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Sample records for chromium 47

  1. Chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of chromium (Cr) on glucose and insulin metabolism are well documented. Normal dietary intake of Cr appears to be suboptimal because several studies have reported beneficial effects of Cr in people with elevated blood glucose or type 2 diabetes eating conventional diets. Stresses that ...

  2. Hexavalent Chromium Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing an updated IRIS assessment of hexavalent chromium. This assessment will evaluate the potential health effects of hexavalent chromium from oral and inhalation exposures. An important component of determining the cancer causing potential of ingested hexavalent chr...

  3. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  4. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  5. Chromium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and carbohydrates . It stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium also aids in insulin action and glucose metabolism.

  6. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  7. Dermatological toxicity of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Shelnutt, Susan R; Goad, Phillip; Belsito, Donald V

    2007-06-01

    Hexavalent chromium causes two types of dermatological toxicities: allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and skin ulcers. This report reviews the etiology, prevalence, pathology, dose-response, and prognosis of both of these reactions. Reports in the literature indicate that repeated exposure to hexavalent chromium in concentrations of 4-25 ppm can both induce sensitization and elicit chromium ACD. Exposure to 20 ppm hexavalent chromium can cause skin ulcers in nonsensitized people. The prevalence of chromium sensitivity in cement workers, exposed to 10-20 ppm hexavalent chromium for years, is approximately 4-5%. Chromium ACD can be a chronic debilitating disease, perhaps because chromium is ubiquitous in foods and in the environment and is difficult to avoid. Due to the high rates of sensitization in populations chronically exposed to chromium and the chronic nature of chromium ACD, some investigators recommend reducing the hexavalent chromiumconcentrations in consumer products, such as detergents, to less than 5 ppm. PMID:17612952

  8. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

  9. Sex hormones and semen quality in welders exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Bonde, J P; Ernst, E

    1992-07-01

    Recent experimental studies in rodents document the spermatotoxic effects of water-soluble hexavalent chromium. Welders comprise, worldwide, a major occupational group with acknowledged exposure to chromium. This study examines the relationship between semen quality and chromium in the urine and blood of a population of 30 tungsten inert gas (TIG) stainless steel welders, 30 mild steel welders and 47 non-welding workers. Each subject provided two to three semen samples. The chromium concentration ranged from 0.17 to 4.74 nmol mmol1 creatinine (median 1.08) in post-shift spot urine and from 6.0 to 46.4 nmol l-1 in blood. None of several semen parameters deteriorated with increasing level of internal exposure to chromium. Low-level exposure to hexavalent chromium associated with TIG stainless steel and mild steel welding do not appear to be a major hazard for human spermatogenesis. PMID:1354973

  10. Mineral of the month: chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papp, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Chromium is one of the most indispensable industrial metals and it plays an essential but hidden role in daily life. Chromium is used in many consumer and building products, and it contributes to a clean, efficient and healthy environment.

  11. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matrices while preserving its oxidation state. Typical recoveries are 90 to 105% in samples spiked with both trivalent and hexavalent chromium. Determination of hexavalent chromium after extraction with sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solution, coupled with the determination of total chromium after nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide digestion, has been applied to the evaluation of chromium speciation in airborne particulates, sludges, and biological tissues. PMID:1935842

  12. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  13. Chromium(VI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( VI ) ; CASRN 18540 - 29 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  14. Chromium and aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  15. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  16. AES XPS study of chromium carbides and chromium iron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of chromium rich carbides which precipitate at grain boundaries in steels is still not perfectly understood. We performed a multitechnique approach on model chromium carbide and chromium-iron carbide samples: Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED) were used to characterise the samples. Significant chemical shifts were observed for the Cr, Fe and C XPS peaks in the M 7C 3 compound (M stands for metal), indicating unambiguously that the compound formed is a mixed iron-chromium carbide.

  17. Bacterial reduction of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieman, E.A.; Yonge, D.R.; Johnstone, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    A mixed culture was enriched from surface soil obtained from an eastern United States site highly contaminated with chromate. Growth of the culture was inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Another mixed culture was enriched from subsurface soil obtained from the Hanford reservation, at the fringe of a chromate plume. The enrichment medium was minimal salts solution augmented with acetate as the carbon source, nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor, and various levels of chromate. This mixed culture exhibited chromate tolerance, but not chromate reduction capability, when growing anaerobically on this medium. However, this culture did exhibit chromate reduction capability when growing anaerobically on TSB. Growth of this culture was not inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Mixed cultures exhibited decreasing diversity with increasing levels of chromate in the enrichment medium. An in situ bioremediation strategy is suggested for chromate contaminated soil and groundwater. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Studies of chromium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Stratton, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions.

  19. Isotope shift in chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, B.; Jarosz, A.; Stefańska, D.; Dembczyński, J.; Stachowska, E.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-three spectral lines of chromium atom in the blue-violet region (425-465 nm) have been investigated with the method of laser-induced resonance fluorescence on an atomic beam. For all the lines, the isotope shifts for every pair of chromium isotopes have been determined. The lines can be divided into six groups, according to the configuration of the upper and lower levels. Electronic factors of the field shift and the specific mass shift ( Fik and MikSMS, respectively) have been evaluated and the values for each pure configuration involved have been determined. Comparison of the values Fik and MikSMS to the ab initio calculations results has been performed. The presence of crossed second order (CSO) effects has been observed.

  20. Hollow tin/chromium whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Li, James C. M.

    2010-05-01

    Tin whiskers have been an engineering challenge for over five decades. The mechanism has not been agreed upon thus far. This experiment aimed to identify a mechanism by applying compressive stresses to a tin film evaporated on silicon substrate with an adhesion layer of chromium in between. A phenomenon was observed in which hollow whiskers grew inside depleted areas. Using focused ion beam, the hollow whiskers were found to contain both tin and chromium. At the bottom of the depleted areas, thin tin/tin oxide film remained over the chromium layer. It indicates that tin transport occurred along the interface between tin and chromium layers.

  1. Anthropogenic Chromium Emissions in China from 1990 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×105t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×104t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  2. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  3. CHROMIUM, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABESITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suboptimal intakes of the essential nutrient, chromium, are characterized by elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL. These are also signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Improvements due to increased intake of chromium are related to the degr...

  4. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, C.

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  5. Hexavalent chromium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-04-12

    A monitor is provided for use in measuring the concentration of hexavalent chromium in a liquid, such as water. The monitor includes a sample cell, a light source, and a photodetector. The sample cell is in the form of a liquid-core waveguide, the sample cell defining an interior core and acting as a receiver for the liquid to be analyzed, the interior surface of the sample cell having a refractive index of less than 1.33. The light source is in communication with a first end of the sample cell for emitting radiation having a wavelength of about and between 350 to 390 nm into the interior core of the waveguide. The photodetector is in communication with a second end of the waveguide for measuring the absorption of the radiation emitted by the light source by the liquid in the sample cell. The monitor may also include a processor electronically coupled to the photodetector for receipt of an absorption signal to determine the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the liquid.

  6. Electrodialysis regeneration of chromium-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kizim, N.F.; Lar'kov, A.P.; Sharova, E.Yu.

    1987-10-10

    The authors describe a process based on a combination of electrodialysis and continuous ion exchange for the purification of chromium-containing waste water resulting from chromium plating processes and for the recovery and recycling of both the chromium and the water. Treatment and monitoring equipment is described and energy consumption scenarios are optimized for chromium removal efficiency.

  7. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects of chromium are also controversial, including DNA and chromosomal damage, reduction in CD8 lymphocyte levels and possible hypersensitivity reactions (ALVAL). The establishment of these issues and the measurement of chromium in biological fluids is the subject of this review. PMID:19461924

  8. Electron-irradiation damage in chromium nitrides and chromium oxynitride thin films.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, Christoph; Grogger, Werner; Wilhartitz, Peter; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to monitor changes of the N-K electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of chromium nitride layers (CrN) introduced by electron irradiation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). These changes are different for each sample material and seem to give an indication for a particular composition. The CrN samples (CrN and Cr(0.47)N(0.53)) were prepared on silicon wafers by reactive magnetron sputtering of a metallic chromium target in nitrogen plasma. In addition, a CrON sample (Cr(0.5)O(0.2)N(0.3)) was also investigated. This sample was prepared by the addition of oxygen to the plasma during film deposition. The ELNES of the N-K ionization edge of stoichiometric CrN shows a typical fine structure (peaks at 399.0 and 401.1 eV) and remains nearly unaffected even after high-current-density irradiation. On the other hand the N-K fine structures of Cr(0.47)N(0.53) and Cr(0.5)O(0.2)N(0.3) show a change of the ELNES with irradiation dose. This presumably arises from a 1s-pi*-transition of molecular nitrogen located at interstitial positions in these samples. PMID:16554164

  9. Chromium isotopes as indicators of hexavalent chromium reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas M.

    2012-03-20

    This is the final report for a university research project which advanced development of a new technology for identifying chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium contamination in groundwater systems. Reduction renders mobile and toxic hexavalent chromium immobile and less toxic. The new method uses stable isotope ratio measurements, which are made using multicollector ICP-mass spectrometry. The main objectives of this project were completed during the project period and two peer-reviewed articles were published to disseminate the information gained.

  10. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-09-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intact cultured cells is discussed, based upon our studies with antioxidants including vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), B2 (riboflavin), C (ascorbic acid), and so on. These studies appear to confirm the participation of paramagnetic Cr such as chromium(V) and Chromium(III) in chromium(VI)-induced cellular damage. PMID:7843124

  11. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C.; Silver, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a K{sub m} of 40 {mu}M CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  12. Biotreatment of chromium (VI) effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Tavares, T.; Neto, P.; Martins, C.

    1995-12-31

    The presence of heavy metals in industrial wastewaters is still a serious problem for some local small and medium size industries. Particularly electroplating and tanneries produce highly concentrated chromium effluents, which are treated by traditional physico-chemical processes. Those are able to reduce the total chromium concentration from some hundreds of mg.l{sup {minus}1} to very low concentrations, but the allowable final value of 0.1 mg.l{sup {minus}1} is hardly obtained as the referred processes become too costly for those small and medium size industries. The aim of these studies is the definition of an efficient system, economically attractive and friendly to the environment, based on the ability of some microorganisms to concentrate heavy metals. This system would be used as a final treatment step to remove low concentrations of hexavalent chromium. Three different bacteria were used in batch systems to evaluate their resistance to Cr(VI) and their ability to reduce it to the trivalent form. The results were compared with those obtained with microorganisms isolated from sludge of treatment plants receiving wastewater loaded with chromium. One of those bacteria was supported on granular activated carbon and the biofilm was optimized in terms of adhesion and removal efficiency. The chromium adsorption capacity of the support was also studied as albeit it is known that adsorption is not used for heavy metals removal, granular activated carbon is an excellent immobilization support for the biofilm and certainly has some responsibility on the chromium fixation process.

  13. Evaluation of aquatic toxicities of chromium and chromium-containing effluents in reference to chromium electroplating industries.

    PubMed

    Baral, A; Engelken, R; Stephens, W; Farris, J; Hannigan, R

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated aquatic toxicities of chromium and chromium-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, and compared the aquatic environmental risks of hexavalent and trivalent chromium electroplating operations. Trivalent chromium electroplating has emerged as an acceptable alternative to hazardous hexavalent chromium electroplating. This process substitution has reduced the human health impact in the workplace and minimized the production of hazardous sludge regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The thrust behind this research was to investigate whether trivalent chromium electroplating operations have lower adverse impacts on standardized toxicity test organisms. Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas were used to investigate toxicities of trivalent chromium (Cr (III)), hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)), and industrial effluents. In agreement with previous studies, Cr (III) was found to be less toxic than Cr (VI). Despite having several organic and inorganic constituents in the effluents obtained from trivalent chromium plating baths, they exhibited less adverse effects to C. dubia than effluents obtained from hexavalent chromium electroplating baths. Thus, transition from hexavalent to trivalent chromium electroplating processes may be justified. However, because of the presence of organic constituents such as formate, oxalate, and triethylene glycol in effluents, trivalent chromium electroplating operations may face additional regulatory requirements for removal of total organic carbon. PMID:16418891

  14. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  16. Diffusion of Chromium in Alpha Cobalt-Chromium Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeton, John W

    1951-01-01

    Diffusion of chromium in cobalt-chromium solid solutions was investigated in the range 0 to 40 atomic percent at temperatures of 1360 degrees, 1300 degrees, 1150 degrees, and 10000 degrees c. The diffusion coefficients were found to be relatively constant within the composition range covered by each specimen. The activation heat of diffusion was determined to be 63,000 calories per mole. This value agrees closely with the value of 63,400 calories per mole calculated by means of the Dushman-Langmuir equation.

  17. Carcinogen risk assessment of chromium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gibb, H.J.; Chen, C.W.; Hiremath, C.B.

    1988-06-01

    Hexavalent chromium has been identified as a human carcinogen. Evidence to support this contention derives from epidemiologic, animal, and genotoxicity studies. Although workers exposed to both trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been shown to be at an excess risk of respiratory cancer, only hexavalent chromium has been shown to be carcinogenic in animals. Both hexavalent and trivalent chromium have been shown to be mutagenic, but the evidence for hexavalent chromium is somewhat stronger than that for trivalent chromium. The quantitative estimation of the cancer risk due to hexavalent chromium in the ambient air is calculated on the basis of lung-cancer mortality data for chromate production workers. The lifetime respiratory cancer risk due to 1 microgram/cu m) of hexavalent chromium in the ambient air is estimated to be 1.2 x .002 on the basis of Mancuso's data and 9.4 x .003 on the basis of the Braver et al. data.

  18. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  19. Precipitating Chromium Impurities in Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new treatments for silicon wafers improve solar-cell conversion efficiency by precipitating electrically-active chromium impurities. One method is simple heat treatment. Other involves laser-induced damage followed by similar heat treatment. Chromium is one impurity of concern in metallurgical-grade silicon for solar cells. In new treatment, chromium active centers are made electrically inactive by precipitating chromium from solid solution, enabling use of lower grade, lower cost silicon in cell manufacture.

  20. Turkey liver - a chromium enriched food source

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, M.M.; Bryden, N.A.; Richards, M.; Anderson, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    There are presently no known foods for humans that are particularly good sources of chromium. As a means of obtaining Cr enriched foods, turkeys were fed diets containing various levels of supplemental chromium. Four groups of 6-month old turkey hens were fed either the basal diet for laying hens or this diet supplemented with 25, 100 or 200 ..mu..g of chromium as chromium chloride per g of diet. Liver Cr concentration of the turkeys sacrificed after 1 week increased from 7 ng/g (wet wt) while consuming the basal diet to 15, 48 and 68 ng/g, respectively, while consuming the diets with supplemental chromium. Comparable values for the turkeys sacrificed after 5 weeks were 2, 43, 170 and 325 ng/g. Similar trends but higher chromium values were observed for kidney samples. The chromium contents of the dark and white meat and eggs were not altered significantly. Chromium concentrations of the pancreas, gizzard and heart increased marginally; final chromium concentrations were less than 23 ng/g even after 5 weeks on the highest level of supplemental chromium. Chromium content of spleen and lungs was approximately 2-fold higher than that of the pancreas, gizzard or heart. Therefore, turkey liver is a food source suitable for Cr enrichment while the eggs, dark and white meat and other edible parts do not appear to be enriched following chromium supplementation.

  1. Cytogenetic effects of hexavalent chromium in Bulgarian chromium platers.

    PubMed

    Benova, Donka; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hristova, Rossitza; Nikolova, Teodora; Boulanova, Minka; Georgieva, Ivanka; Grigorova, Mira; Popov, Todor; Panev, Teodor; Georgieva, Rossitza; Natarajan, Adayapalam T; Darroudi, Firouz; Nilsson, Robert

    2002-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in vivo in exposed Bulgarian chromium platers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes and exfoliated buccal cells. No significant difference was observed between the exposed workers and the controls with regard to the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations (CAs) using conventional Giemsa staining and in the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). However, there was a significant increase in the number of cells with micronuclei (MN) in peripheral lymphocytes from chromium exposed workers as compared to the controls. In the buccal cells from these workers, this increase was even more pronounced. Cytosine arabinoside (AraC), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and repair, was found to significantly increase the levels of MN in vitro in the lymphocytes of both groups. The increase was more expressed in the lymphocytes of chromium exposed workers. Both centromere positive (C(+)) as well as centromere negative (C(-)) MN were observed by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in both of the cell types studied. No difference between C(+) and C(-) MN frequencies was found in the lymphocytes as well as in the buccal cells. Thus, Cr(VI) appears to have both clastogenic as well as aneugenic effects in humans. PMID:11815242

  2. Chromium content of selected Greek foods.

    PubMed

    Bratakos, Michael S; Lazos, Evangelos S; Bratakos, Sotirios M

    2002-05-01

    The total chromium content of a wide variety of Greek foods was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Meat, fish and seafood, cereals and pulses were rich sources of chromium (>0.100 microg/g). Fruits, milk, oils and fats and sugar were poor sources. Differences in chromium content were found between different food classes from Greece and those from some other countries. Based on available food consumption data and chromium levels in this study, it was estimated that the chromium intake of Greeks is 143 microg/day, with vegetables, cereals and meat being the main contributors. PMID:12083715

  3. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  4. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  5. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  6. Electrodeposition of cobalt-chromium alloy from trivalent chromium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dasarathy, H.; Riley, C.; Coble, H.D. . Dept. of Chemistry and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy was deposited from plating solutions containing cobalt(II) chloride and chromium(III) chloride at 3.5 pH. The deposits were obtained using both single and mixed complex solutions. Deposit morphology showed significant dependence on the complexing agent(s) used. Partitioning of the two components in the deposit as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy depended on plating parameters such as concentration ratio of the two salts in the solution, complexing agent, type of current (both dc and pulsed current were studied), and current density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra collected from as-deposited alloy revealed the presence of both oxides and metals. X-ray diffraction spectra for the alloy deposit indicated solid solution formation.

  7. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges.

    PubMed

    Andreola, F; Barbieri, L; Bondioli, F; Cannio, M; Ferrari, A M; Lancellotti, I

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr(0.04)Sn(0.97)SiO(5) and green Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3) were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr(2)O(3). The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr(2)O(3). PMID:18289775

  8. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  9. Food Chromium Contents, Chromium Dietary Intakes And Related Biological Variables In French Free-Living Elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromium (Cr III), an essential trace element, functions in potentiating insulin sensitivity, regulating glucose homeostasis, improving lipid profile, and maintaining lean body mass. Glucose intolerance and chromium deficiency increase with age, and could be aggravating factors of the metabolic synd...

  10. CARCINOGEN RISK ASSESSMENT OF CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexavalent chromium has been identified as a human carcinogen. Evidence to support this contention derives from epidemiologic, animal, and genotoxicity studies. Although workers exposed to both trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been shown to be at an excess risk of respirato...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope....

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1910.1026 Section 1910.1026 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1126 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This...

  14. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  15. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  16. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  17. Chromium

    MedlinePlus

    ... the research to date is inconclusive. No large, randomized, controlled clinical trials testing this hypothesis have been ... risk of developing the disease. A review of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluated this hypothesis [ 35 ]. This ...

  18. [Examination of nickel and chromium contents in selected herbs, herbal fruit teas and their infusions].

    PubMed

    Błoniarz, Jadwiga; Zareba, Stanisław; Rahnama, Mansur

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the contents of nickel and chromium (the trace elements that are necessary for the human organism only in specified amounts) in selected dry herbs, herbal-fruit teas and their water extracts. This examination was expected to answer the question whether infusions or decoctions may constitute the additional source of these elements, or whether the amounts of nickel and chromium included in them may be dangerous for the human organism. The samples were dry mineralized at the temperature of 450 degrees C. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was performed using SOLAAR M5 appliance produced by a US-based Thermo Elemental company; nickel contents were determined from the organic phase, and chromium directly from the mineralisate. Nickel contents ranged on average from 0.56 microg/g to 2.68 microg/g in herbs and from 0.99 microg/g to 1.70 microg/g in herbal fruit teas. On average 40.0% to 82.5% of the amount present in dry, raw material passed into the infusions. The determined amounts of chromium ranged from 0.57 microg/g to 1.36 microg/g in herbs, and from 0.47 microg/g to 1.17 microg/g in herbal fruit teas (average values). The maximum extraction of this element into the infusion or decoction equaled 85.0%. The contents of nickel and chromium in the examined dry herb samples were comparable to results obtained by authors of the other papers. Infusions or decoctions of the examined herbs and herbal fruit teas contain the amounts of these elements that do not harm health and may constitute an additional source of nickel and chromium for the human organism. PMID:15682946

  19. Trivalent chromium electrolyte and process employing reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.W.

    1984-10-16

    An aqueous acidic trivalent chromium electrolyte and process for electrodepositing chromium platings comprising an electrolyte containing trivalent chromium ions, a complexing agent, halide ions, ammonium ions and a reducing agent comprising an ion selected from the group consisting of scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, molybdenum, arsenic, selenium, tellurium, cerium, uranium, and tin present in an amount effective to maintain the concentration of hexavalent chromium ions formed in the bath at a level at which satisfactory chromium electrodeposits are obtained.

  20. Occupational asthma due to chromium.

    PubMed

    Leroyer, C; Dewitte, J D; Bassanets, A; Boutoux, M; Daniel, C; Clavier, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 28-year-old subject employed as a roofer in a construction company since the age of 19, who developed work-related symptoms of a cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, rhinitis and headaches. A description of a usual day at work suggested that the symptoms worsened while he was sawing corrugated fiber cement. Baseline spirometry was normal, and there was a mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. A skin patch test to chromium was negative. A specific inhalation challenge showed a boderline fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after exposure to fiber cement dust. Exposure to nebulization of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), at 0.1 mg.ml-1 for 30 min, was followed by an immediate fall by 20% FEV1. Simultaneously, a significant increase in bronchial hyperresponsiveness was demonstrated. PMID:9782225

  1. Potential of Live Spirulina platensis on Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium and Its Conversion to Trivalent Chromium.

    PubMed

    Colla, Luciane Maria; Dal'Magro, Clinei; De Rossi, Andreia; Thomé, Antônio; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalga biomass has been described worldwide according their capacity to realize biosorption of toxic metals. Chromium is one of the most toxic metals that could contaminate superficial and underground water. Considering the importance of Spirulina biomass in production of supplements for humans and for animal feed we assessed the biosorption of hexavalent chromium by living Spirulina platensis and its capacity to convert hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium, less toxic, through its metabolism during growth. The active biomass was grown in Zarrouk medium diluted to 50% with distilled water, keeping the experiments under controlled conditions of aeration, temperature of 30°C and lighting of 1,800 lux. Hexavalent chromium was added using a potassium dichromate solution in fed-batch mode with the aim of evaluate the effect of several additions contaminant in the kinetic parameters of the culture. Cell growth was affected by the presence of chromium added at the beginning of cultures, and the best growth rates were obtained at lower metal concentrations in the medium. The biomass removed until 65.2% of hexavalent chromium added to the media, being 90.4% converted into trivalent chromium in the media and 9.6% retained in the biomass as trivalent chromium (0.931 mg.g(-1)). PMID:25436450

  2. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M J; Ravenscroft, J E

    1996-03-01

    The development of an analytical technique is described which may be used to determine chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in estuarine and coastal waters. The method is based on selective micro-solvent extraction with subsequent GFAAS. The technique has been applied in a major North Sea estuary. The results obtained confirm that thermodynamic factors alone cannot be relied upon to describe the form of chromium in estuaries. Kinetic factors appear to have a strong influence over speciation and lead to the persistence of Cr(III) species in environments where Cr(VI) would be expected to be present. PMID:15067453

  3. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about one quadrillon atoms cu cm of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200 C to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon mateial.

  4. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  5. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    DOEpatents

    Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Salama, Amal M.

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

  6. Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Takeyoshi; Yoshii, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Kohzo

    2007-02-02

    Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility.

  7. Attenuation of chromium toxicity by bioremediation technology.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chromium is an important toxic environmental pollutant. Chromium pollution results largely from industrial activities, but other natural and anthropogenic sources also contribute to the problem. Plants that are exposed to environmental contamination by chromium are affected in diverse ways, including a tendency to suffer metabolic stress. The stress imposed by Cr exposure also extends to oxidative metabolic stress in plants that leads to the generation of active toxic oxygen free radicals. Such active free radicals degrade essential biomolecules and distort plant biological membranes. In this chapter, we describe sources of environmental chromium contamination, and provide information about the toxic impact of chromium on plant growth and metabolism. In addition, we address different phytoremediation processes that are being studied for use worldwide, in contaminated regions, to address and mitigate Cr pollution. There has been a long history of attempts to successfully mitigate the toxic effects of chromium-contaminated soil on plants and other organisms. One common approach, the shifting of polluted soil to landfills, is expensive and imposes environmental risks and health hazards of its own. Therefore, alternative eco-friendly bioremediation approaches are much in demand for cleaning chromium-polluted areas. To achieve its cleaning effects, bioremediation utilizes living organisms (bacteria, algae, fungi, and plants) that are capable of absorbing and processing chromium residues in ways which amend or eliminate it. Phytoremediation (bioremediation with plants) techniques are increasingly being used to reduce heavy metal contamination and to minimize the hazards of heavy metal toxicity. To achieve this, several processes, viz., rhizofiltration, phytoextraction, phytodetoxification, phytostabilization, and phytovolatilization, have been developed and are showing utility in practice, or promise. Sources of new native hyperaccumulator plants for use at contaminated

  8. Electrodeposition of microcrystalline chromium from fused salts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, T.; Varma, R.; Brown, A.

    1987-01-01

    Chromium can be conveniently electroplated from fused chloride electrolytes. The deposition from LiCl-KCl (eutectic)-CrCl/sub 2/ melts is known to produce large crystal grains. Large grain size and other problems encountered in the electrodeposition of microcrystalline chromium from fused salt are discussed. The results indicate that combined use of forced electrolyte convection and a nucleating pulse in conjunction with a periodic reverse pulse produces fine-grained deposits.

  9. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  10. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated. PMID:25705745

  11. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  12. The First Chromium-53 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra of Diamagnetic Chromium(0) and Chromium(VI) Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, David L.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.

    2001-01-01

    Chromium-53 is a spin-3/2 nucleus with a relatively small magnetic moment, low natural abundance, and large quadrupole moment. These properties have severely hampered the development of 53Cr NMR, especially in the solid state. In this Communication, the first 53Cr solid-state NMR spectra of prototypal diamagnetic chromium(0) and chromium(VI) compounds are presented. Specifically, analyses of 53Cr NMR spectra of solid hexacarbonylchromium(0), caesium chromate(VI), and potassium chromate(VI) have allowed for the determination of 53Cr quadrupolar coupling parameters and the first chromium chemical shift (CS) tensors. This work demonstrates the potential of 53Cr solid-state NMR, in particular the extreme sensitivity of the 53Cr quadrupolar coupling constant to the local chromium environment. Comparisons are made to known 53Cr NMR parameters available from solution studies, and to the 95Mo solid-state NMR parameters of analogous molybdenum compounds. The influence of crystal symmetry present in isomorphic Cr(CO)6 and Mo(CO)6 is strongly reflected in the magnitudes of the metal nuclei CS tensors and in their orientation with respect to their corresponding electric field gradient tensors.

  13. Production of Chromium Oxide from Turkish Chromite Concentrate Using Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, S.; Eyuboglu, C.; Morcali, M. H.; Özbey, S.; Sucuoglu, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the possibility of chromium extraction from Turkish chromite concentrate and the production of chromium oxide were investigated. For the conversion of chromium(III) into chromium(VI), NaOH was employed, as well as air with a rate of 20 L/min. The effects of the base amount, fusing temperature, and fusing time on the chromium conversion percentage were investigated in detail. The conversion kinetics of chromium(III) to chromium(VI) was also undertaken. Following the steps of dissolving the sodium chromate in water and filtering, aluminum hydroxide was precipitated by adjusting the pH level of the solution. The chromium(VI) solution was subsequently converted to Cr(III) by the combination of sulfuric acid and ethanol. Interestingly, it was observed that ethanol precipitated chromium as chromium(VI) at mildly acidic pH levels, although this effect is more pronounced for K2Cr2O7 than Na2Cr2O7. On the other hand, in the strongly acidic regime, ethanol acted as a reducing agent role in that chromium(VI) was converted into Cr(III) whereas ethanol itself was oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. Subsequently, chromium hydroxide was obtained by the help of sodium hydroxide and converted to chromium oxide by heating at 800 °C, as indicated in thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA).

  14. Chromium Recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papp, John F.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the extent to which chromium was recycled in the United States in 1998 and to identify chromium-recycling trends. The major use of chromium was in the metallurgical industry to make stainless steel; substantially less chromium was used in the refractory and chemical industries. In this study, the only chromium recycling reported was that which was a part of stainless steel scrap reuse. In 1998, 20 percent of the U.S. apparent consumption of chromium was secondary (from recycling); the remaining 80 percent was based on net chromium commodity imports and stock adjustments. Chromite ore was not mined in the United States in 1998. In 1998, 75,300 metric tons (t) of chromium contained in old scrap was consumed in the United States; it was valued at $66.4 million. Old scrap generated contained 132,000 t of chromium. The old scrap recycling efficiency was 87 percent, and the recycling rate was 20 percent. About 18,000 t of chromium in old scrap was unrecovered. New scrap consumed contained 28,600 t of chromium, which yielded a new-to-old-scrap ratio of 28:72. U.S. chromium-bearing stainless steel scrap net exports were valued at $154 million and were estimated to have contained 41,000 t of chromium.

  15. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

    1991-01-18

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    PubMed

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. PMID:26325053

  17. NONCARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF CHROMIUM: UPDATE TO HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 1990 document updates the 1984 Health Assessment Document for Chromium by addressing issues regarding noncarcinogenic health effects of chromium: oxidation states and persistence of these states in the environment, sampling and analytical methodology to differentiate these o...

  18. High-temperature creep of polycrystalline chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Klopp, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    The creep properties of high-purity, polycrystalline chromium were determined over the temperature range 0.51 to 0.78 T sub m, where T sub m is the melting temperature. Creep rates determined from step-load creep tests can be represented by the general creep equation; epsilon/D = k((sigma/E) to the nth power) where epsilon is the minimum creep rate, D is the diffusivity, k is the creep rate constant, sigma is the applied stress, E is the modulus, and n is the stress exponent, equal to 4.3 for chromium. This correlation and metallographic observations suggest a dislocation climb mechanism is operative in the creep of chromium over the temperature range investigated.

  19. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esat, T. M.; Ireland, T. R.

    1989-02-01

    The abundances of chromium isotopes, in refractory inclusions from the Allende meteorite, show wide-spread anomalies. The chromium isotope anomalies are similar in pattern to the anomalies discovered in Ca and Ti. The largest effects occur at the neutron-rich isotopes Ca-48, Ti-50 and Cr-54. Individual Cr-rich pink spinels, from the Murchison meteorite, exhibit large and variable excesses in Cr-53 and Cr-54 including the largest Cr-53 anomaly so far reported. Magnesium isotopes, in Murchison Cr-poor blue spinels, also show variable anomalies in Mg-26 including mass-dependent fractionation favoring the lighter isotopes. The Cr-53, Cr-54 and Mg-26 anomalies in Murchison spinels are indicative of a heterogeneous distribution of magnesium and chromium isotopes in the early solar nebula and require a contribution from several nucleosynthetic components in addition to physicochemical processing.

  20. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    PubMed

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  1. SAFETY OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM COMPLEXES USED IN NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxicity studies regarding trivalent chromium have often been completed under conditions that are not designed to reflect conditions that would be encountered under normal physiological conditions. We have shown that the incorporation of chromium into tissues of rats from chromium chloride and chro...

  2. REVIEWS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS: III. CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of the scientific literature on the biological and environmental effects of chromium. Included in the review are a general summary and a comprehensive discussion of the following topics as related to chromium and specific chromium compounds: physical and ch...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  8. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.223-7008 Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium. As prescribed in 223.7306, use the following clause: Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium (JUN 2013) (a) Definitions. As used...

  9. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.223-7008 Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium. As prescribed in 223.7306, use the following clause: Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium (MAY 2011) (a) Definitions. As used...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  11. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  12. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  13. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.223-7008 Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium. As prescribed in 223.7306, use the following clause: Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium (MAY 2011) (a) Definitions. As used...

  14. Effects of exercise on chromium levels. Is supplementation required?

    PubMed

    Clarkson, P M

    1997-06-01

    It is estimated that most individuals are not ingesting sufficient amounts of chromium in their diets. Although there is little information on chromium intake in athletes, many athletes ingest more calories than do non-athletes so their chromium intake should be adequate. However, athletes who restrict calories to maintain low bodyweights could compromise their chromium status. Some evidence also shows that exercise may increase chromium loss into the urine. At present, it is not known whether this loss necessitates additional chromium in the diet or whether the body will increase retention in response to the loss. Chromium deficiency is thought to contribute to glucose intolerance and unhealthy blood lipid profiles. The primary function of chromium is to potentiate the effects of insulin, and thereby alter glucose, amino acid and fat metabolism. Chromium supplements have been purported to increase muscle mass and decrease body fat. However, the preponderance of evidence has not supported this claim. There is little information available on the long term use of chromium supplements, but at present, supplements within the Estimated Safe and Adequate Daily Dietary Allowance (ESADDI) level do not appear harmful. The prudent course of action for athletes would be to ingest foods rich in chromium and perhaps take a multivitamin/mineral supplement containing no more than the ESADDI of chromium. PMID:9219318

  15. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens...

  17. Avoidance behavior of young black ducks treated with chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 20, or 200 ppm chromium in the form of chromium potassium sulfate. Ducklings from these pairs were fed the same diets as adults and were tested for their avoidance responses to a fright stimulus. Neither level of chromium had a significant effect on avoidance behavior.

  18. Synthesis and characterisation of chromium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and the characterisation of various chromium carbide compounds. Thin Cr 23C 6 films were deposited by reactive sputtering while Cr 7C 3 films were formed by the carburisation of chromium films in a CH 4/H 2 atmosphere. Cr xC y powders were synthesised from various precursors (Cr, CrN, Cr 2O 3) by reaction with CH 4/H 2 at high temperature. The samples were characterised by AES, XRD and electron diffraction. The effects of the experimental parameters (gas composition, temperature, reaction time) on the purity, the phase formed and the composition of the product of reaction are examined and discussed.

  19. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  20. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  1. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of the chromium isotopes in terrestrial and bulk meteorite samples are identical to 0.01 percent. However, Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite show endemic isotopic anomalies in chromium which require at least three nucleosynthetic components. Large anomalies at Cr-54 in a special class of inclusions are correlated with large anomalies at Ca-48 and Ti-50 and provide strong support for a component reflecting neutron-rich nucleosynthesis at nuclear statistical equilibrium. This correlation suggests that materials from very near the core of an exploding massive star may be injected into the interstellar medium.

  2. 47 CFR 14.47 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discovery. 14.47 Section 14.47 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Recordkeeping, Consumer Dispute Assistance, and Enforcement §...

  3. 47 CFR 14.47 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discovery. 14.47 Section 14.47 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Recordkeeping, Consumer Dispute Assistance, and Enforcement §...

  4. 47 CFR 14.47 - Discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discovery. 14.47 Section 14.47 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Recordkeeping, Consumer Dispute Assistance, and Enforcement §...

  5. In Vitro Selection of Chromium-Dependent DNAzymes for Sensing Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Vazin, Mahsa; Yu, Tianmeng; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-01

    Chromium is a very important analyte for environmental monitoring, and developing biosensors for chromium is a long-standing analytical challenge. In this work, in vitro selection of RNA-cleaving DNAzymes was carried out in the presence of Cr(3+) . The most active DNAzyme turned out to be the previously reported lanthanide-dependent Ce13d DNAzyme. Although the Ce13d activity was about 150-fold lower with Cr(3+) than that with lanthanides, the activity of lanthanides and other competing metals was masked by using a phosphate buffer; this left Cr(3+) as the only metal that could activate Ce13d. With 100 μm Cr(3+) , the cleavage rate is 1.6 h(-1) at pH 6. By using a molecular beacon design, Cr(3+) was measured with a detection limit of 70 nm, which was significantly lower than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit (11 μm). Cr(4+) was measured after reduction by NaBH4 to Cr(3+) , and it could be sensed with a similar detection limit of 140 nm Cr(4+) ; this value was lower than the EPA limit of 300 nm. This sensor was tested for chromium speciation analysis in a real sample, and the results supported its application for environmental monitoring. At the same time, it has enhanced our understanding of the interactions between chromium and DNA. PMID:27249536

  6. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrCx in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding.

  7. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in lymphocytes of workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, T; Ishikawa, N; Hata, H

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis in lymphocytes as an indicator for mutagenic effects after in vivo exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr), SCE frequency was analysed in lymphocytes of 44 Cr platers occupationally exposed to hexavalent Cr and 47 controls. Although urinary Cr analysis confirmed that the Cr platers were exposed to Cr, no effects of the exposure on SCE frequency were found. Smokers, both Cr platers and controls, had a significantly higher SCE frequency than non-smokers. These results suggest that SCE analysis in human lymphocytes is not a good indicator of possible mutagenic effects of exposure to hexavalent Cr. PMID:2920143

  8. Removal of chromium from wastewater by reverse osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çimen, Aysel

    2015-07-01

    Removal of chromium from wastewaters has been studied and the optimal process conditions were determined. The reverse osmosis (RO) technique, the sea water high rejection (SWHR) and high rejection brackish water (AG, SE, and SG) membranes were used. The chromium rejection depended on membrane type, pH of the feed water and operating pressure. The removal of chromium was most effective when the feed water pH 3. The rejection efficiency of the membranes increased in the order AG > SWHR > SG > SE. RO method can be efficiently used (with >91% rejection) for the removal of chromium from wastewater of chromium coating processes.

  9. FATE OF CHROMIUM (III) IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trivalent chromium, Cr(III), to the more toxic Cr(VI) in chlorinated water is thermodynamically feasible and was the subject of the study. The study found that free available chlorine (FAC) readily converts Cr(III) to Cr(VI) at a rate that is highly dependent upo...

  10. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  11. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR CHROMIUM. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The full document represents a comprehensive data base that considers all sources of chromium in the environment, the likelihood for its exposure to humans, and the possible consequences to man and lower organisms from its absorption. This information is integrated into a format ...

  12. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  13. Chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.K.

    1981-05-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  14. Trace Elements Excluding Iron - Chromium and Zinc

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The percentage of middle-aged US adults who are participating in leisure-time physical activities is growing. These adults also seek credible information about specific supplements that the public press routinely describes as necessary to enable increases in physical performance. Chromium and zinc a...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provide change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provide change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas... Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (k) Medical surveillance—(1) General. (i) The employer shall...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas... Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (k) Medical surveillance—(1) General. (i) The employer shall...

  1. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  2. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  7. The role of mitochondria in chromium carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, S.C. )

    1987-01-01

    The uptake and reduction of chromium(VI) compounds are crucial to their carcinogenicity. Many cellular systems have been shown to reduce chromium(VI). The ability of mitochondria to reduce chromate in vitro was investigated using rat liver submitochondrial particles (SMPs), which contain the electron transport chain, and isolated rat liver mitochondria. SMPs with NADH as substrate reduced chromate as shown by EPR and UV-VIS spectroscopic studies. Chromate was reduced to a chromium(V) species, which was detectable by EPR. SMPs with succinate as substrate were less effective in reducing chromate relative to NADH-driven chromate-reductase activity. SMPs show a higher rate of oxygen depletion with NADH as substrate as compared to succinate as substrate. In SMPs with NADH as substrate, rotenone, antimycin and cyanide all produced a {approx}40% inhibition of chromate-reductase activity. In SMPs with succinate as substrate, cyanide and antimycin produced {approx}50% inhibition of chromate-reductase activity and rotenone caused no detectable inhibition. In vivo studies of rats injected with sodium dichromate spiked with {sup 51}Cr showed that after 24 hr, chromium was bound preferentially to mitochondrial DNA relative to nuclear DNA by a factor of {approximately}1500.

  8. Development of low-chromium, chromium-tungsten steels for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.; Kenik, E. A.

    1995-12-01

    High-chromium (9-12% Cr) CrMo and CrW ferritic steels are favored as candidates for fusion applications. In early work to develop reduced-activation steels, an Fe2.25Cr2W-0.25V-O.1C steel (designated 2.25Cr-2WV) had better strength than an Fe9Cr2W-0.25V-0.07Tra-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel (compositions are in weight percent). However, the 2.25Cr-2WV had poor impact properties, as determined by the ductile-brittle transition temperature and upper-shelf energy of subsize Charpy impact specimens. Because low-chromium steels have some advantages over high-chromium steels, a program to develop low-chromium steels is in progress. Microstructural analysis indicated that the reason for the inferior impact toughness of the 2.25Cr-2WV was the granular bainite obtained when the steel was normalized. Properties can be improved by developing an acicular bainite microstructure by increasing the cooling rate after austenitization. Alternatively, acicular bainite can be promoted by increasing the hardenability. Hardenability was changed by adding small amounts of boron and additional chromium to the 2.250-2WV composition. A combination of B, Cr, and Ta additions resulted in low-chromium reduced-activation steels with mechanical properties comparable to those of 9Cr-2WVTa.

  9. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  10. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  11. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  12. Oral bioavailability of chromium from a specific site.

    PubMed Central

    Witmer, C M; Harris, R; Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil from a specific site in New Jersey indicated a low level of sodium and chromium present as a calcium compound. Chromium was then administered orally to young, mature male rats at a level of 240 micrograms/kg for 14 days as chromium-contaminated soil, as CaCrO4, and as an equimolar mixture of the soil and calcium salts for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosing, and tissues were taken immediately for chromium analysis. Blood, muscle, and liver contained the highest levels of chromium in these animals, although kidney contained the highest concentration per gram of tissue. The total amount of chromium in the tissues was less than 2% of the administered chromium. In a study of the excretion of chromium, the animals were dosed orally for 8 days (with CaCrO4 or contaminated soil, each at the level of 240 mumole Cr/kg), and the chromium in feces and urine was determined on days 1, 2, 7, and 8. After cessation of dosing for 27 days, the same rats were dosed for 2 days at the same level, and chromium in urine and feces was determined for the 2 days. The animals administered the chromium in soil had higher levels of chromium in both urine and feces on all days compared to the group fed the CaCrO4. The total recovery of chromium in any of the 2-day periods was less than 50% of the chromium administered during that period. PMID:1935839

  13. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a novel powder prepared from Colocasia esculenta leaves.

    PubMed

    Nakkeeran, E; Saranya, N; Giri Nandagopal, M S; Santhiagu, A; Selvaraju, N

    2016-08-01

    In this study, batch removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by powdered Colocasia esculenta leaves was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of adsorption of Cr(VI) at different pH values, initial concentrations, agitation speeds, temperatures, and contact times. The biosorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer analysis. The biosorptive capacity of the adsorbent was dependent on the pH of the chromium solution in which maximum removal was observed at pH 2. The adsorption equilibrium data were evaluated for various adsorption isotherm models, kinetic models, and thermodynamics. The equilibrium data fitted well with Freundlich and Halsey models. The adsorption capacity calculated was 47.62 mg/g at pH 2. The adsorption kinetic data were best described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thus, Colocasia esculenta leaves can be considered as one of the efficient and cheap biosorbents for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26853060

  14. Estimation of Release of Nickel and Chromium by Indian Made Orthodontic Appliance in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Sandeep; Gupta, Ankur; Hegde, Chatura; Anand, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With increasing use of Indian made orthodontic materials, need was felt to know nickel and chromium release from these material. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on simulated appliances consisting of brackets (022″Roth, Modern orthodontics, Ludhiana, India), from second premolar to central incisor, buccal tube and 0.019×0.025- inch SS arch wires secured with SS ligatures. Immersion was done in artificial saliva. Samples were analysed to using Atomic Absorption Photospectrometer (GVC ScientificEquipment Pvt. Ltd Australia) at AES Laboratories (P) Ltd., Noida India on 1st, 7th, 14th and 28th day. Results SPSS (ver 17, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used toperform the statistical analysis. Descriptive statistics i.e. median and 25 and75 percentiles were used. Peak nickel release was on 7th day and subsequently declined over 14th and 28th day. The peak level of chromium concentration was on 14th day, which declined thereafter. Conclusion Average daily release of nickel and chromium over a period of one month was 97.368 μg/day and 47.664 μg/day respectively. The estimated release rates were approximately 32% and 16% of the reported average daily dietary. PMID:26501018

  15. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  16. 40 CFR 437.47 - Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Wastestreams § 437.47 Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS). (a) Except as provided in 40 CFR 403.7 or... Antimony 0.249 0.206 Arsenic 0.162 0.104 Cadmium 0.474 0.0962 Chromium 0.746 0.323 Cobalt 0.192 0.124... 0.206 Arsenic 0.162 0.104 Cadmium 0.474 0.0962 Chromium 0.746 0.323 Cobalt 0.192 0.124 Copper...

  17. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  18. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeYoung, J.H., Jr.; Lee, M.P.; Lipin, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    Major world resources of chromium, a strategic mineral commodity, are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of chromium on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  19. Corrosion behavior of chromium in molten carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Vossen, J.P.T.; Makkus, R.C.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1996-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Cr in molten carbonate was investigated with electrochemical techniques in combination with quenching after polarization at fixed potentials. Between {minus}1,700 and {minus}1,500 mV carbon deposition takes place on the surface. The stationary corrosion product formed on Cr after polarization at {minus}1,700 mV is probably chromium carbide. Between {minus}1,600 and {minus}300 mV a LiCrO{sub 2}-layer is present on the surface of the Cr. At potentials above approximately {minus}500 mV chromate formation and dissolution take place. When the potential increases, the oxidation rate of the Cr increases due to the larger driving force for oxidation. In the potential region where oxygen vacancies are filled and bivalent chromium ions are oxidized, the conductivity of the scale decreases and the oxidation rate is determined by the transport properties of the scale: the passive properties of the LiCrO{sub 2}-scale have improved. In the anodic scan of a cyclic voltammogram two peaks can be observed, corresponding with the oxidation of point defects, and the formation of instable intermediate chromium oxide. These reactions are accompanied by the formation of lithium chromite. While scanning cathodically, first chromate ions are reduced. At very cathodic potentials trivalent Cr ions are reduced to bivalent Cr ions and point defects, which are incorporated in the LiCrO{sub 2}-lattice, and water is reduced. These reactions may be accompanied by the reduction of the instable chromium oxide formed during the preceding anodic scan. Near {minus}1,700 mV carbonate decomposes, lithium chromite is reduced and possibly carbide formation also takes place.

  20. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational

  1. Laser action in chromium-doped forsterite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.; Yamagishi, Kiyoshi; Anzai, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on pulsed laser operation obtained in chromium-activated forsterite Cr(3+):Mg2SiO4 at room temperature. The spectrum of the free-running laser peaks at 1235 nm and a bandwidth of about 22 nm. The spectral range of the laser emission is expected to extend from 850 to 1300, provided the parasitic impurity absorption may be minimized by improved crystal growth techique.

  2. X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons pictorial overview, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant uses large quantities of water for process cooling. The X-616 Liquid Effluent Control Facility was placed in operation in December 1976 to treat recirculation cooling water blowdown from the process cooling system. A chromium-based corrosion inhibitor was used in the cooling water system. A chromium sludge was produced in a clarifier to control chromium levels in the water. Chromium sludge produced by this process was stored in two surface impoundments called the X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons. The sludge was toxic due to its chromium concentration and therefore required treatment. The sludge was treated, turning it into a sanitary waste, and buried in an Ohio EPA approved landfill. The plant's process cooling water system has changed to a more environmentally acceptable phosphate-based inhibitor. Closure activities at X-616 began in August 1990, with all construction activities completed in June 1991, at a total cost of $8.0 million.

  3. Luminescence from chromium-neodymium-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahpoud, S.; Chamiel, N.; Weiss, A. M.; Rosenbluh, M.; Herman, A.; Shoham, A.; Lipavsky, B.; Rotman, S. R.

    1999-10-01

    Luminescence from chromium-neodymium-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3) was experimentally measured to determine the degree of non-radiative energy transfer between chromium and neodymium ions. Evidence is presented for two different time constants for emission from chromium ions in the material, indicating that non-radiative transfer does occur. Differences between quasi-continuous pumping and pulsed excitation are discussed.

  4. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution.

  5. Effect of processing cement to concrete on hexavalent chromium levels.

    PubMed

    Turk, K; Rietschel, R L

    1993-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium sensitization is known to occur from exposure to cement. Concrete is a mixture of cement, sand, rock, and water. Admixtures are compounds used to retard or accelerate concrete setting time. Some countries use ferrous sulfate to reduce hexavalent chromium in cement. We evaluated and compared hexavalent chromium levels in cement, rock (aggregate), and wet and dry concrete in samples from Singapore, Ireland, Denmark, Australia, and the United States. Cement from Denmark contains ferrous sulfate. The effect of representative admixtures on hexavalent chromium concentration in concrete was also evaluated, but technical limitations made evaluation difficult. Soluble chromium levels in cement ranged from 0.225 mg/kg in the US sample to 0.036 mg/kg in the Singapore sample. Aggregate chromium levels ranged from 0.083 mg/kg in the Denmark sample to < 0.002 mg/kg in the Ireland sample. Fresh US concrete, with 1.27 mg/kg hexavalent chromium, contained the highest level. The Denmark sample, with ferrous sulfate added, was lowest (< 0.01 mg/kg). Hardened concrete levels ranged from 0.104 mg/kg from the Ireland sample to 0.002 mg/kg from the Singapore sample. Therefore, hexavalent chromium levels do appear to be influenced by admixtures and by processing from powdered cement to dry concrete. Ferrous sulfate significantly reduced hexavalent chromium levels in fresh cement. PMID:8508629

  6. Studies on the essentiality of chromium in ruminants

    SciTech Connect

    Samsell, L.J.; Spears, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    Although chromium has been established as an essential trace element for certain animal species, no requirement has been shown for ruminants. Sixteen female lambs (35 kg) were used in an attempt to determine if chromium is essential in the ruminant. Animals were individually housed in all plastic pens and fed twice daily either a low chromium (100 ppb) torula yeast based diet or the basal diet supplemented with 10 ppm chromium as CrCl/sub 3/. Blood samples obtained prior to the morning feeding and 2 and 6 hr post-feeding on days 28 and 56 indicated no significant treatment differences in plasma glucose or serum free fatty acids. By day 56, serum cholesterol tended to be lower in chromium supplemented lambs (60.9 vs 71.7 mg/dl). Lambs in the chromium supplemented treatment also tended to gain more efficiently through 56 days (.130 vs .118 gain/fed). On day 84, lambs were bled after a 48 hr fast, refed, then bled again at 2 and 6 hr post-feeding. Plasma glucose and serum free fatty acids were not affected by chromium at the end of the 48 hr fast or when lambs were refed following fasting. At 84 days both total serum cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol were lower in lambs receiving supplemental chromium. These results suggest that chromium may have a biological role in the ruminant.

  7. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  8. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.; Conway, R.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  9. Quantitative chemical analysis of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Kuroiwa, A; Ando, Y; Hashimoto, H

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-nine brands of dental casting nickel-chromium alloys made in Japan for small castings were analyzed by electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. Nickel-chromium alloys for metal-ceramic application were composed primarily of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum with the exception of one brand. Of the nickel-chromium alloys for inlay, crown, and bridgework applications, 11 of the 22 alloys were up to the standard of the Ministry of Welfare specifications. And additive metal elements of these alloys were molybdenum, iron, copper, manganese, aluminum, silicon, tin, indium, silver, titanium, and gallium. PMID:2134288

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  15. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid < 0.1 M EDTA<0.3 M HCl, thus hydrochloric acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples. PMID:26599728

  16. Randomized comparison of acute stent malapposition between platinum-chromium versus cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sun; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    No randomized data exist regarding optical coherence tomography (OCT) evaluation immediately post-procedure and at the 3-month follow-up for platinum-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (PtCr-EES) versus cobalt-chromium everolimus-eluting stents (CoCr-EES). A total of 100 patients were randomly assigned to undergo PtCr-EES (n = 51) or CoCr-EES (n = 49) implantation. OCT was serially evaluated after stent deployment with nominal pressure and immediately post-procedure, and 3-month follow-up. The primary endpoint was the percentage of malapposed strut after nominal pressure and immediately post-procedure. Compared to the CoCr-EES, the PtCr-EES showed a lower tendency of percent malapposed strut at nominal pressure [median value (interquartile range); 4.1 % (0.5-11.7) vs. 7.6 % (2.9-13.7), p = 0.082] and immediately post-procedure [1.2 % (0-3.4) vs. 2.5 % (0.7-5.3), p = 0.051]. The percentage of cross sections with any malapposed struts was significantly lower with PtCr-EES at nominal pressure [15.0 % (5.6-39.0) vs. 23.8 % (18.2-44.4), p = 0.036] and immediately post-procedure [6.5 % (0-15.3) vs. 10.5 % (7.1-20.0), p = 0.026]. At the 3-month follow-up, both PtCr-EES and CoCr-EES showed comparable percentages of malapposed struts (0 vs. 0 %, respectively, p = 0.332) and uncovered struts (5.3 vs. 4.7 %, respectively, p = 0.829). We found a significant correlation between the immediate post-procedural percentage of malapposed struts versus the percentage of uncovered struts (r = 0.430, p < 0.001) at the 3-month follow-up. Compared to the CoCr-EES, the PtCr-EES shows a lower tendency toward a lower percentage of malapposed struts but no significant difference in strut coverage at the 3-month follow-up. The percentage of malapposed struts immediately post-procedure was correlated with strut coverage at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:25345751

  17. COST EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AIR EMISSIONS FROM FUNCTIONAL CHROMIUM ELECTROPLATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will summrize thie pollution prevention (p2) method to control stack emissions from hard chromium plating operations performed by the USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) over the last four years. During literature research and user surveys, it...

  18. A Laboratory Procedure for the Reduction of Chromium(VI) to Chromium(III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as oxidizers and must be specially packaged and transported for disposal while Cr(III) compounds are considered nonoxidizers. A process which reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by adding sodium metabisulfite followed by neutralization with magnesium hydroxide is explored. (MVL)

  19. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  20. Urinary chromium concentrations in humans following ingestion of safe doses of hexavalent and trivalent chromium: Implications for biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, B.L.; Scott, P.K.; Norton, R.L.

    1996-08-09

    This study evaluates the significance of increased urinary chromium concentrations as a marker of chromium exposure and potential health risk. Six human volunteers ingested trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] at doses that are known to be safe but higher than typical levels. The following dosing regimen was used: d 1-7, 200 {mu}g/d chromium picolinate; d 8-10, Cr(VI) ingestion at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference dose (RfD) of 0.005 mg/kg/d; d 11-13, no dose; d 14-16, Cr(III) ingestion at the U.S. EPA RfD of 1.0 mg/kg/d; and 17-18, postdose. Findings are as follows: (1) ingestion of 200 {mu}g/d of chromium picolinate yielded significantly elevated urine concentrations such that each participant routinely exceeded background, (2) ingestion of the Cr(VI) RfD (0.005 mg/kg/d) yielded individual mean urinary chromium levels (1.2-2.3 {mu}g/L) and a pooled mean urinary chromium level (2.4 {mu}g/L) that significantly exceeded background, and (3) ingestion of the Cr(III) RfD yielded no significantly exceeded background, and (3) ingestion of the Cr(III) RfD yielded no significant increase in urinary chromium concentrations, indicating that little, if any, absorption occurred. Our work identified three critical issues that need to be accounted for in any future studies that will use urinary chromium as a marker of exposure. First, a minimum urinary chromium concentration of approximately 2 {mu}g/L should be used as a screening level to critically identify individuals who may have experienced elevated exposures to chromium. Second, if Cr(III) levels in soils are known to be less than 80,000 ppm and the Cr(III) is insoluble, urinary chromium concentrations are not an appropriate marker of exposure. Third, newer forms of chromium supplements that contain organic forms of Cr(III) must be considered potential confounders and their contribution to residential chromium uptake must be carefully evaluated. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Improved Atmospheric Sampling of Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Torkmahalleh, Mehdi Amouei; Yu, Chang-Ho; Lin, Lin; Fan, Zhihua (Tina); Swift, Julie L.; Bonanno, Linda; Rasmussen, Don H.; Holsen, Thomas M.; Hopke, Philip K.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) are the primary chromium oxidation states found in ambient atmospheric particulate matter. While Cr(III) is relatively nontoxic, Cr(VI) is toxic and exposure to Cr(VI) may lead to cancer, nasal damage, asthma, bronchitis, and pneumonitis. Accurate measurement of the ambient Cr(VI) concentrations is an environmental challenge since Cr(VI) can be reduced to Cr(III) and vice versa during sampling. In the present study, a new Cr(VI) sampler (Clarkson sampler) was designed, constructed, and field tested to improve the sampling of Cr(VI) in ambient air. The new Clarkson Cr(VI) sampler was based on the concept that deliquescence during sampling leads to aqueous phase reactions. Thus, the relative humidity of the sampled air was reduced below the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the ambient particles. The new sampler was operated to collect Total Suspended Particles (TSP), and compared side-by-side with the current National Air Toxics Trends Stations (NATTS) Cr(VI) sampler that is utilized in the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) air toxics monitoring program. Side-by-side field testing of the samplers occurred in Elizabeth, NJ during the winter and summer of 2012. The average recovery values of Cr(VI) spikes after 24 hour sampling intervals during summer and winter sampling were 57 and 72%, respectively, for the Clarkson sampler, while the corresponding average values for NATTS samplers were 46% for both summer and winter sampling, respectively. Preventing the ambient aerosol collected on the filters from deliquescing is a key to improving the sampling of Cr(VI). PMID:24344574

  2. Improved atmospheric sampling of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Torkmahalleh, Mehdi Amouei; Yu, Chang-Ho; Lin, Lin; Fan, Zhihua; Swift, Julie L; Bonanno, Linda; Rasmussen, Don H; Holsen, Thomas M; Hopke, Philip K

    2013-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) are the primary chromium oxidation states found in ambient atmospheric particulate matter. While Cr(III) is relatively nontoxic, Cr(VI) is toxic and exposure to Cr(VI) may lead to cancer, nasal damage, asthma, bronchitis, and pneumonitis. Accurate measurement of the ambient Cr(VI) concentrations is an environmental challenge since Cr(VI) can be reduced to Cr(III) and vice versa during sampling. In the present study, a new Cr(VI) sampler (Clarkson sampler) was designed, constructed, and field tested to improve the sampling of Cr(VI) in ambient air. The new Clarkson Cr(VI) sampler was based on the concept that deliquescence during sampling leads to aqueous phase reactions. Thus, the relative humidity of the sampled air was reduced below the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the ambient particles. The new sampler was operated to collect total suspended particles (TSP), and compared side-by-side with the current National Air Toxics Trends Stations (NATTS) Cr(VI) sampler that is utilized in the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air toxics monitoring program. Side-by-side field testing of the samplers occurred in Elizabeth, NJ during the winter and summer of 2012. The average recovery values of Cr(VI) spikes after 24-hr sampling intervals during summer and winter sampling were 57 and 72%, respectively, for the Clarkson sampler while the corresponding average values for NATTS samplers were 46% for both summer and winter sampling, respectively. Preventing the ambient aerosol collected on the filters from deliquescing is a key to improving the sampling of Cr(VI). PMID:24344574

  3. ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from dilute aqueous solution by an activated carbon process has been investigated. Two removal mechanisms were observed; hexavalent chromium species were removed by adsorption onto the interior carbon surface and/or through reduction to...

  4. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

  1. Nickel and chromium isotopes in Allende inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birck, J. L.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-precision nickel and chromium isotopic measurements were carried out on nine Allende inclusions. It is found that Ni-62, Ni-64, excesses are present in at least three of the samples. The results suggest that the most likely mechanism for the anomalies is a neutron-rich statistical equilibrium process. An indication of elevated Ni-60 is found in almost every inclusion measured. This effect is thought to be related to the decay of now extinct Fe-60. An upper limit of 1.6 X 10 to the -6th is calculated for the Fe-60/Fe-56 ratio at the time these Allende inclusions crystallized.

  2. Environmental durability of electroplated black chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the durability of nickel-black chromium plated aluminum in an outdoor rural industrial, and seacoast environment. Test panels were exposed to these environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. The results of this study showed that no significant optical degradation occurred from exposure to either of these environments, although a considerable amount of corrosion occurred on the panels exposed to the seacoast environment. The rural and industrial atmosphere produced only a slight amount of corrosion on test panels.

  3. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  4. External biomarkers to assess chromium toxicity in adult Lepomis macrochirus

    SciTech Connect

    Gendusa, T.C.; Beitinger, T.L. )

    1992-02-01

    Chromium is widely used in the production of stainless steel, bricks, pigments, dyes, and in the tanning, textile, and chemical industries, commonly found in the aquatic environment and known to elicit acute and chronic toxicity to aquatic life. In water, chromium tends to speciate into Cr{sup 3+} (trivalent) and Cr{sup +6} (hexavalent). Speciation of chromium is primarily dependent upon water chemistry, e.g., oxygenation, pH, organic content and amount of particulate matter and the bioavailability of each chromium form is different mainly because of the low solubility of Cr{sup +3}. The objective of this research was to evaluate the efficacy of eight potential biomarkers to indicate stress of chromium exposure in adult bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus).

  5. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium. PMID:16874547

  6. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings.

    PubMed

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-11-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includes an interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes in the epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen's chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen's interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations, and analyses the epidemiological pattern between nations and across continents. We provide an update on the allergen from a dermatological point of view, and conclude that much still remains to be discovered about the allergen, and that continued surveillance of exposure sources and prevalence rates is necessary. PMID:26104877

  7. Abnormal deposits of chromium in the pathological human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Duckett, S

    1986-01-01

    Three patients presented with encephalopathies: an undiagnosed degenerative disease of the brain, a degenerative cerebral disease in a patient with a myeloma but without a myelomatous deposit in the CNS and a malignant astrocytoma. Perivascular pallidal deposits (vascular siderosis) containing chromium, phosphorus and calcium plus sometimes traces of other elements were present in the three cases. Such deposits were present in the pallidal parenchyma and around vessels in the cerebellum in one case. Calcium and phosphorus are always present in any CNS calcification but the presence of chromium has not been reported. Chromium and its compounds (ingested, injected or inhaled) are toxic to humans and animals in trace doses. Approximately 900 cases of chromium intoxication have been reported and usually have had dermatological or pulmonary lesions (including cancer) but there is no report of involvement of the CNS. Sublethal doses of chromium nitrate injected intraperitoneally in rats and rabbits results in the presence of chromium in the brain. A thorough investigation was made to find the source of the chromium in these patients. Chromium was found to be present in trace amounts in the radiological contrast agents administered to these patients and in the KCl replacement solution and in mylanta, an antacid, given to one case. The evidence that chromium induced pathological changes in these three brains is circumstantial but shows that chromium can penetrate the human brain. This study indicates that vascular siderosis found in the brains of the majority of middle-aged and elderly humans is not simply an anecdotal pathological curiosity, but that it can serve as a route of entry for toxic products into the brain. Images PMID:3958742

  8. Release of chromium from soils with persulfate chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kawalpreet; Crimi, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    An important part of the evaluation of the effectiveness of persulfate in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for treating organic contaminants is to identify and understand its potential impact on metal co-contaminants in the subsurface. Chromium is a redox-sensitive and toxic metal the release of which poses considerable risk to human health. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of persulfate chemical oxidation on the release of chromium from three soils varying in physical-chemical properties. Soils were treated with unactivated and activated persulfate [activated with Fe(II), Fe(II)-EDTA, and alkaline pH] at two different concentrations (i.e., 41 mM and 2.1 mM persulfate) for 48 h and 6 months and were analyzed for release of chromium. Results show that release of chromium with persulfate chemical oxidation depends on the soil type and the activation method. Sandy soil with low oxidant demand released more chromium compared to soils with high oxidant demand. More chromium was released with alkaline pH activation. Alkaline pH and high Eh conditions favor oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), which is the main mechanism of release of chromium with persulfate chemical oxidation. Unactivated and Fe(II)-activated persulfate decreased pH and at low pH in absence of EDTA chromium release is not a concern. These results indicate that chromium release can be anticipated based on the given site and treatment conditions, and ISCO system can be designed to minimize potential chromium release when treating soils and groundwater contaminated with both organic and metal contaminants. PMID:24028318

  9. CRITICAL EVALUATION OF DIFFERENTIAL PULSE POLAROGRAPHY FOR DETERMINING CHROMIUM(III) AND CHROMIUM(VI) IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tennessee Valley Authority critically evaluated differential pulse polarography for determining chromium(VI) and chromium(III) in water samples from coal-fired steam-electric generating stations. After addition of reagents to overcome interference, the peak currents for chrom...

  10. Determination of chromium in treated crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by electrothermal ASS: study of chromium accumulation in different tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, F.; Diaz, J.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.

    1986-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of chromium in muscle, hepatopancreas, antennal glands, and gills of Procambarus clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following Cr(VI)-exposure. Determinations of chromium were made by using Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and the standard additions method.

  11. Recoating mirrors having a chromium underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali M.; Eng, Peter J.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Macrander, Albert T.; Qian, Jun

    2004-01-01

    X-ray mirrors and multilayers are used to reflect, focus, or monochromatize x-ray beams. Substrate materials are typically silicon, fused silica, Zerodur, ULE, or metals such as molybdenum, copper, or stainless steel. Substrates are polished to a few angstroms rms roughness and often coated with one or more layers to provide the desired spectral reflectivity. Coatings can be damaged as a result of mishandling, contamination and/or chemical reaction, prolonged exposure to x-rays, exposure to poor vacuum, aging, or peeling due to poor coating adhesion and/or high stress. Incomplete or out-of-spec coatings may render an optic unacceptable. In all these cases, it is highly desirable to be able to completely strip off a coating and recoat the substrate without the need for repolishing it. This is particularly important for optical substrates that are expensive or have a long fabrication lead-time. This paper describes one such scheme. It involves pre-coating of mirror reflecting surfaces with a thin layer of chromium. Subsequent coatings can be stripped by etching away the chromium underlayer without damaging the substrate. Experimental results show that surface roughness is unaffected by the etching process in silicon and zerodur, the two substrate material tested so far. The process is expected to be equally applicable to other glasses and can be extended to other substrate materials using appropriate underlayer / etchant combinations.

  12. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26997541

  13. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  14. Kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by ferrous iron

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R.

    1998-09-01

    Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions.

  15. Mode of occurrence of chromium in four US coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Crowley, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The mode of occurrence of chromium in three US bituminous coals and one US subbituminous has been examined using both X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a selective leaching protocol supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe measurements. A synthesis of results from both methods indicates that chromium occurs principally in two forms in the bituminous coals: the major occurrence of chromium is associated with the macerals and is not readily leached by any reagent, whereas a second, lesser occurrence, which is leachable in hydrofluoric acid (HF), is associated with the clay mineral, illite. The former occurrence is believed to be a small particle oxyhydroxide phase (CrO(OH)). One coal also contained a small fraction (<5%) of the chromium in the form of a chromian magnetite, and the leaching protocol indicated the possibility of a similar small fraction of chromium in sulfide form in all three coals. There was little agreement between the two techniques on the mode of occurrence of chromium in the subbituminous coal; however, only a limited number of subbituminous coals have been analyzed by either technique. The chromium in all four coals was trivalent as no evidence was found for the Cr6+ oxidation state in any coal.

  16. Pyrolysis of chromium rich tanning industrial wastes and utilization of carbonized wastes in metallurgical process.

    PubMed

    Tôrres Filho, Artur; Lange, Liséte Celina; de Melo, Gilberto Caldeira Bandeira; Praes, Gustavo Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Pyrolysis is the thermal degradation of organic material in oxygen-free or very lean oxygen atmosphere. This study evaluates the use of pyrolysis for conversion of leather wastes from chromium tanning processes into Carbonized Leather Residues (CLR), and the utilization of CLR in metallurgical processes through the production of iron ore pellets. CLR was used to replace mineral coal in proportions of 10% and 25% on fixed carbon basis content in the mixtures for pellets preparation. Experimental conversions were performed on a pilot scale pyrolysis plant and a pelletizing reactor of the "pot grate" type. The results demonstrated the technical feasibility of using the charcoal product from animal origin as an energy source, with recovery of up to 76.47% of chromium contained in CLR in the final produced of iron ore pellets. Pellets with 25% replacement of fixed carbon in the coal showed an enhanced compressive strength, with an average value of 344kgfpellet(-1), compared to 300kgfpellet(-1) for standard produced pellets. PMID:26691602

  17. Investigation of the threshold for allergic reactivity to chromium.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D; Horev, L; Slodovnik, D; Merimes, S; Trattner, A; Ingber, A

    2001-02-01

    Allergy to chromium is relatively common, often in association with exposure to cement or in leather manufacture. However, in certain locations, there appears to be a relatively large cohort of chromium-sensitive individuals whose allergy cannot be explained by these common sources. In particular, this group include Israeli housewives with persistent hand eczema and concomitant patch test positivity to chromium. The causation of their allergy has been linked with relatively high levels of chromium contamination in household products. To provide further information in respect of the definition of safe levels for such products, we examined 17 chromium-allergic individuals to determine their threshold for reaction under closed patch test and repeated open application test (ROAT) conditions. The data derived indicated that, on normal skin, the patch test threshold was 10 ppm chromium; in the presence of an irritant (sodium lauryl sulfate) the threshold was closer to 1 ppm, 2/17 subjects giving 1+ reactions at this concentration. In the more realistic exposure conditions of the ROAT, 8/14 individuals failed to react to 50 ppm, whilst 3/15 reacted to 5 ppm. Interestingly, there was very poor correlation between patch test sensitivity and ROAT sensitivity. To ensure the large majority of chromium-allergic individuals do not suffer elicitation of their allergy, as well as to limit the development of new chromium-sensitive subjects, it is recommended that household products adhere to a previously published standard of a maximum limit of 5 ppm, with an ultimate target of 1 ppm contamination by chromium. PMID:11205406

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  19. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L(-1). PMID:26894618

  20. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  1. [Blood and urine chromium: compared values between chromium exposed workers and common people].

    PubMed

    Provenzani, A; Verso, M G; Picciotto, D

    2008-01-01

    Aim of present study is the valutation and quantification of chromium in blood and urine. We compared 3 groups of persons formed by building workers, in particular masons, because cement contains potassium chromate that is dangerous for health, and by common people: urban population and outside the town population. In fact, exposure to CrVI risk is high for people who live near chromate industries. We maked a medical examination, blood and instrumental tests, chromium measuring in blood (recent exposure indicator) and urine (recent and previous indicator). Then we used statistical methods to estimate obtained values of blood and urine chromium among professional exposed people and common people. At the end we think that preventive measures in working environment reduced exposure to CrVI but environmental exposure (for example road dust from catalytic converter erosion, from brake lining erosion, cement dust and tobacco smoke), in the last years, has increased. So there are no difference between urban population and outside the town population and there are also no difference with professional exposed people for work prevention according to law in force, that let down professional risk using safe limits. PMID:18700674

  2. Fluid-rock interactions between xanthan-chromium(III) gel systems and dolomite core material

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, C.S.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01

    Gelation of chromium(III)-xanthan systems in dolomite core material was investigated. Compositional changes in the gelant caused by interactions with the dolomite core material resulted in low permeability reductions for gelants prepared with chromium chloride, chromium acetate and a chromium diamine salt. The primary cause of incomplete gelation in the dolomite material was the increase in gelant pH that resulted in precipitation of chromium.

  3. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  4. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrC(x) in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding. PMID:22553115

  5. Aqueous trivalent chromium photoproduction in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczynski, S.E.; Kieber, R.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Field studies indicate Cr(III) is photochemically produced at two freshwater lakes in southeastern North Carolina. Results of controlled photolysis experiments with marine and estuarine samples suggest this process may be common to many natural water systems. This photogeneration mechanism sheds new insight into the existence of the thermodynamically unstable Cr(III) ion in oxygenated surface waters. Sixty-eight water samples from seven water bodies in the southeastern United States (fresh, estuarine, and marine) displayed a range of total aqueous inorganic chromium from <0.01 nM to 1.05 nM, with variable amounts of the trivalent and hexavalent species. These are the first Cr(III) and Cr(VI) values reported for all these aqueous systems and some of the first ever for nonmarine environments. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Self-Lubricating Composite Containing Chromium Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A self lubricating. friction and wear reducing composite material useful over a wide temperature range of from cryogenic temperature up to about 900 C. contains 60 80 wt. % of particulate Cr2O3, dispersed in a metal binder of a metal alloy containing Cr and at least 50 wt. % of Ni, Cr or a mature of Ni and Cr. It also contains 5-20 wt. % of a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II or rare earth metal and. optionally, 5-20 wt. % of a low temperature lubricant metal, such as Ag. Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Cu. This composite exhibits less oxidation instability and less abrasiveness than composites containing chromium carbide, is readily applied using plasma spray and can be ground and polished with a silicon carbide abrasive.

  7. The gelation mechanism of chromium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1988-05-01

    Chromium(III) is commonly used crosslinker for preparing profile control gels with polymers having carboxylate and amide functionalities. Cr(III) is applied in many forms. For example, it can be used in the form of simple chromic salts of chloride and sulfate, or as complexed Cr(III) used in leather tanning, or as in-situ generated Cr(III) from the redox reaction of dichromate and bisulfite or thiourea. The gelation rate, and gel quality, doped on which form of Cr(III) is used. The author has found that the Cr olates, produced by hydrolysis of Cr(III) ions, are the reactive crosslinking species. The different gelation rates are due to the different degrees of olation. Furthermore, by controlling the degree of hydrolysis Cr(III) derived from various sources mentioned above can exhibit the same gelation rate.

  8. Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells

    SciTech Connect

    M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

    2007-04-19

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 μMof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  10. Chromate allergy: total chromium and hexavalent chromate in the air.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L; Wong, P H; Kwok, S F; Gan, S L

    1986-01-01

    This is a study on atmospheric concentration of total chromium and hexavalent chromate and its role in chromate sensitivity. Air concentration of total chromium and hexavalent chromate in a construction factory, a busy city area, a suburban area, a residential area, and a heavy industrial area were measured by air sampling pumps. Hexavalent chromate was not detected in any sampled areas. Two (concreting areas) of 8 locations in the construction factory had total chromium of 0.2 and 2.3 micrograms/m3 in the atmosphere. It appeared that the atmospheric concentration of total chromium and hexavalent chromate was negligible. These findings indicate that unexplained chromate sensitivity, as so often seen in patients attending a contact dermatitis clinic, is not attributable to exposure to hexavalent chromate in the air. PMID:2947791

  11. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ziqiang; Chen, Weixing; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3C 2) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25-30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  12. PBI REVERSE OSMOSIS MEMBRANE FOR CHROMIUM PLATING RINSE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory research study was carried out to select and optimize polybenzimidazole (PBI) reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for the treatment of chromium plating rinse water. The effects of important film casting and annealing variables on RO properties were investigated. Membranes...

  13. Structure and magnetic properties of chromium doped cobalt molybdenum nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskos, Niko; Żołnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander; Adamski, Paweł; Moszyński, Dariusz

    2016-09-01

    Four nanocomposites containing mixed phases of Co3Mo3N and Co2Mo3N doped with chromium have been prepared. A linear fit is found for relation between Co2Mo3N and chromium concentrations. The magnetization in ZFC and FC modes at different temperatures (2-300 K) and in applied magnetic fields (up to 70 kOe) have been investigated. It has been detected that many magnetic characteristics of the studied four nanocomposites correlate not with the chromium concentration but with nanocrystallite sizes. The obtained results were interpreted in terms of magnetic core-shell model of a nanoparticle involving paramagnetic core with two magnetic sublattices and a ferromagnetic shell related to chromium doping.

  14. The effect of chromium oxyhydroxide on solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Cruse, T. A.; Ingram, B. J.; Routbort, J. L.; Wang, S.; Salvador, P. A.; Chen, G.; Carnegie Mellon Univ.; NETL; Ohio Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium species like the oxyhydroxide, CrO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, or hexoxide, CrO{sub 3}, are electrochemically reduced to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in solid oxide fuel cells and adversely affect the cell operating potentials. Using a narrowly focused beam from the Advanced Photon Source, such chromium oxide deposits were unequivocally identified in the active region of the cathode by X-ray diffraction, suggesting that the triple phase boundaries were partially blocked. Under fuel cell operating conditions, the reaction has an equilibrium potential of about 0.9 V and the rate of chromium oxide deposition is therefore dependent on the operating potential of the cell. It becomes diffusion limited after several hours of steady operation. At low operating potentials, lanthanum manganite cathodes begin to be reduced to MnO, which reacts with the chromium oxide to form the MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel.

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  16. USE OF FUME SUPPRESSANTS IN HARD CHROMIUM BATHS - QUALITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Common Sense Initiative (CSI) is a cooperative effort of government, industry, environmental and other stakeholder groups to find "cleaner, cheaper, smarter" approaches to environmental management in industrial sectors. The purpose of the project is to help hard chromium ...

  17. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbard, W.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates.

  18. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  8. High performance supercapacitor from chromium oxide-nanotubes based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lota, Grzegorz; Frackowiak, Elzbieta; Mittal, Jagjiwan; Monthioux, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) filled and doped with chromium oxide have been used as attractive electrodes for supercapacitors. Pseudocapacitance effects related to the presence of nanosized chromium oxide finely dispersed at the nanoscale together with high conducting properties of SWNTs allow building efficient electrodes from this hybrid material. Even if capacitance values are not very high (ca. 60 F g -1), however, extremely quick charge propagation was observed, doubtless due to the overall physical and textural properties of SWNT material. The positive effect - with respect to empty-SWNTs - brought by the presence of chromium oxide in and probably in-between the SWNTs indicates that chromium oxide is accessible to the electrolyte in spite of its encapsulated location, because of the numerous side entries created all along the SWNT walls during the filling step.

  9. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  10. Chromium induced contact dermatitis and indices for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S; Shouman, A E; El, S H; Moussa, E M

    1999-01-01

    Chromium exposure plays an important role in development of contact dermatitis. The prevalence of contact dermatitis among tannery workers and cement-exposed workers is high. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of contact dermatitis among some Egyptian workers exposed to chromium and to investigate the role of patch test and IgE immunoassay in diagnosis of contact dermatitis. Eighty-three male workers who were exposed to chromium were selected after application of certain exclusion criteria to be the target population of this study. Forty male workers away from exposure to chromium were taken to be the controls. All the exposed and non exposed workers were investigated through an interview questionnaire, clinical examination, patch test and determination of blood and urine chromium levels, absolute eosinophilic count and total IgE level. The results showed that there was no significant difference between exposed workers with clinically diagnosed contact dermatitis and the clinically free exposed workers regarding age and work duration. 7.7% of exposed workers with positive patch test suffered from contact dermatitis while 31.6% of exposed workers with negative patch test suffered from contact dermatitis. There was no statistically significant difference between clinically diagnosed contact dermatitis workers and clinically free workers regarding blood and urine chromium levels. IgE level and absolute eosinophilic count were statistically higher among exposed workers with contact dermatitis than among clinically free exposed workers. According to the results of this study, it is concluded that the diagnosis of skin hypersensitivity to chromium should depend upon the history of chromium exposure, clinical examination and a battery of investigations including IgE level, eosinophilic count and patch test. PMID:17219860

  11. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  12. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Guidotti, Ronald A.; McCarthy, David K.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca.sub.5 (CrO.sub.4).sub.3 Cl, Ca.sub.5 (CrO.sub.4).sub.3 OH, and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.5. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  13. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  14. Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloys are electrodeposited from a bath comprising a nickel salt, a chromium salt, a phosphorus source such as sodium hypophosphite, a complexing agent for the nickel ions, supporting salts to increase conductivity, and a buffering agent. The process is carried out at about room temperature and requires a current density between about 20 to 40 A/dm.sup.2.

  15. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  16. EMISSIONS OF METALS, CHROMIUM AND NICKEL SPECIES, AND ORGANICS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE INCINERATORS - VOLUME II: SITE 5 EMISSION TEST REPORT - HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM METHOD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    At Site 5, three candidate samplIng methods and two candIdate analytical methods for hexavalent chromium were assessed. he conversion of hexavalent chromium (Cr+8) to ther valence states of chromium during sampling and sample storage was of primary concern. ethod 5-type samples a...

  17. The chemistry of chromium and some resulting analytical problems.

    PubMed Central

    Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Chromium, named for its many-colored compounds, exists in the oxidation states of -2 to +6 inclusively. The compounds exhibit a wide range of geometries including square planar, tetrahedral, octahedral, and various distorted geometries. Chromium is found in nature principally as the chromite ore FeCr2O4 in which chromium is in the +3 state. The existence of a particular oxidation state is dependent on many factors including pH, redox potentials, and kinetics. Thermodynamically, +3 and +2 are the most stable states, while the +3 and +6 oxidation states are the most common ones found in aqueous solution. Kinetically, chromium +3 is substitutionally inert: for water exchange k(sec-1) = 2.5 x 10(-6), due to the presence of the half-filled d(t2g)3.4A2g state. On the other hand, protonation/deprotonation is quite rapid. Polymerization is very slow but is promoted at higher pHs; acid cleavage of the protonated oligomers is also quite slow. Chromium +6 as the chromate ion is strongly oxidizing at low pHs and less so in basic solution. The chromate ion does form some polyacids and polyanions. These factors must be considered in analyzing samples for total chromium and for the amounts of each oxidation state. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:1935853

  18. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  19. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water. PMID:9380841

  20. Method for fabricating cermets of alumina-chromium systems

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.

    1983-01-01

    Cermet insulators resistant to thermal and mechanical shock are prepared from alumina-chromium systems by providing an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 material of about 0.5 to 7.0 micron size with a solid-hydrocarbon overcoating by slurring an effective amount of said solid hydrocarbon in a solvent mixture containing said Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and thereafter evaporating said solvent, contacting said coated Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 with a solution of chromium precursor compound, heating the resulting mixture in a reducing environment to a temperature above the decomposition temperature of said chromium precursor compound but less than the melting temperature of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 or chromium for sufficient duration to yield a particulate compound having chromium essentially dispersed throughout the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and then densifying said particulate to provide said cermet characterized by a theoretical density in excess of 96% and having 0.1 to 10.0 vol.% elemental chromium metal present therein as a dispersed phase at the boundaries of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 material. Cermet components prepared thereby are useful in high temperature equipment, advanced heat engines, and nuclear-related equipment applications where electrical or thermal insulators are required.

  1. Chromium Exposure and Hygienic Behaviors in Printing Workers in Southern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The main objective of this study was to assess the chromium exposure levels in printing workers. The study evaluated the airborne, serum, and urinary chromium levels and determines any correlation between level of chromium in specimen and airborne chromium levels. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 75 exposed and 75 matched nonexposed subjects. Air breathing zone was measured by furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum and urine samples were collected to determine chromium levels by graphite furnaces atomic absorption spectrometer chromium analyzer. Results and Discussion. The printing workers' urinary chromium levels (6.86 ± 1.93 μg/g creatinine) and serum chromium levels (1.24 ± 1.13 μg/L) were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). Work position, duration of work, personal protective equipment (PPE), and personal hygiene were significantly associated with urinary chromium level and serum chromium levels (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). This study found a correlation between airborne chromium levels and urinary chromium levels (r = 0.247, p = 0.032). A multiple regression model was constructed. Significant predictors of urinary and serum chromium levels were shown in this study. Conclusion. Improvements in working conditions, occupational health training, and PPE use are recommended to reduce chromium exposure. PMID:26448746

  2. [Chromium content in foods and dietary intake estimation in the Northwest of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Ballesteros Vázquez, M N; Cabrera Pacheco, R M

    2001-03-01

    Chromium is an indispensable nutrient for the carbohydrates and lipids metabolism. In this study the chromium content in the twenty main foods of the diet from Northwestern Mexico was determined, as well as the daily mean intake which was estimated based on the food intake basket of this region. Chromium content was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using the graphite furnace technique and previous digestion of foods in microwave oven. The chromium mean intake was estimated considering the chromium daily mean intake for person per day and the chromium content of the foods analyzed in this study. The range chromium content in the foods analyzed was between 0.0004 and 0.1641 microgram/g dry weight. White cheese showed the highest chromium content followed by pasta soup, wheat tortilla, bread and meat. The main foods chromium contributors in the diet were: wheat tortilla (20%), white cheese (11%), corn tortilla (11%), pasta soup (10%), milk (10%), meat (9%) and white bread (8%). The daily chromium intake was 30.43 +/- 1.6 micrograms/d. Chromium values obtained in the food analyzed are considered low. Moreover, chromium intake obtained from the diet is not enough to meet the safety and adequate daily chromium intake. Therefore, the population from the Northwestern Mexico has a suboptimal dietary chromium intake. PMID:11515227

  3. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-chromium-iron and nickel-chromium-molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1303-ASME-8 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-chromium-iron, N06600 (P-43), with filler metal ERNiCrFe-5 (F-43); and nickel-chromium-molybdenum, N06625 (P-43), with filler metal ERNiCrMo-3 (F-43); thickness range is 0.020 to 0.432 in.; shielding gas is argon.

  4. Chromium released from leather – I: exposure conditions that govern the release of chromium(III) and chromium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Lidén, Carola; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1–3% of the adult population in Europe is allergic to chromium (Cr). A new restriction in REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) based on the ISO 17075 standard has recently been adopted in the EU to limit Cr(VI) in consumer and occupational leather products. Objectives The aim of this study was to critically assess key experimental parameters in this standard on the release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and their relevance for skin exposure. Material and methods Four differently tanned, unfinished, leather samples were systematically investigated for their release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in relation to surface area, key exposure parameters, temperature, ultraviolet irradiation, and time. Results Although the total release of Cr was largely unaffected by all investigated parameters, except exposure duration and temperature, the Cr oxidation state was highly dynamic, with reduced amounts of released Cr(VI) with time, owing to the simultaneous release of reducing agents from the leather. Significantly more Cr(III) than Cr(VI) was released from the Cr-tanned leather for all conditions tested, and it continued to be released in artificial sweat up to at least 1 week of exposure. Conclusions Several parameters were identified that influenced the outcome of the ISO 17075 test. PMID:25653094

  5. Simultaneous Electrodialytic Preconcentration and Speciation of Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI).

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Koretaka; Shelor, C Phillip; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2015-11-17

    Large amounts of chromium (Cr) compounds are used for manufacturing of various products and various chemical processes. Some inevitably find their way into the environment. Environmental Cr is dominantly inorganic and is either in the cationic +3 oxidation state or in the anionic oxochromium +6 oxidation state. The two differ dramatically in their implications; Cr(III) is essential to human nutrition and even sold as a supplement, while Cr(VI) is a potent carcinogen. Drinking water standards for chromium may be based on total Cr or Cr(VI) only. Thus, Cr speciation analysis is very important. Despite their high sensitivity, atomic spectrometric techniques or induction coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) cannot directly differentiate the oxidation states. We present here a new electrodialytic separation concept. Sample analyte ions are quantitatively transferred via appropriately ionically functionalized dialysis membranes into individual receptors that are introduced into the ICP-MS. There was no significant conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) or vice versa during the very short (6 s) separation process. Effects of salinity (up to ∼20 mM NaCl) can be eliminated with proper membrane functionalization and receptor optimization. With the ICP-MS detector we used, the limits of detection for either form of Cr was 0.1 μg/L without preconcentration. Up to 10-fold preconcentration was readily possible by increasing the donor solution flow rate relative to the acceptor solution flow rates. The proposed approach permits simultaneous matrix isolation, preconcentration, and chromium speciation. PMID:26507203

  6. Chromium stable isotope fractionation during adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T.; Bullen, T.

    2003-04-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in ground water. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions with Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) controlling the attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our previous study demonstrated that abiotic Cr(VI) reduction causes an isotope fractionation of -3.5 permil (53Cr/52Cr) and isotopes can therefore be used to calculate the extent of reduction. In the present study, experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) sorption on Al203. Sorption of Cr(VI) could be important as a small isotope fractionation may get amplified along the edges of a Cr(VI) contaminated plume. A previous study demonstrated a similar process with Fe isotopes on anion exchange resin. Initial solutions of 200 mg/l Cr(VI) (as K2Cr2O7) and 0.1 mM KCl were made up. Sufficient solid Al203 was added to achieve 50% sorption. After equilibration, the solution was extracted by centrifuging and filtering with a 0.2 micron filter. Al203 was then added again to result in a further 50% sorption of the remaining Cr(VI). This process was repeated 10 times to amplify any isotopic fractionation between dissolved and adsorbed Cr(VI). The instantaneous stable isotope fractionation was calculated based on the δ 53Cr values of the initial and final Cr(VI) solutions. The results show that the stable isotope values measured in the solutions after the ten steps were within the uncertainty of the isotope value of the initial solution. Therefore, no significant stable isotope fractionation occurred. We are presently conducting experiments with goethite and expect similar results. Therefore, any fractionation of chromium stable isotopes observed in contaminant plumes are a result of processes other than adsorption (i.e., reduction).

  7. Chromium-chromium interaction in a binuclear mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gorelsky, Serge I; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Le Roy, Jennifer; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-11-01

    A mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) binuclear complex, {κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,P,P-cyclo[(Ph)PCH2N(CH2Ph)CH2]}2(CrCl2)[Cr(μ-Cl)(AlClMe2)]·4toluene (1), of a P2N2 cyclic ligand was obtained upon treatment of the chromium precursor with alkylaluminum. Complex 1 was accessible from either its trivalent or divalent precursors, and density functional theory calculations revealed the presence of only σ- and π-orbital interactions in the Cr-Cr bond. PMID:25310604

  8. Enhancement of oxidative vaporization of chromium (III) oxide and chromium by oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 were found to be markedly enhanced in the presence of O atoms. Investigations were conducted over the temperature range 470 to 1520 K. For Cr2O3 the enhancement was about 10 to the 9th power at 820 K in oxygen containing 2.5 percent atoms. Rapid oxidative vaporization of bare chromium was observed below 1070 K, the rate being about one-half that of Cr2O3. Results are interpreted in terms of thermochemical analysis.

  9. Hexavalent chromium-resistant bacteria isolated from river sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Luli, G W; Talnagi, J W; Strohl, W R; Pfister, R M

    1983-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen and mutagen; however, the actual mechanisms of Cr toxicity are unknown. Two approaches were used to isolate Cr(VI)-resistant bacteria from metal-contaminated river sediments. Diluted sediments were plated directly onto a peptone-yeast extract (PYE) medium containing 0 to 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Approximately 8.4 x 10(5) CFU g-1 were recovered on 0 microgram of Cr(VI) ml-1, whereas 4.0 x 10(2) CFU g-1 were recovered on PYE plus 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Alternatively, continuous culture enrichment techniques were employed using PYE and 100 micrograms Cr(VI) ml-1 input at dilution rates of 0.02 and 0.10 h-1. After six residence periods, 10(9) CFU were recovered on PYE agar containing 0 microgram of Cr(VI) ml-1 and 10(7) CFU on PYE agar plus 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. Of 89 isolates obtained by direct plating onto PYE, 47% were resistant to 100 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1, and 29% were resistant to 250 micrograms of Cr(VI) ml-1. When the same isolates were plated onto PYE containing Cr(III), 88% were resistant to 100 micrograms ml-1 but only 2% were resistant to 250 micrograms ml-1. Cr, Co, Sb, and Zn were found in significantly higher concentrations at an industry-related contaminated site than at a site 11 km downstream. Total Cr in the sediments at the contaminated site averaged 586 micrograms (dry weight) g-1, and the downstream site averaged 71 micrograms (dry weight) g-1. The Cr recovered from acid-digested Ottawa River sediment samples was predominantly hexavalent. Five acid digestion procedures followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy were compared and found to be 30 to 70% efficient for recovery of Cr relative to neutron activation analysis. A population of aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria was recovered from sediments containing elevated levels of Cr.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6639032

  10. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.