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Sample records for chromium oxide thin

  1. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Okyay, Ali K.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2013-11-01

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO2 layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (Vt) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V Vt shift, the memory with CrO2 layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO2 layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  2. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Nayfeh, Ammar; Okyay, Ali K.

    2013-11-15

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO{sub 2} layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V V{sub t} shift, the memory with CrO{sub 2} layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO{sub 2} layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  3. Compact chromium oxide thin film resistors for use in nanoscale quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. R.; Fenton, J. C.; Constantino, N. G. N.; Warburton, P. A.

    2014-12-14

    We report on the electrical characterisation of a series of thin amorphous chromium oxide (CrO{sub x}) films, grown by dc sputtering, to evaluate their suitability for use as on-chip resistors in nanoelectronics. By increasing the level of oxygen doping, the room-temperature sheet resistance of the CrO{sub x} films was varied from 28 Ω/◻ to 32.6 kΩ/◻. The variation in resistance with cooling to 4.2 K in liquid helium was investigated; the sheet resistance at 4.2 K varied with composition from 65 Ω/◻ to above 20 GΩ/◻. All of the films measured displayed linear current–voltage characteristics at all measured temperatures. For on-chip devices for quantum phase-slip measurements using niobium–silicon nanowires, interfaces between niobium–silicon and chromium oxide are required. We also characterised the contact resistance for one CrO{sub x} composition at an interface with niobium–silicon. We found that a gold intermediate layer is favourable: the specific contact resistivity of chromium-oxide-to-gold interfaces was 0.14 mΩcm{sup 2}, much lower than the value for direct CrO{sub x} to niobium–silicon contact. We conclude that these chromium oxide films are suitable for use in nanoscale circuits as high-value resistors, with resistivity tunable by oxygen content.

  4. Chromium and Ruthenium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films for Propane Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; González-Vidal, José Luis; Torres, Gonzalo Alberto; Rodríguez-Baez, Jorge; Maldonado, Arturo; de la Luz Olvera, María; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Castañeda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cr) and (ZnO:Ru) thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by the sol-gel dip-coating method. A 0.6 M solution of zinc acetate dihydrate dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine was used as basic solution. Chromium (III) acetylacetonate and Ruthenium (III) trichloride were used as doping sources. The Ru incorporation and its distribution profile into the films were proved by the SIMS technique. The morphology and structure of the films were studied by SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements, respectively. The SEM images show porous surfaces covered by small grains with different grain size, depending on the doping element, and the immersions number into the doping solutions. The sensing properties of ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films in a propane (C3H8) atmosphere, as a function of the immersions number in the doping solution, have been studied in the present work. The highest sensitivity values were obtained for films doped from five immersions, 5.8 and 900, for ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films, respectively. In order to evidence the catalytic effect of the chromium (Cr) and ruthenium (Ru), the sensing characteristics of undoped ZnO films are reported as well. PMID:23482091

  5. Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide thin films for propane sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; González-Vidal, José Luis; Torres, Gonzalo Alberto; Rodríguez-Baez, Jorge; Maldonado, Arturo; Olvera, María de la Luz; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Castañeda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cr) and (ZnO:Ru) thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by the sol-gel dip-coating method. A 0.6 M solution of zinc acetate dihydrate dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine was used as basic solution. Chromium (III) acetylacetonate and Ruthenium (III) trichloride were used as doping sources. The Ru incorporation and its distribution profile into the films were proved by the SIMS technique. The morphology and structure of the films were studied by SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements, respectively. The SEM images show porous surfaces covered by small grains with different grain size, depending on the doping element, and the immersions number into the doping solutions. The sensing properties of ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films in a propane (C3H8) atmosphere, as a function of the immersions number in the doping solution, have been studied in the present work. The highest sensitivity values were obtained for films doped from five immersions, 5.8 and 900, for ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films, respectively. In order to evidence the catalytic effect of the chromium (Cr) and ruthenium (Ru), the sensing characteristics of undoped ZnO films are reported as well. PMID:23482091

  6. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  7. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  8. Reduction of a thin chromium oxide film on Inconel surface upon treatment with hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Inconel samples with a surface oxide film composed of solely chromium oxide with a thickness of approximately 700 nm were exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures to determine the suitable parameters for reduction of the oxide film. The hydrogen pressure during treatment was set to 60 Pa. Plasma was created by a surfaguide microwave discharge in a quartz glass tube to allow for a high dissociation fraction of hydrogen molecules. Auger electron depth profiling (AES) was used to determine the decay of the oxygen in the surface film and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to measure structural modifications. During hydrogen plasma treatment, the oxidized Inconel samples were heated to elevated temperatures. The reduction of the oxide film started at temperatures of approximately 1300 K (considering the emissivity of 0.85) and the oxide was reduced in about 10 s of treatment as revealed by AES. The XRD showed sharper substrate peaks after the reduction. Samples treated in hydrogen atmosphere under the same conditions have not been reduced up to approximately 1500 K indicating usefulness of plasma treatment.

  9. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  10. Adsorption of titanium, chromium, and copper atoms on thin aluminum and magnesium oxide film surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvauri, I. V.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Gazzaeva, M. E.; Vladimirov, G. G.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2012-04-01

    Methods of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), spectroscopy of characteristic electron energy losses (SCEEL), slow electron diffraction (SED), and contact potential difference (CPD) in ultrahigh vacuum are used to investigate the adsorption-emission properties and stability of two-component film systems formed by putting of Ti, Cr, and Cu atoms on MgO-Mo(011) and Al2O3-Mo(011) surfaces. All atoms have the properties of electronegative adsorbates. Continuous adatom monolayers are formed on the Al2O3-Mo(011) system surface, and three-dimensional islands are formed on the MgO-Mo(011) surface. The properties of monoatomic films on the oxide layer surface are close to those observed for bulk materials. No radical changes of the system properties are detected with increasing dielectric layer thickness. The thermal stability of the newly formed structures decreases in the order Ti, Cr, Cu, Al2O3(MgO), and Mo(011).

  11. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopic study of adsorption of perchlorate, sulfate, and thiosulfate ions onto chromium(III) oxide hydroxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, J.; McQuillan, A.J.

    1999-06-22

    A thin chromium oxide hydroxide colloid film has been used as a model of the passive stainless steel surface for studies of anion adsorption from aqueous solutions. The adsorption of perchlorate, sulfate, and thiosulfate ions has been investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. Surface charge was monitored from the surface excess concentrations of tetramethylammonium ions and of perchlorate ions using the infrared spectroscopic STIRS technique. The colloid film showed a high positive charge at low pH and a low negative charge at high pH. The adsorption of sulfate was only observed for a positive surface charge. The infrared spectrum of adsorbed sulfate coordination to surface Cr(III) ions. Thiosulfate gave adsorption behavior analogous to sulfate. Adsorption isotherms for sulfate and for thiosulfate were determined from infrared spectral data, and Langmuir binding constants of (2.3 {plus{underscore}minus} 0.4) x 10{sup 5} and (1.4 {plus{underscore}minus} 0.4) x 10{sup 5} M{sup {minus}1} were obtained for the respective adsorbates. The lack of chemical binding of sulfate and of thiosulfate to the chromium oxide hydroxide surface may be part of the basis for the corrosion-promoting properties of these ions at stainless steel surfaces.

  12. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  13. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  14. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  15. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens...

  1. Production of Chromium Oxide from Turkish Chromite Concentrate Using Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, S.; Eyuboglu, C.; Morcali, M. H.; Özbey, S.; Sucuoglu, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the possibility of chromium extraction from Turkish chromite concentrate and the production of chromium oxide were investigated. For the conversion of chromium(III) into chromium(VI), NaOH was employed, as well as air with a rate of 20 L/min. The effects of the base amount, fusing temperature, and fusing time on the chromium conversion percentage were investigated in detail. The conversion kinetics of chromium(III) to chromium(VI) was also undertaken. Following the steps of dissolving the sodium chromate in water and filtering, aluminum hydroxide was precipitated by adjusting the pH level of the solution. The chromium(VI) solution was subsequently converted to Cr(III) by the combination of sulfuric acid and ethanol. Interestingly, it was observed that ethanol precipitated chromium as chromium(VI) at mildly acidic pH levels, although this effect is more pronounced for K2Cr2O7 than Na2Cr2O7. On the other hand, in the strongly acidic regime, ethanol acted as a reducing agent role in that chromium(VI) was converted into Cr(III) whereas ethanol itself was oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. Subsequently, chromium hydroxide was obtained by the help of sodium hydroxide and converted to chromium oxide by heating at 800 °C, as indicated in thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA).

  2. Chromium oxide coatings improve thermal emissivity of alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upshaw, V.

    1966-01-01

    Chromium oxide coatings improve thermal radiation characteristics of alumina-coated heater-cathode systems in vacuum tubes. Chromium oxide is applied either as a surface layer or as a doping material. The new coatings eliminate the high temperature migration problems of carbon surface treatments.

  3. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a)...

  5. Self-Lubricating Composite Containing Chromium Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A self lubricating. friction and wear reducing composite material useful over a wide temperature range of from cryogenic temperature up to about 900 C. contains 60 80 wt. % of particulate Cr2O3, dispersed in a metal binder of a metal alloy containing Cr and at least 50 wt. % of Ni, Cr or a mature of Ni and Cr. It also contains 5-20 wt. % of a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II or rare earth metal and. optionally, 5-20 wt. % of a low temperature lubricant metal, such as Ag. Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Cu. This composite exhibits less oxidation instability and less abrasiveness than composites containing chromium carbide, is readily applied using plasma spray and can be ground and polished with a silicon carbide abrasive.

  6. Release of chromium from soils with persulfate chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kawalpreet; Crimi, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    An important part of the evaluation of the effectiveness of persulfate in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for treating organic contaminants is to identify and understand its potential impact on metal co-contaminants in the subsurface. Chromium is a redox-sensitive and toxic metal the release of which poses considerable risk to human health. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of persulfate chemical oxidation on the release of chromium from three soils varying in physical-chemical properties. Soils were treated with unactivated and activated persulfate [activated with Fe(II), Fe(II)-EDTA, and alkaline pH] at two different concentrations (i.e., 41 mM and 2.1 mM persulfate) for 48 h and 6 months and were analyzed for release of chromium. Results show that release of chromium with persulfate chemical oxidation depends on the soil type and the activation method. Sandy soil with low oxidant demand released more chromium compared to soils with high oxidant demand. More chromium was released with alkaline pH activation. Alkaline pH and high Eh conditions favor oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), which is the main mechanism of release of chromium with persulfate chemical oxidation. Unactivated and Fe(II)-activated persulfate decreased pH and at low pH in absence of EDTA chromium release is not a concern. These results indicate that chromium release can be anticipated based on the given site and treatment conditions, and ISCO system can be designed to minimize potential chromium release when treating soils and groundwater contaminated with both organic and metal contaminants. PMID:24028318

  7. Enhancement of oxidative vaporization of chromium (III) oxide and chromium by oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 were found to be markedly enhanced in the presence of O atoms. Investigations were conducted over the temperature range 470 to 1520 K. For Cr2O3 the enhancement was about 10 to the 9th power at 820 K in oxygen containing 2.5 percent atoms. Rapid oxidative vaporization of bare chromium was observed below 1070 K, the rate being about one-half that of Cr2O3. Results are interpreted in terms of thermochemical analysis.

  8. The effect of chromium oxyhydroxide on solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Cruse, T. A.; Ingram, B. J.; Routbort, J. L.; Wang, S.; Salvador, P. A.; Chen, G.; Carnegie Mellon Univ.; NETL; Ohio Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium species like the oxyhydroxide, CrO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, or hexoxide, CrO{sub 3}, are electrochemically reduced to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in solid oxide fuel cells and adversely affect the cell operating potentials. Using a narrowly focused beam from the Advanced Photon Source, such chromium oxide deposits were unequivocally identified in the active region of the cathode by X-ray diffraction, suggesting that the triple phase boundaries were partially blocked. Under fuel cell operating conditions, the reaction has an equilibrium potential of about 0.9 V and the rate of chromium oxide deposition is therefore dependent on the operating potential of the cell. It becomes diffusion limited after several hours of steady operation. At low operating potentials, lanthanum manganite cathodes begin to be reduced to MnO, which reacts with the chromium oxide to form the MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel.

  9. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  14. High performance supercapacitor from chromium oxide-nanotubes based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lota, Grzegorz; Frackowiak, Elzbieta; Mittal, Jagjiwan; Monthioux, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) filled and doped with chromium oxide have been used as attractive electrodes for supercapacitors. Pseudocapacitance effects related to the presence of nanosized chromium oxide finely dispersed at the nanoscale together with high conducting properties of SWNTs allow building efficient electrodes from this hybrid material. Even if capacitance values are not very high (ca. 60 F g -1), however, extremely quick charge propagation was observed, doubtless due to the overall physical and textural properties of SWNT material. The positive effect - with respect to empty-SWNTs - brought by the presence of chromium oxide in and probably in-between the SWNTs indicates that chromium oxide is accessible to the electrolyte in spite of its encapsulated location, because of the numerous side entries created all along the SWNT walls during the filling step.

  15. Optical and electrical properties of very thin chromium films for optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozanova, V.; Lalova, A.; Soserov, L.; Todorov, R.

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the optimal experimental conditions for the development of transparent metal contacts to be used in optoelectronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes and solar cells, is an important task. In this paper we present an overview of the development of very thin e-beam-deposited chromium films with high optical transparency. The surface morphology is investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The variation is examined of the films' electrical and optical properties (transmittance and complex refractive index) with the variation of the thickness and deposition rate. We observed that, for a given thickness of the chromium films, the absorption coefficient increases when the deposition rate is decreased. We also found that the thin films with a thickness of less than 10 nm show an average transmittance exceeding 60 % in the spectral range 400 - 1500 nm. The films' resistivity, ρ, is determined by the four-point probe method. The value of ρ varies in the range of 10-3 -10-4 Ω cm for chromium coatings in the thickness interval 5 - 100 nm. The results obtained show that very thin metal films could be an alternative to the transparent conductive oxides.

  16. Achieving zero stress in iridium, chromium, and nickel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-05-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for the intrinsic stress in iridium films. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence in the high adatom mobility growth regime. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film with a surface roughness of 5.0 +/- 0.5Å based on x-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurement at CuKα. The surface topography was also examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The examination of the stress in these films has been performed with a novel in-situ measurement device. The methodology and sensitivity of the in-situ instrument is also described herein.

  17. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive... subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. the color additive chormium oxide greens shall conform to the following specifications and shall...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive... subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. the color additive chormium oxide greens shall conform to the following specifications and shall...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive... subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. the color additive chormium oxide greens shall conform to the following specifications and shall...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive... subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. the color additive chormium oxide greens shall conform to the following specifications and shall...

  2. CHROMIUM TRANSPORT, OXIDATION, AND ADSORPTION IN MANGANESE-COATED SAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine how the processes of advection, dispersion, oxidation-reduction, and adsorption combine to affect the transport of chromium through columns packed with pyrolusite (P-MnO$-coated sand. We find that P-Mn02 effectively oxidizes Cr@I) to Cr(VI) and that the extent of oxida...

  3. NaCl-induced accelerated oxidation of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Shinata, Y.; Nishi, Y.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes new phenomena about chloride-induced ;accelerated oxidation of chromium. Thermal analysis was adopted to examine the oxidation, which was studied particularly in the case of NaCl. The presence of NaCl remarkably accelerates the oxidation of chromium. The process occurs below the melting point of NaCl, and the main reaction product is Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. In the accelerated oxidation NaCl plays a catalytic role because it is not consumed significantly in the process. DTA analysis reveals that the heat of reaction also accelerates the rate of oxidation, especially at an early stage of the reaction. The accelerated oxidation takes place similarly under the presence of chlorides other than NaCl, but the oxidation rate depends on the kind of salt. Therefore the Cl/sup -/ anion plays an important role in the process, while the nature of the cation affects the rate of acceleration.

  4. High frequency impedance spectra on the chromium dioxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C. M.; Lai, C. J.; Wu, J. S.; Huang, J. C. A.; Wu, C.-C.; Shyu, S.-G.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the study of high frequency magnetotransport properties of the chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin films, grown on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition. The film exhibits a ferromagnetic transition with a Curie temperature near 390 K. The temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization follows Bloch{close_quote}s law. The impedance spectra, being analyzed based on the fundamental electrodynamics, are demonstrated to be in a low-loss dielectric limit along with the occurrence of dielectric relaxation and magnetization response. The specific features of impedance spectra, distinct from the usual metallic ferromagnet, are attributed to the half metallic nature of CrO{sub 2}. The results explore the possibility for high frequency device applications.

  5. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  6. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  7. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  8. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  9. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg....

  10. Chromium Carbide Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Terajima, Ryou; Emura, Masanari

    1999-06-01

    Chromium carbide thin films are synthesized on Si(100)substrates by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition method at differentsubstrate temperatures. Glancing-angle X-ray diffraction shows that acrystalline chromium carbide film can be prepared at the substratetemperature of 700°C. Grain size of the films, examined witha field-emission secondary electron microscope, increases withincreasing substrate temperature.

  11. Some Thermodynamic Aspects of the Oxides of Chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Ayush; Albertsson, Galina Jelkina; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Subramanian, Sankaran

    2014-04-01

    To understand Cr emissions from slag melts to a vapor phase, an assessment of the stabilities of the chromium oxides at high temperatures has been carried out. The objective of the present study is to present a set of consistent data corresponding to the thermodynamic properties of the oxides of chromium, with special reference to the emission of hexavalent chromium from slags. In the current work, critical analysis of the experimental data available and a third analysis in the case of Cr2O3 have been carried out. Commercial databases, Fact Sage and ThermoCalc along with NIST-JANAF Thermochemical Tables, have been used for the analysis and comparisons of the results that are presented. The significant discrepancies in the available data have been pointed out. The data from NIST-JANAF Thermochemical Tables have been found to provide a set of consistent data for the various chromium oxides. An Ellingham diagram and the equations for the Δ G° (standard Gibbs free energy change) of formation of CrO x have been proposed. The present analysis shows that CrO3(g) is likely to be emitted from slag melts at high oxygen partial pressures.

  12. Factors affecting chromium carbide precipitate dissolution during alloy oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, R.N.; Gleeson, B.; Young, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    Ferrous alloys containing significant volume fractions of chromium carbides were formulated so as to contain an overall chromium level of 15% (by weight) but a nominal metal matrix chromium concentration of only 11%. Their oxidation at 850 C in pure oxygen led to either protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formation accompanied by subsurface carbide dissolution or rapid growth of iron-rich oxide scales associated with rapid alloy surface recession, which engulfed the carbides before they could dissolve. Carbide size was important in austenitic alloys: an as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy contained relatively coarse carbides and failed to form a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, whereas the same alloy when hot-forged to produce very fine carbides oxidized protectively. In ferritic alloys, however, even coarse carbides dissolved sufficiently rapidly to provide the chromium flux necessary to form and maintain the growth of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, a result attributed to the high diffusivity of the ferrite phase. Small additions of silicon to the as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy rendered it ferritic and led to protective cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. However, when the silicon-containing alloy was made austenitic (by the addition of nickel), it still formed a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, showing that the principal function of silicon was in modifying the scale-alloy interface.

  13. Chromium Substitution Effect on the Magnetic Structure of Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Murat, Ozkendir

    2012-05-01

    The local magnetic and electronic structures of chromium substituted iron oxide polycrystalline samples are investigated via Fe L-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structural and magnetic circular dichroism measurements. A strong dependence of atomic magnetic levels on the applied external magnetic field is observed. The magnetic behavior of Cr-doped iron oxides are determined to be dominantly governed by the d—d hybridization between Fe and Cr valence levels. In addition, the formation of CrO2 and Cr2O3 chromium oxide clusters in the sample are observed to determine the magnetic ordering, i.e. anti-ferromagnetic or ferromagnetic with the changing external magnetic fields. The results highly agree with the previous studies.

  14. The technology of chromium oxide passivation on stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmi, Tadahiro; Ohki, Atsushi; Nakamura, Masakazu; Kawada, Koji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Miyoshi, Shinji; Takahashi, Shinji; Chen, M.S.K. . Dept. of Electronics)

    1993-06-01

    A complete chromium oxide (Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]) passivation technology has been developed for stainless steel surfaces for use in high purity gas-delivery systems and process chambers. Starting with an electrochemical buffing (ECB) to add to electro-polished (EP) SUS316L stainless steel material, an optimal thermal treatment was found by using a gas mixture of 10% hydrogen, 1--10 ppm oxygen and argon balance gas at 500C for 1 h. Five-day corrosion tests with HCl gas (containing 1.4 ppm moisture) at 5 kg/cm[sup 2] and 100C showed no sign of corrosion on the chromium oxide passivated surface. Chemical stability tests on this surface with silane specialty gas thermal decomposition also showed a remarkable noncatalytic activity compared with conventional surfaces.

  15. Corrosion, ion release and Mott–Schottky probe of chromium oxide coatings in saline solution with potential for orthopaedic implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Oje, A. M.; Kavanagh, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report our investigation on chromium oxide thin film coatings that show a negligible ion release during electrochemical corrosion testing in saline solution. The chemical constituents of the films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering were identified to be predominantly Cr2O3 based on Raman spectroscopy anti-symmetric stretching vibration modes for CrIII–O and other peaks and an FTIR spectroscopy E u vibrational mode at 409 cm‑1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, multiplet fitting for 2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 states also confirmed the predominantly Cr2O3 stoichiometry in the films. The prepared chromium oxide coatings showed superior pitting corrosion resistance compared to the native chromium oxide films on bare uncoated stainless steel when tested under open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and cyclic voltammetry in saline solution. The chromium ion released into solution during the corrosion testing of stainless steel substrates coated with chromium oxide coatings was found to be negligibly small based on atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements. Our Mott–Schottky analysis investigation showed that the negligibly small ion release from the chromium oxide coated steel substrates is most likely due to a much lower defect density on the surface of the deposited coatings compared to the native oxide layer on the uncoated steel substrates. This opens up the opportunity for using chromium oxide surface coatings in hip, knee and other orthopaedic implants where possible metal ion release in vivo still poses a great challenge.

  16. Unconventional drop in the electrical resistance of chromium metal thin films at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Sawabu, M.; Miyagawa, M.; Kubota, T.; Takanashi, K.

    2016-09-01

    We studied the electrical resistance of single-crystal and polycrystalline chromium films. The ρ (T) curve of single-crystal films decrease with decreasing temperature and show humps at around 300 K consistent with the bulk chromium being an itinerant antiferromagnet. In the polycrystalline films, on the other hand, the ρ (T) curves deviate from those of the bulk chromium. Moreover, we observed sudden decrease in the resistance around 1.5 K. Although previous studies suggested that chromium films become superconductive (Schmidt et al. (1972) [12]), it is difficult to conclude whether a superconducting transition occurs because the electrical resistivity is not zero in all films. No anomaly was detected by resistance measurements around room temperature, and the sudden decrease in the resistance at low temperature may be attributed to the suppression of antiferromagnetic interaction by thinning down the chromium element.

  17. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babukutty, Blessy; Parakkal, Fasalurahman; Bhalero, G. M.; Aravind, P. B.; Nair, Swapna S.

    2015-06-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr3+ ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr2O3. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies.

  18. Structural, morphological and optical properties of chromium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Babukutty, Blessy; Parakkal, Fasalurahman; Nair, Swapna S.; Bhalero, G. M.; Aravind, P. B.

    2015-06-24

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction route from chloride precursors with surfactant, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). Structural and morphological characterization are analyzed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Transmission Electron micrographs show that the average grain size lies in the range 5nm to 10nm. Optical characterization has been done by UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Distinct optical absorptions of Cr{sup 3+} ions show hinting towards the presence of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Presence of oxygen is also confirmed from Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) studies.

  19. Specific features of hydrogenation of chromium-doped polycrystalline thin vanadium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. N.; Klimov, V. A.; Kompan, M. E.; Melekh, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It has been found that hydrogen penetration into chromium-doped polycrystalline thin vanadium dioxide films occurs with a lower rate than in the case of pure vanadium dioxide films. It has been shown that hydrogenation of films with low chromium concentrations is accompanied by a decrease in the phase transition temperature below T c = 340 K. However, at room temperature in these hydrogenated films, no traces of M1 monoclinic phase have been observed. As the chromium concentration increases, hydrogenation ceases to be accompanied by the decrease in the phase transition temperature.

  20. Pulsed Laser Deposited Ferromagnetic Chromium Dioxide thin Films for Applications in Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, S.; Jadhav, J.; Sharma, H.; Biswas, S.

    Stable rutile type tetragonal chromium dioxide (CrO2) thin films have been deposited on lattice-matched layers of TiO2 by KrF excimer laser based pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using Cr2O3 target. The TiO2 seed layer was deposited on oxidized Si substrates by the same PLD process followed by annealing at 1100 °C for 4 h. The lattice-matched interfacial layer is required for the stabilization of Cr (IV) phase in CrO2, since CrO2 behaves as a metastable compound under ambient conditions and readily converts into its stable phase of Cr (III) oxide, Cr2O3. Analyses with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Glancing-angle XRD (GIXRD), Raman spectroscopy and grazing-angle Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy confirm the presence of tetragonal CrO2 phase in the as-deposited films. Microstructure and surface morphology in the films were studied with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Electrical and magnetic characterizations of the films were performed at room temperature. Such type of stable half-metallic CrO2 thin films with low field magnetoresistive switching behaviour are in demand for applications as diverse as spin-FETs, magnetic sensors, and magneto-optical devices.

  1. Study of Chromium Oxide Activities in EAF Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baijun; Li, Fan; Wang, Hui; Sichen, Du

    2016-02-01

    The activity coefficients of chromium in Cu-Cr melts were determined by equilibrating liquid copper with solid Cr2O3 in CO-CO2 atmosphere. The temperature dependence of the activity coefficients of chromium in Cu-Cr melts could be expressed as lg γ_{Cr}(s)^{0} = { 3 2 5 9( ± 1 8 6} )/T - 0. 5 9( { ± 0. 1} ). Based on the above results, the activities of bivalent and trivalent chromium oxide in some slags at 1873 K (1600 °C) were measured. The slags were equilibrated with Cu-Cr melts under two oxygen partial pressures ( {p_{O}_{ 2} }} } = 6.9 × 10-4 and 1.8 × 10-6 Pa, respectively). The morphology of the quenched slags and the solubility of chromium oxide in the melts were investigated by EPMA, SEM, and XRD. Under both oxygen partial pressures, the slags were saturated by the solid solution MgAl2- x Cr x O4- δ . At the low oxygen partial pressure (1.8 × 10-6 Pa), the content of Cr in the liquid phase varied from 0.4 to 1.6 mass pct with the total Cr content in the slags increasing from 1.3 to 10.8 mass pct. At the high oxygen partial pressure (6.9 × 10-4 Pa), the content of Cr in the liquid phase decreased to the level of 0.2 to 0.6 mass pct. Both the activities of CrO and Cr2O3 in slag were found to increase approximately linearly with the increase of the total Cr content in slag. While the oxygen partial pressure had minor effect on the activity of Cr2O3 in the slag, it had significant effect on the activity of CrO.

  2. Half-metallic Chromium dioxide thin films for spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Manjit

    2011-12-01

    CrO2 is a well-established half-metallic oxide with near perfect spin polarization -- known to have the highest spin polarization among all known materials theoretically as well as experimentally. This means that the conduction electrons in CrO2 have only one kind of spin i.e. conduction is due only to the majority spin electrons. Because of its high spin polarization, CrO2 stands as an ideal and one of the most attractive candidates for spin-electronic applications as well as of fundamental interests. The enormous potential of CrO2 is still untapped since thin film growth modes, interface/surface properties and various factors affecting them are not very well understood or, relatively unknown. Reported works confirm strained growth of (100) CrO2 films and strain free growth of (110) CrO2 films on iso-structural TiO 2 substrates investigated using X-ray diffraction. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and element specific X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) techniques were employed to investigate the effect of this substrate-induced strain on the magnetic properties of the films. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) were fabricated with CrO2, Cr2O3 [natural oxide of Cr] as the thin insulating barrier and Co as the other ferromagnetic electrode using photolithography. I..V characteristics of this spin-electronic device are reported. Also, results on the low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of CrO2 and its comparison with standard growth technique under atmospheric pressure are reported.

  3. Chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of chromium (Cr) on glucose and insulin metabolism are well documented. Normal dietary intake of Cr appears to be suboptimal because several studies have reported beneficial effects of Cr in people with elevated blood glucose or type 2 diabetes eating conventional diets. Stresses that ...

  4. Development of RF sputtered chromium oxide coating for wear application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The radio frequency sputtering technique was used to deposite a hard refractory, chromium oxide coating on an Inconel X-750 foil 0.1 mm thick. Optimized sputtering parameters for a smooth and adherent coating were found to be as follows: target-to-substrate spacing, 41.3 mm; argon pressure, 5-10 mTorr; total power to the sputtering module, 400 W (voltage at the target, 1600 V), and a water-cooled substrate. The coating on the annealed foil was more adherent than that on the heat-treated foil. Substrate biasing during the sputter deposition of Cr2O3 adversely affected adherence by removing naturally occurring interfacial oxide layers. The deposited coatings were amorphous and oxygen deficient. Since amorphous materials are extremely hard, the structure was considered to be desirable.

  5. Electron-irradiation damage in chromium nitrides and chromium oxynitride thin films.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, Christoph; Grogger, Werner; Wilhartitz, Peter; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to monitor changes of the N-K electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of chromium nitride layers (CrN) introduced by electron irradiation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). These changes are different for each sample material and seem to give an indication for a particular composition. The CrN samples (CrN and Cr(0.47)N(0.53)) were prepared on silicon wafers by reactive magnetron sputtering of a metallic chromium target in nitrogen plasma. In addition, a CrON sample (Cr(0.5)O(0.2)N(0.3)) was also investigated. This sample was prepared by the addition of oxygen to the plasma during film deposition. The ELNES of the N-K ionization edge of stoichiometric CrN shows a typical fine structure (peaks at 399.0 and 401.1 eV) and remains nearly unaffected even after high-current-density irradiation. On the other hand the N-K fine structures of Cr(0.47)N(0.53) and Cr(0.5)O(0.2)N(0.3) show a change of the ELNES with irradiation dose. This presumably arises from a 1s-pi*-transition of molecular nitrogen located at interstitial positions in these samples. PMID:16554164

  6. Teaching the Properties of Chromium's Oxidation States with a Case Study Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdilek, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how a mixed-method case study affects pre-service science teachers' awareness of hexavalent chromium pollution and content knowledge about the properties of chromium's different oxidation states. The study was conducted in Turkey with 55 sophomores during the fall semester of 2013-2014. The…

  7. Thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 on chromium(III) oxide surfaces at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Noriko; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-12-01

    While many studies of heterogeneous chemistry on Cr(2)O(3) surfaces have focused on its catalytic activity, less is known about chemistry on this surface under atmospheric conditions. We report here studies of the thermal and photochemical reactions of NO(2) on Cr(2)O(3) at one atm in air. In order to follow surface species, the interaction of 16-120 ppm NO(2) with a 15 nm Cr(2)O(3) thin film deposited on a germanium crystal was monitored in a flow system using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) coupled to a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Gas phase products were monitored in the effluent of an ~285 ppm NO(2)-air mixture that had passed over Cr(2)O(3) powder in a flow system. A chemiluminescence NO(y) analyzer, a photometric O(3) analyzer and a long-path FTIR spectrometer were used to probe the gaseous products. In the absence of added water vapor, NO(2) formed nitrate (NO(3)(-)) ions coordinated to Cr(3+). These surface coordinated NO(3)(-) were reversibly solvated by water under humid conditions. In both dry and humid cases, nitrate ions decreased during irradiation of the surface at 302 nm, and NO and NO(2) were generated in the gas phase. Under dry conditions, NO was the major gaseous product while NO(2) was the dominant species in the presence of water vapor. Heating of the surface after exposure to NO(2) led to the generation of both NO(2) and NO under dry conditions, but only NO(2) in the presence of water vapor. Elemental chromium incorporated into metal alloys such as stainless steel is readily oxidized in contact with ambient air, forming a chromium-rich metal oxide surface layer. The results of these studies suggest that active photo- and thermal chemistry will occur when boundary layer materials containing chromium(III) or chromium oxide such as stainless steel, roofs, automobile bumpers etc. are exposed to NO(2) under tropospheric conditions. PMID:23090708

  8. Binary iron-chromium oxide as negative electrode for lithium-ion micro-batteries - spectroscopic and microscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bingbing; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Zanna, Sandrine; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    (Fe,Cr)-binary oxide thin film electrodes were prepared as negative electrode material for lithium-ion micro-batteries by thermal growth on a stainless steel (AISI 410, FeCr12.5) current collector. The mechanisms of lithiation/delithiation were investigated by means of electrochemical (CV, galvanostatic cycling), spectroscopic (XPS, ToF-SIMS) and microscopic (SEM, AFM) analytical techniques. The as-prepared (Fe, Cr)-binary oxide electrodes exhibit a good cycling performance except the first discharge/charge cycle where a high irreversible capacity is observed due to formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer. The influence of substituting an oxidized iron by an oxidized chromium (CrxFe2-xO3 phase) was evaluated. The data show that the inferior electrochemical conversion activity of substituted oxidized chromium results in hindering lithium transport in the bulk thin film electrode. It was observed that the irreversible morphology modifications together with SEI evolution are critical to capacity degradation while retaining good coulombic efficiency.

  9. Hollow tin/chromium whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Li, James C. M.

    2010-05-01

    Tin whiskers have been an engineering challenge for over five decades. The mechanism has not been agreed upon thus far. This experiment aimed to identify a mechanism by applying compressive stresses to a tin film evaporated on silicon substrate with an adhesion layer of chromium in between. A phenomenon was observed in which hollow whiskers grew inside depleted areas. Using focused ion beam, the hollow whiskers were found to contain both tin and chromium. At the bottom of the depleted areas, thin tin/tin oxide film remained over the chromium layer. It indicates that tin transport occurred along the interface between tin and chromium layers.

  10. Chromium vaporization from mechanically deformed pre-coated interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Sattari, Mohammad; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Cathode poisoning, associated with Cr evaporation from interconnect material, is one of the most important degradation mechanisms in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells when Cr2O3-forming steels are used as the interconnect material. Coating these steels with a thin Co layer has proven to decrease Cr vaporization. To reduce production costs, it is suggested that thin metallic PVD coatings be applied to each steel strip before pressing the material into interconnect shape. This process would enable high volume production without the need for an extra post-coating step. However, when the pre-coated material is mechanically deformed, cracks may form and lower the quality of the coating. In the present study, Chromium volatilization is measured in an air-3% H2O environment at 850 °C for 336 h. Three materials coated with 600 nm Co are investigated and compared to an uncoated material. The effect of deformation is investigated on real interconnects. Microscopy observations reveal the presence of cracks in the order of several μm on the deformed pre-coated steel. However, upon exposure, the cracks can heal and form a continuous surface oxide rich in Co and Mn. As an effect of the rapid healing, no increase in Cr vaporization is measured for the pre-coated material.

  11. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  12. The oxidation of iron-chromium-manganese alloys at 900C

    SciTech Connect

    Marasco, A.L.; Young, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    The oxidation of nine ternary iron-chromium-manganese alloys was studied at 900C in an oxygen partial pressure of 26.7 kPa. The manganese concentration was set at 2, 6, and 10 wt.%, and chromium at 5, 12, and 20 wt.%. The scales formed on the low-chromium alloys consisted of (Mn,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. These alloys all exhibited internal oxidation and scale detachment upon cooling. The scales formed on the higher-chromium alloys were complicated by nodule formation. Initially, these scales had an outer layer of MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} underneath, adjacent to the alloy. With the passage of time, however, nodules formed, and the overall reaction rate increased. This tendency was more marked at higher manganese contents. Although these alloys contained a high chromium content, the product chromia scale usually contained manganese. It was concluded that the presence of manganese in iron-chromium alloys had an adverse effect on the oxidation resistance over a wide range of chromium levels.

  13. Oxidative vaporization kinetics of chromium (III) oxide in oxygen from 1270 to 1570 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 on preoxidized resistively heated chromium were determined in flowing oxygen at 0.115 torr for temperatures from 1270 to 1570 K. Reaction controlled rates were obtained from experimental rates by a gold calibration technique. These rates were shown to agree with those predicted by thermochemical analysis. The activation energy obtained for the oxidative vaporation reaction corresponded numerically with the thermochemical enthalpy of the reaction. A theoretical equation is given for calculating the rate from thermodynamic data by using boundary layer theory.

  14. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    NN Krot; VP Shilov; AM Fedoseev; NA Budantseva; MV Nikonov; AB Yusov; AYu Garnov; IA Charushnikova; VP Perminov; LN Astafurova; TS Lapitskaya; VI Makarenkov

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium(III)solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported.

  15. Oxidation of Palladium-Chromium Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Jih-Fen, Lei; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    An alloy consisting of Pd with 13 wt % Cr is a promising material for high temperature applications. High temperature performance is degraded by the oxidation of the material, which is more severe in the fine wires and thin films used for sensor applications than in the bulk. The present study was undertaken to improve our understanding of the physical and chemical changes occurring at these temperatures and to identify approaches to limit oxidation of the alloy. The alloy was studied in both ribbon and wire forms. Ribbon samples were chosen to examine the role of grain boundaries in the oxidation process because of the convenience of handling for the oxidation studies. Wire samples 25 microns in diameter which are used in resistance strain gages were studied to correlate chemical properties with observed electrical, physical, and structural properties. Overcoating the material with a metallic Cr film did prevent the segregation of Pd to the surface; however, it did not eliminate the oxidation of the alloy.

  16. Enhanced room-temperature magnetoresistance in self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Biswas, S

    2016-09-14

    Self-assembled Ag-coated multiphasic diluted magnetic chromium oxide nanocomposites were developed by a facile chemical synthesis route involving a reaction of CrO3 in the presence of Ag(+) ions in an aqueous solution of poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and sucrose. The tiny ferromagnetic single domains of tetragonal and orthorhombic CrO2 (t-CrO2 and o-CrO2) embedded in a dominantly insulating matrix of antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 and Cr3O8, and paramagnetic CrO3 and Cr2O, with a correlated diamagnetic thin and discontinuous shell layer of Ag efficiently tailor useful magnetic and room-temperature magnetoresistance (RTMR) properties. The t-CrO2, o-CrO2, possible canted ferromagnetism due to spin disorder in the matrix components, and the associated exchange interactions are the elements responsible for the observed ferromagnetism in the composite structure. The chain of ferromagnetic centers embedded in the composite matrix constitutes a type of magnetic tunnel junction through which spin-polarized electrons can effectively move without significant local interruptions. Electrical transport measurements showed that the spin-dependent tunneling (SDT) mechanism in the engineered microstructure of the nanocomposites exists even at room temperature (RT). A typical sample unveils a markedly enhanced RTMR-value, e.g., -80% at an applied field (H) of 3 kOe, compared to the reported values for compacted CrO2 powders or composites. The enhanced RTMR-value observed in the Coulomb blockade regime appears not only due to the considerably suppressed spin flipping at RT but primarily due to a highly effective SDT mechanism through an interlinked structure of Ag-coated multiphasic chromium oxide nanocomposites. PMID:27524510

  17. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance. PMID:27434303

  18. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  19. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J. Graham; Warner, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Graham Jones, J., and Warner, C. G. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 169-177. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks. Occupational and medical histories, smoking habits, respiratory symptoms, chest radiographs, and ventilatory capacities were studied in 14 steelworkers employed as deseamers of steel ingots for periods of up to 16 years. The men were exposed for approximately five hours of each working shift to fume concentrations ranging from 1·3 to 294·1 mg/m3 made up mainly of iron oxide with varying proportions of chromium oxide and nickel oxide. Four of the men, with 14 to 16 years' exposure, showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis classified as ILO categories 2 or 3. Of these, two had pulmonary function within the normal range and two had measurable loss of function, moderate in one case and mild in the other. Many observers would diagnose these cases as siderosis but the authors consider that this term should be reserved for cases exposed to pure iron compounds. The correct diagnosis is mixed-dust pneumoconiosis and the loss of pulmonary function is caused by the effects of the mixture of metallic oxides. It is probable that inhalation of pure iron oxide does not cause fibrotic pulmonary changes, whereas the inhalation of iron oxide plus certain other substances obviously does. Images PMID:5021996

  20. Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 Exopolysaccharide as a Flocculant Improving Chromium(III) Oxide Removal from Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Szewczuk-Karpisz, Katarzyna; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Pac, Małgorzata; Choma, Adam; Komaniecka, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Chromium(III) oxide is an amphoteric, dark green solid. This most stable dye is widely used in construction and ceramic industries as well as in painting. In this study, the attempt is made to determine flocculating properties of exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesized by the bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, which would increase the efficiency of chromium(III) oxide removal from sewages and wastewaters. The conditions under which EPS is the most effective destabilizing component of chromium(III) oxide suspension have been determined too. In order to characterize the structure of electric double layer formed at the solid/supporting electrolyte (EPS) solution interface, electrokinetic potential measurements and potentiometric titration were performed. The EPS amount adsorbed on the chromium(III) oxide surface as a solution pH function was also measured. Moreover, the stability of Cr2O3 suspension in the absence and presence of S. meliloti 1021 EPS was estimated. The pooled analysis of all obtained results showed that EPS causes chromium(III) oxide suspension destabilization in the whole examined pH range. The largest change in the system stability before and after the polymer addition was observed at pH 9. It is probable that under these conditions bridging flocculation occurs in the examined system. PMID:25132693

  1. Simulated knee wear with cobalt chromium and oxidized zirconium knee femoral components.

    PubMed

    White, S E; Whiteside, L A; McCarthy, D S; Anthony, M; Poggie, R A

    1994-12-01

    A knee simulator that mimics the plowing/rolling wear mechanisms of the knee was used to compare wear properties of cobalt chromium and oxidized zirconium femoral components. The simulator flexes and extends the knee so that the femoral components travels from 0 degrees to 30 degrees while applying axial loads from 130 to 1300 lb. Three oxidized zirconium and 3 cobalt chromium femoral components were tested with 10-mm tibial polyethylene components. The oxidized zirconium femoral components caused significantly less ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear than cobalt chromium femoral components. Tibial inserts that were articulated against the cobalt chromium components had evidence of scratching, burnishing, and delamination, but none of the surfaces that were articulated against oxidized zirconium components had evidence of delamination. Cobalt chromium surface roughness significantly increased during the 2,000,000 cycle test, but oxidized zirconium surface roughness was not affected. Polyethylene wear was correlated to a significant degree with the surface roughness of the femoral components. The improved wear characteristics of the ceramic articular surfaces can be explained by the wettability of the ceramic surface, which minimized adhesive wear, and the resistance of the hard, ceramic surface to roughening. PMID:7994957

  2. Oxidative damage of DNA by chromium(V) complexes: relative importance of base versus sugar oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, R N; Moghaddas, S; Mazzer, P A; Dudones, L P; Joudah, L; Stroup, D

    1999-01-01

    Chromium(V)-mediated oxidative damage of deoxy-ribonucleic acids was investigated at neutral pH in aqueous solution by utilizing bis(2-ethyl-2-hydroxy-butanato)oxochromate(V) (I) and bis(hydroxyethyl)-amino-tris(hydroxymethyl)methane)oxochromate(V) (II). Single-stranded and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus and human placenta DNA, as well as two oligomers, 5'-GATCTAGTAGGAGGACAAATAGTGTTTG-3' and 5'-GATCCAAGCAAACACTATTTGTCCTCCTACTA-3', were reacted with the chromium(V) complexes. Most products were separated and characterized by chroma-tographic and spectroscopic methods. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments reveal more damage at G sites in comparison to other bases. Three primary oxidation products, 5-methylene-2-furanone (5-MF), furfural and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, were characterized. A minor product, which appears to be thymine propenal, was also observed. The dsDNA produces more furfural than furanone. The formation of these two products resulted from hydrogen ion or hydride transfer from C1' and C5' positions of the ribose to the oxo-chromium(V) center. Since no enhancements of these products (except propenal) were observed in the presence of oxygen, mechanisms pertaining to the participation of activated oxygen species may be ruled out. The oxidation of the G base is most likely associated with an oxygen atom transfer from the oxo-metallates to the double bond between C8 and N7 of the purine ring. The formation of the propenal may be associated with an oxygen-activated species, since a marginal enhancement of this product was observed in the presence of oxygen. The formation of furfural in higher abundance over 5-MF for dsDNA was attributed to the ease of hydrogen ion (or hydride transfer) from the C5' compared to C1' position of the ribose within a Cr(V)-DNA intermediate in which the metal center is bound to the phosphate diester moiety. PMID:10219096

  3. Oxidative damage of DNA by chromium(V) complexes: relative importance of base versus sugar oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bose, R N; Moghaddas, S; Mazzer, P A; Dudones, L P; Joudah, L; Stroup, D

    1999-05-15

    Chromium(V)-mediated oxidative damage of deoxy-ribonucleic acids was investigated at neutral pH in aqueous solution by utilizing bis(2-ethyl-2-hydroxy-butanato)oxochromate(V) (I) and bis(hydroxyethyl)-amino-tris(hydroxymethyl)methane)oxochromate(V) (II). Single-stranded and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus and human placenta DNA, as well as two oligomers, 5'-GATCTAGTAGGAGGACAAATAGTGTTTG-3' and 5'-GATCCAAGCAAACACTATTTGTCCTCCTACTA-3', were reacted with the chromium(V) complexes. Most products were separated and characterized by chroma-tographic and spectroscopic methods. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments reveal more damage at G sites in comparison to other bases. Three primary oxidation products, 5-methylene-2-furanone (5-MF), furfural and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, were characterized. A minor product, which appears to be thymine propenal, was also observed. The dsDNA produces more furfural than furanone. The formation of these two products resulted from hydrogen ion or hydride transfer from C1' and C5' positions of the ribose to the oxo-chromium(V) center. Since no enhancements of these products (except propenal) were observed in the presence of oxygen, mechanisms pertaining to the participation of activated oxygen species may be ruled out. The oxidation of the G base is most likely associated with an oxygen atom transfer from the oxo-metallates to the double bond between C8 and N7 of the purine ring. The formation of the propenal may be associated with an oxygen-activated species, since a marginal enhancement of this product was observed in the presence of oxygen. The formation of furfural in higher abundance over 5-MF for dsDNA was attributed to the ease of hydrogen ion (or hydride transfer) from the C5' compared to C1' position of the ribose within a Cr(V)-DNA intermediate in which the metal center is bound to the phosphate diester moiety. PMID:10219096

  4. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrCx in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding.

  5. Zinc has ambiguous effects on chromium (VI)-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Cervinka, Miroslav; Cerman, Jaroslav

    2005-01-01

    Zinc is an important cellular antioxidant. We investigated its role in chromium-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human tumor cell line Hep-2. The measured parameters included intracellular labile zinc content (Zinquin-E fluorescence), cell viability (WST-1 assay), oxidative stress (spectrophotometry), mitochondrial potential (flow cytometry), caspase-3 activity, and PARP cleavage (immunofluorescence). We found that Hep-2 cells contain abundant labile zinc stores that may be depleted by the ionophore TPEN or increased by external zinc supplementation. Chromium (VI)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis were enhanced in zinc-depleted cells after 24 h, in particular at chromium (VI) concentrations of 50 and 150 micromol/l. On the other hand, elevated levels of labile zinc were able to protect against apoptosis induced by 10 micromol/l chromium (VI) but at higher chromium (VI) concentrations (50 and 150 micromol/l) acted synergistically, significantly enhancing oxidative stress and the course of apoptosis, possibly through oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. PMID:15966574

  6. Synthesis and structure characterization of chromium oxide prepared by solid thermal decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yan, Zi F; Lu, Gao Q; Zhu, Zhong H

    2006-01-12

    Mesoporous chromium oxide (Cr2O3) nanocrystals were first synthesized by the thermal decomposition reaction of Cr(NO3)3.9H2O using citric acid monohydrate (CA) as the mesoporous template agent. The texture and chemistry of chromium oxide nanocrystals were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis, and thermoanalytical methods. It was shown that the hydrate water and CA are the crucial factors in influencing the formation of mesoporous Cr2O3 nanocrystals in the mixture system. The decomposition of CA results in the formation of a mesoporous structure with wormlike pores. The hydrate water of the mixture provides surface hydroxyls that act as binders, making the nanocrystals aggregate. The pore structures and phases of chromium oxide are affected by the ratio of precursor-to-CA, thermal temperature, and time. PMID:16471518

  7. Changes in oxidation state of chromium during LDEF exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    The solar collector used for the McDonnell-Douglas Cascade Variable Heat Pipe, Experiment A0076 (Michael Grote - Principal Investigator) was finished with black chromium plating as a thermal control coating. The coating is metallic for low emittance, and is finely microcrystalline to a dimension which yields its high absorptivity. An underplate of nickel was applied to the aluminum absorber plate in order to achieve optimal absorptance characteristics from the black chromium plate surface. Experiment A0076 was located at tray position F9, receiving a projected 8.7 x 10 exp 21 atomic oxygen atoms/sq cm and 11,200 ESH solar radiation. During retrieval, it was observed that the aluminized kapton thermal blankets covering most of the tray were severely eroded by atomic oxygen, and that a 'flap' of aluminum foil was overlaying a roughly triangular shaped portion of the absorber panel. The aluminum foil 'flap' was lost sometime between the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) retrieval and deintegration. At deintegration, the black chromium was observed to have discolored where it had been covered by the foil 'flap'. A summary of the investigation into the cause of the discoloration is presented.

  8. Techniques for Achieving Zero Stress in Thin Films of Iridium, Chromium, and Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadway, David M.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Weimer, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    We examine techniques for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The intrinsic stress is further correlated to the microstructural features and physical properties such as surface roughness and optical density at a scale appropriate to soft X-ray wavelengths. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight X-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arcsecond resolution through various deposition techniques that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure and deposition rate, including the existence of a critical argon process pressure that results in zero film stress which scales linearly with the atomic mass of the sputtered species. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we report this effect for iridium. In addition to stress reversal, we identify zero stress in the optical functioning iridium layer shortly after island coalescence for low process pressures at a film thickness of approximately 35nm. The measurement of the low values of stress during deposition was achieved with the aid of a sensitive in-situ instrument capable of a minimum detectable level of stress, assuming a 35nm thick film, in the range of 0.40-6.0 MPa for <111> oriented crystalline silicon substrate thicknesses of 70-280 microns, respectively.

  9. Thermogravimetric study of the reduction of oxides of nickel and chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1973-01-01

    The controlled hydrogen, carbon, and hydrogen-carbon reductions of the oxides of nickel and chromium were evaluated by thermogravimetric means. The materials studied were nickel (nickelous) oxide (NiO) and chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3), mixed NiO-Cr2O3, and oxidized nickel - 20-percent chromium (Ni-20Cr). NiO was effectively reduced by all three atmospheres, Cr2O3 only by hydrogen-carbon, NiO-Cr2O3 by hydrogen and hydrogen-carbon, and oxidized Ni-20Cr by hydrogen and hydrogen-carbon and to a considerable extent by carbon alone. The results suggest that the presence of nickel promotes the reduction of Cr2O3. However, no definite explanation could be reached for the effectiveness of the hydrogen-carbon reduction of Cr2O3.

  10. Characterization and Oxidation of Chromium(III) by Sodium Hypochlorite in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijian; Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rai, Dhanpat

    2006-07-01

    Chromium exists in nuclear waste sludges and is a problematic element in the vitrification process of high-level nuclear wastes. It is therefore necessary to treat the waste sludges to remove chromium prior to vitrification, by caustic leaching or oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oligomerization of Cr(III) on its oxidation by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions. Monomeric, dimeric and trimeric Cr(III) species in solution were separated by ion exchange. The kinetics of the oxidation of the separated species by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions was studied by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide previously studied. Results indicate that hypochlorite can oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in alkaline solutions, but the rate of oxidation by hypochlorite is slower than that by hydrogen peroxide at the same alkalinity and concentrations of oxidants. The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) by both oxidants decreases as the concentration of sodium hydroxide is increased, but the oxidation by hypochlorite seems less affected by the degree of oligomerization of Cr(III) than that by peroxide. Compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide where the major reaction pathway has an inverse order with respect to CNaOH, the oxidation by hypochlorite has a significant reaction pathway independent of [OH?].

  11. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of NO2 on a Chromium (III) Oxide Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, N.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) is a major component of the oxide layer on stainless steel surfaces. It is also widely used as pigment in paints and roofs and as a protective coating on various surfaces. While many studies have focused on the catalytic activity of Cr2O3 surfaces for selective catalytic reduction (SCR), less attention has been paid to its surface chemistry involving atmospherically important species such as NO2 under atmospheric conditions. In this study, we have investigated thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 in the presence and the absence of water vapor, using a thin layer of Cr2O3 as a model for the surface of stainless steel as well as other similarly coated surfaces in the boundary layer. A 30 nm thick Cr2O3 film was deposited on a germanium attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal, and the changes in the surface species were monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon NO2 adsorption, nitrate (NO3-) ions appeared likely coordinated to Cr3+ ion(s). The NO3- peaks reversibly shifted when water vapor was added, suggesting that NO3- become solvated. Irradiation at 311 nm led to a decrease in NO3- ions under both dry and humid conditions. The major gas-phase species formed by the irradiation was NO under dry conditions, while NO2 was mainly formed in the presence of H2O. Possible mechanisms and the implications for heterogeneous NO2 chemistry in the boundary layer will be discussed. The results will also be compared to similar chemistry on other surfaces.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of amorphous chromium carbide thin films.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Martin; Andersson, Matilda; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2012-06-01

    The microstructure, electronic structure and chemical bonding of chromium carbide thin films with different carbon contents have been investigated with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and soft x-ray absorption-emission spectroscopies. Most of the films can be described as amorphous nanocomposites with non-crystalline CrC(x) in an amorphous carbon matrix. At high carbon contents, graphene-like structures are formed in the amorphous carbon matrix. At 47 at.% carbon content, randomly oriented nanocrystallites are formed creating a complex microstructure of three components. The soft x-ray absorption-emission study shows additional peak structures exhibiting non-octahedral coordination and bonding. PMID:22553115

  13. Remediation of chromium(VI) by a methane-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Al Hasin, Abubakr; Gurman, Stephen J; Murphy, Loretta M; Perry, Ashlee; Smith, Thomas J; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2010-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment and are globally important in oxidizing the potent greenhouse gas methane. It is also well recognized that they have wide potential for bioremediation of organic and chlorinated organic pollutants, thanks to the wide substrate ranges of the methane monooxygenase enzymes that they produce. Here we have demonstrated that the well characterized model methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is able to bioremediate chromium(VI) pollution over a wide range of concentrations (1.4-1000 mg L(-1) of Cr(6+)), thus extending the bioremediation potential of this major group of microorganisms to include an important heavy-metal pollutant. The chromium(VI) reduction reaction was dependent on the availability of reducing equivalents from the growth substrate methane and was partially inhibited by the metabolic poison sodium azide. X-ray spectroscopy showed that the cell-associated chromium was predominantly in the +3 oxidation state and associated with cell- or medium-derived moieties that were most likely phosphate groups. The genome sequence of Mc. capsulatus (Bath) suggests at least five candidate genes for the chromium(VI) reductase activity in this organism. PMID:20039753

  14. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  15. The effect of temperature on chromium vaporization and oxide scale growth on interconnect steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Svensson, Jan Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium vaporization and oxide scale growth are probably the two most important degradation mechanisms associated with the interconnect in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) when Cr2O3-forming alloys are used as the interconnect material. This study examines the influence of temperature on both mechanisms. Two commercially available steels; Crofer 22 H and Sanergy HT, were isothermally exposed at 650, 750 and 850 °C in an air-3% H2O atmosphere with a high flow rate. Volatile chromium species were collected using the denuder technique. The microstructure of thermally grown oxide scales was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The findings of this study show that although Cr evaporation is reduced with lower temperature, its relative importance compared to oxide scale growth is greater.

  16. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  17. Stability of phosphonic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloy under oxidative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhure, Rahul; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.; Bonner, Carl; Hall, Felicia; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-04-01

    Cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have been widely used in the biomedical arena for cardiovascular, orthopedic and dental applications. Surface modification of the alloy allows us to tailor the interfacial properties to address critical challenges of Co-Cr alloy in medical applications. Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) of Octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) have been used to form thin films on the oxide layer of the Co-Cr alloy surface by solution deposition technique. The SAMs formed were investigated for their stability to oxidative conditions of ambient laboratory environment over periods of 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. The samples were then characterized for their stability using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. Detailed high energy XPS elemental scans confirmed the presence of the phosphonic monolayer after oxidative exposure which suggested that the SAMs were firmly attached to the oxide layer of Co-Cr alloy. AFM images gave topographical data of the surface and showed islands of SAMs on Co-Cr alloy surface, before and after SAM formation and also over the duration of the oxidative exposure. Contact angle measurements confirmed the hydrophobicity of the surface over 14 days. Thus the SAMs were found to be stable for the duration of the study. These SAMs could be subsequently tailored by modifying the terminal functional groups and could be used for various potential biomedical applications such as drug delivery, biocompatibility and tissue integration.

  18. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam . E-mail: subbi100@yahoo.co.uk; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-09-15

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm.

  19. Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Mansour, Hazim Louis; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

  20. Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah; Mansour, Hazim Louis

    2013-12-16

    This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

  1. Carcinogenic Chromium(VI) Compounds Formed by Intracellular Oxidation of Chromium(III) Dietary Supplements by Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lindsay E; Levina, Aviva; Harris, Hugh H; Cai, Zhonghou; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; James, David E; Lay, Peter A

    2016-01-26

    Chromium(III) nutritional supplements are widely consumed for their purported antidiabetic activities. X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) studies have now shown that non-toxic doses of [Cr3 O(OCOEt)6 (OH2 )3 ](+) (A), a prospective antidiabetic drug that undergoes similar H2 O2 induced oxidation reactions in the blood as other Cr supplements, was also oxidized to carcinogenic Cr(VI) and Cr(V) in living cells. Single adipocytes treated with A had approximately 1 μm large Cr hotspots containing Cr(III) , Cr(V) , and Cr(VI) (primarily Cr(VI) thiolates) species. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the antidiabetic activity of Cr(III) and the carcinogenicity of Cr(VI) compounds arise from similar mechanisms involving highly reactive Cr(VI) and Cr(V) intermediates, and highlight concerns over the safety of Cr(III) nutritional supplements. PMID:26696553

  2. Flexible high power-per-weight perovskite solar cells with chromium oxide-metal contacts for improved stability in air.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Adam, Getachew; Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Drack, Michael; Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Leonat, Lucia; Apaydin, Dogukan Hazar; Groiss, Heiko; Scharber, Markus Clark; White, Matthew Schuette; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Bauer, Siegfried

    2015-10-01

    Photovoltaic technology requires light-absorbing materials that are highly efficient, lightweight, low cost and stable during operation. Organolead halide perovskites constitute a highly promising class of materials, but suffer limited stability under ambient conditions without heavy and costly encapsulation. Here, we report ultrathin (3 μm), highly flexible perovskite solar cells with stabilized 12% efficiency and a power-per-weight as high as 23 W g(-1). To facilitate air-stable operation, we introduce a chromium oxide-chromium interlayer that effectively protects the metal top contacts from reactions with the perovskite. The use of a transparent polymer electrode treated with dimethylsulphoxide as the bottom layer allows the deposition-from solution at low temperature-of pinhole-free perovskite films at high yield on arbitrary substrates, including thin plastic foils. These ultra-lightweight solar cells are successfully used to power aviation models. Potential future applications include unmanned aerial vehicles-from airplanes to quadcopters and weather balloons-for environmental and industrial monitoring, rescue and emergency response, and tactical security applications. PMID:26301766

  3. Flexible high power-per-weight perovskite solar cells with chromium oxide-metal contacts for improved stability in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Adam, Getachew; Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Drack, Michael; Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Leonat, Lucia; Apaydin, Dogukan Hazar; Groiss, Heiko; Scharber, Markus Clark; White, Matthew Schuette; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Bauer, Siegfried

    2015-10-01

    Photovoltaic technology requires light-absorbing materials that are highly efficient, lightweight, low cost and stable during operation. Organolead halide perovskites constitute a highly promising class of materials, but suffer limited stability under ambient conditions without heavy and costly encapsulation. Here, we report ultrathin (3 μm), highly flexible perovskite solar cells with stabilized 12% efficiency and a power-per-weight as high as 23 W g-1. To facilitate air-stable operation, we introduce a chromium oxide-chromium interlayer that effectively protects the metal top contacts from reactions with the perovskite. The use of a transparent polymer electrode treated with dimethylsulphoxide as the bottom layer allows the deposition--from solution at low temperature--of pinhole-free perovskite films at high yield on arbitrary substrates, including thin plastic foils. These ultra-lightweight solar cells are successfully used to power aviation models. Potential future applications include unmanned aerial vehicles--from airplanes to quadcopters and weather balloons--for environmental and industrial monitoring, rescue and emergency response, and tactical security applications.

  4. A fundamental study of chromium deposition on solid oxide fuel cell cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Kurokawa, Hideto; Jacobson, Craig P.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.

    Chromium contamination of metal oxides and SOFC cathode catalysts is studied in the range 700-1000 °C. Samples are exposed to a moist air atmosphere saturated with volatile Cr species in the presence and absence of direct contact between the sample and ferritic stainless steel powder. Chromium contamination of the samples is observed to occur via two separate pathways: surface diffusion from the stainless steel surface and vapor deposition from the atmosphere. Surface diffusion dominates in all cases. Surface diffusion is found to be a significant source of Cr contamination for LSM and LSCF at 700, 800, and 1000 °C. Vapor deposition of Cr onto LSCF was observed at each of these temperatures, but was not observed for LSM at 700 or 800 °C. Comparison of the behavior for LSM, LSCF, and single metal oxides suggests that Mn and Co, respectively, are responsible for the Cr contamination of these catalysts.

  5. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P. M.; Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) field cured conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce

  6. Stability of Chromium Carbide/Chromium Oxide Based Porous Ceramics in Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ziqiang

    This research was aimed at developing porous ceramics as well as ceramic-metal composites that can be potentially used in Gen-IV supercritical water reactors (SCWR). The research mainly includes two parts: 1) fabricating and engineering the porous ceramics and porous ceramic-metal composite; 2) Evaluating the stability of the porous ceramics in SCW environments. Reactive sintering in carbonaceous environments was used to fabricate porous Cr3C2/Cr2O3-based ceramic. A new process consisting of freeze casting and reactive sintering has also been successfully developed to fabricate highly porous Cr3C 2 ceramics with multiple interconnected pores. Various amounts of cobalt powders were mixed with ceramic oxides in order to modify the porous structure and property of the porous carbide obtained by reactive sintering. The hardness of the M(Cr,Co)7C3-Co composite has been evaluated and rationalized based on the solid solution of cobalt in the ceramic phase, the composite effect of soft Co metal and the porous structure of the ceramic materials. Efforts have also been made in fabricating and evaluating interpenetrating Cr3C2-Cu composites formed by infiltrating liquid copper into porous Cr3C2. The corrosion evaluation mainly focused on assessing the stability of porous Cr3C2 and Cr2O3 under various SCW conditions. The corrosion tests showed that the porous Cr3C 2 is stable in SCW at temperatures below 425°C. However, cracking and disintegrating of the porous Cr3C2 occurred when the SCW temperature increased above 425°C. Mechanisms of the corrosion attack were also investigated. The porous Cr2O3 obtained by oxidizing the porous Cr3C2 was exposed to various SCW environments. It was found that the stability of Cr 2O 3 was dependent on its morphology and the SCW testing conditions. Increasing SCW temperature increased the dissociation rate of the Cr2O 3. Adding proper amount of Y2O3 can increase the stability of the porous Cr2O3 in SCW. It was also concluded that decreasing

  7. Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Nai-Juan; Ignatiev, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The development of thin-film solid oxide fuel cells (TFSOFCs) and a method of fabricating them have progressed to the prototype stage. This can result in the reduction of mass, volume, and the cost of materials for a given power level.

  8. Microstructural evolution of tungsten oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Thomas, Rajesh; Rao, G. Mohan

    2009-10-01

    Tungsten oxide thin films are of great interest due to their promising applications in various optoelectronic thin film devices. We have investigated the microstructural evolution of tungsten oxide thin films grown by DC magnetron sputtering on silicon substrate. The structural characterization and surface morphology were carried out using X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The as deposited films were amorphous, where as, the films annealed above 400 °C were crystalline. In order to explain the microstructural changes due to annealing, we have proposed a "instability wheel" model for the evolution of the microstructure. This model explains the transformation of mater into various geometries within them selves, followed by external perturbation.

  9. Determination of carbon by the oxidation reduction reaction with chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashkovich, L.; Kuteynikov, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Free carbon was determined in silicon and boron carbides in ash, oxides, and other materials by oxidation to carbon dioxide with a mixture of K2Cr2O7 + H2SO4. The determination was made from the amount of CR(6) consumed, by adding excess Mohr's salt and titrating with a standard solution of KMnO4. The amount of Cr(6) self reduced was determined in a blank test. Optimum oxidation and conditions were achieved when the volumes of 5% k2Cr2Oz and H2SO4 were equal. The mixture was boiled for 1-2 hours using a reflex condenser. The volume should not be reduced, in order to avoid an increase in the sulfuric acid concentration. The relative error was 4-7% for 0.005-0.04 g C and less than or equal to 3.5% for 0.1 g C.

  10. Enhanced oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 and chromium by oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 have been found to be markedly enhanced in the presence of oxygen atoms. Investigations were conducted over the temperature range 200-1250 C. For Cr2O3 the enhancement was about 10 to the 9th power at 550 C in oxygen containing 2.5% atoms. Rapid oxidative vaporization of bare chromium was observed below 800 C, the rate being about one-half that of Cr2O3. Results are interpreted in terms of thermochemical analysis.

  11. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1992-04-28

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness. No Drawings

  12. Process for making a titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A ceramic composition composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to aobut 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  13. Ten-Year Comparison of Oxidized Zirconium and Cobalt-Chromium Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Vioreanu, Mihai; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidized zirconium femoral components had better outcomes than cobalt-chromium in vivo at medium and long term and if the use of oxidized zirconium components had clinical adverse effects. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (eighty knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis from January 2002 to December 2003. For each patient, the knees were randomized to receive the oxidized zirconium femoral component, with the contralateral knee receiving the cobalt-chromium component. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Knee Society score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient satisfaction scale. Radiographic outcomes include the Knee Society total knee arthroplasty roentgenographic evaluation and scoring system and measurement of radiographic wear. Patients and assessors were blinded to the treatment groups and results. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes between the two implants at ten years postoperatively. Ten years following surgery, 36% of the patients preferred the cobalt-chromium knee compared with 11% who preferred the oxidized zirconium knee (p = 0.02) and 53% had no preference. Conclusions: Ten-year outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with oxidized zirconium and cobalt-chromium femoral components showed no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes. Patients had no preference or preferred the cobalt chromium prosthesis to the oxidized zirconium prosthesis. There were no adverse effects associated with the use of oxidized zirconium femoral implants.

  14. Pore Scale Modeling of the Reactive Transport of Chromium in the Cathode of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Amon, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We present a pore scale model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode. Volatile chromium species are known to migrate from the current collector of the SOFC into the cathode where over time they decrease the voltage output of the fuel cell. A pore scale model is used to investigate the reactive transport of chromium species in the cathode and to study the driving forces of chromium poisoning. A multi-scale modeling approach is proposed which uses a cell level model of the cathode, air channel and current collector to determine the boundary conditions for a pore scale model of a section of the cathode. The pore scale model uses a discrete representation of the cathode to explicitly model the surface reactions of oxygen and chromium with a cathode material. The pore scale model is used to study the reaction mechanisms of chromium by considering the effects of reaction rates, diffusion coefficients, chromium vaporization, and oxygen consumption on chromium’s deposition in the cathode. The study shows that chromium poisoning is most significantly affected by the chromium reaction rates in the cathode and that the reaction rates are a function of the local current density in the cathode.

  15. Electronic States of Half-Metallic Chromium Oxides Probed by 53Cr NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hikaru; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Masayuki; Isobe, Masahiko; Ueda, Yutaka

    2012-12-01

    We have performed 53Cr NMR measurements to investigate local electronic states of K2Cr8O16 and CrO2 which are ferromagnetic half-metals with high valent chromium ions. In the ferromagnetic metallic phases of both oxides, we observed at least two 53Cr NMR spectra which are inconsistent with crystallographically inequivalent one chromium site on a tetragonal lattice, the hollandite structure (symmetry I4/m) of K2Cr8O16 and the rutile structure (P42mnm) of CrO2. The origin of this anomalous electronic state may be associated with an electronic phase separation in double exchange systems with the mixed valence.

  16. Oxidation behavior of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium - Magnesium oxide and nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium - zirconate type of cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1976-01-01

    The 1100 and 1200 C cyclic oxidation resistance of dense Ni-Cr-Al-Y - MgO, Ni-Cr-Al-Y - CaZrO3, Ni-Cr-Al-Y - SrZrO3, Ni-Cr-Al-Y - MgZro3 cermets and a 70 percent dense Ni-Cr-Al-Y developmental material was determined. The cermets contained 60 and 50 volume percent of Ni-Cr-Al-Y which formed a matrix with the oxide particles imbedded in it. The cermets containing MgO were superior to cermets based on zirconates and to the porous Ni-Cr-Al-Y material.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan Thin Films on Mixed-Matrix Membranes for Complete Removal of Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Vignesh; Jyothi, Mannekote Shivanna; Balakrishna, R Geetha; Padaki, Mahesh; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi

    2015-01-01

    Herein we present a new approach for the complete removal of CrVI species, through reduction of CrVI to CrIII, followed by adsorption of CrIII. Reduction of chromium from water is an important challenge, as CrIV is one of the most toxic substances emitted from industrial processes. Chitosan (CS) thin films were developed on plain polysulfone (PSf) and PSf/TiO2 membrane substrates by a temperature-induced technique using polyvinyl alcohol as a binder. Structure property elucidation was carried out by X-ray diffraction, microscopy, spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and water uptake studies. The increase in hydrophilicity followed the order: PSf < PSf/TiO2 < PSf/TiO2/CS membranes. Use of this thin-film composite membrane for chromium removal was investigated with regards to the effects of light and pH. The observations reveal 100 % reduction of CrVI to CrIII through electrons and protons donated from OH and NH2 groups of the CS layer; the reduced CrIII species are adsorbed onto the CS layer via complexation to give chromium-free water. PMID:26246989

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan Thin Films on Mixed-Matrix Membranes for Complete Removal of Chromium.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Vignesh; Jyothi, Mannekote Shivanna; Balakrishna, R Geetha; Padaki, Mahesh; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi

    2015-06-01

    Herein we present a new approach for the complete removal of Cr(VI) species, through reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), followed by adsorption of Cr(III). Reduction of chromium from water is an important challenge, as Cr(IV) is one of the most toxic substances emitted from industrial processes. Chitosan (CS) thin films were developed on plain polysulfone (PSf) and PSf/TiO2 membrane substrates by a temperature-induced technique using polyvinyl alcohol as a binder. Structure property elucidation was carried out by X-ray diffraction, microscopy, spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and water uptake studies. The increase in hydrophilicity followed the order: PSf < PSf/TiO2 < PSf/TiO2/CS membranes. Use of this thin-film composite membrane for chromium removal was investigated with regards to the effects of light and pH. The observations reveal 100 % reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) through electrons and protons donated from OH and NH2 groups of the CS layer; the reduced Cr(III) species are adsorbed onto the CS layer via complexation to give chromium-free water. PMID:26246989

  19. Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage Induced by Chromium in Liver and Kidney of Goldfish, Carassius auratus

    PubMed Central

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant element in the Earth’s crust. It exhibits various oxidation states, from divalent to hexavalent forms. Cr has diverse applications in various industrial processes and inadequate treatment of the industrial effluents leads to the contamination of the surrounding water resources. Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is the most toxic form, and its toxicity has been associated with oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the toxic potential of Cr (VI) in fish. In this research, we investigated the role of oxidative stress in chromium-induced genotoxicity in the liver and kidney cells of goldfish, Carassius auratus. Goldfish were acclimatized to the laboratory conditions and exposed them to 5% and 10% of 96 hr-LC50 (85.7 mg/L) of aqueous Cr (VI) in a continuous flow through system. Fish were sampled every 7 days for a period of 28 days to analyze the lipid hydroperoxides (LHP) levels and genotoxic potentials in the liver and kidney. LHP levels were analyzed by spectrophotometry while genotoxicity was assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. LHP levels in the liver increased significantly at week 1, followed by a decrease. LHP levels in the kidney increased significantly at weeks 1, 2, and 3, and decreased at week 4 compared to the control. The percentage of DNA damage increased in both liver and kidney at both test concentrations. The results clearly indicate that Cr (VI) induces significant levels of DNA damage in liver and kidney cells of goldfish. The induced LHP levels in both organs were concentration-dependent and were directly correlated with the levels of DNA damage. The two tested Cr (VI) concentrations induced significant levels of oxidative stress in both organs, however the kidney appears to be more vulnerable and sensitive to Cr-induced toxicity than the liver. PMID:23700361

  20. Effect of chromium oxide as active site over TiO2-PILC for selective catalytic oxidation of NO.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei; Zhong, Qin

    2013-12-01

    This study introduced TiO2-pillared clays (TiO2-PILC) as a support for the catalytic oxidation of NO and analyzed the performance of chromium oxides as the active site of the oxidation process. Cr-based catalysts were prepared by a wet impregnation method. It was found that the 10 wt.% chromium doping on the support achieved the best catalytic activity. At 350 degrees C, the NO conversion was 61% under conditions of GHSV = 23600 hr(-1). The BET data showed that the support particles had a mesoporous structure. H2-TPR showed that Cr(10)TiP (10 wt.% Cr doping on TiO2-PILC) clearly exhibited a smooth single peak. EPR and XPS were used to elucidate the oxidation process. During the NO + O2 adsorption, the intensity of evolution of superoxide ions (O2(-)) increased. The content of Cr3+ on the surface of the used catalyst was 40.37%, but when the used catalyst continued adsorbing NO, the Cr3+ increased to 50.28%. Additionally, O(alpha)/O(beta) increased markedly through the oxidation process. The NO conversion decreased when SO2 was added into the system, but when the SO2 was removed, the catalytic activity recovered almost up to the initial level. FT-IR spectra did not show a distinct characteristic peak of SO4(2-). PMID:24649682

  1. Tunneling corrosion mechanism of 25% chromium-20% nickel-niobium stainless steel in highly oxidizing nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimura, H.; Harada, M.; Okada, T.; Nagano, H.; Okubo, M.

    1995-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steel (SS) is used commonly in chemical plants dealing with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) because of its high corrosion resistance. However, even SS tends to corrode intergranularly in highly oxidizing HNO{sub 3} containing oxidizing chromium or cerium ions, such as Cr{sup 6+} or Ce{sup 4+}. Furthermore, pitting corrosion, so-called tunneling corrosion or end-grain attack, occurs on the forgings in highly oxidizing HNO{sub 3}. The mechanism of tunneling corrosion and its countermeasures for a 25% Cr-20% Ni-Nb steel (UNS S31040) in a mock reprocessing plant were studied. Results indicated tunneling corrosion was a type of pitting corrosion with general and intergranular attack on pit surfaces. It propagated along metal flows with penetrations up to 2 mm in diameter and 6 mm in depth. Rates of tunneling corrosion were 3 to 13 times faster than general corrosion. Tunneling corrosion initiated and propagated parallel to metal flows on the local parts where chromium content was depleted. This method of corrosion was caused both by preferential corrosion of a low-chromium part and corrosion accelerated by the galvanic action between a low-chromium part as an anode and a high-chromium part as a cathode. The electroslag remelting process completely resolved this problem by making ingots free from continuous chromium segregation.

  2. Role of Bacillus subtilis error prevention oxidized guanine system in counteracting hexavalent chromium-promoted oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Santos-Escobar, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Corona, J Félix; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Chromium pollution is potentially detrimental to bacterial soil communities, compromising carbon and nitrogen cycles that are essential for life on earth. It has been proposed that intracellular reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] may cause bacterial death by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage; the molecular basis of the phenomenon was investigated in this work. Here, we report that Bacillus subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention oxidized guanine (GO) system were significantly more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cells of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that oxidative damage to DNA is involved in the deleterious effects of the oxyanion. In agreement with this suggestion, Cr(VI) dramatically increased the ROS concentration and induced mutagenesis in a GO-deficient B. subtilis strain. Alkaline gel electrophoresis (AGE) analysis of chromosomal DNA of WT and ΔGO mutant strains subjected to Cr(VI) treatment revealed that the DNA of the ΔGO strain was more susceptible to DNA glycosylase Fpg attack, suggesting that chromium genotoxicity is associated with 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G) lesions. In support of this notion, specific monoclonal antibodies detected the accumulation of 8-oxo-G lesions in the chromosomes of B. subtilis cells subjected to Cr(VI) treatment. We conclude that Cr(VI) promotes mutagenesis and cell death in B. subtilis by a mechanism that involves radical oxygen attack of DNA, generating 8-oxo-G, and that such effects are counteracted by the prevention and repair GO system. PMID:24973075

  3. Role of Bacillus subtilis Error Prevention Oxidized Guanine System in Counteracting Hexavalent Chromium-Promoted Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Escobar, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Corona, J. Félix

    2014-01-01

    Chromium pollution is potentially detrimental to bacterial soil communities, compromising carbon and nitrogen cycles that are essential for life on earth. It has been proposed that intracellular reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] may cause bacterial death by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage; the molecular basis of the phenomenon was investigated in this work. Here, we report that Bacillus subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention oxidized guanine (GO) system were significantly more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cells of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that oxidative damage to DNA is involved in the deleterious effects of the oxyanion. In agreement with this suggestion, Cr(VI) dramatically increased the ROS concentration and induced mutagenesis in a GO-deficient B. subtilis strain. Alkaline gel electrophoresis (AGE) analysis of chromosomal DNA of WT and ΔGO mutant strains subjected to Cr(VI) treatment revealed that the DNA of the ΔGO strain was more susceptible to DNA glycosylase Fpg attack, suggesting that chromium genotoxicity is associated with 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G) lesions. In support of this notion, specific monoclonal antibodies detected the accumulation of 8-oxo-G lesions in the chromosomes of B. subtilis cells subjected to Cr(VI) treatment. We conclude that Cr(VI) promotes mutagenesis and cell death in B. subtilis by a mechanism that involves radical oxygen attack of DNA, generating 8-oxo-G, and that such effects are counteracted by the prevention and repair GO system. PMID:24973075

  4. Removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solution using aluminum oxide hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Bedemo, Agaje; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Zewge, Feleke

    2016-01-01

    Water is second most essential for human being. Contamination of water makes it unsuitable for human consumption. Chromium ion is released to water bodies from various industries having high toxicity which affects the biota life in these waters. In this study aluminum oxide hydroxide was tested for its efficiency to remove trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions through batch mode experiments. Chromium concentrations in aqueous solutions and tannery waste water before and after adsorption experiments were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption of Cr(III) were studied. The study revealed that more than 99 % removal of Cr(III) was achieved over wide range of initial pH (3-10). The optimum conditions for the removal of Cr(III) were found to be at pH 4-6 with 40 g/L adsorbent dose at 60 min of contact time. The adsorption capacity was assessed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The equilibrium data at varying adsorbent dose obeyed the two isotherms. The adsorbent was found to be efficient for the removal of Cr(III) from tannery waste effluent. PMID:27547663

  5. Nitrogen Impurity Gettering in Oxide Dispersion Ductilized Chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Anderson, Ian M; Weaver, Mark; Meyer III, Harry M; Walker, Larry R; Miller, Michael K; Larson, David James; Wright, Ian G; Sikka, Vinod K; Rar, Andrei; Pharr, George Mathews; Keiser, James R; Walls, Claudia Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Work by Scruggs in the 1960s demonstrated that tensile ductility could be achieved at room temperature in powder metallurgically-produced Cr alloyed with MgO. During consolidation, much of the MgO converted to the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. We have duplicated this effect, achieving room temperature tensile elongations of 4% for hot-pressed Cr-6MgO-(0-1)Ti (wt.%) and 10% for hot-pressed and extruded Cr-6MgO-0.75Ti. Direct incorporation of nitrogen into the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase was not detected; however, impurities, particularly nitrogen and sulfur, were observed to segregate to and/or precipitate at interfaces between the MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases and the Cr matrix. Exploratory studies of other non-spinel forming oxide dispersions (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed a similar pattern of impurity segregation/precipitation, suggesting that there is nothing unique about spinel dispersions in Cr with regards to impurities. However, none of these other dispersions resulted in similar levels of tensile elongation.

  6. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Krot, N N.; Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Budantseva, N A.; Nikonov, M V.; Yusov, A B.; Garnov, A Y.; Charushnikova, I A.; Perminov, V P.; Astafurova, L N.; Lapitskaya, T S.; Makarenkov, V I.

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup -} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported. The present systematic tests investigated oxygen gas, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium persulfate oxidants to dissolve Cr(III) under alkaline conditions to form soluble chromate. Permanganate and ozone also were considered for testing but were thought to be of secondary interest because of the insoluble residue (MnO{sub 2} from permanganate) and complex equipment (necessary to generate ozone) implicit with use of these reagents. The oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reagents leave no condensable residue and sodium persulfate only leaves soluble sodium sulfate. Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}, various hydrothermally aged amorphous Cr(III) oxide hydrates, mixed Fe(III)/Cr(III) oxide hydrates, and nickel and iron Cr(III) spinels, all of which have been identified or are likely constituents in Hanford tank wastes, were prepared and characterized for the dissolution tests. The effects of reagent and hydroxide concentrations, reaction temperature, and transition metal catalysts on reaction progress were investigated for each reagent as functions of reaction time. Reaction progress was measured by monitoring chromate concentration. Oxidation of chromium compounds by

  7. CRYSTALLINE CHROMIUM DOPED ALUMINUM OXIDE (RUBY) USE AS A LUMINESCENT SCREEN FOR PROTON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,K.A.; GASSNER,D.M.

    1999-03-29

    In our search for a better luminescent screen material, we tested pieces of mono-crystalline chromium doped aluminum oxide (more commonly known as a ruby) using a 24 GeV proton beam. Due to the large variations in beam intensity and species which are run at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), we hope to find a material which can sufficiently luminesce, is compatible in vacuum, and maintain its performance level over extended use. Results from frame grabbed video camera images using a variety of neutral density filters are presented.

  8. Origin of ferromagnetism enhancement in bi-layer chromium-doped indium zinc oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C. Y.

    2012-08-06

    This work demonstrates that by controlling the rapid thermal annealing temperature, amorphous chromium-doped indium zinc oxide films develop an amorphous-crystalline bi-layer structure and show magnetization up to {approx}30 emu/cm{sup 3}. The crystalline layer arises from significant out-diffusion of Zn from surfaces, leading to a large difference in the Zn:In ratio in amorphous and crystalline layers. Doped Cr ions in amorphous and crystalline layers form different valence configurations, creating a charge reservoir which transfers electrons through amorphous-crystalline interfaces and in turn enhances ferromagnetism.

  9. Supercritical water oxidation of tannery sludge: stabilization of chromium and destruction of organics.

    PubMed

    Zou, Daoan; Chi, Yong; Dong, Jun; Fu, Chao; Wang, Fei; Ni, Mingjiang

    2013-10-01

    The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of industrial tannery sludge was investigated to understand the simultaneous destruction of organic pollutants and recovery of high content chromium. Experiments were performed in a batch reactor at temperatures of 350-500 °C, reaction time of 150-300 s and different oxygen ratios, to exhibit the effect of operation conditions. Results showed that removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) increased with higher temperature, larger oxidant amount and reaction time; a maximum value of 96% was obtained. Meanwhile, destruction yield was much higher under supercritical conditions than that in subcritical water. In addition, removal efficiency of Cr from sludge reached more than 98% under all conditions; higher temperature played a positive role. Further, leaching toxicity tests of heavy metals in solid products were conducted based on toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. All heavy metals except nickel showed a greatly reduced leaching toxicity through their stabilization. The chromium oxide recovered in ash was amorphous below 550 °C, so that the structure of Cr could not be identified by X-ray diffraction pattern. Special attention should be paid on nickel as its leaching toxicity increased due to the corrosion of reactor surface under severe reaction conditions. PMID:23916746

  10. Alternating current surface photovoltage in thermally oxidized chromium-contaminated n-type silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Nagase, Shintarou; Ikeda, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    We investigated a variation of frequency-dependent alternating current (AC) surface photovoltages (SPVs) in thermally oxidized, chromium-contaminated, n-type silicon (Si) wafers. As previously reported, immediately after rinsing in Cr-contaminated solution, a Cr(OH)3-Si contact causes a Schottky-barrier-type AC SPV on n-type Si. Upon oxidation at 373 K for 10 min, the Schottky barrier collapses and, with further oxidation, a metal-induced negative oxide charge, due to atomic bridging of (CrOSi)- and/or CrO2- networks, definitely grows over time in SiO2. For samples oxidized at temperatures between 823 and 1023 K for 30 min, the observed AC SPV gives evidence that the metal-induced negative oxide charge causes a strongly inverted state of the Si surface. At oxidation temperatures higher than 1023 K and /or for an oxidation time longer than 60 min, the level height of the AC SPV is reduced, implying that the strongly inverted state changes into a less depleted state, whilst, finally, the AC SPV disappears. In this case, the collapse of the (CrOSi)- and/or CrO2- networks is anticipated, with a possible change into Cr2O3. The existence of the (CrOSi)- and/or CrO2- networks has also been confirmed in p-type Si wafers.

  11. Electrochromism in copper oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, T.J.; Slack, J.L.; Rubin, M.D.

    2000-08-15

    Transparent thin films of copper(I) oxide prepared on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by anodic oxidation of sputtered copper films or by direct electrodeposition of Cu2O transformed reversibly to opaque metallic copper films when reduced in alkaline electrolyte. In addition, the same Cu2O films transform reversibly to black copper(II) oxide when cycled at more anodic potentials. Copper oxide-to-copper switching covered a large dynamic range, from 85% and 10% photopic transmittance, with a coloration efficiency of about 32 cm2/C. Gradual deterioration of the switching range occurred over 20 to 100 cycles. This is tentatively ascribed to coarsening of the film and contact degradation caused by the 65% volume change on conversion of Cu to Cu2O. Switching between the two copper oxides (which have similar volumes) was more stable and more efficient (CE = 60 cm2/C), but covered a smaller transmittance range (60% to 44% T). Due to their large electrochemical storage capacity and tolerance for alkaline electrolytes, these cathodically coloring films may be useful as counter electrodes for anodically coloring electrode films such as nickel oxide or metal hydrides.

  12. Amorphous iron–chromium oxide nanoparticles with long-term stability

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, Mihail; Cazacu, Maria; Turta, Constantin; Doroftei, Florica; Botko, Martin; Čižmár, Erik; Zeleňáková, Adriana; Feher, Alexander

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Fe–Cr oxide nanoparticles with pre-established metals ratio were obtained. • The amorphous state and its long-term stability were highlighted by X-ray diffraction. • The average diameter of dried nanoparticles was 3.5 nm, as was estimated by TEM, AFM. • In hexane dispersion, nanoparticles with diameter in the range 2.33–4.85 nm were found. • Superparamagnetic state of NPs co-exists with diamagnetism of the organic layer. - Abstract: Iron–chromium nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained through the thermal decomposition of μ{sub 3}-oxo heterotrinuclear (FeCr{sub 2}O) acetate in the presence of sunflower oil and dodecylamine (DA) as surfactants. The average diameter of the NPs was 3.5 nm, as estimated on the basis of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. Both techniques revealed the formation of roughly approximated spheres with some irregularities and agglomerations in larger spherical assemblies of 50–100 nm. In hexane, NPs with diameters in the 2.33–4.85 nm range are individually dispersed, as emphasized by dynamic light scattering measurements. The amorphous nature of the product was emphasized by X-ray powder diffraction. The study of the magnetic properties shows the presence of superparamagnetic state of iron–chromium oxide NPs and the diamagnetic contribution from DA layer forming a shell of NPs.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Histological Alterations of Chicken Brain Induced by Oral Administration of Chromium(III).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jia; Fan, Wentao; Zhao, Xiaona; Liu, Yanhan; Cheng, Ziqiang; Liu, Yongxia; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the oxidative stress in chickens exposed to different concentrations of chromium trichloride (CrCl3) in drinking water. Seventy-two Hylan Brown male chickens were randomly divided into four groups: three experimental groups and one control group. The experimental groups were exposed to three different doses (50 % LD50, 25 % LD50, and 12.5 % LD50) of CrCl3 mg/kg body weight for 42 days, while the control group was given the equivalent water. The activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and non-enzymatic index (glutathione, total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde, and hydrogen peroxide) were measured after obtaining the brain samples. Results suggested that 50 % LD50 chromium(III) significantly increased (P < 0.05) the contents of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide. The antioxidant enzyme activities, total glutathione concentration, and total antioxidant capacity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with those of the controls and were consistent with the increase in dosage and time. Additionally, extensive histological alterations were observed in the chicken brain, such as the vacuolization and nuclear condensation of the neurons. These results indicated that exposure to high-dose CrCl3 for a certain time could induce the occurrence of oxidative stress and histological alterations. PMID:26873037

  14. Hexavalent Chromium-Induced Apoptosis in Rat Uterus: Involvement of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Marouani, Neila; Tebourbi, Olfa; Mokni, Moncef; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Sakly, Mohsen; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Rhouma, Khémais Ben

    2015-01-01

    The present study is designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates hexavalent chromium (VI)-induced apoptosis in uterus. Female Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of potassium dichromate at doses of 1 and 2 mg/kg. Superoxide anion production was assessed by determination of the reduction of cytochrome c and iodonitrotetrazolium (INT), lipid peroxidation (LPO), metallothioneins (MTs), and catalase (CAT) activity. The expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins was investigated. After 15 days of treatment, an increase of LPO and MT levels occurred, whereas CAT activity decreased. Intense apoptosis was observed in endometriotic stromal cells of Cr-exposed rats. Bax protein expression was induced in endometriotic stromal cells with 1 mg of Cr(VI)/kg, and in stromal and epithelial cells at the higher dose. These results clearly suggest that Cr(VI) subacute treatment causes oxidative stress in rat uterus, leading to endometriotic stromal cells apoptosis. PMID:24965329

  15. Electrochromism: from oxide thin films to devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, A.; Danine, A.; Faure, C.; Buffière, S.

    2014-03-01

    In respect of their adaptability and performance, electrochromic devices, ECDs, which are able to change their optical properties under an applied voltage, have received significant attention. Target applications are multifold both in the visible region (automotive sunroofs, smart windows, ophthalmic lenses, and domestic appliances (oven, fridge…)) and in the infrared region (Satellites Thermal Control, IR furtivity). In our group, focusing on oxide thin films grown preferentially at room temperature, optimization of ECDs performances have been achieved by tuning the microstructure, the stoichiometry and the cationic composition of the various layers. Herein, our approach for optimized ECDs is illustrated through the example of WO3 electrochromic layer in the visible and in the IR domain as well as ZnO based transparent conducting oxide layer. Targeting the field of printed electronics, simplification of the device architecture for low power ECDs is also reported.

  16. Transparent Conductive Oxides in Thin Film Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelmann, Frank U.

    2014-11-01

    This paper show results from the development of transparent conductive oxides (TCO's) on large areas for the use as front electrode in thin film silicon solar modules. It is focused on two types of zinc oxide, which are cheap to produce and scalable to a substrate size up to 6 m2. Low pressure CVD with temperatures below 200°C can be used for the deposition of boron doped ZnO with a native surface texture for good light scattering, while sputtered aluminum doped ZnO needs a post deposition treatment in an acid bath for a rough surface. The paper presents optical and electrical characterization of large area samples, and also results about long term stability of the ZnO samples with respect to the so called TCO corrosion.

  17. Galvanostatic Ion Detrapping Rejuvenates Oxide Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Arvizu, Miguel A; Wen, Rui-Tao; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta E; Martinu, Ludvik; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Granqvist, Claes G

    2015-12-01

    Ion trapping under charge insertion-extraction is well-known to degrade the electrochemical performance of oxides. Galvanostatic treatment was recently shown capable to rejuvenate the oxide, but the detailed mechanism remained uncertain. Here we report on amorphous electrochromic (EC) WO3 thin films prepared by sputtering and electrochemically cycled in a lithium-containing electrolyte under conditions leading to severe loss of charge exchange capacity and optical modulation span. Time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-ERDA) documented pronounced Li(+) trapping associated with the degradation of the EC properties and, importantly, that Li(+) detrapping, caused by a weak constant current drawn through the film for some time, could recover the original EC performance. Thus, ToF-ERDA provided direct and unambiguous evidence for Li(+) detrapping. PMID:26599729

  18. Thin zinc oxide and cuprous oxide films for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seongho

    Metal oxide semiconductors and heterojunctions made from thin films of metal oxide semiconductors have broad range of functional properties and high potential in optical, electrical and magnetic devices such as light emitting diodes, spintronic devices and solar cells. Among the oxide semiconductors, zinc oxide (ZnO) and cuprous oxide (Cu2O) are attractive because they are inexpensive, abundant and nontoxic. As synthesized ZnO is usually an intrinsic n - type semiconductor with wide band gap (3.4 eV) and can be used as the transparent conducting window layer in solar cells. As synthesized Cu2O is usually a p - type semiconductor with a band gap of 2.17 eV and has been considered as a potential material for the light absorbing layer in solar cells. I used various techniques including metal organic chemical vapor deposition, magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition to grow thin films of ZnO and Cu2O and fabricated Cu2O/ZnO heterojunctions. I specifically investigated the optical and electrical properties of Cu 2O thin films deposited on ZnO by MOCVD and showed that Cu2O thin films grow as single phase with [110] axis aligned perpendicular to the ZnO surface which is (0001) plane and with in-plane rotational alignment due to (220) Cu2O || (0002)ZnO; [001]Cu2O || [12¯10]ZnO epitaxy. Moreover, I fabricated solar cells based on these Cu2O/ZnO heterojunctions and characterized them. Electrical characterization of these solar cells as a function of temperature between 100 K and 300 K under illumination revealed that interface recombination and tunneling at the interface are the factors that limit the solar cell performance. To date solar cells based on Cu2O/ZnO heterojunctions had low open circuit voltages (~ 0.3V) even though the expected value is around 1V. I achieved open circuit voltages approaching 1V at low temperature (~ 100 K) and showed that if interfacial recombination is reduced these cells can achieve their predicted potential.

  19. rf plasma oxidation of Ni thin films sputter deposited to generate thin nickel oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, Megan L.; Carlson, J. B.; Osgood, R. M.; Kimball, B.; Buchwald, W.

    2010-10-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) layers were formed on silicon (Si) substrates by plasma oxidation of nickel (Ni) film lines. This ultrathin NiO layer acted as a barrier layer to conduction, and was an integral part of a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode, completed by depositing gold (Au) on top of the oxide. The electrical and structural properties of the NiO thin film were examined using resistivity calculations, current-voltage (I-V) measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) imaging. The flow rate of the oxygen gas, chamber pressure, power, and exposure time and their influence on the characteristics of the NiO thin film were studied.

  20. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  1. Chromium poisoning in (La,Sr)MnO3 cathode: Three-dimensional simulation of a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Kota; Iwai, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Masashi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of a single solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) considering chromium poisoning on the cathode side has been developed to investigate the evolution of the SOFC performance over long-term operation. The degradation model applied in the simulation describes the loss of the cathode electrochemical activity as a decrease in the active triple-phase boundary (TPB) length. The calculations are conducted for two types of cell: lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Ni-YSZ and LSM-YSZ/YSZ/Ni-YSZ. Their electrode microstructures are acquired by imaging with a focused ion beam scanning-electron microscope (FIB-SEM). The simulation results qualitatively reproduce the trends of chromium poisoning reported in the literature. It has been revealed that the performance degradation by chromium is primarily due to an increase in the cathode activation overpotential. In addition, in the LSM-YSZ composite cathode, TPBs in the vicinity of the cathode-electrolyte interface preferentially deteriorate, shifting the active reaction site towards the cathode surface. This also results in an increase in the cathode ohmic loss associated with oxide ion conduction through the YSZ phase. The effects of the cell temperature, the partial pressure of steam at the chromium source, the cathode microstructure, and the cathode thickness on chromium poisoning are also discussed.

  2. Oxidative stress-related lung dysfunction by chromium(VI): alleviation by Citrus aurantium L.

    PubMed

    Soudani, Nejla; Rafrafi, Moez; Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Hakim, Ahmed; Troudi, Afef; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir; Ben Salah, Hichem; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2013-06-01

    Chromium(VI), a very strong oxidant, causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress in tissue systems. Our study investigated the potential ability of ethanolic Citrus aurantium L., family Rutaceae extract, used as a nutritional supplement, to alleviate lung oxidative damage induced by Cr(VI). A high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer method was developed to separate and identify flavonoids in C. aurantium L. Six flavonoids were identified, as (1) poncirin, (2) naringin, (3) naringenin, (4) quercetin, (5) isosinensetin, and (6) tetramethyl-o-isoscutellarein. Adult Wistar rats, used in this study, were divided into six groups of six animals each: group I served as controls which received standard diet, group II received via drinking water K2Cr2O7 alone (700 ppm), groups III and IV were pretreated for 10 days with ethanol extract of C. aurantium L. at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively, and then K2Cr2O7 was administrated during 3 weeks, and groups V and VI received during 10 days only C. aurantium L. ethanol extract at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg/day, respectively. Ethanol extract of C. aurantium L. was administered orally. Rats exposed to Cr(VI) showed in lung an increase in malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels and a decrease in sulflydryl content, glutathione, nonprotein thiol, and vitamins C and E levels. Decreases in enzyme activities such as in Na(+)K(+) ATPase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase were noted. Pretreatment with C. aurantium L. of chromium-treated rats ameliorated all biochemical parameters. Lung histological studies confirmed the biochemical parameters and the beneficial role of C. aurantium L. PMID:22972417

  3. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-12-30

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L(-1) in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe(15)Cr(5)(OH)(60) precipitate. PMID:23284182

  4. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L−1 in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe15Cr5(OH)60 precipitate. PMID:23284182

  5. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  6. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Scarisoreanu, N. D.; Filipescu, M. (Morar); Epurescu, G. N.; Matei, D. G.; Verardi, P.; Craciun, F.; Dinescu, M.

    2004-10-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) emerged as an attractive technique for growth of thin films with different properties as metals, semiconductors, ferroelectrics, biocompatibles, polymers, etc., due to its important advantages: (i) the stoichiometric transfer of a complex composition from target to film and film crystallization at lower substrate temperature respect to other techniques (due to the high energy of species in the laser plasma); (ii) single step process, synthesis and deposition; (iii) creation in plasma of species impossible to be obtained by other processes; (iv) possibility of "in situ" heterostructure deposition using a multi-target system, etc. Simple or complex oxides are between the materials widely studied for their applications. PMN is the most known relaxor ferroelectric material: it exhibits a high dielectric constant value around the (diffuse) maximum phase transition temperature, of more than 35 000 in bulk form. Other oxides as lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 simple or La doped exhibit exceptional properties as large remanent polarization, high dielectric permittivity, high piezoelectric coefficient. SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) is characterized by a high "fatigue resistance" (constant remanent polarization until 1012 switching cycles), low imprint, and low leakage current. The physical properties of zirconium oxide (or zirconia) -- high strength, stability at high temperatures -- make it useful for applications involving gas sensors, corrosion or heat resistant mechanical parts, high refractive index optical coatings. Of particular interest is its use as an alternative gate dielectric in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices or capacitor in dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips. All these oxides have been deposited by laser ablation in oxygen reactive atmosphere and some of their properties will be presented in this paper.

  7. Geogenic Cr oxidation on the surface of mafic minerals and the hydrogeological conditions influencing hexavalent chromium concentrations in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, N; Kantiranis, N; Voudouris, K S; Mitrakas, M; Kaprara, E; Pavlou, A

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to specify the source minerals of geogenic chromium in soils and sediments and groundwater and to determine the favorable hydrogeological environment for high concentrations of Cr(VI) in groundwaters. For this reason, chromium origin and the relevant minerals were identified, the groundwater velocity was calculated and the concentrations of Cr(VI) in different aquifer types were determined. Geochemical and mineralogical analyses showed that chromium concentrations in soils and sediments range from 115 to 959 mg/kg and that serpentine prevails among the phyllosilicates. The high correlation between chromium and serpentine, amphibole and pyroxene minerals verifies the geogenic origin of chromium in soils and sediments and, therefore, in groundwater. Manganese also originates from serpentine, amphibole and pyroxene, and is strongly correlated with chromium, indicating that the oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) is performed by manganese-iron oxides located on the surface of Cr-Mn-rich minerals. Backscattered SEM images of the soils revealed the unweathered form of chromite grains and the presence of Fe-Mn-rich oxide on the outer surface of serpentine grains. Chemical analyses revealed that the highest Cr(VI) concentrations were found in shallow porous aquifers with low water velocities and their values vary from 5 to 70 μg/L. Cr(VI) concentrations in ophiolitic complex aquifers ranged between 3 and 17 μg/L, while in surface water, karst and deeper porous aquifers, Cr(VI) concentrations were lower than the detection limit of 1.4 μg/L. PMID:25666283

  8. Chemical Insight into the Adsorption of Chromium(III) on Iron Oxide/Mesoporous Silica Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Egodawatte, Shani; Datt, Ashish; Burns, Eric A; Larsen, Sarah C

    2015-07-14

    Magnetic iron oxide/mesoporous silica nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles embedded within mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and modified with aminopropyl functional groups were prepared for application to Cr(III) adsorption followed by magnetic recovery of the nanocomposite materials from aqueous solution. The composite materials were extensively characterized using physicochemical techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, and zeta potential measurements. For aqueous Cr(III) at pH 5.4, the iron oxide/mesoporous silica nanocomposite exhibited a superior equilibrium adsorption capacity of 0.71 mmol/g, relative to 0.17 mmol/g for unmodified mesoporous silica. The aminopropyl-functionalized iron oxide/mesoporous silica nanocomposites displayed an equilibrium adsorption capacity of 2.08 mmol/g, the highest adsorption capacity for Cr(III) of all the materials evaluated in this study. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments provided insight into the chemical nature of the adsorbed chromium species. PMID:26134074

  9. The x ray microprobe determination of chromium oxidation state in olivine from lunar basalt and kimberlitic diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    The synchrotron x-ray microprobe is being used to obtain oxidation state information on planetary materials with high spatial resolution. Initial results on chromium in olivine from various sources including laboratory experiments, lunar basalt, and kimberlitic diamonds are reported. The lunar olivine was dominated by Cr(2+) whereas the diamond inclusions had Cr(2+/Cr(3+) ratios up to about 0.3. The simpliest interpretation is that the terrestrial olivine crystallized in a more oxidizing environment than the lunar olivine.

  10. Electrochemical investigation of chromium oxide-coated Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloy substrates.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Viswanathan; Zeng, Haitong; Lawrynowicz, Daniel; Zhang, Zongtao; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2011-08-01

    Hard coatings for articulating surfaces of total joint replacements may improve the overall wear resistance. However, any coating approach must take account of changes in corrosion behavior. This preliminary assessment analyzes the corrosion kinetics, impedance and mechanical-electrochemical stability of 100 μm thick plasma sprayed chromium oxide (Cr₂O₃) coatings on bearing surfaces in comparison to the native alloy oxide films on Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-6V. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and mechanical abrasion under potentiostatic conditions were performed on coated and substrate surfaces in physiological saline. SEM analysis characterized the coating morphology. The results showed that the corrosion current density values of chromium oxide coatings (0.4-1.2 μA/cm²) were of the same order of magnitude as Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Mechanical abrasion did not increase corrosion rates of chromium oxide coatings but did for uncoated Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V. The impedance response of chromium oxide coatings was very different than Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V native oxides characterized by a defected coating model. More of a frequency-independent purely resistive response was seen in mid-frequency range for the coatings (CPE(coat) : 40-280 nF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α: 0.67-0.83) whereas a more capacitive character is seen for Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V (CPE(ox) around 20 μF/cm² (rad/s)(1-α) , α around 0.9). Pores, interparticle gaps and incomplete fusion typical for thermal spray coatings were present in these oxides which could have influenced corrosion resistance. The coating microstructure could have allowed some fluid penetration. Overall, these coatings appear to have suitable corrosion properties for wear surfaces. PMID:21648063

  11. Rapid-extraction oxidation process to recover and reuse copper chromium and arsenic from industrial wood preservative sludge.

    PubMed

    Kazi, F K M; Cooper, P A

    2002-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative can form insoluble sludges when the hexavalent chromium component is reduced by wood extractives, wood particles and preservative additives in the solution. This sludge accumulates in treating solution work tanks, sumps and in-line filters and must be disposed of as hazardous wastes by waste disposal companies at high costs. A number of commercial sludges were investigated and found to contain 18-94% copper, chromium and arsenic as oxides combined with sand, oil, wood particles, additives and wood extractives. We have developed a multi-stage recycling process whereby approximately 97% of the CCA components are recovered from the sludge. It involves extraction with sodium hypochlorite to remove and oxidize chromium (more than 90%) and extract most of the arsenic (approx. 80%) followed by extraction of the copper and remaining arsenic and chromium with phosphoric acid. The phosphoric acid extract contains some trivalent chromium, which is subsequently oxidized by sodium hypochlorite. The combined oxidized extract containing CrVI, CuII and AsV was compatible with CCA treating solutions and could be re-used commercially for treating wood without having a significant effect on the preservative fixation rate or the leach resistance of the treated wood. A cost analysis showed that the economic savings from recovery of CCA chemicals and reduced landfill costs exceeded the variable costs for materials and energy for the process by as much as Can $966 per tonne of sludge if sodium sulfite can be acquired in bulk quantities for the process. PMID:11952176

  12. Effects of FeS on Chromium Oxidation Mediated by Manganese Oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Youxian; Deng, Baolin

    2004-03-31

    Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost-effective approach for Cr-contaminated site remediation. The long-term stability of the immobilized Cr(III), however, is a concern. Cr(III) is known to be oxidized by Mn oxides chemically and Mn-oxides could be produced through microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation. This study examined the effect of FeS on Cr(III) oxidation mediated by Pseudomonas putida. The results showed that commercial granular FeS did not affect Cr(III) oxidation in the culture of P. putida with Mn(II), but freshly precipitated FeS slurry inhibited Cr(III) oxidation. A 10 mg/l of FeS did not inhibit the microbial growth, but delayed the production of Mn oxides, thus postponing potential Cr(III) oxidation. In the presence of excessive FeS slurry, both Cr(VI) and Mn oxides were reduced rapidly. The reduced Cr(III) could not be re-oxidized as long as freshly formed FeS was present, even in the presence of the manganese oxidizers.

  13. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  14. Genotoxicity and oxidative stress in chromium-exposed tannery workers in North India.

    PubMed

    Ambreen, Khushboo; Khan, Faizan Haider; Bhadauria, Smrati; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-06-01

    Trivalent chromium (Cr) is an environmental contaminant, which is extensively used in tanning industries throughout the world and causes various forms of health hazards in tannery workers. Therefore, a cross-sectional study design was used to evaluate the DNA damage and oxidative stress condition in tannery workers exposed to Cr in North India. The study population comprised 100 male tanners in the exposed group and 100 healthy males (no history of Cr exposure) in the comparable control group. Baseline characteristics including age, smoking, alcohol consumption habits and duration of exposure were recorded via interviewing the subjects. Blood Cr level (measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry), DNA damage (measured by comet assay) and oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were estimated in both the groups. As a result of statistical analysis, exposed group showed significantly higher level of Cr (p < 0.0001), DNA damage (p < 0.0001), MDA (p < 0.0001), SOD (p < 0.05) and lower level of GSH (p < 0.001) when compared with controls. Smoking, alcohol consumption habits and age had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on DNA damage and oxidative stress parameters in both the groups. In simple and multiple correlation analysis, DNA damage and oxidative stress parameters showed significant correlation with Cr level and duration of exposure in exposed group. The findings of the present study revealed that chronic occupational exposure to trivalent Cr may cause DNA damage and oxidative stress in tannery workers. PMID:22933550

  15. Synthesis of nanometric iron and chromium oxide films by reactive pulsed laser deposition for photo-thermo sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulenko, S. A.

    2011-02-01

    Films based on oxides of transitional metals have semiconducting properties that make them up-to-date materials for functional electronics. The reactive pulsed laser deposition (RPLD) allows the control of thickness and stoichiometry of deposits in order to obtain semiconductor structures with accurately tailored thickness and band gap. It is very important to study electrical, structural and optical properties of these semiconducting nanometric films, as sensing characteristics strongly depend on these properties. We deposited iron oxide (Fe2O3-X; 0 <= x <= 1) and chromium oxide (Cr3-XO3-Y; 0 <= x <= 2; 0 <= y <= 2) films on <100> Si substrate by RPLD using a KrF laser. The deposited nanometric films (thickness 50-200 nm) of iron and chromium oxides have large thermo electromotive force (e.m.f.) coefficient (S). The S coefficient of iron oxide films varied in the range 0.8-1.65 mV/K in the temperature range 210-322 K. The maximum value of the S coefficient (1.65mV/K) was measured in the temperature range 270-290 K. The largest photosensitivity (F) of iron oxides films was about 44 Vc/W for white light at power density (I) of about 6×10-3 W/cm2. As regards chromium oxide films, the S coefficient varied in the range 0.30-4.5 mV/K in the temperature range 210-333 K, with the maximum of 3.5-4.5 mV/K in the temperature range 270-290 K. The largest photosensitivity of chromium oxide films was about 2.5 Vc/W at I≅6×10-3 W/cm2. Our results show that RPLD is a very simple procedure to synthesize of iron and chromium oxide nanometric films with variable stoichiometry and, consequently, with different values of their band gap result in variable the S coefficient and the photosensitivity (F). The deposited films present large thermo e.m.f. coefficient and high photosensitivity that make them up-to-date materials for photo-thermo sensors.

  16. Synthesis of nanometric iron and chromium oxide films by reactive pulsed laser deposition for photo-thermo sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulenko, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    Films based on oxides of transitional metals have semiconducting properties that make them up-to-date materials for functional electronics. The reactive pulsed laser deposition (RPLD) allows the control of thickness and stoichiometry of deposits in order to obtain semiconductor structures with accurately tailored thickness and band gap. It is very important to study electrical, structural and optical properties of these semiconducting nanometric films, as sensing characteristics strongly depend on these properties. We deposited iron oxide (Fe2O3-X; 0 <= x <= 1) and chromium oxide (Cr3-XO3-Y; 0 <= x <= 2; 0 <= y <= 2) films on <100> Si substrate by RPLD using a KrF laser. The deposited nanometric films (thickness 50-200 nm) of iron and chromium oxides have large thermo electromotive force (e.m.f.) coefficient (S). The S coefficient of iron oxide films varied in the range 0.8-1.65 mV/K in the temperature range 210-322 K. The maximum value of the S coefficient (1.65mV/K) was measured in the temperature range 270-290 K. The largest photosensitivity (F) of iron oxides films was about 44 Vc/W for white light at power density (I) of about 6×10-3 W/cm2. As regards chromium oxide films, the S coefficient varied in the range 0.30-4.5 mV/K in the temperature range 210-333 K, with the maximum of 3.5-4.5 mV/K in the temperature range 270-290 K. The largest photosensitivity of chromium oxide films was about 2.5 Vc/W at I≅6×10-3 W/cm2. Our results show that RPLD is a very simple procedure to synthesize of iron and chromium oxide nanometric films with variable stoichiometry and, consequently, with different values of their band gap result in variable the S coefficient and the photosensitivity (F). The deposited films present large thermo e.m.f. coefficient and high photosensitivity that make them up-to-date materials for photo-thermo sensors.

  17. The Applicability of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Assessing Chromium Induced Toxicity in the Fish Labeo rohita

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Ankur; Dange, Swati

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of metal's toxicity in freshwater is one of the imperative areas of research and there is an emergent concern on the development of techniques for detecting toxic effects in aquatic animals. Oxidative stress biomarkers are very useful in assessing the health of aquatic life and more in depth studies are necessary to establish an exact cause effect relationship. Therefore, to study the effectiveness of this approach, a laboratory study was conducted in the fish Labeo rohita as a function of hexavalent chromium and the toxicity indices using a battery of oxidative stress biomarkers such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GR) in the liver, muscle, gills, and brain have been studied along with biometric parameters, behavioral changes, and Cr bioaccumulation. A significant increased HSI was observed in contrast to CF which reduced significantly. SOD, CAT, and GR activity increased significantly in all the tissues of treated fishes. The bioaccumulation of Cr was highest in liver followed by gills, muscle, and brain. This study highlights the significance of using a set of integrated biomarker and advocate to include these parameters in National Water Quality Monitoring Program in areas potentially polluted with metals to assess the health of the ecosystem. PMID:25302308

  18. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, David

    2000-01-01

    A method of preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A .beta.-metal .beta.-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  19. Surface analytical characterization of chromium-stabilized protecting oxide layers on stainless steel referring to activity buildup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieme, M.; Scharnweber, D.; Drechsler, L.; Heiser, C.; Adolphi, B.; Weiss, A.

    1992-08-01

    Surface analytical methods were used to characterize both protecting oxide layers formed by hydrothermal chromate treatment (HTCT) on stabilized austenitic stainless steel and hydrothermally grown corrosion product layers (CPL) within the scope of lowering the activity buildup in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants. Morphology, thickness and chromium depth distribution of the layers proved to be considerably different from each other. According to Raman microspectrometry, there were also alterations in the chemical nature of the oxide species. Preceding electropolishing gave rise to particular properties of the respective layers. Prerequisites for an optimal corrosion behaviour of the protecting layers are discussed. Titanium-containing precipitations were oxidatively transformed by HTCT.

  20. Cytogenetic studies of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa root tip cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Rajeshwari, A; Jadon, Pradeep Singh; Chaudhuri, Gouri; Mukherjee, Anita; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2015-12-01

    The current study evaluates the cytogenetic effects of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles on the root cells of Allium cepa. The root tip cells of A. cepa were treated with the aqueous dispersions of Cr2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) at five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100μg/mL) for 4hr. The colloidal stability of the nanoparticle suspensions during the exposure period were ascertained by particle size analyses. After 4hr exposure to Cr2O3 NPs, a significant decrease in mitotic index (MI) from 35.56% (Control) to 35.26% (0.01μg/mL), 34.64% (0.1μg/mL), 32.73% (1μg/mL), 29.6% (10μg/mL) and 20.92% (100μg/mL) was noted. The optical, fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopic analyses demonstrated specific chromosomal aberrations such as-chromosome stickiness, chromosome breaks, laggard chromosome, clumped chromosome, multipolar phases, nuclear notch, and nuclear bud at different exposure concentrations. The concentration-dependent internalization/bio-uptake of Cr2O3 NPs may have contributed to the enhanced production of anti oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase to counteract the oxidative stress, which in turn resulted in observed chromosomal aberrations and cytogenetic effects. These results suggest that A. cepa root tip assay can be successfully applied for evaluating environmental risk of Cr2O3 NPs over a wide range of concentrations. PMID:26702979

  1. XPS study of the room temperature surface oxidation of zirconium and its binary alloys with tin, chromium and iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Lalit; Sarma, D. D.; Krummacher, S.

    1988-07-01

    Surface oxidation of pure zirconium and its dilute binary alloys with tin, chromium and iron has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with a view to comparing their oxidation behaviour at room temperature. Mostly suboxides of zirconium are formed during the initial stages of oxidation at oxygen exposures < 10 L, while at higher exposures ZrO 2 is the dominant oxide species formed together with two suboxides. The relative XPS intensity of these two suboxides shows a broad and weak maximum in the exposure range 20-30 L. Pure zirconium as well as its dilute alloys exhibit a decreasing rate of oxidation with increasing oxygen exposures. No significant difference is observed in the surface oxidation behaviour of pure zirconium and its dilute binary alloys at room temperature.

  2. ENHANCED SLUDGE PROCESSING OF HLW: HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION OF CHROMIUM, TECHNETIUM, AND COMPLEXANTS BY NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficient separation of chromium from high-level waste (HLW) sludge could save in excess of $3.4B for Hanford tank wastes. New chemical processes are needed to separate chromium and other metals from tank wastes. Our objective is to lay the foundation for the application of hydro...

  3. Avoiding chromium transport from stainless steel interconnects into contact layers and oxygen electrodes in intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Kim, Ji Woo; Brevet, Aude; Rado, Cyril; Couturier, Karine; Vogt, Ulrich F.; Lefebvre-Joud, Florence; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of (La0.8Sr0.2)(Mn0.5Co0.5)O3-δ (LSMC) and La(Ni0.6Fe0.4)O3-δ (LNF) contact coatings to avoid the transport of Cr from steel interconnects to solid oxide electrolysis electrodes, especially to the anode. The transport of chromium from commercial Crofer 22 APU (ThyssenKrupp) and K41X (AISI441, Aperam Isbergues) steels through LSMC and LNF contact coatings into adjacent (La0.8Sr0.2)MnO3-δ (LSM) oxygen electrodes was investigated in an oxygen atmosphere at 700 °C. Chromium concentrations of up to 4 atom% were detected in the contact coatings after thermal treatments for 3000 h, which also lead to the presence of chromium in adjacent LSM electrodes. Introduction of a dense (Co,Mn)3O4 coating between steel and contact coating was necessary to prevent the diffusion of chromium into contact coatings and electrodes and should lead to extended stack performance and lifetime.

  4. Effects of chromium and chromium + vitamin C combination on metabolic, oxidative, and fear responses of broilers transported under summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perai, A. H.; Kermanshahi, H.; Moghaddam, H. Nassiri; Zarban, A.

    2015-04-01

    A total of 240 female broilers (42 days old) were randomly assigned to four groups with six replicates and fed either a basal diet (two control groups) or a basal diet supplemented with either 1,200 μg Cr+3 from chromium (Cr) methionine/kg (Cr group) or 1,200 μg Cr+3 from Cr methionine plus 800 mg vitamin C (Vit C)/kg of diet (Cr + Vit C group). After 7 days on the dietary treatment, all groups except one of the controls were transported for 3 h under the summer conditions. Performance parameters were not influenced by dietary treatments. The plasma concentrations of insulin, triiodothyronine, triglyceride, and the ratio of triiodothyronine/thyroxin were decreased and the ratio of glucose/insulin was increased due to transport process. Road transportation also increased the plasma concentrations of protein, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase and decreased the concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the Cr + Vit C group. The pretransport concentrations of insulin and triiodothyronine were highest in the Cr + Vit C group. The concentration of phosphorous was lower in the Cr group than that in the other groups after transport. No significant effects of dietary treatments were observed on the other biochemical parameters. Transport increased malondialdehyde concentration in the control group and did not change plasma total antioxidant capacity and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity. Either in combination or alone, Cr increased plasma total antioxidant capacity (before transport P ≤ 0.05, after transport P = 0.07) but did not affect the concentration of malondialdehyde and activity of glutathione peroxidase. The duration of tonic immobility (TI) was similar between nontransported control chicks and transported chicks without any supplements. Pretreatment with Cr + Vit C significantly reduced the duration of TI.

  5. Mechanistic investigation of toxicity of chromium oxide nanoparticles in murine fibrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Alkahtani, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs) are widely used in polymers and paints. In the present study, we aimed to determine the toxicity of Cr2O3NPs in murine fibrosarcoma (L929) cells. The cytotoxicity of Cr2O3NPs was measured by MTT and neutral red uptake assays; Cr2O3NPs had significant cytotoxic effects on L929 cells. Enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in L929 cells after exposure to Cr2O3NPs. Cr2O3NPs produced caspase-3, indicating that exposure to Cr2O3NPs induced apoptosis. After exposure to Cr2O3NPs, the cellular glutathione level decreased and lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, and catalase increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By using single-cell gel tests, we also observed increased DNA damage in a Cr2O3NP exposure-duration- and dose-dependent fashion. Cell toxicity and DNA damage may be useful biomarkers for determining the safety of Cr2O3NPs in human and animal health. PMID:27099490

  6. Mechanistic investigation of toxicity of chromium oxide nanoparticles in murine fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Saud; Ali, Daoud; Alkahtani, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Chromium oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs) are widely used in polymers and paints. In the present study, we aimed to determine the toxicity of Cr2O3NPs in murine fibrosarcoma (L929) cells. The cytotoxicity of Cr2O3NPs was measured by MTT and neutral red uptake assays; Cr2O3NPs had significant cytotoxic effects on L929 cells. Enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in L929 cells after exposure to Cr2O3NPs. Cr2O3NPs produced caspase-3, indicating that exposure to Cr2O3NPs induced apoptosis. After exposure to Cr2O3NPs, the cellular glutathione level decreased and lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, and catalase increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By using single-cell gel tests, we also observed increased DNA damage in a Cr2O3NP exposure-duration- and dose-dependent fashion. Cell toxicity and DNA damage may be useful biomarkers for determining the safety of Cr2O3NPs in human and animal health. PMID:27099490

  7. Chromium oxide nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity and p53-dependent apoptosis in human lung alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Violet Aileen; Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-10-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2 O3 ) nanoparticles (NPs) are being increasingly used as a catalyst for aromatic compound manufacture, abrading agents and as pigments (e.g., Viridian). Owing to increased applications, it is important to study the biological effects of Cr2 O3 NPs on human health. The lung is one of the main exposure routes to nanomaterials; therefore, the present study was designed to determine the genotoxic and apoptotic effect of Cr2 O3 NPs in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The study also elucidated the molecular mechanism of its toxicity. Cr2 O3 NPs led to DNA damage, which was deduced by comet assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. The damage could be mediated by the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. Further, the oxygen species led to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the ratio of BAX/Bcl-2 leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by Cr2 O3 NPs, which ultimately leads to cell death. Hence, there is a need of regulations to be imposed in NP usage. The study provided insight into the caspase-dependent mechanistic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26086747

  8. Unidirectional oxide hetero-interface thin-film diode

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youngmin; Lee, Eungkyu; Lee, Jinwon; Lim, Keon-Hee; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-10-05

    The unidirectional thin-film diode based on oxide hetero-interface, which is well compatible with conventional thin-film fabrication process, is presented. With the metal anode/electron-transporting oxide (ETO)/electron-injecting oxide (EIO)/metal cathode structure, it exhibits that electrical currents ohmically flow at the ETO/EIO hetero-interfaces for only positive voltages showing current density (J)-rectifying ratio of ∼10{sup 5} at 5 V. The electrical properties (ex, current levels, and working device yields) of the thin-film diode (TFD) are systematically controlled by changing oxide layer thickness. Moreover, we show that the oxide hetero-interface TFD clearly rectifies an AC input within frequency (f) range of 10{sup 2} Hz < f < 10{sup 6} Hz, providing a high feasibility for practical applications.

  9. Unidirectional oxide hetero-interface thin-film diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Youngmin; Lee, Eungkyu; Lee, Jinwon; Lim, Keon-Hee; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-10-01

    The unidirectional thin-film diode based on oxide hetero-interface, which is well compatible with conventional thin-film fabrication process, is presented. With the metal anode/electron-transporting oxide (ETO)/electron-injecting oxide (EIO)/metal cathode structure, it exhibits that electrical currents ohmically flow at the ETO/EIO hetero-interfaces for only positive voltages showing current density (J)-rectifying ratio of ˜105 at 5 V. The electrical properties (ex, current levels, and working device yields) of the thin-film diode (TFD) are systematically controlled by changing oxide layer thickness. Moreover, we show that the oxide hetero-interface TFD clearly rectifies an AC input within frequency (f) range of 102 Hz < f < 106 Hz, providing a high feasibility for practical applications.

  10. Stable Isotope Fractionation during Chromium(III) Oxidation by δ-MnO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. T.; Fregoso, D. C.; Ellis, A. S.; Johnson, T. M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a highly mobile anthropogenic pollutant, and reduction of Cr(VI) to the less-soluble Cr(III) is the most important natural process involved in contamination attenuation. Earlier work has shown a preferential reduction of lighter Cr stable isotopes attributed to a kinetically-controlled mechanism, and isotope ratio measurements may be used as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction [1]. Recent work has detected no significant isotope exchange between dissolved Cr(III) and Cr(VI) over a period of days to weeks, and has suggested that complex bidirectional reactions control fractionation during Cr(III) oxidation by H2O2 [2]. Previous studies on oxidation by pyrolusite (β-MnO2) have reported δ53/52Cr up to approximately +1.1‰ in the Cr(VI) product [3]. However, laboratory investigations of fractionation during Cr(III) oxidation by birnessite (δ-MnO2) have been inconclusive, and oxidation mechanisms remain unclear [4]. In order to fully exploit stable isotope fractionation during redox reactions of Cr in groundwater as an indicator of Cr attenuation, the effect of Cr(III) oxidation on isotope ratios must be better understood. We will report the latest measurements of isotope fractionation during oxidation on birnessite under varying pH and MnO2 and Cr(III) concentrations. Our preliminary findings (at initial Cr(III) and δ-MnO2 concentrations of 10 mg/L and 100 mg/L, respectively) show the Cr(VI) product shifted by -0.5‰ to +0.0‰ relative to the reactant at pH ≈ 4.5. The reaction is incomplete and plateaus within 60 min. Unlike that observed with pyrolusite, fractionation during Cr oxidation on birnessite is much smaller or absent. These initial results suggest that kinetic effects are either very small or are negated by back reaction or equilibration in the multi-step oxidation mechanism. Alternatively, in our experiments, a step involving little isotope fractionation may be rate-limiting; thus, the final magnitude of isotope fractionation

  11. Structural characterization of impurified zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Trinca, L. M.; Galca, A. C. Stancu, V. Chirila, C. Pintilie, L.

    2014-11-05

    Europium doped zinc oxide (Eu:ZnO) thin films have been obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). 002 textured thin films were achieved on glass and silicon substrates, while hetero-epilayers and homo-epilayers have been attained on single crystal SrTiO{sub 3} and ZnO, respectively. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) was employed to characterize the Eu:ZnO thin films. Extended XRD studies confirmed the different thin film structural properties as function of chosen substrates.

  12. Biological versus mineralogical chromium reduction: potential for reoxidation by manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Butler, Elizabeth C; Chen, Lixia; Hansel, Colleen M; Krumholz, Lee R; Elwood Madden, Andrew S; Lan, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(vi), present predominantly as CrO4(2-) in water at neutral pH) is a common ground water pollutant, and reductive immobilization is a frequent remediation alternative. The Cr(iii) that forms upon microbial or abiotic reduction often co-precipitates with naturally present or added iron (Fe), and the stability of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitate is a function of its mineral properties. In this study, Fe-Cr solids were formed by microbial Cr(vi) reduction using Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain RCH1 in the presence of the Fe-bearing minerals hematite, aluminum substituted goethite (Al-goethite), and nontronite (NAu-2, Clay Minerals Society), or by abiotic Cr(vi) reduction by dithionite reduced NAu-2 or iron sulfide (FeS). The properties of the resulting Fe-Cr solids and their behavior upon exposure to the oxidant manganese (Mn) oxide (birnessite) differed significantly. In microcosms containing strain RCH1 and hematite or Al-goethite, there was significant initial loss of Cr(vi) in a pattern consistent with adsorption, and significant Cr(vi) was found in the resulting solids. The solid formed when Cr(vi) was reduced by FeS contained a high proportion of Cr(iii) and was poorly crystalline. In microcosms with strain RCH1 and hematite, Cr precipitates appeared to be concentrated in organic biofilms. Reaction between birnessite and the abiotically formed Cr(iii) solids led to production of significant dissolved Cr(vi) compared to the no-birnessite controls. This pattern was not observed in the solids generated by microbial Cr(vi) reduction, possibly due to re-reduction of any Cr(vi) generated upon oxidation by birnessite by active bacteria or microbial enzymes. The results of this study suggest that Fe-Cr precipitates formed in groundwater remediation may remain stable only in the presence of active anaerobic microbial reduction. If exposed to environmentally common Mn oxides such as birnessite in the absence of microbial activity, there is the potential

  13. Titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition and a process for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1991-01-01

    A ceramic composition is described. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1--A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2--The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3--The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness.

  14. Magnetoelectric coupling of multiferroic chromium doped barium titanate thin film probed by magneto-impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jyoti Kotnala, Ravinder K. E-mail: rkkotnala@gmail.com

    2014-04-07

    Thin film of BaTiO{sub 3} doped with 0.1 at. % Cr (Cr:BTO) has been prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique. Film was deposited on Pt/SrTiO{sub 3} substrate at 500 °C in 50 mTorr Oxygen gas pressure using KrF (298 nm) laser. Polycrystalline growth of single phase Cr:BTO thin film has been confirmed by grazing angle X-ray diffraction. Cr:BTO film exhibited remnant polarization 6.4 μC/cm{sup 2} and 0.79 MV/cm coercivity. Magnetization measurement of Cr:BTO film showed magnetic moment 12 emu/cc. Formation of weakly magnetic domains has been captured by magnetic force microscopy. Theoretical impedance equation fitted to experimental data in Cole-Cole plot for thin film in presence of transverse magnetic field resolved the increase in grain capacitance from 4.58 × 10{sup −12} to 5.4 × 10{sup −11} F. Film exhibited high value 137 mV/cm-Oe magneto-electric (ME) coupling coefficient at room temperature. The high value of ME coupling obtained can reduce the typical processing steps involved in multilayer deposition to obtain multiferrocity in thin film. Barium titanate being best ferroelectric material has been tailored to be multiferroic by non ferromagnetic element, Cr, doping in thin film form opens an avenue for more stable and reliable spintronic material for low power magnetoelectric random excess memory applications.

  15. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma Ribera, R. Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  16. NEXAFS Study of Air Oxidation for Mg Nanoparticle Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Murakami, S.; Shirai, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Ohta, T.; Yagi, S.

    2013-03-01

    The air oxidation reaction of Mg nanoparticle thin film has been investigated by Mg K-edge NEXAFS technique. It is revealed that MgO is formed on the Mg nanoparticle surfaces at the early stage of the air oxidation for Mg nanoparticle thin film. The simulation of NEXAFS spectrum using standard spectra indicates the existence of complex magnesium carbonates (x(MgCO3).yMg(OH2).z(H2O)) in addition to MgO at the early stage of the air oxidation.

  17. Synergy between hexavalent chromium ions and TiO2 nanoparticles inside TUD-1 in the photocatalytic oxidation of propane, a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdy, Mohamed S.

    2016-02-01

    Siliceous TUD-1 mesoporous material was bi-functionalized by titanium dioxide nanoparticles and hexavalent chromium ions. The synthesis was carried out by one-pot procedure based on sol-gel technique. The photocatalytic performance of the prepared material was evaluated in the oxidation of propane under the illumination of ultraviolet light (wavelength = 360 nm) and monitored by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared material exhibited an extra-ordinary activity than the reference samples that contain either hexavalent chromium ions or titanium dioxide nanoparticles only, confirming the true synergy between hexavalent chromium and tetravalent titanium ions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

  18. Reactions of a chromium(III)-superoxo complex and nitric oxide that lead to the formation of chromium(IV)-oxo and chromium(III)-nitrito complexes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-10-01

    The reaction of an end-on Cr(III)-superoxo complex bearing a 14-membered tetraazamacrocyclic TMC ligand, [Cr(III)(14-TMC)(O2)(Cl)](+), with nitric oxide (NO) resulted in the generation of a stable Cr(IV)-oxo species, [Cr(IV)(14-TMC)(O)(Cl)](+), via the formation of a Cr(III)-peroxynitrite intermediate and homolytic O-O bond cleavage of the peroxynitrite ligand. Evidence for the latter comes from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, computational chemistry and the observation of phenol nitration chemistry. The Cr(IV)-oxo complex does not react with nitrogen dioxide (NO2), but reacts with NO to afford a Cr(III)-nitrito complex, [Cr(III)(14-TMC)(NO2)(Cl)](+). The Cr(IV)-oxo and Cr(III)-nitrito complexes were also characterized spectroscopically and/or structurally. PMID:24066924

  19. Growth of Epitaxial Oxide Thin Films on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bin; Walker, Clementine; Wang, Kai; Tileli, Vasiliki; Shaforost, Olena; Harrison, Nicholas M.; Klein, Norbert; Alford, Neil M.; Petrov, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    The transfer process of graphene onto the surface of oxide substrates is well known. However, for many devices, we require high quality oxide thin films on the surface of graphene. This step is not understood. It is not clear why the oxide should adopt the epitaxy of the underlying oxide layer when it is deposited on graphene where there is no lattice match. To date there has been no explanation or suggestion of mechanisms which clarify this step. Here we show a mechanism, supported by first principles simulation and structural characterisation results, for the growth of oxide thin films on graphene. We describe the growth of epitaxial SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on a graphene and show that local defects in the graphene layer (e.g. grain boundaries) act as bridge-pillar spots that enable the epitaxial growth of STO thin films on the surface of the graphene layer. This study, and in particular the suggestion of a mechanism for epitaxial growth of oxides on graphene, offers new directions to exploit the development of oxide/graphene multilayer structures and devices. PMID:27515496

  20. Growth of Epitaxial Oxide Thin Films on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Bin; Walker, Clementine; Wang, Kai; Tileli, Vasiliki; Shaforost, Olena; Harrison, Nicholas M; Klein, Norbert; Alford, Neil M; Petrov, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    The transfer process of graphene onto the surface of oxide substrates is well known. However, for many devices, we require high quality oxide thin films on the surface of graphene. This step is not understood. It is not clear why the oxide should adopt the epitaxy of the underlying oxide layer when it is deposited on graphene where there is no lattice match. To date there has been no explanation or suggestion of mechanisms which clarify this step. Here we show a mechanism, supported by first principles simulation and structural characterisation results, for the growth of oxide thin films on graphene. We describe the growth of epitaxial SrTiO3 (STO) thin films on a graphene and show that local defects in the graphene layer (e.g. grain boundaries) act as bridge-pillar spots that enable the epitaxial growth of STO thin films on the surface of the graphene layer. This study, and in particular the suggestion of a mechanism for epitaxial growth of oxides on graphene, offers new directions to exploit the development of oxide/graphene multilayer structures and devices. PMID:27515496

  1. Effects of chromium and aluminum on mechanical and oxidation properties of iron-nickel-base superalloys based on CG-27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chromium and aluminum on the mechanical and oxidation properties of a series of gamma-prime-strengthened alloys based on CG-27 were studied. Gamma-prime dispersion and solid-solution strengthening were the principal modes of alloy strengthening. The oxidation attack parameter K sub a decreased with increasing Cr and Al contents for each alloy group based on Al content. As a group, alloys with 3 wt % Al had the lowest attack parameters. Therefore, 3 wt % is the optimum level of Al for parabolic oxidation behavior. Spalling, due to diffusion-induced grain growth, was controlled by the overall Cr and Al levels. The alloy with 4 wt % Cr and 3 wt % Al had stress-rupture properties superior to those of the base alloy, CG-27, and maintained parabolic oxidation behavior while the Cr content was reduced by two-thirds of its value in cast CG-27.

  2. Examination of zinc oxide, copper chromium oxide, and copper scandium oxide properties for use in transparent electronics and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadik, Patrick

    Greater progress in the field of TCO (transparent oxide semiconductor) research has been hampered by a lack of availability of p-type candidates. Though the n-type TCO's are well documented and easily produced only one well documented oxide has spurred continued efforts at producing robust, p-type behavior, namely ZnO. Though p-ZnO has been produced, a coterminous research effort into improving the film qualities of lesser known naturally p-type TCO's could prove fruitful. Thus, this research has examined the thin film properties of two delafossites, CuCr1-xMgxO 2 and CuSc1-xMgxO2 as well as the surface properties of ZnO. The delafossites, CuCr1-xMgxO2 and CuSc 1-xMgxO2 have been shown to have the superlative properties of high conductivities (220 S cm-1 and 70 S cm-1) and high transparencies in 400 nm thick films of ˜40% and ˜80% throughout the visible spectrum. We have also been the first to describe a near band edge photo-luminescence in CuSc1-x MgxO2 for 0.00< x<0.03, opening the possibility of creating delafossite active layer light emitting diodes. The greatest challenge in creating viable pn-junctions between the delafossites and ZnO is preventing an in situ reaction between CuCr1-xMgxO 2 and ZnO that creates a (Mg/Cu)Cr2O4 spinel interface. We have found that a strategy of using a CuCr1-xMgxO 2/CuSc1-xMgxO2/ZnO on c-Al2O 3 in two ways may allow the growth of either a buffer/p/n or a p/i/n structure. Specifically, growing CuCrO2 at 700°C as a 100 nm nucleation layer followed by a 750°C growth of CuSc1-xMg xO2 and a 400°C growth of ZnO secures an epitaxial growth for the entire structure despite large lattice mismatches between c-Al2O3/CuCrO2 (8.7%) and CuCrO 2/CuScO2 (7.7%). This combined research takes the first steps in making robust pn-heterojunctions possible. Also, in an effort to progress an understanding of the surface chemistry of ZnO we provide results showing marked difference in the chemisorptions of dodecane thiol upon Zn- and O

  3. Transport of chromium(VI) through a supported liquid membrane containing tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.C.; Huang, C.C.; Chen, D.H.

    1998-09-01

    In this study the transport of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions of pH 2--4 through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in kerosene as a mobile carrier was investigated. The transport flux of Cr(VI) increased with an increase in the concentrations of Cr(VI) in the feed phase and of TOPO in the membrane phase, but with a decrease in pH of the feed phase. Considering the equilibria of various Cr(VI) species in the aqueous phase and of the Cr(VI)-TOPO complexes formed in the membrane phase, a permeation model including the aqueous film diffusion of HCrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} toward the membrane, the interfacial chemical reaction between them and TOPO, and the membrane diffusion of the Cr(VI)-TOPO complexes ({ovr H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}{center_dot}(TOPO)} and {ovr H{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{center_dot}(TOPO){sub 3}}) was proposed to describe the transport of Cr(VI) through the SLM. By best fitting the transport flux equations of Cr(VI) with the experimental data using the Rosenbrock method, the apparent mass-transfer coefficients of HCrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} across the aqueous film, and those of {ovr H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}{center_dot}(TOPO)} and {ovr H{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{center_dot}(TOPO){sub 3}} across the membrane phase, were obtained. This work helps to clarify the transport mechanism of Cr(VI) through an SLM.

  4. High temperature coefficient of resistance molybdenum oxide and nickel oxide thin films for microbolometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao O.; John, David Saint; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Horn, Mark W.

    2015-03-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and nickel oxide (NiOx) thin films were deposited by reactive biased target ion beam deposition. MoOx thin film resistivity varied from 3 to 2000 Ω.cm with a temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) from -1.7% to -3.2%/K, and NiOx thin film resistivity varied from 1 to 300 Ω.cm with a TCR from -2.2% to -3.3%/K, both easily controlled by varying the oxygen partial pressure. Biased target ion beam deposited high TCR MoOx and NiOx thin films are polycrystalline semiconductors and have good stability in air. Compared with commonly used vanadium oxide thin films, MoOx or NiOx thin films offer improved process control for resistive temperature sensors.

  5. Multifunctional oxide thin films for magnetoelectric and electromechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung Hyub

    Epitaxial multifunctional oxide thin films have been extensively researched to understand and exploit a variety of their physical properties. In order to integrate such versatile properties into real devices, there are several critical issues: (1) high-quality thin film growth, (2) fundamental understanding on reliable performance, and (3) device fabrication process preserving functionality of oxides. We have investigated all these issues, employing two different materials: multiferroic BiFeO3 and piezoelectric Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) epitaxial thin films. For the high-quality thin film growth, we have chosen both BiFeO 3 and PMN-PT thin films as a model system. Bi2O3and PbO are the volatile species in these oxides, which makes it hard to grow phase-pure stoichiometric thin films. Because the properties of oxides are sensitive to stoichiometry and defects, it is highly required to fix such volatile elements during thin film growth. We have grown high-quality epitaxial thin films using a fast-rate off-axis sputtering method and vicinal substrates. In addition, we were able to control domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films using vicinal substrates. For the study on the reliability issues in oxides, we have used BiFeO 3 thin films within the framework of magnetoelectric device applications. For reliable magnetoelectric performance of BiFeO3, polarization switching path has to be (1) deterministic, and to be retained along with (2) time---retention, and (3) cycles--- fatigue. We have used monodomain BiFeO3 thin films as a model system. Based on theoretical predictions, we have studied polarization switching paths, and achieved both selective polarization switching and retention problems using island BiFeO3 structure. We have also investigated polarization fatigue, dependent on switching path. For the demonstration of working devices preserving the original functionality of oxides, we have fabricated micro-cantilevers using PMN-PT heterostructure on Si. The

  6. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matrices while preserving its oxidation state. Typical recoveries are 90 to 105% in samples spiked with both trivalent and hexavalent chromium. Determination of hexavalent chromium after extraction with sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solution, coupled with the determination of total chromium after nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide digestion, has been applied to the evaluation of chromium speciation in airborne particulates, sludges, and biological tissues. PMID:1935842

  7. Multivariate modeling of chromium-induced oxidative stress and biochemical changes in plants of Pistia stratiotes L.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sarita; Basant, Ankita; Malik, Amrita; Singh, Kunwar P

    2009-07-01

    Biochemical changes in the plants of Pistia stratiotes L., a free floating macrophyte exposed to different concentrations of hexavalent chromium (0, 10, 40, 60, 80 and 160 microM) for 48, 96 and 144 h were studied. Chromium-induced oxidative stress in macrophyte was investigated using the multivariate modeling approaches. Cluster analysis rendered two fairly distinct clusters (roots and shoots) of similar characteristics in terms of their biochemical responses. Discriminant analysis identified ascorbate peroxidase (APX) as discriminating variable between the root and shoot tissues. Principal components analysis results suggested that malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), APX, non-protein thiols (NP-SH), cysteine, ascorbic acid, and Cr-accumulation are dominant in root tissues, whereas, protein and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) in shoots of the plant. Discriminant partial least squares analysis results further confirmed that MDA, SOD, NP-SH, cysteine, GPX, APX, ascorbic acid and Cr-accumulation dominated in the root tissues, while protein in the shoot. Three-way analysis helped in visualizing simultaneous influence of metal concentration and exposure duration on biochemical variables in plant tissues. The multivariate approaches, thus, allowed for the interpretation of the induced biochemical changes in the plant tissues exposed to chromium, which otherwise using the conventional approaches is difficult. PMID:19396544

  8. Corrosion of Alloy 625 and pure chromium in Cl{sup {minus}} containing fluids during supercritical water oxidation (SCWO)

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.; Kolarik, V.; Michelfelder, B.; Juez-Lorenzo, M.; Hirth, T.; Eisenreich, N.; Eyerer, P.

    1999-11-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an efficient procedure for complete degradation of hazardous residues, converting them into acids, salts, and carbon dioxide. The reactor material, however, is subjected to a highly corrosive fluid and to high pressures at high temperatures. An experimental set-up was designed that allows corrosion studies under these conditions. Alloy 625 and chromium of high purity were studied at 500 C and 46.5 MPa up to 300 h with a model fluid consisting of HCl + H{sub 2}O + NaCl + methanol using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as oxidant. Alloy 625 forms complex layers with alternating scales consisting of Cr-Mo-Nb-O mixed oxides, and layers containing chlorides, mainly NiCl{sub 2}. Additionally pitting corrosion and local intergranular corrosion were observed. The analysis of the fluid phase by ICP-AES as a function of time showed periods with a strong transition of Ni into the fluid phase and alternating time periods with high Mo and Cr concentrations indicating that alternating mechanisms are controlling the corrosion procedure. On pure chromium, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales composed of several layers were formed and in wide regions spallation was observed. The reduction of sample thickness and mass changes indicate greater corrosion rates of Cr than Alloy 625.

  9. Review of solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si Joon; Yoon, Seokhyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-02-01

    In this review, we summarize solution-processed oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) researches based on our fulfillments. We describe the fundamental studies of precursor composition effects at the beginning in order to figure out the role of each component in oxide semiconductors, and then present low temperature process for the adoption of flexible devices. Moreover, channel engineering for high performance and reliability of solution-processed oxide TFTs and various coating methods: spin-coating, inkjet printing, and gravure printing are also presented. The last topic of this review is an overview of multi-functional solution-processed oxide TFTs for various applications such as photodetector, biosensor, and memory.

  10. Characterization of reliability of printed indium tin oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Jong-Woong; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2013-11-01

    Recently, decreasing the amount of indium (In) element in the indium tin oxide (ITO) used for transparent conductive oxide (TCO) thin film has become necessary for cost reduction. One possible approach to this problem is using printed ITO thin film instead of sputtered. Previous studies showed potential for printed ITO thin films as the TCO layer. However, nothing has been reported on the reliability of printed ITO thin films. Therefore, in this study, the reliability of printed ITO thin films was characterized. ITO nanoparticle ink was fabricated and printed onto a glass substrate followed by heating at 400 degrees C. After measurement of the initial values of sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the printed ITO thin films, their reliabilities were characterized with an isothermal-isohumidity test for 500 hours at 85 degrees C and 85% RH, a thermal shock test for 1,000 cycles between 125 degrees C and -40 degrees C, and a high temperature storage test for 500 hours at 125 degrees C. The same properties were investigated after the tests. Printed ITO thin films showed stable properties despite extremely thermal and humid conditions. Sheet resistances of the printed ITO thin films changed slightly from 435 omega/square to 735 omega/square 507 omega/square and 442 omega/square after the tests, respectively. Optical transmittances of the printed ITO thin films were slightly changed from 84.74% to 81.86%, 88.03% and 88.26% after the tests, respectively. These test results suggest the stability of printed ITO thin film despite extreme environments. PMID:24245331

  11. DCEMS Study of Thin Oxide Layers and Interface of Stainless Steel Films Deposited by Sputtering Austenitic AISI304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Takahashi, K.; Takeda, M.; Shimizu, K.; Habasaki, H.; Kuzmann, E.

    2004-12-01

    Thin stainless steel films were deposited on surface oxidized Si plate using austenitic AISI304 stainless steel as target with a RF magnetron Ar sputtering method. The deposited films and the oxidized films with about 15 nm in thickness were characterized by depth selective conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (DCEMS) using a 2π gas proportional counter. The as-deposited film consisted of ferromagnetic phase. The average hyperfine magnetic fields increased from 25 to 28 T by heating. A relative large amount of iron oxide (Fe2O3) was produced on the top surface layer upon heating at 400°C. After heating at 500°C the relative amount of iron oxide decreased and chromium oxide layers grew in the interface between the iron oxide and substrate layers. The ferromagnetic phase in the deposited stainless steel film was partially converted into austenitic phase at 500°C and largely at 600°C. DCEMS is effective for non-destructive characterization of both surface and interface layers of thin stainless steel films with several 10 nm thickness.

  12. Ferromagnetic resonance of patterned chromium dioxide thin films grown by selective area chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrant, C. J.; Jokubaitis, M.; Yu, W.; Mohamad, H.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Xiao, Gang; Hicken, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    A selective area chemical vapour deposition technique has been used to fabricate continuous and patterned epitaxial CrO2 thin films on (100)-oriented TiO2 substrates. Precessional magnetization dynamics were stimulated both electrically and optically, and probed by means of time-resolved Kerr microscopy and vector network analyser ferromagnetic resonance techniques. The dependence of the precession frequency and the effective damping parameter upon the static applied magnetic field were investigated. All films exhibited a large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy. The effective damping parameter was found to exhibit strong field dependence in the vicinity of the hard axis saturation field. However, continuous and patterned films were found to possess generally similar dynamic properties, confirming the suitability of the deposition technique for fabrication of future spintronic devices.

  13. Studies on optoelectronic properties of DC reactive magnetron sputtered chromium doped CdO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hymavathi, B. Rao, T. Subba; Kumar, B. Rajesh

    2014-10-15

    Cr doped CdO thin films were deposited on glass substrates by DC reactive magnetron sputtering method and subsequently annealed from 200 °C to 500 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibit (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The optical transmittance of the films increases from 64% to 88% with increasing annealing temperature. The optical band gap values were found to be decreased from 2.77 to 2.65 eV with the increase of annealing temperature. The decrease in optical band gap energy with increasing annealing temperature can be attributed to improvement in the crystallinity of the films and may also be due to quantum confinement effect. A minimum resistivity of 2.23 × 10{sup −4} Ω.cm and sheet resistance of 6.3 Ω/sq is obtained for Cr doped CdO film annealed at 500 °C.

  14. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Duenow, Joel N.; Barnes, Teresa; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2012-08-28

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  15. Multiferroic oxide thin films and heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chengliang E-mail: Tao.Wu@kaust.edu.sa; Hu, Weijin; Wu, Tom E-mail: Tao.Wu@kaust.edu.sa; Tian, Yufeng

    2015-06-15

    Multiferroic materials promise a tantalizing perspective of novel applications in next-generation electronic, memory, and energy harvesting technologies, and at the same time they also represent a grand scientific challenge on understanding complex solid state systems with strong correlations between multiple degrees of freedom. In this review, we highlight the opportunities and obstacles in growing multiferroic thin films with chemical and structural integrity and integrating them in functional devices. Besides the magnetoelectric effect, multiferroics exhibit excellent resistant switching and photovoltaic properties, and there are plenty opportunities for them to integrate with other ferromagnetic and superconducting materials. The challenges include, but not limited, defect-related leakage in thin films, weak magnetism, and poor control on interface coupling. Although our focuses are Bi-based perovskites and rare earth manganites, the insights are also applicable to other multiferroic materials. We will also review some examples of multiferroic applications in spintronics, memory, and photovoltaic devices.

  16. Chromium (VI) induced oxidative stress in halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina and D. tertiolecta isolated from sambhar salt lake of Rajasthan (India).

    PubMed

    Arun, N; Vidyalaxmi; Singh, D P

    2014-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is one of the most serious pollutants in aquatic systems. This study was performed to understand the effect of Cr (VI) on halophilic algal strains of D. salina and D. tertiolecta. The results revealed good tolerance of D. salina towards chromium (VI) up to 8 ppm concentration, whereas tolerance level in D. tertiolecta was up to 2 ppm concentration. Cr (VI) not only inhibited the growth of D. tertiolecta, but also showed increased inhibition in the level of photosynthetic pigments, protein and carbohydrate. Results have revealed that chromium (VI) induced higher increase in lipid peroxidation and H2O2 production in D. tertiolecta than the D. salina, particularly at higher concentration of chromium (VI). Chromium (VI) induced increase in the rate of RNO bleaching, loss of pigments and thiol (-SH) group was relatively higher in D. tertiolecta than the D. salina, which is indicating that D. tertiolecta was prone to Cr (VI) induced oxidative stress. Results on RNO bleaching in the presence of radical quenchers suggested that OH° radical played an important role in the chromium (VI)-induced general oxidative stress in D. tertiolecta. PMID:25535718

  17. Influence of doping with third group oxides on properties of zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Palimar, Sowmya Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2013-03-15

    The study of modifications in structural, optical and electrical properties of vacuum evaporated zinc oxide thin films on doping with III group oxides namely aluminum oxide, gallium oxide and indium oxide are reported. It was observed that all the films have transmittance ranging from 85 to 95%. The variation in optical properties with dopants is discussed. On doping the film with III group oxides, the conductivity of the films showed an excellent improvement of the order of 10{sup 3} {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1}. The measurements of activation energy showed that all three oxide doped films have 2 donor levels below the conduction band.

  18. Thermoelastic properties of chromium oxide Cr2O3 (eskolaite) at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymshits, Anna M.; Dorogokupets, Peter I.; Sharygin, Igor S.; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Shatskiy, Anton; Rashchenko, Sergey V.; Ohtani, Eiji; Suzuki, Akio; Higo, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of chromium oxide Cr2O3 (eskolaite) with the corundum-type structure has been carried out in a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus to pressure of 15 GPa and temperatures of 1873 K. Fitting the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EoS) with the present data up to 15 GPa yielded: bulk modulus ( K 0, T0), 206 ± 4 GPa; its pressure derivative K'0 ,T , 4.4 ± 0.8; (∂ K 0 ,T /∂ T) = ‒0.037 ± 0.006 GPa K‒1; a = 2.98 ± 0.14 × 10-5 K-1 and b = 0.47 ± 0.28 × 10‒8 K‒2, where α 0, T = a + bT is the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion of Cr2O3 was additionally measured at the high-temperature powder diffraction experiment at ambient pressure and α 0, T0 was determined to be 2.95 × 10-5 K-1. The results indicate that coefficient of the thermal expansion calculated from the EoS appeared to be high-precision because it is consistent with the data obtained at 1 atm. However, our results contradict α 0 value suggested by Rigby et al. (Brit Ceram Trans J 45:137-148, 1946) widely used in many physical and geological databases. Fitting the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EoS with the present ambient and high-pressure data yielded the following parameters: K 0, T0 = 205 ± 3 GPa, K'0, T = 4.0, Grüneisen parameter ( γ 0) = 1.42 ± 0.80, q = 1.82 ± 0.56. The thermoelastic parameters indicate that Cr2O3 undergoes near isotropic compression at room and high temperatures up to 15 GPa. Cr2O3 is shown to be stable in this pressure range and adopts the corundum-type structure. Using obtained thermoelastic parameters, we calculated the reaction boundary of knorringite formation from enstatite and eskolaite. The Clapeyron slope (with {{d}}P/{{d}}T = - 0.014 GPa/K) was found to be consistent with experimental data.

  19. Thermoelastic properties of chromium oxide Cr2O3 (eskolaite) at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymshits, Anna M.; Dorogokupets, Peter I.; Sharygin, Igor S.; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Shatskiy, Anton; Rashchenko, Sergey V.; Ohtani, Eiji; Suzuki, Akio; Higo, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of chromium oxide Cr2O3 (eskolaite) with the corundum-type structure has been carried out in a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus to pressure of 15 GPa and temperatures of 1873 K. Fitting the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EoS) with the present data up to 15 GPa yielded: bulk modulus (K 0,T0), 206 ± 4 GPa; its pressure derivative K'0,T , 4.4 ± 0.8; (∂K 0,T /∂T) = ‒0.037 ± 0.006 GPa K‒1; a = 2.98 ± 0.14 × 10-5 K-1 and b = 0.47 ± 0.28 × 10‒8 K‒2, where α 0,T = a + bT is the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion of Cr2O3 was additionally measured at the high-temperature powder diffraction experiment at ambient pressure and α 0,T0 was determined to be 2.95 × 10-5 K-1. The results indicate that coefficient of the thermal expansion calculated from the EoS appeared to be high-precision because it is consistent with the data obtained at 1 atm. However, our results contradict α 0 value suggested by Rigby et al. (Brit Ceram Trans J 45:137-148, 1946) widely used in many physical and geological databases. Fitting the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EoS with the present ambient and high-pressure data yielded the following parameters: K 0,T0 = 205 ± 3 GPa, K'0,T = 4.0, Grüneisen parameter (γ 0) = 1.42 ± 0.80, q = 1.82 ± 0.56. The thermoelastic parameters indicate that Cr2O3 undergoes near isotropic compression at room and high temperatures up to 15 GPa. Cr2O3 is shown to be stable in this pressure range and adopts the corundum-type structure. Using obtained thermoelastic parameters, we calculated the reaction boundary of knorringite formation from enstatite and eskolaite. The Clapeyron slope (with dP/dT = - 0.014 GPa/K) was found to be consistent with experimental data.

  20. Ion beam-based characterization of multicomponent oxide thin films and thin film layered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, A.R.; Rangaswamy, M.; Lin, Yuping; Gruen, D.M.; Schultz, J.A.; Schmidt, H.K.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1992-11-01

    Fabrication of thin film layered structures of multi-component materials such as high temperature superconductors, ferroelectric and electro-optic materials, and alloy semiconductors, and the development of hybrid materials requires understanding of film growth and interface properties. For High Temperature Superconductors, the superconducting coherence length is extremely short (5--15 {Angstrom}), and fabrication of reliable devices will require control of film properties at extremely sharp interfaces; it will be necessary to verify the integrity of thin layers and layered structure devices over thicknesses comparable to the atomic layer spacing. Analytical techniques which probe the first 1--2 atomic layers are therefore necessary for in-situ characterization of relevant thin film growth processes. However, most surface-analytical techniques are sensitive to a region within 10--40 {Angstrom} of the surface and are physically incompatible with thin film deposition and are typically restricted to ultra high vacuum conditions. A review of ion beam-based analytical methods for the characterization of thin film and multi-layered thin film structures incorporating layers of multicomponent oxides is presented. Particular attention will be paid to the use of time-of-flight techniques based on the use of 1- 15 key ion beams which show potential for use as nondestructive, real-time, in-situ surface diagnostics for the growth of multicomponent metal and metal oxide thin films.

  1. Evaluation of protective action of α-tocopherol in chromium-induced oxidative stress in female reproductive system of rats

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, R.; Kumar, C. S. V. Satish; Rani, M. Usha; Kavita, K.; Boobalan, G.; Reddy, A. Gopala

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate whether α-tocopherol could protect the chromium (Cr) VI-induced oxidative stress in female reproductive system of rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms of the same. A total of 24 Wistar adult female rats were equally divided into four groups. Group 1 served as control, while groups 2 and 3 were administered K2Cr2O7 (10 mg/kg b.wt. s.c. single dose). In addition to Cr, group 3 also received α-tocopherol @ 125 mg/kg daily by oral gavage for 14 days. Group 4 was maintained as α-tocopherol control (dose as above). Body weights were recorded at the beginning and at the end of experiment. Further, the rats were observed for occurrence of estrus cycle. At the end of 14 days, blood samples were drawn for sero-biochemical analysis. Subsequently, all the rats were sacrificed to collect uterus along with ovaries for assay of tissue peroxidation, anti-oxidant and functional markers, and histopathology. Administration of chromium (Cr) VI to rats revealed a significant (P < 0.05) accumulation of cholesterol and a prolonged diestrus phase leading to impaired fertility in rats. Administration of chromium (Cr) VI significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the antioxidant markers such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH), along with significant (P < 0.05) increase in peroxidation markers such as malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls in ovaries. The functional marker in serum such as total protein was decreased, whereas other functional markers viz alanine transaminase (ALT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were increased. Prominent pathological changes were observed in the uterus and ovaries of Cr-treated group. Co-treatment with α-tocopherol significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the (Cr) VI induced changes. PMID:23633841

  2. Characterization of low-temperature microwave loss of thin aluminum oxide formed by plasma oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Chunqing Otto, M.; Lupascu, A.

    2014-01-27

    We report on the characterization of microwave loss of thin aluminum oxide films at low temperatures using superconducting lumped resonators. The oxide films are fabricated using plasma oxidation of aluminum and have a thickness of 5 nm. We measure the dielectric loss versus microwave power for resonators with frequencies in the GHz range at temperatures from 54 to 303 mK. The power and temperature dependence of the loss are consistent with the tunneling two-level system theory. These results are relevant to understanding decoherence in superconducting quantum devices. The obtained oxide films are thin and robust, making them suitable for capacitors in compact microwave resonators.

  3. Room Temperature Oxide Deposition Approach to Fully Transparent, All-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Rembert, Thomas; Battaglia, Corsin; Anders, André; Javey, Ali

    2015-10-28

    A room temperature cathodic arc deposition technique is used to produce high-mobility ZnO thin films for low voltage thin-film transistors (TFTs) and digital logic inverters. All-oxide, fully transparent devices are fabricated on alkali-free glass and flexible polyimide foil, exhibiting high performance. This provides a practical materials platform for the low-temperature fabrication of all-oxide TFTs on virtually any substrate. PMID:26455916

  4. Characterization and stability of thin oxide films on plutonium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, H. G. García; Roussel, P.; Moore, D. P.; Pugmire, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were employed to study oxide films on plutonium metal surfaces. Measurements of the relative concentrations of oxygen and plutonium, as well as the resulting oxidation states of the plutonium (Pu) species in the near-surface region are presented. The oxide product of the auto-reduction (AR) of plutonium dioxide films is evaluated and found to be an oxide species which is reduced further than what is expected. The results of this study show a much greater than anticipated extent of auto-reduction and challenge the commonly held notion of the stoichiometric stability of Pu 2O 3 thin-films. The data indicates that a sub-stoichiometric plutonium oxide (Pu 2O 3 - y ) exists at the metal-oxide interface. The level of sub-stoichiometry is shown to depend, in part, on the carbidic contamination of the metal surface.

  5. Comment on "Some Thermodynamic Aspects of the Oxides of Chromium" by A. Mittal, G.J. Albertsson, G.S. Gupta, S. Seetharaman, and S. Subramanian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sourav Kumar; Jung, In-Ho

    2015-02-01

    In a recent publication, Mittal et al. tried to assess the stabilities of the chromium oxides at high temperature in order to understand the Cr hexavalent gas emission. For that, they compared the thermodynamic data of chromium oxides from two commercial databases, FactSage and Thermo-Calc, and NIST-JANAF Thermochemical Tables and found significant discrepancies between them. Apparently, some mistakes were being made in their study which led the present authors to re-evaluate their work and correct their analysis.

  6. Effect of oxidation heat treatment on the bond strength between a ceramic and cast and milled cobalt-chromium alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieyin; Ye, Xiuhua; Li, Bohua; Liao, Juankun; Zhuang, Peilin; Ye, Jiantao

    2015-08-01

    There is a dearth of dental scientific literature on the effect of different oxidation heat treatments (OHTs) (as surface pretreatments) on the bonding performance of cast and milled cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloys. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different OHTs on the bond strength between a ceramic and cast and milled CoCr alloys. Cobalt-chromium metallic specimens were prepared using either a cast or a milled method. Specimens were subjected to four different OHT methods: without OHT; OHT under normal atmospheric pressure; OHT under vacuum; and OHT under vacuum followed by sandblasting. The metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated using a three-point bending test according to ISO9693. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the specimens' microstructure and elemental composition. The bond strength was not affected by the CoCr manufacturing method. Oxidation heat treatment performed under normal atmospheric pressure resulted in the highest bond strength. The concentration of oxygen on the alloy surfaces varied with the different pretreatment methods in the following order: OHT under normal atmospheric pressure > OHT under vacuum > without OHT ≈ OHT under vacuum followed by sandblasting. PMID:26104804

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of chromium(VI) reduction and EDTA oxidization by photoelectrocatalysis combining cationic exchange membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hung-Te; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Tang, Yi-Fang; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2013-03-15

    A novel technology of photoelectrocatalysis (PEC) combining with cationic exchange membrane (CEM) was proposed for simultaneous reduction of chromium(VI) and oxidization of EDTA. The application of CEM was used to enhance the efficiency for prevention of the re-oxidation of reduced chromium with the electron-hole pairs. In this study, effects of current density, pH, TiO2 dosage, hydraulic retention time (HRT), light intensity and EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio were all investigated. The results showed that the optimum conversion efficiency occurred at 4mA/cm(2) with the presence of CEM. Higher conversion efficiencies were observed at lower pH due to the electrostatic attractions between positive charged TiOH2(+), and negatively charged Cr(VI) and EDTA. The optimum TiO2 loading of 1g/L was depended mainly on the acidic pH range, especially at higher HRT and irradiation intensity. In addition, higher EDTA/Cr(VI) molar ratio enhanced the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI), indicating EDTA plays the role of hole scavenger in this system. Moreover, incomplete EDTA decomposition contributes to the occurrence of intermediates, including nitrilotriacetic acid, iminodiacetic acid, glycine, oxamic acid, lyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, as identified by GC/MS. Consequently, transformation pathway was determined from these analyzed byproducts and molecular orbital package analysis. PMID:23380448

  8. Raman spectroscopic analysis of iron chromium oxide microspheres generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Soto-Bernal, J J; Frausto-Reyes, C; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2015-06-15

    Iron chromium oxide microspheres were generated by pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of two commercial samples of stainless steel at room temperature. An Ytterbium pulsed fiber laser was used for this purpose. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the microspheres, whose size was found to be about 0.2-1.7 μm, as revealed by SEM analysis. The laser irradiation on the surface of the stainless steel modified the composition of the microspheres generated, affecting the concentration of the main elemental components when laser power was increased. Furthermore, the peak ratio of the main bands in the Raman spectra has been associated to the concentration percentage of the main components of the samples, as revealed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. These experiments showed that it is possible to generate iron chromium oxide microspheres on stainless steel by laser irradiation and that the concentration percentage of their main components is associated with the laser power applied. PMID:25797225

  9. The prospective protective effect of selenium nanoparticles against chromium-induced oxidative and cellular damage in rat thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Hassanin, Kamel MA; El-Kawi, Samraa H Abd; Hashem, Khalid S

    2013-01-01

    Background Nanotechnology has enabled researchers to synthesize nanosize particles that possess increased surface areas. Compared to conventional microparticles, it has resulted in increased interactions with biological targets. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the protective ability of selenium nanoparticles against hexavalent chromium-induced thyrotoxicity. Design Twenty male rats were used in the study, and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given phosphate-buffered saline. Group 2 was the chromium-treated group and was given K2Cr2O7 60 μg/kg body weight intraperitoneally as a single dose on the third day of administration. Group 3 was the nano-selenium-treated group and was given selenium nanoparticles (size 3–20 nm) 0.5 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally daily for 5 consecutive days. Group 4 was the nano-selenium chromium-treated group, which received selenium nanoparticles for 5 days and a single dose of K2Cr2O7 on the third day of administration. Materials and methods Blood samples were collected from rats for measuring thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine [T3] and free thyroxine [T4]) and oxidative and antioxidant parameters (malondialdehyde [MDA], reduced glutathione [GSH], catalase, and superoxide dismutase [SOD]). Upon dissection, thyroid glands were taken for histopathological examination by using paraffin preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson’s trichrome. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for detecting cellular proliferation using Ki67 antibodies. Results The present study shows that K2Cr2O7 has a toxic effect on the thyroid gland as a result of inducing a marked oxidative damage and release of reactive oxygen species. This was shown by the significant decrease in free T3 and T4 and GSH levels, which was accompanied by significant increases in catalase, SOD, and MDA in the chromium-treated group compared to the control group. Se nanoparticles

  10. Low reflectance sputtered vanadium oxide thin films on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esther, A. Carmel Mary; Dey, Arjun; Rangappa, Dinesh; Sharma, Anand Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Vanadium oxide thin films on silicon (Si) substrate are grown by pulsed radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique at RF power in the range of 100-700 W at room temperature. Deposited thin films are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques to investigate microstructural, phase, electronic structure and oxide state characteristics. The reflectance and transmittance spectra of the films and the Si substrate are recorded at the solar region (200-2300 nm) of the spectral window. Substantial reduction in reflectance and increase in transmittance is observed for the films grown beyond 200 W. Further, optical constants viz. absorption coefficient, refractive index and extinction coefficient of the deposited vanadium oxide films are evaluated.

  11. Process Design for Preventing the Gate Oxide Thinning in the Integration of Dual Gate Oxide Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hoan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Myung-Soo; Park, Joo-Han; Kim, Eun-Soo; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2002-04-01

    In this study, a method is proposed to alleviate a gate oxide (GOX) thinning problem at the edge of shallow trench isolation (STI), when STI is adopted in the dual gate oxide process (DGOX). It is well known that the DGOX process is usually used for realizing both low and high voltage operating parts in one chip. However, it is found that severe GOX thinning occurs from 320 Å (in active area) to 79 Å (at STI top edge) and a dent profile exists at the top edge of STI, when conventional DGOX and STI processes are adopted. In order to solve these problems, a new DGOX process is used in this study. The GOX thinning is prevented mainly by a combination of a thick sidewall oxide with SiN pullback. Therefore, good subthreshold characteristics without a so-called double hump are obtained by the prevention of GOX thinning and a deep dent profile.

  12. Altering properties of cerium oxide thin films by Rh doping

    SciTech Connect

    Ševčíková, Klára; Nehasil, Václav; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Haviar, Stanislav; Matolín, Vladimír; and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Thin films of ceria doped by rhodium deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. • Concentration of rhodium has great impact on properties of Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films. • Intensive oxygen migration in films with low concentration of rhodium. • Oxygen migration suppressed in films with high amount of Rh dopants. - Abstract: Ceria containing highly dispersed ions of rhodium is a promising material for catalytic applications. The Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films with different concentrations of rhodium were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and were studied by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, Temperature programmed reaction and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The sputtered films consist of rhodium–cerium mixed oxide where cerium exhibits a mixed valency of Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} and rhodium occurs in two oxidation states, Rh{sup 3+} and Rh{sup n+}. We show that the concentration of rhodium has a great influence on the chemical composition, structure and reducibility of the Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films. The films with low concentrations of rhodium are polycrystalline, while the films with higher amount of Rh dopants are amorphous. The morphology of the films strongly influences the mobility of oxygen in the material. Therefore, varying the concentration of rhodium in Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films leads to preparing materials with different properties.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Antimicrobial Activity of Chromium(III) and Ruthenium(II) Complexes on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Páez, Paulina L.; Bazán, Claudia M.; Bongiovanni, María E.; Toneatto, Judith; Albesa, Inés; Becerra, María C.; Argüello, Gerardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance has resulted in the need for new approaches to be developed to combat previously easily treatable infections. The main aim of this work was to establish the potential of the synthetic α-diimine chromium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes (where the α-diimine ligands are bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]-phenazine) like [Cr(phen)3]3+, [Cr(phen)2(dppz)]3+, [Ru(phen)3]2+, and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as antibacterial agents by generating oxidative stress. The [Cr(phen)3]3+ and [Cr(phen)2(dppz)]3+ complexes showed activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0.125 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL, while [Ru(phen)3]2+ and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ do not exhibit antimicrobial activity against the two bacterial genera studied at the concentration range used. When ciprofloxacin was combined with [Cr(phen)3]3+ for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, an important synergistic effect was observed, FIC 0.066 for S. aureus and FIC 0.064 for E. coli. The work described here shows that chromium(III) complexes are bactericidal for S. aureus and E. coli. Our results indicate that α-diimine chromium(III) complexes may be interesting to open new paths for metallodrug chemotherapy against different bacterial genera since some of these complexes have been found to exhibit remarkable antibacterial activities. PMID:24093107

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structures of uranyl compounds containing mixed chromium oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Daniel K.; Quicksall, Andrew; Pressprich, Laura; Stoffer, Megan; Qiu, Jie; Nuzhdin, Kirill; Wu, Weiqiang; Vyushkova, Mariya; Burns, Peter C.

    2012-07-15

    The mixed-valence chromium uranyl compounds Li{sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(Cr(V)O{sub 5})(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 17} (1), (Mg(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}(Cr(V)O{sub 5}){sub 2}(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 8}] (2) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(Cr(V)O{sub 5})(Cr(VI)O{sub 4}){sub 2}]H{sub 2}O{sub 11} (3) have been synthesized and characterized. Each contains an identical sheet of cation-centered polyhedra. Central to the connectivity of the sheet are four uranyl pentagonal bipyramids that share some of their equatorial vertices, giving a four-membered ring. The Cr(V) cation located near the center of this ring is coordinated by O atoms in a square pyramidal arrangement. The Cr(VI) is tetrahedrally coordinated by O atoms, and these tetrahedra link the four-membered rings of bipyramids. The mixed-valence nature of the sheet was verified by XANES, an EPR spectrum, and bond-valence analysis. Low-valence cations and H{sub 2}O groups reside between the sheets of uranyl and chromate polyhedra, where they provide linkages between adjacent sheets. - Graphical abstract: Three uranyl chromate compounds contain both pentavalent and hexavalent chromium. The unusual topology of the uranyl chromate sheet contains unusual pentavalent chromium in a square pyramidal coordination environment. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first uranyl compounds with mixed Cr valences are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sheet of uranyl polyhedra stabilizes pentavalent chromium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uranyl and chromate polyhedra form a topologically novel sheet.

  15. Reaction of CO2 with propylene oxide and styrene oxide catalyzed by a chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complex.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca K; Devaine-Pressing, Katalin; Dawe, Louise N; Kozak, Christopher M

    2013-07-01

    A diamine-bis(phenolate) chromium(III) complex, {CrCl[O2NN'](BuBu)}2 catalyzes the copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The synthesis of this metal complex is straightforward and it can be obtained in high yields. This catalyst incorporates a tripodal amine-bis(phenolate) ligand, which differs from the salen or salan ligands typically used with Cr and Co complexes that have been employed as catalysts for the synthesis of such polycarbonates. The catalyst reported herein yields low molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities when the reaction is performed at room temperature. Performing the reaction at elevated temperatures causes the selective synthesis of propylene carbonate. The copolymerization activity for propylene oxide and carbon dioxide, as well as the coupling of carbon dioxide and styrene oxide to give styrene carbonate are presented. PMID:23192332

  16. Copper oxide thin films for ethanol sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamri Zeggar, M.; Bourfaa, F.; Adjimi, A.; Aida, M. S.; Attaf, N.

    2016-03-01

    The present is a study of a new active layer for ethanol (C2H5OH) vapour sensing devices based on copper oxide (CuO). CuO films were prepared by spray ultrasonic pyrolysis at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. Films microstructure was examined by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Vapour-sensing testing was conducted using static vapour-sensing system, at different operating temperatures in the range of 100°C to 175°C for the vapour concentration of 300 ppm. The results show a high response of 45% at relatively low operating temperatures of 150°C towards ethanol vapour.

  17. Nanostructured copper, chromium, and tin oxide multicomponent materials as catalysts for methanol decomposition: 11C-radiolabeling study.

    PubMed

    Tsoncheva, Tanya; Sarkadi-Priboczki, Eva; Dimitrov, Momtchil; Genova, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Copper and chromium modified tin oxide nanocomposites were obtained via incipient wetness impregnation of high surface area nanosized SnO(2) with the corresponding metal acetylacetonates and their further decomposition in air. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Nitrogen physisorption, UV-Vis, and Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) with hydrogen were applied for the samples characterization. The catalytic activity of the obtained materials was tested in methanol conversion. A new approach based on the selective coverage of the surface with (11)C-methanol was used for the characterization of the catalytic sites. It was demonstrated that the products distribution could be controlled by the surface coverage with methanol and the role of different active sites was discussed. The modification of SnO(2) with copper oxide increased the activity in methanol decomposition to CO(2)via dioxymethylene intermediates, but the catalyst suffered considerable loss of activity due to the reduction transformations by the reaction medium and formation of an inactive intermetallic alloy. The modification with chromium changed the acid-basic properties of SnO(2) by the formation of Cr(2)O(3) nanoparticles as well as anchored to the support chromate species. The former particles facilitated the formation of dimethyl ether (DME), while the latter species converted methanol predominantly to hydrocarbons. The fraction of chromate species increased in Cu-Cr-Sn oxide multicomponent nanocomposites and promoted the formation of hydrocarbons over DME at low temperatures, while at higher temperatures, the activity of the copper species leading to CO(2) formation was more pronounced. PMID:23031492

  18. Nitrogen doped zinc oxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sonny X.

    2003-12-15

    To summarize, polycrystalline ZnO thin films were grown by reactive sputtering. Nitrogen was introduced into the films by reactive sputtering in an NO{sub 2} plasma or by N{sup +} implantation. All ZnO films grown show n-type conductivity. In unintentionally doped ZnO films, the n-type conductivities are attributed to Zn{sub i}, a native shallow donor. In NO{sub 2}-grown ZnO films, the n-type conductivity is attributed to (N{sub 2}){sub O}, a shallow double donor. In NO{sub 2}-grown ZnO films, 0.3 atomic % nitrogen was found to exist in the form of N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}. Upon annealing, N{sub 2}O decomposes into N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In furnace-annealed samples N{sub 2} redistributes diffusively and forms gaseous N{sub 2} bubbles in the films. Unintentionally doped ZnO films were grown at different oxygen partial pressures. Zni was found to form even at oxygen-rich condition and led to n-type conductivity. N{sup +} implantation into unintentionally doped ZnO film deteriorates the crystallinity and optical properties and leads to higher electron concentration. The free electrons in the implanted films are attributed to the defects introduced by implantation and formation of (N{sub 2}){sub O} and Zni. Although today there is still no reliable means to produce good quality, stable p-type ZnO material, ZnO remains an attractive material with potential for high performance short wavelength optoelectronic devices. One may argue that gallium nitride was in a similar situation a decade ago. Although we did not obtain any p-type conductivity, we hope our research will provide a valuable reference to the literature.

  19. Dysprosium oxide and dysprosium-oxide-doped titanium oxide thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Aile Kozlova, Jekaterina; Aarik, Lauri; Aarik, Jaan; Kukli, Kaupo; Link, Joosep; Stern, Raivo

    2015-01-15

    Dysprosium oxide and dysprosium-oxide-doped titanium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on silicon substrates. For depositing dysprosium and titanium oxides Dy(thd){sub 3}-O{sub 3} and TiCl{sub 4}-O{sub 3} were used as precursors combinations. Appropriate parameters for Dy(thd){sub 3}-O{sub 3} growth process were obtained by using a quartz crystal microbalance system. The Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited on planar substrates and on three-dimensional substrates with aspect ratio 1:20. The Dy/Ti ratio of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped TiO{sub 2} films deposited on a planar silicon substrate ranged from 0.04 to 0.06. Magnetometry studies revealed that saturation of magnetization could not be observed in planar Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, but it was observable in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on 3D substrates and in doped TiO{sub 2} films with a Dy/Ti atomic ratio of 0.06. The latter films exhibited saturation magnetization 10{sup −6} A cm{sup 2} and coercivity 11 kA/m at room temperature.

  20. Breakdown voltage enhancement of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by polyimide/chromium composite thin film passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futong, Chu; Chao, Chen; Xingzhao, Liu

    2014-03-01

    A novel AlGaN/GaN high electric mobility transistor (HEMT) with polyimide (PI)/chromium (Cr) as the passivation layer is proposed for enhancing breakdown voltage and its DC performance is also investigated. The Cr nanoparticles firstly introduced in PI thin films by the co-evaporation can be used to increase the permittivity of PI film. The high-permittivity PI/Cr passivation acting as field plate can suppress the fringing electric field peak at the drain-side edge of the gate electrode. This mechanism is demonstrated in accord with measured results. The experimental results show that in comparison with the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs without passivation, the breakdown voltage of HEMTs with the PI/Cr composite thin films can be significantly improved, from 122 to 248 V.

  1. Environmentally Responsible Redox Chemistry: An Example of Convenient Oxidation Methodology without Chromium Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumbie, Robyn L.

    2006-01-01

    The reactions use recyclable Magtrieve as the oxidant in a simple reaction sequence illustrating the reciprocity of oxidation and reduction processes. The reciprocity of oxidation and reduction reactions are explored while undertaking the reactions in an environmentally friendly manner.

  2. Growth control of the oxidation state in vanadium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Park, Sungkyun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-12-05

    Precise control of the chemical valence or oxidation state of vanadium in vanadium oxide thin films is highly desirable for not only fundamental research, but also technological applications that utilize the subtle change in the physical properties originating from the metalinsulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. However, due to the multivalent nature of vanadium and the lack of a good understanding on growth control of the oxidation state, stabilization of phase pure vanadium oxides with a single oxidation state is extremely challenging. Here, we systematically varied the growth conditions to clearly map out the growth window for preparing phase pure epitaxial vanadium oxides by pulsed laser deposition for providing a guideline to grow high quality thin films with well-defined oxidation states of V₂⁺²O₃, V⁺⁴O₂, and V₂⁺⁵O₅. A well pronounced MIT was only observed in VO₂ films grown in a very narrow range of oxygen partial pressure P(O₂). The films grown either in lower (< 10 mTorr) or higher P(O₂) (> 25 mTorr) result in V₂O₃ and V₂O₅ phases, respectively, thereby suppressing the MIT for both cases. We have also found that the resistivity ratio before and after the MIT of VO₂ thin films can be further enhanced by one order of magnitude when the films are further oxidized by post-annealing at a well-controlled oxidizing ambient. This result indicates that stabilizing vanadium into a single valence state has to compromise with insufficient oxidation of an as grown thin film and, thereby, a subsequent oxidation is required for an 3 improved MIT behavior.

  3. Growth control of the oxidation state in vanadium oxide thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Park, Sungkyun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-12-05

    Precise control of the chemical valence or oxidation state of vanadium in vanadium oxide thin films is highly desirable for not only fundamental research, but also technological applications that utilize the subtle change in the physical properties originating from the metalinsulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. However, due to the multivalent nature of vanadium and the lack of a good understanding on growth control of the oxidation state, stabilization of phase pure vanadium oxides with a single oxidation state is extremely challenging. Here, we systematically varied the growth conditions to clearly map out the growth window for preparing phase puremore » epitaxial vanadium oxides by pulsed laser deposition for providing a guideline to grow high quality thin films with well-defined oxidation states of V₂⁺²O₃, V⁺⁴O₂, and V₂⁺⁵O₅. A well pronounced MIT was only observed in VO₂ films grown in a very narrow range of oxygen partial pressure P(O₂). The films grown either in lower (< 10 mTorr) or higher P(O₂) (> 25 mTorr) result in V₂O₃ and V₂O₅ phases, respectively, thereby suppressing the MIT for both cases. We have also found that the resistivity ratio before and after the MIT of VO₂ thin films can be further enhanced by one order of magnitude when the films are further oxidized by post-annealing at a well-controlled oxidizing ambient. This result indicates that stabilizing vanadium into a single valence state has to compromise with insufficient oxidation of an as grown thin film and, thereby, a subsequent oxidation is required for an 3 improved MIT behavior.« less

  4. Growth control of the oxidation state in vanadium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Park, Sungkyun; Egami, Takeshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2014-12-01

    Precise control of the chemical valence or oxidation state of vanadium in vanadium oxide thin films is highly desirable for not only fundamental research but also technological applications that utilize the subtle change in the physical properties originating from the metal-insulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. However, due to the multivalent nature of vanadium and the lack of a good understanding on growth control of the oxidation state, stabilization of phase pure vanadium oxides with a single oxidation state is extremely challenging. Here, we systematically varied the growth conditions to clearly map out the growth window for preparing phase pure epitaxial vanadium oxides by pulsed laser deposition for providing a guideline to grow high quality thin films with well-defined oxidation states of V2 + 3 O 3 , V + 4 O 2 , and V2 + 5 O 5 . A well pronounced MIT was only observed in VO2 films grown in a very narrow range of oxygen partial pressure P(O2). The films grown either in lower (<10 mTorr) or higher P(O2) (>25 mTorr) result in V2O3 and V2O5 phases, respectively, thereby suppressing the MIT for both cases. We have also found that the resistivity ratio before and after the MIT of VO2 thin films can be further enhanced by one order of magnitude when the films are further oxidized by post-annealing at a well-controlled oxidizing ambient. This result indicates that stabilizing vanadium into a single valence state has to compromise with insufficient oxidation of an as grown thin film and, thereby, a subsequent oxidation is required for an improved MIT behavior.

  5. Growth control of the oxidation state in vanadium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Park, Sungkyun; Egami, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    Precise control of the chemical valence or oxidation state of vanadium in vanadium oxide thin films is highly desirable for not only fundamental research but also technological applications that utilize the subtle change in the physical properties originating from the metal-insulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. However, due to the multivalent nature of vanadium and the lack of a good understanding on growth control of the oxidation state, stabilization of phase pure vanadium oxides with a single oxidation state is extremely challenging. Here, we systematically varied the growth conditions to clearly map out the growth window for preparing phase pure epitaxial vanadium oxides by pulsed laser deposition for providing a guideline to grow high quality thin films with well-defined oxidation states of V{sub 2}{sup +3}O{sub 3}, V{sup +4}O{sub 2}, and V{sub 2}{sup +5}O{sub 5}. A well pronounced MIT was only observed in VO{sub 2} films grown in a very narrow range of oxygen partial pressure P(O{sub 2}). The films grown either in lower (<10 mTorr) or higher P(O{sub 2}) (>25 mTorr) result in V{sub 2}O{sub 3} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} phases, respectively, thereby suppressing the MIT for both cases. We have also found that the resistivity ratio before and after the MIT of VO{sub 2} thin films can be further enhanced by one order of magnitude when the films are further oxidized by post-annealing at a well-controlled oxidizing ambient. This result indicates that stabilizing vanadium into a single valence state has to compromise with insufficient oxidation of an as grown thin film and, thereby, a subsequent oxidation is required for an improved MIT behavior.

  6. Structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces and thin film structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lad, Robert J.

    1999-12-14

    This project focused on three different aspects of oxide thin film systems: (1) Model metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interface studies were carried out by depositing ultra-thin metal (Al, K, Mg) and oxide (MgO, AlO{sub x}) films on TiO{sub 2}, NiO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal oxide substrates. (2) Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) oxygen plasma deposition was used to fabricate AlO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates, and film growth mechanisms and structural characteristics were investigated. (3) The friction and wear characteristics of ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates in unlubricated sliding contact were studied and correlated with film microstructure. In these studies, thin film and interfacial regions were characterized using diffraction (RHEED, LEED, XRD), electron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS, AES), microscopy (AFM) and tribology instruments (pin-on-disk, friction microprobe, and scratch tester). By precise control of thin film microstructure, an increased understanding of the structural and chemical stability of interface regions and tribological performance of ultra-thin oxide films was achieved in these important ceramic systems.

  7. Anisotropic thermal conductivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, A.; Boussois, K.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D. S.; Blanchart, P.

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports about the development of a modified laser-flash technique and relation to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity of thin polycrystalline oxide samples. Thermal conductivity is then calculated with the product of diffusivity, specific heat and density. Design and operating features for evaluating in-plane thermal conductivities are described. The technique is advantageous as thin samples are not glued together to measure in-plane thermal conductivities like earlier methods reported in literature. The approach was employed to study anisotropic thermal conductivity in alumina sheet, textured kaolin ceramics and montmorillonite. Since it is rare to find in-plane thermal conductivity values for such anisotropic thin samples in literature, this technique offers a useful variant to existing techniques.

  8. Single event gate rupture in thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Dodd, P.E.; Hash, G.L.

    1997-06-01

    As integrated circuit densities increase with each new technology generation, both the lateral and vertical dimensions shrink. Operating voltages, however, have not scaled as aggressively as feature size, with a resultant increase in the electric fields within advanced geometry devices. Oxide electric fields are in fact increasing to greater than 5 MV/cm as feature size approaches 0.1 {micro}m. This trend raises the concern that single event gate rupture (SEGR) may limit the scaling of advanced integrated circuits (ICs) for space applications. The dependence of single event gate rupture (SEGR) critical field on oxide thickness is examined for thin gate oxides. Critical field for SEGR increases with decreasing oxide thickness, consistent with an increasing intrinsic breakdown field.

  9. Investigation of iron-chromium-niobium-titanium ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare AISI441 and AISI441 coated with (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protection layers were studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The addition of minor alloying elements, in particular Nb, led to formation of Laves phases both inside grains and along grain boundaries. In particular, the Laves phase which precipitated out along grain boundaries during exposure at intermediate SOFC operating temperatures was found to be rich in both Nb and Si. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the alloy matrix and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface, resulting in a reduction in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR). However, the relatively high oxidation rate of the steel, which leads to increasing ASR over time, and the need to prevent volatilization of chromium from the steel necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, the application of a Mn 1.5Co 1.5O 4 spinel protection layer substantially improved the electrical performance of the 441 by reducing the oxidation rate.

  10. Application of Fe-Cu binary oxide nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif Ullah; Zaidi, Rumman; Hassan, Saeikh Z; Farooqi, I H; Azam, Ameer

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption process has been used as an effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. Groundwater remediation by nanoparticles has received interest in recent years. In the present study, a binary metal oxide of Fe-Cu was prepared and used for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effects of initial Cr (VI) concentration, dose of adsorbent, and pH of solution on the removal efficiency of Cr (VI). The prepared nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxides were able to reduce the concentration of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution. Binary metal oxides nanoparticle exhibited an outstanding ability to remove Cr (VI) due to high surface area, low particle size, and high inherent activity. The percentage removal efficiency of Cr (VI) increased with nanoparticles doses (0.1 g L(-1)-2.5 g L(-1)), whereas it decreased with initial Cr (VI) concentration (1 mg L(-1)-25 mg L(-1)) and with pH (3-9). The Freundlich model was found to be the better fit for adsorption isotherm. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy. It showed that the Fe-Cu binary oxides were formed in single phase. SEM micrograph showed aggregates with many nano-sized particles. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect. PMID:27386994

  11. The oxidative stress response of the filamentous yeast Trichosporon cutaneum R57 to copper, cadmium and chromium exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lazarova, Nevena; Krumova, Ekaterina; Stefanova, Tsvetanka; Georgieva, Nelly; Angelova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Despite the intensive research in the past decade on the microbial bioaccumulation of heavy metals, the significance of redox state for oxidative stress induction is not completely clarified. In the present study, we examined the effect of redox-active (copper and chromium) and redox-inactive (cadmium) metals on the changes in levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant enzyme defence in Trichosporon cutaneum R57 cells. This filamentous yeast strain showed significant tolerance and bioaccumulation capability of heavy metals. Our findings indicated that the treatment by both redox-active and redox-inactive heavy metal induced oxidative stress events. Enhanced concentrations of Cu2+, Cr6+ and Cd2+ caused acceleration in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase in the level of oxidatively damaged proteins and accumulation of reserve carbohydrates (glycogen and trehalose). Cell response against heavy metal exposure also includes elevation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, which are key enzymes for directly scavenging of ROS. Despite the mentioned changes in the stress biomarkers, T. cutaneum did not show a significant growth diminution. Probably, activated antioxidant defence contributes to the yeast survival under conditions of heavy metal stress. PMID:26019570

  12. Nanostructured zinc oxide thin film by simple vapor transport deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athma, P. V.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Johns, N.; Safeera, T. A.; Reshmi, R.; Anila, E. I.

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures find applications in optoelectronic devices, photo voltaic displays and sensors. In this work zinc oxide nanostructures in different forms like nanorods, tripods and tetrapods have been synthesized by thermal evaporation of zinc metal and subsequent deposition on a glass substrate by vapor transport in the presence of oxygen. It is a comparatively simpler and environment friendly technique for the preparation of thin films. The structure, morphology and optical properties of the synthesized nanostructured thin film were characterized in detail by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and photoluminescence (PL). The film exhibited bluish white emission with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates x = 0.22, y = 0.31.

  13. Investigation of tungsten doped tin oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen; Meng, Ting; Yang, Zhao; Cui, Can; Zhang, Qun

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten doped tin oxide thin film transistors (TWO-TFTs) were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. With TWO thin films as the channel layers, the TFTs show lower off-current and positive shift turn-on voltage than the intrinsic tin oxide TFTs, which can be explained by the reason that W doping is conducive to suppress the carrier concentration of the TWO channel layer. It is important to elect an appropriate channel thickness for improving the TFT performance. The optimum TFT performance in enhancement mode is achieved at W doping content of 2.7 at% and channel thickness of 12 nm, with the saturation mobility, turn-on voltage, subthreshold swing value and on-off current ratio of 5 cm2 V-1 s-1, 0.4 V, 0.4 V/decade and 2.4  ×  106, respectively.

  14. Vanadium oxide thin film with improved sheet resistance uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Généreux, Francis; Provençal, Francis; Tremblay, Bruno; Boucher, Marc-André; Julien, Christian; Alain, Christine

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on the deposition of vanadium oxide thin films with sheet resistance uniformity better than 2.5% over a 150 mm wafer. The resistance uniformity within the array is estimated to be less than 1%, which is comparable with the value reported for amorphous silicon-based microbolometer arrays. In addition, this paper also shows that the resistivity of vanadium oxide, like amorphous silicon, can be modeled by Arrhenius' equation. This result is expected to significantly ease the computation of the correction table required for TEC-less operation of VOx-based microbolometer arrays.

  15. Solid-state thin-film supercapacitor with ruthenium oxide and solid electrolyte thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Y. S.; Cho, W. I.; Lim, J. H.; Choi, D. J.

    Direct current reactive sputtering deposition of ruthenium oxide thin films (bottom and top electrodes) at 400°C are performed to produce a solid-state thin-film supercapacitor (TFSC). The supercapacitor has a cell structure of RuO 2/Li 2.94PO 2.37N 0.75 (Lipon)/RuO 2/Pt. Radio frequency, reactive sputtering deposition of an Li 2.94PO 2.37N 0.75 electrolyte film is performed on the bottom RuO 2 film at room temperature to separate the bottom and top RuO 2 electrodes electrically. The stoichiometry of the RuO 2 thin film is investigated by Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the as-deposited RuO 2 thin film is an amorphous phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements reveal that the RuO 2/Lipon/RuO 2 hetero-interfaces have no inter-diffusion problems. Charge-discharge measurements with constant current at room temperature clearly reveal typical supercapacitor behaviour for a RuO 2/Lipon/RuO 2/Pt cell structure. Since the electrolyte thin film has low ionic mobility, the capacity and cycle performance are inferior to those of a bulk type of supercapacitor. These results indicate that a high performance, TFSC can be fabricated by a solid electrolyte thin film with high ionic conductivity.

  16. Structure, magnetism, and dissociation energy of small bimetallic cobalt-chromium oxide cluster cations: A density-functional-theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hung Tan; Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Tam, Nguyen Minh; Lam, Vu Dinh; Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-01-01

    We study CoxCryOm+ (x + y = 2, 3 and 1 ≤ m ≤ 4) clusters by means of density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the clusters grow preferentially through maximizing the number of metal-oxygen bonds with a favor on Cr sites. The size- and composition-dependent magnetic behavior is discussed in relation with the local atomic magnetic moments. While doped species show an oscillatory magnetic behavior, the total magnetic moment of pure cobalt and chromium oxide clusters tends to enhance or reduce as increasing the oxygen content, respectively. The dissociation energies for different evaporation channels are also calculated to suggest the stable patterns, as fingerprints for future photofragmentation experiments.

  17. The effect of chromium oxide on the properties of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Vojtech, O.; Sussmilch, J.; Urbanec, Z.

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effect of chromium on the properties of selected glasses was performed in the frame of a Contract between Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Nuclear Research Institute, ReZ. In the period from July 1994 to June 1995 two borosilicate glasses of special composition were prepared according to the PNL procedure and their physical and structural characteristics of glasses were studied. This Final Report contains a vast documentation on the properties of all glasses studied. For the preparation of the respective technology more detailed study of physico-chemical properties and crystallinity of investigated systems would be desirable.

  18. Growth and characterization of chromium oxide coatings prepared by pulsed-direct current reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barshilia, Harish C.; Rajam, K. S.

    2008-12-01

    Approximately 0.2-3.2 μm thick single phase chromium oxide (Cr 2O 3) coatings with different oxygen flow rates were deposited on silicon and mild steel substrates at low substrate temperature (˜60 °C) by pulsed-direct current (DC) reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering. Two asymmetric bipolar-pulsed DC generators were used to co-sputter two Cr targets, in Ar + O 2 plasma. The coatings were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nanoindentation hardness tester, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The XRD data showed the presence of mixture of crystalline (rhombohedral Cr 2O 3) and amorphous phases for the coatings prepared with oxygen flow rate less than 10 sccm. A complete transformation to amorphous phase was observed at higher oxygen flow rates. The XRD results were supported by Raman spectroscopy data. The XPS data suggested that the chemical state of Cr was in the form of Cr 3+. The chromium oxide coatings exhibited a maximum hardness of 22 GPa and an elastic modulus of 208 GPa. The coatings exhibited high thermal stability upon annealing in vacuum up to 500 °C and retained hardness as high as 17 GPa. Spectroscopic ellipsometry data indicated that coatings prepared at higher oxygen flow rates were dielectric in nature and those prepared at low oxygen flow rates exhibited an intermediate character, i.e., a transition between the dielectric and the metallic behavior. The corrosion behavior of Cr 2O 3 coating deposited on mild steel substrates was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results indicated that Cr 2O 3 coating exhibited superior corrosion resistance as compared to the uncoated substrate.

  19. Electrical properties of vanadium tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sung-Pill; Noh, Hyun-Ji; Lee, Sung-Gap; Lee, Young-Hie

    2010-03-15

    The vanadium tungsten oxide thin films deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by RF sputtering exhibited good TCR and dielectric properties. The dependence of crystallization and electrical properties are related to the grain size of V{sub 1.85}W{sub 0.15}O{sub 5} thin films with different annealing temperatures. It was found that the dielectric properties and TCR properties of V{sub 1.85}W{sub 0.15}O{sub 5} thin films were strongly dependent upon the annealing temperature. The dielectric constants of the V{sub 1.85}W{sub 0.15}O{sub 5} thin films annealed at 400 {sup o}C were 44, with a dielectric loss of 0.83%. The TCR values of the V{sub 1.85}W{sub 0.15}O{sub 5} thin films annealed at 400 {sup o}C were about -3.45%/K.

  20. Highly Conducting Transparent Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2014-09-01

    Highly conducting transparent indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films have been achieved by controlling different growth parameters using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the IZO thin films have been investigated for varied indium content and growth temperature ( T G) in order to find out the optimum level of doping to achieve the highest conducting transparent IZO thin films. The highest mobility and carrier concentration of 11.5 cm2/V-s and 3.26 × 1020 cm-3, respectively, have been achieved in IZO doped with 2% indium. It has been shown that as T G of the 2% IZO thin films increase, more and more indium atoms are substituted into Zn sites leading to shift in (002) peaks towards higher angles which correspond to releasing the stress within the IZO thin film. The minimum resistivity of 5.3 × 10-4 Ω-cm has been achieved in 2% indium-doped IZO grown at 700°C.

  1. Surface and bulk properties of chromium oxide: Implications for reduction by methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjelbred, Kristin M.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Støvneng, Jon Andreas; Andersson, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    A computational method for Cr2O3 and Cr3C2 has been established based on a systematic investigation of functionals, basis sets and corrections for dispersion, self-interaction and relativistic effects. The suggested method comprises of the PBE functional with Grimme's dispersion correction, the TZ2P basis set with a frozen core of up to 2p for chromium and 1s for oxygen and carbon, and with the zeroth-order regular approximation for relativistic effects, and is in good agreement with experimental results for both bulk crystals and surface structures. Self-interactions have been corrected for by the DFT+U approach, but it still gives band gaps significantly different from the experimental band gap. We have also calculated the adsorption energy of methane on a chromium terminated (0001) Cr2O3 surface, and the significance of dispersion and self-interaction corrections for the adsorption of methane on Cr2O3 was found to be substantial.

  2. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking and selective internal oxidation of nickel-chromium-iron alloys in hydrogenated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.

    2005-07-01

    Selective internal oxidation (SIO) is a mechanism of grain boundary embrittlement through the formation of intergranular oxides of Cr2O3. SIO is proposed as a mechanism to explain intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Ni-base alloys in pressurized water reactor environments. The purpose of this work is to investigate SIO through a series of experiments using controlled-purity alloys in a controlled, low-pressure steam environment in which the oxygen potential is varied. Five alloys; Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, LCr (Ni-5Cr-9Fe), CD85 (Ni-16Cr-9Fe) and HCr (Ni-30Cr-9Fe), were used in corrosion coupon exposure tests and constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 550°C and 400°C in an environment consisting of a controlled mixture of hydrogen, water vapor and argon. The hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratio (PPR) was varied between 0.001 and 0.9 to control the oxygen partial pressure. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr and LCr alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPR values less than 0.09 while CD85 and HCr formed Cr2O 3 oxide films over the entire PPR range. Corrosion coupon results also show the formation of highly localized oxide particles at grain boundaries. Focused ion beam analysis revealed that intergranular oxides were observed at significant depths (>150 nm) down grain boundaries and the oxide morphology depended on the alloy composition and PPR value. Diffusion of oxygen along the grain boundary accounted for the growth of intergranular oxides. CERT test results showed that intergranular cracking was caused by creep-induced microvoid coalescence only at 550°C and did not depend on PPR. At 400°C, the cracking behavior depended on the PPR and resulted in a mixture of creep-induced microvoid coalescence and brittle intergranular failure. The cracked boundary fraction was higher at a PPR value where a Ni(OH)2 surface film formed. Alloy composition influenced cracking and the cracked boundary fraction decreased as the alloy chromium content increased. The

  3. Lateral solid-phase epitaxy of oxide thin films on glass substrate seeded with oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kenji; Hirose, Yasushi; Nakao, Shoichiro; Yamada, Naoomi; Kogure, Toshihiro; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-06-24

    We developed a technique to fabricate oxide thin films with uniaxially controlled crystallographic orientation and lateral size of more than micrometers on amorphous substrates. This technique is lateral solid-phase epitaxy, where epitaxial crystallization of amorphous precursor is seeded with ultrathin oxide nanosheets sparsely (≈10% coverage) deposited on the substrate. Transparent conducting Nb-doped anatase TiO2 thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by this technique. Perfect (001) orientation and large grains with lateral sizes up to 10 μm were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron beam backscattering diffraction measurements. As a consequence of these features, the obtained film exhibited excellent electrical transport properties comparable to those of epitaxial thin films on single-crystalline substrates. This technique is a versatile method for fabricating high-quality oxide thin films other than anatase TiO2 and would increase the possible applications of oxide-based thin film devices. PMID:24867286

  4. Investigation of Iron-Chromium-Niobium-Titanium Ferritic Stainless Steel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Chong M.; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-09-01

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, AL 441 HPTM was studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. Minor alloying elements (Nb and Ti) captured interstitials such as C by forming carbides, stabilizing the ferritic structure and mitigating the risks of sensitization and inter-granular corrosion. Laves phases rich in Nb and Si precipitated along grain boundaries during high temperature exposure, improving the steel’s high temperature mechanical strength. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the steel substrate and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface. However, the relatively high oxidation rate, and thus increasing ASR over time, necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel protection layers drastically improved the electrical performance of the ferritic stainless steel 441, acting as barriers to chromium outward and oxygen inward diffusion.

  5. Air plasma-material interactions at the oxidized surface of the PM1000 nickel-chromium superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panerai, Francesco; Marschall, Jochen; Thömel, Jan; Vandendael, Isabelle; Hubin, Annick; Chazot, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are promising options for the thermal protection systems of hypersonic re-entry vehicles operating under moderate aerothermal heating conditions. We present an experimental study on the interactions between PM1000, an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium superalloy, and air plasma at surface temperatures between 1000 and 1600 K and pressures of 1500, 7500 and 10,000 Pa. Pre-oxidized PM1000 specimens are tested in high-enthalpy reactive air plasma flows generated by the Plasmatron wind tunnel at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Microscopic analysis of plasma-exposed specimens shows enhanced damage to the chromia scale at the lowest plasma pressure. Elemental surface analysis reveals the loss of Cr and the enhancement of Ni at the scale surface. A thermodynamic analysis supports the accelerated volatilization of Cr2O3 and the relative stability of NiO in the presence of atomic oxygen. Changes in the reflectance and emissivity of the oxidized surfaces due to plasma-exposure are presented. The catalytic efficiencies for dissociated air species recombination are determined as a function of surface temperature and pressure through a numerical rebuilding procedure and are compared with values presented in the literature for the same material.

  6. Changes in the Young Modulus of hafnium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André Luís Marin; de Araújo Ribeiro, Fabiana; Hübler, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium-oxide (HfO2)-based materials have been extensively researched due to their excellent optical and electrical properties. However, the literature data on the mechanical properties of these materials and its preparation for heavy machinery application is very limited. The aim of this work is to deposit hafnium oxide thin films by DC reactive magnetron sputtering with different Young's Modulus from the Ar/O2 concentration variation in the deposition chamber. The thin films were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering with different Ar/O2 gas concentrations in plasma. After deposition, HfOx thin films were characterized through XRD, AFM, RBS and XRF. In this regard, it was observed that the as-deposited HfO2 films were mostly amorphous in the lower Ar/O2 gas ratio and transformed to polycrystalline with monoclinic structure as the Ar/O2 gas ratios grows. RBS technique shows good compromise between the experimental data and the simulated ones. It was possible to tailored the Young Modulus of the films by alter the Ar/O2 content on the deposition chamber without thermal treatment.

  7. Development of oxidation resistance in thoriated nickel-chromium base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wilcox, B. A.; Jaffee, R. I.; Stringer, J.

    1971-01-01

    A pack process was developed which permits the introduction of nearly six weight percent aluminum into solid solution in the near-surface region of TDNiCr (Ni-20Cr-2ThO2. At this aluminum concentration an adherent alumina scale is produced on the alloy surface upon exposure to an environment of 1330 n/sq m (10 torr) or 101,000 n/sq m (760 torr) air at temperatures of 1093 C (2000 F) and 1204 C (2200 F). Room temperature mechanical properties of the aluminized alloys compare favorably with those of TDNiCr as received. While diffusivities for aluminum are a factor of three higher than those for chromium in TDNiCr or Ni-20Cr, the diffusion rates are similar for either of these elements in the thoriated or unthoriated alloy for a given temperature and grain size.

  8. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Fatsiou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI)-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was less affected under Cr(VI) stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS)-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific.

  9. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Fatsiou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI)-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was less affected under Cr(VI) stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS)-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific. PMID:26204828

  10. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Fatsiou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI)-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was less affected under Cr(VI) stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS)-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific. PMID:26184178