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Sample records for chromatin condensation modulates

  1. Efficient cell migration requires global chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Gerlitz, Gabi; Bustin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process that is necessary for the development and survival of multicellular organisms. Here, we show that cell migration is contingent on global condensation of the chromatin fiber. Induction of directed cell migration by the scratch-wound assay leads to decreased DNaseI sensitivity, alterations in the chromatin binding of architectural proteins and elevated levels of H4K20me1, H3K27me3 and methylated DNA. All these global changes are indicative of increased chromatin condensation in response to induction of directed cell migration. Conversely, chromatin decondensation inhibited the rate of cell migration, in a transcription-independent manner. We suggest that global chromatin condensation facilitates nuclear movement and reshaping, which are important for cell migration. Our results support a role for the chromatin fiber that is distinct from its known functions in genetic processes. PMID:20530575

  2. Genome maintenance in the context of 4D chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sonia; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged in the three-dimensional nuclear space by forming loops, domains, and compartments in a hierarchical manner. However, when duplicated genomes prepare for segregation, mitotic cells eliminate topologically associating domains and abandon the compartmentalized structure. Alongside chromatin architecture reorganization during the transition from interphase to mitosis, cells halt most DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. The intrinsically condensed chromatin serves as a sophisticated signaling module subjected to selective relaxation for programmed genomic activities. To understand the elaborate genome-epigenome interplay during cell cycle progression, the steady three-dimensional genome requires a time scale to form a dynamic four-dimensional and a more comprehensive portrait. In this review, we will dissect the functions of critical chromatin architectural components in constructing and maintaining an orderly packaged chromatin environment. We will also highlight the importance of the spatially and temporally conscious orchestration of chromatin remodeling to ensure high-fidelity genetic transmission. PMID:27098512

  3. Highly condensed chromatins are formed adjacent to subtelomeric and decondensed silent chromatin in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Chikashige, Yuji; Ding, Da-Qiao; Ohtsuki, Chizuru; Mori, Chie; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that silent chromatin is condensed and transcriptionally active chromatin is decondensed. However, little is known about the relationship between the condensation levels and gene expression. Here we report the condensation levels of interphase chromatin in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe examined by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Unexpectedly, silent chromatin is less condensed than the euchromatin. Furthermore, the telomeric silent regions are flanked by highly condensed chromatin bodies, or ‘knobs'. Knob regions span ∼50 kb of sequence devoid of methylated histones. Knob condensation is independent of HP1 homologue Swi6 and other gene silencing factors. Disruption of methylation at lysine 36 of histone H3 (H3K36) eliminates knob formation and gene repression at the subtelomeric and adjacent knob regions. Thus, epigenetic marks at H3K36 play crucial roles in the formation of a unique chromatin structure and in gene regulation at those regions in S. pombe. PMID:26205977

  4. Chromatin condensation of Xist genomic loci during oogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Repression of maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) during preimplantation in mouse embryos is essential for establishing imprinted X chromosome inactivation. Nuclear transplantation (NT) studies using nuclei derived from non-growing (ng) and full-grown (fg) oocytes have indicated that maternal-specific repressive modifications are imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis, as well as on autosomal imprinted genes. Recent studies have revealed that histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) enrichments on Xm-Xist promoter regions are involved in silencing at the preimplantation stages. However, whether H3K9me3 is imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis is not known. Here, we dissected the chromatin states in ng and fg oocytes and early preimplantation stage embryos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments against H3K9me3 revealed that there was no significant enrichment within the Xm-Xist region during oogenesis. However, NT embryos with ng nuclei (ngNT) showed extensive Xm-Xist derepression and H3K9me3 hypomethylation of the promoter region at the 4-cell stage, which corresponds to the onset of paternal Xist expression. We also found that the chromatin state at the Xist genomic locus became markedly condensed as oocyte growth proceeded. Although the condensed Xm-Xist genomic locus relaxed during early preimplantation phases, the extent of the relaxation across Xm-Xist loci derived from normally developed oocytes was significantly smaller than those of paternal-Xist and ngNT-Xist genomic loci. Furthermore, Xm-Xist from 2-cell metaphase nuclei became derepressed following NT. We propose that chromatin condensation is associated with imprinted Xist repression and that skipping of the condensation step by NT leads to Xist activation during the early preimplantation phase. PMID:26459223

  5. Chromatin condensation of Xist genomic loci during oogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    Repression of maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) during preimplantation in mouse embryos is essential for establishing imprinted X chromosome inactivation. Nuclear transplantation (NT) studies using nuclei derived from non-growing (ng) and full-grown (fg) oocytes have indicated that maternal-specific repressive modifications are imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis, as well as on autosomal imprinted genes. Recent studies have revealed that histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) enrichments on Xm-Xist promoter regions are involved in silencing at the preimplantation stages. However, whether H3K9me3 is imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis is not known. Here, we dissected the chromatin states in ng and fg oocytes and early preimplantation stage embryos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments against H3K9me3 revealed that there was no significant enrichment within the Xm-Xist region during oogenesis. However, NT embryos with ng nuclei (ngNT) showed extensive Xm-Xist derepression and H3K9me3 hypomethylation of the promoter region at the 4-cell stage, which corresponds to the onset of paternal Xist expression. We also found that the chromatin state at the Xist genomic locus became markedly condensed as oocyte growth proceeded. Although the condensed Xm-Xist genomic locus relaxed during early preimplantation phases, the extent of the relaxation across Xm-Xist loci derived from normally developed oocytes was significantly smaller than those of paternal-Xist and ngNT-Xist genomic loci. Furthermore, Xm-Xist from 2-cell metaphase nuclei became derepressed following NT. We propose that chromatin condensation is associated with imprinted Xist repression and that skipping of the condensation step by NT leads to Xist activation during the early preimplantation phase. PMID:26459223

  6. Class I Histone Deacetylase Thd1p Promotes Global Chromatin Condensation in Tetrahymena thermophila▿

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Kathryn; Maxson, Julia; Mooney, Alissa; Wiley, Emily A.

    2007-01-01

    Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate DNA-templated processes such as transcription. They act both at specific loci and more generally across global chromatin, contributing to acetylation patterns that may underlie large-scale chromatin dynamics. Although hypoacetylation is correlated with highly condensed chromatin, little is known about the contribution of individual HDACs to chromatin condensation mechanisms. Using the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila, we investigated the role of a specific class I HDAC, Τhd1p, in the reversible condensation of global chromatin. In this system, the normal physiological response to cell starvation includes the widespread condensation of the macronuclear chromatin and general repression of gene transcription. We show that the chromatin in Thd1p-deficient cells failed to condense during starvation. The condensation failure correlated with aberrant hyperphosphorylation of histone H1 and the overexpression of CDC2, encoding the major histone H1 kinase. Changes in the rate of acetate turnover on core histones and in the distribution of acetylated lysines 9 and 23/27 on histone H3 isoforms that were found to correlate with normal chromatin condensation were absent from Thd1p mutant cells. These results point to a role for a class I HDAC in the formation of reversible higher-order chromatin structures and global genome compaction through mechanisms involving the regulation of H1 phosphorylation and core histone acetylation/deacetylation kinetics. PMID:17715364

  7. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  8. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  9. Chromatin condensation in the erythrocytes of fish following exposure to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, T.S.; Pant, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Experimental cadmium poisoning in the fishes has been investigated and a variety of hematological changes have been observed. Studies on mammals have also revealed that Cd interferes with basic cellular processes and the metal has been shown to cause chromatin condensation and emptying of interchromatin spaces in cultured hepatocytes. The present work illustrates the effect of chronic Cd poisoning on the erythrocytes of a freshwater fish, Puntius conchonius with reference to chromatin condensation.

  10. Insulation of the Chicken β-Globin Chromosomal Domain from a Chromatin-Condensing Protein, MENT

    PubMed Central

    Istomina, Natalia E.; Shushanov, Sain S.; Springhetti, Evelyn M.; Karpov, Vadim L.; A. Krasheninnikov, Igor; Stevens, Kimberly; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Singh, Prim B.; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2003-01-01

    Active genes are insulated from developmentally regulated chromatin condensation in terminally differentiated cells. We mapped the topography of a terminal stage-specific chromatin-condensing protein, MENT, across the active chicken β-globin domain. We observed two sharp transitions of MENT concentration coinciding with the β-globin boundary elements. The MENT distribution profile was opposite to that of acetylated core histones but correlated with that of histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3me2K9). Ectopic MENT expression in NIH 3T3 cells caused a large-scale and specific remodeling of chromatin marked by H3me2K9. MENT colocalized with H3me2K9 both in chicken erythrocytes and NIH 3T3 cells. Mutational analysis of MENT and experiments with deacetylase inhibitors revealed the essential role of the reaction center loop domain and an inhibitory affect of histone hyperacetylation on the MENT-induced chromatin remodeling in vivo. In vitro, the elimination of the histone H3 N-terminal peptide containing lysine 9 by trypsin blocked chromatin self-association by MENT, while reconstitution with dimethylated but not acetylated N-terminal domain of histone H3 specifically restored chromatin self-association by MENT. We suggest that histone H3 modification at lysine 9 directly regulates chromatin condensation by recruiting MENT to chromatin in a fashion that is spatially constrained from active genes by gene boundary elements and histone hyperacetylation. PMID:12944473

  11. Proteomics and the genetics of sperm chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Rafael; Castillo, Judit

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis involves extremely marked cellular, genetic and chromatin changes resulting in the generation of the highly specialized sperm cell. Proteomics allows the identification of the proteins that compose the spermatogenic cells and the study of their function. The recent developments in mass spectrometry (MS) have markedly increased the throughput to identify and to study the sperm proteins. Catalogs of thousands of testis and spermatozoan proteins in human and different model species are becoming available, setting up the basis for subsequent research, diagnostic applications and possibly the future development of specific treatments. The present review intends to summarize the key genetic and chromatin changes at the different stages of spermatogenesis and in the mature sperm cell and to comment on the presently available proteomic studies. PMID:21042303

  12. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs. PMID:27558729

  13. Dynamic and flexible H3K9me3 bridging via HP1β dimerization establishes a plastic state of condensed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Hiragami-Hamada, Kyoko; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Nikolov, Miroslav; Wilkins, Bryan; Kreuz, Sarah; Chen, Carol; De La Rosa-Velázquez, Inti A.; Zenn, Hans Michael; Kost, Nils; Pohl, Wiebke; Chernev, Aleksandar; Schwarzer, Dirk; Jenuwein, Thomas; Lorincz, Matthew; Zimmermann, Bastian; Walla, Peter Jomo; Neumann, Heinz; Baubec, Tuncay; Urlaub, Henning; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3 trimethylation of lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and proteins of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family are hallmarks of heterochromatin, a state of compacted DNA essential for genome stability and long-term transcriptional silencing. The mechanisms by which H3K9me3 and HP1 contribute to chromatin condensation have been speculative and controversial. Here we demonstrate that human HP1β is a prototypic HP1 protein exemplifying most basal chromatin binding and effects. These are caused by dimeric and dynamic interaction with highly enriched H3K9me3 and are modulated by various electrostatic interfaces. HP1β bridges condensed chromatin, which we postulate stabilizes the compacted state. In agreement, HP1β genome-wide localization follows H3K9me3-enrichment and artificial bridging of chromatin fibres is sufficient for maintaining cellular heterochromatic conformation. Overall, our findings define a fundamental mechanism for chromatin higher order structural changes caused by HP1 proteins, which might contribute to the plastic nature of condensed chromatin. PMID:27090491

  14. Dynamic and flexible H3K9me3 bridging via HP1β dimerization establishes a plastic state of condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Hiragami-Hamada, Kyoko; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Nikolov, Miroslav; Wilkins, Bryan; Kreuz, Sarah; Chen, Carol; De La Rosa-Velázquez, Inti A; Zenn, Hans Michael; Kost, Nils; Pohl, Wiebke; Chernev, Aleksandar; Schwarzer, Dirk; Jenuwein, Thomas; Lorincz, Matthew; Zimmermann, Bastian; Walla, Peter Jomo; Neumann, Heinz; Baubec, Tuncay; Urlaub, Henning; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3 trimethylation of lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and proteins of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family are hallmarks of heterochromatin, a state of compacted DNA essential for genome stability and long-term transcriptional silencing. The mechanisms by which H3K9me3 and HP1 contribute to chromatin condensation have been speculative and controversial. Here we demonstrate that human HP1β is a prototypic HP1 protein exemplifying most basal chromatin binding and effects. These are caused by dimeric and dynamic interaction with highly enriched H3K9me3 and are modulated by various electrostatic interfaces. HP1β bridges condensed chromatin, which we postulate stabilizes the compacted state. In agreement, HP1β genome-wide localization follows H3K9me3-enrichment and artificial bridging of chromatin fibres is sufficient for maintaining cellular heterochromatic conformation. Overall, our findings define a fundamental mechanism for chromatin higher order structural changes caused by HP1 proteins, which might contribute to the plastic nature of condensed chromatin. PMID:27090491

  15. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore’s fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies. PMID:27526631

  16. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore's fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies. PMID:27526631

  17. Chromatin Condensation and Enucleation in Red Blood Cells: An Open Question.

    PubMed

    Baron, Margaret H; Barminko, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating erythroid cells undergo dramatic changes in morphology, with reduction in cell size, chromatin and nuclear condensation, and enucleation. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Zhao et al. (2016) show that these events are associated with the formation of transient, recurring nuclear openings and selective histone release mediated by caspase-3. PMID:26954541

  18. Spatially Resolved Quantification of Chromatin Condensation through Differential Local Rheology in Cell Nuclei Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Spagnol, Stephen T.; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-01-01

    The linear sequence of DNA encodes access to the complete set of proteins that carry out cellular functions. Yet, much of the functionality appropriate for each cell is nested within layers of dynamic regulation and organization, including a hierarchy of chromatin structural states and spatial arrangement within the nucleus. There remain limitations in our understanding of gene expression within the context of nuclear organization from an inability to characterize hierarchical chromatin organization in situ. Here we demonstrate the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify and spatially resolve chromatin condensation state using cell-permeable, DNA-binding dyes (Hoechst 33342 and PicoGreen). Through in vitro and in situ experiments we demonstrate the sensitivity of fluorescence lifetime to condensation state through the mechanical effects that accompany the structural changes and are reflected through altered viscosity. The establishment of FLIM for resolving and quantifying chromatin condensation state opens the door for single-measurement mechanical studies of the nucleus and for characterizing the role of genome structure and organization in nuclear processes that accompany physiological and pathological changes. PMID:26765322

  19. Spatially Resolved Quantification of Chromatin Condensation through Differential Local Rheology in Cell Nuclei Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Stephen T; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-01-01

    The linear sequence of DNA encodes access to the complete set of proteins that carry out cellular functions. Yet, much of the functionality appropriate for each cell is nested within layers of dynamic regulation and organization, including a hierarchy of chromatin structural states and spatial arrangement within the nucleus. There remain limitations in our understanding of gene expression within the context of nuclear organization from an inability to characterize hierarchical chromatin organization in situ. Here we demonstrate the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to quantify and spatially resolve chromatin condensation state using cell-permeable, DNA-binding dyes (Hoechst 33342 and PicoGreen). Through in vitro and in situ experiments we demonstrate the sensitivity of fluorescence lifetime to condensation state through the mechanical effects that accompany the structural changes and are reflected through altered viscosity. The establishment of FLIM for resolving and quantifying chromatin condensation state opens the door for single-measurement mechanical studies of the nucleus and for characterizing the role of genome structure and organization in nuclear processes that accompany physiological and pathological changes. PMID:26765322

  20. Phosphorylation-Dependent Targeting of Tetrahymena HP1 to Condensed Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yale, Katerina; Tackett, Alan J.; Neuman, Monica; Bulley, Emily; Chait, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The evolutionarily conserved proteins related to heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), originally described in Drosophila, are well known for their roles in heterochromatin assembly and gene silencing. Targeting of HP1 proteins to specific chromatin locales is mediated, at least in part, by the HP1 chromodomain, which binds to histone H3 methylated at lysine 9 that marks condensed regions of the genome. Mechanisms that regulate HP1 targeting are emerging from studies with yeast and metazoans and point to roles for posttranslational modifications. Here, we report that modifications of an HP1 homolog (Hhp1) in the ciliate model Tetrahymena thermophila correlated with the physiological state and with nuclear differentiation events involving the restructuring of chromatin. Results support the model in which Hhp1 chromodomain binds lysine 27-methylated histone H3, and we show that colocalization with this histone mark depends on phosphorylation at a single Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase site in the “hinge region” adjacent to the chromodomain. These findings help elucidate important functional roles of reversible posttranslational modifications of proteins in the HP1 family, in this case, regulating the targeting of a ciliate HP1 to chromatin regions marked with methylated H3 lysine 27. IMPORTANCE Compacting the genome to various degrees influences processes that use DNA as a template, such as gene transcription and replication. This project was aimed at learning more about the cellular mechanisms that control genome compaction. Posttranslational modifications of proteins involved in genome condensation are emerging as potentially important points of regulation. To help elucidate protein modifications and how they affect the function of condensation proteins, we investigated the phosphorylation of the chromatin protein called Hhp1 in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. This is one of the first functional investigations of these modifications of a nonhistone

  1. Phosphorylation-Dependent Targeting of Tetrahymena HP1 to Condensed Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yale, Katerina; Tackett, Alan J; Neuman, Monica; Bulley, Emily; Chait, Brian T; Wiley, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved proteins related to heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), originally described in Drosophila, are well known for their roles in heterochromatin assembly and gene silencing. Targeting of HP1 proteins to specific chromatin locales is mediated, at least in part, by the HP1 chromodomain, which binds to histone H3 methylated at lysine 9 that marks condensed regions of the genome. Mechanisms that regulate HP1 targeting are emerging from studies with yeast and metazoans and point to roles for posttranslational modifications. Here, we report that modifications of an HP1 homolog (Hhp1) in the ciliate model Tetrahymena thermophila correlated with the physiological state and with nuclear differentiation events involving the restructuring of chromatin. Results support the model in which Hhp1 chromodomain binds lysine 27-methylated histone H3, and we show that colocalization with this histone mark depends on phosphorylation at a single Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase site in the "hinge region" adjacent to the chromodomain. These findings help elucidate important functional roles of reversible posttranslational modifications of proteins in the HP1 family, in this case, regulating the targeting of a ciliate HP1 to chromatin regions marked with methylated H3 lysine 27. IMPORTANCE Compacting the genome to various degrees influences processes that use DNA as a template, such as gene transcription and replication. This project was aimed at learning more about the cellular mechanisms that control genome compaction. Posttranslational modifications of proteins involved in genome condensation are emerging as potentially important points of regulation. To help elucidate protein modifications and how they affect the function of condensation proteins, we investigated the phosphorylation of the chromatin protein called Hhp1 in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. This is one of the first functional investigations of these modifications of a nonhistone chromatin

  2. Chromatin-modifying enzymes as modulators of reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Onder, Tamer T; Kara, Nergis; Cherry, Anne; Sinha, Amit U; Zhu, Nan; Bernt, Kathrin M; Cahan, Patrick; Marcarci, B Ogan; Unternaehrer, Juli; Gupta, Piyush B; Lander, Eric S; Armstrong, Scott A; Daley, George Q

    2012-03-29

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by somatic cell reprogramming involves global epigenetic remodelling. Whereas several proteins are known to regulate chromatin marks associated with the distinct epigenetic states of cells before and after reprogramming, the role of specific chromatin-modifying enzymes in reprogramming remains to be determined. To address how chromatin-modifying proteins influence reprogramming, we used short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to target genes in DNA and histone methylation pathways, and identified positive and negative modulators of iPSC generation. Whereas inhibition of the core components of the polycomb repressive complex 1 and 2, including the histone 3 lysine 27 methyltransferase EZH2, reduced reprogramming efficiency, suppression of SUV39H1, YY1 and DOT1L enhanced reprogramming. Specifically, inhibition of the H3K79 histone methyltransferase DOT1L by shRNA or a small molecule accelerated reprogramming, significantly increased the yield of iPSC colonies, and substituted for KLF4 and c-Myc (also known as MYC). Inhibition of DOT1L early in the reprogramming process is associated with a marked increase in two alternative factors, NANOG and LIN28, which play essential functional roles in the enhancement of reprogramming. Genome-wide analysis of H3K79me2 distribution revealed that fibroblast-specific genes associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal transition lose H3K79me2 in the initial phases of reprogramming. DOT1L inhibition facilitates the loss of this mark from genes that are fated to be repressed in the pluripotent state. These findings implicate specific chromatin-modifying enzymes as barriers to or facilitators of reprogramming, and demonstrate how modulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes can be exploited to more efficiently generate iPSCs with fewer exogenous transcription factors. PMID:22388813

  3. The Dynamics of HCF-1 Modulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Chromatin during Initiation of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jodi L.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection of herpes simplex virus is dependent upon chromatin modulation by the cellular coactivator host cell factor-1 (HCF-1). This review focuses on the multiple chromatin modulation components associated with HCF-1 and the chromatin-related dynamics mediated by this coactivator that lead to the initiation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) immediate early gene expression. PMID:23698399

  4. Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Evgenya Y.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Short, Sarah A.; Lee, Gloria; Villalobos, Jonathan; Etzell, Joan; Koury, Mark J.; Ney, Paul A.; Chasis, Joel Anne; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2008-08-21

    Terminal erythroid differentiation in vertebrates is characterized by progressive heterochromatin formation, chromatin condensation and, in mammals, culminates in nuclear extrusion. To date, although mechanisms regulating avian erythroid chromatin condensation have been identified, little is known regarding this process during mammalian erythropoiesis. To elucidate the molecular basis for mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation, we used Friend virus-infected murine spleen erythroblasts that undergo terminal differentiation in vitro. Chromatin isolated from early and late stage erythroblasts had similar levels of linker and core histones, only a slight difference in nucleosome repeats, and no significant accumulation of known developmentally-regulated architectural chromatin proteins. However, histone H3(K9) dimethylation markedly increased while histone H4(K12) acetylation dramatically decreased and became segregated from the histone methylation as chromatin condensed. One histone deacetylase, HDAC5, was significantly upregulated during the terminal stages of Friend virus-infected erythroblast differentiation. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, blocked both chromatin condensation and nuclear extrusion. Based on our data, we propose a model for a unique mechanism in which extensive histone deacetylation at pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates heterochromatin condensation in vertebrate erythroblasts that would otherwise be mediated by developmentally-regulated architectural proteins in nucleated blood cells.

  5. Linker histones are not essential and affect chromatin condensation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Yu, L; Weir, J W; Gorovsky, M A

    1995-07-14

    We have (separately) disrupted all of the expressed macronuclear copies of the HHO gene encoding macronuclear histone H1 and of the micronuclear linker histone (MLH) gene encoding the protein MicLH in Tetrahymena thermophila. These disruptions are shown to eliminate completely the expression of each protein. Strains without either linker histone grow at normal rates and reach near-normal cell densities, demonstrating that linker histones are not essential for cell survival. Histone H1 knockout (delta H1) cells have enlarged DAPI-stained macronuclei and normal-sized micronuclei, while MicLH knockout (delta MicLH) cells have enlarged micronuclei and normal-sized macronuclei. delta MicLH cells undergo mitosis normally. However, the micronuclear mitotic chromosome structure is less condensed. These studies provide evidence that linker histones are nonessential and are involved in chromatin packaging and condensation in vivo. PMID:7606784

  6. Sperm chromatin condensation, DNA integrity, and apoptosis in men with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Ali Reza; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Vahidi, Serajodin; Ghasemzadeh, Jalal; Tabibnejad, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of cord injury on (1) sperm parameters and (2) DNA chromatin status. Design Case–control study. Setting Data were collected from men referred to Research and Clinical Center for Infertility, Yazd, Iran. Participants Thirty infertile men with the presence of any level of spinal cord injury (SCI) were compared with 30 healthy donors with definite fertility and normal sperm parameters. Interventions Not applicable. Outcome measures Sperm chromatin integrity was assessed using aniline blue (AB), chromomycin A3 (CMA3), toluidine blue (TB), and acridine orange (AO) assays. The rate of apoptotic spermatozoa was evaluated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining. Results Sperm concentration, motility, and morphology in men with SCI were significantly decreased compared with control group (P < 0.05). In addition, with regard to cytochemical staining and TUNEL test, the rate of reacted spermatozoa was increased significantly in SCI group when compared with the controls (P < 0.05). The majority of AB, TB, AO, and CMA3-reacted spermatozoa were higher than the “cut-off” value in men with SCI, as were the number of apoptotic spermatozoa stained with TUNEL. Conclusion Results showed that SCI disturbs sperm parameters, nuclear maturity, and DNA integrity of spermatozoa. Therefore, the production of spermatozoa with less condensed chromatin and more apoptotic rate increases after cord injury and this may be one possible cause of infertility following SCI. PMID:23809529

  7. EGFR-Mediated Chromatin Condensation Protects KRAS-Mutant Cancer Cells Against Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Kern, Ashley M.; Hülskötter, Marieke; Greninger, Patricia; Singh, Anurag; Pan, Yunfeng; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Benes, Cyril H.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Settleman, Jeff; Willers, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutics that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can enhance the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation (IR). However, predictive genomic biomarkers of this radiosensitization have remained elusive. By screening 40 non-small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC) lines, we established a surprising positive correlation between the presence of a KRAS mutation and radiosensitization by the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib and cetuximab. EGFR signaling in KRAS-mutant NSCLC cells promotes chromatin condensation in-vitro and in-vivo, thereby restricting the number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) produced by a given dose of IR. Chromatin condensation in interphase cells is characterized by an unexpected mitosis-like co-localization of serine 10 phosphorylation and lysine 9 trimethylation on histone H3. Aurora B promotes this process in a manner that is co-dependent upon EGFR and PKCα. PKCα, in addition to MEK/ERK signaling, is required for the suppression of DSB-inducible premature senescence by EGFR. Blockade of autophagy results in a mutant KRAS-dependent senescence-to-apoptosis switch in cancer cells treated with IR and erlotinib. In conclusion, we identify EGFR as a molecular target to overcome a novel mechanism of radioresistance in KRAS-mutant tumor cells, which stands in contrast to the unresponsiveness of KRAS-mutant cancers to EGFR-directed agents in monotherapy. Our findings may reposition EGFR-targeted agents for combination with DSB-inducing therapies in KRAS-mutant NSCLC. PMID:24648348

  8. A DEK Domain-Containing Protein Modulates Chromatin Structure and Function in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1α and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  9. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  10. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility.

    PubMed

    Clauvelin, N; Lo, P; Kulaeva, O I; Nizovtseva, E V; Diaz-Montes, J; Zola, J; Parashar, M; Studitsky, V M; Olson, W K

    2015-02-18

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of ∼150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the 'local' inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and

  11. Chromatin condensation, cysteine-rich protamine, and establishment of disulphide interprotamine bonds during spermiogenesis of Eledone cirrhosa (Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Bonafé, Pepita; Ribes, Enric; Sautière, Pierre; Gonzalez, Angel; Kasinsky, Harold; Kouach, Mustafa; Sautière, Pierre-Eric; Ausió, Juan; Chiva, Manel

    2002-06-01

    During spermiogenesis in Eledone cirrhosa a single protamine substitutes for histones in nuclei of developing spermatids. This protein displays a peculiar primary structure. It contains 22.6 mol% cysteine residues (19 cysteines in 84 residues). This makes it the most cysteine-rich protamine known. The proportion of basic residues is relatively low (arginine 36.9 mol%, lysine 19.0 mol%). The protamine of E. cirrhosa condenses spermiogenic chromatin in a pattern which comprises fibres with a progressively larger diameter and lamellae that finally undergo definitive coalescence. We have also performed a study that estimates the number of interprotamine disulphide bonds formed during the process of spermiogenic chromatin condensation by means of sequential disappearance of MMNA (monomaleimido-nanogold) labelling. During the first step of spermiogenesis, protamines are found spread over very slightly condensed chromatin with their cysteines in a reactive state (protamine-cys-SH). From this stage the interprotamine disulphide bonds are established in a progressive way. First they are formed inside the chromatin fibres. Subsequently, they participate in the mechanism of fibre coalescence and finally, in the last step of spermiogenesis, the remaining free reactive -SH groups of cysteine form disulphide bonds, thus promoting a definitive stabilization of the nucleoprotein complex in the ripe sperm nucleus. PMID:12113475

  12. Dynamic modulation of HSV chromatin drives initiation of infection and provides targets for epigenetic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kristie, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection, the genomes of herpesviruses undergo a striking transition from a non-nucleosomal structure to a chromatin structure. The rapid assembly and modulation of nucleosomes during the initial stage of infection results in an overlay of complex regulation that requires interactions of a plethora of chromatin modulation components. For herpes simplex virus, the initial chromatin dynamic is dependent on viral and host cell transcription factors and coactivators that mediate the balance between heterochromatic suppression of the viral genome and the euchromatin transition that allows and promotes the expression of viral immediate early genes. Strikingly similar to lytic infection, in sensory neurons this dynamic transition between heterochromatin and euchromatin governs the establishment, maintenance, and reactivation from the latent state. Chromatin dynamics in both the lytic infection and latency-reactivation cycles provides opportunities to shift the balance using small molecule epigenetic modulators to suppress viral infection, shedding, and reactivation from latency. PMID:25702087

  13. HMGA proteins as modulators of chromatin structure during transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nihan; Singh, Indrabahadur; Mehta, Aditi; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant non-histone chromatin associated proteins. HMG proteins bind to DNA and nucleosome and alter the structure of chromatin locally and globally. Accessibility to DNA within chromatin is a central factor that affects DNA-dependent nuclear processes, such as transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. HMG proteins associate with different multi-protein complexes to regulate these processes by mediating accessibility to DNA. HMG proteins can be subdivided into three families: HMGA, HMGB, and HMGN. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in understanding the function of HMGA family members, specifically their role in gene transcription regulation during development and cancer. PMID:25364713

  14. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  15. An Essential Viral Transcription Activator Modulates Chromatin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gibeault, Rebecca L.; Bildersheim, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Although ICP4 is the only essential transcription activator of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), its mechanisms of action are still only partially understood. We and others propose a model in which HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized as a cellular defense to inhibit HSV-1 transcription. To counteract silencing, HSV-1 would have evolved proteins that prevent or destabilize chromatinization to activate transcription. These proteins should act as HSV-1 transcription activators. We have shown that HSV-1 genomes are organized in highly dynamic nucleosomes and that histone dynamics increase in cells infected with wild type HSV-1. We now show that whereas HSV-1 mutants encoding no functional ICP0 or VP16 partially enhanced histone dynamics, mutants encoding no functional ICP4 did so only minimally. Transient expression of ICP4 was sufficient to enhance histone dynamics in the absence of other HSV-1 proteins or HSV-1 DNA. The dynamics of H3.1 were increased in cells expressing ICP4 to a greater extent than those of H3.3. The dynamics of H2B were increased in cells expressing ICP4, whereas those of canonical H2A were not. ICP4 preferentially targets silencing H3.1 and may also target the silencing H2A variants. In infected cells, histone dynamics were increased in the viral replication compartments, where ICP4 localizes. These results suggest a mechanism whereby ICP4 activates transcription by disrupting, or preventing the formation of, stable silencing nucleosomes on HSV-1 genomes. PMID:27575707

  16. Effect of different thawing temperatures on the viability, in vitro fertilizing capacity and chromatin condensation of frozen boar semen packaged in 5 ml straws.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Izquierdo, A; Oliva, J H; Lleó, B; García-Artiga, C; Corcuera, B D; Pérez-Gutiérrez, J F

    2006-03-01

    The effect of two different thawing temperatures on frozen boar semen viability, in vitro fertilizing capacity and chromatin condensation and stability was studied. Freeze-thaw motility, normal apical ridge (NAR), in vitro fertilizing (IVF) capacity and chromatin condensation and stability were evaluated after thawing at 42 degrees C, 40s and 50 degrees C, 40s. Chromatin condensation degree was determined by flow cytometry, using propidium iodide as fluorochrome intercalating agent, and chromatin stability was evaluated by the same procedure after inducing sperm chromatin decondensation with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The results showed that thawing straws at 42 degrees C, 40s significantly reduced motility compared to straws thawed at 50 degrees C, 40s. NAR, penetration, monospermy and polyspermy were not different between the two groups of samples thawed at different temperatures. Chromatin was significantly more compact when thawing was performed at 50 degrees C, but its stability did not show any difference relative to thawing at 42 degrees C. It is suggested that the interactions involved in chromatin overcondensation had a non-covalent nature. PMID:15975744

  17. A systematic method to identify modulation of transcriptional regulation via chromatin activity reveals regulatory network during mESC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Duren, Zhana; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulators (CRs) are crucial for connecting the chromatin level and transcriptome level by modulating chromatin structures, establishing, and maintaining epigenetic modifications. We present a systematic method to identify MOdulation of transcriptional regulation via CHromatin Activity (MOCHA) from gene expression data and demonstrate its advantage in associating CRs to their chromatin localization and understand CRs’ function. We first re-construct the CRs modulation network by integrating the correlation and conditional correlation concepts. Then we quantify the chromatin activity as hidden variable in network by integrating the upstream and downstream information. We applied MOCHA to systematically explore the interplay of CRs, TFs, and target genes in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). As a result, MOCHA identified 420 chromatin regulators with modulation preference, including Pou5f1 and Eed. We found that BAF complex, NuRD complex, and polycomb-group proteins, regulate the delicate balance between pluripotency and differentiation by modulating key TFs including Klf4, Tcf3, and Max; NuRD complex members Mbd3 and Hdac1 may modulate Klf4 to achieve its dual functional roles in pluripotent and differentiation stages;Imprinted gene H19 and Igf2 are modulated by DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and insulator CTCF. Finally, we analyzed CR’s combinational modulation pattern by constructing a CR-CR interaction network. PMID:26949222

  18. A systematic method to identify modulation of transcriptional regulation via chromatin activity reveals regulatory network during mESC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Duren, Zhana; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulators (CRs) are crucial for connecting the chromatin level and transcriptome level by modulating chromatin structures, establishing, and maintaining epigenetic modifications. We present a systematic method to identify MOdulation of transcriptional regulation via CHromatin Activity (MOCHA) from gene expression data and demonstrate its advantage in associating CRs to their chromatin localization and understand CRs' function. We first re-construct the CRs modulation network by integrating the correlation and conditional correlation concepts. Then we quantify the chromatin activity as hidden variable in network by integrating the upstream and downstream information. We applied MOCHA to systematically explore the interplay of CRs, TFs, and target genes in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). As a result, MOCHA identified 420 chromatin regulators with modulation preference, including Pou5f1 and Eed. We found that BAF complex, NuRD complex, and polycomb-group proteins, regulate the delicate balance between pluripotency and differentiation by modulating key TFs including Klf4, Tcf3, and Max; NuRD complex members Mbd3 and Hdac1 may modulate Klf4 to achieve its dual functional roles in pluripotent and differentiation stages;Imprinted gene H19 and Igf2 are modulated by DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and insulator CTCF. Finally, we analyzed CR's combinational modulation pattern by constructing a CR-CR interaction network. PMID:26949222

  19. Etoposide interferes with the process of chromatin condensation during alga Chara vulgaris spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Agnieszka, Wojtczak

    2014-10-01

    DNA topoisomerase II plays an essential role in animal spermiogenesis, where changes of chromatin structure are connected with appearance of transient DNA breaks. Such topo II activity can be curtailed by inhibitors such as etoposide and suramine. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the effect of etoposide on spermatid chromatin remodeling in the green alga Chara vulgaris. This inhibitor prolonged the early spermiogenesis stages and blocked the formation of the phosphorylated form of histone H2AX at stages VI-VII. The lack of transient DSBs at these stages impairs the elimination of supercoils containing nucleosomes which lead to disturbances in nucleoprotein exchange and the pattern of spermatid chromatin fibrils at stages VI-VIII. Immunofluorescent and ultrastructural observations revealed that during C. vulgaris spermiogenesis topo II played an important role similar to that in mammals. Some corresponding features had been pointed out before, the present studies showed further similarities. PMID:25041830

  20. Dynamics of histone H2A, H4 and HS1ph during spermatogenesis with a focus on chromatin condensation and maturity of spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Mu, Shu-Mei; Guo, Ming-Shen; Wu, Jiang-li; Li, Yan-qin; Zhang, Han; Wang, Ying; Kang, Xian-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Histones and histone phosphorylation play vital roles during animal spermatogenesis and spermatozoa maturation. The dynamic distribution of histones H2A and H4 and phosphorylated H2A and H4 at serine 1 (HS1ph) was explored in mammalian and Decapoda germ cells, with a special focus on the distribution of H2A, H4 and HS1ph between mouse condensed spermatozoa chromatin and crab non-condensed spermatozoa chromatin. The distribution of histone marks was also analysed in mature spermatozoa with different chromatin structures. Histone H2A and H4 marks were closely associated with the relatively loose chromatin structure in crab spermatozoa. The significant decrease in the HS1ph signal during spermatogenesis suggests that eliminating most of these epigenetic marks in the nucleusis closely associated with spermatozoa maturity. PMID:27121047

  1. Piwi Modulates Chromatin Accessibility by Regulating Multiple Factors Including Histone H1 to Repress Transposons.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yuka W; Murano, Kensaku; Ishizu, Hirotsugu; Shibuya, Aoi; Iyoda, Yumiko; Siomi, Mikiko C; Siomi, Haruhiko; Saito, Kuniaki

    2016-08-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) mediate transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing of transposable element (TE) in animal gonads. In Drosophila ovaries, Piwi-piRNA complexes (Piwi-piRISCs) repress TE transcription by modifying the chromatin state, such as by H3K9 trimethylation. Here, we demonstrate that Piwi physically interacts with linker histone H1. Depletion of Piwi decreases H1 density at a subset of TEs, leading to their derepression. Silencing at these loci separately requires H1 and H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a). Loss of H1 increases target loci chromatin accessibility without affecting H3K9me3 density at these loci, while loss of HP1a does not impact H1 density. Thus, Piwi-piRISCs require both H1 and HP1a to repress TEs, and the silencing is correlated with the chromatin state rather than H3K9me3 marks. These findings suggest that Piwi-piRISCs regulate the interaction of chromatin components with target loci to maintain silencing of TEs through the modulation of chromatin accessibility. PMID:27425411

  2. How chromatin-binding modules interpret histone modifications: lessons from professional pocket pickers

    PubMed Central

    Ruthenburg, Alexander J; Allis, C David; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-01-01

    Histones comprise the major protein component of chromatin, the scaffold in which the eukaryotic genome is packaged, and are subject to many types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially on their flexible tails. These modifications may constitute a ‘histone code’ and could be used to manage epigenetic information that helps extend the genetic message beyond DNA sequences. This proposed code, read in part by histone PTM–binding ‘effector’ modules and their associated complexes, is predicted to define unique functional states of chromatin and/or regulate various chromatin-templated processes. A wealth of structural and functional data show how chromatin effector modules target their cognate covalent histone modifications. Here we summarize key features in molecular recognition of histone PTMs by a diverse family of ‘reader pockets’, highlighting specific readout mechanisms for individual marks, common themes and insights into the downstream functional consequences of the interactions. Changes in these interactions may have far-reaching implications for human biology and disease, notably cancer. PMID:17984965

  3. Chromatin Modulation of Herpesvirus Lytic Gene Expression: Managing Nucleosome Density and Heterochromatic Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Kristie, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Like their cellular hosts, herpesviruses are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin assembled on their genomes. Upon infection, these viruses are assembled into domains of chromatin with heterochromatic signatures that suppress viral gene expression or euchromatic characteristics that promote gene expression. The organization and modulation of these chromatin domains appear to be intimately linked to the coordinated expression of the different classes of viral genes and thus ultimately play an important role in the progression of productive infection or the establishment and maintenance of viral latency. A recent report from the Knipe laboratory (J. S. Lee, P. Raja, and D. M. Knipe, mBio 7:e02007-15, 2016) contributes to the understanding of the dynamic modulation of chromatin assembled on the herpes simplex virus genome by monitoring the levels of characteristic heterochromatic histone modifications (histone H3 lysine 9 and 27 methylation) associated with a model viral early gene during the progression of lytic infection. Additionally, this study builds upon previous observations that the viral immediate-early protein ICP0 plays a role in reducing the levels of heterochromatin associated with the early genes. PMID:26884430

  4. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations

    PubMed Central

    Visvanathan, Ashwat; Ahmed, Kashif; Even-Faitelson, Liron; Lleres, David; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2013-01-01

    The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism. PMID:23840764

  5. The CW domain, a new histone recognition module in chromatin proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Verena; Thorstensen, Tage; Kristiansen, Per Eugen; Veiseth, Silje Veie; Rahman, Mohummad Aminur; Finne, Kenneth; Aalen, Reidunn B; Aasland, Rein

    2011-05-18

    Post-translational modifications of the N-terminal histone tails, including lysine methylation, have key roles in regulation of chromatin and gene expression. A number of protein modules have been identified that recognize differentially modified histone tails and provide their proteins with the capacity to sense such modifications. Here, we identify the CW domain of plant and animal chromatin-related proteins as a novel module that recognizes different methylated states of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me). The solution structure of the CW domain of the Arabidopsis ASH1 HOMOLOG2 (ASHH2) histone methyltransferase provides insight into how different CW domains can distinguish different methylated histone tails. We provide evidence that ASHH2 is acting on H3K4me-marked genes, allowing for ASHH2-dependent H3K36 tri-methylation, which contributes to sustained expression of tissue-specific and developmentally regulated genes. This suggests that ASHH2 is a combined 'reader' and 'writer' of the histone code. We propose that different CW domains, dependent on their specificity for different H3K4 methylations, are important for epigenetic memory or participate in switching between permissive and repressive chromatin states. PMID:21522130

  6. Packaging, Transportation and Recycling of NPP Condenser Modules - 12262

    SciTech Connect

    Polley, G.M.

    2012-07-01

    Perma-Fix was awarded contract from Energy Northwest for the packaging, transportation and disposition of the condenser modules, water boxes and miscellaneous metal, combustibles and water generated during the 2011 condenser replacement outage at the Columbia Generating Station. The work scope was to package the water boxes and condenser modules as they were removed from the facility and transfer them to the Perma-Fix Northwest facility for processing, recycle of metals and disposition. The condenser components were oversized and overweight (the condenser modules weighed ∼102,058 kg [225,000 lb]) which required special equipment for loading and transport. Additional debris waste was packaged in inter-modals and IP-1 boxes for transport. A waste management plan was developed to minimize the generation of virtually any waste requiring landfill disposal. The Perma-Fix Northwest facility was modified to accommodate the ∼15 m [50-ft] long condenser modules and equipment was designed and manufactured to complete the disassembly, decontamination and release survey. The condenser modules are currently undergoing processing for free release to a local metal recycler. Over three millions pounds of metal will be recycled and over 95% of the waste generated during this outage will not require land disposal. There were several elements of this project that needed to be addressed during the preparation for this outage and the subsequent packaging, transportation and processing. - Staffing the project to support 24/7 generation of large components and other wastes. - The design and manufacture of the soft-sided shipping containers for the condenser modules that measured ∼15 m X 4 m X 3 m [50 ft X 13 ft X 10 ft] and weighed ∼102,058 kg [225,000 lbs] - Developing a methodology for loading the modules into the shipping containers. - Obtaining a transport vehicle for the modules. - Designing and modifying the processing facility. - Movement of the modules at the processing

  7. Modulation of chromatin position and gene expression by HDAC4 interaction with nucleoporins

    PubMed Central

    Kehat, Izhak; Accornero, Federica; Aronow, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) can modulate chromatin architecture and transcriptional activity, thereby participating in the regulation of cellular responses such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, the target genes of class IIa HDACs that control inducible cardiac growth and the broader mechanisms whereby these deacetylases modulate locus-specific gene expression within chromatin remain a mystery. Here, we used genome-wide promoter occupancy analysis, expression profiling, and primary cell validation to identify direct class IIa HDAC4 targets in cardiomyocytes. Simultaneously, we identified nucleoporin155 (Nup155) as an HDAC4-interacting protein. Mechanistically, we show that HDAC4 modulated the association of identified target genes with nucleoporins through interaction with Nup155. Moreover, a truncated mutant of Nup155 that cannot bind HDAC4 suppressed HDAC4-induced gene expression patterns and chromatin–nucleoporin association, suggesting that Nup155-mediated localization was required for HDAC4’s effect on gene expression. We thus propose a novel mechanism of action for HDAC4, suggesting it can function to dynamically regulate gene expression through changes in chromatin–nucleoporin association. PMID:21464227

  8. Dynamic aspects of spermiogenic chromatin condensation patterning by phase separation during the histone-to-protamine transition in charalean algae and relation to bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Kasinsky, H E; Ellis, S; Martens, G; Ausió, J

    2014-12-01

    During early-to-middle spermiogenesis in multicellular, internally fertilizing charalean green algae (Chara fibrosa, Chara vulgaris, Chara tomentosa, Nitella missouriensis), patterning of chromatin/nucleoplasm in developing spermatid nuclei changes from granules → fibers → contorted lamellae → condensed chromatin. Cytochemical, immunocytochemical, electrophoretic studies on C. vulgaris and C. tomentosa spermatids (Kwiatkowska, Poplonska) and amino acid analysis of protamines in Chara corallina sperm (Reynolds, Wolfe), indicate that more positively charged protamines replace histones directly during spermiogenesis, not indirectly through other intermediate transitional proteins as in internally fertilizing neogastropods and sharks with more ordered spermatid lamellae. We hypothesize that such lamellar-mediated patterning is due to liquid-liquid phase separation by spinodal decomposition. This is a spontaneous thermodynamic process that involves diffusive instability of a lamellar chromatin network, a dominant pattern repeat distance and bicontinuity of chromatin/nucleoplasm phases. C. vulgaris sperm show contorted lamellae in the posterior region, whereas C. corallina sperm display contorted peripheral lamellae and interior fibrils. Among internally fertilizing liverworts, which may have evolved from Zygnematales, mid-spermatid nuclei lack lamellae. Instead they display self-coiled chromatin rods in Blasia pusilla, contain short chromatin tubules in Haplomitrium hookeri resembling those in internally fertilizing mosses and a hornwort and indirectly replace histones with protamines in Marchantia polymorpha. PMID:25262620

  9. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David; Patrick, Steve M.

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  10. Structure and Function of the SWIRM Domain, a Conserved Protein Module Found in Chromatin Regulatory Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da,G.; Lenkart, J.; Zhao, K.; Shiekhattar, R.; Cairns, B.; Marmorstein, R.

    2006-01-01

    The SWIRM domain is a module found in the Swi3 and Rsc8 subunits of SWI/SNF-family chromatin remodeling complexes, and the Ada2 and BHC110/LSD1 subunits of chromatin modification complexes. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the SWIRM domain from Swi3 and characterize the in vitro and in vivo function of the SWIRM domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi3 and Rsc8. The Swi3 SWIRM forms a four-helix bundle containing a pseudo 2-fold axis and a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. We show that the Swi3 SWIRM binds free DNA and mononucleosomes with high and comparable affinity and that a subset of Swi3 substitution mutants that display growth defects in vivo also show impaired DNA-binding activity in vitro, consistent with a nucleosome targeting function of this domain. Genetic and biochemical studies also reveal that the Rsc8 and Swi3 SWIRM domains are essential for the proper assembly and in vivo functions of their respective complexes. Together, these studies identify the SWIRM domain as an essential multifunctional module for the regulation of gene expression.

  11. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Jiang; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bu, Youquan

    2015-03-13

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. PMID:25666944

  12. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates cytokine production through the modulation of chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    RIOS, ESTER C.S.; SZCZESNY, BARTOSZ; SORIANO, FRANCISCO G.; OLAH, GABOR; SZABO, CSABA

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous biological mediator, which regulates, among others, the oxidative balance of cells under normal physiological conditions, as well as in various diseases. Several previous studies have reported that H2S attenuates inflammatory mediator production. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in chromatin modulation in an in vitro model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and evaluated its effects on inflammatory cytokine production. Tamm-Horsfall protein 1 (THP-1) differentiated macrophages were pre-treated with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (an H2S donor) at 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 or 1 mM for 30 min. To stimulate cytokine production, the cells were challenged with bacterial LPS (1 μg/ml) for 1, 4, 8 or 24 h. Histone H3 acetylation was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), cytokine production was measured by ELISA and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity was analyzed using a standard biochemical assay. H2S inhibited the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a concentration-dependent manner; it was most effective at the two highest concentrations used. This effect was associated with a decrease in histone H3 acetylation at the IL-6 and TNF-α promoters in the cells exposed to H2S or H2S + LPS. The findings of the present study suggest that H2S suppresses histone acetylation, which, in turn, inhibits chromatin openness, leading to a decrease in the gene transcription of various pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, this mechanism may contribute to the previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects of H2S and various H2S donors. PMID:25873160

  13. Transcriptional Control by PARP-1: Chromatin Modulation, Enhancer-binding, Coregulation, and Insulation

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, W. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Summary The regulation of gene expression requires a wide array of protein factors that can modulate chromatin structure, act at enhancers, function as transcriptional coregulators, or regulate insulator function. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent addition of ADP-ribose polymers on a variety of nuclear proteins, has been implicated in all of these functions. Recent biochemical, genomic, proteomic, and cell-based studies have highlighted the role of PARP-1 in each of these processes and provided new insights about the molecular mechanisms governing PARP-1-dependent regulation of gene expression. In addition, these studies have demonstrated how PARP-1 functions as an integral part of cellular signaling pathways that culminate in gene regulatory outcomes. PMID:18450439

  14. PRR11 regulates late-S to G2/M phase progression and induces premature chromatin condensation (PCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chundong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yi; Zhu, Huifang; Wang, Yitao; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Jiang; Ozaki, Toshinori; Bu, Youquan

    2015-03-13

    Recently, we have demonstrated that proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) is a novel tumor-related gene product likely implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression as well as lung cancer development. However, its precise role in cell cycle progression remains unclear. In the present study, we have further investigated the expression pattern and functional implication of PRR11 during cell cycle in detail in human lung carcinoma-derived H1299 cells. According to our immunofluorescence study, PRR11 was expressed largely in cytoplasm, the amount of PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase, and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. Consistent with those observations, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRR11 caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase. Intriguingly, the treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. Moreover, knockdown of PRR11 also resulted in a remarkable retardation of G2/M progression, and PRR11-knockdown cells subsequently underwent G2 phase cell cycle arrest accompanied by obvious mitotic defects such as multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. In addition, forced expression of PRR11 promoted the premature Chromatin condensation (PCC), and then proliferation of PRR11-expressing cells was massively attenuated and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that PRR11, which is strictly regulated during cell cycle progression, plays a pivotal role in the regulation of accurate cell cycle progression through the late S phase to mitosis. - Highlights: • PRR11 started to increase in the late S phase and was retained until just before mitotic telophase. • PRR11-knockdown caused a significant cell cycle arrest in the late S phase and G2 phase. • The treatment with dNTPs further augmented PRR11 silencing-mediated S phase arrest. • PRR11-knockdown led to multipolar spindles and multiple nuclei. • Forced expression of PRR11 promoted the PCC and inhibited

  15. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  16. Nuclear DNA Methylation and Chromatin Condensation Phenotypes Are Distinct Between Normally Proliferating/Aging, Rapidly Growing/Immortal, and Senescent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Tajbakhsh, Jian

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on probing the utility of in situ chromatin texture features such as nuclear DNA methylation and chromatin condensation patterns — visualized by fluorescent staining and evaluated by dedicated three-dimensional (3D) quantitative and high-throughput cell-by-cell image analysis — in assessing the proliferative capacity, i.e. growth behavior of cells: to provide a more dynamic picture of a cell population with potential implications in basic science, cancer diagnostics/prognostics and therapeutic drug development. Two types of primary cells and four different cancer cell lines were propagated and subjected to cell-counting, flow cytometry, confocal imaging, and 3D image analysis at various points in culture. Additionally a subset of primary and cancer cells was accelerated into senescence by oxidative stress. DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels decreased with declining doubling times when primary cells aged in culture with the lowest levels reached at the stage of proliferative senescence. In comparison, immortal cancer cells with constant but higher doubling times mostly displayed lower and constant levels of the two in situ-derived features. However, stress-induced senescent primary and cancer cells showed similar levels of these features compared with primary cells that had reached natural growth arrest. With regards to global DNA methylation and chromatin condensation levels, aggressively growing cancer cells seem to take an intermediate level between normally proliferating and senescent cells. Thus, normal cells apparently reach cancer-cell equivalent stages of the two parameters at some point in aging, which might challenge phenotypic distinction between these two types of cells. Companion high-resolution molecular profiling could provide information on possible underlying differences that would explain benign versus malign cell growth behaviors. PMID:23562889

  17. The role of chromatin structure in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Gerlitz, Gabi; Bustin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play a major role in regulating genetic processes. Now, accumulating data suggest that chromatin structure may also affect the mechanical properties of the nucleus and cell migration. Global chromatin organization seems to modulate the shape, the size and the stiffness of the nucleus. Directed-cell migration, which often requires nuclear reshaping to allow cellular passage through narrow openings, is dependent not only on changes in cytoskeletal elements, but also on the global chromatin condensation. Conceivably, during cell migration a physical link between the chromatin and the cytoskeleton facilitates coordinated structural changes in these two components. Thus, in addition to regulating genetic processes, we suggest that alterations in chromatin structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations necessary for efficient migration. PMID:20951589

  18. Progressive Chromatin Condensation and H3K9 Methylation Regulate the Differentiation of Embryonic and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte, Fernando; Sousae, Rebekah; Cinquin, Bertrand; Martin, Eric W.; Krietsch, Jana; Sanchez, Gabriela; Inman, Margaux; Tsang, Herman; Warr, Matthew; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Forsberg, E. Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic regulation serves as the basis for stem cell differentiation into distinct cell types, but it is unclear how global epigenetic changes are regulated during this process. Here, we tested the hypothesis that global chromatin organization affects the lineage potential of stem cells and that manipulation of chromatin dynamics influences stem cell function. Using nuclease sensitivity assays, we found a progressive decrease in chromatin digestion among pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), multipotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and mature hematopoietic cells. Quantitative high-resolution microscopy revealed that ESCs contain significantly more euchromatin than HSCs, with a further reduction in mature cells. Increased cellular maturation also led to heterochromatin localization to the nuclear periphery. Functionally, prevention of heterochromatin formation by inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9A resulted in delayed HSC differentiation. Our results demonstrate global chromatin rearrangements during stem cell differentiation and that heterochromatin formation by H3K9 methylation regulates HSC differentiation. PMID:26489895

  19. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  20. A phylogenetic study of SPBP and RAI1: evolutionary conservation of chromatin binding modules.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar; Rekdal, Cecilie; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Our genome is assembled into and array of highly dynamic nucleosome structures allowing spatial and temporal access to DNA. The nucleosomes are subject to a wide array of post-translational modifications, altering the DNA-histone interaction and serving as docking sites for proteins exhibiting effector or "reader" modules. The nuclear proteins SPBP and RAI1 are composed of several putative "reader" modules which may have ability to recognise a set of histone modification marks. Here we have performed a phylogenetic study of their putative reader modules, the C-terminal ePHD/ADD like domain, a novel nucleosome binding region and an AT-hook motif. Interactions studies in vitro and in yeast cells suggested that despite the extraordinary long loop region in their ePHD/ADD-like chromatin binding domains, the C-terminal region of both proteins seem to adopt a cross-braced topology of zinc finger interactions similar to other structurally determined ePHD/ADD structures. Both their ePHD/ADD-like domain and their novel nucleosome binding domain are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution, and construction of a phylogenetic tree displayed two well supported clusters representing SPBP and RAI1, respectively. Their genome and domain organisation suggest that SPBP and RAI1 have occurred from a gene duplication event. The phylogenetic tree suggests that this duplication has happened early in vertebrate evolution, since only one gene was identified in insects and lancelet. Finally, experimental data confirm that the conserved novel nucleosome binding region of RAI1 has the ability to bind the nucleosome core and histones. However, an adjacent conserved AT-hook motif as identified in SPBP is not present in RAI1, and deletion of the novel nucleosome binding region of RAI1 did not significantly affect its nuclear localisation. PMID:24205348

  1. A Phylogenetic Study of SPBP and RAI1: Evolutionary Conservation of Chromatin Binding Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darvekar, Sagar; Rekdal, Cecilie; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Our genome is assembled into and array of highly dynamic nucleosome structures allowing spatial and temporal access to DNA. The nucleosomes are subject to a wide array of post-translational modifications, altering the DNA-histone interaction and serving as docking sites for proteins exhibiting effector or “reader” modules. The nuclear proteins SPBP and RAI1 are composed of several putative “reader” modules which may have ability to recognise a set of histone modification marks. Here we have performed a phylogenetic study of their putative reader modules, the C-terminal ePHD/ADD like domain, a novel nucleosome binding region and an AT-hook motif. Interactions studies in vitro and in yeast cells suggested that despite the extraordinary long loop region in their ePHD/ADD-like chromatin binding domains, the C-terminal region of both proteins seem to adopt a cross-braced topology of zinc finger interactions similar to other structurally determined ePHD/ADD structures. Both their ePHD/ADD-like domain and their novel nucleosome binding domain are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution, and construction of a phylogenetic tree displayed two well supported clusters representing SPBP and RAI1, respectively. Their genome and domain organisation suggest that SPBP and RAI1 have occurred from a gene duplication event. The phylogenetic tree suggests that this duplication has happened early in vertebrate evolution, since only one gene was identified in insects and lancelet. Finally, experimental data confirm that the conserved novel nucleosome binding region of RAI1 has the ability to bind the nucleosome core and histones. However, an adjacent conserved AT-hook motif as identified in SPBP is not present in RAI1, and deletion of the novel nucleosome binding region of RAI1 did not significantly affect its nuclear localisation. PMID:24205348

  2. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape.

    PubMed

    Camp, J Gray; Frank, Christopher L; Lickwar, Colin R; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E; Rawls, John F

    2014-09-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. PMID:24963153

  3. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape

    PubMed Central

    Camp, J. Gray; Frank, Christopher L.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M.; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. PMID:24963153

  4. Cell cycle regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells: antagonistic effects of nuclear envelope breakdown and chromatin condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Mannioui, Abdelkrim . E-mail: karim.mannioui@chu-stlouis.fr; Schiffer, Cecile . E-mail: cecile.schiffer@voila.fr; Felix, Nathalie . E-mail: nathalie.felix@chu-stlouis.fr

    2004-11-10

    We examined the influence of mitosis on the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells. Single-round infection of cells arrested in G1b or allowed to synchronously proceed through division showed that mitosis delays virus integration until 18-24 h postinfection, whereas integration reaches maximum levels by 15 h in G1b-arrested cells. Subcellular fractionation of metaphase-arrested cells indicated that, while nuclear envelope disassembly facilitates docking of viral DNA to chromatin, chromosome condensation directly antagonizes and therefore delays integration. As a result of the balance between the two effects, virus integration efficiency is eventually up to threefold greater in dividing cells. At the single-cell level, using a green fluorescent protein-expressing reporter virus, we found that passage through mitosis leads to prominent asymmetric segregation of the viral genome in daughter cells without interfering with provirus expression.

  5. Counteracting H3K4 methylation modulators Set1 and Jhd2 co-regulate chromatin dynamics and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Pokhrel, Srijana; Palani, Sowmiya; Pflueger, Christian; Parnell, Timothy J; Cairns, Bradley R; Bhaskara, Srividya; Chandrasekharan, Mahesh B

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3K4 methylation is connected to gene transcription from yeast to humans, but its mechanistic roles in transcription and chromatin dynamics remain poorly understood. We investigated the functions for Set1 and Jhd2, the sole H3K4 methyltransferase and H3K4 demethylase, respectively, in S. cerevisiae. Here, we show that Set1 and Jhd2 predominantly co-regulate genome-wide transcription. We find combined activities of Set1 and Jhd2 via H3K4 methylation contribute to positive or negative transcriptional regulation. Providing mechanistic insights, our data reveal that Set1 and Jhd2 together control nucleosomal turnover and occupancy during transcriptional co-regulation. Moreover, we find a genome-wide co-regulation of chromatin structure by Set1 and Jhd2 at different groups of transcriptionally active or inactive genes and at different regions within yeast genes. Overall, our study puts forth a model wherein combined actions of Set1 and Jhd2 via modulating H3K4 methylation-demethylation together control chromatin dynamics during various facets of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27325136

  6. Counteracting H3K4 methylation modulators Set1 and Jhd2 co-regulate chromatin dynamics and gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Pokhrel, Srijana; Palani, Sowmiya; Pflueger, Christian; Parnell, Timothy J.; Cairns, Bradley R.; Bhaskara, Srividya; Chandrasekharan, Mahesh B.

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3K4 methylation is connected to gene transcription from yeast to humans, but its mechanistic roles in transcription and chromatin dynamics remain poorly understood. We investigated the functions for Set1 and Jhd2, the sole H3K4 methyltransferase and H3K4 demethylase, respectively, in S. cerevisiae. Here, we show that Set1 and Jhd2 predominantly co-regulate genome-wide transcription. We find combined activities of Set1 and Jhd2 via H3K4 methylation contribute to positive or negative transcriptional regulation. Providing mechanistic insights, our data reveal that Set1 and Jhd2 together control nucleosomal turnover and occupancy during transcriptional co-regulation. Moreover, we find a genome-wide co-regulation of chromatin structure by Set1 and Jhd2 at different groups of transcriptionally active or inactive genes and at different regions within yeast genes. Overall, our study puts forth a model wherein combined actions of Set1 and Jhd2 via modulating H3K4 methylation−demethylation together control chromatin dynamics during various facets of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27325136

  7. Glom is a novel mitochondrial DNA packaging protein in Physarum polycephalum and causes intense chromatin condensation without suppressing DNA functions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Narie; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Nishitani, Chikako; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Shirai, Yuki; Sakai, Atsushi; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packed into highly organized structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). To understand the organization of mtDNA and the overall regulation of its genetic activity within the mt-nucleoids, we identified and characterized a novel mtDNA packaging protein, termed Glom (a protein inducing agglomeration of mitochondrial chromosome), from highly condensed mt-nucleoids of the true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum. This protein could bind to the entire mtDNA and package mtDNA into a highly condensed state in vitro. Immunostaining analysis showed that Glom specifically localized throughout the mt-nucleoid. Deduced amino acid sequence revealed that Glom has a lysine-rich region with proline-rich domain in the N-terminal half and two HMG boxes in C-terminal half. Deletion analysis of Glom revealed that the lysine-rich region was sufficient for the intense mtDNA condensation in vitro. When the recombinant Glom proteins containing the lysine-rich region were expressed in Escherichia coli, the condensed nucleoid structures were observed in E. coli. Such in vivo condensation did not interfere with transcription or replication of E. coli chromosome and the proline-rich domain was essential to keep those genetic activities. The expression of Glom also complemented the E. coli mutant lacking the bacterial histone-like protein HU and the HMG-boxes region of Glom was important for the complementation. Our results suggest that Glom is a new mitochondrial histone-like protein having a property to cause intense DNA condensation without suppressing DNA functions. PMID:12960433

  8. Chromatin condensation and recruitment of PHD finger proteins to histone H3K4me3 are mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Gallardo, Carmen Mora; Shinsky, Stephen A; Ospina, Ruben Rosas; Liendo, Andrea Mansilla; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Klein, Brianna J; Andrews, Forest H; Strahl, Brian D; M van Wely, Karel H; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-07-27

    Histone post-translational modifications, and specific combinations they create, mediate a wide range of nuclear events. However, the mechanistic bases for recognition of these combinations have not been elucidated. Here, we characterize crosstalk between H3T3 and H3T6 phosphorylation, occurring in mitosis, and H3K4me3, a mark associated with active transcription. We detail the molecular mechanisms by which H3T3ph/K4me3/T6ph switches mediate activities of H3K4me3-binding proteins, including those containing plant homeodomain (PHD) and double Tudor reader domains. Our results derived from nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation analysis, orthogonal binding assays and cell fluorescence microscopy studies reveal a strong anti-correlation between histone H3T3/T6 phosphorylation and retention of PHD finger proteins in chromatin during mitosis. Together, our findings uncover the mechanistic rules of chromatin engagement for H3K4me3-specific readers during cell division. PMID:27016734

  9. GATA-1 modulates the chromatin structure and activity of the chicken alpha-globin 3' enhancer.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Long-distance regulatory elements and local chromatin structure are critical for proper regulation of gene expression. Here we characterize the chromatin conformation of the chicken alpha-globin silencer-enhancer elements located 3' of the domain. We found a characteristic and erythrocyte-specific structure between the previously defined silencer and the enhancer, defined by two nuclease hypersensitive sites, which appear when the enhancer is active during erythroid differentiation. Fine mapping of these sites demonstrates the absence of a positioned nucleosome and the association of GATA-1. Functional analyses of episomal vectors, as well as stably integrated constructs, revealed that GATA-1 plays a major role in defining both the chromatin structure and the enhancer activity. We detected a progressive enrichment of histone acetylation on critical enhancer nuclear factor binding sites, in correlation with the formation of an apparent nucleosome-free region. On the basis of these results, we propose that the local chromatin structure of the chicken alpha-globin enhancer plays a central role in its capacity to differentially regulate alpha-globin gene expression during erythroid differentiation and development. PMID:17984219

  10. Modulating chromatin structure and DNA accessibility by deacetylase inhibition enhances the anti-cancer activity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Nóra; Kovács, Dávid; Rázga, Zsolt; Kónya, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered as novel therapeutic agents inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Inhibition of deacetylase activity results in a relaxed chromatin structure thereby rendering the genetic material more vulnerable to DNA targeting agents that could be exploited by combinational cancer therapy. The unique potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in tumor therapy relies on the generation of reactive radicals which trigger oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. The revolutionary application of AgNPs as chemotherapeutical drugs seems very promising, nevertheless the exact molecular mechanisms of AgNP action in combination with other anti-cancer agents have yet to be elucidated in details before clinical administrations. As a step towards this we investigated the combinational effect of HDAC inhibition and AgNP administration in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We identified synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth and migration upon combinational treatments. Here we report that the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A enhances the DNA targeting capacity and apoptosis inducing efficacy of AgNPs most probably due to its effect on chromatin condensation. These results point to the potential benefits of combinational application of HDAC inhibitors and AgNPs in novel cancer medication protocols. PMID:27434153

  11. MIDGET Unravels Functions of the Arabidopsis Topoisomerase VI Complex in DNA Endoreduplication, Chromatin Condensation, and Transcriptional Silencing[W

    PubMed Central

    Kirik, Viktor; Schrader, Andrea; Uhrig, Joachim F.; Hulskamp, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The plant homologs of the archaeal DNA topoisomerase VI complex are required for the progression of endoreduplication cycles. Here, we describe the identification of MIDGET (MID) as a novel component of topoisomerase VI. We show that mid mutants show the same phenotype as rhl1, rhl2, and top6B mutants and that MID protein physically interacts with RHL1. The phenotypic analysis revealed new phenotypes, indicating that topoisomerase VI is involved in chromatin organization and transcriptional silencing. In addition, genetic evidence is provided suggesting that the ATR-dependent DNA damage repair checkpoint is activated in mid mutants, and CYCB1;1 is ectopically activated. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of CYCB1;2 can rescue the endoreduplication defects in mid mutants, suggesting that in mid mutants, a specific checkpoint is activated preventing further progression of endoreduplication cycles. PMID:17951446

  12. LincRNA-Cox2 Promotes Late Inflammatory Gene Transcription in Macrophages through Modulating SWI/SNF-Mediated Chromatin Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Wang, Yang; Ma, Shibin; Chen, Xiqiang; Chen, Jing; Su, Chun-Jen; Shibata, Annemarie; Strauss-Soukup, Juliane K; Drescher, Kristen M; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2016-03-15

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are long noncoding transcripts (>200 nt) from the intergenic regions of annotated protein-coding genes. One of the most highly induced lincRNAs in macrophages upon TLR ligation is lincRNA-Cox2, which was recently shown to mediate the activation and repression of distinct classes of immune genes in innate immune cells. We report that lincRNA-Cox2, located at chromosome 1 proximal to the PG-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2/Cox2) gene, is an early-primary inflammatory gene controlled by NF-κB signaling in murine macrophages. Functionally, lincRNA-Cox2 is required for the transcription of NF-κB-regulated late-primary inflammatory response genes stimulated by bacterial LPS. Specifically, lincRNA-Cox2 is assembled into the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF) complex in cells after LPS stimulation. This resulting lincRNA-Cox2/SWI/SNF complex can modulate the assembly of NF-κB subunits to the SWI/SNF complex, and ultimately, SWI/SNF-associated chromatin remodeling and transactivation of the late-primary inflammatory-response genes in macrophages in response to microbial challenge. Therefore, our data indicate a new regulatory role for NF-κB-induced lincRNA-Cox2 as a coactivator of NF-κB for the transcription of late-primary response genes in innate immune cells through modulation of epigenetic chromatin remodeling. PMID:26880762

  13. Removal of excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates by space- and time-modulated potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Staliunas, Kestutis

    2011-07-15

    We propose that periodically in space- and time-modulated potentials (dynamic lattices) can efficiently remove the excited (the high-energy and large momentum) components of the trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and, consequently, can result in efficient cleaning of the BECs. We prove the idea by numerically solving the mean-field models (the Schroedinger equation for noninteracting condensates and the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for interacting condensates of repulsive atoms), and we evaluate parameters and conditions for the efficient removal of excitations.

  14. Infrasound induced instability by modulation of condensation process in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Naugolnykh, Konstantin; Rybak, Samuil

    2008-12-01

    A sound wave in supersaturated water vapor can modulate both the process of heat release caused by condensation, and subsequently, as a result, the resonance interaction of sound with the modulated heat release provides sound amplification. High-intensity atmospheric perturbations such as cyclones and thunderstorms generate infrasound, which is detectable at large distances from the source. The wave-condensation instability can lead to variation in the level of infrasound radiation by a developing cyclone, and this can be as a precursor of these intense atmospheric events. PMID:19206769

  15. Full-time dynamics of modulational instability in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Doktorov, Evgeny V.; Rothos, Vassilis M.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2007-07-15

    We describe the full-time dynamics of modulational instability in F=1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates for the case of the integrable three-component model associated with the matrix nonlinear Schroedinger equation. We obtain an exact homoclinic solution of this model by employing the dressing method which we generalize to the case of the higher-rank projectors. This homoclinic solution describes the development of modulational instability beyond the linear regime, and we show that the modulational instability demonstrates the reversal property when the growth of the modulated amplitude is changed by its exponential decay.

  16. A novel method for detecting apoptosis shows that hepatocytes undergo a time dependent increase in DNA cleavage and chromatin condensation which is augmented after TGF-beta 1 treatment.

    PubMed

    Cain, K; Inayat-Hussain, S H; Couet, C; Qin, H M; Oberhammer, F A

    1996-04-01

    This study describes a new method for quantitating apoptosis in hepatocyte monolayers in which nuclei were isolated from the cells and DNA strand breaks detected by in situ end-labeling and flow cytometry. Most (97%) nuclei from untreated hepatocytes had low end-labelling and were derived from non-apoptotic cells. Approximately 2-3% of the nuclei had high end-labelling and originated from apoptotic hepatocytes. The numbers of these nuclei increased linearly from 3 to 85% between 0 and 48 h after treatment with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). However, a morphological assessment of apoptosis with Hoechst H33258 showed that the proportion of apoptotic nuclei plateaued at 18-19% between 24 and 48 h after TGF-beta 1 treatment. Thus, the in situ end-labeling technique also detected DNA cleavage in nuclei which did not have an obvious apoptotic morphology. Confocal microscopy of low and high end-labelled nuclei which had been separated by fluorescent cell sorting showed that nuclei with high levels of end-labeling exhibited a wide diversity of morphologies. These included nuclei with little or no chromatin condensation and nuclei with characteristic apoptotic morphology. In addition, nuclei from untreated hepatocytes contained low levels of DNA cleavage, which were localized in areas of condensed chromatin and increased according to the time in culture. Thus, hepatocytes undergo a progressive and cumulative process of DNA cleavage/chromatin condensation which is markedly enhanced by TGF-beta 1. PMID:8900474

  17. Bose-Einstein condensates under a spatially modulated transverse confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, L.; Toigo, F.; Cetoli, A.; Malomed, B. A.; Reatto, L.

    2007-07-15

    We derive an effective nonpolynomial Schroedinger equation (NPSE) for self-repulsive or attractive BEC in the nearly one-dimensional cigar-shaped trap, with the transverse confining frequency periodically modulated along the axial direction. In addition to the usual linear cigar-shaped trap, where the periodic modulation emulates the action of an optical lattice (OL), the model may be also relevant to toroidal traps, where an ordinary OL cannot be created. For either sign of the nonlinearity, extended and localized states are found, in the numerical form [using both the effective NPSE and the full three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation] and by means of the variational approximation (VA). The latter is applied to construct ground-state solitons and predict the collapse threshold in the case of self-attraction. It is shown that numerical solutions provided by the one-dimensional NPSE are always very close to full 3D solutions, and the VA yields quite reasonable results too. The transition from delocalized states to gap solitons, in the first finite bandgap of the linear spectrum, is examined in detail, for the repulsive and attractive nonlinearities alike.

  18. Phosphorylation of H2AX histones in response to double-strand breaks and induction of premature chromatin condensation in hydroxyurea-treated root meristem cells of Raphanus sativus, Vicia faba, and Allium porrum.

    PubMed

    Rybaczek, Dorota; Maszewski, Janusz

    2007-01-01

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation and hydroxyurea-mediated replication arrest, resulting in the formation of gamma-H2AX foci along megabase chromatin domains nearby the sites of incurred DNA damage. In an attempt to establish a relationship between species-specific nuclear architecture and H2AX phosphorylation in S/G(2) phase-arrested root meristem cells, immunocytochemical comparisons using an antibody raised against human gamma-H2AX were made among three plants differing with respect to DNA contents: Allium porrum, representing a reticulate type of DNA package, Vicia faba, having semireticulate cell nuclei, and Raphanus sativus, characterised by a chromocentric type of chromatin. Another approach was aimed at determining possible correlations between the extent of hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of H2AX histones and the quantities of root meristem cells induced by caffeine to enter aberrant mitotic division (premature chromosome condensation). It was concluded that the higher-order structure of chromatin may contribute to the accessibility of molecular factors engaged in the recognition and repair of genetic lesions. Consequently, in contrast to A. porrum and V. faba, a diffuse chromatin in chromocentric cell nuclei of R. sativus may become more vulnerable both to generate DNA double-strand breaks and to recruit molecular elements needed to arrange the cell cycle checkpoint functions, and thus, more resistant to factors which allow the cells to enter premature chromosome condensation spontaneously. On the other hand, however, caffeine-mediated overriding of the S-M checkpoint control system resulted in the typical appearance of premature chromosome condensation, irrespective of the genomic content of DNA. PMID:17111099

  19. Glutamylation of Nap1 modulates histone H1 dynamics and chromosome condensation in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kelly E; Heald, Rebecca

    2015-04-27

    Linker histone H1 is required for mitotic chromosome architecture in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and, unlike core histones, exhibits rapid turnover on chromatin. Mechanisms regulating the recruitment, deposition, and dynamics of linker histones in mitosis are largely unknown. We found that the cytoplasmic histone chaperone nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1) associates with the embryonic isoform of linker histone H1 (H1M) in egg extracts. Immunodepletion of Nap1 decreased H1M binding to mitotic chromosomes by nearly 50%, reduced H1M dynamics as measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and caused chromosome decondensation similar to the effects of H1M depletion. Defects in H1M dynamics and chromosome condensation were rescued by adding back wild-type Nap1 but not a mutant lacking sites subject to posttranslational modification by glutamylation. Nap1 glutamylation increased the deposition of H1M on sperm nuclei and chromatin-coated beads, indicating that charge-shifting posttranslational modification of Nap1 contributes to H1M dynamics that are essential for higher order chromosome architecture. PMID:25897082

  20. A Kinetic Approach to Bose-Einstein Condensates: Self-Phase Modulation and Bogoliubov Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, J.T.; Bingham, R.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-11-01

    A kinetic approach to Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) is proposed based on the Wigner-Moyal equation (WME). In the semiclassical limit, the WME reduces to the particle-number conservation equation. Two examples of applications are (i) a self-phase modulation of a BE condensate beam, where we show that part of the beam is decelerated and eventually stops as a result of the gradient of the effective self-potential, and (ii) the derivation of a kinetic dispersion relation for sound waves in BECs, including collisionless Landau damping.

  1. The p23 molecular chaperone and GCN5 acetylase jointly modulate protein-DNA dynamics and open chromatin status

    PubMed Central

    Zelin, Elena; Zhang, Yang; Toogun, Oyetunji A.; Zhong, Sheng; Freeman, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular processes function through multi-step pathways that are reliant on the controlled association and disassociation of sequential protein complexes. While dynamic action is critical to propagate and terminate work, the mechanisms used to disassemble biological structures are not fully understood. Here, we show that the p23 molecular chaperone initiates disassembly of protein-DNA complexes and that the GCN5 acetyltransferase prolongs the dissociated state through lysine acetylation. By modulating the DNA bound-state, we found that the conserved and essential joint activities of p23 and GCN5 impacted transcription factor activation potential and response time to an environmental cue. Notably, p23 and GCN5 were required to maintain open chromatin regions along the genome indicating that dynamic protein behavior is a critical feature of various DNA-associated events. Our data support a model in which p23 and GCN5 regulate diverse multi-step pathways by controlling the longevity of protein-DNA complexes. PMID:23022381

  2. Facilitation of base excision repair by chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Czaja, Wioletta

    2015-12-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) is a conserved, intracellular DNA repair system that recognizes and removes chemically modified bases to insure genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis. Aberrant BER has been tightly linked with a broad spectrum of human pathologies, such as several types of cancer, neurological degeneration, developmental abnormalities, immune dysfunction and aging. In the cell, BER must recognize and remove DNA lesions from the tightly condensed, protein-coated chromatin. Because chromatin is necessarily refractory to DNA metabolic processes, like transcription and replication, the compaction of the genomic material is also inhibitory to the repair systems necessary for its upkeep. Multiple ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complexes play essential roles in modulating the protein-DNA interactions within chromatin, regulating transcription and promoting activities of some DNA repair systems, including double-strand break repair and nucleotide excision repair. However, it remains unclear how BER operates in the context of chromatin, and if the chromatin remodelling processes that govern transcription and replication also actively regulate the efficiency of BER. In this review we highlight the emerging role of ACR in regulation of BER. PMID:26422134

  3. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  4. Glycolytic metabolism influences global chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Song; Little, John B.; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rewiring, specifically elevated glycolytic metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Global chromatin structure regulates gene expression, DNA repair, and also affects cancer progression. But the interrelationship between tumor metabolism and chromatin architecture remain unclear. Here we show that increased glycolysis in cancer cells promotes an open chromatin configuration. Using complementary methods including Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion assay, electron microscope and immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrate that glycolysis inhibition by pharmacological and genetic approaches was associated with induction of compacted chromatin structure. This condensed chromatin status appeared to result chiefly from histone hypoacetylation as restoration of histone acetylation with an HDAC inhibitor reversed the compacted chromatin state. Interestingly, glycolysis inhibition-induced chromatin condensation impeded DNA repair efficiency leading to increased sensitivity of cancer cells to DNA damage drugs, which may represent a novel molecular mechanism that can be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:25784656

  5. Chromatin Computation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this “chromatin computer” to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal – and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  6. Lactobacillus reuteri modulates cytokines production in exhaled breath condensate of children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Miniello, Vito Leonardo; Brunetti, Luigia; Tesse, Riccardina; Natile, Miria; Armenio, Lucio; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2010-05-01

    We measured the concentration of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in the exhaled breath condensate of children with atopic and nonallergic dermatitis receiving a probiotic supplementation (Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730) or placebo for 8 weeks. We demonstrated that the levels of these cytokines increased and decreased respectively only in atopic subjects receiving active treatment. Our data suggest that the oral administration of a specific probiotic strain in patients with atopic dermatitis can modulate in vivo the cytokine pattern at a different site from intestine. PMID:20639717

  7. Dark-dark solitons and modulational instability in miscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefer, M. A.; Chang, J. J.; Hamner, C.; Engels, P.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the dynamics of two miscible superfluids experiencing fast counterflow in a narrow channel. The superfluids are formed by two distinguishable components of a trapped dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The onset of counterflow-induced modulational instability throughout the cloud is observed and shown to lead to the proliferation of dark-dark vector solitons. These solitons do not exist in single-component systems, exhibit intriguing beating dynamics, and can experience a transverse instability leading to vortex line structures. Experimental results and multidimensional numerical simulations are presented.

  8. HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofei; Zhu, Iris; Deng, Tao; Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Vacchio, Melanie S.; Bosselut, Remy; Yamane, Arito; Casellas, Rafael; Landsman, David; Bustin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn−/− mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes. PMID:27112571

  9. Directed momentum current of Bose–Einstein condensate in the presence of spatially modulated nonlinear interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen-Lei; Ding, Cai-Ying; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the quantum transport dynamics of periodically delta-kicked Bose–Einstein condensate under the effect of spatially modulated nonlinear interactions. The spatial modulation frequency can dramatically affect the transport behaviors of the ultra-cold atoms. For odd frequency, the linear growth of the directed current is close to that of the noninteracting case for not very strong nonlinear interaction. Both the acceleration and the quantum state evolution gradually approach that of the noninteracting case with increasing frequency. For other values of frequency, a very weak nonlinear interaction can dramatically reduce the linear growth of the directed current. The quantum state evolution differs rapidly from that of the noninteracting case. The underlying dynamic mechanism is uncovered and some important implications are addressed.

  10. Quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates with spatially modulated cubic-quintic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Chaoqing; Wang Dengshan; Wang Liangliang; Zhang Jiefang; Liu, W.M.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate exact nonlinear matter wave functions with odd and even parities in the framework of quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with spatially modulated cubic-quintic nonlinearities and harmonic potential. The existence condition for these exact solutions requires that the minimum energy eigenvalue of the corresponding linear Schroedinger equation with harmonic potential is the cutoff value of the chemical potential {lambda}. The competition between two-body and three-body interactions influences the energy of the localized state. For attractive two-body and three-body interactions, the larger the matter wave order number n, the larger the energy of the corresponding localized state. A linear stability analysis and direct simulations with initial white noise demonstrate that, for the same state (fixed n), increasing the number of atoms can add stability. A quasi-stable ground-state matter wave is also found for repulsive two-body and three-body interactions. We also discuss the experimental realization of these results in future experiments. These results are of particular significance to matter wave management in higher-dimensional BECs. - Highlights: > 2D Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with spatially modulated cubic-quintic nonlinearities and the harmonic potential are discussed. > 2D exact quantized nonlinear matter wave functions with the odd and even parities are obtained. > The 2D ground-state matter wave with attractive two-body and repulsive three-body interactions is stable. > Experimental realization of our results in future experiments is proposed.

  11. Membrane-associated glucocorticoid activity is necessary for modulation of long-term memory via chromatin modification

    PubMed Central

    Roozendaal, Benno; Hernandez, Angelina; Cabrera, Sara M.; Hagewoud, Roelina; Malvaez, Melissa; Stefanko, Daniel P.; Haettig, Jakob; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones enhance the consolidation of long-term memory of emotionally arousing training experiences. This memory enhancement requires activation of the cAMP-dependent kinase pathway and the subsequent phosphorylation of cAMP response-element binding (CREB) protein. Here, we demonstrate that glucocorticoids enhance the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent aspects of object recognition memory via chromatin modification. More specifically, systemic corticosterone increases histone acetylation, a form of chromatin modification, in both the hippocampus and insular cortex following training on an object recognition task. This led us to examine whether increasing histone acetylation via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition enhances memory in a similar manner as corticosterone. We found a double dissociation between posttraining HDAC inhibitor infusion into the insular cortex and hippocampus on the enhancement of object recognition and object location memory, respectively. In determining the molecular pathway upstream of glucocorticoids’ effects on chromatin modification, we found that activation of membrane-associated glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and the subsequent interaction between phospho-CREB and CREB-binding protein (CBP) appear to be necessary for glucocorticoids to enhance memory consolidation via chromatin modification. In contrast, mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) do not appear to be involved. The findings also indicate that glucocorticoid activity has differential influences on hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent components of memory for objects. PMID:20371824

  12. Dynamical stability of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates with temporal modulation of the s-wave scattering length.

    PubMed

    Sabari, S; Jisha, Chandroth P; Porsezian, K; Brazhnyi, Valeriy A

    2015-09-01

    We study the stabilization properties of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate by temporal modulation of short-range two-body interaction. Through both analytical and numerical methods, we analyze the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation with short-range two-body and long-range, nonlocal, dipolar interaction terms. We derive the equation of motion and effective potential of the dipolar condensate by variational method. We show that there is an enhancement of the condensate stability due to the inclusion of dipolar interaction in addition to the two-body contact interaction. We also show that the stability of the dipolar condensate increases in the presence of time varying two-body contact interaction; the temporal modification of the contact interaction prevents the collapse of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate. Finally we confirm the semi-analytical prediction through the direct numerical simulations of the governing equation. PMID:26465538

  13. Correlated Spatio-Temporal Fluctuations in Chromatin Compaction States Characterize Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Shefali; Kumar, Abhishek; Rao, Madan; Menon, Gautam I.; Shivashankar, G.V.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells integrate signals from the microenvironment to generate lineage-specific gene expression programs upon differentiation. Undifferentiated cell nuclei are easily deformable, with an active transcriptome, whereas differentiated cells have stiffer nuclei and condensed chromatin. Chromatin organization in the stem cell state is known to be highly dynamic but quantitative characterizations of its plasticity are lacking. Using fluorescence imaging, we study the spatio-temporal dynamics of nuclear architecture and chromatin compaction in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and differentiated states. Individual ES cells exhibit a relatively narrow variation in chromatin compaction, whereas primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (PMEF) show broad distributions. However, spatial correlations in chromatin compaction exhibit an emergent length scale in PMEFs, although they are unstructured and longer ranged in ES cells. We provide evidence for correlated fluctuations with large amplitude and long intrinsic timescales, including an oscillatory component, in both chromatin compaction and nuclear area in ES cells. Such fluctuations are largely frozen in PMEF. The role of actin and Lamin A/C in modulating these fluctuations is described. A simple theoretical formulation reproduces the observed dynamics. Our results suggest that, in addition to nuclear plasticity, correlated spatio-temporal structural fluctuations of chromatin in undifferentiated cells characterize the stem cell state. PMID:23442906

  14. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Is Required to Modulate Chromatin Changes at c-MYC Promoter during Emergence from Quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Battistelli, Cecilia; Ciotti, Agnese; Amati, Paolo; Maione, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of various proteins and participates in the regulation of chromatin structure and transcription through complex mechanisms not completely understood. We have previously shown that PARP-1, the major family member of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases, plays an important role in the cell cycle reactivation of resting cells by regulating the expression of Immediate Early Response Genes, such as c-MYC, c-FOS, JUNB and EGR-1. In the present work we have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the enzyme induces c-MYC transcription upon serum stimulation of quiescent cells. We show that PARP-1 is constitutively associated in vivo to a c-MYC promoter region recognized as biologically relevant for the transcriptional regulation of the gene. Moreover, we report that serum stimulation causes the prompt accumulation of ADP-ribose polymers on the same region and that this modification is required for chromatin decondensation and for the exchange of negative for positive transcriptional regulators. Finally we provide evidence that the inhibition of PARP activity along with serum stimulation impairs c-MYC induction by preventing the proper accumulation of histone H3 phosphoacetylation, a specific chromatin mark for the activation of Immediate Early Response Genes. These findings not only suggest a novel strategy by which PARP-1 regulates the transcriptional activity of promoters but also provide new information about the complex regulation of c-MYC expression, a critical determinant of the transition from quiescence to proliferation. PMID:25047032

  15. Theta and Alpha Band Modulations Reflect Error-Related Adjustments in the Auditory Condensation Task

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Nikita A.; Bryzgalov, Dmitri V.; Chernyshev, Boris V.

    2015-01-01

    Error commission leads to adaptive adjustments in a number of brain networks that subserve goal-directed behavior, resulting in either enhanced stimulus processing or increased motor threshold depending on the nature of errors committed. Here, we studied these adjustments by analyzing post-error modulations of alpha and theta band activity in the auditory version of the two-choice condensation task, which is highly demanding for sustained attention while involves no inhibition of prepotent responses. Errors were followed by increased frontal midline theta (FMT) activity, as well as by enhanced alpha band suppression in the parietal and the left central regions; parietal alpha suppression correlated with the task performance, left central alpha suppression correlated with the post-error slowing, and FMT increase correlated with both behavioral measures. On post-error correct trials, left-central alpha band suppression started earlier before the response, and the response was followed by weaker FMT activity, as well as by enhanced alpha band suppression distributed over the entire scalp. These findings indicate that several separate neuronal networks are involved in post-error adjustments, including the midfrontal performance monitoring network, the parietal attentional network, and the sensorimotor network. Supposedly, activity within these networks is rapidly modulated after errors, resulting in optimization of their functional state on the subsequent trials, with corresponding changes in behavioral measures. PMID:26733266

  16. Deoxyribonuclease II as a probe to sequence-specific chromatin organization: preferential cleavage in the 72 bp modulator sequence of SV40 minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Shakhov, A N; Nedospasov, S A; Georgiev, G P

    1982-01-01

    T prove sequence-specific chromatin structure of SV40 minichromosome, we further modified previously described hybridization mapping. Actually (i) the digestion patterns by two nucleases (micrococcal and DNAase II) were compared and (ii) the kinetics of nuclease digestion was analyzed from early time points when only a fraction of minichromosomes was cleaved once to longer digestions when oligo- and mononucleosomal bands appeared. DNAase II is shown to possess certain sequence specificity different from that of micrococcal nuclease. The major finding is that DNAase II preferentially cleaves the SV40 minichromosome at a distinct region of the genome known as 72 bp modulator element. Other hypersensitive sites are located near the replication origin and T-ag binding site II and also near BamHI site where termination of replication and "late" transcription occurs. Micrococcal nuclease splits the BglI-Hpaii region in a different manner. Images PMID:6287427

  17. Systematic discovery of regulated and conserved alternative exons in the mammalian brain reveals NMD modulating chromatin regulators.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinghong; Weyn-Vanhentenryck, Sebastien M; Wu, Jie; Sloan, Steven A; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Kenian; Wu, Jia Qian; Barres, Ben A; Zhang, Chaolin

    2015-03-17

    Alternative splicing (AS) dramatically expands the complexity of the mammalian brain transcriptome, but its atlas remains incomplete. Here we performed deep mRNA sequencing of mouse cortex to discover and characterize alternative exons with potential functional significance. Our analysis expands the list of AS events over 10-fold compared with previous annotations, demonstrating that 72% of multiexon genes express multiple splice variants in this single tissue. To evaluate functionality of the newly discovered AS events, we conducted comprehensive analyses on central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific splicing, targets of tissue- or cell type-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs), evolutionary selection pressure, and coupling of AS with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD). We show that newly discovered events account for 23-42% of all cassette exons under tissue- or cell type-specific regulation. Furthermore, over 7,000 cassette exons are under evolutionary selection for regulated AS in mammals, 70% of which are new. Among these are 3,058 highly conserved cassette exons, including 1,014 NMD exons that may function directly to control gene expression levels. These NMD exons are particularly enriched in RBPs including splicing factors and interestingly also regulators for other steps of RNA metabolism. Unexpectedly, a second group of NMD exons reside in genes encoding chromatin regulators. Although the conservation of NMD exons in RBPs frequently extends into lower vertebrates, NMD exons in chromatin regulators are introduced later into the mammalian lineage, implying the emergence of a novel mechanism coupling AS and epigenetics. Our results highlight previously uncharacterized complexity and evolution in the mammalian brain transcriptome. PMID:25737549

  18. Quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates with spatially modulated cubic-quintic nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chao-Qing; Wang, Deng-Shan; Wang, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Jie-Fang; Liu, W. M.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate exact nonlinear matter wave functions with odd and even parities in the framework of quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with spatially modulated cubic-quintic nonlinearities and harmonic potential. The existence condition for these exact solutions requires that the minimum energy eigenvalue of the corresponding linear Schrödinger equation with harmonic potential is the cutoff value of the chemical potential λ. The competition between two-body and three-body interactions influences the energy of the localized state. For attractive two-body and three-body interactions, the larger the matter wave order number n, the larger the energy of the corresponding localized state. A linear stability analysis and direct simulations with initial white noise demonstrate that, for the same state (fixed n), increasing the number of atoms can add stability. A quasi-stable ground-state matter wave is also found for repulsive two-body and three-body interactions. We also discuss the experimental realization of these results in future experiments. These results are of particular significance to matter wave management in higher-dimensional BECs.

  19. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  20. EAST Organizes Drosophila Insulator Proteins in the Interchromosomal Nuclear Compartment and Modulates CP190 Binding to Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Golovnin, Anton; Melnikova, Larisa; Shapovalov, Igor; Kostyuchenko, Margarita; Georgiev, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Recent data suggest that insulators organize chromatin architecture in the nucleus. The best studied Drosophila insulator proteins, dCTCF (a homolog of the vertebrate insulator protein CTCF) and Su(Hw), are DNA-binding zinc finger proteins. Different isoforms of the BTB-containing protein Mod(mdg4) interact with Su(Hw) and dCTCF. The CP190 protein is a cofactor for the dCTCF and Su(Hw) insulators. CP190 is required for the functional activity of insulator proteins and is involved in the aggregation of the insulator proteins into specific structures named nuclear speckles. Here, we have shown that the nuclear distribution of CP190 is dependent on the level of EAST protein, an essential component of the interchromatin compartment. EAST interacts with CP190 and Mod(mdg4)-67.2 proteins in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of EAST in S2 cells leads to an extrusion of the CP190 from the insulator bodies containing Su(Hw), Mod(mdg4)-67.2, and dCTCF. In consistent with the role of the insulator bodies in assembly of protein complexes, EAST over-expression led to a striking decrease of the CP190 binding with the dCTCF and Su(Hw) dependent insulators and promoters. These results suggest that EAST is involved in the regulation of CP190 nuclear localization. PMID:26489095

  1. Light-modulated abundance of an mRNA encoding a calmodulin-regulated, chromatin-associated NTPase in pea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Tong, C. G.; Thomas, C.; Roux, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    A CDNA encoding a 47 kDa nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) that is associated with the chromatin of pea nuclei has been cloned and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA includes several domains predicted by known biochemical properties of the enzyme, including five motifs characteristic of the ATP-binding domain of many proteins, several potential casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a helix-turn-helix region characteristic of DNA-binding proteins, and a potential calmodulin-binding domain. The deduced primary structure also includes an N-terminal sequence that is a predicted signal peptide and an internal sequence that could serve as a bipartite-type nuclear localization signal. Both in situ immunocytochemistry of pea plumules and immunoblots of purified cell fractions indicate that most of the immunodetectable NTPase is within the nucleus, a compartment proteins typically reach through nuclear pores rather than through the endoplasmic reticulum pathway. The translated sequence has some similarity to that of human lamin C, but not high enough to account for the earlier observation that IgG against human lamin C binds to the NTPase in immunoblots. Northern blot analysis shows that the NTPase MRNA is strongly expressed in etiolated plumules, but only poorly or not at all in the leaf and stem tissues of light-grown plants. Accumulation of NTPase mRNA in etiolated seedlings is stimulated by brief treatments with both red and far-red light, as is characteristic of very low-fluence phytochrome responses. Southern blotting with pea genomic DNA indicates the NTPase is likely to be encoded by a single gene.

  2. Quiescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae forms telomere hyperclusters at the nuclear membrane vicinity through a multifaceted mechanism involving Esc1, the Sir complex, and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Damien; Courtout, Fabien; Tollis, Sylvain; Sagot, Isabelle

    2016-06-15

    Like other eukaryotes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae spatially organizes its chromosomes within the nucleus. In G1 phase, the yeast's 32 telomeres are clustered into 6-10 foci that dynamically interact with the nuclear membrane. Here we show that, when cells leave the division cycle and enter quiescence, telomeres gather into two to three hyperclusters at the nuclear membrane vicinity. This localization depends on Esc1 but not on the Ku proteins. Telomere hypercluster formation requires the Sir complex but is independent of the nuclear microtubule bundle that specifically assembles in quiescent cells. Importantly, mutants deleted for the linker histone H1 Hho1 or defective in condensin activity or affected for histone H4 Lys-16 deacetylation are impaired, at least in part, for telomere hypercluster formation in quiescence, suggesting that this process involves chromosome condensation. Finally, we establish that telomere hypercluster formation is not necessary for quiescence establishment, maintenance, and exit, raising the question of the physiological raison d'être of this nuclear reorganization. PMID:27122604

  3. Quiescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae forms telomere hyperclusters at the nuclear membrane vicinity through a multifaceted mechanism involving Esc1, the Sir complex, and chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Damien; Courtout, Fabien; Tollis, Sylvain; Sagot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Like other eukaryotes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae spatially organizes its chromosomes within the nucleus. In G1 phase, the yeast’s 32 telomeres are clustered into 6–10 foci that dynamically interact with the nuclear membrane. Here we show that, when cells leave the division cycle and enter quiescence, telomeres gather into two to three hyperclusters at the nuclear membrane vicinity. This localization depends on Esc1 but not on the Ku proteins. Telomere hypercluster formation requires the Sir complex but is independent of the nuclear microtubule bundle that specifically assembles in quiescent cells. Importantly, mutants deleted for the linker histone H1 Hho1 or defective in condensin activity or affected for histone H4 Lys-16 deacetylation are impaired, at least in part, for telomere hypercluster formation in quiescence, suggesting that this process involves chromosome condensation. Finally, we establish that telomere hypercluster formation is not necessary for quiescence establishment, maintenance, and exit, raising the question of the physiological raison d’être of this nuclear reorganization. PMID:27122604

  4. Bhas 42 cell transformation activity of cigarette smoke condensate is modulated by selenium and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Pant, Kamala; Bruce, Shannon W; Gairola, C Gary

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major health risk worldwide. Development of newer tobacco products requires the use of quantitative toxicological assays. Recently, v-Ha-ras transfected BALB/c3T3 (Bhas 42) cell transformation assay was established that simulates the two-stage animal tumorigenesis model and measures tumor initiating and promoting activities of chemicals. The present study was performed to assess the feasibility of using this Bhas 42 cell transformation assay to determine the initiation and promotion activities of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and its water soluble fraction. Further, the modulating effects of selenium and arsenic on cigarette smoke-induced cell transformation were investigated. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and water extracts of CSC (CSC-D and CSC-W, respectively) were tested at concentrations of 2.5-40 µg mL(-1) in the initiation or promotion assay formats. Initiation protocol of the Bhas 42 assay showed a 3.5-fold increase in transformed foci at 40 µg mL(-1) of CSC-D but not CSC-W. The promotion phase of the assay yielded a robust dose response with CSC-D (2.5-40 µg mL(-1)) and CSC-W (20-40 µg mL(-1)). Preincubation of cells with selenium (100 nM) significantly reduced CSC-induced increase in cell transformation in initiation assay. Co-treatment of cells with a sub-toxic dose of arsenic significantly enhanced cell transformation activity of CSC-D in promotion assay. The results suggest a presence of both water soluble and insoluble tumor promoters in CSC, a role of oxidative stress in CSC-induced cell transformation, and usefulness of Bhas 42 cell transformation assay in comparing tobacco product toxicities and in studying the mechanisms of tobacco carcinogenesis. PMID:26924598

  5. Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5–50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

  6. Chromosome condensation and decondensation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Antonin, Wolfram; Neumann, Heinz

    2016-06-01

    During eukaryotic cell division, nuclear chromatin undergoes marked changes with respect to shape and degree of compaction. Although already significantly compacted during interphase, upon entry into mitosis chromatin further condenses and individualizes to discrete chromosomes that are captured and moved independently by the mitotic spindle apparatus. Once segregated by the spindle, chromatin decondenses to re-establish its interphase structure competent for DNA replication and transcription. Although cytologically described a long time ago, the underlying molecular mechanisms of mitotic chromatin condensation and decondensation are still ill-defined. Here we summarize our current knowledge of mitotic chromatin restructuring and recent progress in the field. PMID:26895139

  7. Histone H3 phosphorylation – A versatile chromatin modification for different occasions

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Anna; Seiser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Post-translation modifications of histones modulate the accessibility and transcriptional competence of specific chromatin regions within the eukaryotic genome. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is unique in the sense that it associates on one hand with open chromatin during gene activation and marks on the other hand highly condensed chromatin during mitosis. Phosphorylation of serine residues at histone H3 is a highly dynamic process that creates together with acetylation and methylation marks at neighboring lysine residues specific combinatorial patterns that are read by specific detector proteins. In this review we describe the importance of different histone H3 phosphorylation marks for chromatin condensation during mitosis. In addition, we review the signals that trigger histone H3 phosphorylation and the factors that control this reversible modification during interphase and mediate the biological readout of the signal. Finally, we discuss different models describing the role of histone H3 phosphorylation in the activation of transcription of poised genes or by transient derepression of epigenetically silenced genes. We propose that histone H3 phosphorylation in the context with lysine methylation might temporarily relieve the silencing of specific genes without affecting the epigenetic memory. PMID:22564826

  8. The Chromatin Regulator DMAP1 Modulates Activity of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Transcription Factor Relish in the Drosophila Innate Immune Response*

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Akira; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Imler, Jean-Luc; Hoffmann, Jules A.

    2014-01-01

    The host defense of the model organism Drosophila is under the control of two major signaling cascades controlling transcription factors of the NF-κB family, the Toll and the immune deficiency (IMD) pathways. The latter shares extensive similarities with the mammalian TNF-R pathway and was initially discovered for its role in anti-Gram-negative bacterial reactions. A previous interactome study from this laboratory reported that an unexpectedly large number of proteins are binding to the canonical components of the IMD pathway. Here, we focus on DNA methyltransferase-associated protein 1 (DMAP1), which this study identified as an interactant of Relish, a Drosophila transcription factor reminiscent of the mammalian p105 NF-κB protein. We show that silencing of DMAP1 expression both in S2 cells and in flies results in a significant reduction of Escherichia coli-induced expression of antimicrobial peptides. Epistatic analysis indicates that DMAP1 acts in parallel or downstream of Relish. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments further reveal that, in addition to Relish, DMAP1 also interacts with Akirin and the Brahma-associated protein 55 kDa (BAP55). Taken together, these results reveal that DMAP1 is a novel nuclear modulator of the IMD pathway, possibly acting at the level of chromatin remodeling. PMID:24947515

  9. The chromatin regulator DMAP1 modulates activity of the nuclear factor B (NF-B) transcription factor Relish in the Drosophila innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Goto, Akira; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Imler, Jean-Luc; Hoffmann, Jules A

    2014-07-25

    The host defense of the model organism Drosophila is under the control of two major signaling cascades controlling transcription factors of the NF-B family, the Toll and the immune deficiency (IMD) pathways. The latter shares extensive similarities with the mammalian TNF-R pathway and was initially discovered for its role in anti-Gram-negative bacterial reactions. A previous interactome study from this laboratory reported that an unexpectedly large number of proteins are binding to the canonical components of the IMD pathway. Here, we focus on DNA methyltransferase-associated protein 1 (DMAP1), which this study identified as an interactant of Relish, a Drosophila transcription factor reminiscent of the mammalian p105 NF-B protein. We show that silencing of DMAP1 expression both in S2 cells and in flies results in a significant reduction of Escherichia coli-induced expression of antimicrobial peptides. Epistatic analysis indicates that DMAP1 acts in parallel or downstream of Relish. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments further reveal that, in addition to Relish, DMAP1 also interacts with Akirin and the Brahma-associated protein 55 kDa (BAP55). Taken together, these results reveal that DMAP1 is a novel nuclear modulator of the IMD pathway, possibly acting at the level of chromatin remodeling. PMID:24947515

  10. The Double-Bromodomain Proteins Bdf1 and Bdf2 Modulate Chromatin Structure to Regulate S-Phase Stress Response in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Mikael V.; Noguchi, Chiaki; Ziegler, Melissa A.; Das, Mukund M.; Singh, Tanu; Harper, Logan J.; Leman, Adam R.; Khair, Lyne; Moser, Bettina A.; Nakamura, Toru M.; Noguchi, Eishi

    2012-01-01

    Bromodomain proteins bind acetylated histones to regulate transcription. Emerging evidence suggests that histone acetylation plays an important role in DNA replication and repair, although its precise mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report studies of two double bromodomain-containing proteins, Bdf1 and Bdf2, in fission yeast. Loss of Bdf1 or Bdf2 led to a reduction in the level of histone H4 acetylation. Both bdf1Δ and bdf2Δ cells showed sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, including camptothecin, that cause replication fork breakage. Consistently, Bdf1 and Bdf2 were important for recovery of broken replication forks and suppression of DNA damage. Surprisingly, deletion of bdf1 or bdf2 partially suppressed sensitivity of various checkpoint mutants including swi1Δ, mrc1Δ, cds1Δ, crb2Δ, chk1Δ, and rad3Δ, to hydroxyurea, a compound that stalls replication forks and activates the Cds1-dependent S-phase checkpoint. This suppression was not due to reactivation of Cds1. Instead, we found that bdf2 deletion alleviates DNA damage accumulation caused by defects in the DNA replication checkpoint. We also show that hydroxyurea sensitivity of mrc1Δ and swi1Δ was suppressed by mutations in histone H4 acetyltransferase subunits or histone H4. These results suggest that the double bromodomain-containing proteins modulate chromatin structure to coordinate DNA replication and S-phase stress response. PMID:22095079

  11. Valproic acid modulates brain plasticity through epigenetic chromatin remodeling in the blind rat: implications for human sight recovery.

    PubMed

    Fetter-Pruneda, I; Martínez-Méndez, R; Olivos-Cisneros, L; Diaz, D; Padilla-Cortés, P; Báez-Saldaña, A; Gutiérrez-Ospina, G

    2011-01-01

    Blindness is a pervasive sensory condition that imposes diverse difficulties to carry on with activities of daily living. In blind individuals, the brain is subjected to a large scale reorganization characterized by expanded cortical territories associated with somatosensory and auditory functions and the recruitment of the former visual areas to perform bimodal somatosensory and auditory integration. This poses obstacles to efforts aimed at reassigning visual functions to the recruited visual cortex in the blind, especially after the end of the ontogentic sensitive period. Devising pharmacological measures to modulate the magnitude of brain plasticity could improve our chances of recovering visual functions in the blind. Here, by using the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in the rat as a working model, we showed that valproic acid administered through the mother's milk prevents cortical reorganization in blinded rats by delaying neuronal histone de-acetylation. These results suggest that in the future, we might be able to devise epigenetic pharmacological measures that could improve our chances of reassigning visual functions to the once deprived former visual cortex in the blind, by modulating the magnitude of brain plasticity during critical times of development. PMID:22423589

  12. A Novel Toxoplasma gondii Nuclear Factor TgNF3 Is a Dynamic Chromatin-Associated Component, Modulator of Nucleolar Architecture and Parasite Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Olguin-Lamas, Alejandro; Madec, Edwige; Hovasse, Agnes; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Callebaut, Isabelle; Slomianny, Christian; Delhaye, Stephane; Mouveaux, Thomas; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2011-01-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, cis-acting elements present in promoter sequences of genes that are stage-specifically regulated have been described. However, the nuclear factors that bind to these cis-acting elements and regulate promoter activities have not been identified. In the present study, we performed affinity purification, followed by proteomic analysis, to identify nuclear factors that bind to a stage-specific promoter in T. gondii. This led to the identification of several nuclear factors in T. gondii including a novel factor, designated herein as TgNF3. The N-terminal domain of TgNF3 shares similarities with the N-terminus of yeast nuclear FK506-binding protein (FKBP), known as a histone chaperone regulating gene silencing. Using anti-TgNF3 antibodies, HA-FLAG and YFP-tagged TgNF3, we show that TgNF3 is predominantly a parasite nucleolar, chromatin-associated protein that binds specifically to T. gondii gene promoters in vivo. Genome-wide analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified promoter occupancies by TgNF3. In addition, TgNF3 has a direct role in transcriptional control of genes involved in parasite metabolism, transcription and translation. The ectopic expression of TgNF3 in the tachyzoites revealed dynamic changes in the size of the nucleolus, leading to a severe attenuation of virulence in vivo. We demonstrate that TgNF3 physically interacts with H3, H4 and H2A/H2B assembled into bona fide core and nucleosome-associated histones. Furthermore, TgNF3 interacts specifically to histones in the context of stage-specific gene silencing of a promoter that lacks active epigenetic acetylated histone marks. In contrast to virulent tachyzoites, which express the majority of TgNF3 in the nucleolus, the protein is exclusively located in the cytoplasm of the avirulent bradyzoites. We propose a model where TgNF3 acts essentially to coordinate nucleolus and nuclear functions by modulating nucleosome

  13. Modulating the amplitude of dark soliton by scattering-length management in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Wang, D. L.; He, Z. M.; Wang, F. J.; Ding, J. W.

    2008-06-01

    We present a family of soliton solutions of the quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length, by developing multiple-scale method combined with truncated Painlevé expansion. Then, by numerical calculating the solutions, it is shown that there exhibit two types of dark solitons-black soliton (the zero minimum amplitude at its center) and gray soliton (the minimum density does not drop to zero) in a repulsive condensate. Furthermore, we propose experimental protocols to realize the exchange between black and gray solitons by varying the scattering length via the Feshbach resonance in currently experimental conditions.

  14. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  15. A Macrohistone Variant Links Dynamic Chromatin Compaction to BRCA1-Dependent Genome Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Simran; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Kim, Jeongkyu; Tran, Andy D.; Liu, Jinping; Nyswaner, Katherine; Shi, Lei; Jailwala, Parthav; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hakim, Ofir; Oberdoerffer, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Appropriate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor choice is essential for ensuring accurate repair outcome and genomic integrity. The factors that regulate this process remain poorly understood. Here, we identify two repressive chromatin components, the macrohistone variant macroH2A1 and the H3K9 methyltransferase and tumor suppressor PRDM2, which together direct the choice between the antagonistic DSB repair mediators BRCA1 and 53BP1. The macroH2A1/PRDM2 module mediates an unexpected shift from accessible to condensed chromatin that requires the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent accumulation of both proteins at DSBs in order to promote DSB-flanking H3K9 dimethylation. Remarkably, loss of macroH2A1 or PRDM2, as well as experimentally induced chromatin decondensation, impairs the retention of BRCA1, but not 53BP1, at DSBs. As a result, mac-roH2A1 and/or PRDM2 depletion causes epistatic defects in DSB end resection, homology-directed repair, and the resistance to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition—all hallmarks of BRCA1-deficient tumors. Together, these findings identify dynamic, DSB-associated chromatin reorganization as a critical modulator of BRCA1-dependent genome maintenance. PMID:25131201

  16. Chromatin Higher-order Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Christopher L.; Ghosh, Rajarshi P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary role of the nucleus as an information storage, retrieval, and replication site requires the physical organization and compaction of meters of DNA. Although it has been clear for many years that nucleosomes constitute the first level of chromatin compaction, this contributes a relatively small fraction of the condensation needed to fit the typical genome into an interphase nucleus or set of metaphase chromosomes, indicating that there are additional “higher order” levels of chromatin condensation. Identifying these levels, their interrelationships, and the principles that govern their occurrence has been a challenging and much discussed problem. In this article, we focus on recent experimental advances and the emerging evidence indicating that structural plasticity and chromatin dynamics play dominant roles in genome organization. We also discuss novel approaches likely to yield important insights in the near future, and suggest research areas that merit further study. PMID:20452954

  17. Stationary States and Modulational Instability of Coupled Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Ring Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hai-Ming; Zhong, Hong-Hua; Huang, Jia-Hao; Dai, Hui; Yao, Min; Huang, Xiao-Yi

    2015-08-01

    We investigate modulational instability (MI) of a coupled two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in a rotating ring trap. The excitation spectrum and the MI condition of the system are presented analytically. We find that the coupling between the two components strongly modifies the MI condition, and the MI condition is phase-dependent. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of MI on both density excitation and spin excitation. If the inter- and intra-component interaction strengths are all equal, the MI causes density excitation but not spin excitation, and if the inter- and intra-component interaction strengths are different, the MI causes both density excitation and spin excitation. Our results provide a promising approach for controlling the stability and excitation of a rotating two-component Bose-Einstein condensates by modulating its coupling strength and interaction strength. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11465008, the Hunan Provincial Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. 2015JJ2114, the Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department under Grant Nos. 14A118, 13C881, Science and Technology Innovative Research Team in Higher Educational Instituions of Hunan Province, and Science Research Foundation of Xiangnan University under Grant No. 2012-126(41)

  18. NET23/STING Promotes Chromatin Compaction from the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I.; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  19. NET23/STING promotes chromatin compaction from the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Malik, Poonam; Zuleger, Nikolaj; de las Heras, Jose I; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  20. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems.

    PubMed

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin's dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber's structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:27345617

  1. Human sperm chromatin epigenetic potential: genomics, proteomics, and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballescà, Josep Lluis; Oliva, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The classical idea about the function of the mammalian sperm chromatin is that it serves to transmit a highly protected and transcriptionally inactive paternal genome, largely condensed by protamines, to the next generation. In addition, recent sperm chromatin genome-wide dissection studies indicate the presence of a differential distribution of the genes and repetitive sequences in the protamine-condensed and histone-condensed sperm chromatin domains, which could be potentially involved in regulatory roles after fertilization. Interestingly, recent proteomic studies have shown that sperm chromatin contains many additional proteins, in addition to the abundant histones and protamines, with specific modifications and chromatin affinity features which are also delivered to the oocyte. Both gene and protein signatures seem to be altered in infertile patients and, as such, are consistent with the potential involvement of the sperm chromatin landscape in early embryo development. This present work reviews the available information on the composition of the human sperm chromatin and its epigenetic potential, with a particular focus on recent results derived from high-throughput genomic and proteomic studies. As a complement, we provide experimental evidence for the detection of phosphorylations and acetylations in human protamine 1 using a mass spectrometry approach. The available data indicate that the sperm chromatin is much more complex than what it was previously thought, raising the possibility that it could also serve to transmit crucial paternal epigenetic information to the embryo. PMID:25926607

  2. Phosphorylation of histone variant regions in chromatin: unlocking the linker?

    PubMed

    Green, G R

    2001-01-01

    Histone variants illuminate the behavior of chromatin through their unique structures and patterns of postsynthetic modification. This review examines the literature on heteromorphous histone structures in chromatin, structures that are primary targets for histone kinases and phosphatases in vivo. Special attention is paid to certain well-studied experimental systems: mammalian culture cells, chicken erythrocytes, sea urchin sperm, wheat sprouts, Tetrahymena, and budding yeast. A common theme emerges from these studies. Specialized, highly basic structures in histone variants promote chromatin condensation in a variety of developmental situations. Before, and sometimes after condensed chromatin is formed, the chromatin is rendered soluble by phosphorylation of the heteromorphous regions, preventing their interaction with linker DNA. A simple structural model accounting for histone variation and phosphorylation is presented. PMID:11467741

  3. Histone acetylation: a switch between repressive and permissive chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Eberharter, Anton; Becker, Peter B.

    2002-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic chromatin has a major impact on all nuclear processes involving DNA substrates. Gene expression is affected by the positioning of individual nucleosomes relative to regulatory sequence elements, by the folding of the nucleosomal fiber into higher-order structures and by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus. Because site-specific acetylation of nucleosomal histones influences all three aspects of chromatin organization, it is central to the switch between permissive and repressive chromatin structure. The targeting of enzymes that modulate the histone acetylation status of chromatin, in synergy with the effects mediated by other chromatin remodeling factors, is central to gene regulation. PMID:11882541

  4. Integrable model for density-modulated quantum condensates: Solitons passing through a soliton lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Daisuke A.

    2016-06-01

    An integrable model possessing inhomogeneous ground states is proposed as an effective model of nonuniform quantum condensates such as supersolids and Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov superfluids. The model is a higher-order analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We derive an n -soliton solution via the inverse scattering theory with elliptic-functional background and reveal various kinds of soliton dynamics such as dark soliton billiards, dislocations, gray solitons, and envelope solitons. We also provide the exact bosonic and fermionic quasiparticle eigenstates and show their tunneling phenomena. The solutions are expressed by a determinant of theta functions.

  5. Integrable model for density-modulated quantum condensates: Solitons passing through a soliton lattice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke A

    2016-06-01

    An integrable model possessing inhomogeneous ground states is proposed as an effective model of nonuniform quantum condensates such as supersolids and Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov superfluids. The model is a higher-order analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We derive an n-soliton solution via the inverse scattering theory with elliptic-functional background and reveal various kinds of soliton dynamics such as dark soliton billiards, dislocations, gray solitons, and envelope solitons. We also provide the exact bosonic and fermionic quasiparticle eigenstates and show their tunneling phenomena. The solutions are expressed by a determinant of theta functions. PMID:27415270

  6. Localized spatially nonlinear matter waves in atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with space-modulated nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Li, Ji; Han, Wei; Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nonlinearity is the most remarkable characteristic of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) systems. Many studies have been done on atomic BECs with time- and space- modulated nonlinearities, while there is few work considering the atomic-molecular BECs with space-modulated nonlinearities. Here, we obtain two kinds of Jacobi elliptic solutions and a family of rational solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with trapping potential and space-modulated nonlinearity and consider the effect of three-body interaction on the localized matter wave solutions. The topological properties of the localized nonlinear matter wave for no coupling are analysed: the parity of nonlinear matter wave functions depends only on the principal quantum number n, and the numbers of the density packets for each quantum state depend on both the principal quantum number n and the secondary quantum number l. When the coupling is not zero, the localized nonlinear matter waves given by the rational function, their topological properties are independent of the principal quantum number n, only depend on the secondary quantum number l. The Raman detuning and the chemical potential can change the number and the shape of the density packets. The stability of the Jacobi elliptic solutions depends on the principal quantum number n, while the stability of the rational solutions depends on the chemical potential and Raman detuning. PMID:27403634

  7. Localized spatially nonlinear matter waves in atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with space-modulated nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Li, Ji; Han, Wei; Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nonlinearity is the most remarkable characteristic of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) systems. Many studies have been done on atomic BECs with time- and space- modulated nonlinearities, while there is few work considering the atomic-molecular BECs with space-modulated nonlinearities. Here, we obtain two kinds of Jacobi elliptic solutions and a family of rational solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with trapping potential and space-modulated nonlinearity and consider the effect of three-body interaction on the localized matter wave solutions. The topological properties of the localized nonlinear matter wave for no coupling are analysed: the parity of nonlinear matter wave functions depends only on the principal quantum number n, and the numbers of the density packets for each quantum state depend on both the principal quantum number n and the secondary quantum number l. When the coupling is not zero, the localized nonlinear matter waves given by the rational function, their topological properties are independent of the principal quantum number n, only depend on the secondary quantum number l. The Raman detuning and the chemical potential can change the number and the shape of the density packets. The stability of the Jacobi elliptic solutions depends on the principal quantum number n, while the stability of the rational solutions depends on the chemical potential and Raman detuning. PMID:27403634

  8. Protein kinase A and protein kinase C modulators have reciprocal effects on mesenchymal condensation during skin appendage morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Noveen, A; Jiang, T X; Chuong, C M

    1995-10-01

    The molecular signaling of secondary induction is a fundamental process in organogenesis during embryonic development. To study the signal transduction pathways involved, we used developing chicken skin as a model and focused on the roles of intracellular signaling during feather morphogenesis. Protein kinase C (PKC) immunoreactivity increases in the whole layer of forming dermis around H and H stage 30. This is followed by a gradual and highly localized decrease of PKC expression immediately beneath each forming feather germ. In contrast, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is ubiquitously expressed in both epithelium and mesenchyme. From stage 29 on, phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB), reflecting the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), begins to be seen in placode but not in interplacode epithelia. P-CREB is also expressed in bud mesenchyme transiently between stages 33 and 36, but not in the interbud mesenchyme. The presence and activity of PKC, PKA, and P-CREB in developing chicken skin are further characterized by immunoblot, kinase activity, and gel shift assays. To explore their physiological significance, embryonic chicken dorsal skin explants were treated with different modulators in medium or in beads for localized effects. The results showed that PKA activators and PKC inhibitors can expand a feather bud domain by enhancing dermal condensation, while PKC activators and PKA inhibitors can expand interbud domains. Neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is involved in dermal condensation. We observed that activation of PKA causes diffused expression of N-CAM in mesenchyme while activation of PKC causes the disappearance of N-CAM in precondensed mesenchymal regions. A model of how the well-concerted PKA and PKC signaling may be involved in the formation and size regulation of dermal condensation is presented. PMID:7556946

  9. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  10. Condensing polarization mode dispersion using CSRZ-DQPSK modulation in WDM-RoF-PON system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanofer, P. Fathima; Julus, L. Jerart; Vijayarangan, V.

    2015-06-01

    Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (DQPSK) is considered as an acceptable modulation technique for long-haul high speed communication owing to its ability to diminish the Polarization Mode Dispersion (PMD), non-linear effects and has constant envelope over the communication. The assessment includes Carrier Suppressed Return to Zero (CSRZ) modulation format. The combination of CSRZ and DQPSK techniques would result in a high bit rate with better Bit Error Rate (BER) in Wavelength Division Multiplexing - Passive Optical Network (WDM-PON) setup. The Radio Frequency (RF) signal is obtained finally for wireless service which can be assessed. . The optical communication system is expanded by comprising Polarization Multiplexing (PM) which improves the user scope and the spectral efficiency. The goal is to experimentally analyze the performances of CSRZ-DQPSK modulated non-coherent receiver for wire and RoF (Radio over Fiber) system for wireless service. Also, equal amount of power is provided for both the services. The PMD is reduced both the services. The Proposed system can provide flexible, cost-effective and high bandwidth utilization with reduced BER.

  11. Organization of higher-level chromatin structures (chromomere, chromonema and chromatin block) examined using visible light-induced chromatin photo-stabilization.

    PubMed

    Sheval, E V; Prusov, A N; Kireev, I I; Fais, D; Polyakov, V Yu

    2002-01-01

    The method of chromatin photo-stabilization by the action of visible light in the presence of ethidium bromide was used for investigation of higher-level chromatin structures in isolated nuclei. As a model we used rat hepatocyte nuclei isolated in buffers which stabilized or destabilized nuclear matrix. Several higher-level chromatin structures were visualized: 100nm globules-chromomeres, chains of chromomeres-chromonemata, aggregates of chromomeres-blocks of condensed chromatin. All these structures were completely destroyed by 2M NaCl extraction independent of the matrix state, and DNA was extruded from the residual nuclei (nuclear matrices) into a halo. These results show that nuclear matrix proteins do not play the main role in the maintenance of higher-level chromatin structures. Preliminary irradiation led to the reduction of the halo width in the dose-dependent manner. In regions of condensed chromatin of irradiated nucleoids there were discrete complexes consisting of DNA fibers radiating from an electron-dense core and resembling the decondensed chromomeres or the rosette-like structures. As shown by the analysis of proteins bound to irradiated nuclei upon high-salt extraction, irradiation presumably stabilized the non-histone proteins. These results suggest that in interphase nuclei loop domains are folded into discrete higher-level chromatin complexes (chromomeres). These complexes are possibly maintained by putative non-histone proteins, which are extracted with high-salt buffers from non-irradiated nuclei. PMID:12127937

  12. The landscape of accessible chromatin in mammalian preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingyi; Huang, Bo; Chen, He; Yin, Qiangzong; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Yunlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Liu, Bofeng; Wang, Qiujun; Xia, Weikun; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Zheng, Hui; Ming, Jia; Zhang, Wenhao; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Geng; Xu, Feng; Chang, Zai; Na, Jie; Yang, Xuerui; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-30

    In mammals, extensive chromatin reorganization is essential for reprogramming terminally committed gametes to a totipotent state during preimplantation development. However, the global chromatin landscape and its dynamics in this period remain unexplored. Here we report a genome-wide map of accessible chromatin in mouse preimplantation embryos using an improved assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) approach with CRISPR/Cas9-assisted mitochondrial DNA depletion. We show that despite extensive parental asymmetry in DNA methylomes, the chromatin accessibility between the parental genomes is globally comparable after major zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Accessible chromatin in early embryos is widely shaped by transposable elements and overlaps extensively with putative cis-regulatory sequences. Unexpectedly, accessible chromatin is also found near the transcription end sites of active genes. By integrating the maps of cis-regulatory elements and single-cell transcriptomes, we construct the regulatory network of early development, which helps to identify the key modulators for lineage specification. Finally, we find that the activities of cis-regulatory elements and their associated open chromatin diminished before major ZGA. Surprisingly, we observed many loci showing non-canonical, large open chromatin domains over the entire transcribed units in minor ZGA, supporting the presence of an unusually permissive chromatin state. Together, these data reveal a unique spatiotemporal chromatin configuration that accompanies early mammalian development. PMID:27309802

  13. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and an open chromatin assay in zebrafish erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, S; Ott, C J; Rossmann, M P; Superdock, M; Zon, L I; Zhou, Y

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish is an excellent genetic and developmental model for the study of vertebrate development and disease. Its ability to produce an abundance of transparent, externally developed embryos has facilitated large-scale genetic and chemical screens for the identification of critical genes and chemical factors that modulate developmental pathways. These studies can have profound implications for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of human diseases. Recent advancements in molecular and genomic studies have provided valuable tools and resources for comprehensive and high-resolution analysis of epigenomes during cell specification and lineage differentiation throughout development. In this chapter, we describe two simple methods to evaluate protein-DNA interaction and chromatin architecture in erythrocytes from adult zebrafish. These are chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) and an assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq). These techniques, together with gene expression profiling, are useful for analyzing epigenomic regulation of cell specification, differentiation, and function during zebrafish development in both normal and disease models. PMID:27443937

  14. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  15. Gearing up chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mandemaker, Imke K; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2014-01-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase may encounter DNA lesions, which causes stalling of transcription. To overcome the RNA polymerase blocking lesions, the transcribed strand is repaired by a dedicated repair mechanism, called transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER). After repair is completed, it is essential that transcription restarts. So far, the regulation and exact molecular mechanism of this transcriptional restart upon genotoxic damage has remained elusive. Recently, three different chromatin remodeling factors, HIRA, FACT, and Dot1L, were identified to stimulate transcription restart after DNA damage. These factors either incorporate new histones or establish specific chromatin marks that will gear up the chromatin to subsequently promote transcription recovery. This adds a new layer to the current model of chromatin remodeling necessary for repair and indicates that this specific form of transcription, i.e., the transcriptional restart upon DNA damage, needs specific chromatin remodeling events. PMID:24809693

  16. HERC2 rs12913832 modulates human pigmentation by attenuating chromatin-loop formation between a long-range enhancer and the OCA2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mijke; Kayser, Manfred; Palstra, Robert-Jan

    2012-03-01

    Pigmentation of skin, eye, and hair reflects some of the most evident common phenotypes in humans. Several candidate genes for human pigmentation are identified. The SNP rs12913832 has strong statistical association with human pigmentation. It is located within an intron of the nonpigment gene HERC2, 21 kb upstream of the pigment gene OCA2, and the region surrounding rs12913832 is highly conserved among animal species. However, the exact functional role of HERC2 rs12913832 in human pigmentation is unknown. Here we demonstrate that the HERC2 rs12913832 region functions as an enhancer regulating OCA2 transcription. In darkly pigmented human melanocytes carrying the rs12913832 T-allele, we detected binding of the transcription factors HLTF, LEF1, and MITF to the HERC2 rs12913832 enhancer, and a long-range chromatin loop between this enhancer and the OCA2 promoter that leads to elevated OCA2 expression. In contrast, in lightly pigmented melanocytes carrying the rs12913832 C-allele, chromatin-loop formation, transcription factor recruitment, and OCA2 expression are all reduced. Hence, we demonstrate that allelic variation of a common noncoding SNP located in a distal regulatory element not only disrupts the regulatory potential of this element but also affects its interaction with the relevant promoter. We provide the key mechanistic insight that allele-dependent differences in chromatin-loop formation (i.e., structural differences in the folding of gene loci) result in differences in allelic gene expression that affects common phenotypic traits. This concept is highly relevant for future studies aiming to unveil the functional basis of genetically determined phenotypes, including diseases. PMID:22234890

  17. Minor Groove Binder Distamycin Remodels Chromatin but Inhibits Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parijat; Banerjee, Amrita; Shandilya, Jayasha; Senapati, Parijat; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Kundu, Tapas K.; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2013-01-01

    The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as “chromatin remodeling”. In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance. PMID:23460895

  18. Functional interplay between histone H1 and HMG proteins in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, Yuri V; Bustin, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic interaction of nucleosome binding proteins with their chromatin targets is an important element in regulating the structure and function of chromatin. Histone H1 variants and High Mobility Group (HMG) proteins are ubiquitously expressed in all vertebrate cells, bind dynamically to chromatin, and are known to affect chromatin condensation and the ability of regulatory factors to access their genomic binding sites. Here, we review the studies that focus on the interactions between H1 and HMGs and highlight the functional consequences of the interplay between these architectural chromatin binding proteins. H1 and HMG proteins are mobile molecules that bind to nucleosomes as members of a dynamic protein network. All HMGs compete with H1 for chromatin binding sites, in a dose dependent fashion, but each HMG family has specific effects on the interaction of H1 with chromatin. The interplay between H1 and HMGs affects chromatin organization and plays a role in epigenetic regulation. PMID:26455954

  19. An Overview of Chromatin-Regulating Proteins in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingyu; Torres, Keila; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, gene expressions on chromosome DNA are orchestrated by a dynamic chromosome structure state that is largely controlled by chromatin-regulating proteins, which regulate chromatin structures, release DNA from the nucleosome, and activate or suppress gene expression by modifying nucleosome histones or mobilizing DNA-histone structure. The two classes of chromatin- regulating proteins are 1) enzymes that modify histones through methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, adenosine diphosphate–ribosylation, glycosylation, sumoylation, or ubiquitylation and 2) enzymes that remodel DNA-histone structure with energy from ATP hydrolysis. Chromatin-regulating proteins, which modulate DNA-histone interaction, change chromatin conformation, and increase or decrease the binding of functional DNA-regulating protein complexes, have major functions in nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA replication, repair, and recombination. This review provides a general overview of chromatin-regulating proteins, including their classification, molecular functions, and interactions with the nucleosome in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26796306

  20. Maintenance of a functional higher order chromatin structure: The role of the nuclear matrix in normal and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Amelia K.; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The ordered packaging of DNA within the nucleus of somatic cells reflects a dynamic supportive structure that facilitates stable transcription interrupted by intermittent cycles of extreme condensation. This dynamic mode of packing and unpacking chromatin is intimately linked to the ability of the genome to specifically complex with both histones and non-histone proteins. Understanding the underlying mechanism that governs the formation of higher order chromatin structures is a key to understanding how local architecture modulates transcription. In part, the formation of these structures appears to be regulated through genomic looping that is dynamically mediated by attachment to the nuclear scaffold/matrix at S/MARs, i.e., Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions. Although the mechanism guiding the formation and use of these higher-ordered structures remains unknown, S/MARs continue to reveal a multitude of roles in development and the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:20948980

  1. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  2. Chromatin deregulation in disease.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Anne C; Foster, Benjamin M; Bartke, Till

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of chromatin by epigenetic mechanisms plays a central role in gene expression and is essential for development and maintenance of cell identity and function. Aberrant chromatin regulation is observed in many diseases where it leads to defects in epigenetic gene regulation resulting in pathological gene expression programmes. These defects are caused by inherited or acquired mutations in genes encoding enzymes that deposit or remove DNA and histone modifications and that shape chromatin architecture. Chromatin deregulation often results in neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities, frequently linked to physical and developmental abnormalities, but can also cause neurodegenerative diseases, immunodeficiency, or muscle wasting syndromes. Epigenetic diseases can either be of monogenic origin or manifest themselves as complex multifactorial diseases such as in congenital heart disease, autism spectrum disorders, or cancer in which mutations in chromatin regulators are contributing factors. The environment directly influences the epigenome and can induce changes that cause or predispose to diseases through risk factors such as stress, malnutrition or exposure to harmful chemicals. The plasticity of chromatin regulation makes targeting the enzymatic machinery an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention and an increasing number of small molecule inhibitors against a variety of epigenetic regulators are in clinical use or under development. In this review, we will give an overview of the molecular lesions that underlie epigenetic diseases, and we will discuss the impact of the environment and prospects for epigenetic therapies. PMID:26188466

  3. Chromatin signatures of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Marc A.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the pattern of gene expression play an important role in allowing cancer cells to acquire their hallmark characteristics, while genomic instability enables cells to acquire genetic alterations that promote oncogenesis. Chromatin plays central roles in both transcriptional regulation and the maintenance of genomic stability. Studies by cancer genome consortiums have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin regulatory factors and histone proteins in human cancer, implicating them as major mediators in the pathogenesis of both hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the role of chromatin in cancer, focusing on transcriptional regulatory complexes, enhancer-associated factors, histone point mutations, and alterations in heterochromatin-interacting factors. PMID:25644600

  4. Nucleoporins and chromatin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Christopher; Wozniak, Richard W

    2016-06-01

    Mounting evidence has implicated a group of proteins termed nucleoporins, or Nups, in various processes that regulate chromatin structure and function. Nups were first recognized as building blocks for nuclear pore complexes, but several members of this group of proteins also reside in the cytoplasm and within the nucleus. Moreover, many are dynamic and move between these various locations. Both at the nuclear envelope, as part of nuclear pore complexes, and within the nucleoplasm, Nups interact with protein complexes that function in gene transcription, chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and DNA replication. Here, we review recent studies that provide further insight into the molecular details of these interactions and their role in regulating the activity of chromatin modifying factors. PMID:27085162

  5. Studies on chromatin. II. Isolation and characterization of chromatin subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Bakayev, V V; Melnickov, A A; Osicka, V D; Varshausky, A J

    1975-01-01

    Earlier findings /1-10/ bearing on a subunit organization of chromatin were confirmed and in some points detailed. Besides this, a large-scale isolation of chromatin subunits; their protein composition, electron microscopic appearance and CsCl banding pattern are described. Although the purified chromatin subunit contains all five histones, the relative content of histone H1 i in it is two times lower than that in the original chromatin. tit is shown that a mild digestion of chromatin with staphylococcal nuclease produced not only separate chromatin subunits and their "oligomers' but also deoxyribonucleoprotein particles which sediment more slowly than subunits. It appears that these particles and subunits are produced from different initial structures in the chromatin. Finally, a crystallization of the purified chromatin subunit as a cetyltrimethyl ammonium salt is described. Images PMID:1178523

  6. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  7. Chromatin and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, David M; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program. PMID:23751185

  8. Chromatin dynamics: Interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swygert, Sarah G.; Peterson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. PMID:24583555

  9. Stress-induced structural changes in plant chromatin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Aline V; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-10-01

    Stress defense in plants is elaborated at the level of protection and adaptation. Dynamic changes in sophisticated chromatin substructures and concomitant transcriptional changes play an important role in response to stress, as illustrated by the transient rearrangement of compact heterochromatin structures or the modulation of chromatin composition and modification upon stress exposure. To connect cytological, developmental, and molecular data around stress and chromatin is currently an interesting, multifaceted, and sometimes controversial field of research. This review highlights some of the most recent findings on nuclear reorganization, histone variants, histone chaperones, DNA- and histone modifications, and somatic and meiotic heritability in connection with stress. PMID:26042538

  10. Aging-related chromatin defects via loss of the NURD complex

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Kubben, Nard; Wickert, Ute; Göhler, Heike; Hoffmann, Katrin; Misteli, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Physiological and premature aging are characterized by multiple defects in chromatin structure and accumulation of persistent DNA damage. Here we identify the NURD remodeling complex as a key modulator of these aging-associated chromatin defects. We demonstrate loss of several NURD components during premature and normal aging and we find aging-associated reduction of HDAC1 activity. Silencing of individual NURD subunits recapitulates some chromatin defects associated with aging and we provide evidence that structural chromatin defects precede DNA damage accumulation. These results outline a molecular mechanism for chromatin defects during aging. PMID:19734887

  11. Biophysical Regulation of Chromatin Architecture Instills a Mechanical Memory in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Jin; Thorpe, Stephen D.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Duncan, Randall L.; Lee, David A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical cues direct the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we identified the operative molecular mechanisms through which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates changes in chromatin organization and nuclear mechanics in MSCs. Our data show that, in the absence of exogenous differentiation factors, short term DL elicits a rapid increase in chromatin condensation, mediated by acto-myosin based cellular contractility and the activity of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2. The resulting change in chromatin condensation stiffened the MSC nucleus, making it less deformable when stretch was applied to the cell. We also identified stretch induced ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling as a central mediator of this chromatin condensation process. Further, we showed that DL, through differential stabilization of the condensed chromatin state, established a ‘mechanical memory’ in these cells. That is, increasing strain levels and number of loading events led to a greater degree of chromatin condensation that persisted for longer periods of time after the cessation of loading. These data indicate that, with mechanical perturbation, MSCs develop a mechanical memory encoded in structural changes in the nucleus which may sensitize them to future mechanical loading events and define the trajectory and persistence of their lineage specification. PMID:26592929

  12. CPF-Associated Phosphatase Activity Opposes Condensin-Mediated Chromosome Condensation

    PubMed Central

    Vanoosthuyse, Vincent; Legros, Pénélope; van der Sar, Sjaak J. A.; Yvert, Gaël; Toda, Kenji; Le Bihan, Thierry; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Hardwick, Kevin; Bernard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Functional links connecting gene transcription and condensin-mediated chromosome condensation have been established in species ranging from prokaryotes to vertebrates. However, the exact nature of these links remains misunderstood. Here we show in fission yeast that the 3′ end RNA processing factor Swd2.2, a component of the Cleavage and Polyadenylation Factor (CPF), is a negative regulator of condensin-mediated chromosome condensation. Lack of Swd2.2 does not affect the assembly of the CPF but reduces its association with chromatin. This causes only limited, context-dependent effects on gene expression and transcription termination. However, CPF-associated Swd2.2 is required for the association of Protein Phosphatase 1 PP1Dis2 with chromatin, through an interaction with Ppn1, a protein that we identify as the fission yeast homologue of vertebrate PNUTS. We demonstrate that Swd2.2, Ppn1 and PP1Dis2 form an independent module within the CPF, which provides an essential function in the absence of the CPF-associated Ssu72 phosphatase. We show that Ppn1 and Ssu72, like Swd2.2, are also negative regulators of condensin-mediated chromosome condensation. We conclude that Swd2.2 opposes condensin-mediated chromosome condensation by facilitating the function of the two CPF-associated phosphatases PP1 and Ssu72. PMID:24945319

  13. HMG Nuclear Proteins: Linking Chromatin Structure to Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    I. Summary Although the three families of mammalian HMG proteins (HMGA, HMGB and HMGN) participate in many of the same nuclear processes, each family plays its own unique role in modulating chromatin structure and regulating genomic function. This review focuses on the similarities and differences in the mechanisms by which the different HMG families impact chromatin structure and influence cellular phenotype. The biological implications of having three architectural transcription factor families with complementary, but partially overlapping, nuclear functions are discussed. PMID:19748605

  14. Chromatin remodeling effects on enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    García-González, Estela; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Arzate-Mejía, Rodrigo; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2016-08-01

    During organism development, a diversity of cell types emerges with disparate, yet stable profiles of gene expression with distinctive cellular functions. In addition to gene promoters, the genome contains enhancer regulatory sequences, which are implicated in cellular specialization by facilitating cell-type and tissue-specific gene expression. Enhancers are DNA binding elements characterized by highly sophisticated and various mechanisms of action allowing for the specific interaction of general and tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, eukaryotic organisms package their genetic material into chromatin, generating a physical barrier for TFs to interact with their cognate sequences. The ability of TFs to bind DNA regulatory elements is also modulated by changes in the chromatin structure, including histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and the methylation status of DNA. Furthermore, it has recently been revealed that enhancer sequences are also transcribed into a set of enhancer RNAs with regulatory potential. These interdependent processes act in the context of a complex network of chromatin interactions, which together contributes to a renewed vision of how gene activation is coordinated in a cell-type-dependent manner. In this review, we describe the interplay between genetic and epigenetic aspects associated with enhancers and discuss their possible roles on enhancer function. PMID:27026300

  15. Chromatin fiber allostery and the epigenetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick; Foray, Nicolas; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry; Wong, Hua; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    The notion of allostery introduced for proteins about fifty years ago has been extended since then to DNA allostery, where a locally triggered DNA structural transition remotely controls other DNA-binding events. We further extend this notion and propose that chromatin fiber allosteric transitions, induced by histone-tail covalent modifications, may play a key role in transcriptional regulation. We present an integrated scenario articulating allosteric mechanisms at different scales: allosteric transitions of the condensed chromatin fiber induced by histone-tail acetylation modify the mechanical constraints experienced by the embedded DNA, thus possibly controlling DNA-binding of allosteric transcription factors or further allosteric mechanisms at the linker DNA level. At a higher scale, different epigenetic constraints delineate different statistically dominant subsets of accessible chromatin fiber conformations, which each favors the assembly of dedicated regulatory complexes, as detailed on the emblematic example of the mouse Igf2-H19 gene locus and its parental imprinting. This physical view offers a mechanistic and spatially structured explanation of the observed correlation between transcriptional activity and histone modifications. The evolutionary origin of allosteric control supports to speak of an ‘epigenetic code’, by which events involved in transcriptional regulation are encoded in histone modifications in a context-dependent way.

  16. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF.

  17. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    PubMed Central

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF. PMID:24472778

  18. Interplay of RNA Pol IV and ROS1 during post-embryonic 5S rDNA chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Douet, Julien; Blanchard, Bertrand; Cuvillier, Claudine; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2008-12-01

    We have investigated the chromatin structure of 5S rDNA, a heterochromatic pericentromeric tandemly repeated family, at 2, 3, 4 and 5 days post-germination. Our results revealed a large-scale reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin that occurs during the first days of development. Unexpectedly, there is a decondensation followed by a 're'condensation of 5S rDNA chromatin, to obtain almost mature nuclei 5 d post-germination. The reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin is accompanied by a rapid and active demethylation of 5S rDNA mediated by the ROS1 (repressor of silencing 1) demethylase, whereas the plant-specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is essential to the 5S chromatin 're'condensation. In conclusion, Pol IV and ROS1 collaborate to unlock the 5S rDNA chromatin inherited from the seed, and establish adult features. PMID:18845569

  19. A conformational study of the binding of a high mobility group protein with chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sasi, R; Hüvös, P E; Fasman, G D

    1982-10-10

    The nature of the binding of a high mobility group protein (HMG 17) to native and H1-H5-depleted chicken erythrocyte chromatin was studied, as a function of ionic strength, using circular dichroism and thermal denaturation techniques. The circular dichroism properties of the HMG 17-reconstituted whole chromatin and H1-H5-depleted chromatin demonstrated that a condensation of chromatin structure occurred upon HMG 17 binding at low ionic strength (1 mM Na phosphate, 0.25 mM EDTA, pH 7.0). Thermal denaturation profiles confirmed this change in the structure of chromatin induced by HMG 17. Thermal denaturation profiles were resolved into three-component transitions. In general, a shift in the temperature of maximum dh/dT for each transition (Tm) was observed for all transitions upon HMG 17 binding. DNA melting in the first transition, originating from linker regions of whole chromatin, was nearly totally depleted and was distributed mainly into the highest melting transition. The same trends were also observed in H1-H5-depleted chromatin. These results indicate that the binding sites of HMG 17 are situated in the linker regions immediately adjacent to the core. The nature of the interaction of HMG 17 at higher ionic strength (50 mM NaCl, 1 mM Na phosphate, 0.25 mM EDTA, pH 7.0) with whole chromatin and H1-H5-depleted chromatin was found to be different but a decrease in [theta] values was found in both chromatins. These observations suggest that HMG 17 does not loosen chromatin structure but produces an overall stabilization and condensation of structure. The implications of these results to the currently accepted models of transcriptionally active chromatin are discussed. PMID:6214552

  20. Nitric oxide modulates chromatin folding in human endothelial cells via protein phosphatase 2A activation and class II histone deacetylases nuclear shuttling.

    PubMed

    Illi, Barbara; Dello Russo, Claudio; Colussi, Claudia; Rosati, Jessica; Pallaoro, Michele; Spallotta, Francesco; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Ragone, Gianluca; Martelli, Fabio; Biglioli, Paolo; Steinkuhler, Christian; Gallinari, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates important endothelial cell (EC) functions and gene expression by a molecular mechanism which is still poorly characterized. Here we show that in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) NO inhibited serum-induced histone acetylation and enhanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. By immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses it was found that NO induced class II HDAC4 and 5 nuclear shuttling and that class II HDACs selective inhibitor MC1568 rescued serum-dependent histone acetylation above control level in NO-treated HUVECs. In contrast, class I HDACs inhibitor MS27-275 had no effect, indicating a specific role for class II HDACs in NO-dependent histone deacetylation. In addition, it was found that NO ability to induce HDAC4 and HDAC5 nuclear shuttling involved the activation of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In fact, HDAC4 nuclear translocation was impaired in ECs expressing small-t antigen and exposed to NO. Finally, in cells engineered to express a HDAC4-Flag fusion protein, NO induced the formation of a macromolecular complex including HDAC4, HDAC3, HDAC5, and an active PP2A. The present results show that NO-dependent PP2A activation plays a key role in class II HDACs nuclear translocation. PMID:17975112

  1. Mammalian sperm chromatin as a model for chromatin function in DNA degradation and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Michael A; Sil, Payel; Ward, W Steven

    2011-02-01

    Reproductive biology is considered a specialty field, however, an argument can be made that it is instead generally applicable to many fields of biology. The one-cell embryo is presented here as a model system for the study of eukaryotic DNA replication, apoptotic DNA degradation, and signaling mechanisms between the cytoplasm and nucleus. Two unique aspects of this system combine to make it particularly useful for the study of chromatin function. First, the evolutionary pressure that lead to the extreme condensation of mammalian sperm DNA resulted in a cell with virtually inert chromatin, no DNA replication or transcription ongoing in the sperm cell, and all of the cells in a G(0) state. This chromatin is suddenly transformed into actively transcribing and replicating DNA upon fertilization. Therefore, the sperm chromatin is poised to become active but does not yet possess sufficient components present in somatic chromatin structure for all these processes. The second unique aspect of this system is that the one cell embryo houses two distinct nuclei, termed pronuclei, through the first round of DNA synthesis. This means the sperm cell can be experimentally manipulated to test the affects of the various treatments on the biological functions of interest. Experimental manipulations of the system have already revealed a certain level of plasticity in the coordination of both the timing of DNA synthesis in the two pronuclei and in the response to cellular signals by each pronucleus involved with the progression through the G1/S checkpoint, including the degradation of DNA in the paternal pronucleus. The fact that two nuclei in the same cytoplasm can undergo different responses infers a level of autonomy in the nuclear control of the cell cycle. Thus, the features of mammalian fertilization can provide unique insights for the normal biology of the cell cycle in somatic cells. PMID:21204750

  2. Quantifying chromatin-associated interactions: the HI-FI system.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Duane D; Luger, Karolin; Hieb, Aaron R

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin plays a vital role in regulating cellular processes that occur on the DNA. Modulation of chromatin structure is conducted through interactions with binding factors that direct critical actions such as posttranslational modifications, nucleosome remodeling, and incorporation of histone variants. Specific factors recognize and act upon the various physical states of chromatin to modulate DNA accessibility. The ability to quantitatively characterize these interactions in vitro can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms that dictate chromatin architecture. Here, we describe in detail fluorescence methodologies for quantifying the thermodynamic principles that guide interactions between nucleosomal arrays, mononucleosomes, or nucleosome components and chromatin-associated factors through application of the HI-FI (High-throughput Interactions by Fluorescence Intensity) system. These measurements utilize fluorescence (de)quenching and FRET assays performed in 384-well microplates, making the assays suitable for high-throughput characterization of interactions at low concentrations. Further, this system can be used to determine the stoichiometric composition of complexes and specific sites of interaction. After quantification on a plate reader or similar instrument, the solution-based assays can be directly transferred to native gels for visualization of interaction(s). We also highlight procedural details on the efficient attachment of fluorescent dyes to histones and DNA. In all, the HI-FI system of assays can be used to elucidate mechanistic details of how specific chromatin-associated factors function at the molecular level. PMID:22910210

  3. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Barkal, Amira A; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  4. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  5. Mechanism of chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-02-23

    Results from biochemical and structural studies of the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex prompt a proposal for the remodeling mechanism: RSC binding to the nucleosome releases the DNA from the histone surface and initiates DNA translocation (through one or a small number of DNA base pairs); ATP binding completes translocation, and ATP hydrolysis resets the system. Binding energy thus plays a central role in the remodeling process. RSC may disrupt histone-DNA contacts by affecting histone octamer conformation and through extensive interaction with the DNA. Bulging of the DNA from the octamer surface is possible, and twisting is unavoidable, but neither is the basis of remodeling. PMID:20142505

  6. Mapping chromatin modifications in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shuang Fang; Karpusenko, Alena; Riehn, Robert

    2013-03-01

    DNA and chromatin are elongated to a fixed fraction of their contour length when introduced into quasi-1d nanochannels. Because single molecules are analyzed, their hold great potential for the analysis for the genetic analysis of material from single cells. In this study, we have reconstituted chromatin with histones from a variety of sources, and mapped the modification profile of the chromatin. We monitored methylation and acetylation patterns of the histone tail protein residues using fluorescently labelled antibodies. Using those, we distinguished chromatin reconstituted from chicken erythrocytes, calf thymus, and HeLa cells. We discuss prospects for profiling histone modifications for whole chromosomes from single cells.

  7. Effects of cryostorage on human sperm chromatin integrity.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Adriana; Leo, Rita; Liguori, Francesca

    2013-11-01

    The integrity of sperm chromatin structure has proven to be of great importance for human fertility. In this study, we investigated whether sperm cryopreservation has an effect on nuclear DNA tertiary structure, (i.e. condensation), measured by aniline blue staining, in 103 male patients who required consultation for hypo-fertility. Sperm DNA damage was significantly higher in patients showing oligospermia and severe morphological abnormalities than in native sperm populations. Furthermore we observed that chromatin decondensation was related to the cryostorage technique and to the duration of storage. This increase in decondensation was highly significant (P < 0.01) immediately after cryopreservation and from 90 days of cryostorage onwards. The possible mechanisms involved in sperm chromatin cryoinjury and the need to incorporate new methods for testing sperm nuclear structure alteration into the routine spermiogram are discussed. PMID:22398023

  8. Conservation laws and dark-soliton solutions of an integrable higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation for a density-modulated quantum condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, De-Yin; Tian, Bo; Sun, Wen-Rong; Wang, Yun-Po

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, an integrable higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation for a density-modulated quantum condensate is investigated. Based on the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur system, an infinite number of conservation laws are obtained. Introducing an auxiliary function, we derive the bilinear forms and construct the dark-soliton solutions with the help of the Hirota method and symbolic computation. Dark one, two, and three solitons are analyzed graphically. Via asymptotic analysis, interactions between the two dark solitons are proved to be elastic. We see that the coefficients in the equation only affect the soliton velocity. We analyze the linear stability of the plane wave solutions in the presence of a small perturbation.

  9. CCSI: a database providing chromatin-chromatin spatial interaction information.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaowei; Ma, Wenbin; Songyang, Zhou; Luo, Zhenhua; Huang, Junfeng; Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan

    2016-01-01

    Distal regulatory elements have been shown to regulate gene transcription through spatial interactions, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are linked with distal gene expression by spatial proximity, which helps to explain the causal role of disease-associated SNPs in non-coding region. Therefore, studies on spatial interactions between chromatin have created a new avenue for elucidating the mechanism of transcriptional regulation in disease pathogenesis. Recently, a growing number of chromatin interactions have been revealed by means of 3C, 4C, 5C, ChIA-PET and Hi-C technologies. To interpret and utilize these interactions, we constructed chromatin-chromatin spatial interaction (CCSI) database by integrating and annotating 91 sets of chromatin interaction data derived from published literature, UCSC database and NCBI GEO database, resulting in a total of 3,017,962 pairwise interactions (false discovery rate < 0.05), covering human, mouse and yeast. A web interface has been designed to provide access to the chromatin interactions. The main features of CCSI are (i) showing chromatin interactions and corresponding genes, enhancers and SNPs within the regions in the search page; (ii) offering complete interaction datasets, enhancer and SNP information in the download page; and (iii) providing analysis pipeline for the annotation of interaction data. In conclusion, CCSI will facilitate exploring transcriptional regulatory mechanism in disease pathogenesis associated with spatial interactions among genes, regulatory regions and SNPs. Database URL: http://songyanglab.sysu.edu.cn/ccsi. PMID:26868054

  10. [Cytophotometric analysis of the chromatin structural conformity in interphase nuclei detected in UV light and by gallocyanine staining].

    PubMed

    Zhukotskiĭ, A V; Shchegolev, A I; Butusova, N N; Nemirovskiĭ, L E; Kogan, E M

    1985-06-01

    Geometric and optical parameters of chromatin of hepatocyte nuclei have been examined before (UV, lambda = 265 nm) and after gallocyanine staining. Quantitative parameters of the chromatin structure in the same nuclei measured in situ by a scanning microscope-photometer (step size 0.125 micron) before and after staining were equal. Tinctorial properties of chromatin granules (condensed part of the nuclear material) and its diffuse part were different. It is suggested that the difference between granules and the nongranular part of chromatin is not only of optical but also of chemical nature. PMID:2410060

  11. A WD-repeat protein stabilizes ORC binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhen; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Geng, Yijie; Zheng, Ruiping; Chakraborty, Arindam; Freeman, Brian; Wang, Fei; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2010-10-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC) plays critical roles in the initiation of DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. In metazoans, ORC associates with origin DNA during G1 and with heterochromatin in postreplicated cells. However, what regulates the binding of ORC to chromatin is not understood. We have identified a highly conserved, leucine-rich repeats and WD40 repeat domain-containing protein 1 (LRWD1) or ORC-associated (ORCA) in human cells that interacts with ORC and modulates chromatin association of ORC. ORCA colocalizes with ORC and shows similar cell-cycle dynamics. We demonstrate that ORCA efficiently recruits ORC to chromatin. Depletion of ORCA in human primary cells and embryonic stem cells results in loss of ORC association to chromatin, concomitant reduction of MCM binding, and a subsequent accumulation in G1 phase. Our results suggest ORCA-mediated association of ORC to chromatin is critical to initiate preRC assembly in G1 and chromatin organization in post-G1 cells. PMID:20932478

  12. Ultrastructure of bovine sperm chromatin.

    PubMed

    Filho, Romualdo Morandi; Beletti, Marcelo Emilio; de Oliveira, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian semen chromatin comprises DNA, protamine, and, at lower levels, other proteins. This constitution confers intense compaction to the chromatin, helping to protect the DNA and causing the head of the sperm to be very small, facilitating the safe transport of its genetic contents. It is known that changes in the sperm chromatin compaction lead to fertility problems in bulls, justifying studies of this structure. Although there are theoretical models of sperm chromatin because of its high compaction, there is no morphological evidence of such models. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ultrastructure of bovine sperm chromatin in an attempt to corroborate the theoretical chromatin models existing today. The isolated bull sperm heads had their chromatin partially unpacked by chemical treatment using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dithiothreitol (DTT) and were then embedded in Epon resin. Using an ultramicrotome, ultrathin sections were obtained, which were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and then viewed under transmission electron microscopy. The methodology used allowed the visualization of toroidal structures interconnected by a filamentous nuclear matrix, which is entirely consistent with the most current theoretical models. PMID:26515508

  13. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Colvin, M E; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2004-01-06

    The DNA in eukaryotic cells is tightly packaged as chromatin through interactions with histone proteins to form nucleosomes. These nucleosomes are themselves packed together through interactions with linker histone and non-histone proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the chromatin fiber must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. The structure of the chromatin fiber beyond the level of the single nucleosome and the structural changes which accompany the remodeling process are poorly understood. We are studying the structures and forces behind the remodeling process through the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This allows both high-resolution imaging of the chromatin, and manipulation of individual fibers. Pulling a single chromatin fiber apart using the AFM tip yields information on the forces which hold the structure together. We have isolated chromatin fibers from chicken erythrocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. AFM images of these fibers will be presented, along with preliminary data from the manipulation of these fibers using the AFM tip. The implications of these data for the structure of chromatin undergoing the remodeling process are discussed.

  14. Ubiquitous Over-Expression of Chromatin Remodeling Factor SRG3 Ameliorates the T Cell-Mediated Exacerbation of EAE by Modulating the Phenotypes of both Dendritic Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Won; Park, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Sung Ho; Lee, Changjin; Seong, Rho Hyun; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2015-01-01

    Although SWI3-related gene (SRG3), a chromatin remodeling factor, is critical for various biological processes including early embryogenesis and thymocyte development, it is unclear whether SRG3 is involved in the differentiation of CD4+ T cells, the key mediator of adaptive immune responses. Because it is known that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) development is determined by the activation of CD4+ T helper cells, here, we investigated the role of SRG3 in EAE development using SRG3 transgenic mouse models exhibiting two distinct SRG3 expression patterns: SRG3 expression driven by either the CD2 or β-actin promoter. We found that the outcome of EAE development was completely different depending on the expression pattern of SRG3. The specific over-expression of SRG3 using the CD2 promoter facilitated EAE via the induction of Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 using the β-actin promoter inhibited EAE by promoting Th2 differentiation and suppressing Th1 and Th17 differentiation. In addition, the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 polarized CD4+ T cell differentiation towards the Th2 phenotype by converting dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages to Th2 types. SRG3 over-expression not only reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs but also shifted macrophages from the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-expressing M1 phenotype to the arginase-1-expressing M2 phenotype during EAE. In addition, Th2 differentiation in β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice during EAE was associated with an increase in the basophil and mast cell populations and in IL4 production. Furthermore, the increased frequency of Treg cells in the spinal cord of β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice might induce the suppression of and accelerate the recovery from EAE symptoms. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence supporting the development of a new therapeutic strategy for EAE involving the modulation of SRG3 expression to induce M2 and Th2 polarization

  15. Nuclear Condensation during Mouse Erythropoiesis Requires Caspase-3-Mediated Nuclear Opening.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Mei, Yang; Schipma, Matthew J; Roth, Eric Wayne; Bleher, Reiner; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Wickrema, Amittha; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian erythropoiesis involves chromatin condensation that is initiated in the early stage of terminal differentiation. The mechanisms of chromatin condensation during erythropoiesis are unclear. Here, we show that the mouse erythroblast forms large, transient, and recurrent nuclear openings that coincide with the condensation process. The opening lacks nuclear lamina, nuclear pore complexes, and nuclear membrane, but it is distinct from nuclear envelope changes that occur during apoptosis and mitosis. A fraction of the major histones are released from the nuclear opening and degraded in the cytoplasm. We demonstrate that caspase-3 is required for the nuclear opening formation throughout terminal erythropoiesis. Loss of caspase-3 or ectopic expression of a caspase-3 non-cleavable lamin B mutant blocks nuclear opening formation, histone release, chromatin condensation, and terminal erythroid differentiation. We conclude that caspase-3-mediated nuclear opening formation accompanied by histone release from the opening is a critical step toward chromatin condensation during erythropoiesis in mice. PMID:26954545

  16. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  17. Chromatin organization: form to function.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; van Steensel, Bas

    2013-04-01

    Recent developments in technology have made it possible to create high resolution genome-wide maps of histone marks, DNA binding proteins and physical interactions along genomic regions. Chromatin features are found together in different combinations, dividing the genome up into domains with distinct functional properties. Microscopy and chromatin conformation capture techniques have shown that the 3D structure of chromosomes is constrained by nuclear features and functional links between different parts of chromatin. These results provide insights about the 3D and domain organization of the genome and their connection to gene regulation and other nuclear functions. PMID:23274160

  18. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  19. Painting a Clearer Picture of Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Finn, Elizabeth H; Misteli, Tom; Shachar, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Elucidating chromatin's 3D shape is critical to understanding its function, but the fine structure of chromatin domains remains poorly resolved. In a recent report in Nature, Boettiger et al. (2016) visualize chromatin in super-resolution, gaining unprecedented insight into chromatin architecture. PMID:26906730

  20. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair. PMID:26617633

  1. The insulation of genes from external enhancers and silencing chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Burgess-Beusse, Bonnie; Farrell, Catherine; Gaszner, Miklos; Litt, Michael; Mutskov, Vesco; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Simpson, Melanie; West, Adam; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Insulators are DNA sequence elements that can serve in some cases as barriers to protect a gene against the encroachment of adjacent inactive condensed chromatin. Some insulators also can act as blocking elements to protect against the activating influence of distal enhancers associated with other genes. Although most of the insulators identified so far derive from Drosophila, they also are found in vertebrates. An insulator at the 5′ end of the chicken β-globin locus marks a boundary between an open chromatin domain and a region of constitutively condensed chromatin. Detailed analysis of this element shows that it possesses both enhancer blocking activity and the ability to screen reporter genes against position effects. Enhancer blocking is associated with binding of the protein CTCF; sites that bind CTCF are found at other critical points in the genome. Protection against position effects involves other properties that appear to be associated with control of histone acetylation and methylation. Insulators thus are complex elements that can help to preserve the independent function of genes embedded in a genome in which they are surrounded by regulatory signals they must ignore. PMID:12154228

  2. Analysis of chromatin structure at meiotic DSB sites in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kouji; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2009-01-01

    One of the major features of meiosis is a high frequency of homologous recombination that not only confers genetic diversity to a successive generation but also ensures proper segregation of chromosomes. Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks that require many proteins including the catalytic core, Spo11. In this regard, like transcription and repair, etc., recombination is hindered by a compacted chromatin structure because trans-acting factors cannot easily access the DNA. Such inhibitory effects must be alleviated prior to recombination initiation. Indeed, a number of groups showed that chromatin around recombination hotspots is less condensed, by using nucleases as a probe to assess local DNA accessibility. Here we describe a method to analyze chromatin structure of a recombination hotspot in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This method, combining micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion ofchromatin DNA and subsequent Southern blotting, is expected to provide information as to chromatin context around a hotspot. Moreover, by virtue of MNase preferentially targeting linker DNA, positions of several nucleosomes surrounding a hotspot can also be determined. Our protocol is a very powerful way to analyze several-kb regions of interest and can be applied to other purposes. PMID:19799187

  3. Critical electrolyte concentration of silk gland chromatin of the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis, induced using agrochemicals.

    PubMed

    Santos, S A; Fermino, F; Moreira, B M T; Araujo, K F; Falco, J R P; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C C

    2014-01-01

    The sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis is widely known as the main pest of sugarcane crop, causing increased damage to the entire fields. Measures to control this pest involve the use of chemicals and biological control with Cotesia flavipes wasps. In this study, we evaluated the insecticides fipronil (Frontline; 0.0025%), malathion (Malatol Bio Carb; 0.4%), cipermetrina (Galgotrin; 10%), and neem oil (Natuneem; 100%) and the herbicide nicosulfuron (Sanson 40 SC; 100%) in the posterior region silk glands of 3rd- and 5th-instar D. saccharalis by studying the variation in the critical electrolyte concentration (CEC). Observations of 3rd-instar larvae indicated that malathion, cipermetrina, and neem oil induced increased chromatin condensation that may consequently disable genes. Tests with fipronil showed no alteration in chromatin condensation. With the use of nicosulfuron, there was chromatin and probable gene decompaction. In the 5th-instar larvae, the larval CEC values indicated that malathion and neem oil induced increased chromatin condensation. The CEC values for 5th-instar larvae using cipermetrina, fipronil, and nicosulfuron indicated chromatin unpacking. These observations led us to conclude that the quantity of the pesticide does not affect the mortality of these pests, can change the conformation of complexes of DNA, RNA, and protein from the posterior region of silk gland cells of D. saccharalis, activating or repressing the expression of genes related to the defense mechanism of the insect and contributing to the selection and survival of resistant individuals. PMID:25299111

  4. Polariton Condensation in Dynamic Acoustic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Wouters, M.; Bradley, R.; Biermann, K.; Guda, K.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.; Sarkar, D.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that the tunable potential introduced by a surface acoustic wave on a homogeneous polariton condensate leads to fragmentation of the condensate into an array of wires which move with the acoustic velocity. Reduction of the spatial coherence of the condensate emission along the surface acoustic wave direction is attributed to the suppression of coupling between the spatially modulated condensates. Interparticle interactions observed at high polariton densities screen the acoustic potential, partially reversing its effect on spatial coherence.

  5. Genome accessibility is widely preserved and locally modulated during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Chris C.-S.; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Udugama, Maheshi; Frank, Christopher L.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Baek, Songjoon; Giardine, Belinda; Crawford, Gregory E.; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis entails global alterations to chromosome structure and nuclear architecture, concomitant with transient silencing of transcription. How cells transmit transcriptional states through mitosis remains incompletely understood. While many nuclear factors dissociate from mitotic chromosomes, the observation that certain nuclear factors and chromatin features remain associated with individual loci during mitosis originated the hypothesis that such mitotically retained molecular signatures could provide transcriptional memory through mitosis. To understand the role of chromatin structure in mitotic memory, we performed the first genome-wide comparison of DNase I sensitivity of chromatin in mitosis and interphase, using a murine erythroblast model. Despite chromosome condensation during mitosis visible by microscopy, the landscape of chromatin accessibility at the macromolecular level is largely unaltered. However, mitotic chromatin accessibility is locally dynamic, with individual loci maintaining none, some, or all of their interphase accessibility. Mitotic reduction in accessibility occurs primarily within narrow, highly DNase hypersensitive sites that frequently coincide with transcription factor binding sites, whereas broader domains of moderate accessibility tend to be more stable. In mitosis, proximal promoters generally maintain their accessibility more strongly, whereas distal regulatory elements tend to lose accessibility. Large domains of DNA hypomethylation mark a subset of promoters that retain accessibility during mitosis and across many cell types in interphase. Erythroid transcription factor GATA1 exerts site-specific changes in interphase accessibility that are most pronounced at distal regulatory elements, but has little influence on mitotic accessibility. We conclude that features of open chromatin are remarkably stable through mitosis, but are modulated at the level of individual genes and regulatory elements. PMID:25373146

  6. Shugoshin forms a specialized chromatin domain at subtelomeres that regulates transcription and replication timing

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Sanki; Handa, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Atsushi; Ban, Takuto; Takigawa, Toru; Miyasato, Kazumi; Ishii, Kojiro; Kugou, Kazuto; Ohta, Kunihiro; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Masukata, Hisao; Kanoh, Junko

    2016-01-01

    A chromosome is composed of structurally and functionally distinct domains. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of chromatin structure and the function of subtelomeres, the telomere-adjacent regions, remain obscure. Here we report the roles of the conserved centromeric protein Shugoshin 2 (Sgo2) in defining chromatin structure and functions of the subtelomeres in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that Sgo2 localizes at the subtelomeres preferentially during G2 phase and is essential for the formation of a highly condensed subtelomeric chromatin body ‘knob'. Furthermore, the absence of Sgo2 leads to the derepression of the subtelomeric genes and premature DNA replication at the subtelomeric late origins. Thus, the subtelomeric specialized chromatin domain organized by Sgo2 represses both transcription and replication to ensure proper gene expression and replication timing. PMID:26804021

  7. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Beneke, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose), the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor. PMID:22969794

  8. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-18

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (∼50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a 'buoy' to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination. PMID:25563431

  9. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  10. Chromatin Decondensation and Nuclear Softening Accompany Nanog Downregulation in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chalut, Kevin J.; Höpfler, Markus; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Boyde, Lars; Chan, Chii Jou; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Guck, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between epigenetic modification and chromatin compaction is implicated in the regulation of gene expression, and it comprises one of the most fascinating frontiers in cell biology. Although a complete picture is still lacking, it is generally accepted that the differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells is accompanied by a selective condensation into heterochromatin with concomitant gene silencing, leaving access only to lineage-specific genes in the euchromatin. ES cells have been reported to have less condensed chromatin, as they are capable of differentiating into any cell type. However, pluripotency itself—even prior to differentiation—is a split state comprising a naïve state and a state in which ES cells prime for differentiation. Here, we show that naïve ES cells decondense their chromatin in the course of downregulating the pluripotency marker Nanog before they initiate lineage commitment. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and histone modification analysis paired with a novel, to our knowledge, optical stretching method, to show that ES cells in the naïve state have a significantly stiffer nucleus that is coupled to a globally more condensed chromatin state. We link this biophysical phenotype to coinciding epigenetic differences, including histone methylation, and show a strong correlation of chromatin condensation and nuclear stiffness with the expression of Nanog. Besides having implications for transcriptional regulation and embryonic cell sorting and suggesting a putative mechanosensing mechanism, the physical differences point to a system-level regulatory role of chromatin in maintaining pluripotency in embryonic development. PMID:23200040

  11. Global quantitative modeling of chromatin factor interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the "chromatin codes") remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles--we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions. PMID:24675896

  12. The tethering of chromatin to the nuclear envelope supports nuclear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sarah M.; Koo, Peter K.; Zhao, Yao; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; King, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be the primary mechanical defence of the nucleus. However, the lamina is integrated within a network of lipids, proteins and chromatin; the interdependence of this network poses a challenge to defining the individual mechanical contributions of these components. Here, we isolate the role of chromatin in nuclear mechanics by using a system lacking lamins. Using novel imaging analyses, we observe that untethering chromatin from the inner nuclear membrane results in highly deformable nuclei in vivo, particularly in response to cytoskeletal forces. Using optical tweezers, we find that isolated nuclei lacking inner nuclear membrane tethers are less stiff than wild-type nuclei and exhibit increased chromatin flow, particularly in frequency ranges that recapitulate the kinetics of cytoskeletal dynamics. We suggest that modulating chromatin flow can define both transient and long-lived changes in nuclear shape that are biologically important and may be altered in disease. PMID:26074052

  13. Structural and functional genome analysis using extended chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Heaf, T.; Ward, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Highly extended linear chromatin fibers (ECFs) produced by detergent and high-salt lysis and stretching of nuclear chromatin across the surface of a glass slide can by hybridized over physical distances of at least several Mb. This allows long-range FISH analysis of the human genome with excellent DNA resolution (<10 kb/{mu}m). The insertion of Alu elements which are more than 50-fold underrepresented in centromeres can be seen within and near long tandem arrays of alpha-satellite DNA. Long tracts of trinucleotide repeats, i.e. (CCA){sub n}, can be localized within larger genomic regions. The combined application of BrdU incorporation and ECFs allows one to study the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA replication sites in finer detail. DNA synthesis occurs at multiple discrete sites within Mb arrays of alpha-satellite. Replicating DNA is tightly associated with the nuclear matrix and highly resistant to stretching out, while ECFs containing newly replicated DNA are easily released. Asynchrony in replication timing is accompanied by differences in condensation of homologous DNA segments. Extended chromatin reveals differential packaging of active and inactive DNA. Upon transcriptional inactivation by AMD, the normally compact rRNA genes become much more susceptible to decondensation procedures. By extending the chromatin from pachytene spermatocytes, meiotic pairing and genetic exchange between homologs can be visualized directly. Histone depletion by high salt and detergent produces loop chromatin surrounding the nuclear matrix in a halo-like fashion. DNA halos can be used to map nuclear matrix attachment sites in somatic cells and in mature sperm. Alpha-satellite containing DNA loops appear to be attached to the sperm-cell matrix by CENP-B boxes, short 17 bp sequences found in a subset of alpha satellite monomers. Sperm telomeres almost always appear as hybridization doublets, suggesting the presence of already replicated chromosome ends.

  14. Cytomixis doesn't induce obvious changes in chromatin modifications and programmed cell death in tobacco male meiocytes.

    PubMed

    Mursalimov, Sergey; Permyakova, Natalya; Deineko, Elena; Houben, Andreas; Demidov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Cytomixis is a poorly studied process of nuclear migration between plant cells. It is so far unknown what drives cytomixis and what is the functional state of the chromatin migrating between cells. Using immunostaining, we have analyzed the distribution of posttranslational histone modifications (methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation) that reflect the functional state of chromatin in the tobacco microsporocytes involved in cytomixis. We demonstrate that the chromatin in the cytomictic cells does not differ from the chromatin in intact microsporocytes according to all 14 analyzed histone modification types. We have also for the first time demonstrated that the migrating chromatin contains normal structures of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and lacks any signs of apoptosis. As has been shown, the chromatin migrating between cells in cytomixis is neither selectively heterochromatized nor degraded both before its migration to another cell and after it enters a recipient cell as micronuclei. We also showed that cytomictic chromatin contains marks typical for transcriptionally active chromatin as well as heterochromatin. Moreover, marks typical for chromosome condensation, SC formation and key proteins required for the formation of bivalents were also detected at migrated chromatin. PMID:26528310

  15. Histone H3 Acetylation and H3 K4 Methylation Define Distinct Chromatin Regions Permissive for Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunhong; Boyd, Douglas D.

    2006-01-01

    Histone modifications are associated with distinct transcription states and serve as heritable epigenetic markers for chromatin structure and function. While H3 K9 methylation defines condensed heterochromatin that is able to silence a nearby gene, how gene silencing within euchromatin regions is achieved remains elusive. We report here that histone H3 K4 methylation or K9/K14 acetylation defines distinct chromatin regions permissive or nonpermissive for transgene expression. A permissive chromatin region is enriched in H3 K4 methylation and H3 acetylation, while a nonpermissive region is poor in or depleted of these two histone modifications. The histone modification states of the permissive chromatin can spread to transgenic promoters. However, de novo histone H3 acetylation and H3 K4 methylation at a transgenic promoter in a nonpermissive chromatin region are stochastic, leading to variegated transgene expression. Moreover, nonpermissive chromatin progressively silences a transgene, an event that is accompanied by the reduction of H3 K4 methylation and H3 acetylation levels at the transgenic promoter. These repressive effects of nonpermissive chromatin cannot be completely countered by strong transcription activators, indicating the dominance of the chromatin effects. We therefore propose a model in which histone H3 acetylation and H3 K4 methylation localized to discrete sites in the mammalian genome mark distinct chromatin functions that dictate transgene expression or silencing. PMID:16914722

  16. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-01-01

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  17. Cytomixis doesn’t induce obvious changes in chromatin modifications and programmed cell death in tobacco male meiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mursalimov, Sergey; Permyakova, Natalya; Deineko, Elena; Houben, Andreas; Demidov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Cytomixis is a poorly studied process of nuclear migration between plant cells. It is so far unknown what drives cytomixis and what is the functional state of the chromatin migrating between cells. Using immunostaining, we have analyzed the distribution of posttranslational histone modifications (methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation) that reflect the functional state of chromatin in the tobacco microsporocytes involved in cytomixis. We demonstrate that the chromatin in the cytomictic cells does not differ from the chromatin in intact microsporocytes according to all 14 analyzed histone modification types. We have also for the first time demonstrated that the migrating chromatin contains normal structures of the synaptonemal complex (SC) and lacks any signs of apoptosis. As has been shown, the chromatin migrating between cells in cytomixis is neither selectively heterochromatized nor degraded both before its migration to another cell and after it enters a recipient cell as micronuclei. We also showed that cytomictic chromatin contains marks typical for transcriptionally active chromatin as well as heterochromatin. Moreover, marks typical for chromosome condensation, SC formation and key proteins required for the formation of bivalents were also detected at migrated chromatin. PMID:26528310

  18. Chromatin Structure Regulates Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, W. Jason; Yabuki, Munehisa; Ordinario, Ellen C; Bednarski, David W; Quay, Simon; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vλ pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205), expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vλ donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vλ array, and altered the outcome of Vλ diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences. PMID:17880262

  19. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  20. Implementation of non-condensable gases condensation suppression model into the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 LOCA safety evaluation code

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, J.; Cao, L.; Ohkawa, K.; Frepoli, C.

    2012-07-01

    The non-condensable gases condensation suppression model is important for a realistic LOCA safety analysis code. A condensation suppression model for direct contact condensation was previously developed by Westinghouse using first principles. The model is believed to be an accurate description of the direct contact condensation process in the presence of non-condensable gases. The Westinghouse condensation suppression model is further revised by applying a more physical model. The revised condensation suppression model is thus implemented into the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 LOCA safety evaluation code for both 3-D module (COBRA-TF) and 1-D module (TRAC-PF1). Parametric study using the revised Westinghouse condensation suppression model is conducted. Additionally, the performance of non-condensable gases condensation suppression model is examined in the ACHILLES (ISP-25) separate effects test and LOFT L2-5 (ISP-13) integral effects test. (authors)

  1. Transcription of fractionated mammalian chromatin by mammalian ribonucleic acid polymerase. Demonstration of temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites in euchromatin deoxyribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chesterton, C. James; Coupar, Barbara E. H.; Butterworth, Peter H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The chromatin fractionation method of Frenster et al. (1963) as modified by Leake et al. (1972) was used to prepare fragments of euchromatin from rat liver nuclei. These remain soluble in 5mm-MgCl2, and contain DNA of maximum mol.wt. 1×106–2×106. The fragments were separated from condensable chromatin on a sucrose gradient. Euchromatin contains endogenous DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and most of the nascent RNA labelled in vivo or in vitro. Euchromatin fragments allow initiation of transcription by added purified rat liver form-B RNA polymerase and contain temperature-dependent rifampicin-resistant initiation sites for the form-B enzyme. These findings indicate that transcription of the euchromatin regions of interphase chromosomes is not initiated in condensed chromatin, but is initiated within the euchromatin stretches. Condensable chromatin also contains most of these activities, but is not associated with nascent RNA. PMID:4464858

  2. Discovering Cooperative Relationships of Chromatin Modifications in Human T Cells Based on a Proposed Closeness Measure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbo; Wu, Xueting; Zhu, Jiang; Su, Jianzhong; Wang, Fang; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic transcription is accompanied by combinatorial chromatin modifications that serve as functional epigenetic markers. Composition of chromatin modifications specifies histone codes that regulate the associated gene. Discovering novel chromatin regulatory relationships are of general interest. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on the premise that the interaction of chromatin modifications is hypothesized to influence CpG methylation, we present a closeness measure to characterize the regulatory interactions of epigenomic features. The closeness measure is applied to genome-wide CpG methylation and histone modification datasets in human CD4+T cells to select a subset of potential features. To uncover epigenomic and genomic patterns, CpG loci are clustered into nine modules associated with distinct chromatin and genomic signatures based on terms of biological function. We then performed Bayesian network inference to uncover inherent regulatory relationships from the feature selected closeness measure profile and all nine module-specific profiles respectively. The global and module-specific network exhibits topological proximity and modularity. We found that the regulatory patterns of chromatin modifications differ significantly across modules and that distinct patterns are related to specific transcriptional levels and biological function. DNA methylation and genomic features are found to have little regulatory function. The regulatory relationships were partly validated by literature reviews. We also used partial correlation analysis in other cells to verify novel regulatory relationships. Conclusions/Significance The interactions among chromatin modifications and genomic elements characterized by a closeness measure help elucidate cooperative patterns of chromatin modification in transcriptional regulation and help decipher complex histone codes. PMID:21151929

  3. Regulation of DNA transposition by CpG methylation and chromatin structure in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of transposable elements can be regulated by different means. DNA CpG methylation is known to decrease or inhibit transpositional activity of diverse transposons. However, very surprisingly, it was previously shown that CpG methylation of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon significantly enhanced transposition in mouse embryonic stem cells. Results In order to investigate the unexpected response of SB transposition to CpG methylation, related transposons from the Tc1/mariner superfamily, that is, Tc1, Himar1, Hsmar1, Frog Prince (FP) and Minos were tested to see how transposition was affected by CpG methylation. A significant increase of >20-fold in transposition of SB, FP and Minos was seen, whereas Tc1, Himar1 and Hsmar1 showed no difference in transposition upon CpG-methylation. The terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the SB, FP and Minos elements share a common structure, in which each TIR contains two functionally important binding sites for the transposase (termed the IR/DR structure). The group of IR/DR elements showed increased excision after CpG methylation compared to untreated transposon donor plasmids. We found that de novo CpG methylation is not required for transposition. A mutated FP donor plasmid with depleted CpG sites in both TIRs was as efficient in transposition as the wild-type transposon, indicating that CpG sites inside the TIRs are not responsible for altered binding of factors potentially modulating transposition. By using an in vivo one-hybrid DNA-binding assay in cultured human cells we found that CpG methylation had no appreciable effect on the affinity of SB transposase to its binding sites. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that CpG-methylated transposon donor plasmids are associated with a condensed chromatin structure characterized by trimethylated histone H3K9. Finally, DNA compaction by protamine was found to enhance SB transposition. Conclusions We have shown that DNA CpG methylation

  4. In vitro chromatin templates to study nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqi

    2015-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA associates with histones and exists in the form of a chromatin hierarchy. Thus, it is generally believed that many eukaryotic cellular DNA processing events such as replication, transcription, recombination and DNA repair are influenced by the packaging of DNA into chromatin. This mini-review covers the current knowledge of DNA damage and repair in chromatin based on in vitro studies. Specifically, nucleosome assembly affects DNA damage formation in both random sequences and sequences with strong nucleosome-positioning signals such as 5S rDNA. At least three systems have been used to analyze the effect of nucleosome folding on nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro: (a) human cell extracts that have to rely on labeling of repair synthesis to monitor DNA repair, due to very low repair efficacy; (b) Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts, that have very robust DNA repair efficacy, have been utilized to follow direct removal of DNA damage; (c) six purified human DNA repair factors (RPA, XPA, XPC, TFIIH, XPG, and XPF-ERCC1) that have been used to reconstitute excision repair in vitro. In general, the results have shown that nucleosome folding inhibits NER and, therefore, its activity must be enhanced by chromatin remodeling factors like SWI/SNF. In addition, binding of transcription factors such as TFIIIA to the 5S rDNA promoter also modulates NER efficacy. PMID:26531320

  5. Evolution of histone 2A for chromatin compaction in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Macadangdang, Benjamin R; Oberai, Amit; Spektor, Tanya; Campos, Oscar A; Sheng, Fang; Carey, Michael F; Vogelauer, Maria; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-01-01

    During eukaryotic evolution, genome size has increased disproportionately to nuclear volume, necessitating greater degrees of chromatin compaction in higher eukaryotes, which have evolved several mechanisms for genome compaction. However, it is unknown whether histones themselves have evolved to regulate chromatin compaction. Analysis of histone sequences from 160 eukaryotes revealed that the H2A N-terminus has systematically acquired arginines as genomes expanded. Insertion of arginines into their evolutionarily conserved position in H2A of a small-genome organism increased linear compaction by as much as 40%, while their absence markedly diminished compaction in cells with large genomes. This effect was recapitulated in vitro with nucleosomal arrays using unmodified histones, indicating that the H2A N-terminus directly modulates the chromatin fiber likely through intra- and inter-nucleosomal arginine–DNA contacts to enable tighter nucleosomal packing. Our findings reveal a novel evolutionary mechanism for regulation of chromatin compaction and may explain the frequent mutations of the H2A N-terminus in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02792.001 PMID:24939988

  6. Chromatin Structure in Telomere Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Cacchione, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a specific nucleoprotein structure, the telomere, is required to ensure the protection of chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage sites. Telomere shortening below a critical length triggers a DNA damage response that leads to replicative senescence. In normal human somatic cells, characterized by telomere shortening with each cell division, telomere uncapping is a regulated process associated with cell turnover. Nevertheless, telomere dysfunction has also been associated with genomic instability, cell transformation, and cancer. Despite the essential role telomeres play in chromosome protection and in tumorigenesis, our knowledge of the chromatin structure involved in telomere maintenance is still limited. Here we review the recent findings on chromatin modifications associated with the dynamic changes of telomeres from protected to deprotected state and their role in telomere functions. PMID:23471416

  7. A chromatin perspective of adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Musri, Melina M; Gomis, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional cascade governing adipogenesis has been thoroughly examined throughout the years. Transcription factors PPARγ and C/EBPα are universally recognized as the master regulators of adipocyte differentiation and together they direct the establishment of the gene expression pattern of mature adipose cells. However, this familiar landscape has been considerably broadened in recent years by the identification of novel factors that participate in the regulation of adipogenesis, either favoring or inhibiting it, through their effects on chromatin. Epigenetic signals and chromatin-modifying proteins contribute to adipogenesis and, through regulation of the phenotypic maintenance of the mature adipocytes, to the control of metabolism. In this review we intend to summarize the recently described epigenetic events that participate in adipogenesis and their connections with the main factors that constitute the classical transcriptional cascade. PMID:20592861

  8. Residual chromatin breaks as biodosimetry for cell killing by carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Kase, Y; Nakano, T; Kanai, T; Ando, K

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between cell killing and the induction of residual chromatin breaks on various human cell lines and primary cultured cells obtained by biopsy from patients irradiated with either X-rays or heavy-ion beams to identify potential bio-marker of radiosensitivity for radiation-induced cell killing. The carbon-ion beams were accelerated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Six primary cultures obtained by biopsy from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were irradiated with two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/micrometer, 76 keV/micrometer) and 200kV X rays. Residual chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique after a 24 hour post-irradiation incubation period. The induction rate of residual chromatin breaks per cell per Gy was the highest for 76 keV/micrometer beams on all of the cells. Our results indicated that cell which was more sensitive to the cell killing was similarly more susceptible to induction of residual chromatin breaks. Furthermore there is a good correlation between these two end points in various cell lines and primary cultured cells. This suggests that the detection of residual chromatin breaks by the PCC technique may be useful as a predictive assay of tumor response to cancer radiotherapy. PMID:11542410

  9. Residual chromatin breaks as biodosimetry for cell killing by carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Kase, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kanai, T.; Ando, K.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the relationship between cell killing and the induction of residual chromatin breaks on various human cell lines and primary cultured cells obtained by biopsy from patients irradiated with either X-rays or heavy-ion beams to identify potential bio-marker of radiosensitivity for radiation-induced cell killing. The carbon-ion beams were accelerated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Six primary cultures obtained by biopsy from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were irradiated with two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/μm, 76 keV/μm) and 200kV X rays. Residual chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique after a 24 hour post-irradiation incubation period. The induction rate of residual chromatin breaks per cell per Gy was the highest for 76 keV/μm beams on all of the cells. Our results indicated that cell which was more sensitive to the cell killing was similarly more susceptible to induction of residual chromatin breaks. Furthermore there is a good correlation between these two end points in various cell lines and primary cultured cells. This suggests that the detection of residual chromatin breaks by the PCC technique may be useful as a predictive assay of tumor response to cancer radiotherapy.

  10. Three distinct stages of apoptotic nuclear condensation revealed by time-lapse imaging, biochemical and electron microscopy analysis of cell-free apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tone, Shigenobu Sugimoto, Kenji; Tanda, Kazue; Suda, Taiji; Uehira, Kenzo; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Samejima, Kumiko; Minatogawa, Yohsuke; Earnshaw, William C.

    2007-10-01

    During apoptotic execution, chromatin undergoes a phase change from a heterogeneous, genetically active network to an inert highly condensed form that is fragmented and packaged into apoptotic bodies. We have previously used a cell-free system to examine the roles of caspases or other proteases in apoptotic chromatin condensation and nuclear disassembly. But so far, the role of DNase activity or ATP hydrolysis in this system has not yet been elucidated. Here, in order to better define the stages of nuclear disassembly in apoptosis, we have characterized the apoptotic condensation using a cell-free system and time-lapse imaging. We demonstrated that the population of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in vitro appears to follow a reproducible program of nuclear condensation, suggesting the existence of an ordered biochemical pathway. This enabled us to define three stages of apoptotic chromatin condensation: stage 1 ring condensation; stage 2 necklace condensation; and stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. Electron microscopy revealed that neither chromatin nor detectable subnuclear structures were present inside the stage 1 ring-condensed structures. DNase activity was not essential for stage 1 ring condensation, which could occur in apoptotic extracts depleted of all detectable DNase activity. However, DNase(s) were required for stage 2 necklace condensation. Finally, we demonstrated that hydrolyzable ATP is required for stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. This requirement for ATP hydrolysis further distinguished stage 2 from stage 3. Together, these experiments provide the first steps towards a systematic biochemical characterization of chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

  11. Estimation of thermoelastic deformations in the near-surface layers of condensed media upon absorption of time-modulated laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratikov, K. L.

    2015-10-01

    Nonstationary thermoelastic deformation in the near-surface layers of condensed media are determined in the quasi-static approximation. The deformations are induced by the absorbed laser radiation. A 3D model is used to derive analytical expressions for normal and radial components of the deformation vector of the surface.

  12. Correlation among DNA Linker Length, Linker Histone Concentration, and Histone Tails in Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Luque, Antoni; Ozer, Gungor; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells condense their genetic material in the nucleus in the form of chromatin, a macromolecular complex made of DNA and multiple proteins. The structure of chromatin is intimately connected to the regulation of all eukaryotic organisms, from amoebas to humans, but its organization remains largely unknown. The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) and the concentration of linker histones (ρLH) are two structural parameters that vary among cell types and cell cycles; the NRL is the number of DNA basepairs wound around each nucleosome core plus the number of basepairs linking successive nucleosomes. Recent studies have found a linear empirical relationship between the variation of these two properties for different cells, but its underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we apply our established mesoscale chromatin model to explore the mechanisms responsible for this relationship, by investigating chromatin fibers as a function of NRL and ρLH combinations. We find that a threshold of linker histone concentration triggers the compaction of chromatin into well-formed 30-nm fibers; this critical value increases linearly with NRL, except for long NRLs, where the fibers remain disorganized. Remarkably, the interaction patterns between core histone tails and chromatin elements are highly sensitive to the NRL and ρLH combination, suggesting a molecular mechanism that could have a key role in regulating the structural state of the fibers in the cell. An estimate of the minimized work and volume associated with storage of chromatin fibers in the nucleus further suggests factors that could spontaneously regulate the NRL as a function of linker histone concentration. Both the tail interaction map and DNA packing considerations support the empirical NRL/ρLH relationship and offer a framework to interpret experiments for different chromatin conditions in the cell. PMID:27276249

  13. Active chromatin and transcription play a key role in chromosome partitioning into topologically associating domains

    PubMed Central

    Ulianov, Sergey V.; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Gavrilov, Alexey A.; Flyamer, Ilya M.; Kos, Pavel; Mikhaleva, Elena A.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Imakaev, Maxim V.; Chertovich, Alexander; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Shevelyov, Yuri Y.; Razin, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances enabled by the Hi-C technique have unraveled many principles of chromosomal folding that were subsequently linked to disease and gene regulation. In particular, Hi-C revealed that chromosomes of animals are organized into topologically associating domains (TADs), evolutionary conserved compact chromatin domains that influence gene expression. Mechanisms that underlie partitioning of the genome into TADs remain poorly understood. To explore principles of TAD folding in Drosophila melanogaster, we performed Hi-C and poly(A)+ RNA-seq in four cell lines of various origins (S2, Kc167, DmBG3-c2, and OSC). Contrary to previous studies, we find that regions between TADs (i.e., the inter-TADs and TAD boundaries) in Drosophila are only weakly enriched with the insulator protein dCTCF, while another insulator protein Su(Hw) is preferentially present within TADs. However, Drosophila inter-TADs harbor active chromatin and constitutively transcribed (housekeeping) genes. Accordingly, we find that binding of insulator proteins dCTCF and Su(Hw) predicts TAD boundaries much worse than active chromatin marks do. Interestingly, inter-TADs correspond to decompacted inter-bands of polytene chromosomes, whereas TADs mostly correspond to densely packed bands. Collectively, our results suggest that TADs are condensed chromatin domains depleted in active chromatin marks, separated by regions of active chromatin. We propose the mechanism of TAD self-assembly based on the ability of nucleosomes from inactive chromatin to aggregate, and lack of this ability in acetylated nucleosomal arrays. Finally, we test this hypothesis by polymer simulations and find that TAD partitioning may be explained by different modes of inter-nucleosomal interactions for active and inactive chromatin. PMID:26518482

  14. Macronuclear chromatin structure dynamics in Colpoda inflata (Protista, Ciliophora) resting encystment.

    PubMed

    Tiano, L; Chessa, M G; Carrara, S; Tagliafierro, G; Delmonte Corrado, M U

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin structure dynamics of the Colpoda inflata macronucleus have been investigated in relation to its functional condition, concerning chromatin body extrusion regulating activity. Samples of 2- and 25-day-old resting cysts derived from a standard culture, and of 1-year-old resting cysts derived from a senescent culture, were examined by means of histogram analysis performed on acquired optical microscopy images. Three groups of histograms were detected in each sample. Histogram classification, clustering and matching were assessed in order to obtain the mean histogram of each group. Comparative analysis of the mean histogram showed a similarity in the grey level range of 25-day- and 1-year-old cysts, unlike the wider grey level range found in 2-day-old cysts. Moreover, the respective mean histograms of the three cyst samples appeared rather similar in shape. All this implies that macronuclear chromatin structural features of 1-year-old cysts are common to both cyst standard cultures. The evaluation of the acquired images and their respective histograms evidenced a dynamic state of the macronuclear chromatin, appearing differently condensed in relation to the chromatin body extrusion regulating activity of the macronucleus. The coexistence of a chromatin-decondensed macronucleus with a pycnotic extrusion body suggests that chromatin unable to decondense, thus inactive, is extruded. This finding, along with the presence of chromatin structural features common to standard and senescent cyst populations, supports the occurrence of 'rejuvenated' cell lines from 1-year-old encysted senescent cells, a phenomenon which could be a result of accomplished macronuclear renewal. PMID:10439214

  15. Imaging of DNA/Nanosphere Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    DNA forms condensates in a variety of environments. In chromatin, DNA is condensed around 10-nm-diameter, positively-charged histone complexes. To model chromatin formation in cells, lambda-phage (16 microns long) and herring sperm (0.03 to1 micron) DNAs were mixed with polystyrene nanospheres of diameter 40nm and 930nm containing 1.8x10^4 and 2.6x10^8 positive surface charges, respectively, to form condensates. Sphere concentrations were 1-2 times the isoelectric concentration. Condensation vs time was imaged at various concentrations, pH's, viscosities, and ionic strengths. Bright-field and fluorescence (YOYO-1 dye bound to DNA) images were recorded. In general HS DNA aggregate size increased with time. Except in 0.5-0.8 M KCl, herring sperm DNA formed one huge aggregate (100's of microns) and depleted other areas, both in 10% and 20% glycerol. Phage DNA samples rapidly formed longer, fiber-like aggregates. Within 2 hours it formed ordered structures and in most samples, empty, apparently depleted regions were found in the viewing area. Shapes of the phage-DNA aggregates in 20% glycerol, in contrast, formed small clumps like HS DNA.

  16. Chromatibody, a novel non-invasive molecular tool to explore and manipulate chromatin in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Denis; Vignard, Julien; Fedor, Yoann; Béry, Nicolas; Olichon, Aurélien; Crozatier, Michèle; Erard, Monique; Cassard, Hervé; Ducommun, Bernard; Salles, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin function is involved in many cellular processes, its visualization or modification being essential in many developmental or cellular studies. Here, we present the characterization of chromatibody, a chromatin-binding single-domain, and explore its use in living cells. This non-intercalating tool specifically binds the heterodimer of H2A–H2B histones and displays a versatile reactivity, specifically labeling chromatin from yeast to mammals. We show that this genetically encoded probe, when fused to fluorescent proteins, allows non-invasive real-time chromatin imaging. Chromatibody is a dynamic chromatin probe that can be modulated. Finally, chromatibody is an efficient tool to target an enzymatic activity to the nucleosome, such as the DNA damage-dependent H2A ubiquitylation, which can modify this epigenetic mark at the scale of the genome and result in DNA damage signaling and repair defects. Taken together, these results identify chromatibody as a universal non-invasive tool for either in vivo chromatin imaging or to manipulate the chromatin landscape. PMID:27206857

  17. Identification of lamin B-regulated chromatin regions based on chromatin landscapes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobin; Kim, Youngjo; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-07-15

    Lamins, the major structural components of the nuclear lamina (NL) found beneath the nuclear envelope, are known to interact with most of the nuclear peripheral chromatin in metazoan cells. Although NL-chromatin associations correlate with a repressive chromatin state, the role of lamins in tethering chromatin to NL and how such tether influences gene expression have remained challenging to decipher. Studies suggest that NL proteins regulate chromatin in a context-dependent manner. Therefore understanding the context of chromatin states based on genomic features, including chromatin-NL interactions, is important to the study of lamins and other NL proteins. By modeling genome organization based on combinatorial patterns of chromatin association with lamin B1, core histone modification, and core and linker histone occupancy, we report six distinct large chromatin landscapes, referred to as histone lamin landscapes (HiLands)-red (R), -orange (O), -yellow (Y), -green (G), -blue (B), and -purple (P), in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). This HiLands model demarcates the previously mapped lamin-associated chromatin domains (LADs) into two HiLands, HiLands-B and HiLands-P, which are similar to facultative and constitutive heterochromatins, respectively. Deletion of B-type lamins in mESCs caused a reduced interaction between regions of HiLands-B and NL as measured by emerin-chromatin interaction. Our findings reveal the importance of analyzing specific chromatin types when studying the function of NL proteins in chromatin tether and regulation. PMID:25995381

  18. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  19. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity. PMID:25257534

  20. Application of the Protein Semisynthesis Strategy to the Generation of Modified Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Matthew; Muir, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are subject to a host of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that modulate chromatin structure and function. Such control is achieved by the direct alteration of the intrinsic physical properties of the chromatin fiber or by regulating the recruitment and activity of a host of trans-acting nuclear factors. The sheer number of histone PTMs presents a formidable barrier to understanding the molecular mechanisms at the heart of epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic genomes. One aspect of this multifarious problem, namely how to access homogeneously modified chromatin for biochemical studies, is well suited to the sensibilities of the organic chemist. Indeed, recent years have witnessed a critical role for synthetic protein chemistry methods in generating the raw materials needed for studying how histone PTMs regulate chromatin biochemistry. This review focuses on what is arguably the most powerful, and widely employed, of these chemical strategies, namely histone semisynthesis via the chemical ligation of peptide fragments. PMID:25784050

  1. Single cell correlation fractal dimension of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Récamier, Vincent; Izeddin, Ignacio; Bosanac, Lana; Dahan, Maxime; Proux, Florence; Darzacq, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a major nuclear component, and it is an active matter of debate to understand its different levels of spatial organization, as well as its implication in gene regulation. Measurements of nuclear chromatin compaction were recently used to understand how DNA is folded inside the nucleus and to detect cellular dysfunctions such as cancer. Super-resolution imaging opens new possibilities to measure chromatin organization in situ. Here, we performed a direct measure of chromatin compaction at the single cell level. We used histone H2B, one of the 4 core histone proteins forming the nucleosome, as a chromatin density marker. Using photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and adaptive optics, we measured the three-dimensional distribution of H2B with nanometric resolution. We computed the distribution of distances between every two points of the chromatin structure, namely the Ripley K(r) distribution. We found that the K(r) distribution of H2B followed a power law, leading to a precise measurement of the correlation fractal dimension of chromatin of 2.7. Moreover, using photoactivable GFP fused to H2B, we observed dynamic evolution of chromatin sub-regions compaction. As a result, the correlation fractal dimension of chromatin reported here can be interpreted as a dynamically maintained non-equilibrium state. PMID:24637833

  2. Open chromatin in pluripotency and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Meshorer, Eran; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can be derived from embryos or induced from adult cells by reprogramming. They are unique from any other stem cell in that they can give rise to all cell types of the body. Recent findings indicate that a particularly open chromatin state contributes to maintenance of pluripotency. Two emerging principles are that: specific factors maintain a globally open chromatin state that is accessible for transcriptional activation; and other chromatin regulators contribute locally to the silencing of lineage-specific genes until differentiation is triggered. These same principles may apply during reacquisition of an open chromatin state upon reprogramming to pluripotency, and during de-differentiation in cancer. PMID:21179060

  3. Epigenetic Regulation by ATP-Dependent Chromatin-Remodeling Enzymes: SNF-ing Out Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Runge, John S; Raab, Jesse R; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Cells utilize precise mechanisms to access genomic DNA with spatiotemporal accuracy. ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes (also known simply as "remodelers") comprise a specialized class of enzymes that is intimately involved in genomic organization and accessibility. Remodelers selectively position nucleosomes to either alleviate chromatin compaction or achieve genomic condensation locally, based on a multitude of cellular signals. By dictating nucleosome position, remodelers control local euchromatic and heterochromatic states. These activities govern the accessibility of regulatory regions like promoters and enhancers to transcription factors, RNA polymerases, and coactivators or -repressors. As studies unravel the complexities of epigenetic topography, evidence points to a chromatin-based interactome where regulators interact competitively, cooperatively, and/or codependently through physical and functional means. These types of interactions, or crosstalk, between remodelers raise important questions for tissue development. Here, we briefly review the evidence for remodeler interactions and argue for additional studies examining crosstalk. PMID:26969969

  4. Condensed-phase thermal decomposition of TATB investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Foltz, M.F.; Behrens, R. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A combination of techniques has been used to investigate the condensed-phase thermal decomposition of TATB. STMBMS has been used to identify the thermal decomposition products and their temporal correlation`s. These experiments have shown that the condensed-phase decomposition proceeds through several autocatalytic pathways. Both low and high molecular weight decomposition products have been identified. Mono-, di- and tri-furazans products have been identified and, their temporal behaviors are consistent with a stepwise loss of water. AFM has been used to correlate the decomposition chemistry with morphological changes occurring as a function of heating. Patches of small 25-140 nm round holes were observed throughout the lattice of TATB crystals that were heated briefly to 300C. It is likely that these holes show where decomposition reactions have started. Evidence of decomposition products have been seen in TATB that has been held at 250C for one hour.

  5. Identification of lamin B–regulated chromatin regions based on chromatin landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaobin; Kim, Youngjo; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Lamins, the major structural components of the nuclear lamina (NL) found beneath the nuclear envelope, are known to interact with most of the nuclear peripheral chromatin in metazoan cells. Although NL–chromatin associations correlate with a repressive chromatin state, the role of lamins in tethering chromatin to NL and how such tether influences gene expression have remained challenging to decipher. Studies suggest that NL proteins regulate chromatin in a context-dependent manner. Therefore understanding the context of chromatin states based on genomic features, including chromatin–NL interactions, is important to the study of lamins and other NL proteins. By modeling genome organization based on combinatorial patterns of chromatin association with lamin B1, core histone modification, and core and linker histone occupancy, we report six distinct large chromatin landscapes, referred to as histone lamin landscapes (HiLands)-red (R), -orange (O), -yellow (Y), -green (G), -blue (B), and -purple (P), in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). This HiLands model demarcates the previously mapped lamin-associated chromatin domains (LADs) into two HiLands, HiLands-B and HiLands-P, which are similar to facultative and constitutive heterochromatins, respectively. Deletion of B-type lamins in mESCs caused a reduced interaction between regions of HiLands-B and NL as measured by emerin–chromatin interaction. Our findings reveal the importance of analyzing specific chromatin types when studying the function of NL proteins in chromatin tether and regulation. PMID:25995381

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of sperm chromatin structure and DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Oldenhof, H; Schütze, S; Wolkers, W F; Sieme, H

    2016-05-01

    Sperm chromatin structure and condensation determine accessibility for damage, and hence success of fertilization and development. The aim of this study was to reveal characteristic spectral features coinciding with abnormal sperm chromatin packing (i.e., DNA-protein interactions) and decreased fertility, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Chromatin structure in spermatozoa obtained from different stallions was investigated. Furthermore, spermatozoa were exposed to oxidative stress, or treated with thiol-oxidizing and disulfide-reducing agents, to alter chromatin structure and packing. Spectroscopic studies were corroborated with flow cytometric analyses using the DNA-intercalating fluorescent dye acridine orange. Decreased fertility of individuals correlated with increased abnormal sperm morphology and decreased stability toward induced DNA damage. Treatment with the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol resulted in increased sperm chromatin decondensation and DNA accessibility, similar as found for less mature epididymal spermatozoa. In situ infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that characteristic bands arising from the DNA backbone (ν1230, ν1086, ν1051 cm(-1) ) changed in response to induced oxidative damage, water removal, and decondensation. This coincided with changes in the amide-I region (intensity at ν1620 vs. ν1640 cm(-1) ) denoting concomitant changes in protein secondary structure. Reduction in protein disulfide bonds resulted in a decreased value of the asymmetric to symmetric phosphate band intensity (ν1230/ν1086 cm(-1) ), suggesting that this band ratio is sensitive for the degree of chromatin condensation. Moreover, when analyzing spermatozoa from different individuals, it was found that the asymmetric/symmetric phosphate band ratio negatively correlated with the percentage of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa. PMID:26916383

  7. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Längst, Gernot; Manelyte, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development. PMID:26075616

  8. Structure, Assembly and Reading of Centromeric Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Paul S; Corbett, Kevin D; Desai, Arshad

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are epigenetically defined chromatin domains marked by the presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A. Here we review recent structural and biochemical work on CENP-A, and advances in understanding the mechanisms that propagate and read centromeric chromatin domains. PMID:22178421

  9. Single Chromatin Fiber Stretching Reveals Physically Distinct Populations of Disassembly Events

    PubMed Central

    Pope, L. H.; Bennink, M. L.; van Leijenhorst-Groener, K. A.; Nikova, D.; Greve, J.; Marko, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged into the cell nucleus as a nucleoprotein complex, chromatin. Despite this condensed state, access to the DNA sequence must occur during gene expression and other essential genetic events. Here we employ optical tweezers stretching of reconstituted chromatin fibers to investigate the release of DNA from its protein-bound structure. Analysis of fiber length increase per unbinding event revealed discrete values of ∼30 and ∼60 nm. Furthermore, a loading rate analysis of the disruption forces revealed three individual energy barriers. The heights of these barriers were found to be ∼20 kBT, ∼25 kBT, and ∼28 kBT. For subsequent stretches of the fiber it was found that events corresponding to the ∼28 kBT energy barrier were significantly reduced. No correlation between energy barrier crossed and DNA length release was found. These studies clearly demonstrate that optical tweezers stretching of chromatin provides insight into the energetic penalties imposed by chromatin structure. Furthermore these studies reveal possible pathways via which chromatin may be disrupted during genetic code access. PMID:15695630

  10. Organization of spacer DNA in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, D; Van Holde, K E

    1979-01-01

    Detailed analysis of the DNA fragment patterns produced by DNase I digestion of yeast, HeLa, and chicken erythrocyte nuclei reveals surprising features of nucleosome phasing. First, the spacer regions in phased yeast chromatin must be of lengths (10m + 5) base pairs, where m = 0, 1, 2,....This feature is not seen in parallel studies of chicken erythrocyte chromatin. The 5-base pair increment in the yeast spacer imposes interesting restraints on the higher order structure of yeast chromatin. Second, we have been able to simulate the DNase I cutting patterns and get good agreement with the observed yeast patterns. Third, three different chromatins show a long range periodicity in the DNase I digest pattern, with a period half that of the staphylococcal nuclease repeat. These results suggest that the amount of chromatin observed in discrete extended-ladder bands is a minimum estimate of phasing and in fact phasing may be a more general feature. Images PMID:392519

  11. Chromatin signaling in muscle stem cells: interpreting the regenerative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Arianna; Palacios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult occurs in response to damage at expenses of a population of adult stem cells, the satellite cells. Upon injury, either physical or genetic, signals released within the satellite cell niche lead to the commitment, expansion and differentiation of the pool of muscle progenitors to repair damaged muscle. To achieve this goal satellite cells undergo a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming to coordinately activate and repress specific subset of genes. Although the epigenetics of muscle regeneration has been extensively discussed, less emphasis has been put on how extra-cellular cues are translated into the specific chromatin reorganization necessary for progression through the myogenic program. In this review we will focus on how satellite cells sense the regenerative microenvironment in physiological and pathological circumstances, paying particular attention to the mechanism through which the external stimuli are transduced to the nucleus to modulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We will discuss the pathways involved and how alterations in this chromatin signaling may contribute to satellite cells dysfunction during aging and disease. PMID:25904863

  12. Effete, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with multiple roles in Drosophila development and chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Cipressa, Francesca; Cenci, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila effete gene encodes an extremely conserved class I E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. Growing evidence indicates that Eff is involved in many cellular processes including eye development, maintenance of female germline stem cells, and regulation of apoptosis. Eff is also a major component of Drosophila chromatin and it is particularly enriched in chromatin with repressive properties. In addition, Eff is required for telomere protection and to prevent telomere fusion. Consistent with its multiple roles in chromatin maintenance, Eff is also one of the rare factors that modulate both telomere-induced and heterochromatin-induced position effect variegation. PMID:24088712

  13. RBPJ, the Major Transcriptional Effector of Notch Signaling, Remains Associated with Chromatin throughout Mitosis, Suggesting a Role in Mitotic Bookmarking

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms that maintain transcriptional memory through cell division are important to maintain cell identity, and sequence-specific transcription factors that remain associated with mitotic chromatin are emerging as key players in transcriptional memory propagation. Here, we show that the major transcriptional effector of Notch signaling, RBPJ, is retained on mitotic chromatin, and that this mitotic chromatin association is mediated through the direct association of RBPJ with DNA. We further demonstrate that RBPJ binds directly to nucleosomal DNA in vitro, with a preference for sites close to the entry/exit position of the nucleosomal DNA. Genome-wide analysis in the murine embryonal-carcinoma cell line F9 revealed that roughly 60% of the sites occupied by RBPJ in asynchronous cells were also occupied in mitotic cells. Among them, we found that a fraction of RBPJ occupancy sites shifted between interphase and mitosis, suggesting that RBPJ can be retained on mitotic chromatin by sliding on DNA rather than disengaging from chromatin during mitotic chromatin condensation. We propose that RBPJ can function as a mitotic bookmark, marking genes for efficient transcriptional activation or repression upon mitotic exit. Strikingly, we found that sites of RBPJ occupancy were enriched for CTCF-binding motifs in addition to RBPJ-binding motifs, and that RBPJ and CTCF interact. Given that CTCF regulates transcription and bridges long-range chromatin interactions, our results raise the intriguing hypothesis that by collaborating with CTCF, RBPJ may participate in establishing chromatin domains and/or long-range chromatin interactions that could be propagated through cell division to maintain gene expression programs. PMID:24603501

  14. Beyond Transcription Factors: The Role of Chromatin Modifying Enzymes in Regulating Transcription Required for Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ruth M.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    One of the alluring aspects of examining chromatin modifications in the role of modulating transcription required for long-term memory processes is that these modifications may provide transient and potentially stable epigenetic marks in the service of activating and/or maintaining transcriptional processes. These, in turn, may ultimately…

  15. XNP/dATRX interacts with DREF in the chromatin to regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Velazquez, Oscar; Kawamori, Akihito; Vázquez, Martha; Neumann, Adina; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Zurita, Mario

    2012-02-01

    The ATRX gene encodes a chromatin remodeling protein that has two important domains, a helicase/ATPase domain and a domain composed of two zinc fingers called the ADD domain. The ADD domain binds to histone tails and has been proposed to mediate their binding to chromatin. The putative ATRX homolog in Drosophila (XNP/dATRX) has a conserved helicase/ATPase domain but lacks the ADD domain. In this study, we propose that XNP/dATRX interacts with other proteins with chromatin-binding domains to recognize specific regions of chromatin to regulate gene expression. We report a novel functional interaction between XNP/dATRX and the cell proliferation factor DREF in the expression of pannier (pnr). DREF binds to DNA-replication elements (DRE) at the pnr promoter to modulate pnr expression. XNP/dATRX interacts with DREF, and the contact between the two factors occurs at the DRE sites, resulting in transcriptional repression of pnr. The occupancy of XNP/dATRX at the DRE, depends on DNA binding of DREF at this site. Interestingly, XNP/dATRX regulates some, but not all of the genes modulated by DREF, suggesting a promoter-specific role of XNP/dATRX in gene regulation. This work establishes that XNP/dATRX directly contacts the transcriptional activator DREF in the chromatin to regulate gene expression. PMID:22021382

  16. XNP/dATRX interacts with DREF in the chromatin to regulate gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Velazquez, Oscar; Kawamori, Akihito; Vázquez, Martha; Neumann, Adina; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Zurita, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The ATRX gene encodes a chromatin remodeling protein that has two important domains, a helicase/ATPase domain and a domain composed of two zinc fingers called the ADD domain. The ADD domain binds to histone tails and has been proposed to mediate their binding to chromatin. The putative ATRX homolog in Drosophila (XNP/dATRX) has a conserved helicase/ATPase domain but lacks the ADD domain. In this study, we propose that XNP/dATRX interacts with other proteins with chromatin-binding domains to recognize specific regions of chromatin to regulate gene expression. We report a novel functional interaction between XNP/dATRX and the cell proliferation factor DREF in the expression of pannier (pnr). DREF binds to DNA-replication elements (DRE) at the pnr promoter to modulate pnr expression. XNP/dATRX interacts with DREF, and the contact between the two factors occurs at the DRE sites, resulting in transcriptional repression of pnr. The occupancy of XNP/dATRX at the DRE, depends on DNA binding of DREF at this site. Interestingly, XNP/dATRX regulates some, but not all of the genes modulated by DREF, suggesting a promoter-specific role of XNP/dATRX in gene regulation. This work establishes that XNP/dATRX directly contacts the transcriptional activator DREF in the chromatin to regulate gene expression. PMID:22021382

  17. Nucleosome structure in chromatin from heated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.; Winward, R.T.

    1980-12-01

    The effect of hyperthermia (40 to 80/sup 0/C) on the nucleosome structure of mammalian chromatin was determined using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. At equivalent fractional DNA digestion it was found that neither the size of DNA nor the total fraction of cellular DNA associated with nucleosome structure is altered by heat exposure up to 48/sup 0/C for 30 min. It is proposed that this heat-induced reduction in the accessibility to nuclease attack of DNA in chromatin from heated cells is due to the increased protein mass associated with chromatin.

  18. Diazinon alters sperm chromatin structure in mice by phosphorylating nuclear protamines

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@mail.cinvestav.mx

    2005-01-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, widely used in agriculture and pest control, are associated with male reproductive effects, including sperm chromatin alterations, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. The main toxic action of OP is related to phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical alterations in sperm nuclear proteins (protamines), which pack DNA during the last steps of spermatogenesis, contribute to male reproductive toxicity. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the ability of diazinon (DZN), an OP compound, to alter sperm chromatin by phosphorylating nuclear protamines. Mice were injected with a single dose of DZN (8.12 mg/kg, i.p.), and killed 8 and 15 days after treatment. Quality of sperm from epididymis and vas deferens was evaluated through standard methods and chromatin condensation by flow cytometry (DNA Fragmented Index parameters: DFI and DFI%) and fluorescence microscopy using chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3}). Increases in DFI (15%), DFI% (4.5-fold), and CMA{sub 3} (2-fold) were observed only at 8 days post-treatment, indicating an alteration in sperm chromatin condensation and DNA damage during late spermatid differentiation. In addition, an increase of phosphorous content (approximately 50%) in protamines, especially in the phosphoserine content (approximately 73%), was found at 8 days post-treatment. Sperm viability, motility, and morphology showed significant alterations at this time. These data strongly suggest that spermatozoa exposed during the late steps of maturation were the targets of DZN exposure. The correlation observed between the phosphorous content in nuclear protamines with DFI%, DFI, and CMA{sub 3} provides evidence that phosphorylation of nuclear protamines is involved in the OP effects on sperm chromatin.

  19. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  20. Chromatin defects in normal and malformed human ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa: a cytochemical ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; Cordeschi, G; Gabriele, A; Gianaroli, L; Properzi, G

    1996-03-01

    Cytochemical defects in chromatin were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after the staining by alcoholic phosphotungstic acid (PTA) of normal and malformed ejaculated spermatozoa from 35 male partners of infertile couples, and in six sperm samples retrieved from the caput epididymidis of men affected by obstructive azoospermia. PTA staining was also analysed in normal ejaculates of fertile men after incubation of the washed spermatozoa with dithiothreitol (DTT) to reduce disulfides to thiols, or with DTT followed by iodoacetamide, a blocking agent for thiol groups. PTA stained 63 (27-100)% of malformed heads and 25 (10-100)% of normal sperm heads (median (range) n = 35; P = 0.0001, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). The percentage of normal heads stained by PTA was negatively correlated with the percentage of heads of normal form, with condensed chromatin and a normal acrosome (Spearman r = 0.75; P = 0.0001), and positively correlated with the percentage of malformed heads after conventional TEM analysis (Spearman r 0.60; P = 0.0001). Staining with PTA in normal heads was not correlated with the presence of non-condensed chromatin in otherwise normal sperm heads evaluated by conventional TEM analysis. In spermatozoa recovered from the caput epididymidis, 15% of normal heads were stained with PTA, significantly fewer than in ejaculated sperm samples (P = 0.014). The reduction of disulfides to thiols was associated with PTA staining of all normal heads, and this was prevented by incubation with iodoacetamide. We conclude that PTA staining of the nuclei of human ejaculated spermatozoa may indicate a defect of chromatin condensation, owing to an excess of free thiol groups. The lower percentage of normal epididymal sperm heads that stained with PTA in cases of obstructive azoospermia compared with ejaculated sperm may be related to an overoxidation of thils owing to the ageing of spermatozoa. PMID:8699409

  1. Predictive Computational Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pierro, Miichele; Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter J.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    In vivo, the human genome folds into well-determined and conserved three-dimensional structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown. We report a theoretical model (MiChroM) for chromatin derived by using the maximum entropy principle. The proposed model allows Molecular Dynamics simulations of the genome using as input the classification of loci into chromatin types and the presence of binding sites of loop forming protein CTCF. The model was trained to reproduce the Hi-C map of chromosome 10 of human lymphoblastoid cells. With no additional tuning the model was able to predict accurately the Hi-C maps of chromosomes 1-22 for the same cell line. Simulations show unknotted chromosomes, phase separation of chromatin types and a preference of chromatin of type A to sit at the periphery of the chromosomes.

  2. Pulling chromatin apart: Unstacking or Unwrapping?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanical properties of chromatin is an essential step towards deciphering the physical rules of gene regulation. In the past ten years, many single molecule experiments have been carried out, and high resolution measurements of the chromatin fiber stiffness are now available. Simulations have been used in order to link those measurements with structural cues, but so far no clear agreement among different groups has been reached. Results We revisit here some of the most precise experimental results obtained with carefully reconstituted fibers. Conclusions We show that the mechanical properties of the chromatin fiber can be quantitatively accounted for by the stiffness of the DNA molecule and the 3D structure of the chromatin fiber. PMID:23186373

  3. Recruitment of Phosphorylated Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 to Chromatin after UV Irradiation of Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Emmanuelle; Roche, Danièle M.J.; Marheineke, Kathrin; Verreault, Alain; Almouzni, Geneviève

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and posttranslational modification of human chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) have been investigated after UV irradiation of HeLa cells. In an asynchronous cell population only a subfraction of the two large CAF-1 subunits, p150 and p60, were found to exist in a chromatin-associated fraction. This fraction is most abundant during S phase in nonirradiated cells and is much reduced in G2 cells. After UV irradiation, the chromatin-associated form of CAF-1 dramatically increased in all cells irrespective of their position in the cell cycle. Such chromatin recruitment resembles that seen for PCNA, a DNA replication and repair factor. The chromatin-associated fraction of p60 was predominantly hypophosphorylated in nonirradiated G2 cells. UV irradiation resulted in the rapid recruitment to chromatin of phosphorylated forms of the p60 subunit. Furthermore, the amount of the p60 and p150 subunits of CAF-1 associated with chromatin was a function of the dose of UV irradiation. Consistent with these in vivo observations, we found that the amount of CAF-1 required to stimulate nucleosome assembly during the repair of UV photoproducts in vitro depended upon both the number of lesions and the phosphorylation state of CAF-1. The recruitment of CAF-1 to chromatin in response to UV irradiation of human cells described here supports a physiological role for CAF-1 in linking chromatin assembly to DNA repair. PMID:9813080

  4. Probabilistic modelling of chromatin code landscape reveals functional diversity of enhancer-like chromatin states

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting the functional state of chromatin from the combinatorial binding patterns of chromatin factors, that is, the chromatin codes, is crucial for decoding the epigenetic state of the cell. Here we present a systematic map of Drosophila chromatin states derived from data-driven probabilistic modelling of dependencies between chromatin factors. Our model not only recapitulates enhancer-like chromatin states as indicated by widely used enhancer marks but also divides these states into three functionally distinct groups, of which only one specific group possesses active enhancer activity. Moreover, we discover a strong association between one specific enhancer state and RNA Polymerase II pausing, linking transcription regulatory potential and chromatin organization. We also observe that with the exception of long-intron genes, chromatin state transition positions in transcriptionally active genes align with an absolute distance to their corresponding transcription start site, regardless of gene length. Using our method, we provide a resource that helps elucidate the functional and spatial organization of the chromatin code landscape. PMID:26841971

  5. Chromatin Dynamics During DNA Replication and Uncharacterized Replication Factors determined by Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Bau; Kustatscher, Georg; Nakamura, Kyosuke; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Menard, Patrice; Mejlvang, Jakob; Rappsilber, Juri; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity-purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors like CAF-1, DNMT1, SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, while H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance. PMID:24561620

  6. Chromatin remodeling by nucleosome disassembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2006-02-28

    The RSC chromatin-remodeling complex completely disassembles a nucleosome in the presence of the histone chaperone Nap1 and ATP. Disassembly occurs in a stepwise manner, with the removal of H2A/H2B dimers, followed by the rest of the histones and the release of naked DNA. RSC and related chromatin-remodeling complexes may be responsible for the removal of promoter nucleosomes during transcriptional activation in vivo. PMID:16492771

  7. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes. PMID:26208520

  8. The ISW1 and CHD1 ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers compete to set nucleosome spacing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Josefina; Chereji, Răzvan V.; Eriksson, Peter R.; Clark, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeling machines play a central role in gene regulation by manipulating chromatin structure. Most genes have a nucleosome-depleted region at the promoter and an array of regularly spaced nucleosomes phased relative to the transcription start site. In vitro, the three known yeast nucleosome spacing enzymes (CHD1, ISW1 and ISW2) form arrays with different spacing. We used genome-wide nucleosome sequencing to determine whether these enzymes space nucleosomes differently in vivo. We find that CHD1 and ISW1 compete to set the spacing on most genes, such that CHD1 dominates genes with shorter spacing and ISW1 dominates genes with longer spacing. In contrast, ISW2 plays a minor role, limited to transcriptionally inactive genes. Heavily transcribed genes show weak phasing and extreme spacing, either very short or very long, and are depleted of linker histone (H1). Genes with longer spacing are enriched in H1, which directs chromatin folding. We propose that CHD1 directs short spacing, resulting in eviction of H1 and chromatin unfolding, whereas ISW1 directs longer spacing, allowing H1 to bind and condense the chromatin. Thus, competition between the two remodelers to set the spacing on each gene may result in a highly dynamic chromatin structure. PMID:26861626

  9. The ISW1 and CHD1 ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers compete to set nucleosome spacing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Josefina; Chereji, Răzvan V; Eriksson, Peter R; Clark, David J

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeling machines play a central role in gene regulation by manipulating chromatin structure. Most genes have a nucleosome-depleted region at the promoter and an array of regularly spaced nucleosomes phased relative to the transcription start site. In vitro, the three known yeast nucleosome spacing enzymes (CHD1, ISW1 and ISW2) form arrays with different spacing. We used genome-wide nucleosome sequencing to determine whether these enzymes space nucleosomes differently in vivo We find that CHD1 and ISW1 compete to set the spacing on most genes, such that CHD1 dominates genes with shorter spacing and ISW1 dominates genes with longer spacing. In contrast, ISW2 plays a minor role, limited to transcriptionally inactive genes. Heavily transcribed genes show weak phasing and extreme spacing, either very short or very long, and are depleted of linker histone (H1). Genes with longer spacing are enriched in H1, which directs chromatin folding. We propose that CHD1 directs short spacing, resulting in eviction of H1 and chromatin unfolding, whereas ISW1 directs longer spacing, allowing H1 to bind and condense the chromatin. Thus, competition between the two remodelers to set the spacing on each gene may result in a highly dynamic chromatin structure. PMID:26861626

  10. Phosphorylation of the Scc2 cohesin deposition complex subunit regulates chromosome condensation through cohesin integrity

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Julie; Hoffman, Matthew; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C.; Megee, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The cohesion of replicated sister chromatids promotes chromosome biorientation, gene regulation, DNA repair, and chromosome condensation. Cohesion is mediated by cohesin, which is deposited on chromosomes by a separate conserved loading complex composed of Scc2 and Scc4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although it is known to be required, the role of Scc2/Scc4 in cohesin deposition remains enigmatic. Scc2 is a phosphoprotein, although the functions of phosphorylation in deposition are unknown. We identified 11 phosphorylated residues in Scc2 by mass spectrometry. Mutants of SCC2 with substitutions that mimic constitutive phosphorylation retain normal Scc2–Scc4 interactions and chromatin association but exhibit decreased viability, sensitivity to genotoxic agents, and decreased stability of the Mcd1 cohesin subunit in mitotic cells. Cohesin association on chromosome arms, but not pericentromeric regions, is reduced in the phosphomimetic mutants but remains above a key threshold, as cohesion is only modestly perturbed. However, these scc2 phosphomimetic mutants exhibit dramatic chromosome condensation defects that are likely responsible for their high inviability. From these data, we conclude that normal Scc2 function requires modulation of its phosphorylation state and suggest that scc2 phosphomimetic mutants cause an increased incidence of abortive cohesin deposition events that result in compromised cohesin complex integrity and Mcd1 turnover. PMID:26354421