25093996

  15. Prp22 and Spliceosome Components Regulate Chromatin Dynamics in Germ-Line Polyploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klusza, Stephen; Novak, Amanda; Figueroa, Shirelle; Palmer, William; Deng, Wu-Min

    2013-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, the endopolyploid nuclei of germ-line nurse cells undergo a dramatic shift in morphology as oogenesis progresses; the easily-visible chromosomes are initially polytenic during the early stages of oogenesis before they transiently condense into a distinct ‘5-blob’ configuration, with subsequent dispersal into a diffuse state. Mutations in many genes, with diverse cellular functions, can affect the ability of nurse cells to fully decondense their chromatin, resulting in a ‘5-blob arrest’ phenotype that is maintained throughout the later stages of oogenesis. However, the mechanisms and significance of nurse-cell (NC) chromatin dispersal remain poorly understood. Here, we report that a screen for modifiers of the 5-blob phenotype in the germ line isolated the spliceosomal gene peanuts, the Drosophila Prp22. We demonstrate that reduction of spliceosomal activity through loss of peanuts promotes decondensation defects in NC nuclei during mid-oogenesis. We also show that the Prp38 spliceosomal protein accumulates in the nucleoplasm of nurse cells with impaired peanuts function, suggesting that spliceosomal recycling is impaired. Finally, we reveal that loss of additional spliceosomal proteins impairs the full decondensation of NC chromatin during later stages of oogenesis, suggesting that individual spliceosomal subcomplexes modulate expression of the distinct subset of genes that are required for correct morphology in endopolyploid nurse cells. PMID:24244416

  16. CTCF-Mediated Human 3D Genome Architecture Reveals Chromatin Topology for Transcription.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhonghui; Luo, Oscar Junhong; Li, Xingwang; Zheng, Meizhen; Zhu, Jacqueline Jufen; Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Trzaskoma, Pawel; Magalska, Adriana; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Ruszczycki, Blazej; Michalski, Paul; Piecuch, Emaly; Wang, Ping; Wang, Danjuan; Tian, Simon Zhongyuan; Penrad-Mobayed, May; Sachs, Laurent M; Ruan, Xiaoan; Wei, Chia-Lin; Liu, Edison T; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Plewczynski, Dariusz; Li, Guoliang; Ruan, Yijun

    2015-12-17

    Spatial genome organization and its effect on transcription remains a fundamental question. We applied an advanced chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) strategy to comprehensively map higher-order chromosome folding and specific chromatin interactions mediated by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with haplotype specificity and nucleotide resolution in different human cell lineages. We find that CTCF/cohesin-mediated interaction anchors serve as structural foci for spatial organization of constitutive genes concordant with CTCF-motif orientation, whereas RNAPII interacts within these structures by selectively drawing cell-type-specific genes toward CTCF foci for coordinated transcription. Furthermore, we show that haplotype variants and allelic interactions have differential effects on chromosome configuration, influencing gene expression, and may provide mechanistic insights into functions associated with disease susceptibility. 3D genome simulation suggests a model of chromatin folding around chromosomal axes, where CTCF is involved in defining the interface between condensed and open compartments for structural regulation. Our 3D genome strategy thus provides unique insights in the topological mechanism of human variations and diseases. PMID:26686651

  17. Angiogenesis Assays.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  18. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R. . E-mail: tsaneva@biochem.ucl.ac.uk

    2005-11-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA{sup +} protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis.

  19. Chromatin remodeling — a novel strategy to control excessive alcohol drinking

    PubMed Central

    Warnault, V; Darcq, E; Levine, A; Barak, S; Ron, D

    2013-01-01

    Harmful excessive use of alcohol has a severe impact on society and it remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the population. However, mechanisms that underlie excessive alcohol consumption are still poorly understood, and thus available medications for alcohol use disorders are limited. Here, we report that changing the level of chromatin condensation by affecting DNA methylation or histone acetylation limits excessive alcohol drinking and seeking behaviors in rodents. Specifically, we show that decreasing DNA methylation by inhibiting the activity of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) with systemic administration of the FDA-approved drug, 5-azacitidine (5-AzaC) prevents excessive alcohol use in mice. Similarly, we find that increasing histone acetylation via systemic treatment with several histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors reduces mice binge-like alcohol drinking. We further report that systemic administration of the FDA-approved HDAC inhibitor, SAHA, inhibits the motivation of rats to seek alcohol. Importantly, the actions of both DNMT and HDAC inhibitors are specific for alcohol, as no changes in saccharin or sucrose intake were observed. In line with these behavioral findings, we demonstrate that excessive alcohol drinking increases DNMT1 levels and reduces histone H4 acetylation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rodents. Together, our findings illustrate that DNA methylation and histone acetylation control the level of excessive alcohol drinking and seeking behaviors in preclinical rodent models. Our study therefore highlights the possibility that DNMT and HDAC inhibitors can be used to treat harmful alcohol abuse. PMID:23423140

  20. Intergenic Locations of Rice Centromeric Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huihuang; Talbert, Paul B; Lee, Hye-Ran; Jett, Jamie; Henikoff, Steven; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Jiming

    2008-01-01

    Centromeres are sites for assembly of the chromosomal structures that mediate faithful segregation at mitosis and meiosis. Plant and animal centromeres are typically located in megabase-sized arrays of tandem satellite repeats, making their precise mapping difficult. However, some rice centromeres are largely embedded in nonsatellite DNA, providing an excellent model to study centromere structure and evolution. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation and 454 sequencing to define the boundaries of nine of the 12 centromeres of rice. Centromere regions from chromosomes 8 and 9 were found to share synteny, most likely reflecting an ancient genome duplication. For four centromeres, we mapped discrete subdomains of binding by the centromeric histone variant CENH3. These subdomains were depleted in both intact and nonfunctional genes relative to interspersed subdomains lacking CENH3. The intergenic location of rice centromeric chromatin resembles the situation for human neocentromeres and supports a model of the evolution of centromeres from gene-poor regions. PMID:19067486

  1. Chromatin structure and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Dinant, Christoffel; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Vermeulen, Wim

    2008-01-01

    The integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks, single strand breaks, oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The cell has evolved intricate DNA damage response mechanisms to counteract the genotoxic effects of these lesions. The two main features of the DNA damage response mechanisms are cell-cycle checkpoint activation and, at the heart of the response, DNA repair. For both damage signalling and repair, chromatin remodelling is most likely a prerequisite. Here, we discuss current knowledge on chromatin remodelling with respect to the cellular response to DNA damage, with emphasis on the response to lesions resolved by nucleotide excision repair. We will discuss the role of histone modifications as well as their displacement or exchange in nucleotide excision repair and make a comparison with their requirement in transcription and double strand break repair. PMID:19014481

  2. Modulation of chromatin access during adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cellular development requires reprogramming of the genome to modulate the gene program of the undifferentiated cell and allow expression of the gene program unique to differentiated cells. A number of key transcription factors involved in this reprogramming of preadipocytes to adipocytes have been identified; however, it is not until recently that we have begun to understand how these factors act at a genome-wide scale. In a recent publication we have mapped the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and shown that a major reorganization of the chromatin landscape occurs within few hours following the addition of the adipogenic cocktail. In addition, we have mapped the genome-wide profiles of several of the early adipogenic transcription factors and shown that they act in a highly cooperative manner to drive this dramatic remodeling process. PMID:22540022

  3. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jégu, Teddy; Domenichini, Séverine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Aurélie; Kim, Soon-Kap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Mouille, Grégory; Bourge, Mickaël; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression. PMID:26457678

  4. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Required Solutions

    E-print Network

    de Lange, Titia

    Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Required Solutions 10x PBS 80 g NaCl 2 g KCl 17.4 g Na2HPO4.7H-HCl pH 7.0 1 M NaPi pH 7.2 In 2.3 liters (orange capped roller bottle filled to shoulder). 308 g Na2HPO4

  5. Effects of chromatin decondensation on alternative NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Moscariello, Mario; Iliakis, George

    2013-11-01

    In cells of higher eukaryotes, repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) utilizes different forms of potentially error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ): canonical DNA-PK-dependent (C-NHEJ) and alternative backup pathways (A-NHEJ). In contrast to C-NHEJ, A-NHEJ shows pronounced efficiency fluctuations throughout the cell cycle and is severely compromised as cells cease proliferating and enter the plateau phase (Windhofer et al., 2007 [23]). The molecular mechanisms underpinning this response remain unknown but changes in chromatin structure are prime candidate-A-NHEJ-modulators. Since parameters beyond chromatin acetylation appear to determine A-NHEJ efficiency (Manova et al., 2012 [42,76]), we study here the role of chromatin decondensation mediated either by treatment with 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AzadC) or growth in hypotonic conditions, on A-NHEJ. We report that both treatments have no detectable effect on C-NHEJ but provoke, specifically for A-NHEJ, cell-growth-dependent effects. These results uncover for the first time a link between A-NHEJ and chromatin organization and provide means for understanding the regulatory mechanisms underpinning the growth-state dependency of A-NHEJ. A-NHEJ is implicated in the formation of chromosomal translocations and in chromosome fusions that underlie genomic instability and carcinogenesis. The observations reported here may therefore contribute to the development of drug-based A-NHEJ suppression-strategies aiming at optimizing cancer treatment outcomes and possibly also at suppressing carcinogenesis. PMID:24051048

  6. The polymorphisms of the chromatin fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulé, Jean-Baptiste; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the genome is packed into chromosomes, each consisting of large polymeric fibers made of DNA bound with proteins (mainly histones) and RNA molecules. The nature and precise 3D organization of this fiber has been a matter of intense speculations and debates. In the emerging picture, the local chromatin state plays a critical role in all fundamental DNA transactions, such as transcriptional control, DNA replication or repair. However, the molecular and structural mechanisms involved remain elusive. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the tremendous efforts that have been made for almost 40 years to build physiologically relevant models of chromatin structure. The motivation behind building such models was to shift our representation and understanding of DNA transactions from a too simplistic ‘naked DNA’ view to a more realistic ‘coated DNA’ view, as a step towards a better framework in which to interpret mechanistically the control of genetic expression and other DNA metabolic processes. The field has evolved from a speculative point of view towards in vitro biochemistry and in silico modeling, but is still longing for experimental in vivo validations of the proposed structures or even proof of concept experiments demonstrating a clear role of a given structure in a metabolic transaction. The mere existence of a chromatin fiber as a relevant biological entity in vivo has been put into serious questioning. Current research is suggesting a possible reconciliation between theoretical studies and experiments, pointing towards a view where the polymorphic and dynamic nature of the chromatin fiber is essential to support its function in genome metabolism.

  7. Identifying transcriptional regulatory regions using reporter genes and DNA-protein interactions by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Lezanne; Wood, Ian C

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of regulatory protein interactions with their target genes is fundamental to determining transcriptional networks and identifying important events in the regulation of gene expression. Here we describe how transcriptional regulatory regions are to be identified using luciferase assays (including the transfection of cells by Amaxa and lipid-based reagents) and how protein-DNA interactions are to be characterised by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with quantitative PCR. Together these techniques provide a powerful combination for investigating potassium channel gene regulation. PMID:18998080

  8. Default assembly of early adenovirus chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, David J. . E-mail: dspector@psu.edu

    2007-03-01

    In adenovirus particles, the viral nucleoprotein is organized into a highly compacted core structure. Upon delivery to the nucleus, the viral nucleoprotein is very likely to be remodeled to a form accessible to the transcription and replication machinery. Viral protein VII binds to intra-nuclear viral DNA, as do at least two cellular proteins, SET/TAF-I{beta} and pp32, components of a chromatin assembly complex that is implicated in template remodeling. We showed previously that viral DNA-protein complexes released from infecting particles were sensitive to shearing after cross-linking with formaldehyde, presumably after transport of the genome into the nucleus. We report here the application of equilibrium-density gradient centrifugation to the analysis of the fate of these complexes. Most of the incoming protein VII was recovered in a form that was not cross-linked to viral DNA. This release of protein VII, as well as the binding of SET/TAF-I{beta} and cellular transcription factors to the viral chromatin, did not require de novo viral gene expression. The distinct density profiles of viral DNA complexes containing protein VII, compared to those containing SET/TAF-I{beta} or transcription factors, were consistent with the notion that the assembly of early viral chromatin requires both the association of SET/TAF-1{beta} and the release of protein VII.

  9. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  10. Chromatin signature of widespread monoallelic expression

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Anwesha; Savova, Virginia; Fung, Ho-Lim; Miron, Alexander; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Zhang, Kun; Gimelbrant, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, numerous autosomal genes are subject to mitotically stable monoallelic expression (MAE), including genes that play critical roles in a variety of human diseases. Due to challenges posed by the clonal nature of MAE, very little is known about its regulation; in particular, no molecular features have been specifically linked to MAE. In this study, we report an approach that distinguishes MAE genes in human cells with great accuracy: a chromatin signature consisting of chromatin marks associated with active transcription (H3K36me3) and silencing (H3K27me3) simultaneously occurring in the gene body. The MAE signature is present in ?20% of ubiquitously expressed genes and over 30% of tissue-specific genes across cell types. Notably, it is enriched among key developmental genes that have bivalent chromatin structure in pluripotent cells. Our results open a new approach to the study of MAE that is independent of polymorphisms, and suggest that MAE is linked to cell differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01256.001 PMID:24381246

  11. Effects of Myogenin on Expression of Late Muscle Genes through MyoD-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Ability of Myogenin

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chao; Jin, Ya-Qiong; Qi, Jun-Juan; Ji, Zhen-Xing; Li, Shu-Yan; An, Guo-Shun; Jia, Hong-Ti; Ni, Ju-Hua

    2012-01-01

    MyoD and myogenin (Myog) recognize sets of distinct but overlapping target genes and play different roles in skeletal muscle differentiation. MyoD is sufficient for near-full expression of early targets, while Myog can only partially enhance expression of MyoD-initiated late muscle genes. However, the way in which Myog enhances the expression of MyoD-initiated late muscle genes remains unclear. Here, we examine the effects of Myog on chromatin remodeling at late muscle gene promoters and their activation within chromatin environment. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that Myog selectively bound to the regulatory sequences of late muscle genes. Overexpression of Myog was found to overcome sodium butyrate-inhibited chromatin at late muscle genes in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, shifting the transcriptional activation of these genes to an earlier time period. Furthermore, overexpression of Myog led to increased hyperacetylation of core histone H4 in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts but not NIH3T3 fibroblasts, and hyperacetylated H4 was associated directly with the late muscle genes in differentiating C2C12, indicating that Myog can induce chromatin remodeling in the presence of MyoD. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) revealed that Myog was associated with the nuclear protein Brd4 in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts. Together, these results suggest that Myog enhances the expression of MyoD-initiated late muscle genes through MyoD-dependent ability of Myog to induce chromatin remodeling, in which Myog-Brd4 interaction may be involved. PMID:22814845

  12. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  13. The ING1b tumor suppressor facilitates nucleotide excision repair by promoting chromatin accessibility to XPA

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Wei-Hung W.; Wang Yemin; Wong, Ronald P.C.; Campos, Eric I.; Li Gang . E-mail: gangli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2007-05-01

    ING1b is the most studied ING family protein and perhaps the most ubiquitously and abundantly expressed. This protein is involved in the regulation of various biological functions ranging from senescence, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, to DNA repair. ING1b is upregulated by UV irradiation and enhances the removal of bulky nucleic acid photoproducts. In this study, we provide evidence that ING1b mediates nucleotide excision repair by facilitating the access to damaged nucleosomal DNA. We demonstrate that ING1b is not recruited to UV-induced DNA lesions but enhances nucleotide excision repair only in XPC-proficient cells, implying an essential role in early steps of the 'access, repair, restore' model. We also find that ING1b alters histone acetylation dynamics upon exposure to UV radiation and induces chromatin relaxation in microccocal nuclease digestion assay, revealing that ING1b may allow better access to nucleotide excision repair machinery. More importantly, ING1b associates with chromatin in a UV-inducible manner and facilitates DNA access to nucleotide excision repair factor XPA. Furthermore, depletion of the endogenous ING1b results to the sensitization of cells at S-phase to UV irradiation. Taken together, these observations establish a role of ING1b acting as a chromatin accessibility factor for DNA damage recognition proteins upon genotoxic injury.

  14. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions

    PubMed Central

    Schep, Alicia N.; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Denny, Sarah K.; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal “fingerprint” as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  15. Quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced changes in sperm morphology and chromatin distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Aubele, M.; Juetting, U.R.; Rodenacker, K.; Gais, P.; Burger, G.; Hacker-Klom, U. )

    1990-01-01

    Sperm head cytometry provides a useful assay for the detection of radiation-induced damage in mouse germ cells. Exposure of the gonads to radiation is known to lead to an increase of diploid and higher polyploid sperm and of sperm with head shape abnormalities. In the pilot studies reported here quantitative analysis of the total DNA content, the morphology, and the chromatin distribution of mouse sperm was performed. The goal was to evaluate the discriminative power of features derived by high resolution image cytometry in distinguishing sperm of control and irradiated mice. Our results suggest that besides the induction of the above mentioned variations in DNA content and shape of sperm head, changes of the nonhomogeneous chromatin distribution within the sperm may also be used to quantify the radiation effect on sperm cells. Whereas the chromatin distribution features show larger variations for sperm 21 days after exposure (dpr), the shape parameters seem to be more important to discriminate sperm 35 dpr. This may be explained by differentiation processes, which take place in different stages during mouse spermatogenesis.

  16. Upgrading the GSI beamline microscope with a confocal fluorescence lifetime scanner to monitor charged particle induced chromatin decondensation in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Elham; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Durante, Marco; Jakob, Burkhard

    2015-12-01

    We report the upgrade of the GSI beamline microscope coupled to the linear accelerator UNILAC by a confocal FLIM scanner utilizing time correlated single photon counting technique (TCSPC). The system can now be used to address the radiation induced chromatin decondensation in more detail and with higher sensitivity compared to intensity based methods. This decondensation of heterochromatic areas is one of the early DNA damage responses observed after charged particle irradiation and might facilitate the further processing of the induced lesions. We describe here the establishment of different DNA dyes as chromatin compaction probes usable for quantification of the DNA condensation status in living cells utilizing lifetime imaging. In addition, we find an evidence of heterochromatic chromatin decondensation in ion irradiated murine chromocenters detected after subsequent fixation using FLIM measurements.

  17. Drugging Chromatin in Cancer: Recent Advances and Novel Approaches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng F; Chen, Chun-Wei; Armstrong, Scott A

    2015-11-19

    Chromatin regulatory mechanisms play a major role in the control of gene expression programs during normal development and are disrupted in specific disease states, particularly in cancer. Important mediators of chromatin regulatory processes can broadly be classified into writers, erasers, and readers of covalent chromatin modifications that modulate eukaryotic gene transcription and maintain the integrity of the genome. The reversibility and disease-specific nature of these chromatin states make these regulators attractive therapeutic targets. As such, there is an ever-increasing number of candidate therapies aimed at targeting cancer-associated chromatin states that are in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. In this review, we discuss recent advances that have been made in the rational therapeutic targeting of chromatin regulatory mechanisms and highlight certain cancers where there is a specific rationale to assess these therapeutic approaches. PMID:26590715

  18. Aging by epigenetics-A consequence of chromatin damage?

    SciTech Connect

    Sedivy, John M. Banumathy, Gowrishankar; Adams, Peter D.

    2008-06-10

    Chromatin structure is not fixed. Instead, chromatin is dynamic and is subject to extensive developmental and age-associated remodeling. In some cases, this remodeling appears to counter the aging and age-associated diseases, such as cancer, and extend organismal lifespan. However, stochastic non-deterministic changes in chromatin structure might, over time, also contribute to the break down of nuclear, cell and tissue function, and consequently aging and age-associated diseases.

  19. Single-cell chromatin accessibility reveals principles of regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Jason D; Wu, Beijing; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Ruff, Dave; Gonzales, Michael L; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-07-23

    Cell-to-cell variation is a universal feature of life that affects a wide range of biological phenomena, from developmental plasticity to tumour heterogeneity. Although recent advances have improved our ability to document cellular phenotypic variation, the fundamental mechanisms that generate variability from identical DNA sequences remain elusive. Here we reveal the landscape and principles of mammalian DNA regulatory variation by developing a robust method for mapping the accessible genome of individual cells by assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) integrated into a programmable microfluidics platform. Single-cell ATAC-seq (scATAC-seq) maps from hundreds of single cells in aggregate closely resemble accessibility profiles from tens of millions of cells and provide insights into cell-to-cell variation. Accessibility variance is systematically associated with specific trans-factors and cis-elements, and we discover combinations of trans-factors associated with either induction or suppression of cell-to-cell variability. We further identify sets of trans-factors associated with cell-type-specific accessibility variance across eight cell types. Targeted perturbations of cell cycle or transcription factor signalling evoke stimulus-specific changes in this observed variability. The pattern of accessibility variation in cis across the genome recapitulates chromosome compartments de novo, linking single-cell accessibility variation to three-dimensional genome organization. Single-cell analysis of DNA accessibility provides new insight into cellular variation of the 'regulome'. PMID:26083756

  20. c-Myb Binding Sites in Haematopoietic Chromatin Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsen, Mads; Klepper, Kjetil; Gundersen, Sveinung; Cuervo, Ignacio; Drabløs, Finn; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke; Eskeland, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Strict control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role during lineage commitment. The transcription factor c-Myb has an essential role in adult haematopoiesis and functions as an oncogene when rearranged in human cancers. Here we have exploited digital genomic footprinting analysis to obtain a global picture of c-Myb occupancy in the genome of six different haematopoietic cell-types. We have biologically validated several c-Myb footprints using c-Myb knockdown data, reporter assays and DamID analysis. We show that our predicted conserved c-Myb footprints are highly dependent on the haematopoietic cell type, but that there is a group of gene targets common to all cell-types analysed. Furthermore, we find that c-Myb footprints co-localise with active histone mark H3K4me3 and are significantly enriched at exons. We analysed co-localisation of c-Myb footprints with 104 chromatin regulatory factors in K562 cells, and identified nine proteins that are enriched together with c-Myb footprints on genes positively regulated by c-Myb and one protein enriched on negatively regulated genes. Our data suggest that c-Myb is a transcription factor with multifaceted target regulation depending on cell type. PMID:26208222

  1. Long non-coding RNA and chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2015-10-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are pivotal regulators of genome structure and gene expression. LncRNAs can directly interact with chromatin-modifying enzymes and nucleosome-remodeling factors to control chromatin structure and accessibility of genetic information. Moreover, lncRNA expression can be controlled by chromatin-remodeling factors, suggesting a feedback circuit of regulation. Here, we discuss the recent advances of lncRNA studies, focusing on the function and mechanism of lncRNA-chromatin interactions. PMID:26177256

  2. Epigenetics: Beyond Chromatin Modifications and Complex Genetic Regulation1

    PubMed Central

    Eichten, Steven R.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Springer, Nathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin modifications and epigenetics may play important roles in many plant processes, including developmental regulation, responses to environmental stimuli, and local adaptation. Chromatin modifications describe biochemical changes to chromatin state, such as alterations in the specific type or placement of histones, modifications of DNA or histones, or changes in the specific proteins or RNAs that associate with a genomic region. The term epigenetic is often used to describe a variety of unexpected patterns of gene regulation or inheritance. Here, we specifically define epigenetics to include the key aspects of heritability (stable transmission of gene expression states through mitotic or meiotic cell divisions) and independence from DNA sequence changes. We argue against generically equating chromatin and epigenetics; although many examples of epigenetics involve chromatin changes, those chromatin changes are not always heritable or may be influenced by genetic changes. Careful use of the terms chromatin modifications and epigenetics can help separate the biochemical mechanisms of regulation from the inheritance patterns of altered chromatin states. Here, we also highlight examples in which chromatin modifications and epigenetics affect important plant processes. PMID:24872382

  3. Snapshots: Chromatin control of viral infection David M. Knipe a

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Adenovirus Papillomavirus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Influenza virus a b s t r a c t Like their cellular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Association of papillomavirus genomes with host chromatin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  4. Protein-dependent conformational behavior of DNA in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Riehm, M R; Harrington, R E

    1987-05-19

    Information from circular dichroism (CD) and DNA thermal denaturation has been used in concert to study the conformational behavior of DNA in the extended 11-nm fiber of chromatin isolated from HeLa nuclei. The histone-dependent conformational states of the system were investigated by selectively removing the hydrophilic histone domains with trypsin. These were compared to acetylated chromatin from the same source. The integrated intensity of the positive CD band for DNA above 260 nm is found to increase with the content of relatively unstressed B-form DNA. This same increase is observed along the series of whole, H1-stripped, and trypsinized chromatin samples as protein is removed. Hence, the ratio of percent hyperchromicity to integrated CD band intensity of the respective melting transitions provides useful information on the conformational state of DNA in the three principal regions of the chromatin fiber: the central loop and flanking nucleosomal regions and the linker. Results from this study suggest that central loop DNA in both hyperacetylated and control chromatin relaxes as protein is removed. However, hyperacetylated chromatin shows significantly less dependence than control chromatin upon core histone hydrophilic domains in the flanking and linker regions. Thus, histone hyperacetylation evidently relaxes DNA in chromatin with no major overall conformational changes. A possible role of histone hyperacetylation may therefore be to reduce cooperativity in the unfolding transition in chromatin and thus provide for greater localized control of unfolding during transcription. PMID:3606996

  5. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    On a multi-mega base pair scale of the DNA, the arrangement of chromatin is non-random. In M10 epithelial cells, both telomere regions tend to be located towards the exterior of the chromosome domain, whereas the rest p-arm of the chromatin region towards the interior. In contrast, most of the q-arm of the chromatin is found in the peripheral of the domain. In lymphocytes, the p-arm chromatin regions towards the interior in close proximity with each other, whereas two q-arm regions are nearness in space. It indicates that G0 lymphocytes may lack secondary 3D chromatin folding. There chromatin folding patterns are consistent with our previous finding of non-random distribution of intra-chromosomal exchanges. In simulated microgravity conditions, the chromosome conformation may be altered and new regions in close proximity, especially to region 2 are suggested.

  6. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Steglich, Babett; Strålfors, Annelie; Khorosjutina, Olga; Persson, Jenna; Smialowska, Agata; Javerzat, Jean-Paul; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3? cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR) elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope. PMID:25798942

  7. Postsynthetic acetylation of histones during the cell cycle: a general function for the displacement of histones during chromatin rearrangements.

    PubMed Central

    Loidl, P; Gröbner, P

    1987-01-01

    Postsynthetic acetylation of core histones exhibits a peak during S-phase of the Physarum cell cycle. The maximum 3H-acetate incorporation precedes the maximum of histone synthesis. Acetate is incorporated into all core histones during S-phase, but only into H2A and H2B during G2-period. Resolution of acetylated H4-subspecies reveals acetate incorporation into preexisting H4, but not into newly synthesized molecules during mitosis and early S-phase. In a protamine competition assay histones from S-phase chromatin are released at lower protamine concentrations as compared to the lower acetylated G2-chromatin. We demonstrate a preferential release of highly acetylated H4-subspecies at low protamine concentrations. Our results fit into a general model of the relationship between histone acetylation and chromatin assembly. According to this model acetylation of core histones would serve as a signal for displacement of histones from nucleosomes by modulating histone-protein or histone-DNA interactions. We propose that this mechanism operates during DNA-replication and transcription, as well as during other chromatin rearrangements. Images PMID:3118335

  8. Caffeine-Induced Premature Chromosome Condensation Results in the Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death in Root Meristems of Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Rybaczek, Dorota; Musia?ek, Marcelina Weronika; Balcerczyk, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the activation of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) was a secondary result of caffeine (CF) induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in hydroxyurea-synchronized Vicia faba root meristem cells. Initiation of the apoptotic-like cell degradation pathway seemed to be the result of DNA damage generated by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) [double-stranded breaks (DSBs) mostly] and co-treatment with HU/CF [single-stranded breaks (SSBs) mainly]. A single chromosome comet assay was successfully used to study different types of DNA damage (neutral variant–DSBs versus alkaline–DSBs or SSBs). The immunocytochemical detection of H2AXS139Ph and PARP-2 were used as markers for DSBs and SSBs, respectively. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB) were applied for quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of dead, dying and living cells. Apoptotic-type DNA fragmentation and positive TUNEL reaction finally proved that CF triggers AL-PCD in stressed V. faba root meristem cells. In addition, the results obtained under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further revealed apoptotic-like features at the ultrastructural level of PCC-type cells: (i) extensive vacuolization; (ii) abnormal chromatin condensation, its marginalization and concomitant degradation; (iii) formation of autophagy-like vesicles (iv) protoplast shrinkage (v) fragmentation of cell nuclei and (vi) extensive degeneration of the cells. The results obtained have been discussed with respect to the vacuolar/autolytic type of plant-specific AL-PCD. PMID:26545248

  9. Combinatorial probabilistic chromatin interactions produce transcriptional heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Ty C.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Sung, Myong-Hee; Johnson, Thomas A.; John, Sam; Hager, Gordon L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Gene regulation often appears deterministic in the average cell population, but transcription is a probabilistic process at the single-cell level. Although many mechanisms are invoked to account for this behavior, it is difficult to determine how cell-to-cell variation in the interactions of transcription factors with target chromatin impact transcriptional output. Here, we use cells that contain a 200-copy tandem array of promoter or reporter gene units to simultaneously visualize transient interaction, equilibrium or steady-state binding of fluorescent-protein-labeled glucocorticoid receptor with its DNA response elements, the recruitment of diverse coregulators, and transcriptional output at the single-cell level. These regulatory proteins associate with target chromatin via a probabilistic mechanism that produces cell-to-cell variability in binding. The multiple steps of this process are partially independent and differ between individual regulators. The association level of each regulator influences the transcriptional output in individual cells, but this does not account for all transcriptional heterogeneity. Additionally, specific combinatorial interactions of the glucocorticoid receptor and coregulators with response elements regulate transcription at the single-cell level. Like many endogenous genes, the average array transcriptional activity evolves over time. This apparently deterministic average temporal promoter progression involves changes in the probability that specific combinatorial glucocorticoid receptor and coregulator interactions will occur on the response elements in single cells. These data support the emerging `return-to-template' transcription model, which mechanistically unifies the observed extremely transient interactions between the transcription factor and response elements, cell-to-cell variability in steady-state association of factors with chromatin, and the resulting heterogeneous gene expression between individual cells. PMID:19126674

  10. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Breakthrough Research Unit, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR ; Gilbert, Nick; Breakthrough Research Unit, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XR

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by linker histones. We suggest that following DSB formation, although there is localised chromatin unfolding to facilitate repair, the bulk genome becomes rapidly compacted protecting cells from further damage.

  11. Evaluation of genetic damage in open-cast coal mine workers using the buccal micronucleus cytome assay.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Paula; da Silva, Juliana; da Silva, Fernanda R; Sarmento, Merielen; Porto, Carem; Debastiani, Rafaela; Dos Santos, Carla E I; Dias, Johnny F; Kvitko, Kátia

    2013-01-01

    Coal is the largest fossil fuel source used for the generation of energy. However, coal extraction and its use constitute important pollution factors; thus, risk characterization and estimation are extremely important for the safety of coal workers and the environment. Candiota is located to the southeast of the state of Rio Grande do Sul and has the largest coal reserves in Brazil, and the largest thermal power complex in the state. In the open-cast mines, the coal miners are constantly exposed to coal dust. The human buccal micronucleus cytome (BMCyt) assay has been used widely to investigate biomarkers for DNA damage, cell death, and basal cell frequency in buccal cells. The aim of this study was to assess whether prolonged exposure to coal dust could lead to an increase in genomic instability, cell death, and frequency of basal cells using the BMCyt assay. In the analysis of epithelial cells, the exposed group (n = 41) presented with a significantly higher frequency of basal cells, micronuclei in basal and differentiated cells, and binucleated cells compared to the non-exposed group (n = 29). The exposed group showed a significantly lower frequency of condensed chromatin cells than the non-exposed group. However, we found no correlation between DNA damage and metal concentration in the blood of mine workers. DNA damage observed in the mine workers may be a consequence of oxidative damage resulting from exposure to coal residue mixtures. In addition, our findings confirm that the BMCyt assay can be used to identify occupational risk. PMID:23055270

  12. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  13. Histone demethylases in chromatin biology and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Emilia; Turberfield, Anne H; Klose, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    Histone methylation plays fundamental roles in regulating chromatin-based processes. With the discovery of histone demethylases over a decade ago, it is now clear that histone methylation is dynamically regulated to shape the epigenome and regulate important nuclear processes including transcription, cell cycle control and DNA repair. In addition, recent observations suggest that these enzymes could also have functions beyond their originally proposed role as histone demethylases. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the role of histone demethylases in a wide variety of normal cellular processes. PMID:26564907

  14. Facilitated diffusion of proteins on chromatin

    E-print Network

    O. Benichou; C. Chevalier; B. Meyer; R. Voituriez

    2011-01-26

    We present a theoretical model of facilitated diffusion of proteins in the cell nucleus. This model, which takes into account the successive binding/unbinding events of proteins to DNA, relies on a fractal description of the chromatin which has been recently evidenced experimentally. Facilitated diffusion is shown quantitatively to be favorable for a fast localization of a target locus by a transcription factor, and even to enable the minimization of the search time by tuning the affinity of the transcription factor with DNA. This study shows the robustness of the facilitated diffusion mechanism, invoked so far only for linear conformations of DNA.

  15. Chromatin, DNA structure and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Giono, Luciana E; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-11-14

    Coupling of transcription and alternative splicing via regulation of the transcriptional elongation rate is a well-studied phenomenon. Template features that act as roadblocks for the progression of RNA polymerase II comprise histone modifications and variants, DNA-interacting proteins and chromatin compaction. These may affect alternative splicing decisions by inducing pauses or decreasing elongation rate that change the time-window for splicing regulatory sequences to be recognized. Herein we discuss the evidence supporting the influence of template structural modifications on transcription and splicing, and provide insights about possible roles of non-B DNA conformations on the regulation of alternative splicing. PMID:26296319

  16. Histone demethylases in chromatin biology and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Emilia; Turberfield, Anne H; Klose, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Histone methylation plays fundamental roles in regulating chromatin-based processes. With the discovery of histone demethylases over a decade ago, it is now clear that histone methylation is dynamically regulated to shape the epigenome and regulate important nuclear processes including transcription, cell cycle control and DNA repair. In addition, recent observations suggest that these enzymes could also have functions beyond their originally proposed role as histone demethylases. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the role of histone demethylases in a wide variety of normal cellular processes. PMID:26564907

  17. Stem cell factors in plants: chromatin connections.

    PubMed

    Kornet, N; Scheres, B

    2008-01-01

    The progression of pluripotent stem cells to differentiated cell lineages requires major shifts in cell differentiation programs. In both mammals and higher plants, this process appears to be controlled by a dedicated set of transcription factors, many of which are kingdom specific. These divergent transcription factors appear to operate, however, together with a shared suite of factors that affect the chromatin state. It is of major importance to investigate whether such shared global control mechanisms indicate a common mechanistic basis for preservation of the stem cell state, initiation of differentiation programs, and coordination of cell state transitions. PMID:19150963

  18. Chromatin insulators: regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Bushey, Ashley M.; Dorman, Elizabeth R.; Corces, Victor G.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancer-blocking insulators are DNA elements that disrupt the communication between a regulatory sequence, such as an enhancer or a silencer, and a promoter. Insulators participate in both transcriptional regulation and global nuclear organization, two features of chromatin that are thought to be maintained from one generation to the next through epigenetic mechanisms. Furthermore, there are many regulatory mechanisms in place that enhance or hinder insulator activity. These modes of regulation could be used to establish cell-type specific insulator activity that is epigenetically inherited along a cell and/or organismal lineage. This review will discuss the evidence for epigenetic inheritance and regulation of insulator function. PMID:18851828

  19. Chromatin dynamics: interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Swygert, Sarah G; Peterson, Craig L

    2014-08-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. PMID:24583555

  20. RESEARCH ARTICLE A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein

    E-print Network

    Hirt, Heribert

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regula- tors have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/ SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show

  1. Whole-Genome Chromatin IP Sequencing (ChIP-Seq)

    E-print Network

    Kopp, Artyom

    ILLUMINA® SEQUENCING Whole-Genome Chromatin IP Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) Illumina ChIP-Seq combines-associated proteins. Illumina ChIP-Seq technology precisely and cost-effectively maps global binding sites. The powerful Illumina Whole-Genome Chromatin IP Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) application allows researchers to easily

  2. Prediction of Transposable Element Derived Enhancers Using Chromatin Modification Profiles

    E-print Network

    Jordan, King

    Prediction of Transposable Element Derived Enhancers Using Chromatin Modification Profiles Ahsan, Georgia, United States of America Abstract Experimentally characterized enhancer regions have previously modelled these enhancer chromatin profiles in the human genome and used them to guide the search for novel

  3. Sperm chromatin proteomics identifies evolutionarily conserved fertility factors

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Barbara

    haploid spermatids, oocytes complete meiosis after fertilization, creating one haploid cell and two polarSperm chromatin proteomics identifies evolutionarily conserved fertility factors Diana S. Chu1 of sperm chromatin is a clinical indicator of male fertility and in vitro fertilization potential1

  4. Chromatin structure of hormono-dependent promoters.

    PubMed

    Adom, J; Carr, K D; Gouilleux, F; Marsaud, V; Richard-Foy, H

    1991-01-01

    Transient transfections of mutated MMTV LTRs, driving the luciferase reporter gene, have shown the presence of at least one cis-acting element cooperating with the GREs. Studies of the chromatin structure of two glucocorticoid-regulated promoters, the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR), a retroviral promoter, and the rat tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) promoter, demonstrate that both DNAs are organized into precisely positioned nucleosomes. Hormonal activation of transcription is accompanied by structural changes of one (MMTV LTR) or two (TAT promoter) nucleosomes associated with the hormone-response elements (HREs). These changes can be visualized by the appearance of DNasel hypersensitive sites. Association of the hormone-receptor complex with the nucleus is necessary to induce the DNasel hypersensitive site and to maintain transcription, but is not necessary to maintain DNasel hypersensitivity. Anti-hormones, even when able to promote a strong binding of the receptor to the nucleus, are unable to induce the chromatin structural change. Using cell lines containing approx. 200 copies of a MMTV LTR/Hv-ras chimeric construct, we have demonstrated a strong, hormono-independent nuclear matrix interaction of sequences located just upstream and downstream of the ras coding sequences. PMID:1683563

  5. Histone modification and chromatin remodeling during NER.

    PubMed

    Waters, Raymond; van Eijk, Patrick; Reed, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Here we review our developments of and results with high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Technologies were developed to examine NER at nucleotide resolution in yeast sequences of choice and to determine how these related to local changes in chromatin. We focused on how GG-NER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we identified the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. Factors influencing this Gcn5-mediated event are considered which include Rad16, a GG-NER specific SWI/SNF factor and the yeast histone variant of H2AZ (Htz1). We describe results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then consider the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire yeast genome. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage before it is returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes. PMID:26422133

  6. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: consequences of chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Miller, Daniel G.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years we have seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease mechanism and to discuss the observations supporting the possibility of a developmental defect in this disorder. Recent findings In the majority of cases FSHD is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array (FSHD1). This results in local chromatin relaxation and stable expression of the DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle, but only when a polymorphic DUX4 polyadenylation signal is present. In some cases (FSHD2), D4Z4 chromatin relaxation and stable DUX4 expression occurs in the absence of D4Z4 array contraction. DUX4 is a germline transcription factor and its expression in skeletal muscle leads to activation of early stem cell and germline programs and transcriptional activation of retroelements. Summary Recent studies have provided a plausible disease mechanism for FSHD where FSHD results from inappropriate expression of the germline transcription factor DUX4. The genes regulated by DUX4 suggest several mechanisms of muscle damage, and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:22892954

  7. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Donà, Mattia; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-08-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  8. Chromatin modifications: The driving force of senescence and aging?

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Teresa; David, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    An emerging field of investigation in the search for treatment of human disease is the modulation of chromatin modifications. Chromatin modifications impart virtually all processes occurring in the mammalian nucleus, from regulation of transcription to genomic stability and nuclear high order organization. It has been well recognized that, as the mammalian cell ages, its chromatin structure evolves, both at a global level and at specific loci. While these observations are mostly correlative, recent technical developments allowing loss-of-function experiments and genome-wide approaches have permitted the identification of a causal relationship between specific changes in chromatin structure and the aging phenotype. Here we review the evidence pointing to the modulation of chromatin structure as a potential driving force of cellular aging in mammals. PMID:20157508

  9. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Shima, Hiroki; Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Ishida, Takafumi; Nagata, Yasushi; Tashiro, Satoshi

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA damage response at a very early stage, via the damaged chromatin reorganization required for RAD51 focus formation.

  10. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--May 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-06-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  11. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--May 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-11-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  12. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Allan; Snoke, D. W.; Stringari, S.

    1996-08-01

    1. Introduction: Unifying themes of Bose-Einstein condensation; Part I. Review Papers: 2. Some comments on Bose-Einstein condensation; 3. Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity; 4. Bose-Einstein condensation in liquid helium; 5. Sum rules and Bose-Einstein condensation; 6. Dilute degenerate gases; 7. Prospects for Bose-Einstein condensation in magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen; 8. Spin-polarized hydrogen: Prospects for Bose-Einstein condensation and two-dimensional superfluidity; 9. Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms; 10. Kinetics of Bose-Einstein condensation in an interacting Bose gas; 11. Condensate formation in a Bose gas; 12. Bose-Einstein condensation of excitonic particles in semiconductors; 13. Macroscopic coherent states of excitons in semiconductors; 14. Bose-Einstein condensation in a nearly ideal gas: excitons in Cu2O; 15. Crossover from BCS theory to Bose-Einstein condensation; 16. Bose-Einstein condensation of bipolarons in high-Tc superconductors; 17. Kaon condensation in dense matter; 18. The bosonization method in nuclear physics; 19. Broken gauge symmetry in a Bose condensate; Part II. Brief Reports: 20. Bose-Einstein condensation in ultra-cold cesium: collisional constraints; 21. Bose-Einstein condensation and relaxation explosion in magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen; 22. Quest for Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in two-dimensional atomic hydrogen; 23. Bose-Einstein condensation of biexcitons in CuCl; 24. The influence of polariton effects on the Bose-Einstein condensation of biexcitons; 25. Light-induced Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons and biexcitons; 26. Decay of a non-equilibrium polariton condensate and the distribution functions of interacting polaritons in semiconductors; 27. Possibilities for Bose-Einstein condensation in positronium; 28. Excitonic superfluidity in Cu2O; 29. On the Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons - finite-lifetime composite bosons; 30. Charged bosons in quantum heterostructures; 31. The dynamic structure function of Bose liquids in the deep inelastic regime; 32. Evidence for bipolaronic Bose-liquid and Bose-Einstein condensation in high-Tc oxides; 33. Bose-Einstein condensation and spin waves; 34. Universal behaviour within the Nozières and Schmitt-Rink theory; 35. Bound states and superfluidity in strongly coupled fermion systems; 36. Onset of superfluidity in nuclear matter.

  13. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Singh, Purnima; Tsai, Shirley Y; Oates, Nathan; Spalla, Alexander; Spalla, Claudio; Brown, Lucy; Rivas, Guillermo; Larson, Garrett; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-11-01

    Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR) depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia. PMID:21124827

  14. Effects of cryopreservation on head morphometry and its relation with chromatin status in brown bear (Ursus arctos) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M; García-Macías, V; Martínez-Pastor, F; Martínez, F; Borragán, S; Mata, M; Garde, J; Anel, L; De Paz, P

    2008-12-01

    The Cantabrian brown bear (Ursus arctos) is a highly endangered species in Spain and basic studies are necessary in order to bank its germplasm. Sperm heads are mainly made up of chromatin, thus their shape depends partly on chromatin structure. Thawed semen from 10 bears was used to analyze chromatin status by sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and head morphometry by the computer-assisted sperm morphology assessment (CASMA) system. Morphometry was analyzed before and after freezing-thawing in order to evaluate the effects of cryopreservation on sperm heads. Each spermatozoon was measured for four primary parameters (length, L; width, W; area, A; perimeter, P) and derived parameters (ellipticity: L/W, circularity: 4piA/ P2, elongation: (L-W)/(L+W), regularity: piLW/ 4A). All the derived parameters significantly differed between bears. Likewise, cryopreservation affected head morphometry by reducing its size. Clustering based on morphometric parameters separated three subpopulations, one of them being significantly more influenced by the cryopreservation process. We obtained high correlations between head morphometry and SCSA parameters: standard deviation of DNA fragmentation index (SD-DFI) was correlated with perimeter and area (r=0.75 and r=0.62, respectively) and DFIm and DFIt (moderate and total DNA fragmentation index) were correlated with perimeter (r=0.65 and r=0.67, respectively). Nevertheless, classification of males according to SCSA or head morphometry did not completely agree so the two assays might explain male variability differently. We conclude that cryopreservation affected morphometry at least in a subset of spermatozoa. These results might improve future application of sperm banking techniques in this species. PMID:18692226

  15. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Csaba; M-Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs) are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization. PMID:24084787

  16. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Timsy; Jha, Hem C.; Verma, Subhash C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle. PMID:25594667

  17. Fractal Characterization of Chromatin Decompaction in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Blaha, Catherine S; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin organization has a fundamental impact on the whole spectrum of genomic functions. Quantitative characterization of the chromatin structure, particularly at submicron length scales where chromatin fractal globules are formed, is critical to understanding this structure-function relationship. Such analysis is currently challenging due to the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. We herein present an optical approach termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to characterize the mass density fractality of chromatin, and we apply the technique to observe chromatin decompaction in live cells. The technique makes it possible for the first time, to our knowledge, to sense intracellular morphology with length-scale sensitivity from ?30 to 450 nm, thus primarily probing the higher-order chromatin structure, without resolving the actual structures. We used chromatin decompaction due to inhibition of histone deacytelases and measured the subsequent changes in the fractal dimension of the intracellular structure. The results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26636933

  18. On the mechanochemical machinery underlying chromatin remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.

    This dissertation discuss two recent efforts, via a unique combination of structural bioinformatics and density functional theory, to unravel some of the details concerning how molecular machinery within the eukaryotic cell nucleus controls chromatin architecture. The first, a study of the 5-methylation of cytosine in 5'-CG-3' : 5'-CG-3' base-pair steps, reveals that the methyl groups roughen the local elastic energy landscape of the DNA. This enhances the probability of the canonical B-DNA structure transitioning into the undertwisted A-like and overtwisted C-like forms seen in nucleosomes, or looped segments of DNA bound to histones. The second part focuses on the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. The arginine residues are ob- served to apply a tunable mechanical load to the backbone, enabling precision-controlled activation of DNA deformations.

  19. Oligodendroglial Development: New Roles for Chromatin Accessibility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nanxin; Niu, Jianqin; Feng, Yue; Xiao, Lan

    2015-12-01

    In the central nervous system, the generation of mature oligodendrocytes from their progenitors is a critical step in myelination, which is essential for normal nervous system function. Thus, understanding the regulatory mechanism underlying oligodendroglial development is of great importance, especially for the development of new therapeutic strategies that promote remyelination in demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. Previous studies have focused on genetic patterns and revealed a network of cell signaling pathways and related transcription factors involved in oligodendroglial lineage development. Recently, epigenetic regulation, which refers to regulation of gene expression by adjusting the environment of the genes has been shown to play a profound role during oligodendroglial development. In this review, we summarize the recent data demonstrating the effects of chromatin modification and remodeling in regulating oligodendroglial development and discuss the use of high-throughput analysis and bio-informatics in future studies. PMID:25564030

  20. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ~ 150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and that care must be taken in the choice of models used to interpret the experimental properties of long chromatin fibers. PMID:25564155

  1. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and that care must be taken in the choice of models used to interpret the experimental properties of long chromatin fibers.

  2. Formation of higher-order secondary and tertiary chromatin structures by genomic mouse mammary tumor virus promoters

    PubMed Central

    Georgel, Philippe T.; Fletcher, Terace M.; Hager, Gordon L.; Hansen, Jeffrey C.

    2003-01-01

    Agarose multigel electrophoresis has been used to characterize the structural features of isolated genomic mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoters. The mouse 3134cells used for these studies contain ?200 stably integrated tandem repeats of a 2.4-kb MMTV promoter fragment. Inactive, basally active, and hormonally activated genomic promoters were liberated by restriction digestion of isolated nuclei, recovered in low-salt nuclear extracts, and electrophoresed in multigels consisting of nine individual agarose running gels. Specific bands were detected and characterized by Southern and Western blotting. We find that transcriptionally inactive promoters contain TBP and high levels of histone H1, and are present to varying extents in both untreated and dexamethasone (DEX)-treated 3134cells. In contrast, the basally active promoter, present in untreated cells, is bound to RNA Pol II, TBP, and Oct1, contains acetylated H3 tail domains, and is depleted of histone H1. The DEX-activated promoter possessed similar composition as the basal promoter, but also contains stably bound Brg1. Strikingly, all forms of the MMTV promoter condense into higher-order secondary and/or tertiary chromatin structures in vitro in the presence of Mg2+. Thus, genomic MMTV promoter chromatin retains the ability to form classical higher-order structures under physiological salt conditions, even after dissociation of H1 and binding of several transcription factors and multiprotein complexes. These results suggest that transcriptionally active eukaryotic promoters may function in a locally folded chromatin environment in vivo. PMID:12842912

  3. Multivalent engagement of chromatin modifications by linked binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Li, Haitao; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David

    2015-01-01

    Various chemical modifications on histones and regions of associated DNA play crucial roles in genome management by binding specific factors that, in turn, serve to alter the structural properties of chromatin. These so-called effector proteins have typically been studied with the biochemist's paring knife — the capacity to recognize specific chromatin modifications has been mapped to an increasing number of domains that frequently appear in the nuclear subset of the proteome, often present in large, multisubunit complexes that bristle with modification-dependent binding potential. We propose that multivalent interactions on a single histone tail and beyond may have a significant, if not dominant, role in chromatin transactions. PMID:18037899

  4. The Necessity of Chromatin: A View in Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYEpigenomics has grown exponentially, providing a better understanding of the mechanistic aspects of new and old phenomena originally described through genetics, as well as providing unexpected insights into the way chromatin modulates the genomic information. In this overview, some of the advances are selected for discussion and comment under six topics: (1) histone modifications, (2) weak interactions, (3) interplay with external inputs, (4) the role of RNA molecules, (5) chromatin folding and architecture, and, finally, (6) a view of the essential role of chromatin transactions in regulating the access to genomic DNA. PMID:26729649

  5. Nanoscale squeezing in elastomeric nanochannels for single chromatin linearization

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Toshiki; Kim, Byoung Choul; Huang, Jiexi; Douville, Nicholas Joseph; Thouless, M.D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel nanofluidic phenomenon where untethered DNA and chromatin are linearized by rapidly narrowing an elastomeric nanochannel filled with solutions of the biopolymers. This nanoscale squeezing procedure generates hydrodynamic flows while also confining the biopolymers into smaller and smaller volumes. The unique features of this technique enable full linearization then trapping of biopolymers such as DNA. The versatility of the method is also demonstrated by analysis of chromatin stretchability and mapping of histone states using single strands of chromatin. PMID:23186544

  6. Stress-induced structural changes in plant chromatin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Aline V; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-10-01

    Stress defense in plants is elaborated at the level of protection and adaptation. Dynamic changes in sophisticated chromatin substructures and concomitant transcriptional changes play an important role in response to stress, as illustrated by the transient rearrangement of compact heterochromatin structures or the modulation of chromatin composition and modification upon stress exposure. To connect cytological, developmental, and molecular data around stress and chromatin is currently an interesting, multifaceted, and sometimes controversial field of research. This review highlights some of the most recent findings on nuclear reorganization, histone variants, histone chaperones, DNA- and histone modifications, and somatic and meiotic heritability in connection with stress. PMID:26042538

  7. Targeting a SWI/SNF-related chromatin remodeling complex to the ?-globin promoter in erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Murphy, Michael R.; Lee, Jong-Soo; Chung, Jay H.

    1999-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complexes such as the SWI/SNF complex make DNA accessible to transcription factors by disrupting nucleosomes. However, it is not known how such complexes are targeted to the promoter. For example, a SWI/SNF1-like chromatin remodeling complex erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) coactivator-remodeling complex 1 (E-RC1) disrupts the nucleosomes over the human ?-globin promoter in an EKLF-dependent manner. However, it is not known whether E-RC1 is targeted specifically to the ?-globin promoter or whether E-RC1 is randomly targeted, but its activity is evident only at the ?-globin promoter. Because E-RC1 cannot remodel chromatin over the ?-globin promoter without EKLF in vitro, it has been proposed that SWI/SNF1-like complexes such as E-RC1 are targeted specifically to the promoter by selectively interacting with promoter-associated transcription factors such as EKLF. In this report, we test this hypothesis in the cellular context by using the ProteIN POsition Identification with Nuclease Tail (PIN*POINT) assay. We find that the Brahma-related gene (BRG) 1 and BRG1-associated factor (BAF) 170 subunits of E-RC1 are both recruited near the transcription initiation site of the ?-globin promoter. On transiently transfected templates, both the locus control region and the EKLF-binding site are important for their recruitment to the ?-globin promoter in mouse erythroleukemia cells. When the ?-globin promoter was linked to the cytomegalovirus enhancer, the E-RC1 complex was not recruited, suggesting that recruitment of the E-RC1 complex is not a general property of enhancers. PMID:10535918

  8. Sequence analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation data for factors

    E-print Network

    MacIsaac, Kenzie Daniel

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments allow the location of transcription factors to be determined across the genome. Subsequent analysis of the sequences of the identified regions allows binding to be localized ...

  9. The Regulation of Chromatin Dynamics by Histone Chaperones and Variants

    E-print Network

    Zunder, Rachel Miriam

    2011-01-01

    L. (1996) Remodeling the chromatin structure of a nucleosomealtering nucleosome structure (21). Remodeling complexes arestructure (39). These loosely assembled nucleosomes are thought to reduce the energetic costs of ATP-dependent remodeling,

  10. Control of Chromatin Structure by Long Noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2015-10-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a pivotal factor regulating various aspects of genome activity. Genome regulation via DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications is a well-documented function of lncRNA in plants, fungi, and animals. Here, we summarize evidence showing that lncRNA also controls chromatin structure, including nucleosome positioning and chromosome looping. We focus on data from plant experimental systems, discussed in the context of other eukaryotes. We explain the mechanisms of lncRNA-controlled chromatin remodeling and the implications of the functional interplay between noncoding transcription and several different chromatin remodelers. We propose that the unique properties of RNA make it suitable for controlling chromatin modifications and structure. PMID:26410408

  11. Nuclear morphometry and chromatin textural characteristics of basal cell carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Mendaçolli, Paola Jung; Brianezi, Gabrielli; Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Histological subtypes of basal cell carcinoma have biological, evolutionary and distinct prognostic behavior. The analysis of characteristics of the nucleus can provide data on their cellular physiology and behavior. The authors of this study evaluated nuclear morphological parameters and textural patterns of chromatin from different subtypes of basal cell carcinoma: nodular (n=37), superficial (n=28) and sclerodermiform (n=28). The parameters were compared between neoplasms' subtypes and with unaffected adjacent basal epithelium. Nuclear area and diameter of sclerodermiform neoplasms were superior to the other subtypes. Chromatin's color intensity and fractal dimension were less intense in superficial subtypes. Nuclear roundness and chromatin's entropy presented lower values in tumors than in normal epithelium. There was significant correlation between morphological and textural variables of normal skin and tumors. Morphometric elements and textural chromatin's homogeneity of basal cell carcinomas may be related to evolutionary, biological and behavior particularities related to each histotype.

  12. Chromatin dynamics at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PHO5 promoter 

    E-print Network

    Jessen, Walter Joseph

    2006-04-12

    In eukaryotes, the organization of DNA into chromatin is a primary determinant of gene expression. Positioned nucleosomes in promoter regions are frequently found to regulate gene expression by obstructing the accessibility of cis...

  13. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA. PMID:25486562

  14. Integrative annotation of chromatin elements from ENCODE data

    E-print Network

    Ernst, Jason

    The ENCODE Project has generated a wealth of experimental information mapping diverse chromatin properties in several human cell lines. Although each such data track is independently informative toward the annotation of ...

  15. Target DNA chromatinization modulates nicking by L1 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Cost, Gregory J.; Golding, Amit; Schlissel, Mark S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2001-01-01

    L1 elements are human transposons which replicate via an RNA intermediate. At least 15% of the human genome is composed of L1 sequence. An important initial step in the transposition reaction is nicking of the genomic DNA by L1 endonuclease (L1 EN). In vivo much of the genome exists in the form of chromatin or is undergoing biochemical transactions such as transcription, replication or repair, which may alter the accessibility of the L1 transposition machinery to DNA. To investigate this possibility we have examined the effect of substrate chromatinization on the ability of L1 EN to nick DNA. We find that DNA incorporated into nucleosomes is generally refractory to nicking by L1 EN. Interestingly, nicking of a minority of DNA sequences is enhanced when included in chromatin. Thus, dynamic epigenetic factors such as chromatinization are likely to influence the relatively permanent placement of L1 and other retroelements in the human genome. PMID:11139628

  16. Chromatin-modifying enzymes as modulators of reprogramming

    E-print Network

    Onder, Tamer T.

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by somatic cell reprogramming involves global epigenetic remodelling. Whereas several proteins are known to regulate chromatin marks associated with the distinct epigenetic ...

  17. Computational analysis of promoter elements and chromatin features in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wyrick, John J

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory elements in promoter sequences typically function as binding sites for transcription factor proteins and thus are critical determinants of gene transcription. There is growing evidence that chromatin features, such as histone modifications or nucleosome positions, also have important roles in transcriptional regulation. Recent functional genomics and computational studies have yielded extensive datasets cataloging transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and chromatin features, such as nucleosome positions, throughout the yeast genome. However, much of this data can be difficult to navigate or analyze efficiently. This chapter describes practical methods for the visualization, data mining, and statistical analysis of yeast promoter elements and chromatin features using two Web-accessible bioinformatics databases: ChromatinDB and Ceres. PMID:22113279

  18. 33rd Annual International Asilomar Chromatin and Chromosomes Conference

    E-print Network

    Eirin Lopez, Jose Maria

    of histone variants in bivalve molluscs and their relevance in the development of chromatin-based tests.Z variants, actively expressed (transcribed and translated) in a bivalve mollusc, the mussel Mytilus

  19. Conservation and divergence in higher order chromatin structure 

    E-print Network

    Chambers, Emily Victoria

    2013-11-29

    Aspects of higher order chromatin structure such as replication timing, lamina association and Hi-C inter-locus interactions have been recently studied in several human and mouse cell types and it has been suggested that ...

  20. Genome-wide analysis of chromatin status using tiling microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Shivaswamy, Sushma; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged into chromatin, and chromatin modification and remodeling play an important role in transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Recent findings have shown that various post-translational histone modifications cooperate to recruit different effector proteins that bring about mobilization of the nucleosomes and cause distinct downstream consequences. The combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using antibodies directed against the core histones or specific histone modifications, with high-resolution tiling microarray analysis allows the examination of nucleosome occupancy and histone modification status genome-wide. Comparing genome-wide chromatin status with global gene expression patterns can reveal causal connections between specific patterns of histone modifications and the resulting gene expression. Here, we describe current methods based on recent advances in microarray technology to conduct such studies. PMID:17309841

  1. Reshaping the chromatin landscape after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    WONG, Jamie K.; ZOU, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology underlying spinal cord injury is complex. Mechanistic understanding of the adaptive responses to injury is critical for targeted therapy aimed at reestablishing lost connections between proximal and distal neurons. After injury, cell-type specific gene transcription programs govern distinct cellular behaviors, and chromatin regulators play a central role in shaping the chromatin landscape to adjust transcriptional profiles in a context-dependent manner. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the pleiotropic roles of chromatin regulators in mediating the diverse adaptive behaviors of neurons and glial cells after spinal cord injury, and wherever possible, discuss the underlying mechanisms and genomic targets. We specifically draw attention to the perspective that takes into consideration the impact of epigenetic modulation on axon growth potential, together with its effect on wound-healing properties of glial cells. Epigenetic modulation of chromatin state represents an emerging therapeutic direction to promote neural repair and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. PMID:25554728

  2. Chromatin Insulators: Linking genome organization to cellular function

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E.; Corces, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that insulators have a primary role in orchestrating the topological arrangement of higher-order chromatin architecture. Insulator-mediated long-range interactions can influence the epigenetic status of the genome and, in certain contexts, may have important effects on gene expression. Here we discuss higher-order chromatin organization as a unifying mechanism for diverse insulator actions across the genome. PMID:23706817

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps: Is immunity the second function of chromatin?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are made of processed chromatin bound to granular and selected cytoplasmic proteins. NETs are released by white blood cells called neutrophils, maybe as a last resort, to control microbial infections. This release of chromatin is the result of a unique form of cell death, dubbed “NETosis.” Here we review our understanding of how NETs are made, their function in infections and as danger signals, and their emerging importance in autoimmunity and coagulation. PMID:22945932

  4. Environmental-stress-induced Chromatin Regulation and its Heritability

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lei; Wuptra, Kenly; Chen, Danqi; Li, Hongjie; Huang, Shau-Ku; Jin, Chunyuan; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is subject to proofreading and repair mechanisms during the process of DNA replication, as well as repair to maintain genetic and epigenetic information and genome stability. The dynamic structure of chromatin modulates various nuclear processes, including transcription and replication, by altering the accessibility of the DNA to regulatory factors. Structural changes in chromatin are affected by the chemical modification of histone proteins and DNA, remodeling of nucleosomes, incorporation of variant histones, noncoding RNAs, and nonhistone DNA-binding proteins. Phenotypic diversity and fidelity can be balanced by controlling stochastic switching of chromatin structure and dynamics in response to the environmental disruptors and endogenous stresses. The dynamic chromatin remodeling can, therefore, serve as a sensor, through which environmental and/or metabolic agents can alter gene expression, leading to global cellular changes involving multiple interactive networks. Furthermore its recent evidence also suggests that the epigenetic changes are heritable during the development. This review will discuss the environmental sensing system for chromatin regulation and genetic and epigenetic controls from developmental perspectives. PMID:25045581

  5. Accelerated Chromatin Biochemistry Using DNA-Barcoded Nucleosome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Uyen T. T.; Bittova, Lenka; Müller, Manuel M.; Fierz, Beat; David, Yael; Houck-Loomis, Brian; Feng, Vanessa; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Muir, Tom W.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular details of how chromatin-associated factors deposit, remove and recognize histone posttranslational modification (‘PTM’) signatures remains a daunting task in the epigenetics field. Here, we introduce a versatile platform that greatly accelerates biochemical investigations into chromatin recognition and signaling. This technology is based on the streamlined semi-synthesis of DNA-barcoded nucleosome libraries with distinct combinations of PTMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of these libraries treated with purified chromatin effectors or the combined chromatin recognizing and modifying activities of the nuclear proteome is followed by multiplexed DNA-barcode sequencing. This ultrasensitive workflow allowed us to collect thousands of biochemical data points revealing the binding preferences of various nuclear factors for PTM patterns and how pre-existing PTMs, alone or synergistically, affect further PTM deposition via crosstalk mechanisms. We anticipate that the high-throughput and -sensitivity of the technology will help accelerate the decryption of the diverse molecular controls that operate at the level of chromatin. PMID:24997861

  6. A Bayesian mixture model for chromatin interaction data.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liang; Lin, Shili

    2015-02-01

    Chromatin interactions mediated by a particular protein are of interest for studying gene regulation, especially the regulation of genes that are associated with, or known to be causative of, a disease. A recent molecular technique, Chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET), that uses chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and high throughput paired-end sequencing, is able to detect such chromatin interactions genomewide. However, ChIA-PET may generate noise (i.e., pairings of DNA fragments by random chance) in addition to true signal (i.e., pairings of DNA fragments by interactions). In this paper, we propose MC_DIST based on a mixture modeling framework to identify true chromatin interactions from ChIA-PET count data (counts of DNA fragment pairs). The model is cast into a Bayesian framework to take into account the dependency among the data and the available information on protein binding sites and gene promoters to reduce false positives. A simulation study showed that MC_DIST outperforms the previously proposed hypergeometric model in terms of both power and type I error rate. A real data study showed that MC_DIST may identify potential chromatin interactions between protein binding sites and gene promoters that may be missed by the hypergeometric model. An R package implementing the MC_DIST model is available at http://www.stat.osu.edu/~statgen/SOFTWARE/MDM. PMID:25485614

  7. Chd5 orchestrates chromatin remodeling during sperm development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wangzhi; Wu, Jie; Kim, Sang-Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hearn, Stephen A.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Meistrich, Marvin L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most remarkable chromatin remodeling processes occurs during spermiogenesis, the post-meiotic phase of sperm development during which histones are replaced with sperm-specific protamines to repackage the genome into the highly compact chromatin structure of mature sperm. Here we identify Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 5 (Chd5) as a master regulator of the histone-to-protamine chromatin remodeling process. Chd5 deficiency leads to defective sperm chromatin compaction and male infertility in mice, mirroring the observation of low CHD5 expression in testes of infertile men. Chd5 orchestrates a cascade of molecular events required for histone removal and replacement, including histone 4 (H4) hyperacetylation, histone variant expression, nucleosome eviction, and DNA damage repair. Chd5 deficiency also perturbs expression of transition proteins (Tnp1/Tnp2) and protamines (Prm1/2). These findings define Chd5 as a multi-faceted mediator of histone-to-protamine replacement and depict the cascade of molecular events underlying chromatin remodeling during this process of extensive chromatin remodeling. PMID:24818823

  8. eRNAs Promote Transcription by Establishing Chromatin Accessibility at Defined Genomic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell’Orso, Stefania; Grontved, Lars; Gutierrez-Cruz, Gustavo; Derfoul, Assia; Hager, Gordon L.; Sartorelli, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription factors and DNA regulatory binding motifs are fundamental components of the gene regulatory network. Here, by using genome-wide binding profiling, we show extensive occupancy of transcription factors of myogenesis (MyoD and Myogenin) at extragenic enhancer regions coinciding with RNA synthesis (i.e. eRNA). In particular, multiple regions were transcribed to eRNA within regulatory region of MYOD1, including previously characterized Distal Regulatory Regions (DRR) and Core Enhancer (CE). While CERNA enhanced RNA polymerase II (PolII) occupancy and transcription at MYOD1, DRRRNA acted to activate the downstream myogenic genes. The deployment of transcriptional machinery to appropriate loci is contingent on chromatin accessibility, a rate-limiting step preceding PolII assembly. By nuclease sensitivity assay, it appear that eRNAs regulate genomic access of the transcriptional complex to defined regulatory regions. In conclusion, our data suggest that eRNAs contribute to establishing a cell-type-specific transcriptional circuitry by directing chromatin-remodeling events. PMID:23993744

  9. Developmentally stable chromatin structure in the human. beta. -globin gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, W.C.; Thompson, C.; Elder, J.T.; Groudine, M.

    1986-03-01

    The DNase I-hypersensitive sites in the human embryonic ..beta..-globin gene region have been mapped in erythroid-enriched fractions of disaggregated fetal livers, in adult nucleated red blood cells, and in fetal brain tissue. The analysis of a region extending 11 kilobases (kb) 5' of the epsilion-globin gene reveals many minor nuclease-hypersensitive sites and one major site located 6.1 kb upstream of the epsilon-globin gene. All of these hypersensitive sites are erythroid-specific, and the major site is stable throughout erythroid development. As assayed by nuclear runoff transcription, little or no epsilon-globin gene expression is detectable in fetal or adult erythroid cells. Thus, the presence of the major hypersensitive site 5' of the epsilon-globin gene in both fetal and adult erythroid cells demonstrates that this site is not specifically correlated with transcription of the gene or with a particular stage of development. Rather, this site may reflect an early event in erythroid differentiation. In addition, DNase I has been used to probe the overall sensitivity of epsilon-globin chromatin in fetal erythroid cells. The findings indicate that the epsilon-globin gene as well as the other genes in the ..beta..-globin cluster reside within the chomatin domain that is more DNase I-sensitive than bulk chromatin.

  10. Development of homogeneous luminescence assays for histone demethylase catalysis and binding

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Tumber, Anthony; Rose, Nathan R.; King, Oliver N. F.; Daniel, Michelle; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D.; Schofield, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Covalent modifications to histones play important roles in chromatin dynamics and the regulation of gene expression. The JmjC-containing histone demethylases (HDMs) catalyse the demethylation of methylated lysine residues on histone tails. Here we report the development of homogeneous luminescence based assay methods for measuring the catalytic activity and the binding affinities of peptides to HDMs. The assays use Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay (ALPHA) technology and are sensitive, robust, and can be used for small molecule inhibitor screening of HDMs. We have profiled known inhibitors of JMJD2E and demonstrate correlation between the inhibitor potencies determined by the ALPHA and other types of assays. Although this study focuses on the JMJD2E isoform, the catalytic turnover and binding assays described here can be used in studies on other HDMs. The assays should be useful for the development of small molecule inhibitors selective for HDM isoforms. PMID:20435012

  11. Schultheiss, Schiepe, & Rawolle Hormone assays 1 Running head: HORMONE ASSAYS

    E-print Network

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    Schultheiss, Schiepe, & Rawolle Hormone assays 1 Running head: HORMONE ASSAYS Hormone assays Oliver: Schultheiss, O. C., Schiepe, A., & Rawolle, M. (2012). Hormone assays. In H. Cooper, P. M. Camic, D. L. Long Association. #12;Schultheiss, Schiepe, & Rawolle Hormone assays 2 Hormone assays Hormones can be assayed from

  12. Ancestral Chromatin Configuration Constrains Chromatin Evolution on Differentiating Sex Chromosomes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes evolve distinctive types of chromatin from a pair of ancestral autosomes that are usually euchromatic. In Drosophila, the dosage-compensated X becomes enriched for hyperactive chromatin in males (mediated by H4K16ac), while the Y chromosome acquires silencing heterochromatin (enriched for H3K9me2/3). Drosophila autosomes are typically mostly euchromatic but the small dot chromosome has evolved a heterochromatin-like milieu (enriched for H3K9me2/3) that permits the normal expression of dot-linked genes, but which is different from typical pericentric heterochromatin. In Drosophila busckii, the dot chromosomes have fused to the ancestral sex chromosomes, creating a pair of ‘neo-sex’ chromosomes. Here we collect genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data from D. busckii, to investigate the evolutionary trajectory of sex chromosomes from a largely heterochromatic ancestor. We show that the neo-sex chromosomes formed <1 million years ago, but nearly 60% of neo-Y linked genes have already become non-functional. Expression levels are generally lower for the neo-Y alleles relative to their neo-X homologs, and the silencing heterochromatin mark H3K9me2, but not H3K9me3, is significantly enriched on silenced neo-Y genes. Despite rampant neo-Y degeneration, we find that the neo-X is deficient for the canonical histone modification mark of dosage compensation (H4K16ac), relative to autosomes or the compensated ancestral X chromosome, possibly reflecting constraints imposed on evolving hyperactive chromatin in an originally heterochromatic environment. Yet, neo-X genes are transcriptionally more active in males, relative to females, suggesting the evolution of incipient dosage compensation on the neo-X. Our data show that Y degeneration proceeds quickly after sex chromosomes become established through genomic and epigenetic changes, and are consistent with the idea that the evolution of sex-linked chromatin is influenced by its ancestral configuration. PMID:26114585

  13. EVALUATION OF SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAY (SCSA REGISTERED TRADEMARK) IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Home semen collection kits allow men to collect a sample at their convenience and send it via overnight mail to the laboratory. Benefits of this approach include facilitated sample collection from different geographic locations, minimized variability through analysis by a central...

  14. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  15. Pds5 regulators segregate cohesion and condensation pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kevin; Skibbens, Robert V

    2015-06-01

    Cohesins are required both for the tethering together of sister chromatids (termed cohesion) and subsequent condensation into discrete structures-processes fundamental for faithful chromosome segregation into daughter cells. Differentiating between cohesin roles in cohesion and condensation would provide an important advance in studying chromatin metabolism. Pds5 is a cohesin-associated factor that is essential for both cohesion maintenance and condensation. Recent studies revealed that ELG1 deletion suppresses the temperature sensitivity of pds5 mutant cells. However, the mechanisms through which Elg1 may regulate cohesion and condensation remain unknown. Here, we report that ELG1 deletion from pds5-1 mutant cells results in a significant rescue of cohesion, but not condensation, defects. Based on evidence that Elg1 unloads the DNA replication clamp PCNA from DNA, we tested whether PCNA overexpression would similarly rescue pds5-1 mutant cell cohesion defects. The results indeed reveal that elevated levels of PCNA rescue pds5-1 temperature sensitivity and cohesion defects, but do not rescue pds5-1 mutant cell condensation defects. In contrast, RAD61 deletion rescues the condensation defect, but importantly, neither the temperature sensitivity nor cohesion defects exhibited by pds5-1 mutant cells. In combination, these findings reveal that cohesion and condensation are separable pathways and regulated in nonredundant mechanisms. These results are discussed in terms of a new model through which cohesion and condensation are spatially regulated. PMID:25986377

  16. Program Specificity for Ptf1a in Pancreas versus Neural Tube Development Correlates with Distinct Collaborating Cofactors and Chromatin Accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, David M.; Borromeo, Mark D.; Deering, Tye G.; Casey, Bradford H.; Savage, Trisha K.; Mayer, Paul R.; Hoang, Chinh; Tung, Kuang-Chi; Kumar, Manonmani; Shen, Chengcheng; Swift, Galvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ptf1a is a critical driver for development of both the pancreas and nervous system. How one transcription factor controls diverse programs of gene expression is a fundamental question in developmental biology. To uncover molecular strategies for the program-specific functions of Ptf1a, we identified bound genomic regions in vivo during development of both tissues. Most regions bound by Ptf1a are specific to each tissue, lie near genes needed for proper formation of each tissue, and coincide with regions of open chromatin. The specificity of Ptf1a binding is encoded in the DNA surrounding the Ptf1a-bound sites, because these regions are sufficient to direct tissue-restricted reporter expression in transgenic mice. Fox and Sox factors were identified as potential lineage-specific modifiers of Ptf1a binding, since binding motifs for these factors are enriched in Ptf1a-bound regions in pancreas and neural tube, respectively. Of the Fox factors expressed during pancreatic development, Foxa2 plays a major role. Indeed, Ptf1a and Foxa2 colocalize in embryonic pancreatic chromatin and can act synergistically in cell transfection assays. Together, these findings indicate that lineage-specific chromatin landscapes likely constrain the DNA binding of Ptf1a, and they identify Fox and Sox gene families as part of this process. PMID:23754747

  17. ?-H2AX in recognition and signaling of DNA double-strand breaks in the context of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Kinner, Andrea; Wu, Wenqi; Staudt, Christian; Iliakis, George

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are extremely dangerous lesions with severe consequences for cell survival and the maintenance of genomic stability. In higher eukaryotic cells, DSBs in chromatin promptly initiate the phosphorylation of the histone H2A variant, H2AX, at Serine 139 to generate ?-H2AX. This phosphorylation event requires the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase-like family of protein kinases, DNA-PKcs, ATM, and ATR, and serves as a landing pad for the accumulation and retention of the central components of the signaling cascade initiated by DNA damage. Regions in chromatin with ?-H2AX are conveniently detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and serve as beacons of DSBs. This has allowed the development of an assay that has proved particularly useful in the molecular analysis of the processing of DSBs. Here, we first review the role of ?-H2AX in DNA damage response in the context of chromatin and discuss subsequently the use of this modification as a surrogate marker for mechanistic studies of DSB induction and processing. We conclude with a critical analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach and present some interesting applications of the resulting methodology. PMID:18772227

  18. Centromeric chromatin and its dynamics in plants.

    PubMed

    Lermontova, Inna; Sandmann, Michael; Mascher, Martin; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2015-07-01

    Centromeres are chromatin structures that are required for proper separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. The centromere is composed of centromeric DNA, often enriched in satellite repeats, and kinetochore complex proteins. To date, over 100 kinetochore components have been identified in various eukaryotes. Kinetochore assembly begins with incorporation of centromeric histone H3 variant CENH3 into centromeric nucleosomes. Protein components of the kinetochore are either present at centromeres throughout the cell cycle or localize to centromeres transiently, prior to attachment of microtubules to each kinetochore in prometaphase of mitotic cells. This is the case for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) proteins in animal cells. The SAC complex ensures equal separation of chromosomes between daughter nuclei by preventing anaphase onset before metaphase is complete, i.e. the sister kinetochores of all chromosomes are attached to spindle fibers from opposite poles. In this review, we focus on the organization of centromeric DNA and the kinetochore assembly in plants. We summarize recent advances regarding loading of CENH3 into the centromere, and the subcellular localization and protein-protein interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in kinetochore assembly and function. We describe the transcriptional activity of corresponding genes based on in silico analysis of their promoters and cell cycle-dependent expression. Additionally, barley homologs of all selected A. thaliana proteins have been identified in silico, and their sequences and domain structures are presented. PMID:25976696

  19. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  20. Broadly permissive intestinal chromatin underlies lateral inhibition and cell plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Li, Fugen; Ferreiro-Neira, Isabel; Ho, Li-Lun; Luyten, Annouck; Nalapareddy, Kodandaramireddy; Long, Henry; Verzi, Michael; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Cells differentiate when transcription factors (TFs) bind accessible cis-regulatory elements to establish specific gene expression programs. In differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells, chromatin at lineage-restricted genes becomes sequentially accessible1-4, probably by virtue of “pioneer” TF activity5, but tissues may utilize other strategies in vivo. Lateral inhibition is a pervasive process in which one cell forces a different identity on its neighbors6, and it is unclear how chromatin in equipotent progenitors undergoing lateral inhibition quickly enables distinct, transiently reversible cell fates. Here we report the chromatin and transcriptional underpinnings of differentiation in mouse small intestine crypts, where Notch signaling mediates lateral inhibition to assign progenitor cells into absorptive or secretory lineages7-9. Transcript profiles in isolated LGR5+ intestinal stem cells (ISC)10 and secretory and absorptive progenitors indicated that each cell population was distinct and the progenitors specified. Nevertheless, secretory and absorptive progenitors showed comparable levels of H3K4me2 and H3K27ac histone marks and DNaseI hypersensitivity - signifying accessible, permissive chromatin - at most of the same cis-elements. Enhancers acting uniquely in progenitors were well-demarcated in LGR5+ ISC, revealing early priming of chromatin for divergent transcriptional programs, and retained active marks well after lineages were specified. On this chromatin background, ATOH1, a secretory-specific TF, controls lateral inhibition through Delta-like Notch ligand genes and also drives numerous secretory lineage genes. Depletion of ATOH1 from specified secretory cells converted them into functional enterocytes, indicating prolonged responsiveness of marked enhancers to presence or absence of a key TF. Thus, lateral inhibition and intestinal crypt lineage plasticity involve interaction of a lineage-restricted TF with broadly permissive chromatin established in multipotent stem cells. PMID:24413398

  1. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response. PMID:26391293

  2. Broadly permissive intestinal chromatin underlies lateral inhibition and cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Li, Fugen; Ferreiro-Neira, Isabel; Ho, Li-Lun; Luyten, Annouck; Nalapareddy, Kodandaramireddy; Long, Henry; Verzi, Michael; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2014-02-27

    Cells differentiate when transcription factors bind accessible cis-regulatory elements to establish specific gene expression programs. In differentiating embryonic stem cells, chromatin at lineage-restricted genes becomes sequentially accessible, probably by means of 'pioneer' transcription factor activity, but tissues may use other strategies in vivo. Lateral inhibition is a pervasive process in which one cell forces a different identity on its neighbours, and it is unclear how chromatin in equipotent progenitors undergoing lateral inhibition quickly enables distinct, transiently reversible cell fates. Here we report the chromatin and transcriptional underpinnings of differentiation in mouse small intestine crypts, where notch signalling mediates lateral inhibition to assign progenitor cells into absorptive or secretory lineages. Transcript profiles in isolated LGR5(+) intestinal stem cells and secretory and absorptive progenitors indicated that each cell population was distinct and the progenitors specified. Nevertheless, secretory and absorptive progenitors showed comparable levels of H3K4me2 and H3K27ac histone marks and DNase I hypersensitivity--signifying accessible, permissive chromatin-at most of the same cis-elements. Enhancers acting uniquely in progenitors were well demarcated in LGR5(+) intestinal stem cells, revealing early priming of chromatin for divergent transcriptional programs, and retained active marks well after lineages were specified. On this chromatin background, ATOH1, a secretory-specific transcription factor, controls lateral inhibition through delta-like notch ligand genes and also drives the expression of numerous secretory lineage genes. Depletion of ATOH1 from specified secretory cells converted them into functional enterocytes, indicating prolonged responsiveness of marked enhancers to the presence or absence of a key transcription factor. Thus, lateral inhibition and intestinal crypt lineage plasticity involve interaction of a lineage-restricted transcription factor with broadly permissive chromatin established in multipotent stem cells. PMID:24413398

  3. Diversity and evolution of chromatin proteins encoded by DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Robson F.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA viruses display a great variety of proteins that interact with host chromatin. Using the wealth of available genomic and functional information, we have systematically surveyed chromatin-related proteins encoded by dsDNA viruses. The distribution of viral chromatin-related proteins is primarily influenced by viral genome size and the superkingdom to which the host of the virus belongs. Smaller viruses usually encode multifunctional proteins that mediate several distinct interactions with host chromatin proteins and viral or host DNA. Larger viruses additionally encode several enzymes, which catalyze manipulations of chromosome structure, chromatin remodeling and covalent modifications of proteins and DNA. Among these viruses, it is also common to encounter transcription factors and DNA-packaging proteins such as histones and IHF/HU derived from cellular genomes, which might play a role in constituting virus-specific chromatin states. Through all size ranges a subset of domains in viral chromatin proteins appear to have been derived from those found in host proteins. Examples include the Zn-finger domains of the E6 and E7 proteins of papillomaviruses, SET-domain methyltransferases and Jumonji-related demethylases in certain nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and BEN domains in poxviruses and polydnaviruses. In other cases, chromatin-interacting modules, such as the LxCxE motif, appear to have been widely disseminated across distinct viral lineages, resulting in similar retinoblastoma targeting strategies. Viruses, especially those with large linear genomes, have evolved a number of mechanisms to manipulate viral chromosomes in the process of replication-associated recombination. These include topoisomerases, Rad50/SbcC-like ABC ATPases and a novel recombinase system in bacteriophages utilizing RecA and Rad52 homologs. Larger DNA viruses also encode SWI2/SNF2 and A18-like ATPases which appear to play specialized roles in transcription and recombination. Finally, it also appears that certain domains of viral provenance have given rise to key functions in eukaryotic chromatin such as a HEH domain of chromosome tethering proteins and the TET/JBP-like cytosine and thymine hydroxylases. PMID:19878744

  4. Dissecting the chromatin interactome of microRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dijun; Fu, Liang-Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Guoliang; Zhang, Hang; Jiang, Li; Harrison, Andrew P.; Shanahan, Hugh P.; Klukas, Christian; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Ruan, Yijun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the role of higher-order chromatin structures in transcription of microRNA genes (MIRs) is evolving rapidly. Here we investigate the effect of 3D architecture of chromatin on the transcriptional regulation of MIRs. We demonstrate that MIRs have transcriptional features that are similar to protein-coding genes. RNA polymerase II–associated ChIA-PET data reveal that many groups of MIRs and protein-coding genes are organized into functionally compartmentalized chromatin communities and undergo coordinated expression when their genomic loci are spatially colocated. We observe that MIRs display widespread communication in those transcriptionally active communities. Moreover, miRNA–target interactions are significantly enriched among communities with functional homogeneity while depleted from the same community from which they originated, suggesting MIRs coordinating function-related pathways at posttranscriptional level. Further investigation demonstrates the existence of spatial MIR–MIR chromatin interacting networks. We show that groups of spatially coordinated MIRs are frequently from the same family and involved in the same disease category. The spatial interaction network possesses both common and cell-specific subnetwork modules that result from the spatial organization of chromatin within different cell types. Together, our study unveils an entirely unexplored layer of MIR regulation throughout the human genome that links the spatial coordination of MIRs to their co-expression and function. PMID:24357409

  5. Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4–5 µm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors. We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces. PMID:24019504

  6. Rules of Engagement for Base Excision Repair in Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Odell, Ian D.; Wallace, Susan S.; Pederson, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the DNA in eukaryotes is packaged in tandemly arrayed nucleosomes that, together with numerous DNA- and nucleosome-associated enzymes and regulatory factors, make up chromatin. Chromatin modifying and remodeling agents help regulate access to selected DNA segments in chromatin, thereby facilitating transcription and DNA replication and repair. Studies of nucleotide excision repair (NER), single strand break repair (SSBR), and the homology-directed (HDR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) double strand break repair pathways have led to an ‘access-repair-restore’ paradigm, in which chromatin in the vicinity of damaged DNA is disrupted, thereby enabling efficient repair and the subsequent repackaging of DNA into nucleosomes. When damage is extensive, these repair processes are accompanied by cell cycle checkpoint activation, which provides cells with sufficient time to either complete the repair or initiate apoptosis. It is not clear, however, if base excision repair (BER) of the ~20,000 or more oxidative DNA damages that occur daily in each nucleated human cell can be viewed through this same lens. Until recently, we did not know if BER requires or is accompanied by nucleosome disruption, and it is not yet clear that anything short of overwhelming oxidative damage (resulting in the shunting of DNA substrates into other repair pathways) results in checkpoint activation. This review highlights studies of how oxidatively damaged DNA in nucleosomes is discovered and repaired, and offers a working model of events associated with BER in chromatin that we hope will have heuristic value. PMID:22718094

  7. Forced unraveling of chromatin fibers with nonuniform linker DNA lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Gungor; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-02-01

    The chromatin fiber undergoes significant structural changes during the cell's life cycle to modulate DNA accessibility. Detailed mechanisms of such structural transformations of chromatin fibers as affected by various internal and external conditions such as the ionic conditions of the medium, the linker DNA length, and the presence of linker histones, constitute an open challenge. Here we utilize Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of a coarse grained model of chromatin with nonuniform linker DNA lengths as found in vivo to help explain some aspects of this challenge. We investigate the unfolding mechanisms of chromatin fibers with alternating linker lengths of 26-62 bp and 44-79 bp using a series of end-to-end stretching trajectories with and without linker histones and compare results to uniform-linker-length fibers. We find that linker histones increase overall resistance of nonuniform fibers and lead to fiber unfolding with superbeads-on-a-string cluster transitions. Chromatin fibers with nonuniform linker DNA lengths display a more complex, multi-step yet smoother process of unfolding compared to their uniform counterparts, likely due to the existence of a more continuous range of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions. This finding echoes the theme that some heterogeneity in fiber component is biologically advantageous.

  8. Histone modifications and chromatin dynamics: a focus on filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Gerald; Loidl, Peter; Graessle, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The readout of the genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is significantly regulated by modifications of DNA and chromatin proteins. Chromatin alterations induce genome-wide and local changes in gene expression and affect a variety of processes in response to internal and external signals during growth, differentiation, development, in metabolic processes, diseases, and abiotic and biotic stresses. This review aims at summarizing the roles of histone H1 and the acetylation and methylation of histones in filamentous fungi and links this knowledge to the huge body of data from other systems. Filamentous fungi show a wide range of morphologies and have developed a complex network of genes that enables them to use a great variety of substrates. This fact, together with the possibility of simple and quick genetic manipulation, highlights these organisms as model systems for the investigation of gene regulation. However, little is still known about regulation at the chromatin level in filamentous fungi. Understanding the role of chromatin in transcriptional regulation would be of utmost importance with respect to the impact of filamentous fungi in human diseases and agriculture. The synthesis of compounds (antibiotics, immunosuppressants, toxins, and compounds with adverse effects) is also likely to be regulated at the chromatin level. PMID:18221488

  9. Chd5 orchestrates chromatin remodelling during sperm development.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangzhi; Wu, Jie; Kim, Sang-Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hearn, Stephen A; Zhang, Michael Q; Meistrich, Marvin L; Mills, Alea A

    2014-01-01

    One of the most remarkable chromatin remodelling processes occurs during spermiogenesis, the post-meiotic phase of sperm development during which histones are replaced with sperm-specific protamines to repackage the genome into the highly compact chromatin structure of mature sperm. Here we identify Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 5 (Chd5) as a master regulator of the histone-to-protamine chromatin remodelling process. Chd5 deficiency leads to defective sperm chromatin compaction and male infertility in mice, mirroring the observation of low CHD5 expression in testes of infertile men. Chd5 orchestrates a cascade of molecular events required for histone removal and replacement, including histone 4 (H4) hyperacetylation, histone variant expression, nucleosome eviction and DNA damage repair. Chd5 deficiency also perturbs expression of transition proteins (Tnp1/Tnp2) and protamines (Prm1/2). These findings define Chd5 as a multi-faceted mediator of histone-to-protamine replacement and depict the cascade of molecular events underlying this process of extensive chromatin remodelling. PMID:24818823

  10. Chromatin dynamics during epigenetic reprogramming in the mouse germ line.

    PubMed

    Hajkova, Petra; Ancelin, Katia; Waldmann, Tanja; Lacoste, Nicolas; Lange, Ulrike C; Cesari, Francesca; Lee, Caroline; Almouzni, Genevieve; Schneider, Robert; Surani, M Azim

    2008-04-17

    A unique feature of the germ cell lineage is the generation of totipotency. A critical event in this context is DNA demethylation and the erasure of parental imprints in mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) on embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) after they enter into the developing gonads. Little is yet known about the mechanism involved, except that it is apparently an active process. We have examined the associated changes in the chromatin to gain further insights into this reprogramming event. Here we show that the chromatin changes occur in two steps. The first changes in nascent PGCs at E8.5 establish a distinctive chromatin signature that is reminiscent of pluripotency. Next, when PGCs are residing in the gonads, major changes occur in nuclear architecture accompanied by an extensive erasure of several histone modifications and exchange of histone variants. Furthermore, the histone chaperones HIRA and NAP-1 (NAP111), which are implicated in histone exchange, accumulate in PGC nuclei undergoing reprogramming. We therefore suggest that the mechanism of histone replacement is critical for these chromatin rearrangements to occur. The marked chromatin changes are intimately linked with genome-wide DNA demethylation. On the basis of the timing of the observed events, we propose that if DNA demethylation entails a DNA repair-based mechanism, the evident histone replacement would represent a repair-induced response event rather than being a prerequisite. PMID:18354397

  11. Dissecting the chromatin interactome of microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dijun; Fu, Liang-Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Guoliang; Zhang, Hang; Jiang, Li; Harrison, Andrew P; Shanahan, Hugh P; Klukas, Christian; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Ruan, Yijun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ming

    2014-03-01

    Our knowledge of the role of higher-order chromatin structures in transcription of microRNA genes (MIRs) is evolving rapidly. Here we investigate the effect of 3D architecture of chromatin on the transcriptional regulation of MIRs. We demonstrate that MIRs have transcriptional features that are similar to protein-coding genes. RNA polymerase II-associated ChIA-PET data reveal that many groups of MIRs and protein-coding genes are organized into functionally compartmentalized chromatin communities and undergo coordinated expression when their genomic loci are spatially colocated. We observe that MIRs display widespread communication in those transcriptionally active communities. Moreover, miRNA-target interactions are significantly enriched among communities with functional homogeneity while depleted from the same community from which they originated, suggesting MIRs coordinating function-related pathways at posttranscriptional level. Further investigation demonstrates the existence of spatial MIR-MIR chromatin interacting networks. We show that groups of spatially coordinated MIRs are frequently from the same family and involved in the same disease category. The spatial interaction network possesses both common and cell-specific subnetwork modules that result from the spatial organization of chromatin within different cell types. Together, our study unveils an entirely unexplored layer of MIR regulation throughout the human genome that links the spatial coordination of MIRs to their co-expression and function. PMID:24357409

  12. Chromatin remodeling and bivalent histone modifications in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Arigela; Meshorer, Eran

    2015-12-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by distinct epigenetic features including a relative enrichment of histone modifications related to active chromatin. Among these is tri-methylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me3). Several thousands of the H3K4me3-enriched promoters in pluripotent cells also contain a repressive histone mark, namely H3K27me3, a situation referred to as "bivalency". While bivalent promoters are not unique to pluripotent cells, they are relatively enriched in these cell types, largely marking developmental and lineage-specific genes which are silent but poised for immediate action. The H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 modifications are catalyzed by lysine methyltransferases which are usually found within, although not entirely limited to, the Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) protein complexes, respectively, but these do not provide selective bivalent specificity. Recent studies highlight the family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins as regulators of bivalent domains. Here, we discuss bivalency in general, describe the machineries that catalyze bivalent chromatin domains, and portray the emerging connection between bivalency and the action of different families of chromatin remodelers, namely INO80, esBAF, and NuRD, in pluripotent cells. We posit that chromatin remodeling proteins may enable "bivalent specificity", often selectively acting on, or selectively depleted from, bivalent domains. PMID:26553936

  13. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC. PMID:26729112

  14. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. IV. Charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Greco, O.; Grossi, G.; Matsufuji, N.; Pugliese, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently reported the kinetics of chromosome rejoining and exchange formation in human lymphocytes exposed to gamma rays using the techniques of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and premature chromosome condensation (PCC). In this paper, we have extended previous measurements to cells exposed to charged particles. Our goal was to determine differences in chromatin break rejoining and misrejoining after exposure to low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Cells were irradiated with hydrogen, neon, carbon or iron ions in the LET range 0.3-140 keV/microm and were incubated at 37 degrees C for various times after exposure. Little difference was observed in the yield of early prematurely condensed chromosome breaks for the different ions. The kinetics of break rejoining was exponential for all ions and had similar time constants, but the residual level of unrejoined breaks after prolonged incubation was higher for high-LET radiation. The kinetics of exchange formation was also similar for the different ions, but the yield of chromosome interchanges measured soon after exposure was higher for high-LET particles, suggesting that a higher fraction of DNA breaks are misrejoined quickly. On the other hand, the rate of formation of complete exchanges was slightly lower for densely ionizing radiation. The ratios between the yields of different types of aberrations observed at 10 h postirradiation in prematurely condensed chromosome preparations were dependent on LET. We found significant differences between the yields of aberrations measured in interphase (after repair) and metaphase for densely ionizing radiation. This difference might be caused by prolonged mitotic delay and/or interphase death. Overall, the results point out significant differences between low- and high-LET radiation for the formation of chromosome aberrations.

  15. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. H4K44 Acetylation Facilitates Chromatin Accessibility during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jialei; Donahue, Greg; Dorsey, Jean; Govin, Jérôme; Yuan, Zuofei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shah, Parisha P; Berger, Shelley L

    2015-12-01

    Meiotic recombination hotspots are associated with histone post-translational modifications and open chromatin. However, it remains unclear how histone modifications and chromatin structure regulate meiotic recombination. Here, we identify acetylation of histone H4 at Lys44 (H4K44ac) occurring on the nucleosomal lateral surface. We show that H4K44 is acetylated at pre-meiosis and meiosis and displays genome-wide enrichment at recombination hotspots in meiosis. Acetylation at H4K44 is required for normal meiotic recombination, normal levels of double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis, and optimal sporulation. Non-modifiable H4K44R results in increased nucleosomal occupancy around DSB hotspots. Our results indicate that H4K44ac functions to facilitate chromatin accessibility favorable for normal DSB formation and meiotic recombination. PMID:26628362

  18. Bacteria tune interferon responses by playing with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Alice; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections, like their viral counterparts, trigger the onset of innate immune defense mechanisms through the release of cytokines, including interferons (IFNs). While type I and II IFN responses to bacteria have long been explored, type III IFN response remains poorly addressed. We have recently reported that the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes triggers the expression of type I and III IFN genes in epithelial cells, and is able to fine-tune downstream signaling at the chromatin level. This bacterium can negatively or positively modulate the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) by manipulating the function of BAHD1, a component of a host chromatin-silencing complex. To this end, L. monocytogenes tightly controls the secretion of a BAHD1 inhibitory factor, LntA. Here, we further document the current knowledge about chromatin mechanisms modulating interferon responses during host-bacteria interplay, and discuss their physiological consequences. PMID:22286704

  19. Chromatin Dynamics in Lineage Commitment and Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Shchuka, Virlana M.; Malek-Gilani, Nakisa; Singh, Gurdeep; Langroudi, Lida; Dhaliwal, Navroop K.; Moorthy, Sakthi D.; Davidson, Scott; Macpherson, Neil N.; Mitchell, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic structural properties of chromatin play an essential role in defining cell identity and function. Transcription factors and chromatin modifiers establish and maintain cell states through alteration of DNA accessibility and histone modifications. This activity is focused at both gene-proximal promoter regions and distally located regulatory elements. In the three-dimensional space of the nucleus, distal elements are localized in close physical proximity to the gene-proximal regulatory sequences through the formation of chromatin loops. These looping features in the genome are highly dynamic as embryonic stem cells differentiate and commit to specific lineages, and throughout reprogramming as differentiated cells reacquire pluripotency. Identifying these functional distal regulatory regions in the genome provides insight into the regulatory processes governing early mammalian development and guidance for improving the protocols that generate induced pluripotent cells. PMID:26193323

  20. Advanced methods for the analysis of chromatin-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Shortreed, Michael R.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-protein interactions are central to gene expression and chromatin regulation and have become one of the main focus areas of the ENCODE consortium. Advances in mass spectrometry and associated technologies have facilitated studies of these interactions, revealing many novel DNA-interacting proteins and histone posttranslational modifications. Proteins interacting at a single locus or at multiple loci have been targeted in these recent studies, each requiring a separate analytical strategy for isolation and analysis of DNA-protein interactions. The enrichment of target chromatin fractions occurs via a number of methods including immunoprecipitation, affinity purification, and hybridization, with the shared goal of using proteomics approaches as the final readout. The result of this is a number of exciting new tools, with distinct strengths and limitations that can enable highly robust and novel chromatin studies when applied appropriately. The present review compares and contrasts these methods to help the reader distinguish the advantages of each approach. PMID:24803678

  1. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  2. TALE proteins bind to both active and inactive chromatin.

    PubMed

    Scott, James N F; Kupinski, Adam P; Kirkham, Christopher M; Tuma, Roman; Boyes, Joan

    2014-02-15

    TALE (transcription activator-like effector) proteins can be tailored to bind to any DNA sequence of choice and thus are of immense utility for genome editing and the specific delivery of transcription activators. However, to perform these functions, they need to occupy their sites in chromatin. In the present study, we have systematically assessed TALE binding to chromatin substrates and find that in vitro TALEs bind to their target site on nucleosomes at the more accessible entry/exit sites, but not at the nucleosome dyad. We show further that in vivo TALEs bind to transcriptionally repressed chromatin and that transcription increases binding by only 2-fold. These data therefore imply that TALEs are likely to bind to their target in vivo even at inactive loci. PMID:24438328

  3. Chromatin organization at the nuclear pore favours HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Lelek, Mickaël; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Pellin, Danilo; Rizzi, Ermanno; Souque, Philippe; Severgnini, Marco; Di Serio, Clelia; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Zimmer, Christophe; Charneau, Pierre; Di Nunzio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow HIV to integrate into particular sites of the host genome are poorly understood. Here we tested if the nuclear pore complex (NPC) facilitates the targeting of HIV integration by acting on chromatin topology. We show that the integrity of the nuclear side of the NPC, which is mainly composed of Tpr, is not required for HIV nuclear import, but that Nup153 is essential. Depletion of Tpr markedly reduces HIV infectivity, but not the level of integration. HIV integration sites in Tpr-depleted cells are less associated with marks of active genes, consistent with the state of chromatin proximal to the NPC, as analysed by super-resolution microscopy. LEDGF/p75, which promotes viral integration into active genes, stabilizes Tpr at the nuclear periphery and vice versa. Our data support a model in which HIV nuclear import and integration are concerted steps, and where Tpr maintains a chromatin environment favourable for HIV replication. PMID:25744187

  4. Nuclear body movement is determined by chromatin accessibility and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Görisch, Sabine M.; Wachsmuth, Malte; Ittrich, Carina; Bacher, Christian P.; Rippe, Karsten; Lichter, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and Cajal bodies are mobile subnuclear organelles, which are involved in activities like RNA processing, transcriptional regulation, and antiviral defense. A key parameter in understanding their biological functions is their mobility. The diffusion properties of PML and Cajal bodies were compared with a biochemically inactive body formed by aggregates of murine Mx1 by using single-particle tracking methods. The artificial Mx1-yellow fluorescent protein body showed a very similar mobility compared with PML and Cajal bodies. The data are described quantitatively by a mechanism of nuclear body movement consisting of two components: diffusion of the body within a chromatin corral and its translocation resulting from chromatin diffusion. This finding suggests that the body mobility reflects the dynamics and accessibility of the chromatin environment, which might target bodies to specific nuclear subcompartments where they exert their biological function. PMID:15331777

  5. Identification of the ISWI Chromatin Remodeling Complex of the Early Branching Eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Stanne, Tara; Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Ridewood, Sophie; Ling, Alexandra; Witmer, Kathrin; Kushwaha, Manish; Wiesler, Simone; Wickstead, Bill; Wood, Jennifer; Rudenko, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    ISWI chromatin remodelers are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are important for the assembly and spacing of nucleosomes, thereby controlling transcription initiation and elongation. ISWI is typically associated with different subunits, forming specialized complexes with discrete functions. In the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, TbISWI down-regulates RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression sites (ESs), which are monoallelically expressed. Here, we use tandem affinity purification to determine the interacting partners of TbISWI. We identify three proteins that do not show significant homology with known ISWI-associated partners. Surprisingly, one of these is nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), which we had previously shown to play a role in ES control. In addition, we identify two novel ISWI partners, regulator of chromosome condensation 1-like protein (RCCP) and phenylalanine/tyrosine-rich protein (FYRP), both containing protein motifs typically found on chromatin proteins. Knockdown of RCCP or FYRP in bloodstream form T. brucei results in derepression of silent variant surface glycoprotein ESs, as had previously been shown for TbISWI and NLP. All four proteins are expressed and interact with each other in both major life cycle stages and show similar distributions at Pol I-transcribed loci. They are also found at Pol II strand switch regions as determined with ChIP. ISWI, NLP, RCCP, and FYRP therefore appear to form a single major ISWI complex in T. brucei (TbIC). This reduced complexity of ISWI regulation and the presence of novel ISWI partners highlights the early divergence of trypanosomes in evolution. PMID:26378228

  6. Identification of the ISWI Chromatin Remodeling Complex of the Early Branching Eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Stanne, Tara; Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Ridewood, Sophie; Ling, Alexandra; Witmer, Kathrin; Kushwaha, Manish; Wiesler, Simone; Wickstead, Bill; Wood, Jennifer; Rudenko, Gloria

    2015-11-01

    ISWI chromatin remodelers are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are important for the assembly and spacing of nucleosomes, thereby controlling transcription initiation and elongation. ISWI is typically associated with different subunits, forming specialized complexes with discrete functions. In the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, TbISWI down-regulates RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression sites (ESs), which are monoallelically expressed. Here, we use tandem affinity purification to determine the interacting partners of TbISWI. We identify three proteins that do not show significant homology with known ISWI-associated partners. Surprisingly, one of these is nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), which we had previously shown to play a role in ES control. In addition, we identify two novel ISWI partners, regulator of chromosome condensation 1-like protein (RCCP) and phenylalanine/tyrosine-rich protein (FYRP), both containing protein motifs typically found on chromatin proteins. Knockdown of RCCP or FYRP in bloodstream form T. brucei results in derepression of silent variant surface glycoprotein ESs, as had previously been shown for TbISWI and NLP. All four proteins are expressed and interact with each other in both major life cycle stages and show similar distributions at Pol I-transcribed loci. They are also found at Pol II strand switch regions as determined with ChIP. ISWI, NLP, RCCP, and FYRP therefore appear to form a single major ISWI complex in T. brucei (TbIC). This reduced complexity of ISWI regulation and the presence of novel ISWI partners highlights the early divergence of trypanosomes in evolution. PMID:26378228

  7. Analysis of Single Locus Trajectories for Extracting In Vivo Chromatin Tethering Interactions

    E-print Network

    Amitai, Assaf

    Is it possible to extract tethering forces applied on chromatin from the statistics of a single locus trajectories imaged in vivo? Chromatin fragments interact with many partners such as the nuclear membrane, other chromosomes ...

  8. Combinatorial Patterning of Chromatin Regulators Uncovered by Genome-wide Location Analysis in Human Cells

    E-print Network

    Ram, Oren

    Hundreds of chromatin regulators (CRs) control chromatin structure and function by catalyzing and binding histone modifications, yet the rules governing these key processes remain obscure. Here, we present a systematic ...

  9. Systematic chromatin state comparison of epigenomes associated with diverse properties including sex and tissue type

    E-print Network

    Yen, Angela

    Epigenomic data sets provide critical information about the dynamic role of chromatin states in gene regulation, but a key question of how chromatin state segmentations vary under different conditions across the genome has ...

  10. Systematic Dissection of Roles for Chromatin Regulators in a Yeast Stress Response

    E-print Network

    Pfeffner, Jenna

    Packaging of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin has wide-ranging effects on gene transcription. Curiously, it is commonly observed that deletion of a global chromatin regulator affects expression of only a limited subset ...

  11. Roles of HDACs in chromatin remodelling and response to chemotherapy in cancer 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Rui

    2014-07-05

    Background: The higher-order structure of chromatin changes in response to extracellular and environmental signals. We observed nuclear morphological changes in biopsied cancer tissue after chemotherapy. Since chromatin ...

  12. Scaffold Assisted Chromosome Condensation

    E-print Network

    Poonen, Bjorn

    resembling the X-shape of the chromosome #12;Great Thanks to: PRIMES Prof. Leonid Mirny Geoffrey FudenbergScaffold Assisted Chromosome Condensation: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Dong-Gil Shin MIT PRIMES May 21, 2011 #12;Mitosis and Chromosome Condensation Interphase Prophase Metaphase Anaphase Telophase

  13. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  14. Chromatin dynamics during interphase explored by single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Levi, Valeria; Gratton, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Our view of the structure and function of the interphase nucleus has changed drastically in recent years. It is now widely accepted that the nucleus is a well organized and highly compartmentalized organelle and that this organization is intimately related to nuclear function. In this context, chromatin-initially considered a randomly entangled polymer-has also been shown to be structurally organized in interphase and its organization was found to be very important to gene regulation. Relevant and not completely answered questions are how chromatin organization is achieved and what mechanisms are responsible for changes in the positions of chromatin loci in the nucleus. A significant advance in the field resulted from tagging chromosome sites with bacterial operator sequences, and visualizing these tags using green fluorescent protein fused with the appropriate repressor protein. Simultaneously, fluorescence imaging techniques evolved significantly during recent years, allowing observation of the time evolution of processes in living specimens. In this context, the motion of the tagged locus was observed and analyzed to extract quantitative information regarding its dynamics. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of chromatin dynamics in interphase with the emphasis placed on the information obtained from single-particle tracking (SPT) experiments. We introduce the basis of SPT methods and trajectory analysis, and summarize what has been learnt by using this new technology in the context of chromatin dynamics. Finally, we briefly describe a method of SPT in a two-photon excitation microscope that has several advantages over methods based on conventional microscopy and review the information obtained using this novel approach to study chromatin dynamics. PMID:18461483

  15. Chromatin dynamics during interphase explored by single particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Valeria; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Our view of the structure and function of the interphase nucleus has drastically changed in the last years. It is now widely accepted that the nucleus is a well organized and highly compartmentalized organelle and that this organization is intimately related to nuclear function. In this context, chromatin -initially considered a randomly entangled polymer- has also been shown to be structurally organized in interphase and its organization was found to be very important to gene regulation. Relevant and not completely answered questions are how chromatin organization is achieved and what mechanisms are responsible for changes in the positions of chromatin loci in the nucleus. A significant advance in the field resulted from tagging chromosome sites with bacterial operator sequences, and visualizing these tags using green fluorescent protein fused with the appropriate repressor protein. Simultaneously, fluorescence imaging techniques significantly evolved during the last years allowing the observation of the time evolution of processes in living specimens. In this context, the motion of the tagged locus was observed and analyzed to extract quantitative information regarding its dynamics. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of chromatin dynamics in interphase with the emphasis placed on the information obtained from single particle tracking (SPT) experiments. We introduce the basis of SPT methods and trajectories analysis, and summarize what has been learnt by using this new technology in the context of chromatin dynamics. Finally, we briefly describe a method of SPT in a two-photon excitation microscope that has several advantages over methods based on conventional microscopy and review the information obtained by using this novel approach to study chromatin dynamics. PMID:18461483

  16. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh). The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied across a broad range of clinically relevant samples to allow demarcation of regulatory elements of considerable prognostic significance. PMID:22734930

  17. Dicer Is Associated with Ribosomal DNA Chromatin in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filipowicz, Witold; Svoboda, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Background RNA silencing is a common term for pathways utilizing small RNAs as sequence-specific guides to repress gene expression. Components of the RNA silencing machinery are involved in different aspects of chromatin function in numerous organisms. However, association of RNA silencing with chromatin in mammalian cells remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunostaining of mitotic chromosomes with antibodies visualizing either endogenous or ectopically expressed Dicer in mammalian cells revealed association of the protein with ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and bisulfite sequencing experiments indicated that Dicer is associated with transcribed regions of both active and silenced genes in rDNA arrays of interphase chromosomes. Metabolic labeling of the mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking Dicer did not reveal apparent defect in rRNA biogenesis though pre-rRNA synthesis in these cells was decreased, likely as a consequence of their slower growth caused by the loss of miRNAs. We analyzed in detail chromatin structure of rDNA but did not find any epigenetic changes at rDNA loci in Dicer?/? ES cells. Instead, we found that rDNA methylation is rather low in primary tissues, contrasting with rDNA methylation patterns in transformed cell lines. Conclusion/Significance We found that Dicer, a key component of RNA silencing pathways, can be detected in association with rDNA chromatin in mammalian cells. The role of this particular localization of Dicer is not readily apparent since the enzyme is associated with rDNA genes regardless of their transcriptional activity. However, localization of Dicer to the transcribed region suggests that transcription may contribute to the Dicer deposition at rDNA chromatin. We hypothesize that Dicer functions in maintaining integrity of rDNA arrays. PMID:20730047

  18. The histone content of chromatin preparations from leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, H; Mahon, K

    1977-12-01

    The histone compositions of chromatin preparations obtained from different adult laukaemias were compared and showed differences between myeloid, monoblastic and lymphoblastic types. The differences were observed whether or not the myeloid precursors were mature or blast forms. Mixing experiments revealed that a potent histone protease was present in the myelocyte chromatin fraction which, unlike most histone proteases, appeared not to be inhibited by serine esterase inhibitors. It is concluded that the differences observed in the histone patterns do not reflect the histon composition present in the cell but are created by proteolytic degradation during the isolation procedures. However, these may still provide some help in identifying myeloblasts in undifferentiated leukaemias. PMID:603773

  19. Retention of the Native Epigenome in Purified Mammalian Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ehrensberger, Andreas H.; Franchini, Don-Marc; East, Philip; George, Roger; Matthews, Nik; Maslen, Sarah L.; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2015-01-01

    A protocol is presented for the isolation of native mammalian chromatin as fibers of 25–250 nucleosomes under conditions that preserve the natural epigenetic signature. The material is composed almost exclusively of histones and DNA and conforms to the structure expected by electron microscopy. All sequences probed for were retained, indicating that the material is representative of the majority of the genome. DNA methylation marks and histone marks resembled the patterns observed in vivo. Importantly, nucleosome positions also remained largely unchanged, except on CpG islands, where nucleosomes were found to be unstable. The technical challenges of reconstituting biochemical reactions with native mammalian chromatin are discussed. PMID:26248330

  20. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination) and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed. PMID:26388882

  1. Phosphoinositides as regulators of protein-chromatin interactions.

    PubMed

    Viiri, Keijo; Mäki, Markku; Lohi, Olli

    2012-05-01

    The molecular function of phospholipids in the nucleus has been only partially elucidated. The upsurge of epigenetic research has contributed to increased interest in nuclear phospholipids, such as phosphoinositides, and their involvement in gene transcription. However, the mechanisms by which phosphoinositides regulate transcription is still unknown at the molecular level. Certain phosphoinositide species can regulate protein-chromatin and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and specific nuclear target proteins link nuclear signaling lipids to gene expression. We propose that a phosphoinositide-mediated detachment of proteins from chromatin is a general biological mechanism that partly underlies the signaling effects of nuclear phosphoinositides. PMID:22550339

  2. Global Nature of Dynamic Protein-Chromatin Interactions In Vivo: Three-Dimensional Genome Scanning and Dynamic Interaction Networks of Chromatin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Phair, Robert D.; Scaffidi, Paola; Elbi, Cem; Vecerová, Jaromíra; Dey, Anup; Ozato, Keiko; Brown, David T.; Hager, Gordon; Bustin, Michael; Misteli, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Genome structure and gene expression depend on a multitude of chromatin-binding proteins. The binding properties of these proteins to native chromatin in intact cells are largely unknown. Here, we describe an approach based on combined in vivo photobleaching microscopy and kinetic modeling to analyze globally the dynamics of binding of chromatin-associated proteins in living cells. We have quantitatively determined basic biophysical properties, such as off rate constants, residence time, and bound fraction, of a wide range of chromatin proteins of diverse functions in vivo. We demonstrate that most chromatin proteins have a high turnover on chromatin with a residence time on the order of seconds, that the major fraction of each protein is bound to chromatin at steady state, and that transient binding is a common property of chromatin-associated proteins. Our results indicate that chromatin-binding proteins find their binding sites by three-dimensional scanning of the genome space and our data are consistent with a model in which chromatin-associated proteins form dynamic interaction networks in vivo. We suggest that these properties are crucial for generating high plasticity in genome expression. PMID:15226439

  3. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  4. Reconstitution of recombinant chromatin establishes a requirement for histone-tail modifications during chromatin assembly and transcription.

    PubMed

    Loyola, A; LeRoy, G; Wang, Y H; Reinberg, D

    2001-11-01

    The human ISWI-containing factor RSF (remodeling and spacing factor) was found to mediate nucleosome deposition and, in the presence of ATP, generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays. Using this system, recombinant chromatin was reconstituted with bacterially produced histones. Acetylation of the histone tails was found to play an important role in establishing regularly spaced nucleosome arrays. Recombinant chromatin lacking histone acetylation was impaired in directing transcription. Histone-tail modifications were found to regulate transcription from the recombinant chromatin. Acetylation of the histone tails by p300 was found to increase transcription. Methylation of the histone H3 tail by Suv39H1 was found to repress transcription in an HP1-dependent manner. The effects of histone-tail modifications were observed in nuclear extracts. A highly reconstituted RNA polymerase II transcription system was refractory to the effect imposed by acetylation and methylation. PMID:11691835

  5. DC Protein Assay Instruction

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    the addition of reagents. The assay is based on the reaction of protein with an alkaline copper tartrate: The reaction between protein and copper in an alkaline medium, and the subsequent reduction of Folin reagentDC Protein Assay Instruction Manual For Technical Service Call Your Local Bio-Rad Office

  6. ISWI Regulates Higher-Order Chromatin Structure and Histone H1 Assembly In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Scott, Matthew

    -dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure of histones. Chromatin remodeling reactions--including changes in the structure and spacing of nucleosomesISWI Regulates Higher-Order Chromatin Structure and Histone H1 Assembly In Vivo Davide F. V. Corona

  7. Histone H2A C-Terminus Regulates Chromatin Dynamics, Remodeling, and Histone H1 Binding

    E-print Network

    Rippe, Karsten

    Histone H2A C-Terminus Regulates Chromatin Dynamics, Remodeling, and Histone H1 Binding Christine C- terminal tail plays a pivotal role in regulating chromatin structure and dynamics. We find for efficient nucleosome translocation by ISWI-type chromatin remodelers and acts as a novel recognition module

  8. Roles of Chromatin Remodeling Factors in the Formation and Maintenance of Heterochromatin Structure*S

    E-print Network

    Bi, Xin

    Roles of Chromatin Remodeling Factors in the Formation and Maintenance of Heterochromatin Structure*S nucleosomes with characteristic histone modifications. There is evidence implicating chromatin remodeling cerevisiae that the Fun30p and Isw1p chromatin remodeling factors are similarly required for transcriptional

  9. Rapid mercury assays

    SciTech Connect

    Szurdoki, S.; Kido, H.; Hammock, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    We have developed rapid assays with the potential of detecting mercury in environmental samples. our methods combine the simple ELISA-format with the selective, high affinity complexation of mercuric ions by sulfur-containing ligands. The first assay is based on a sandwich chelate formed by a protein-bound ligand immobilized on the wells of a microliter plate, mercuric ion of the analyzed sample, and another ligand conjugated to a reporter enzyme. The second assay involves competition between mercuric ions and an organomercury-conjugate to bind to a chelating conjugate. Several sulfur containing chelators (e.g., dithiocarbamates) and organomercurials linked to macromolecular carriers have been investigated in these assay formats. The assays detect mercuric ions in ppb/high ppt concentrations with high selectivity.

  10. Single-cell assays

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Declan; Ren, Kangning; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-01-01

    This review presents an overview of literature that describes the applications of microfluidics to assay individual cells. We quantify the content of an individual mammalian cell, so that we can understand what criteria a single-cell assay must satisfy to be successful. We put in context the justification for single-cell assays and identify the characteristics that are relevant to single-cell assays. We review the literature from the past 24 months that describe the methods that use microfabrication—conventional or otherwise—and microfluidics in particular to study individual cells, and we present our views on how an increasing emphasis on three-dimensional cell culture and the demonstration of the first chemically defined cell might impact single-cell assays. PMID:21559238

  11. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  12. SLAC synchronous condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Corvin, C.

    1995-06-01

    A synchronous condenser is a synchronous machine that generates reactive power that leads real power by 90{degrees} in phase. The leading reactive power generated by the condenser offsets or cancels the normal lagging reactive power consumed by inductive and nonlinear loads at the accelerator complex. The quality of SLAC`s utility power is improved with the addition of the condenser. The inertia of the condenser`s 35,000 pound rotor damps and smoothes voltage excursions on two 12 kilovolt master substation buses, improving voltage regulation site wide. The condenser absorbs high frequency transients and noise in effect ``scrubbing`` the electric system power at its primary distribution source. In addition, the condenser produces a substantial savings in power costs. Federal and investor owned utilities that supply electric power to SLAC levy a monthly penalty for lagging reactive power delivered to the site. For the 1993 fiscal year this totaled over $285,000 in added costs for the year. By generating leading reactive power on site, thereby reducing total lagging reactive power requirements, a substantial savings in electric utility bills is achieved. Actual savings of $150,000 or more a year are possible depending on experimental operations.

  13. Up-regulation of the mu-opioid receptor gene is mediated through chromatin remodeling and transcriptional factors in differentiated neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Law, Ping-Yee; Wei, Li-Na; Loh, Horace H

    2010-07-01

    The effects of morphine are mediated mainly through the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Expression of the MOR is up-regulated during neuronal differentiation in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells and epigenetic changes play an important role in MOR up-regulation. This study investigates the basis for differentiation-dependent alterations of MOR chromatin by studying the recruitment or dissociation of several factors to the remodeled chromatin locus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were used to demonstrate the recruitment of the transcriptional activator Sp1 and the chromatin remodeling factors Brg1 and BAF155 to this promoter, as well as the dissociation of repressors [histone deacetylases, mSin3A, Brm, and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)]. Histone modifications (acetylation, induction of histone H3-lys4 methylation, and reduction of H3-lys9 methylation) were consistently detected on this promoter. Overexpression of Sp1 strongly enhanced MOR promoter activity, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A also increased promoter activity. In vitro DNA CpG-methylation of the promoter partially blocked binding of the Sp1 factor but induced MeCP2 binding. Coimmunoprecipitation studies also found novel evidence of an endogenous MeCP2 interaction with Sp3 but a weaker interaction with Sp1. Overall, the results suggest that during neuronal differentiation, MeCP2 and DNA methylation mediate remodeling of the MOR promoter by chromatin remodeling factors (Brg1 and BAF155) from a compacted state to a conformation allowing access for transcriptional factors. Subsequent recruitment of the activating transcription factor Sp1 to the remodeled promoter results in MOR up-regulation. PMID:20385708

  14. CPF-Associated Phosphatase Activity Opposes Condensin-Mediated Chromosome Condensation

    PubMed Central

    Vanoosthuyse, Vincent; Legros, Pénélope; van der Sar, Sjaak J. A.; Yvert, Gaël; Toda, Kenji; Le Bihan, Thierry; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Hardwick, Kevin; Bernard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Functional links connecting gene transcription and condensin-mediated chromosome condensation have been established in species ranging from prokaryotes to vertebrates. However, the exact nature of these links remains misunderstood. Here we show in fission yeast that the 3? end RNA processing factor Swd2.2, a component of the Cleavage and Polyadenylation Factor (CPF), is a negative regulator of condensin-mediated chromosome condensation. Lack of Swd2.2 does not affect the assembly of the CPF but reduces its association with chromatin. This causes only limited, context-dependent effects on gene expression and transcription termination. However, CPF-associated Swd2.2 is required for the association of Protein Phosphatase 1 PP1Dis2 with chromatin, through an interaction with Ppn1, a protein that we identify as the fission yeast homologue of vertebrate PNUTS. We demonstrate that Swd2.2, Ppn1 and PP1Dis2 form an independent module within the CPF, which provides an essential function in the absence of the CPF-associated Ssu72 phosphatase. We show that Ppn1 and Ssu72, like Swd2.2, are also negative regulators of condensin-mediated chromosome condensation. We conclude that Swd2.2 opposes condensin-mediated chromosome condensation by facilitating the function of the two CPF-associated phosphatases PP1 and Ssu72. PMID:24945319

  15. Steam Condensation Induced Waterhammer 

    E-print Network

    Kirsner, W.

    2000-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-00-04-29.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 33804 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-00-04-29.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Steam Condensation... mer-- i.e. fast moving steam picking up a slug of condensate and hurling it downstream against an elbow or a valve. Condensation Induced Waterham mer can be 100 times more powerful than this type of waterhammer. Because it does not require flowing...

  16. Expression, purification and characterisation of recombinant chromatin assembly factor 1

    E-print Network

    Royle, Nikki

    2013-01-08

    Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) is the only known replication dependant histone chaperone, responsible for the deposition of the histone H3/H4 tetramer onto DNA. Found in all eukaryotes, CAF-1 consists of three subunits, p150, p60 and p48. Since...

  17. Effect of saffron on rat sperm chromatin integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mardani, Mohammad; Vaez, Ahmad; Razavi, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, relation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) ROS concentration and semen quality was indicated. Saffron has traditionally been not only considered as a food additive but also as a medicinal herb, which has a good antioxidant properties. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection potency of saffron and vitamin E on sperm chromatin integrity. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats divided equally into saffron (100 mg/kg), vitamin E (100 mg/kg) and control (0.5cc distilled water /day) groups. After 60 days, cauda epididymis dissected and sperm cells were used for analysis of sperm chromatin packaging by chromomycin A3 (CMA3) staining, and sperm chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation by acridine orange (AO) staining. Results: The mean percentage of CMA3 positive sperm was significantly decreased in saffron and vitamin E groups relative to control group (p<0.001). Moreover, the AO staining results showed that the mean percentage of sperm with DNA damage was significantly decreased in saffron and vitamin E groups as compared with control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Our results purposed that saffron can protect sperm against DNA damage and chromatin anomalies. PMID:25031579

  18. Selective Excision of the Centromere Chromatin Complex from Saccharomycescerevisiae

    E-print Network

    ., 1984). Replacement of this CEN3-Bam HI linker cassette into a chromosome or plasmid results for chromosomal stability (Carbon and Clarke, 1984; Panzeri et al., 1985; Hegemann et al., 1986; McGrew et al and the ability of CEN to impart chromosomal stability. The chromatin components involved in the struc- tural

  19. Transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling mechanisms at PHO5 

    E-print Network

    Carvin, Christopher Dumas

    2005-08-29

    at lysine 4 of histone H3 is required for the full repression of PHO5and GAL1-10. We show that bromodomains, a domain conserved in chromatin remodeling coactivators, may function to stabilize binding. Finally, we present a strategy using DNA...

  20. Chromatin Dynamics in the Regulation of CFTR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gosalia, Nehal; Harris, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of chromatin dynamics to the regulation of human disease-associated loci such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has been the focus of intensive experimentation for many years. Recent technological advances in the analysis of transcriptional mechanisms across the entire human genome have greatly facilitated these studies. In this review we describe the complex machinery of tissue-specific regulation of CFTR expression, and put earlier observations in context by incorporating them into datasets generated by the most recent genomics methods. Though the gene promoter is required for CFTR expression, cell-type specific regulatory elements are located elsewhere in the gene and in flanking intergenic regions. Probably within its own topological domain established by the architectural proteins CTCF and cohesin, the CFTR locus utilizes chromatin dynamics to remodel nucleosomes, recruit cell-selective transcription factors, and activate intronic enhancers. These cis-acting elements are then brought to the gene promoter by chromatin looping mechanisms, which establish long-range interactions across the locus. Despite its complexity, the CFTR locus provides a paradigm for elucidating the critical role of chromatin dynamics in the transcription of individual human genes. PMID:26184320

  1. From DNA Sequence to Chromatin Dynamics: Computational Analysis of Transcriptional

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Nir

    From DNA Sequence to Chromatin Dynamics: Computational Analysis of Transcriptional Regulation be fought. In my PhD, I focus on regulation of gene expression from three perspectives. First, I present short sequence elements in their DNA regulatory regions, and represent them using a probabilistic model

  2. Structure of transcribed chromatin is a sensor of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Pestov, Nikolay A.; Gerasimova, Nadezhda S.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and repair of damaged DNA is essential for cell functioning and survival. Although multiple cellular systems are involved in the repair of single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs), it remains unknown how SSBs present in the nontemplate strand (NT-SSBs) of DNA organized in chromatin are detected. The effect of NT-SSBs on transcription through chromatin by RNA polymerase II was studied. NT-SSBs localized in the promoter-proximal region of nucleosomal DNA and hidden in the nucleosome structure can induce a nearly quantitative arrest of RNA polymerase downstream of the break, whereas more promoter-distal SSBs moderately facilitate transcription. The location of the arrest sites on nucleosomal DNA suggests that formation of small intranucleosomal DNA loops causes the arrest. This mechanism likely involves relief of unconstrained DNA supercoiling accumulated during transcription through chromatin by NT-SSBs. These data suggest the existence of a novel chromatin-specific mechanism that allows the detection of NT-SSBs by the transcribing enzyme. PMID:26601207

  3. Influence of CpG islands on chromatin structure 

    E-print Network

    Wachter, Elisabeth

    2014-06-28

    CpG islands (CGIs) are short GC rich sequences with a high frequency of CpGs that are associated with the active chromatin mark H3K4me3. Most occur at gene promoters and are often free of cytosine methylation. Recent ...

  4. Chromatin-remodeling and the initiation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-11-01

    The nucleosome serves as a general gene repressor by the occlusion of regulatory and promoter DNA sequences. Repression is relieved by the SWI/SNF-RSC family of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Research reviewed here has revealed the essential features of the remodeling process. PMID:26537406

  5. In vitro chromatin templates to study nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqi

    2015-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA associates with histones and exists in the form of a chromatin hierarchy. Thus, it is generally believed that many eukaryotic cellular DNA processing events such as replication, transcription, recombination and DNA repair are influenced by the packaging of DNA into chromatin. This mini-review covers the current knowledge of DNA damage and repair in chromatin based on in vitro studies. Specifically, nucleosome assembly affects DNA damage formation in both random sequences and sequences with strong nucleosome-positioning signals such as 5S rDNA. At least three systems have been used to analyze the effect of nucleosome folding on nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro: (a) human cell extracts that have to rely on labeling of repair synthesis to monitor DNA repair, due to very low repair efficacy; (b) Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts, that have very robust DNA repair efficacy, have been utilized to follow direct removal of DNA damage; (c) six purified human DNA repair factors (RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, and XPF-ERCC1) that have been used to reconstitute excision repair in vitro. In general, the results have shown that nucleosome folding inhibits NER and, therefore, its activity must be enhanced by chromatin remodeling factors like SWI/SNF. In addition, binding of transcription factors such as TFIIIA to the 5S rDNA promoter also modulates NER efficacy. PMID:26531320

  6. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Beneke, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose), the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor. PMID:22969794

  7. Trivalent Chromatin Marks the Way iN

    PubMed Central

    Hysolli, Eriona; Park, In-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Recently in Cell, Wapinski et al. investigated the epigenetic mechanisms underlying direct conversion of fibroblasts to induced neurons (iNs). They found that Ascl1 acts as a pioneer factor at neurogenic loci marked by a closed “trivalent” chromatin state in cells permissive to direct conversion but not in restrictive cell types. PMID:24209756

  8. Chromatin immunoprecipitation: optimization, quantitative analysis and data normalization

    PubMed Central

    Haring, Max; Offermann, Sascha; Danker, Tanja; Horst, Ina; Peterhansel, Christoph; Stam, Maike

    2007-01-01

    Background Chromatin remodeling, histone modifications and other chromatin-related processes play a crucial role in gene regulation. A very useful technique to study these processes is chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). ChIP is widely used for a few model systems, including Arabidopsis, but establishment of the technique for other organisms is still remarkably challenging. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the precipitated material and normalization of the data is often underestimated, negatively affecting data quality. Results We developed a robust ChIP protocol, using maize (Zea mays) as a model system, and present a general strategy to systematically optimize this protocol for any type of tissue. We propose endogenous controls for active and for repressed chromatin, and discuss various other controls that are essential for successful ChIP experiments. We experienced that the use of quantitative PCR (QPCR) is crucial for obtaining high quality ChIP data and we explain why. The method of data normalization has a major impact on the quality of ChIP analyses. Therefore, we analyzed different normalization strategies, resulting in a thorough discussion of the advantages and drawbacks of the various approaches. Conclusion Here we provide a robust ChIP protocol and strategy to optimize the protocol for any type of tissue; we argue that quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) is the best method to analyze the precipitates, and present comprehensive insights into data normalization. PMID:17892552

  9. Flow cytometric method for measuring chromatin fragmentation in fixed sperm from yellow perch (Perca flavescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O.; Pinkney, Alfred E.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Blazer, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Declining harvests of yellow perch, Perca flavescens, in urbanized watersheds of Chesapeake Bay have prompted investigations of their reproductive fitness. The purpose of this study was to establish a flow cytometric technique for DNA analysis of fixed samples sent from the field to provide reliable gamete quality measurements. Similar to the sperm chromatin structure assay, measures were made on the susceptibility of nuclear DNA to acid-induced denaturation, but used fixed rather than live or thawed cells. Nuclei were best exposed to the acid treatment for 1 minute at 37 °C followed by the addition of cold (4 °C) propidium iodide staining solution before flow cytometry. The rationale for protocol development is presented graphically through cytograms. Field results collected in 2008 and 2009 revealed DNA fragmentation up to 14.5%. In 2008, DNA fragmentation from the more urbanized watersheds was significantly greater than from reference sites (P = 0.026) and in 2009, higher percentages of haploid testicular cells were noted from the less urbanized watersheds (P = 0.032) indicating better reproductive condition at sites with less urbanization. For both years, total and progressive live sperm motilities by computer-assisted sperm motion analysis ranged from 19.1% to 76.5%, being significantly higher at the less urbanized sites (P < 0.05). This flow cytometric method takes advantage of the propensity of fragmented DNA to be denatured under standard conditions, or 1 minute at 37 °C with 10% buffered formalin–fixed cells. The study of fixed sperm makes possible the restrospective investigation of germplasm fragmentation, spermatogenic ploidy patterns, and chromatin compaction levels from samples translocated over distance and time. The protocol provides an approach that can be modified for other species across taxa.

  10. A negative loop within the nuclear pore complex controls global chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Manuel; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) tethers chromatin to create an environment for gene regulation, but little is known about how this activity is regulated to avoid excessive tethering of the genome. Here we propose a negative regulatory loop within the NPC controlling the chromatin attachment state, in which Nup155 and Nup93 recruit Nup62 to suppress chromatin tethering by Nup155. Depletion of Nup62 severely disrupts chromatin distribution in the nuclei of female germlines and somatic cells, which can be reversed by codepleting Nup155. Thus, this universal regulatory system within the NPC is crucial to control large-scale chromatin organization in the nucleus. PMID:26341556

  11. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  12. Re-Condensation 

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, P.; Kozman, T.

    2004-01-01

    return lines from trap discharges based totally on water is a gross error and causes lines to be drastically undersized for the flash steam. This causes condensate lines to become pressurized, not atmospheric, which in turn causes a backpressure...

  13. Mechanism of dropwise condensation

    E-print Network

    Umur, Aydin

    1963-01-01

    From a study of surface phenomena, information is obtained about conditions under which net condensation can occur. An experimental examination of the surface, using an optical method capable of detecting thin films of ...

  14. Beware of condenser fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    1995-04-01

    Many chemical process plants generate steam for power production and process use. Recovering this steam as condensate, and returning it to the boiler, is an economical way to recycle heat. This is usually done in a watercooled, steam-surface condenser located at the exhaust of a turbine. Poor performance of such a condenser -- which is really a large heat exchanger -- can significantly decrease a plant`s heat-recycling efficiency. The most-common causes of condenser inefficiency are: microbiological growth on the water side, scale formation on the water side, tube pluggage by debris and air in-leakage on the steam side. These problems can cost a plant dearly. Well-planned treatment programs to combat these causes, however, pay for themselves many times over. The paper discusses these four types of fouling and solutions to their mitigation.

  15. Ghost condensate busting

    SciTech Connect

    Bilic, Neven; Tupper, Gary B; Viollier, Raoul D E-mail: gary.tupper@uct.ac.za

    2008-09-15

    Applying the Thomas-Fermi approximation to renormalizable field theories, we construct ghost condensation models that are free of the instabilities associated with violations of the null-energy condition.

  16. Ghost Condensate Busting

    E-print Network

    Neven Bili?; Gary B. Tupper; Raoul D. Viollier

    2008-08-06

    Applying the Thomas-Fermi approximation to renormalizable field theories, we construct ghost condensation models that are free of the instabilities associated with violations of the null-energy condition.

  17. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  18. Chromatin conformation in living cells: support for a zig-zag model of the 30 nm chromatin fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Holley, W. R.; Mian, I. S.; Chatterjee, A.

    1998-01-01

    A new method was used to probe the conformation of chromatin in living mammalian cells. The method employs ionizing radiation and is based on the concept that such radiation induces correlated breaks in DNA strands that are in spatial proximity. Human dermal fibroblasts in G0 phase of the cell cycle and Chinese hamster ovary cells in mitosis were irradiated by X-rays or accelerated ions. Following lysis of the cells, DNA fragments induced by correlated breaks were end-labeled and separated according to size on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. A characteristic peak was obtained for a fragment size of 78 bases, which is the size that corresponds to one turn of DNA around the nucleosome. Additional peaks between 175 and 450 bases reflect the relative position of nearest-neighbor nucleosomes. Theoretical calculations that simulate the indirect and direct effect of radiation on DNA demonstrate that the fragment size distributions are closely related to the chromatin structure model used. Comparison of the experimental data with theoretical results support a zig-zag model of the chromatin fiber rather than a simple helical model. Thus, radiation-induced damage analysis can provide information on chromatin structure in the living cell. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  19. Chromatin remodelling and transcription: be-WICHed by nuclear myosin 1.

    PubMed

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Ostlund

    2006-06-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells requires dynamic changes of chromatin structure to facilitate or prevent RNA polymerase access to active genes. These structural modifications rely on the concerted action of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complexes and histone-modifying enzymes, which generate a chromatin configuration that is either compatible with transcription (euchromatin) or incompatible (heterochromatin). Insights into how these structural changes might be coordinated for RNA polymerase I (pol I) genes come from the discoveries of the nucleolar-remodelling complex (NoRC) and B-WICH--a high molecular weight fraction of the WSTF/SNF2h chromatin-remodelling complex. NoRC produces a repressive chromatin state; B-WICH, together with nuclear myosin 1, activates pol I transcription directly on chromatin templates and might also function in the maintenance of ribosomal chromatin structure. PMID:16574391

  20. Super-resolution microscopy reveals decondensed chromatin structure at transcription sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yejun; Maharana, Shovamayee; Wang, Michelle D.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-03-01

    Remodeling of the local chromatin structure is essential for the regulation of gene expression. While a number of biochemical and bioimaging experiments suggest decondensed chromatin structures are associated with transcription, a direct visualization of DNA and transcriptionally active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) at super-resolution is still lacking. Here we investigate the structure of chromatin isolated from HeLa cells using binding activatable localization microscopy (BALM). The sample preparation method preserved the structural integrity of chromatin. Interestingly, BALM imaging of the chromatin spreads revealed the presence of decondensed chromatin as gap structures along the spreads. These gaps were enriched with phosphorylated S5 RNA pol II, and were sensitive to the cellular transcriptional state. Taken together, we could visualize the decondensed chromatin regions together with active RNA pol II for the first time using super-resolution microscopy.

  1. HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of assays to evaluate and assist in predicting potentially adverse human health effects associated with exposure to pollutants in water (that is, municipal wastewater, sewage sludge, ambient water, and drinking water) is the focus of this review.

  2. ChromoShake: a chromosome dynamics simulator reveals that chromatin loops stiffen centromeric chromatin.

    PubMed

    Lawrimore, Josh; Aicher, Joseph K; Hahn, Patrick; Fulp, Alyona; Kompa, Ben; Vicci, Leandra; Falvo, Michael; Taylor, Russell M; Bloom, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    ChromoShake is a three-dimensional simulator designed to find the thermodynamically favored states for given chromosome geometries. The simulator has been applied to a geometric model based on experimentally determined positions and fluctuations of DNA and the distribution of cohesin and condensin in the budding yeast centromere. Simulations of chromatin in differing initial configurations reveal novel principles for understanding the structure and function of a eukaryotic centromere. The entropic position of DNA loops mirrors their experimental position, consistent with their radial displacement from the spindle axis. The barrel-like distribution of cohesin complexes surrounding the central spindle in metaphase is a consequence of the size of the DNA loops within the pericentromere to which cohesin is bound. Linkage between DNA loops of different centromeres is requisite to recapitulate experimentally determined correlations in DNA motion. The consequences of radial loops and cohesin and condensin binding are to stiffen the DNA along the spindle axis, imparting an active function to the centromere in mitosis. PMID:26538024

  3. Chromatin extrusion explains key features of loop and domain formation in wild-type and engineered genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Adrian L.; Rao, Suhas S. P.; Huang, Su-Chen; Durand, Neva C.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Jewett, Andrew I.; Bochkov, Ivan D.; Chinnappan, Dharmaraj; Cutkosky, Ashok; Li, Jian; Geeting, Kristopher P.; Gnirke, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexandre; McKenna, Doug; Stamenova, Elena K.; Lander, Eric S.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2015-01-01

    We recently used in situ Hi-C to create kilobase-resolution 3D maps of mammalian genomes. Here, we combine these maps with new Hi-C, microscopy, and genome-editing experiments to study the physical structure of chromatin fibers, domains, and loops. We find that the observed contact domains are inconsistent with the equilibrium state for an ordinary condensed polymer. Combining Hi-C data and novel mathematical theorems, we show that contact domains are also not consistent with a fractal globule. Instead, we use physical simulations to study two models of genome folding. In one, intermonomer attraction during polymer condensation leads to formation of an anisotropic “tension globule.” In the other, CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin act together to extrude unknotted loops during interphase. Both models are consistent with the observed contact domains and with the observation that contact domains tend to form inside loops. However, the extrusion model explains a far wider array of observations, such as why loops tend not to overlap and why the CTCF-binding motifs at pairs of loop anchors lie in the convergent orientation. Finally, we perform 13 genome-editing experiments examining the effect of altering CTCF-binding sites on chromatin folding. The convergent rule correctly predicts the affected loops in every case. Moreover, the extrusion model accurately predicts in silico the 3D maps resulting from each experiment using only the location of CTCF-binding sites in the WT. Thus, we show that it is possible to disrupt, restore, and move loops and domains using targeted mutations as small as a single base pair. PMID:26499245

  4. Chromatin extrusion explains key features of loop and domain formation in wild-type and engineered genomes.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Adrian L; Rao, Suhas S P; Huang, Su-Chen; Durand, Neva C; Huntley, Miriam H; Jewett, Andrew I; Bochkov, Ivan D; Chinnappan, Dharmaraj; Cutkosky, Ashok; Li, Jian; Geeting, Kristopher P; Gnirke, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexandre; McKenna, Doug; Stamenova, Elena K; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2015-11-24

    We recently used in situ Hi-C to create kilobase-resolution 3D maps of mammalian genomes. Here, we combine these maps with new Hi-C, microscopy, and genome-editing experiments to study the physical structure of chromatin fibers, domains, and loops. We find that the observed contact domains are inconsistent with the equilibrium state for an ordinary condensed polymer. Combining Hi-C data and novel mathematical theorems, we show that contact domains are also not consistent with a fractal globule. Instead, we use physical simulations to study two models of genome folding. In one, intermonomer attraction during polymer condensation leads to formation of an anisotropic "tension globule." In the other, CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin act together to extrude unknotted loops during interphase. Both models are consistent with the observed contact domains and with the observation that contact domains tend to form inside loops. However, the extrusion model explains a far wider array of observations, such as why loops tend not to overlap and why the CTCF-binding motifs at pairs of loop anchors lie in the convergent orientation. Finally, we perform 13 genome-editing experiments examining the effect of altering CTCF-binding sites on chromatin folding. The convergent rule correctly predicts the affected loops in every case. Moreover, the extrusion model accurately predicts in silico the 3D maps resulting from each experiment using only the location of CTCF-binding sites in the WT. Thus, we show that it is possible to disrupt, restore, and move loops and domains using targeted mutations as small as a single base pair. PMID:26499245

  5. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah (Albany, CA); Stevens, Raymond C. (Albany, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  6. The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus encodes a proline-rich protein required for meiotic chromosome condensation and synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, L.C.; Tang, Keliang; Cummings, W.J.; Zolan, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus is essential for the normal completion of meiosis. We examined surface-spread preparations of wild-type and rad9-1 nuclei from the meiotic stages of karyogamy through metaphase I, and we determined the primary sequence, structure, and meiotic expression of the rad9 gene. In wild-type C. cinereus, karyogamy is followed by condensation and alignment of homologous chromosomes. Condensation and axial core development largely precede synapsis, which often initiates at telomeres. A diffuse diplotene phase coincides with dissolution of the synaptonemal complex, and subsequently chromosomes further condense as the cells progress into metaphase I. In contrast, although karyogamy and nucleolar fusion are apparently normal in rad9-1 basidia, only short stretches of synaptonemal complex form. These correlate with stretches of condensed chromatin, mostly at apparent chromosome ends, and regions of presumptive triple synapsis are numerous. rad9-1 basidia enter the diffuse stages of early diplotene, and then 50% of these cells enter metaphase I by the criteria of nucleolar elimination and at least some chromatin condensation. rad9 gene expression is induced after gamma irradiation and during meiosis. The gene has 27 exons and encodes a predicted protein of 2157 amino acids, with a proline-rich amino terminus. 62 refs., 10 figs.

  7. The Rad9 Gene of Coprinus Cinereus Encodes a Proline-Rich Protein Required for Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, L. C.; Tang, K.; Cummings, W. J.; Zolan, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus is essential for the normal completion of meiosis. We examined surface-spread preparations of wild-type and rad9-1 nuclei from the meiotic stages of karyogamy through metaphase I, and we determined the primary sequence, structure, and meiotic expression of the rad9 gene. In wild-type C. cinereus, karyogamy is followed by condensation and alignment of homologous chromosomes. Condensation and axial core development largely precede synapsis, which often initiates at telomeres. A diffuse diplotene phase coincides with dissolution of the synaptonemal complex, and subsequently chromosomes further condense as the cells progress into metaphase I. In contrast, although karyogamy and nucleolar fusion are apparently normal in rad9-1 basidia, only short stretches of synaptonemal complex form. These correlate with stretches of condensed chromatin, mostly at apparent chromosome ends, and regions of presumptive triple synapsis are numerous. rad9-1 basidia enter the diffuse stage of early diplotene, and then 50% of these cells enter metaphase I by the criteria of nucleolar elimination and at least some chromatin condensation. rad9 gene expression is induced after gamma irradiation and during meiosis. The gene has 27 exons and encodes a predicted protein of 2157 amino acids, with a proline-rich amino terminus. PMID:8846891

  8. Nuclear stiffening and chromatin softening with progerin expression leads to an attenuated nuclear response to force.

    PubMed

    Booth, Elizabeth A; Spagnol, Stephen T; Alcoser, Turi A; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2015-08-28

    Progerin is a mutant form of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin A, and its expression results in the rare premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Patients with HGPS demonstrate several characteristic signs of aging including cardiovascular and skeletal dysfunction. Cells from HGPS patients show several nuclear abnormalities including aberrant morphology, nuclear stiffening and loss of epigenetic modifications including heterochromatin territories. However, it is unclear why these changes disproportionately impact mechanically-responsive tissues. Using micropipette aspiration, we show that nuclei in progerin-expressing cells are stiffer than control cells. Conversely, our particle tracking reveals the nuclear interior becomes more compliant in cells from HGPS patients or with progerin expression, as consistent with decreased chromatin condensation as shown previously. Additionally, we find the nuclear interior is less responsive to external mechanical force from shear or compression likely resulting from damped force propagation due to nucleoskeletal stiffening. Collectively our findings suggest that force is similarly transduced into the nuclear interior in normal cells. In HGPS cells a combination of a stiffened nucleoskeleton and softened nuclear interior leads to mechanical irregularities and dysfunction of mechanoresponsive tissues in HGPS patients. PMID:26171741

  9. CYTOKINE-INDUCED CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS OF THE TYPE I COLLAGEN ALPHA 2 GENE DURING INTESTINAL ENDOTHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Tammy; Scarpa, Melania; Rieder, Florian; West, Gail; Stylianou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrosis of the intestine is currently an irreversible complication of Inflammatory Bowel Disease yet little is understood of the underlying pathogenesis and anti-fibrotic strategies remain elusive. To develop effective therapies, knowledge of the mechanism of transcription and excessive deposition of type I collagen - a hallmark of fibrosis, is needed. We have shown previously that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) contributes to the pool of intestinal fibrotic cells and that a cytokine cocktail (IL1-?, TNF-? and TGF-?) induces Collagen I alpha 2 (COL1A2) mRNA and protein. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on pure cultures of human intestinal mucosal endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT were performed with antibodies to specific histone modifications and RNA polymerase II. RT-PCR was used to quantify the levels of Col1A2 and endothelial specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) mRNA. Results We show that cytokines induce selective chromatin modifications (histone 4 hyperacetylation and hypermethylation of histone 3) and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II at the COL1A2 promoter. Hypoacetylated and hypomethylated histone 3 was detected on the repressed vWF gene. Prolonged exposure to cytokines (16 days) retained hyperacetylation of select lysines in H4 on the COL1A2 promoter. Removal of cytokines after 16 days and continued culture for 10 days, showed persistent hyperacetylation at lysine 16 in histone H4. Conclusion This is the first study to show that COL1A2 gene expression is associated with cytokine-induced, temporally ordered and persistent chromatin modifications and suggests that these are important determinants of gene expression in EndoMT and intestinal fibrosis. PMID:23635716

  10. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification.

    PubMed

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy; Primig, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6? mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MAT a/? wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes. PMID:25957495

  11. Genomic response to Wnt signalling is highly context-dependent - Evidence from DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens of Wnt/TCF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Railo, Antti; Pajunen, Antti; Itaeranta, Petri; Naillat, Florence; Vuoristo, Jussi; Kilpelaeinen, Pekka; Vainio, Seppo

    2009-10-01

    Wnt proteins are important regulators of embryonic development, and dysregulated Wnt signalling is involved in the oncogenesis of several human cancers. Our knowledge of the downstream target genes is limited, however. We used a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based assay to isolate and characterize the actual gene segments through which Wnt-activatable transcription factors, TCFs, regulate transcription and an Affymetrix microarray analysis to study the global transcriptional response to the Wnt3a ligand. The anti-{beta}-catenin immunoprecipitation of DNA-protein complexes from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing a fusion protein of {beta}-catenin and TCF7 resulted in the identification of 92 genes as putative TCF targets. GeneChip assays of gene expression performed on NIH3T3 cells and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 revealed 355 genes in NIH3T3 and 129 genes in the PC12 cells with marked changes in expression after Wnt3a stimulus. Only 2 Wnt-regulated genes were shared by both cell lines. Surprisingly, Disabled-2 was the only gene identified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation approach that displayed a marked change in expression in the GeneChip assay. Taken together, our approaches give an insight into the complex context-dependent nature of Wnt pathway transcriptional responses and identify Disabled-2 as a potential new direct target for Wnt signalling.

  12. Treatment of ovine oocytes with caffeine increases the accessibility of DNase I to the donor chromatin and reduces apoptosis in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inchul; Campbell, Keith H S

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine treatment of ovine oocytes increases the activity of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and, in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, increases the frequency of nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) and premature chromosome condensation (PCC). At the blastocyst stage, caffeine-treated SCNT embryos have increased cell numbers. One explanation for this is that NEBD and PCC release chromatin-bound somatic factors, allowing greater access of oocyte factors involved in DNA synthesis and nuclear reprogramming to donor chromatin. This could advance DNA replication and cleavage in the first cell cycle, resulting in increased cell numbers. Alternatively, increased MAPK activity may affect localisation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and reduce apoptosis. To investigate these possibilities, we investigated chromatin accessibility, the timing of DNA synthesis and first cleavage, the localisation of HSP27 during early development and the frequency of apoptotic nuclei at the blastocyst stage. Compared with control SCNT (non-caffeine treatment), caffeine treatment (10 mM caffeine for 6 h prior to activation) increased the accessibility of DNase I to donor chromatin (P < 0.05 at 1.5 h post activation (h.p.a.)), advanced DNA synthesis (43.5% v. 67.6%, respectively; P < 0.01 at 6 h.p.a.) and first cleavage (27.3% v. 40.5% at 20 h.p.a., respectively) and increased nuclear localisation of HSP27. Although development to the blastocyst stage was not affected, caffeine increased total cell numbers (98.5 v. 76.6; P < 0.05) and reduced the frequency of apoptotic nuclei (11.27% v. 20.3%; P < 0.05) compared with control SCNT group. PMID:20591334

  13. Sp1 Regulates Chromatin Looping between an Intronic Enhancer and Distal Promoter of the Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene in Renal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Deshane, Jessy; Kim, Junghyun; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Hock, Thomas D.; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2010-01-01

    HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1) is an inducible microsomal enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of pro-oxidant heme. The goal of this study was to characterize a minimal enhancer region within the human HO-1 gene and delineate its role in modulating HO-1 expression by participation with its promoter elements in renal epithelial cells. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis identified a 220-bp minimal enhancer in intron 1 of the HO-1 gene, which regulates hemin-mediated HO-1 gene expression. Small interfering RNA, decoy oligonucleotides, site-directed mutagenesis, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the functional interaction of Sp1 with a consensus binding sequence within the 220-bp region. Mutations of regulatory elements within the ?4.5 kb promoter region (a cyclic AMP response and a downstream NF-E2/AP-1 element, both located at ?4.0 kb, and/or an E-box sequence located at ?44 bp) resulted in the loss of enhancer activity. A chromosome conformation capture assay performed in human renal epithelial (HK-2) cells demonstrated hemin-inducible chromatin looping between the intronic enhancer and the ?4.0 kb promoter region in a time-dependent manner. Restriction digestion with ApaLI (which cleaves the 220-bp enhancer) led to a loss of stimulus-dependent chromatin looping. Sp1 small interfering RNA and mithramycin A, a Sp1 binding site inhibitor, resulted in loss of the loop formation between the intronic enhancer and the distal HO-1 promoter by the chromosome conformation capture assay. These results provide novel insight into the complex molecular interactions that underlie human HO-1 regulation in renal epithelial cells. PMID:20351094

  14. Chromatin Signature Identifies Monoallelic Gene Expression Across Mammalian Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Anwesha; Vigneau, Sébastien; Savova, Virginia; Zwemer, Lillian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of autosomal genes (MAE) is a widespread epigenetic phenomenon which is poorly understood, due in part to current limitations of genome-wide approaches for assessing it. Recently, we reported that a specific histone modification signature is strongly associated with MAE and demonstrated that it can serve as a proxy of MAE in human lymphoblastoid cells. Here, we use murine cells to establish that this chromatin signature is conserved between mouse and human and is associated with MAE in multiple cell types. Our analyses reveal extensive conservation in the identity of MAE genes between the two species. By analyzing MAE chromatin signature in a large number of cell and tissue types, we show that it remains consistent during terminal cell differentiation and is predominant among cell-type specific genes, suggesting a link between MAE and specification of cell identity. PMID:26092837

  15. piRNA clusters and open chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are major structural components of eukaryotic genomes; however, mobilization of TEs generally has negative effects on the host genome. To counteract this threat, host cells have evolved genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that keep TEs silenced. One such mechanism involves the Piwi-piRNA complex, which represses TEs in animal gonads either by cleaving TE transcripts in the cytoplasm or by directing specific chromatin modifications at TE loci in the nucleus. Most Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are derived from genomic piRNA clusters. There has been remarkable progress in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying piRNA biogenesis. However, little is known about how a specific locus in the genome is converted into a piRNA-producing site. In this review, we will discuss a possible link between chromatin boundaries and piRNA cluster formation. PMID:25126116

  16. Synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin genes disrupted in autism

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Poultney, Christopher S.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Ercument; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarjinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Fu, Shih-Chen; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F.; Brownfeld, Jessica M.; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas J.; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H.; Chiocchetti, Andreas G.; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L.; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah R.; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hill, R. Sean; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Gonzalez, Patricia Jimenez; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R.; McInnes, Alison L.; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J.; Ozaki, Norio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R.; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J.; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Wang, Li-San; Weiss, Lauren A.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W.; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Cook, Edwin H.; Freitag, Christine M.; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M.; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Zwick, Michael E.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Cutler, David J.; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variation and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, and a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin remodeling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating propagation of action potentials, pacemaking, and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodelers, prominently histone post-translational modifications involving lysine methylation/demethylation. PMID:25363760

  17. A quantitative telomeric chromatin isolation protocol identifies different telomeric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolimund, Larissa; Aeby, Eric; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Chiappe, Diego; Moniatte, Marc; Lingner, Joachim

    2013-11-01

    Telomere composition changes during tumourigenesis, aging and in telomere syndromes in a poorly defined manner. Here we develop a quantitative telomeric chromatin isolation protocol (QTIP) for human cells, in which chromatin is cross-linked, immunopurified and analysed by mass spectrometry. QTIP involves stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to compare and identify quantitative differences in telomere protein composition of cells from various states. With QTIP, we specifically enrich telomeric DNA and all shelterin components. We validate the method characterizing changes at dysfunctional telomeres, and identify and validate known, as well as novel telomere-associated polypeptides including all THO subunits, SMCHD1 and LRIF1. We apply QTIP to long and short telomeres and detect increased density of SMCHD1 and LRIF1 and increased association of the shelterins TRF1, TIN2, TPP1 and POT1 with long telomeres. Our results validate QTIP to study telomeric states during normal development and in disease.

  18. Chromatin Challenges during DNA Replication: A Systems Representation

    PubMed Central

    Aladjem, Mirit I.; Weinstein, John N.; Pommier, Yves

    2008-01-01

    In a recent review, A. Groth and coworkers presented a comprehensive account of nucleosome disassembly in front of a DNA replication fork, assembly behind the replication fork, and the copying of epigenetic information onto the replicated chromatin. Understanding those processes however would be enhanced by a comprehensive graphical depiction analogous to a circuit diagram. Accordingly, we have constructed a molecular interaction map (MIM) that preserves in essentially complete detail the processes described by Groth et al. The MIM organizes and elucidates the information presented by Groth et al. on the complexities of chromatin replication, thereby providing a tool for system-level comprehension of the effects of genetic mutations, altered gene expression, and pharmacologic intervention. PMID:17959828

  19. Chromatin modifications as therapeutic targets in MLL-rearranged Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Aniruddha J.; Bradner, James; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    MLL-rearranged leukemias exemplify malignancies with perturbations of the epigenetic landscape. Specific chromatin modifications that aid in the perpetuation of MLL-fusion gene driven oncogenic programs are being defined, presenting novel avenues for therapeutic intervention. Proof-of-concept studies have recently been reported, using small-molecule inhibitors targeting the histone methyltransferase DOT1L or the acetyl-histone binding protein BRD4 showing potent activity against MLL-rearranged leukemias in pre-clinical models. It is apparent that intensive efforts will be made toward the further development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting these, and other chromatin-associated protein targets. These studies may lead to the advent of a new generation of much-needed therapeutic modalities in leukemia and other cancers. PMID:22867873

  20. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Alters Chromatin Organization, Nuclear Positioning and Activity of 45S rDNA Loci in Cycling Cells of Q. robur

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Tomislav; Maglica, Željka; Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2014-01-01

    Around 2200 copies of genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in pedunculate oak, Quercus robur, are organized into two rDNA loci, the major (NOR-1) and the minor (NOR-2) locus. We present the first cytogenetic evidence indicating that the NOR-1 represents the active nucleolar organizer responsible for rRNA synthesis, while the NOR-2 probably stays transcriptionally silent and does not participate in the formation of the nucleolus in Q. robur, which is a situation resembling the well-known phenomenon of nucleolar dominance. rDNA chromatin topology analyses in cycling root tip cells by light and electron microscopy revealed the minor locus to be highly condensed and located away from the nucleolus, while the major locus was consistently associated with the nucleolus and often exhibited different levels of condensation. In addition, silver precipitation was confined exclusively to the NOR-1 locus. Also, NOR-2 was highly methylated at cytosines and rDNA chromatin was marked with histone modifications characteristic for repressive state. After treatment of the root cells with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine, we observed an increase in the total level of rRNA transcripts and a decrease in DNA methylation level at the NOR-2 locus. Also, NOR-2 sites relocalized with respect to the nuclear periphery/nucleolus, however, the relocation did not affect the contribution of this locus to nucleolar formation, nor did it affect rDNA chromatin decondensation, strongly suggesting that NOR-2 has lost the function of rRNA synthesis and nucleolar organization. PMID:25093501

  1. A Ligand Binding Domain Mutation in the Mouse Glucocorticoid Receptor Functionally Links Chromatin Remodeling and Transcription Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Lynn A.; Smith, Catharine L.; Bodwell, Jack E.; Munck, Allan U.; Hager, Gordon L.

    1999-01-01

    We utilized the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) in vivo to understand how the interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with a nucleosome-assembled promoter allows access of factors required for the transition from a repressed promoter to a derepressed, transcriptionally competent promoter. A mutation (C644G) in the ligand binding domain (LBD) of the mouse GR has provided information regarding the steps required in the derepression/activation process and in the functional significance of the two major transcriptional activation domains, AF1 and AF2. The mutant GR activates transcription from a transiently transfected promoter that has a disordered nucleosomal structure, though significantly less well than the wild-type GR. With an integrated, replicated promoter, which is assembled in an ordered nucleosomal array, the mutant GR does not activate transcription, and it fails to induce chromatin remodeling of the MMTV LTR promoter, as indicated by nuclease accessibility assays. Together, these findings support a two-step model for the transition of a nucleosome-assembled, repressed promoter to its transcriptionally active, derepressed form. In addition, we find that the C-terminal GR mutation is dominant over the transcription activation function of the N-terminal GR activation domain. These findings suggest that the primary activation function of the C-terminal activation domain is different from the function of the N-terminal activation domain and that it is required for derepression of the chromatin-repressed MMTV promoter. PMID:10567540

  2. Flies stretch their cells to avoid a chromatin trap

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Before the final step of cytokinesis, termed abscission, dividing cells need to ensure that the cleavage plane is clear of chromatin. In this issue, Kotadia et al. (2012. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/jcb.201208041) show that in Drosophila melanogaster, larval neuroblasts elongate to allow segregation of extra-long chromatids and clearance of the midzone, thereby avoiding cytokinesis failure and aneuploidy. PMID:23185028

  3. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E; Dumler, J Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of several key phagocyte oxidase genes. The A. phagocytophilum protein AnkA localizes to the myeloid cell nucleus where it binds AT-rich regions in the CYBB promoter and decreases its transcription. AT-rich regions of DNA are characteristic of matrix attachment regions (MARs) which are critical for chromatin structure and transcription. MAR-binding proteins, such as SATB1, interact with histone modifying enzymes resulting in altered gene expression. With A. phagocytophilum infection, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) expression is increased and histone H3 acetylation is decreased at the CYBB promoter, suggesting a role for AnkA in altering host epigenetics and modulating gene transcription, at this, and perhaps other loci. This review will focus on how bacterial pathogens alter host epigenetics, by specifically examining A. phagocytophilum AnkA cis-regulation of CYBB transcription and epigenetic changes associated with infection. PMID:23082961

  4. Chromatin signaling in muscle stem cells: interpreting the regenerative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Arianna; Palacios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult occurs in response to damage at expenses of a population of adult stem cells, the satellite cells. Upon injury, either physical or genetic, signals released within the satellite cell niche lead to the commitment, expansion and differentiation of the pool of muscle progenitors to repair damaged muscle. To achieve this goal satellite cells undergo a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming to coordinately activate and repress specific subset of genes. Although the epigenetics of muscle regeneration has been extensively discussed, less emphasis has been put on how extra-cellular cues are translated into the specific chromatin reorganization necessary for progression through the myogenic program. In this review we will focus on how satellite cells sense the regenerative microenvironment in physiological and pathological circumstances, paying particular attention to the mechanism through which the external stimuli are transduced to the nucleus to modulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We will discuss the pathways involved and how alterations in this chromatin signaling may contribute to satellite cells dysfunction during aging and disease. PMID:25904863

  5. Footprint traversal by ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler motor

    E-print Network

    Ashok Garai; Jesrael Mani; Debashish Chowdhury

    2012-03-14

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific segments of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. The helical path of histone-DNA contact on a nucleosome is also called "footprint". We investigate the mechanism of footprint traversal by a CRE that translocates along the dsDNA. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean time of traversal. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the mean traversal time can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments on mono-nucleosomes.

  6. Epigenetics and chromatin plasticity in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    P?ikrylová, Terézia; Pacherník, Ji?í; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The study of embryonic stem cells is in the spotlight in many laboratories that study the structure and function of chromatin and epigenetic processes. The key properties of embryonic stem cells are their capacity for self-renewal and their pluripotency. Pluripotent stem cells are able to differentiate into the cells of all three germ layers, and because of this property they represent a promising therapeutic tool in the treatment of diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and diabetes, or in the healing of lesions after heart attack. As the basic nuclear unit, chromatin is responsible for the regulation of the functional status of cells, including pluripotency and differentiation. Therefore, in this review we discuss the functional changes in chromatin during differentiation and the correlation between epigenetics events and the differentiation potential of embryonic stem cells. In particular we focus on post-translational histone modification, DNA methylation and the heterochromatin protein HP1 and its unique function in mouse and human embryonic stem cells. PMID:23951389

  7. Rsc4 Connects the Chromatin Remodeler RSC to RNA Polymerases‡

    PubMed Central

    Soutourina, Julie; Bordas-Le Floch, Véronique; Gendrel, Gabrielle; Flores, Amando; Ducrot, Cécile; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Soularue, Pascal; Navarro, Francisco; Cairns, Bradley R.; Lefebvre, Olivier; Werner, Michel

    2006-01-01

    RSC is an essential, multisubunit chromatin remodeling complex. We show here that the Rsc4 subunit of RSC interacted via its C terminus with Rpb5, a conserved subunit shared by all three nuclear RNA polymerases (Pol). Furthermore, the RSC complex coimmunoprecipitated with all three RNA polymerases. Mutations in the C terminus of Rsc4 conferred a thermosensitive phenotype and the loss of interaction with Rpb5. Certain thermosensitive rpb5 mutations were lethal in combination with an rsc4 mutation, supporting the physiological significance of the interaction. Pol II transcription of ca. 12% of the yeast genome was increased or decreased twofold or more in a rsc4 C-terminal mutant. The transcription of the Pol III-transcribed genes SNR6 and RPR1 was also reduced, in agreement with the observed localization of RSC near many class III genes. Rsc4 C-terminal mutations did not alter the stability or assembly of the RSC complex, suggesting an impact on Rsc4 function. Strikingly, a C-terminal mutation of Rsc4 did not impair RSC recruitment to the RSC-responsive genes DUT1 and SMX3 but rather changed the chromatin accessibility of DNases to their promoter regions, suggesting that the altered transcription of DUT1 and SMX3 was the consequence of altered chromatin remodeling. PMID:16782880

  8. Novel chromatin texture features for the classification of pap smears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejnordi, Babak E.; Moshavegh, Ramin; Sujathan, K.; Malm, Patrik; Bengtsson, Ewert; Mehnert, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a set of novel structural texture features for quantifying nuclear chromatin patterns in cells on a conventional Pap smear. The features are derived from an initial segmentation of the chromatin into bloblike texture primitives. The results of a comprehensive feature selection experiment, including the set of proposed structural texture features and a range of different cytology features drawn from the literature, show that two of the four top ranking features are structural texture features. They also show that a combination of structural and conventional features yields a classification performance of 0.954±0.019 (AUC±SE) for the discrimination of normal (NILM) and abnormal (LSIL and HSIL) slides. The results of a second classification experiment, using only normal-appearing cells from both normal and abnormal slides, demonstrates that a single structural texture feature measuring chromatin margination yields a classification performance of 0.815±0.019. Overall the results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed structural approach and that it is possible to detect malignancy associated changes (MACs) in Papanicoloau stain.

  9. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Francesca S. (Livermore, CA); Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  10. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  11. Economical Condensing Turbines? 

    E-print Network

    Dean, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Turbines? by J.E.Dean, P.E. Steam turbines have long been used at utilities and in industry to generate power. There are three basic types of steam turbines: condensing, letdown 1 and extraction/condensing. ? Letdown turbines reduce the pressure... of the incoming steam to one or more pressures and generate power very efficiently, assuming that all the letdown steam has a use. Two caveats: ? Letdown turbines produce power based upon steam requirements and not based upon power requirements, and ? If all...

  12. Interference of condensed tannin in lignin analyses of dry bean and forage crops.

    PubMed

    Marles, M A Susan; Coulman, Bruce E; Bett, Kirstin E

    2008-11-12

    Legumes with high concentrations of condensed tannin (pinto bean [Phaseolus vulgaris L.], sainfoin [Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.], and big trefoil [Lotus uliginosus Hoff.]), were compared to a selection of forages, with low or zero condensed tannin (smooth bromegrass [ Bromus inermis Leyss], Lotus japonicus [Regel] K. Larsen, and alfalfa [Medicago sativa L.]), using four methods to estimate fiber or lignin. Protocols were validated by using semipurified condensed tannin polymers in adulteration assays that tested low-lignin tissue with polyphenolic-enriched samples. The effect on lignin assay methods by condensed tannin concentration was interpreted using a multivariate analysis. There was an overestimation of fiber or lignin in the presence of condensed tannin in the acid detergent fiber (ADF) and Klason lignin (KL) assays compared to that in the thioglycolic acid (TGA) and acid detergent lignin (ADL) methods. Sulfite reagents (present in TGA lignin method) or sequential acidic digests at high temperatures (ADF followed by ADL) were required to eliminate condensed tannin. The ADF (alone) and KL protocols are not recommended to screen nonwoody plants, such as forages, where condensed tannin has accumulated in the tissue. PMID:18841900

  13. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation-Sequencing (ChIP-seq) for Mapping of Estrogen Receptor-Chromatin Interactions in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kelly A; Brown, Gordon D; Carroll, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) is a powerful tool which combines the established method of ChIP with next-generation sequencing (NGS) to determine DNA-binding sites of a protein of interest on a genome-wide level, importantly, allowing for de novo discovery of binding events. Here we describe ChIP-seq using the well-established example of estrogen receptor-? mapping in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. PMID:26585129

  14. Multi-omic data integration links Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 (DBC1) Degradation to Chromatin Remodeling in Inflammatory Response

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ansong, Charles; Sydor, Michael A.; Imtiaz, Sayed; Mihai, Cosmin; Sontag, Ryan L.; Hixson, Kim K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Sobreira, Tiago; Orr, Galya; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-08-12

    Ubiquitination is a common protein post-translational modification that regulates many key cellular functions. Here we investigated the dynamics of ubiquitinated proteins after an inflammatory stimulation of RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. We demonstrate that levels of global ubiquitination, and K48 and K63 polyubiquitination change after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. A quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1199 ubiquitinated proteins, 78 of which had significantly changed ubiquitination levels after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. We next identified a subset of proteins that were targeted for degradation after lipopolysaccharide stimulation, by integrating the ubiquitinome data with global proteomics and transcriptomics results. Using cellular assays and western blot analyses we biochemically validated DBC1, a histone deacetylase inhibitor not previously linked to inflammation, as a degradation substrate, which is targeted via an orchestrated mechanism utilizing caspases and the proteasome. The degradation of DBC1 releases histone deacetylase activity, linking lipopolysaccharide activation to chromatin remodeling in caspase- and proteasome-mediated signaling.

  15. Contribution of Topological Domains and Loop Formation to 3D Chromatin Organization

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Vuthy; Baudement, Marie-Odile; Lesne, Annick; Forné, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Recent investigations on 3D chromatin folding revealed that the eukaryote genomes are both highly compartmentalized and extremely dynamic. This review presents the most recent advances in topological domains’ organization of the eukaryote genomes and discusses the relationship to chromatin loop formation. CTCF protein appears as a central factor of these two organization levels having either a strong insulating role at TAD borders, or a weaker architectural role in chromatin loop formation. TAD borders directly impact on chromatin dynamics by restricting contacts within specific genomic portions thus confining chromatin loop formation within TADs. We discuss how sub-TAD chromatin dynamics, constrained into a recently described statistical helix conformation, can produce functional interactions by contact stabilization. PMID:26226004

  16. Restoring chromatin after replication: how new and old histone marks come together.

    PubMed

    Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2010-04-01

    In dividing cells genome stability and function rely on faithful transmission of both DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin. In the course of DNA replication chromatin undergoes transient genome-wide disruption followed by restoration on new DNA. This involves tight coordination of DNA replication and chromatin assembly processes in time and space. Dynamic recycling and de novo deposition of histones are fundamental for chromatin restoration. Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are thought to have a causal role in establishing distinct chromatin structures. Here we discuss PTMs present on new and parental histones and how they influence genome stability and restoration of epigenetically defined domains. Newly deposited histones must change their signature in the process of chromatin restoration, this may occur in a step-wise fashion involving replication-coupled processes and information from recycled parental histones. PMID:19815085

  17. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (inventor); Koeing, David W. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  18. Sigma Receptor Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2015-01-01

    Sigma receptors, both Sigma-1(S1R) and Sigma-2 (S2R), are small molecule-regulated, primarily endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated sites. A number of drugs bind to sigma receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol and (+)-pentazocine, an opioid analgesic. Sigma receptors are implicated in many central nervous system disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease and conditions associated with motor control, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Described in this unit are radioligand binding assays used for the pharmacological characterization of S1R and S2R. Methods detailed include a radioligand saturation binding assay for defining receptor densities and a competitive inhibition binding assay employing [(3) H]-(+)-pentazocine for identifying and characterizing novel ligands that interact with S1R. Procedures using [(3) H]-1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([(3) H]-DTG), a nonselective sigma receptor ligand, are described for conducting a saturation binding and competitive inhibition assays for the S2R site. These protocols are of value in drug discovery in identifying new sigma ligands and in the characterization of these receptors. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26646191

  19. Chromatin pattern consisting of repeating bipartite structures in WI-38 cells infected with human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kierszenbaum, A L; Huang, E S

    1978-01-01

    A novel chromatin structural pattern displaying bipartite and oblate ellipsoid structures orderly arranged along a fiber axis has been observed in WI-38 cells infected with human cytomegalovirus. This chromatin type coexists with chromatin fibers showing conventional nucleosomes. Each bipartite-oblate structure is 40 nm in length, about four times as long as an ordinary nucleosome, and the number of these structures per micrometer (11/micrometer) is clearly less than that of typical cellular nucleosomes (32/micrometer). Images PMID:214585

  20. Treatment of gas condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Breidenbach, D.; Dellmann, W.; Mosebach, W.

    1985-01-22

    The invention makes possible a coking operation largely or completely eliminating waste water by converting the gas condensates obtained from the coking plant by a reverse osmosis process into a permeate which can be recycled to the coking operation, and a concentrated lye.

  1. The Color Glass Condensate

    E-print Network

    F. Gelis; E. Iancu; J. Jalilian-Marian; R. Venugopalan

    2010-02-01

    We provide a broad overview of the theoretical status and phenomenological applications of the Color Glass Condensate effective field theory describing universal properties of saturated gluons in hadron wavefunctions that are extracted from deeply inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collision experiments at high energies.

  2. Inflation from gravitino condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2015-07-01

    We review work on the formation of gravitino condensates via the super-Higgs effect in the early Universe. This is a scenario for both inflating the early universe and breaking local supersymmetry(supergravity), entirely independent of any coupling to external matter. The goldstino mode associated with the breaking of (global) supersymmetry is “eaten” by the gravitino field, which becomes massive (via its own vacuum condensation) and breaks supergravity dynamically. The most natural association of gravitino condensates with inflation proceeds in an indirect way, via a Starobinsky-type inflation, in the massive gravitino phase. This inflationary phase is associated with scalar modes hidden in the higher order curvature corrections of the effective action arising from integrating out massive gravitino degrees of freedom. The scenario is in agreement with Planck data phenomenology in a natural and phenomenologically-relevant range of parameters, namely Grand-Unified-Theory values for the supersymmetry breaking energy scale and dynamically-induced gravitino mass. A hill-top inflation, on the other hand, which could also occur in the model, whereby the role of the inflaton field is played by the gravitino condensate itself, would require significant fine tuning in the inflaton's wave function renormalisation and thus may be discarded on naturalness grounds.

  3. Effects of X-irradiation on mouse testicular cells and sperm chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, B.L.; Jost, L.K.; Erickson, K.R.; Tajiran, M.A.; Evenson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The testicular regions of male mice were exposed to x-ray doses ranging from 0 to 400 rads. Forty days after exposure the mice were killed and the testes and cauda epididymal sperm removed surgically. Flow cytometric measurements of acridine orange stained testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular samples indicated a repopulation of testicular cell types following x-ray killing of stem cells. Cauda epididymal sperm were analyzed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), a flow cytometric measurement of the susceptibility of the sperm nuclear DNA to in situ acid denaturation. The SCSA detected increased susceptibility to DNA denaturation in situ after 12.5 rads of x-ray exposure, with significant increases following 25 rads. Abnormal sperm head morphology was not significantly increased until the testes were exposed to 60 rads of x-rays. These data suggest that the SCSA is currently the most sensitive, noninvasive method of detecting x-ray damage to testicular stem spermatogonia. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Chromatin states modify network motifs contributing to cell-specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Yu, Fulong; Fan, Huihui; Ping, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification can affect many important biological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. It can alter chromatin conformation and contribute to gene regulation. To investigate how chromatin states associated with network motifs, we assembled chromatin state-modified regulatory networks by combining 269 ChIP-seq data and chromatin states in four cell types. We found that many chromatin states were significantly associated with network motifs, especially for feedforward loops (FFLs). These distinct chromatin state compositions contribute to different expression levels and translational control of targets in FFLs. Strikingly, the chromatin state-modified FFLs were highly cell-specific and, to a large extent, determined cell-selective functions, such as the embryonic stem cell-specific bivalent modification-related FFL with an important role in poising developmentally important genes for expression. Besides, comparisons of chromatin state-modified FFLs between cancerous/stem and primary cell lines revealed specific type of chromatin state alterations that may act together with motif structural changes cooperatively contribute to cell-to-cell functional differences. Combination of these alterations could be helpful in prioritizing candidate genes. Together, this work highlights that a dynamic epigenetic dimension can help network motifs to control cell-specific functions. PMID:26169043

  5. A DEK domain-containing protein modulates chromatin structure and function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1? and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  6. A DEK Domain-Containing Protein Modulates Chromatin Structure and Function in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1? and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  7. Chromatin states modify network motifs contributing to cell-specific functions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Yu, Fulong; Fan, Huihui; Ping, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification can affect many important biological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. It can alter chromatin conformation and contribute to gene regulation. To investigate how chromatin states associated with network motifs, we assembled chromatin state-modified regulatory networks by combining 269 ChIP-seq data and chromatin states in four cell types. We found that many chromatin states were significantly associated with network motifs, especially for feedforward loops (FFLs). These distinct chromatin state compositions contribute to different expression levels and translational control of targets in FFLs. Strikingly, the chromatin state-modified FFLs were highly cell-specific and, to a large extent, determined cell-selective functions, such as the embryonic stem cell-specific bivalent modification-related FFL with an important role in poising developmentally important genes for expression. Besides, comparisons of chromatin state-modified FFLs between cancerous/stem and primary cell lines revealed specific type of chromatin state alterations that may act together with motif structural changes cooperatively contribute to cell-to-cell functional differences. Combination of these alterations could be helpful in prioritizing candidate genes. Together, this work highlights that a dynamic epigenetic dimension can help network motifs to control cell-specific functions. PMID:26169043

  8. Maintenance of Open Chromatin and Selective Genomic Occupancy at the Cell Cycle-Regulated Histone H4 Promoter during Differentiation of HL-60 Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hovhannisyan, Hayk; Cho, Brian; Mitra, Partha; Montecino, Martin; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    During the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation of HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells, expression of the cell cycle-dependent histone genes is downregulated at the level of transcription. To address the mechanism by which this regulation occurs, we examined the chromatin structure of the histone H4/n (FO108, H4FN) gene locus. Micrococcal nuclease, DNase I, and restriction enzymes show similar cleavage sites and levels of sensitivity at the H4/n locus in both proliferating and differentiated HL-60 cells. In contrast, differentiation-related activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1/WAF1 gene is accompanied by increased nuclease hypersensitivity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the H4/n gene reveal that acetylated histones H3 and H4 are maintained at the same levels in proliferating and postproliferative cells. Thus, the chromatin of the H4/n locus remains in an open state even after transcription ceases. Using ligation-mediated PCR to visualize genomic DNase I footprints at single-nucleotide resolution, we find that protein occupancy at the site II cell cycle element is selectively diminished in differentiated cells while the site I element remains occupied. Decreased occupancy of site II is reflected by loss of the site II binding protein HiNF-P. We conclude that H4 gene transcription during differentiation is downregulated by modulating protein interaction at the site II cell cycle element and that retention of an open chromatin conformation may be associated with site I occupancy. PMID:12556504

  9. Challenges in quantifying condensed tannins and their impact on the ruminal degradability of protein in birdsfoot trefoil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is considerable interest in defining optimal concentrations of condensed tannins (CT) for limiting wasteful pregastric proteolysis of protein in forage legumes. The butanol-HCl assay is widely used for quantifying extractable CT in forages, but the assay underestimates total CT when applied di...

  10. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  11. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sarah E; O'Gara, James P

    2016-01-01

    Experimental demonstration of regulatory protein interactions with the sequences upstream of potential target genes is an important element in gene expression studies. These experiments termed electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) provide valuable insight into the mechanism of action of transcription factors. EMSAs combined with downstream applications such as transcriptional analysis help uncover precisely how regulatory proteins control target gene expression. This chapter comprises a guideline for expression and purification of recombinant transcription factor proteins followed by a detailed protocol for EMSAs. PMID:26194709

  12. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay.

    PubMed

    Smale, Stephen T

    2010-05-01

    When a transient or stable transfection assay is developed for a promoter, a primary objective is to quantify promoter strength. Because transfection efficiency in such assays can be low, promoters are commonly fused to heterologous reporter genes that encode enzymes that can be quantified using highly sensitive assays. The reporter protein's activity or fluorescence within a transfected cell population is approximately proportional to the steady-state mRNA level. In this protocol, cells transfected with an Escherichia coli transposon chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter plasmid are lysed by repeated cycles of freezing and thawing and cellular debris is removed by centrifugation. The lysate is incubated with [(14)C]chloramphenicol and acetyl-coenzyme A; CAT catalyzes the acetylation of chloramphenicol. The acetylated products and the unmodified reactants are separated from the aqueous solution by organic extraction with ethyl acetate. Acetylation is monitored by autoradiography following thin-layer chromatography (TLC) to separate the acetylated from the unacetylated forms. The percent conversion of [(14)C]chloramphenicol to acetyl-[(14)C]chloramphenicol can be measured by PhosphorImager analysis of the TLC plate, by excising the radioactive spots from the TLC plate and counting in a scintillation counter, or by densitometry analysis of an autoradiograph. The acetylated (14)C-labeled product can also be quantified without TLC by organic extraction and scintillation counting using reagent-grade chemicals. PMID:20439409

  13. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause of CHARGE syndrome. Here, we review recent work aimed at understanding the mechanism of CHD7 function in normal and pathological states, highlighting results from biochemical and in vivo studies. The emerging picture from this work suggests that the mechanisms by which CHD7 fine-tunes gene expression are context specific, consistent with the pleiotropic nature of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26411921

  14. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  15. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2004-01-01

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose–Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate pv = -?v and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness ? of fluid with equation of state p = +?, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order kB?Mc/, instead of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula, SBH = 4?kBGM2/c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  16. Multilayer graphene condenser microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovi?, Dejan; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Mili?evi?, Marijana; Jovanovi?, Djordje; Gaji?, Radoš; Salom, Iva; Spasenovi?, Marko

    2015-12-01

    Vibrating membranes are the cornerstone of acoustic technology, forming the backbone of modern loudspeakers and microphones. Acoustic performance of a condenser microphone is derived mainly from the membrane’s size, surface mass and achievable static tension. The widely studied and available nickel has been a dominant membrane material for professional microphones for several decades. In this paper we introduce multilayer graphene as a membrane material for condenser microphones. The graphene device outperforms a high end commercial nickel-based microphone over a significant part of the audio spectrum, with a larger than 10 dB enhancement of sensitivity. Our experimental results are supported with numerical simulations, which also show that a 300 layer thick graphene membrane under maximum tension would offer excellent extension of the frequency range, up to 1 MHz.

  17. 15q11.2–13.3 chromatin analysis reveals epigenetic regulation of CHRNA7 with deficiencies in Rett and autism brain

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Dag H.; Scoles, Haley A.; Horike, Shin-ichi; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Dunaway, Keith W.; Schroeder, Diane I.; LaSalle, Janine M.

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) within human 15q11.2–13.3 show reduced penetrance and variable expressivity in a range of neurologic disorders. Therefore, characterizing 15q11.2–13.3 chromatin structure is important for understanding the regulation of this locus during normal neuronal development. Deletion of the Prader–Willi imprinting center (PWS-IC) within 15q11.2–13.3 disrupts long-range imprinted gene expression resulting in Prader–Willi syndrome. Previous results establish that MeCP2 binds to the PWS-IC and is required for optimal expression of distal GABRB3 and UBE3A. To examine the hypothesis that MeCP2 facilitates 15q11.2–13.3 transcription by linking the PWS-IC with distant elements, chromosome capture conformation on chip (4C) analysis was performed in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. SH-SY5Y neurons had 2.84-fold fewer 15q11.2–13.3 PWS-IC chromatin interactions than undifferentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblasts, revealing developmental chromatin de-condensation of the locus. Out of 68 PWS-IC interactions with15q11.2–13.3 identified by 4C analysis and 62 15q11.2–13.3 MeCP2-binding sites identified by previous ChIP-chip studies, only five sites showed overlap. Remarkably, two of these overlapping PWS-IC- and MeCP2-bound sites mapped to sites flanking CHRNA7 (cholinergic receptor nicotinic alpha 7) encoding the cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, alpha 7. PWS-IC interaction with CHRNA7 in neurons was independently confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. Subsequent quantitative transcriptional analyses of frontal cortex from Rett syndrome and autism patients revealed significantly reduced CHRNA7 expression compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that transcription of CHRNA7 is modulated by chromatin interactions with the PWS-IC. Thus, loss of long-range chromatin interactions within 15q11.2–13.3 may contribute to multiple human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:21840925

  18. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  19. Biosensors: Viruses for ultrasensitive assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional assay based on genetically engineered viral nanoparticles and nickel nanohairs can detect much lower levels of protein markers associated with heart attacks than conventional assays.

  20. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    E-print Network

    Aguirre, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate can be very light, $10^{-22}\\,{\\rm eV} \\lesssim m \\lesssim 10^2\\,{\\rm eV}$; the lower limit arises from constraints on small-scale structure formation, while the upper bound ensures that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of deco...

  1. A chromatin-modifying protein is a context-dependent modulator of cell survival in hematopoietic malignancies

    E-print Network

    Shingleton, Jennifer Ricks

    2014-01-01

    Proteins that modify chromatin architecture are important drivers of leukemia. Many genetic lesions in hematopoietic malignancies lead to altered function of one or more chromatin-modifying proteins, often resulting in ...

  2. The Pentameric Nucleoplasmin Fold Is Present in Drosophila FKBP39 and a Large Number of Chromatin-Related Proteins

    E-print Network

    Edlich-Muth, Christian; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Callow, Phil; Przewloka, Marcin R.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; Zhang, Wei; Glover, David M.; Debski, Janusz; Dadlez, Michal; Round, Adam R.; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Laue, Ernest D.

    2015-03-24

    report the first structure of a nucleoplasmin-like domain (NPL) from the unrelated Drosophila protein, FKBP39, and we present evidence that this protein associates with chromatin. Furthermore, we show that two other chromatin proteins, Arabidopsis...

  3. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  4. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  5. Chromatin at the Nanolevel Towards the analysis of nucleosome remodeling kinetics by single pair FRET spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Langowski, Jörg

    Chromatin at the Nanolevel ­ Towards the analysis of nucleosome remodeling kinetics by single pair is wrapped around an histone protein octamer in 1.65 superhelical turns [1,2]. Their local structure strongly determines the folding into the higher order chromatin structure, whose morphology plays a pivotal role

  6. Memory-Associated Dynamic Regulation of the "Stable" Core of the Chromatin Particle.

    PubMed

    Zovkic, Iva B; Sweatt, J David

    2015-07-01

    Chromatin is a critical regulator of neural plasticity, but basic principles of chromatin function in neurons are unclear. In this issue of Neuron, Maze et al. (2015) establish histone H3.3 turnover as a novel mechanism contributing to CNS gene regulation, synaptic plasticity, and cognition. PMID:26139363

  7. [Effect of amizon on structural modifications of liver nuclear chromatin from rats, intoxicated with tetrachloromethane].

    PubMed

    Hubskiy?, Iu I; Horiushko, A H; Vistunova, I Ie; Marchenko, O M; Kurapova, T M; Danylenko, V P; Sachenko, L H

    1999-01-01

    The actions of the amizon on the antioxidant activity and free radicaloformation level in the nuclear chromatin fractions of rat liver methan tetrachlorid intoxication was studied using the Fe(+2)-induction biochemiluminescence and microcalorimetry methods. The amizon genomoprotective effect on the chromatin transcriptionally active fraction was shown. PMID:10820846

  8. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Jenna; Ekwall, Karl; School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  9. Chromatin remodelling in mammalian cells by ISWI-type complexes where, when and why?

    E-print Network

    Rippe, Karsten

    receptor corepressor; NoRC, nucleolar remodelling complex; NURF, nucleosome remodelling factor; PCNAMINIREVIEW Chromatin remodelling in mammalian cells by ISWI-type complexes ­ where, when and why complexes Chromatin structure is a key determinant of gene regu- lation. The wrapping of the DNA around

  10. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed. PMID:25501817

  11. Four-dimensional imaging of chromatin dynamics during the assembly of the interphase nucleus

    E-print Network

    Liere, Robert van

    Four-dimensional imaging of chromatin dynamics during the assembly of the interphase nucleus E. M, chromatin, confocal microscopy, four-dimensional imaging, interphase nucleus, nuclear organization Abstract distributed throughout the interphase nucleus. First of all, each individual chromosome occupies a discrete

  12. A polymer model with long-range interactions: analysis and applications to the chromatin structure

    E-print Network

    Holcman, David

    A polymer model with long-range interactions: analysis and applications to the chromatin structure consists of the DNA and its hierarchy of interact- ing molecules that can be modeled as a complex polymer. To describe the chromatin dynamic, we develop and analyze here a polymer model that accounts for long range

  13. Hi-C Chromatin Interaction Networks Predict Co-expression in the Mouse Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hulsman, Marc; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The three dimensional conformation of the genome in the cell nucleus influences important biological processes such as gene expression regulation. Recent studies have shown a strong correlation between chromatin interactions and gene co-expression. However, predicting gene co-expression from frequent long-range chromatin interactions remains challenging. We address this by characterizing the topology of the cortical chromatin interaction network using scale-aware topological measures. We demonstrate that based on these characterizations it is possible to accurately predict spatial co-expression between genes in the mouse cortex. Consistent with previous findings, we find that the chromatin interaction profile of a gene-pair is a good predictor of their spatial co-expression. However, the accuracy of the prediction can be substantially improved when chromatin interactions are described using scale-aware topological measures of the multi-resolution chromatin interaction network. We conclude that, for co-expression prediction, it is necessary to take into account different levels of chromatin interactions ranging from direct interaction between genes (i.e. small-scale) to chromatin compartment interactions (i.e. large-scale). PMID:25965262

  14. N-Butyrate incubation of immature chicken erythrocytes preferentially enhances the solubility of beta A chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Ferenz, C R; Nelson, D A

    1985-01-01

    The solubility of adult beta-globin chromatin (beta A chromatin) from immature chicken red blood cells can be controlled by the presence or absence of n-butyrate in a cell incubation medium. In the absence of n-butyrate, only a small percentage (approximately 4%) of the total beta A chromatin is in a soluble chromatin fraction following micrococcal nuclease digestion and centrifugation. This percentage increases to approximately 40-45% of the beta A chromatin if cells are incubated 1 hour in the presence of 10 mM sodium n-butyrate. The highest yield and enrichment of solubilized beta A chromatin is attained when 1-4% of the DNA is rendered acid soluble, and in buffers containing 1.5 - 5 mM MgCl2. The soluble beta A nucleohistone is nucleosome oligomer size (contains DNA 250-600 bases in length) and can be separated from soluble, transcriptionally inert mononucleosomes by agarose A-5m exclusion chromatography. The enhanced solubility appears to be specific for transcriptionally active chromatin. Whereas 40-45% of the beta A chromatin is recovered in the supernatant fraction from n-butyrate incubated immature erythrocytes, nucleohistone containing ovalbumin DNA sequences remains insoluble. Images PMID:4000950

  15. A positive but complex association between meiotic double-strand break hotspots and open chromatin

    E-print Network

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.

    -3280, USA During meiosis, chromatin undergoes extensive changes to facilitate recombination, homolog pairing the transition from mitosis to meiosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that meiosis chromatin and DSB hotspots is most prominent 3 h into meiosis, when the early meiotic genes DMC1 and HOP1

  16. Recent advances in understanding chromatin remodeling by Swi/Snf complexes

    E-print Network

    Winston, Fred

    Recent advances in understanding chromatin remodeling by Swi/Snf complexes Joseph A Martens and Fred Winston Members of the Swi/Snf family of chromatin-remodeling complexes play critical roles aspects of Swi/Snf complexes, including the roles of specific subunits, the repression of transcription

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLES The BAF60 Subunit of the SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling

    E-print Network

    Hirt, Heribert

    RESEARCH ARTICLES The BAF60 Subunit of the SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Directly Controls Evry, France SWI/SNF complexes mediate ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to regulate gene expression thaliana SWI/SNF complexes are involved in the control of flowering, a process that depends on the floral

  18. Genome-wide prediction and analysis of human chromatin boundary elements

    E-print Network

    Jordan, King

    Genome-wide prediction and analysis of human chromatin boundary elements Jianrong Wang1 , Victoria; Accepted August 29, 2011 ABSTRACT Boundary elements partition eukaryotic chromatin into active and repressive domains, and can also block regulatory interactions between domains. Boundary elements act via

  19. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines

    E-print Network

    Lamond, Angus I.

    was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation withinModulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated

  20. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    E-print Network

    Blow, J. Julian

    Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated online 19 April 2012 Communicated by Marcel Mechali Keywords: Xenopus Egg extract In vitro Cell-free system DNA replication Chromatin a b s t r a c t The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs

  1. Resistance of the nucleosomal organization of eucaryotic chromatin to ionizing radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1982-09-01

    The structural organization and radiation sensitivity of Tetrahymena chromatin under several conditions of modified transcriptional activity were investigated using the structure-specific nucleases, micrococcal nuclease and DNase I. Digestion of unirradiated nuclei by those nucleases proceeded with very similar kinetics and to a similar extent irrespective of the stages of growth of the cultures, except for the cultures in stationary phase, which became more resistant to DNase I digestion. Neither for suppression of total cellular RNA synthesis by actinomycin D nor the transient inhibition of only rRNA synthesis by 40 krad of ..gamma.. radiation affected the sensitivity of the chromatin of the nucleases. These results confirm that activity transcribing chromatin remains in an active conformation even when its function is temporarily inhibited, while more permanent repression of some genes during stationary phase appears to alter the chromatin and hence its susceptibility to DNase I. Actively transcribing ribosomal chromatin was found to be very sensitive to DNase I degradation compared to bulk chromatin; its sensitivity to DNase I was also not altered by 40 krad of ..gamma.. radiation, but was reduced in stationary phase. It is concluded that damage to DNA and/or chromatin resulting from ..gamma.. irradiation does not produce alterations in the nucleosome-level organization of chromatin which can be measured by micrococcal nuclease and DNase I.

  2. Chromatin Fiber Folding: Requirement for the Histone H4 N-terminal Tail

    E-print Network

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    Chromatin Fiber Folding: Requirement for the Histone H4 N-terminal Tail Benedetta Dorigo, Thomas the consequence of individual histone tail domain deletions on array folding. Fully compacted chromatin fibers are obtained with any one of the histone tails deleted with the exception of the H4 N terminus. The region

  3. Coupling circadian rhythms of metabolism and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Masri, S; Orozco-Solis, R; Aguilar-Arnal, L; Cervantes, M; Sassone-Corsi, P

    2015-09-01

    The circadian clock controls a large variety of neuronal, endocrine, behavioural and physiological responses in mammals. This control is exerted in large part at the transcriptional level on genes expressed in a cyclic manner. A highly specialized transcriptional machinery based on clock regulatory factors organized in feedback autoregulatory loops governs a significant portion of the genome. These oscillations in gene expression are paralleled by critical events of chromatin remodelling that appear to provide plasticity to circadian regulation. Specifically, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(+) -dependent deacetylases SIRT1 and SIRT6 have been linked to circadian control of gene expression. This, and additional accumulating evidence, shows that the circadian epigenome appears to share intimate links with cellular metabolic processes and has remarkable plasticity showing reprogramming in response to nutritional challenges. In addition to SIRT1 and SIRT6, a number of chromatin remodellers have been implicated in clock control, including the histone H3K4 tri-methyltransferase MLL1. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that link metabolism, epigenetic control and circadian responses will provide valuable insights towards innovative strategies of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26332964

  4. Nuclear location of a chromatin insulator in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghao; Li, Mo; Adams, Jessica; Cai, Haini N

    2004-03-01

    Chromatin-related functions are associated with spatial organization in the nucleus. We have investigated the relationship between the enhancer-blocking activity and subnuclear localization of the Drosophila melanogaster suHw insulator. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we observed that genomic loci containing the gypsy retrotransposon were distributed closer to the nuclear periphery than regions without the gypsy retrotransposon. However, transgenes containing a functional 340 bp suHw insulator did not exhibit such biased distribution towards the nuclear periphery, which suggests that the suHw insulator sequence is not responsible for the peripheral localization of the gypsy retrotransposon. Antibody stains showed that the two proteins essential for the suHw insulator activity, SUHW and MOD(MDG4), are not restricted to the nuclear periphery. The enhancer-blocking activity of suHw remained intact under the heat shock conditions, which was shown to disrupt the association of gypsy, SUHW and MOD(MDG4) with the nuclear periphery. Our results indicate that the suHw insulator can function in the nuclear interior, possibly through local interactions with chromatin components or other nuclear structures. PMID:14996934

  5. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  6. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones. PMID:25363760

  7. Growth cone collapse assay.

    PubMed

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia. PMID:24838959

  8. Three-dimensional structure of human chromatin accessibility complex hCHRAC by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.; Hainfeld, J.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Qian, L.; Brinas, R. P.; Kuznetsova, L.

    2008-12-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes modulate the dynamic assembly and remodeling of chromatin involved in DNA transcription, replication, and repair. There is little structural detail known about these important multiple-subunit enzymes that catalyze chromatin remodeling processes. Here we report a three-dimensional structure of the human chromatin accessibility complex, hCHRAC, using single particle reconstruction by negative stain electron microscopy. This structure shows an asymmetric 15 x 10 x 12 nm disk shape with several lobes protruding out of its surfaces. Based on the factors of larger contact area, smaller steric hindrance, and direct involvement of hCHRAC in interactions with the nucleosome, we propose that four lobes on one side form a multiple-site contact surface 10 nm in diameter for nucleosome binding. This work provides the first determination of the three-dimensional structure of the ISWI-family of chromatin remodeling complexes.

  9. RNA polymerase activity and template activity of chromatin after butyrate induced hyperacetylation of histones in Physarum.

    PubMed Central

    Loidl, P; Loidl, A; Puschendorf, B; Gröbner, P

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the effect of sodium-n-butyrate on endogenous RNA polymerase in Physarum polycephalum. 1 mM butyrate strongly reduces RNA polymerase activity measured in isolated nuclei or chromatin; both RNA polymerase A as well as the alpha-amanitin sensitive RNA polymerase B are equally affected. Despite a concomitant hyperacetylation of histone H4 the template activity of chromatin, as analyzed by in vitro transcription of the chromatin with exogenous RNA polymerase from E. coli or RNA polymerase II from wheat germ, remains unaltered as compared to untreated control chromatin, indicating that there is no positive correlation between histone acetylation and template activity of chromatin for transcription in this organism. The results further indicate, that butyrate acts primarily as a quick but reversible inhibitor of protein synthesis in Physarum; the fast decrease of endogenous RNA polymerase activity after butyrate treatment is due to inhibition of enzyme synthesis rather than inactivation of other factors necessary for transcription. PMID:6462909

  10. Loss of lamin A function increases chromatin dynamics in the nuclear interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtein, I.; Kepten, E.; Kanter, I.; Berezin, S.; Lindner, M.; Redwood, Abena B.; Mai, S.; Gonzalo, S.; Foisner, R.; Shav-Tal, Y.; Garini, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Chromatin is organized in a highly ordered yet dynamic manner in the cell nucleus, but the principles governing this organization remain unclear. Similarly, it is unknown whether, and how, various proteins regulate chromatin motion and as a result influence nuclear organization. Here by studying the dynamics of different genomic regions in the nucleus of live cells, we show that the genome has highly constrained dynamics. Interestingly, depletion of lamin A strikingly alters genome dynamics, inducing a dramatic transition from slow anomalous diffusion to fast and normal diffusion. In contrast, depletion of LAP2?, a protein that interacts with lamin A and chromatin, has no such effect on genome dynamics. We speculate that chromosomal inter-chain interactions formed by lamin A throughout the nucleus contribute to chromatin dynamics, and suggest that the molecular regulation of chromatin diffusion by lamin A in the nuclear interior is critical for the maintenance of genome organization.

  11. Systematic chromatin state comparison of epigenomes associated with diverse properties including sex and tissue type

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Angela; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    Epigenomic data sets provide critical information about the dynamic role of chromatin states in gene regulation, but a key question of how chromatin state segmentations vary under different conditions across the genome has remained unaddressed. Here we present ChromDiff, a group-wise chromatin state comparison method that generates an information-theoretic representation of epigenomes and corrects for external covariate factors to better isolate relevant chromatin state changes. By applying ChromDiff to the 127 epigenomes from the Roadmap Epigenomics and ENCODE projects, we provide novel group-wise comparative analyses across sex, tissue type, state and developmental age. Remarkably, we find that distinct sets of epigenomic features are maximally discriminative for different group-wise comparisons, in each case revealing distinct enriched pathways, many of which do not show gene expression differences. Our methodology should be broadly applicable for epigenomic comparisons and provides a powerful new tool for studying chromatin state differences at the genome scale. PMID:26282110

  12. Systematic chromatin state comparison of epigenomes associated with diverse properties including sex and tissue type.

    PubMed

    Yen, Angela; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    Epigenomic data sets provide critical information about the dynamic role of chromatin states in gene regulation, but a key question of how chromatin state segmentations vary under different conditions across the genome has remained unaddressed. Here we present ChromDiff, a group-wise chromatin state comparison method that generates an information-theoretic representation of epigenomes and corrects for external covariate factors to better isolate relevant chromatin state changes. By applying ChromDiff to the 127 epigenomes from the Roadmap Epigenomics and ENCODE projects, we provide novel group-wise comparative analyses across sex, tissue type, state and developmental age. Remarkably, we find that distinct sets of epigenomic features are maximally discriminative for different group-wise comparisons, in each case revealing distinct enriched pathways, many of which do not show gene expression differences. Our methodology should be broadly applicable for epigenomic comparisons and provides a powerful new tool for studying chromatin state differences at the genome scale. PMID:26282110

  13. The tethering of chromatin to the nuclear envelope supports nuclear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sarah M.; Koo, Peter K.; Zhao, Yao; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; King, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be the primary mechanical defence of the nucleus. However, the lamina is integrated within a network of lipids, proteins and chromatin; the interdependence of this network poses a challenge to defining the individual mechanical contributions of these components. Here, we isolate the role of chromatin in nuclear mechanics by using a system lacking lamins. Using novel imaging analyses, we observe that untethering chromatin from the inner nuclear membrane results in highly deformable nuclei in vivo, particularly in response to cytoskeletal forces. Using optical tweezers, we find that isolated nuclei lacking inner nuclear membrane tethers are less stiff than wild-type nuclei and exhibit increased chromatin flow, particularly in frequency ranges that recapitulate the kinetics of cytoskeletal dynamics. We suggest that modulating chromatin flow can define both transient and long-lived changes in nuclear shape that are biologically important and may be altered in disease. PMID:26074052

  14. Loss of lamin A function increases chromatin dynamics in the nuclear interior

    PubMed Central

    Bronshtein, I.; Kepten, E.; Kanter, I.; Berezin, S.; Lindner, M.; Redwood, Abena B.; Mai, S; Gonzalo, S.; Foisner, R.; Shav-Tal, Y.; Garini, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin is organized in a highly ordered yet dynamic manner in the cell nucleus, but the principles governing this organization remain unclear. Similarly, it is unknown whether, and how, various proteins regulate chromatin motion and as a result influence nuclear organization. Here by studying the dynamics of different genomic regions in the nucleus of live cells, we show that the genome has highly constrained dynamics. Interestingly, depletion of lamin A strikingly alters genome dynamics, inducing a dramatic transition from slow anomalous diffusion to fast and normal diffusion. In contrast, depletion of LAP2?, a protein that interacts with lamin A and chromatin, has no such effect on genome dynamics. We speculate that chromosomal inter-chain interactions formed by lamin A throughout the nucleus contribute to chromatin dynamics, and suggest that the molecular regulation of chromatin diffusion by lamin A in the nuclear interior is critical for the maintenance of genome organization. PMID:26299252

  15. Diverse lamin-dependent mechanisms interact to control chromatin dynamics. Focus on laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Camozzi, Daria; Capanni, Cristina; Cenni, Vittoria; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Columbaro, Marta; Squarzoni, Stefano; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Interconnected functional strategies govern chromatin dynamics in eukaryotic cells. In this context, A and B type lamins, the nuclear intermediate filaments, act on diverse platforms involved in tissue homeostasis. On the nuclear side, lamins elicit large scale or fine chromatin conformational changes, affect DNA damage response factors and transcription factor shuttling. On the cytoplasmic side, bridging-molecules, the LINC complex, associate with lamins to coordinate chromatin dynamics with cytoskeleton and extra-cellular signals.   Consistent with such a fine tuning, lamin mutations and/or defects in their expression or post-translational processing, as well as mutations in lamin partner genes, cause a heterogeneous group of diseases known as laminopathies. They include muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy, lipodystrophies, neuropathies, and progeroid syndromes. The study of chromatin dynamics under pathological conditions, which is summarized in this review, is shedding light on the complex and fascinating role of the nuclear lamina in chromatin regulation. PMID:25482195

  16. Survey of assay methods of antivenins

    PubMed Central

    Grasset, E.

    1957-01-01

    In view of the multiplicity of methods used at present for the preparation and assay of antivenins and as a first step towards the international standardization of antivenins, it seemed advisable to make a comparative study of the methods used in the institutes specializing in the production of these sera. With this end in view, the author circulated to the serologists of institutes concerned a detailed questionnaire on the assay methods used for the determination of the neutralization potency of the various types of antivenins prepared under their direction. The information supplied by these institutes is reproduced, in condensed form, in this report and is analysed by the author. The author emphasizes that the great variety in the constitution of venoms necessitates: (1) the use of monovalent standard sera against homologous “test” venoms of high activity and stability; and (2) the establishment, on a regional basis, of standard antivenins corresponding to groups of snakes characterized by venoms of common or closely related antigenic constitution. PMID:13413648

  17. The Chromatin Remodelling Complex B-WICH Changes the Chromatin Structure and Recruits Histone Acetyl-Transferases to Active rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vintermist, Anna; Böhm, Stefanie; Sadeghifar, Fatemeh; Louvet, Emilie; Mansén, Anethe; Percipalle, Pergiorgio; Östlund Farrants, Ann-Kristin

    2011-01-01

    The chromatin remodelling complex B-WICH, which comprises the William syndrome transcription factor (WSTF), SNF2h, and nuclear myosin 1 (NM1), is involved in regulating rDNA transcription, and SiRNA silencing of WSTF leads to a reduced level of 45S pre-rRNA. The mechanism behind the action of B-WICH is unclear. Here, we show that the B-WICH complex affects the chromatin structure and that silencing of the WSTF protein results in a compaction of the chromatin structure over a 200 basepair region at the rRNA promoter. WSTF knock down does not show an effect on the binding of the rRNA-specific enhancer and chromatin protein UBF, which contributes to the chromatin structure at active genes. Instead, WSTF knock down results in a reduced level of acetylated H3-Ac, in particular H3K9-Ac, at the promoter and along the gene. The association of the histone acetyl-transferases PCAF, p300 and GCN5 with the promoter is reduced in WSTF knock down cells, whereas the association of the histone acetyl-transferase MOF is retained. A low level of H3-Ac was also found in growing cells, but here histone acetyl-transferases were present at the rDNA promoter. We propose that the B-WICH complex remodels the chromatin structure at actively transcribed rRNA genes, and this allows for the association of specific histone acetyl-transferases. PMID:21559432

  18. Spinor condensates and light scattering from Bose-Einstein condensates

    E-print Network

    Dan M. Stamper-Kurn; Wolfgang Ketterle

    2000-04-29

    These notes discuss two aspects of the physics of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates: optical properties and spinor condensates. The first topic includes light scattering experiments which probe the excitations of a condensate in both the free-particle and phonon regime. At higher light intensity, a new form of superradiance and phase-coherent matter wave amplification were observed. We also discuss properties of spinor condensates and describe studies of ground--state spin domain structures and dynamical studies which revealed metastable excited states and quantum tunneling.

  19. Improving shuffler assay accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.M.

    1995-07-01

    Drums of uranium waste should be disposed of in an economical and environmentally sound manner. The most accurate possible assays of the uranium masses in the drums are required for proper disposal. The accuracies of assays from a shuffler are affected by the type of matrix material in the drums. Non-hydrogenous matrices have little effect on neutron transport and accuracies are very good. If self-shielding is known to be a minor problem, good accuracies are also obtained with hydrogenous matrices when a polyethylene sleeve is placed around the drums. But for those cases where self-shielding may be a problem, matrices are hydrogenous, and uranium distributions are non-uniform throughout the drums, the accuracies are degraded. They can be greatly improved by determining the distributions of the uranium and then applying correction factors based on the distributions. This paper describes a technique for determining uranium distributions by using the neutron count rates in detector banks around the waste drum and solving a set of overdetermined linear equations. Other approaches were studied to determine the distributions and are described briefly. Implementation of this correction is anticipated on an existing shuffler next year.

  20. Pion condensation in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Dylan; Erlich, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We study pion condensation at zero temperature in a hard-wall holographic model of hadrons with isospin chemical potential. We find that the transition from the hadronic phase to the pion condensate phase is first order except in a certain limit of model parameters. Our analysis suggests that immediately across the phase boundary the condensate acts as a stiff medium approaching the Zel'dovich limit of equal energy density and pressure.

  1. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  2. Antiestrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Lee, Sang Ki; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2005-12-01

    The antiestrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) and three major cannabinoids, ie., delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol (CBN), were evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the human breast cancer cell proliferation assay, the recombinant human estrogen receptor (ER) competitive binding assay, and the reporter gene assay. The inhibitory effects on estrogen were also examined using the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay, the aromatase assay, and the 17beta-estradiol (E2) metabolism assay. The results showed that MSC induced the antiestrogenic effect via the ER-mediated pathway, while THC, CBD, and CBN did not have any antiestrogenic activity. This suggests that the combined effects of the marijuana smoke components are responsible for the antiestrogenicity of marijuana use. In addition, MSC induced the CYP1A activity and the E2 metabolism, but inhibited the aromatase activity, suggesting that the antiestrogenic activity of MSC is also related to the indirect ER-dependent pathway, as a result of the depletion of the in situ E2 level available to bind to the ER. In conclusion, pyrogenic products including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the non-polar fraction, which is the most biologically active fraction among the seven fractions of MSC, might be responsible for the antiestrogenic effect. PMID:16392670

  3. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  4. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  5. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  6. Cholesterol efflux assay.

    PubMed

    Low, Hann; Hoang, Anh; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol content of cells must be maintained within the very tight limits, too much or too little cholesterol in a cell results in disruption of cellular membranes, apoptosis and necrosis. Cells can source cholesterol from intracellular synthesis and from plasma lipoproteins, both sources are sufficient to fully satisfy cells' requirements for cholesterol. The processes of cholesterol synthesis and uptake are tightly regulated and deficiencies of cholesterol are rare. Excessive cholesterol is more common problem. With the exception of hepatocytes and to some degree adrenocortical cells, cells are unable to degrade cholesterol. Cells have two options to reduce their cholesterol content: to convert cholesterol into cholesteryl esters, an option with limited capacity as overloading cells with cholesteryl esters is also toxic, and cholesterol efflux, an option with potentially unlimited capacity. Cholesterol efflux is a specific process that is regulated by a number of intracellular transporters, such as ATP binding cassette transporter proteins A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1) and scavenger receptor type B1. The natural acceptor of cholesterol in plasma is high density lipoprotein (HDL) and apolipoprotein A-I. The cholesterol efflux assay is designed to quantitate the rate of cholesterol efflux from cultured cells. It measures the capacity of cells to maintain cholesterol efflux and/or the capacity of plasma acceptors to accept cholesterol released from cells. The assay consists of the following steps. Step 1: labelling cellular cholesterol by adding labelled cholesterol to serum-containing medium and incubating with cells for 24-48 h. This step may be combined with loading of cells with cholesterol. Step 2: incubation of cells in serum-free medium to equilibrate labelled cholesterol among all intracellular cholesterol pools. This stage may be combined with activation of cellular cholesterol transporters. Step 3: incubation of cells with extracellular acceptor and quantitation of movement of labelled cholesterol from cells to the acceptor. If cholesterol precursors were used to label newly synthesized cholesterol, a fourth step, purification of cholesterol, may be required. The assay delivers the following information: (i) how a particular treatment (a mutation, a knock-down, an overexpression or a treatment) affects the capacity of cell to efflux cholesterol and (ii) how the capacity of plasma acceptors to accept cholesterol is affected by a disease or a treatment. This method is often used in context of cardiovascular research, metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders, infectious and reproductive diseases. PMID:22414908

  7. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis. PMID:26498795

  8. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Pawel O; Mottola, Emil

    2004-06-29

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate p(v) = -rho(v) and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness l of fluid with equation of state p = +rho, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order k(B)lMc/Planck's over 2 pi, instead of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy formula, S(BH) = 4 pi k(B)GM(2)/Planck's over 2 pi c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  9. Cosmic curvature and condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the universe may consist of a patchwork of domains with different Riemann curvature constants k = 0, +/-1. Features of a phase transition in which flat space breaks up in a transition 2k0 - k(-) + k(+) with initial scale factors R(-) = R(+) are postulated and explored. It is shown that such a transition is energetically permitted, has the equivalent of a Curie temperature, and can lead in a natural way to the formation of voids and galaxies. It is predicted that, if the ambient universe on average is well fitted by a purely k(-) space, with only occasional domains of k(+) containing galaxies, a density parameter of (A(z sub c + 1)) super -1 should be expected, where z sub c represents the redshift of the earliest objects to have condensed, and A takes on values ranging from about 5 to 3. Present observations of quasars would suggest a density of about 0.03 or 0.05, respectively, but it could be lower if earlier condensation took place.

  10. Enrichment of H3K9me2 on Unsynapsed Chromatin in Caenorhabditis elegans Does Not Target de Novo Sites

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yiqing; Yang, Bing; Li, Yini; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2015-01-01

    Many organisms alter the chromatin state of unsynapsed chromosomes during meiotic prophase, a phenomenon hypothesized to function in maintaining germline integrity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is detected by immunolabeling as enriched on unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. Loss of the SET domain protein, MET-2, greatly reduces H3K9me2 abundance and results in germline mortality. Here, we used him-8 mutations to disable X chromosome synapsis and performed a combination of molecular assays to map the sites of H3K9me2 accumulation, evaluate H3K9me2 abundance in germline vs. whole animals, and evaluate the impact of H3K9me2 loss on the germline transcriptome. Our data indicate that H3K9me2 is elevated broadly across the X chromosome and at defined X chromosomal sites in him-8 adults compared with controls. H3K9me2 levels are also elevated to a lesser degree at sites on synapsed chromosomes in him-8 adults compared with controls. These results suggest that MET-2 activity is elevated in him-8 mutants generally as well as targeted preferentially to the unsynapsed X. Abundance of H3K9me2 and other histone H3 modifications is low in germline chromatin compared with whole animals, which may facilitate genome reprogramming during gametogenesis. Loss of H3K9me2 has a subtle impact on the him-8 germline transcriptome, suggesting H3K9me2 may not be a major regulator of developmental gene expression in C. elegans. We hypothesize H3K9me2 may have a structural function critical for germline immortality, and a greater abundance of these marks may be required when a chromosome does not synapse. PMID:26156747

  11. Enrichment of H3K9me2 on Unsynapsed Chromatin in Caenorhabditis elegans Does Not Target de Novo Sites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiqing; Yang, Bing; Li, Yini; Xu, Xia; Maine, Eleanor M

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms alter the chromatin state of unsynapsed chromosomes during meiotic prophase, a phenomenon hypothesized to function in maintaining germline integrity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is detected by immunolabeling as enriched on unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. Loss of the SET domain protein, MET-2, greatly reduces H3K9me2 abundance and results in germline mortality. Here, we used him-8 mutations to disable X chromosome synapsis and performed a combination of molecular assays to map the sites of H3K9me2 accumulation, evaluate H3K9me2 abundance in germline vs. whole animals, and evaluate the impact of H3K9me2 loss on the germline transcriptome. Our data indicate that H3K9me2 is elevated broadly across the X chromosome and at defined X chromosomal sites in him-8 adults compared with controls. H3K9me2 levels are also elevated to a lesser degree at sites on synapsed chromosomes in him-8 adults compared with controls. These results suggest that MET-2 activity is elevated in him-8 mutants generally as well as targeted preferentially to the unsynapsed X. Abundance of H3K9me2 and other histone H3 modifications is low in germline chromatin compared with whole animals, which may facilitate genome reprogramming during gametogenesis. Loss of H3K9me2 has a subtle impact on the him-8 germline transcriptome, suggesting H3K9me2 may not be a major regulator of developmental gene expression in C. elegans. We hypothesize H3K9me2 may have a structural function critical for germline immortality, and a greater abundance of these marks may be required when a chromosome does not synapse. PMID:26156747

  12. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and...Quality Assurance § 225.158 Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by...

  13. Nonequilibrium Weak Processes in Kaon Condensation II - Kinetics of condensation ---

    E-print Network

    Takumi Muto; Toshitaka Tatsumi; Naoki Iwamoto

    1999-09-18

    The kinetics of negatively charged kaon condensation in the early stages of a newly born neutron star is considered. The thermal kaon process, in which kaons are thermally produced by nucleon-nucleon collisions, is found to be dominant throughout the equilibration process. Temporal changes of the order parameter of the condensate and the number densities of the chemical species are obtained from the rate equations, which include the thermal kaon reactions as well as the kaon-induced Urca and the modified Urca reactions. It is shown that the dynamical evolution of the condensate is characterized by three stages: the first, prior to establishment of a condensate, the second, during the growth and subsequent saturation of the condensate, and the third, near chemical equilibrium. The connection between the existence of a soft kaon mode and the instability of the noncondensed state is discussed. Implications of the nonequilibrium process on the possible delayed collapse of a protoneutron star are also mentioned.

  14. A Nonhistone Protein-Protein Interaction Required for Assembly of the SIR Complex and Silent Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Rudner, Adam D.; Hall, Brian E.; Ellenberger, Tom; Moazed, Danesh

    2005-01-01

    Budding yeast silent chromatin, or heterochromatin, is composed of histones and the Sir2, Sir3, and Sir4 proteins. Their assembly into silent chromatin is believed to require the deacetylation of histones by the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sir2 and the subsequent interaction of Sir3 and Sir4 with these hypoacetylated regions of chromatin. Here we explore the role of interactions among the Sir proteins in the assembly of the SIR complex and the formation of silent chromatin. We show that significant fractions of Sir2, Sir3, and Sir4 are associated together in a stable complex. When the assembly of Sir3 into this complex is disrupted by a specific mutation on the surface of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain of Sir4, Sir3 is no longer recruited to chromatin and silencing is disrupted. Because in sir4 mutant cells the association of Sir3 with chromatin is greatly reduced despite the partial Sir2-dependent deacetylation of histones near silencers, we conclude that histone deacetylation is not sufficient for the full recruitment of silencing proteins to chromatin and that Sir-Sir interactions are essential for the assembly of heterochromatin. PMID:15899856

  15. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair. PMID:26617633

  16. APRIN is a Unique Pds5 Paralog with Features of a Chromatin Regulator in Hormonal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Maffini, Maricel; Denes, Viktoria; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana; Geck, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Activation of steroid receptors results in global changes of gene expression patterns. Recent studies showed that steroid receptors control only a portion of their target genes directly, by promoter binding. The majority of the changes are indirect, through chromatin rearrangements. The mediators that relay the hormonal signals to large-scale chromatin changes are, however, unknown. We report here that APRIN, a novel hormone-induced nuclear phosphoprotein has the characteristics of a chromatin regulator and may link endocrine pathways to chromatin. We showed earlier that APRIN is involved in the hormonal regulation of proliferative arrest in cancer cells. To investigate its function we cloned and characterized APRIN orthologs and performed homology and expression studies. APRIN is a paralog of the cohesin-associated Pds5 gene lineage and arose by gene-duplication in early vertebrates. The conservation and domain differences we found suggest, however, that APRIN acquired novel chromatin-related functions (e.g. the HMG-like domains in APRIN, the hallmarks of chromatin regulators, are absent in Pds5). We show that in interphase nuclei APRIN localizes in the euchromatin/heterochromatin interface and we also identified its DNA-binding and nuclear import signal domains. Our results indicate that APRIN, in addition to its Pds5 similarity, has the features and localization of a hormone-induced chromatin regulator. PMID:17997301

  17. In vivo dynamical behavior of yeast chromatin modeled as an entangled polymer network with constraint release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenxi; Kilfoil, Maria L.

    2013-03-01

    The high fidelity segregation of chromatin is the central problem in cell mitosis. The role of mechanics underlying this, however, is undetermined. Work in this area has largely focused on cytoskeletal elements of the process. Preliminary work in our lab suggests the mechanical properties of chromatin are fundamental in this process. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of chromatin in the cellular context are not well-characterized. For better understanding of the role of mechanics in this cellular process, and of the chromatin mechanics in vivo generally, a systematic dynamical description of chromatin in vivo is required. Accordingly, we label specific sites on chromatin with fluorescent proteins of different wave lengths, enabling us to detect multiple spots separately in 3D and track their displacements in time inside living yeast cells. We analyze the pairwise cross-correlated motion between spots as a function of relative distance along the DNA contour. Comparison between the reptation model and our data serves to test our conjecture that chromatin in the cell is basically an entangled polymer network under constraints to thermal motion, and removal of constraints by non-thermal cellular processes is expected to affect its dynamic behavior.

  18. Sense and antisense transcription are associated with distinct chromatin architectures across genes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Struan C.; Haenni, Simon; Howe, Françoise S.; Fischl, Harry; Chocian, Karolina; Nair, Anitha; Mellor, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Genes from yeast to mammals are frequently subject to non-coding transcription of their antisense strand; however the genome-wide role for antisense transcription remains elusive. As transcription influences chromatin structure, we took a genome-wide approach to assess which chromatin features are associated with nascent antisense transcription, and contrast these with features associated with nascent sense transcription. We describe a distinct chromatin architecture at the promoter and gene body specifically associated with antisense transcription, marked by reduced H2B ubiquitination, H3K36 and H3K79 trimethylation and increased levels of H3 acetylation, chromatin remodelling enzymes, histone chaperones and histone turnover. The difference in sense transcription between genes with high or low levels of antisense transcription is slight; thus the antisense transcription-associated chromatin state is not simply analogous to a repressed state. Using mutants in which the level of antisense transcription is reduced at GAL1, or altered genome-wide, we show that non-coding transcription is associated with high H3 acetylation and H3 levels across the gene, while reducing H3K36me3. Set1 is required for these antisense transcription-associated chromatin changes in the gene body. We propose that nascent antisense and sense transcription have fundamentally distinct relationships with chromatin, and that both should be considered canonical features of eukaryotic genes. PMID:26130720

  19. Early Aberrations in Chromatin Dynamics in Embryos Produced Under In Vitro Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Rahul S.; Strejcek, Frantisek; Vejlsted, Morten; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Petersen, Bjorn; Li, Juan; Callesen, Henrik; Niemann, Heiner; Hyttel, Poul

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In vitro production of porcine embryos by means of in vitro fertilization (IVF) or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is limited by great inefficienciy. The present study investigated chromatin and nucleolar dynamics in porcine embryos developed in vivo (IV) and compared this physiological standard to that of embryos produced by IVF, parthenogenetic activation (PA), or SCNT. In contrast to IV embryos, chromatin spatial and temporal dynamics in PA, IVF, and SCNT embryos were altered; starting with aberrant chromatin–nuclear envelope interactions at the two-cell stage, delayed chromatin decondensation and nucleolar development at the four-cell stage, and ultimately culminating in failure of proper first lineage segregation at the blastocyst stage, demonstrated by poorly defined inner cell mass. Interestingly, in vitro produced (IVP) embryos also lacked a heterochromatin halo around nucleolar precursors, indicating imperfections in global chromatin remodeling after fertilization/activation. Porcine IV-produced zygotes and embryos display a well-synchronized pattern of chromatin dynamics compatible with genome activation and regular nucleolar formation at the four-cell stage. Production of porcine embryos under in vitro conditions by IVF, PA, or SCNT is associated with altered chromatin remodeling, delayed nucleolar formation, and poorly defined lineage segregation at the blastocyst stage, which in turn may impair their developmental capacity. PMID:22468997

  20. How the cell cycle impacts chromatin architecture and influences cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiqin; Kanakousaki, Kiriaki; Buttitta, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Since the earliest observations of cells undergoing mitosis, it has been clear that there is an intimate relationship between the cell cycle and nuclear chromatin architecture. The nuclear envelope and chromatin undergo robust assembly and disassembly during the cell cycle, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone biogenesis and chromatin modification is controlled in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Chromatin binding proteins and chromatin modifications in turn influence the expression of critical cell cycle regulators, the accessibility of origins for DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell fate. In this review we aim to provide an integrated discussion of how the cell cycle machinery impacts nuclear architecture and vice-versa. We highlight recent advances in understanding cell cycle-dependent histone biogenesis and histone modification deposition, how cell cycle regulators control histone modifier activities, the contribution of chromatin modifications to origin firing for DNA replication, and newly identified roles for nucleoporins in regulating cell cycle gene expression, gene expression memory and differentiation. We close with a discussion of how cell cycle status may impact chromatin to influence cell fate decisions, under normal contexts of differentiation as well as in instances of cell fate reprogramming. PMID:25691891

  1. Impact of Chromatin Structure on PR Signaling: Transition from Local to Global Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2011-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) interacts with chromatin in a highly dynamic manner that requires ongoing chromatin remodeling, interaction with chaparones and activity of the proteasome. Here we discuss dynamic interaction of steroid receptor with chromatin, with special attention not only to PR but also to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as these receptors share many similarities regarding interaction with, and remodeling of, chromatin. Both receptors can bind nucleosomal DNA and have accordingly been described as pioneering factors. However recent genomic approaches (ChIP-seq and DHS-seq) show that a large fraction of receptor binding events occur at pre-accessible chromatin. Thus factors which generate and maintain accessible chromatin during development, and in fully differentiated tissue, contribute a major fraction of receptor tissue specificity. In addition, chromosome conformation capture techniques suggest that steroid receptors preferentially sequester within distinct nuclear hubs. We will integrate dynamic studies from single cells and genomic studies from cell populations, and discuss how genomic approaches have reshaped our current understanding of mechanisms that control steroid receptor interaction with chromatin. PMID:21958695

  2. Targeted INO80 enhances subnuclear chromatin movement and ectopic homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Frank R.; Dion, Vincent; Gehlen, Lutz R.; Tsai-Pflugfelder, Monika; Schmid, Roger; Taddei, Angela; Gasser, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin in the interphase nucleus moves in a constrained random walk. Despite extensive study, the molecular causes of such movement and its impact on DNA-based reactions are unclear. Using high-precision live fluorescence microscopy in budding yeast, we quantified the movement of tagged chromosomal loci to which transcriptional activators or nucleosome remodeling complexes were targeted. We found that local binding of the transcriptional activator VP16, but not of the Gal4 acidic domain, enhances chromatin mobility. The increase in movement did not correlate strictly with RNA polymerase II (PolII) elongation, but could be phenocopied by targeting the INO80 remodeler to the locus. Enhanced chromatin mobility required Ino80's ATPase activity. Consistently, the INO80-dependent remodeling of nucleosomes upon transcriptional activation of the endogenous PHO5 promoter enhanced chromatin movement locally. Finally, increased mobility at a double-strand break was also shown to depend in part on the INO80 complex. This correlated with increased rates of spontaneous gene conversion. We propose that local chromatin remodeling and nucleosome eviction increase large-scale chromatin movements by enhancing the flexibility of the chromatin fiber. PMID:22345518

  3. Histone variants: the tricksters of the chromatin world.

    PubMed

    Volle, Catherine; Dalal, Yamini

    2014-04-01

    The eukaryotic genome exists in vivo at an equimolar ratio with histones, thus forming a polymer composed of DNA and histone proteins. Each nucleosomal unit in this polymer provides versatile capabilities and dynamic range. Substitutions of the individual components of the histone core with structurally distinct histone variants and covalent modifications alter the local fabric of the chromatin fiber, resulting in epigenetic changes that can be regulated by the cell. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of histone variant structure, assembly, and inheritance, their influence on nucleosome positioning, and their cumulative effect upon gene expression, DNA repair and the progression of disease. We also highlight fundamental questions that remain unanswered regarding the behavior of histone variants and their influence on cellular function in the normal and diseased states. PMID:24463272

  4. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    PubMed Central

    Melters, Daniël P.; Nye, Jonathan; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini

    2015-01-01

    Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo. PMID:26262644

  5. Paternal diet defines offspring chromatin state and intergenerational obesity.

    PubMed

    Öst, Anita; Lempradl, Adelheid; Casas, Eduard; Weigert, Melanie; Tiko, Theodor; Deniz, Merdin; Pantano, Lorena; Boenisch, Ulrike; Itskov, Pavel M; Stoeckius, Marlon; Ruf, Marius; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Reuter, Gunter; Iovino, Nicola; Ribeiro, Carlos; Alenius, Mattias; Heyne, Steffen; Vavouri, Tanya; Pospisilik, J Andrew

    2014-12-01

    The global rise in obesity has revitalized a search for genetic and epigenetic factors underlying the disease. We present a Drosophila model of paternal-diet-induced intergenerational metabolic reprogramming (IGMR) and identify genes required for its encoding in offspring. Intriguingly, we find that as little as 2 days of dietary intervention in fathers elicits obesity in offspring. Paternal sugar acts as a physiological suppressor of variegation, desilencing chromatin-state-defined domains in both mature sperm and in offspring embryos. We identify requirements for H3K9/K27me3-dependent reprogramming of metabolic genes in two distinct germline and zygotic windows. Critically, we find evidence that a similar system may regulate obesity susceptibility and phenotype variation in mice and humans. The findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying intergenerational metabolic reprogramming and carry profound implications for our understanding of phenotypic variation and evolution. PMID:25480298

  6. Histone variants: the tricksters of the chromatin world?

    PubMed Central

    Volle, Catherine; Dalal, Yamini

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome exists in vivo at an equimolar ratio with histones, thus forming a polymer composed of DNA and histone proteins. Each nucleosomal unit in this polymer provides versatile capabilities and dynamic range. Substitutions of the individual components of the histone core with structurally distinct histone variants and covalent modifications alter the local fabric of the chromatin fiber, resulting in epigenetic changes that can be regulated by the cell. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of histone variant structure, assembly, and inheritance, their influence on nucleosome positioning, and their cumulative effect upon gene expression, DNA repair and the progression of disease. We also highlight fundamental questions that remain unanswered regarding the behavior of histone variants and their influence on cellular function in the normal and diseased states. PMID:24463272

  7. Human Transcriptome and Chromatin Modifications: An ENCODE Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Choi, Inchan; Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    A decade-long project, led by several international research groups, called the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), recently released an unprecedented amount of data. The ambitious project covers transcriptome, cistrome, epigenome, and interactome data from more than 1,600 sets of experiments in human. To make use of this valuable resource, it is important to understand the information it represents and the techniques that were used to generate these data. In this review, we introduce the data that ENCODE generated, summarize the observations from the data analysis, and revisit a computational approach that ENCODE used to predict gene expression, with a focus on the human transcriptome and its association with chromatin modifications. PMID:23843771

  8. Assembly of telomeric chromatin to create ALTernative endings.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Almouzni, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Circumvention of the telomere length-dependent mechanisms that control the upper boundaries of cellular proliferation is necessary for the unlimited growth of cancer. Most cancer cells achieve cellular immortality by up-regulating the expression of telomerase to extend and maintain their telomere length. However, a small but significant number of cancers do so via the exchange of telomeric DNA between chromosomes in a pathway termed alternative lengthening of telomeres, or ALT. Although it remains to be clarified why a cell chooses the ALT pathway and how ALT is initiated, recently identified mutations in factors that shape the chromatin and epigenetic landscape of ALT telomeres are shedding light on these mechanisms. In this review, we examine these recent findings and integrate them into the current models of the ALT mechanism. PMID:25172551

  9. Changes in chromatin state in donors subjected to physical stress

    E-print Network

    Yuriy Shckorbatov; Valeriy Samokhvalov; Dariya Bevziuk; Maxim Kovaliov

    2012-06-04

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate changes in chromatin of human buccal epithelium under the influence of stressing factor - dosed physical activity. Investigations were performed in a group of students (13 men) of age 19-23. Cells were stained on a slide by a 2% orcein solution in 45% acetic acid during 1 h. The following physiological indexes were determined: arterial blood pressure, pulse frequency, and frequency of breathing. The physical stress produced by the dosed physical activity causes the considerable increase of degree of heterochromatinization in the cell nuclei of human buccal epithelium. As a rule, the level of heterochromatinization increases after first stage of training, but in some donors it increases significantly only after the second stage of training.

  10. High-Resolution Chromatin Dynamics during a Yeast Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Assaf; Hsieh, Tsung-Han S.; Appleboim, Alon; Chen, Hsiuyi V.; Rahat, Ayelet; Amit, Ido; Rando, Oliver J.; Friedman, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Summary Covalent histone modifications are highly conserved and play multiple roles in eukaryotic transcription regulation. Here, we mapped 26 histone modifications genome-wide in exponentially growing yeast and during a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming—the response to diamide stress. We extend prior studies showing that steady-state histone modification patterns reflect genomic processes, especially transcription, and display limited combinatorial complexity. Interestingly, during the stress response we document a modest increase in the combinatorial complexity of histone modification space, resulting from roughly 3% of all nucleosomes transiently populating rare histone modification states. Most of these rare histone states result from differences in the kinetics of histone modification that transiently uncouple highly correlated marks, with slow histone methylation changes often lagging behind the more rapid acetylation changes. Explicit analysis of modification dynamics uncovers ordered sequences of events in gene activation and repression. Together, our results provide a comprehensive view of chromatin dynamics during a massive transcriptional upheaval. PMID:25801168

  11. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, Andrea L.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the best studied systems for mammalian chromatin remodeling is transcriptional regulation during T cell development. The variety of these studies have led to important findings in T cell gene regulation and cell fate determination. Importantly, these findings have also advanced our knowledge of the function of remodeling enzymes in mammalian gene regulation. In this review, first we briefly present biochemical/cell-free analysis of 3 types of ATP dependent remodeling enzymes (SWI/SNF, Mi2, and ISWI), to construct an intellectual framework to understand how these enzymes might be working. Second, we compare and contrast the function of these enzymes, during early (thymic) and late (peripheral) T cell development. Finally, we examine some of the gaps in our present understanding. PMID:21999456

  12. Transcriptional and Chromatin Regulation during Fasting - The Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L

    2015-12-01

    An elaborate metabolic response to fasting is orchestrated by the liver and is heavily reliant on transcriptional regulation. In response to hormones (glucagon, glucocorticoids) many transcription factors (TFs) are activated and regulate various genes involved in metabolic pathways aimed at restoring homeostasis: gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, and amino acid shuttling. We summarize recent discoveries regarding fasting-related TFs with an emphasis on genome-wide binding patterns. Collectively, the findings we discuss reveal a large degree of cooperation between TFs during fasting that occurs at motif-rich DNA sites bound by a combination of TFs. These new findings implicate transcriptional and chromatin regulation as major determinants of the response to fasting and unravels the complex, multi-TF nature of this response. PMID:26520657

  13. The Chromatin Remodeler SPLAYED Negatively Regulates SNC1-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kaeli C M; Xia, Shitou; Feng, Xiaoqi; Li, Xin

    2015-08-01

    SNC1 (SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1, CONSTITUTIVE 1) is one of a suite of intracellular Arabidopsis NOD-like receptor (NLR) proteins which, upon activation, result in the induction of defense responses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NLR activation and the subsequent provocation of immune responses are only partially characterized. To identify negative regulators of NLR-mediated immunity, a forward genetic screen was undertaken to search for enhancers of the dwarf, autoimmune gain-of-function snc1 mutant. To avoid lethality resulting from severe dwarfism, the screen was conducted using mos4 (modifier of snc1, 4) snc1 plants, which display wild-type-like morphology and resistance. M2 progeny were screened for mutant, snc1-enhancing (muse) mutants displaying a reversion to snc1-like phenotypes. The muse9 mos4 snc1 triple mutant was found to exhibit dwarf morphology, elevated expression of the pPR2-GUS defense marker reporter gene and enhanced resistance to the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2. Via map-based cloning and Illumina sequencing, it was determined that the muse9 mutation is in the gene encoding the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler SYD (SPLAYED), and was thus renamed syd-10. The syd-10 single mutant has no observable alteration from wild-type-like resistance, although the syd-4 T-DNA insertion allele displays enhanced resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. Transcription of SNC1 is increased in both syd-4 and syd-10. These data suggest that SYD plays a subtle, specific role in the regulation of SNC1 expression and SNC1-mediated immunity. SYD may work with other proteins at the chromatin level to repress SNC1 transcription; such regulation is important for fine-tuning the expression of NLR-encoding genes to prevent unpropitious autoimmunity. PMID:26063389

  14. Chromatin mediation of a transcriptional memory effect in yeast.

    PubMed

    Paul, Emily; Tirosh, Itay; Lai, William; Buck, Michael J; Palumbo, Michael J; Morse, Randall H

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have described a transcriptional "memory effect," whereby transcript levels of many Abf1-regulated genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are undiminished even after Abf1 has dissociated from its regulatory sites. Here we provide additional support for this effect and investigate its molecular basis. We show that the effect is observed in a distinct abf1 ts mutant from that used in earlier studies, demonstrating that it is robust, and use chromatin immunoprecipitation to show that Abf1 association is decreased similarly from memory effect and transcriptionally responsive genes at the restrictive temperature. We also demonstrate that the association of TATA-binding protein and Pol II decreases after the loss of Abf1 binding for transcriptionally responsive genes but not for memory effect genes. Examination of genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data reveals that although transcriptionally responsive genes exhibit increased nucleosome occupancy in abf1 ts yeast, the promoter regions of memory effect targets show no change in abf1 ts mutants, maintaining an open chromatin conformation even after Abf1 eviction. This contrasting behavior reflects different inherent propensity for nucleosome formation between the two classes, driven by the presence of A/T-rich sequences upstream of the Abf1 site in memory effect gene promoters. These sequence-based differences show conservation in closely related fungi and also correlate with different gene expression noise, suggesting a physiological basis for greater access to "memory effect" promoter regions. Thus, our results establish a conserved mechanism underlying a transcriptional memory effect whereby sequences surrounding Abf1 binding sequences affect local nucleosome occupancy following loss of Abf1 binding. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that sequence-based differences in the propensity for nucleosome occupancy can influence the transcriptional response of genes to an altered regulatory signal. PMID:25748434

  15. Chromatin Mediation of a Transcriptional Memory Effect in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Emily; Tirosh, Itay; Lai, William; Buck, Michael J.; Palumbo, Michael J.; Morse, Randall H.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described a transcriptional “memory effect,” whereby transcript levels of many Abf1-regulated genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are undiminished even after Abf1 has dissociated from its regulatory sites. Here we provide additional support for this effect and investigate its molecular basis. We show that the effect is observed in a distinct abf1 ts mutant from that used in earlier studies, demonstrating that it is robust, and use chromatin immunoprecipitation to show that Abf1 association is decreased similarly from memory effect and transcriptionally responsive genes at the restrictive temperature. We also demonstrate that the association of TATA-binding protein and Pol II decreases after the loss of Abf1 binding for transcriptionally responsive genes but not for memory effect genes. Examination of genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data reveals that although transcriptionally responsive genes exhibit increased nucleosome occupancy in abf1 ts yeast, the promoter regions of memory effect targets show no change in abf1 ts mutants, maintaining an open chromatin conformation even after Abf1 eviction. This contrasting behavior reflects different inherent propensity for nucleosome formation between the two classes, driven by the presence of A/T-rich sequences upstream of the Abf1 site in memory effect gene promoters. These sequence-based differences show conservation in closely related fungi and also correlate with different gene expression noise, suggesting a physiological basis for greater access to “memory effect” promoter regions. Thus, our results establish a conserved mechanism underlying a transcriptional memory effect whereby sequences surrounding Abf1 binding sequences affect local nucleosome occupancy following loss of Abf1 binding. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that sequence-based differences in the propensity for nucleosome occupancy can influence the transcriptional response of genes to an altered regulatory signal. PMID:25748434

  16. Amine catalyzed condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    The catalysis of the condensation of hydrolyzed metal alkoxides by amines has been mentioned in the literature, but there has been no systematic study of their influence on the rate of the condensation reaction of the alkoxide and the microstructure of the resultant gel.

  17. Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation in Candida albicans and Other Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Matthew B; Kongsomboonvech, Pisiwat; Madrigal, Maria; Hernday, Aaron D; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments are critical to investigating the interactions between DNA and a wide range of nuclear proteins within a cell or biological sample. In this chapter we outline an optimized protocol for genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation that has been used successfully for several distinct morphological forms of numerous yeast species, and include an optimized method for amplification of chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA samples and hybridization to a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray. We also provide detailed suggestions on how to analyze the complex data obtained from these experiments. PMID:26483022

  18. Spontaneous emergence of sequence-dependent rosettelike folding of chromatin fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Jean, Ph.; Vaillant, C.; Audit, B.; Arneodo, A.

    2008-06-01

    In the crowded environment of the eukaryotic nucleus, the presence of intrinsic structural defects is shown to predispose chromatin fiber to spontaneously form rosettelike structures. These multilooped patterns self-organize through entropy-driven clustering of sequence-induced fiber defects by depletive forces prior to any external factors coming into play. They provide an attractive description of replication foci that are observed in interphase mammalian nuclei as stable chromatin domains of autonomous DNA replication and gene expression. Experimental perspectives for in vivo visualization of rosettelike organization of the chromatin fiber via the clustering of recently identified putative replication initiation zones are discussed.

  19. Intriguing aspects of meson condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    We analyze various aspects of pion and kaon condensation in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. Considering a system at vanishing temperature and varying the isospin chemical potential and the strange quark chemical potential we reproduce known results about the phase transition to the pion condensation phase and to the kaon condensation phase. However, we obtain mesonic mixings and masses in the condensed phases that are in disagreement with the results reported in previous works. Our findings are obtained both by a theory group analysis and by direct calculation by means of the same low-energy effective Lagrangian used in previous works. We also study the leptonic decay channels in the normal phase and in the pion condensed phase, finding that some of these channels have a peculiar nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the isospin chemical potential. Regarding the semileptonic decays, we find that they are feeding processes for the stable charged pion state.

  20. The diameters of frozen-hydrated chromatin fibers increase with DNA linker length: evidence in support of variable diameter models for chromatin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The diameters of chromatin fibers from Thyone briareus (sea cucumber) sperm (DNA linker length, n = 87 bp) and Necturus maculosus (mudpuppy) erythrocytes (n = 48 bp) were investigated. Soluble fibers were frozen into vitrified aqueous solutions of physiological ionic strength (124 mM), imaged by cryo-EM, and measured interactively using quantitative computer image-processing techniques. Frozen-hydrated Thyone and Necturus fibers had significantly different mean diameters of 43.5 nm (SD = 4.2 nm; SEM = 0.61 nm) and 32.0 nm (SD = 3.0 nm; SEM = 0.36 nm), respectively. Evaluation of previously published EM data shows that the diameters of chromatin from a large number of sources are proportional to linker length. In addition, the inherent variability in fiber diameter suggests a relationship between fiber structure and the heterogeneity of linker length. The cryo-EM data were in quantitative agreement with space-filling double-helical crossed-linker models of Thyone and Necturus chromatin. The data, however, do not support solenoid or twisted-ribbon models for chromatin that specify a constant 30 nm diameter. To reconcile the concept of solenoidal packing with the data, we propose a variable-diameter solid-solenoid model with a fiber diameter that increases with linker length. In principle, each of the variable diameter models for chromatin can be reconciled with local variations in linker length. PMID:2391364