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Sample records for chromosomes lacking gene

  1. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes. PMID:21542906

  2. Lack of association between the pseudo deficiency mutation in the arylsulfatase A gene on chromosome 22 with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.L.; Chetty, V.; Kasch, L.

    1994-09-01

    Arylsulfatase-A deficiency causes the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease metachromatic leukodystrophy. In the late-onset variant, schizophrenia-like psychosis is a frequent finding and sometimes given as the initial diagnosis. A mutant allele, pseudo-deficiency, causes deficient enzyme activity but no apparent clinical effect. It occurs at a high frequency and consists of two tightly-linked A{r_arrow}G transitions: one causing the loss of a glycosylation site (PDg); and one causing the loss of a polyadenylation signal (PDa). Since this gene was mapped to chromosome 22q13-qter, a region implicated in a potential linkage with schizophrenia, we hypothesized that this common mutation may be a predisposing genetic factor for schizophrenia. We studied a random sample of schizophrenic patients for possible increase in frequency of the pseudo-deficiency mutations and in multiplex families to verify if the mutations are linked to schizophrenia. Among 50 Caucasian patients identified through out-patient and in-patient clinics, the frequencies for the three alleles PDg + PDa together, PDg or PDa alone were 11%, 5% and 0%, respectively. The corresponding frequencies among 100 Caucasian controls were 7.5%, 6% and 0%, respectively, the differences between the patients and controls being insignificant ({chi}{sup 2}tests: 0.10

  3. Comparative Sex Chromosome Genomics in Snakes: Differentiation, Evolutionary Strata, and Lack of Global Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  4. Lack of segregation of a Marfan-like phenotype associating marfanoie habitus and mitral valve disease with fibrillin gene on chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    VanMaldergen, L.; Hilbert, P.; Gillerot, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Apart from typical Marfan syndrome (MS), several Marfan-like conditions are known. One of those is the MASS syndrome (Mitral involvement, Aortic dilatation, Skin and Skeletal abnormalities) defined by Pyeritz et al. Among these, a dominantly inherited mitral valve prolapse with marfanoid habitus have also been reported. Until now, except for a Marfan-like condition described by Boileau et al., all Marfan families are linked to fib 15. A large Belgian pedigree with 25 affected patients among 62 at risk subjects spanning four generations is described. A syndrome including marfanoid skeletal dysplasia (tall stature, dolichostenomelia, arachnodactyly, pectus carinatum joint dislocation), prolapse and/or myxomatous degeneration of the mitral valve, but without aortic dilatation of eye involvement was observed. Although the phenotype fulfills Berlin diagnostic criteria for MS, it closely resembles MASS syndrome. Preliminary linkage results show discordance aggregation insertion in the fib 15 gene, as evaluated by intragenic microsatellite fib 15. Since Dietz et al. described a similar patient with fib 15 gene, we suggest that this variant of Marfan syndrome is genetically heterogeneous and caused by mutations, some of which are allelic to classical Marfan syndrome plus a subtype, some of which are not. Linkage studies are under way to further characterize the gene involved in the present family.

  5. Gene mapping and chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, D J; Brook, J D; Meredith, A L; Harley, H G; Sarfarazi, M; Harper, P S

    1986-01-01

    Chromosome 19 is currently the most fully mapped of the smaller chromosomes, with about 40 loci assigned to it (HGM8). Major inherited disorders on this chromosome include myotonic dystrophy and familial hypercholesterolaemia. Other loci include five blood groups, a cluster of apolipoprotein genes, and the receptors for insulin and polio virus. A number of cloned genes and random DNA sequences identify polymorphisms which, together with blood group and other protein polymorphisms, have been used to establish a framework for ordering the loci and estimating genetic distances. Hybrid cell lines allow loci to be assigned to one of eight different regions and a detailed genetic map of the chromosome will be possible in the near future. PMID:3081724

  6. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2015-01-01

    Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition) with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT), such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men. PMID:25814157

  7. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2015-01-01

    Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition) with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT), such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men. PMID:25814157

  8. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  9. Single chromosome transcriptional profiling reveals chromosome-level regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Marshall J.; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Here we report iceFISH, a multiplex imaging method for measuring gene expression and chromosome structure simultaneously on single chromosomes. We demonstrate that chromosomal translocations can alter transcription chromosome-wide, finding substantial differences in transcriptional frequency between genes located on a translocated chromosome in comparison to the normal chromosome in the same cell. Examination of correlations between genes on a single chromosome revealed a cis chromosome-level transcriptional interaction spanning 14.3 megabases. PMID:23416756

  10. Constitutive Stringent Response Restores Viability of Bacillus subtilis Lacking Structural Maintenance of Chromosome Protein

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, Camille; Guérin, Cyprien; Noirot, Philippe; Dervyn, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants lacking the SMC-ScpAB complex are severely impaired for chromosome condensation and partitioning, DNA repair, and cells are not viable under standard laboratory conditions. We isolated suppressor mutations that restored the capacity of a smc deletion mutant (Δsmc) to grow under standard conditions. These suppressor mutations reduced chromosome segregation defects and abrogated hypersensitivity to gyrase inhibitors of Δsmc. Three suppressor mutations were mapped in genes involved in tRNA aminoacylation and maturation pathways. A transcriptomic survey of isolated suppressor mutations pointed to a potential link between suppression of Δsmc and induction of the stringent response. This link was confirmed by (p)ppGpp quantification which indicated a constitutive induction of the stringent response in multiple suppressor strains. Furthermore, sublethal concentrations of arginine hydroxamate (RHX), a potent inducer of stringent response, restored growth of Δsmc under non permissive conditions. We showed that production of (p)ppGpp alone was sufficient to suppress the thermosensitivity exhibited by the Δsmc mutant. Our findings shed new light on the coordination between chromosome dynamics mediated by SMC-ScpAB and other cellular processes during rapid bacterial growth. PMID:26539825

  11. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  12. Lack of Degeneration of Loci on the Neo-Y Chromosome of Drosophila Americana Americana

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, B.; Charlesworth, D.; Hnilicka, J.; Yu, A.; Guttman, D. S.

    1997-01-01

    The extent of genetic degeneration of the neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila americana americana has been investigated. Three loci, coding for the enzymes enolase, phosphoglycerate kinase and alcohol dehydrogenase, have been localized to chromosome 4 of D. a. americana, which forms the neo-Y and neo-X chromosomes. Crosses between D. a. americana and D. virilis or D. montana showed that the loci coding for these enzymes carry active alleles on the neo-Y chromosome in all wild-derived strains of americana that were tested. Intercrosses between a genetically marked stock of virilis and strains of americana were carried out, creating F(3) males that were homozygous for sections of the neo-Y chromosome. The sex ratios in the F(3) generation of the intercrosses showed that no lethal alleles have accumulated on any of the neo-Y chromosomes tested. There was evidence for more minor reductions in fitness, but this seems to be mainly caused by deleterious alleles that are specific to each strain. A similar picture was provided by examination of the segregation ratios of two marker genes among the F(3) progeny. Overall, the data suggest that the neo-Y chromosome has undergone very little degeneration, certainly not to the extent of having lost the functions of vital genes. This is consistent with the recent origin of the neo-Y and neo-X chromosomes, and the slow rates at which the forces that cause Y chromosome degeneration are likely to work. PMID:9093852

  13. Lack of Dosage Compensation Accompanies the Arrested Stage of Sex Chromosome Evolution in Ostriches

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsson, Sofia; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosome evolution is usually seen as a process that, once initiated, will inevitably progress toward an advanced stage of degeneration of the nonrecombining chromosome. However, despite evidence that avian sex chromosome evolution was initiated >100 Ma, ratite birds have been trapped in an arrested stage of sex chromosome divergence. We performed RNA sequencing of several tissues from male and female ostriches and assembled the transcriptome de novo. A total of 315 Z-linked genes fell into two categories: those that have equal expression level in the two sexes (for which Z–W recombination still occurs) and those that have a 2-fold excess of male expression (for which Z–W recombination has ceased). We suggest that failure to evolve dosage compensation has constrained sex chromosome divergence in this basal avian lineage. Our results indicate that dosage compensation is a prerequisite for, not only a consequence of, sex chromosome evolution. PMID:23329687

  14. Lack of dosage compensation accompanies the arrested stage of sex chromosome evolution in ostriches.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Sofia; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-04-01

    Sex chromosome evolution is usually seen as a process that, once initiated, will inevitably progress toward an advanced stage of degeneration of the nonrecombining chromosome. However, despite evidence that avian sex chromosome evolution was initiated >100 Ma, ratite birds have been trapped in an arrested stage of sex chromosome divergence. We performed RNA sequencing of several tissues from male and female ostriches and assembled the transcriptome de novo. A total of 315 Z-linked genes fell into two categories: those that have equal expression level in the two sexes (for which Z-W recombination still occurs) and those that have a 2-fold excess of male expression (for which Z-W recombination has ceased). We suggest that failure to evolve dosage compensation has constrained sex chromosome divergence in this basal avian lineage. Our results indicate that dosage compensation is a prerequisite for, not only a consequence of, sex chromosome evolution. PMID:23329687

  15. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Sarah

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  16. Small marker X chromosomes lack the X inactivation center: implications for karyotype/phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, D. J.; Brown, C. J.; Schwartz, S.; Duncan, A. M.; Surti, U.; Willard, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    The abnormal phenotype and/or mental retardation seen in persons with small marker X (mar(X)) chromosomes has been hypothesized to be due to the loss of the X inactivation center (XIC) at Xq13.2, resulting in two active copies of genes in the pericentromeric region. In order to define precisely the DNA content of mar(X) chromosomes and to correlate phenotype with karyotype, we studied small mar(X) chromosomes, using FISH with probes in the juxtacentromeric region. One of the probes was a 40-kb genomic cosmid for the XIST gene, which maps to the smallest interval known to contain the XIC and is thought to be involved in X inactivation. Our findings reveal that small mar(X) chromosomes do not include the XIC and therefore cannot be subject to X inactivation, supporting the premise that abnormal dosage of expressed genes in the pericentromeric region of the X generates the aberrant phenotype seen in patients with small mar(X) chromosomes. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8023855

  17. Making the Chromosome-Gene-Protein Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, Charlotte

    1996-01-01

    Presents an exercise that demonstrates the chromosome-gene-protein connection using sickle-cell anemia, a genetic disease with a well-characterized molecular basis. Involves connecting changes in DNA to protein outcomes and tying them into the next generation by meiosis and gamete formation with genetic crosses. Motivates students to integrate…

  18. The uni chromosome of Chlamydomonas: histone genes and nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Walther, Z; Hall, J L

    1995-09-25

    The uni linkage group (ULG) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains many genes involved in the basal body-flagellar system. Recent evidence suggests that the corresponding uni chromosome is located in close proximity to the basal body complex. In the course of studies into its molecular organization, we have found a cluster of four histone genes on the ULG. The genes are arranged as divergently-transcribed pairs: H3-H4 and H2B-H2A. Genomic sequencing reveals that these genes lack introns and contain characteristic 3' palindromes similar to those of animals. The predicted amino acid sequences are highly conserved across species, with greatest similarities to the histone genes of Volvox. Southern analysis shows that each histone gene is present in 15-20 copies in Chlamydomonas and suggests a dispersed genomic organization. Northern analysis of mitotically-synchronized cells shows that, like the replication-dependent histones of higher eukaryotes, Chlamydomonas histone genes are expressed during S-phase. Using a gene-specific probe on Northern blots, we provide evidence that the ULG H4 gene is regulated in the same manner as other Chlamydomonas histone genes. Finally, micrococcal nuclease protection experiments show that the uni chromosome itself associates with histone proteins and displays a conventional nucleosomal banding pattern. PMID:7479007

  19. Marker chromosomes lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA: A new intriguing class of abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L.A.; Zinn, A.B.; Stallard, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have implicated {alpha}-satellite DNA as an integral part of the centromere and important for the normal segregation of chromosomes. We analyzed four supernumerary marker chromosomes in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could detect neither pancentromeric or chromosome specific {alpha}-satellite DNA. Mosaicism of the markers existed, but each was present in the majority of cells indicating that they segregated normally. FISH with chromosome-specific libraries identified the origins of these markers as chromosomes 13 (1 case) and 15 (3 cases). High resolution analysis, combined with hybridization of a series of cosmid probes, revealed that each marker was a symmetrical duplication of the terminal long arm of the parent chromosome. Telomeric sequences were detected by FISH indicating linear structures. Breakpoint heterogeneity, as defined by cosmid probes, was demonstrated in the three cases involving chromosome 15. No pericentromeric satellite III DNA could be detected on three markers. Studies with anti-centromere antibodies are in progress to assay for centromeric antigens on the markers, as expected at functional centromeric sites. Our results demonstrate that the precise structural identification and heterogeneity of these markers can be easily elucidated using FISH with unique sequence cosmid probes. We conclude from our studies and others in the literature: (1) there is a newly defined class of markers lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA and containing duplications of terminal sequences; (2)neither {alpha}-satellite nor satellite III DNA at levels detectable by FISH is necessary for fidelity in the normal segregation of chromosomes; and (3) these markers were most likely formed by recombination of the long arms during meiosis.

  20. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  1. Chromosomal localization of the human fibromodulin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roughley, P.J.; Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and mapping of genes is a fundamental step in understanding inherited diseases. This study reports the chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding fibromodulin, a collagen-binding proteoglycan which exhibits a wide distribution in connective tissue extracellular matrices. Attempts to localize the gene utilizing a probe covering the published coding region of the human fibromodulin cDNA were unsuccessful. Thus, in order to obtain an alternate probe, the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNA was cloned utilizing the 3{prime}-RACE protocol. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA with probes covering either the coding sequence or the 3{prime}-untranslated region revealed simple patterns, indicative of a single-copy gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the 3{prime}-untranslated region probe resulted in hybridization at two chromosomal regions. The majority of signals were observed at 1q32, but some signals were also observed at 9q34.1. The localization of the fibromodulin gene to chromosome 1 was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrid lines. In addition to allowing the gene localization, cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region demonstrates that the human fibromodulin cDNA possesses an insert of approximately 160 base pairs which is not present in the published bovine sequence. The human sequence also possesses a single polyadenylation signal, yielding a 3 kb mRNA which was observed in Northern blotting experiments. These results now provide the necessary information to evaluate the potential role of fibromodulin in genetic disorders of connective tissues.

  2. Proof of physical exchange of genes on the chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Coe, Edward; Kass, Lee B

    2005-05-10

    Seventy-five years ago, a convincing demonstration that the genes were physically aligned along the chromosome was lacking. Harriet Creighton (1909-2004) and Barbara McClintock (1902-1992) [Creighton, H. B. & McClintock, B. (1931) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 17, 492-497] showed by an elegantly simple experiment in 1931 that exchange between genes was accompanied by exchange of cytological, i.e., physical, parts of chromosomes. The work has been acclaimed as one of the great experiments in biology. Creighton's doctoral dissertation under McClintock's mentorship provided the basis for the landmark paper, which was unique in merging cytological with genetic data. A companion paper by McClintock, printed and bound back-to-back with the joint paper, set the essential stage with data on the cytological and genetic features that Creighton applied. Following directly from this work, and leading to today's recognition that the genome is a graspable entity, was the knowledge that the genes could be studied as components of a linear structure, the chromosome. Here, we review the data surrounding the Creighton and McClintock paper and provide a perspective on the significance of their findings. PMID:15867161

  3. Process for immune defect and chromosomal translocation during early thymocyte development lacking ATM.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Takeshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Piao, Jinhua; Nakagama, Shun; Sato, Masaki; Masuda, Kyoko; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Azuma, Miyuki; Morio, Tomohiro; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Shuki

    2012-07-26

    Immune defect in ataxia telangiectasia patients has been attributed to either the failure of V(D)J recombination or class-switch recombination, and the chromosomal translocation in their lymphoma often involves the TCR gene. The ATM-deficient mouse exhibits fewer CD4 and CD8 single-positive T cells because of a failure to develop from the CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive phase to the single-positive phase. Although the occurrence of chromosome 14 translocations involving TCR-δ gene in ATM-deficient lymphomas suggests that these are early events in T-cell development, a thorough analysis focusing on early T-cell development has never been performed. Here we demonstrate that ATM-deficient mouse thymocytes are perturbed in passing through the β- or γδ-selection checkpoint, leading in part to the developmental failure of T cells. Detailed karyotype analysis using the in vitro thymocyte development system revealed that RAG-mediated TCR-α/δ locus breaks occur and are left unrepaired during the troublesome β- or γδ-selection checkpoints. By getting through these selection checkpoints, some of the clones with random or nonrandom chromosomal translocations involving TCR-α/δ locus are selected and accumulate. Thus, our study visualized the first step of multistep evolutions toward lymphomagenesis in ATM-deficient thymocytes associated with T-lymphopenia and immunodeficiency. PMID:22709691

  4. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.J.; Rounsley, S.D.; Rodriguez-Carres, M.; Kuo, A.; Wasmann, C.c.; Grimwood, J.; Schmutz, J.; Taga, M.; White, G.J.; Zhuo, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Freitag, M.; Ma, L.-J.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Henrissat, B.; Cutinho, P.M.; Nelson, D.R.; Straney, D.; Napoli, C.A.; Baker, B.M.; Gribskov, M.; Rep, M.; Kroken, S.; Molnar, I.; Rensing, C.; Kennell, J.C.; Zamora, J.; Farman, M.L.; Selker, E.U.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H.; Pangilinan, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lamers, C.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Geiser, D.M.; Covert, S.F.; Temporini, S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    2009-04-20

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of .50 species known as the"Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on .100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on

  5. Chromosomal Redistribution of Male-Biased Genes in Mammalian Evolution with Two Bursts of Gene Gain on the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong E.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A. B.; Long, Manyuan

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution. PMID:20957185

  6. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-02-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage. PMID:25637223

  7. Compensation of Dosage-Sensitive Genes on the Chicken Z Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Fabian; Harrison, Peter W; Dessimoz, Christophe; Mank, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    In many diploid species, sex determination is linked to a pair of sex chromosomes that evolved from a pair of autosomes. In these organisms, the degeneration of the sex-limited Y or W chromosome causes a reduction in gene dose in the heterogametic sex for X- or Z-linked genes. Variations in gene dose are detrimental for large chromosomal regions when they span dosage-sensitive genes, and many organisms were thought to evolve complete mechanisms of dosage compensation to mitigate this. However, the recent realization that a wide variety of organisms lack complete mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation has presented a perplexing question: How do organisms with incomplete dosage compensation avoid deleterious effects of gene dose differences between the sexes? Here we use expression data from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to show that ohnologs, duplicated genes known to be dosage-sensitive, are preferentially dosage-compensated on the chicken Z chromosome. Our results indicate that even in the absence of a complete and chromosome wide dosage compensation mechanism, dosage-sensitive genes are effectively dosage compensated on the Z chromosome. PMID:27044516

  8. Compensation of Dosage-Sensitive Genes on the Chicken Z Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Fabian; Harrison, Peter W.; Dessimoz, Christophe; Mank, Judith E.

    2016-01-01

    In many diploid species, sex determination is linked to a pair of sex chromosomes that evolved from a pair of autosomes. In these organisms, the degeneration of the sex-limited Y or W chromosome causes a reduction in gene dose in the heterogametic sex for X- or Z-linked genes. Variations in gene dose are detrimental for large chromosomal regions when they span dosage-sensitive genes, and many organisms were thought to evolve complete mechanisms of dosage compensation to mitigate this. However, the recent realization that a wide variety of organisms lack complete mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation has presented a perplexing question: How do organisms with incomplete dosage compensation avoid deleterious effects of gene dose differences between the sexes? Here we use expression data from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to show that ohnologs, duplicated genes known to be dosage-sensitive, are preferentially dosage-compensated on the chicken Z chromosome. Our results indicate that even in the absence of a complete and chromosome wide dosage compensation mechanism, dosage-sensitive genes are effectively dosage compensated on the Z chromosome. PMID:27044516

  9. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function. PMID:27356611

  10. Human chromosome 21/Down syndrome gene function and pathway database.

    PubMed

    Nikolaienko, Oleksii; Nguyen, Cao; Crinc, Linda S; Cios, Krzysztof J; Gardiner, Katheleen

    2005-12-30

    Down syndrome, trisomy of human chromosome 21, is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. Correlating the increased expression, due to gene dosage, of the >300 genes encoded by chromosome 21 with specific phenotypic features is a goal that becomes more feasible with the increasing availability of large scale functional, expression and evolutionary data. These data are dispersed among diverse databases, and the variety of formats and locations, plus their often rapid growth, makes access and assimilation a daunting task. To aid the Down syndrome and chromosome 21 community, and researchers interested in the study of any chromosome 21 gene or ortholog, we are developing a comprehensive chromosome 21-specific database with the goals of (i) data consolidation, (ii) accuracy and completeness through expert curation, and (iii) facilitation of novel hypothesis generation. Here we describe the current status of data collection and the immediate future plans for this first human chromosome-specific database. PMID:16310977

  11. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia gene region cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kere, J. |; Grzeschik, K.H.; Limon, J.; Gremaud, M.; Schlessinger, D.; De La Chapelle, A.

    1993-05-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), an X-chromosomal recessive disorder, is expressed in a few females with chromosomal translocations involving bands Xq12-q13. Using available DNA markers from the region and somatic cell hybrids the authors mapped the X-chromosomal breakpoints in two such translocations. The breakpoints were further mapped within a yeast artificial chromosome contig constructed by chromosome walking techniques. Genomic DNA markers that map between the two translocation breakpoints were recovered representing putative portions of the EDA gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Assignment of the lactotransferrin gene to human chromosome 3 and to mouse chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Teng, C T; Pentecost, B T; Marshall, A; Solomon, A; Bowman, B H; Lalley, P A; Naylor, S L

    1987-11-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family of genes, is the major iron-binding protein in milk and body secretions. The amino acid sequence of LTF consists of two homologous domains homologous to proteins in the transferrin family. Recent isolation of cDNA encoding mouse LTF has expedited the mapping of both mouse and human LTF genes. Southern blot analysis of DNA from mouse-Chinese hamster and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids maps the LTF gene to mouse chromosome 9 and to human chromosome 3, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of cell hybrids containing defined segments of human chromosome 3 demonstrates that the gene is located in the 3q21-qter region. These results suggest that LTF and associated genes of the transferrin family have existed together on the same chromosomal region for 300-500 million years. PMID:3478818

  13. Spare PRELI Gene Loci: Failsafe Chromosome Insurance?

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Roberto; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Blackburn, Michael R.; Martinez-Valdez, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK) motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression. Methods and Findings Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox)/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13) locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELIf/f), the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI−/−) bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI−/− deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression from spare

  14. Brain organization in a reptile lacking sex chromosomes: effects of gonadectomy and exogenous testosterone.

    PubMed

    Crews, D; Coomber, P; Baldwin, R; Azad, N; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    1996-12-01

    In mammals, males and females differ both genetically and hormonally, making it difficult to assess the relative contributions of genetic constitution and fetal environment in the process of sexual differentiation. Many reptiles lack sex chromosomes, relying instead on the temperature of incubation to determine sex. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), an incubation temperature of 26 degrees C produces all females, whereas 32.5 degrees C results in mostly males. Incubation temperature is the primary determinant of differences both within and between the sexes in growth, physiology, and sociosexual behavior, as well as the volume and metabolic capacity of specific brain nuclei. To determine if incubation temperature organizes the brain directly rather than via gonadal sex hormones, the gonads of male and female leopard geckos from the two incubation temperatures were removed and, in some instances, animals were given exogenous testosterone. In vertebrates with sex chromosomes, the size of sexually dimorphic nuclei are sensitive to hormone levels in adulthood, but in all species studied to date, these changes are restricted to the male. Therefore, after behavior tests, morphometrics of certain limbic and nonlimbic brain areas were determined. Because nervous system tissue depends on oxidative metabolism for energy production and the level of cytochrome oxidase activity is coupled to the functional level of neuronal activity, cytochrome oxidase histochemistry also was performed on the same brains. Hormonal manipulation had little effect on the volume of the preoptic area or ventromedial hypothalamus in geckos from the all-female incubation temperature, but significantly influenced the volumes of these brain areas in males and females from the male-biased incubation temperature. A similar relationship was found for cytochrome oxidase activity of the anterior hypothalamus, amygdala, dorsal ventricular ridge, and septum. The only sex difference observed was

  15. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y.Q. Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G.; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L.; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E.; Murphy, William J.; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sequenced the MSY (Male-Specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only two percent of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 50 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs, but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  16. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-01

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  17. Chromosomal localisation of five genes in Perkinsus olseni (Phylum Perkinsozoa).

    PubMed

    Marques, Américo; Tato-Costa, Joana; Conde, Carlos; Azevedo, Carlos; Teles-Grilo, M Leonor

    2012-08-01

    The molecular karyotype of Perkinsus olseni, a pathogenic protist that infects the clam Ruditapes decussatus, comprises nine chromosomes, ranging in size from 0.15 Mb to 6.5 Mb, representing a haploid genome of about 28 Mb. In order to establish chromosome specific markers, PCR-amplified DNA sequences belonging to five conserved genes (18S rRNA, actin type I, hsp90, β-tubulin and calmodulin) were hybridised to chromosomal bands separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Three of those probes (actin type I, hsp90 and calmodulin) hybridised to only one chromosome and the remaining two (18S rRNA and β-tubulin) hybridised to two chromosomes. In the first place, the hybridisation pattern obtained serves to dispel any doubt about the nuclear location of the smallest chromosome observed in the molecular karyotype of Perkinsus olseni. Additionally, it will be a reference for further analysis of karyotype polymorphisms in the genus Perkinsus. PMID:22342132

  18. Sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of human pseudoautosomal genes and their mouse homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Li, X.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is an area of sequence identity between the X and Y chromosomes and is important for mediating X-Y pairing during male meiosis. Of the seven genes assigned to the human PAR, none of the mouse homologs have been isolated by a cross-hybridization strategy. Two of these homologs, Csfgmra and II3ra, have been isolated using a functional assay for the gene products. These genes are quite different in sequence from their human homologs, showing only 60-70% sequence similarity. The Csfgmra gene has been found to further differ from its human homolog in being isolated not on the sex chromosomes, but on a mouse autosome (chromosome 19). Using a mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have mapped the II3ra gene to yet another mouse autosome, chromosome 14. Attempts to clone the mouse homolog of the ANT3 locus resulted in the isolation of two related genes, Ant1 and Ant2, but failed to yield the Ant3 gene. Southern blot analysis of the ANT/Ant genes showed the Ant1 and Ant2 sequences to be well-conserved among all of a dozen mammals tested. In contrast, the ANT3 gene only showed hybridization to non-rodent mammals, suggesting it is either greatly divergent or has been deleted in the rodent lineage. Similar experiments with other human pseudoautosomal probes likewise showed a lack of hybridization to rodent sequences. The results show a definite trend of extensive divergence of pseudoautosomal sequences in addition to chromosomal rearrangements involving X;autosome translocations and perhaps gene deletions. Such observations have interesting implications regarding the evolution of this important region of the sex chromosomes.

  19. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jennifer M.; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T.; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle–dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina. PMID:24600046

  20. Two human relaxin genes are on chromosome 9.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R J; Hudson, P; Shine, J; Niall, H D; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    We have recently cloned two different human relaxin gene sequences. One of these (H1) was isolated from a human genomic clone bank and the other (H2) from a cDNA library prepared from human pregnant ovarian tissue. Southern gel analysis of the relaxin genes within the genomes of several unrelated individuals showed that all genomes contained both relaxin genes. Hence it is unlikely (p less than 0.001) that the two relaxin gene sequences are alleles. Rather, it is probable that there are two relaxin genes within the human genome. It is likely that relaxin and insulin genes have evolved from a common ancestral gene by gene duplication, since structural similarities between insulin and relaxin are evident at both the peptide and gene level. To investigate the evolutionary relationship between the two human relaxin genes and the insulin gene, we have determined the chromosomal position of the relaxin genes using mouse/human cell hybrids. We found that the human insulin and relaxin genes are on different chromosomes. Both human relaxin genes are located on the short arm region of chromosome 9. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6548703

  1. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  2. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review.

    PubMed

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  3. Human metallothionein genes are clustered on chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Karin, M; Eddy, R L; Henry, W M; Haley, L L; Byers, M G; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    The metallothioneins are a family of heavy-metal binding proteins of low molecular weight. They function in the regulation of trace metal metabolism and in the protection against toxic heavy metal ions. In man, the metallothioneins are encoded by at least 10-12 genes separated into two groups, MT-I and MT-II. To understand the genomic organization of these genes and their involvement in hereditary disorders of trace metal metabolism, we have determined their chromosomal location. Using human-mouse cell hybrids and hybridization probes derived from cloned and functional human MT1 and MT2 genes, we show that the functional human genes are clustered on human chromosome 16. Analysis of RNA from somatic cell hybrids indicated that hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 expressed both human MT1 and MT2 mRNA, and this expression is regulated by both heavy metal ions and glucocorticoid hormones. Images PMID:6089206

  4. Chromosomal Instability and Phosphoinositide Pathway Gene Signatures in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Structural rearrangements of chromosome 10 are frequently observed in glioblastoma multiforme and over 80 % of tumour samples archived in the catalogue of somatic mutations in cancer database had gene copy number loss for PI4K2A which encodes phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type IIalpha. PI4K2A loss of heterozygosity mirrored that of PTEN, another enzyme that regulates phosphoinositide levels and also PIK3AP1, MINPP1, INPP5A and INPP5F. These results indicated a reduction in copy number for a set of phosphoinositide signalling genes that co-localise to chromosome 10q. This analysis was extended to a panel of phosphoinositide pathway genes on other chromosomes and revealed a number of previously unreported associations with glioblastoma multiforme. Of particular note were highly penetrant copy number losses for a group of X-linked phosphoinositide phosphatase genes OCRL, MTM1 and MTMR8; copy number amplifications for the chromosome 19 genes PIP5K1C, AKT2 and PIK3R2, and also for the phospholipase C genes PLCB1, PLCB4 and PLCG1 on chromosome 20. These mutations are likely to affect signalling and trafficking functions dependent on the PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4,5)P3 and PI(3,5)P2 lipids as well as the inositol phosphates IP3, IP5 and IP6. Analysis of flanking genes with functionally unrelated products indicated that chromosomal instability as opposed to a phosphoinositide-specific process underlay this pattern of copy number variation. This in silico study suggests that in glioblastoma multiforme, karyotypic changes have the potential to cause multiple abnormalities in sets of genes involved in phosphoinositide metabolism and this may be important for understanding drug resistance and phosphoinositide pathway redundancy in the advanced disease state. PMID:25502460

  5. The human gene for alkaptonuria (AKU) maps to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Janocha, S.; Wolz, W.; Grimm, T.; Kress, W.; Mueller, C.R. ); Srsen, S.; Srsnova, K. ); Montagutelli, X.; Guenet, J.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU; McKusick no. 203500) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by the lack of homogentisic acid oxidase activity. Patients excrete large amounts of homogentisic acid in their urine and a black ochronotic pigment is deposited in their cartilage and collagenous tissues. Ochronosis is the predominant clinical complication of the disease leading to ochronotic arthropathy, dark urine, pigment changes of the skin, and other clinical features. A mutation causing alkaptonuria in the mouse has mapped to chromosome 16. Considering conserved synteny, the authors were able to map the human gene to chromosome 3q in six alkaptonuria pedigrees of Slovak origin. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Sex chromosome complement regulates expression of mood-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on major depressive and anxiety disorders suggest dysfunctions in brain corticolimbic circuits, including altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and modulatory (serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmission. Interestingly, sexual dimorphisms in GABA, serotonin, and dopamine systems are also reported. Understanding the mechanisms behind these sexual dimorphisms may help unravel the biological bases of the heightened female vulnerability to mood disorders. Here, we investigate the contribution of sex-related factors (sex chromosome complement, developmental gonadal sex, or adult circulating hormones) to frontal cortex expression of selected GABA-, serotonin-, and dopamine-related genes. Methods As gonadal sex is determined by sex chromosome complement, the role of sex chromosomes cannot be investigated individually in humans. Therefore, we used the Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mouse model, in which sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex are artificially decoupled, to examine the expression of 13 GABA-related genes, 6 serotonin- and dopamine-related genes, and 8 associated signal transduction genes under chronic stress conditions. Results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA (sex chromosome complement × gonadal sex × circulating testosterone). A global perspective of gene expression changes was provided by heatmap representation and gene co-expression networks to identify patterns of transcriptional activities related to each main factor. Results We show that under chronic stress conditions, sex chromosome complement influenced GABA/serotonin/dopamine-related gene expression in the frontal cortex, with XY mice consistently having lower gene expression compared to XX mice. Gonadal sex and circulating testosterone exhibited less pronounced, more complex, and variable control over gene expression. Across factors, male conditions were associated with a tightly co-expressed set of signal transduction genes. Conclusions Under chronic stress conditions

  7. Sequence and analysis of the human ABL gene, the BCR gene, and regions involved in the Philadelphia chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Burian, D.; Clifton, S.W.; Crabtree, J.

    1995-05-01

    The complete human BCR gene (152j-141 nt) on chromosome 22 and greater than 80% of the human ABL gene (179-512 nt) on chromosome 9 have been sequenced from mapped cosmid and plasmid clones via a shotgun strategy. Because these two chromosomes are translocated with breakpoints within the BCR and ABL genes in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, knowledge of these sequences also might provide insight into the validity of various theories of chromosomal rearrangements. Comparison of these genes with their cDNA sequences reveal the positions of 23 BCR exons and putative alternative BCR first and second exons, as well as the common ABL exons 2-11, respectively. Additionally, these regions include the alternative ABL first exons 1b and 1a, a new gene 5` to the first ABL exon, and an open reading frame with homology to an EST within the BCR fourth intron. Further analysis reveals an Alu homology of 38.83 and 39.35% for the BCR and ABL genes, respectively, with other repeat elements present to a lesser extent. Four new Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoints from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients also were sequenced, and the positions of these and several other previously sequenced breakpoints now have been mapped precisely, although no consistent breakpoint features immediately were apparent. Comparative analysis of genomic sequences encompassing the murine homologues to the human ABL exons 1b and 1a, as well as regions encompassing the ABL exons 2 and 3, reveals that although there is a high degree of homology in their corresponding exons and promoter regions, these two vertebrate species show a striking lack of homology outside these regions. 122 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. The Role of Chromosomal Instability and Epigenetics in Colorectal Cancers Lacking β-Catenin/TCF Regulated Transcription.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski, Anni; Knuutila, Sakari; Järvinen, Heikki; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active β-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various β-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for β-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors with membranous β-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics. PMID:27047543

  9. The Role of Chromosomal Instability and Epigenetics in Colorectal Cancers Lacking β-Catenin/TCF Regulated Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lotsari-Salomaa, Johanna E.; Kaur, Sippy; Niskakoski, Anni; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    All colorectal cancer cell lines except RKO displayed active β-catenin/TCF regulated transcription. This feature of RKO was noted in familial colon cancers; hence our aim was to dissect its carcinogenic mechanism. MFISH and CGH revealed distinct instability of chromosome structure in RKO. Gene expression microarray of RKO versus 7 colon cancer lines (with active Wnt signaling) and 3 normal specimens revealed 611 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the tested gene loci were susceptible to LOH in primary tumors with various β-catenin localizations as a surrogate marker for β-catenin activation. The immunohistochemistry of selected genes (IFI16, RGS4, MCTP1, DGKI, OBCAM/OPCML, and GLIPR1) confirmed that they were differentially expressed in clinical specimens. Since epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to expression changes, selected target genes were evaluated for promoter methylation in patient specimens from sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. CMTM3, DGKI, and OPCML were frequently hypermethylated in both groups, whereas KLK10, EPCAM, and DLC1 displayed subgroup specificity. The overall fraction of hypermethylated genes was higher in tumors with membranous β-catenin. We identified novel genes in colorectal carcinogenesis that might be useful in personalized tumor profiling. Tumors with inactive Wnt signaling are a heterogeneous group displaying interaction of chromosomal instability, Wnt signaling, and epigenetics. PMID:27047543

  10. Imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tanino, Motohiko; Matoba, Ryo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Oocytes have unique characteristics compared with other cell types. In mouse and human oocytes, two X chromosomes are maintained in the active state. Previous microarray studies have shown that the balance of the expression state is maintained in haploid oocytes. Here, we investigated transcripts using RNA-sequence technology in mouse and human oocytes. The median expression ratio between X chromosome and autosomal genes (X:A) in immature mouse oocytes increased as the gene expression levels increased, reaching a value of 1. However, the ratio in mature oocytes was under 1 for all expression categories. Moreover, we observed a markedly low ratio resulting from the bimodal expression patterns of X–linked genes. The low X:A expression ratio in mature oocyte was independent of DNA methylation. While mature human oocytes exhibited a slightly low X:A expression ratio, this was the result of the skewed high frequency of lowly expressed X-linked genes rather than the bimodal state. We propose that this imbalance between the expression dosages of X-chromosome and autosomal genes is a feature of transcripts in mammalian oocytes lacking X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:26370379

  11. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes.

    PubMed

    Jazaeri, Amir A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti VR; Aprelikova, Olga; Nuber, Ulrike A; Sotiriou, Christos; Liu, Edison T; Ropers, H Hilger; Yee, Cindy J; Boyd, Jeff; Barrett, J Carl

    2004-09-21

    Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling). Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P < 0.005 as a cutoff. Forty of 178 total X-chromosome transcripts were differentially expressed between the BRCA1-associated tumors and sporadic cancers with a BRCA2-like molecular profile. Thirty of these 40 genes showed higher mean expression in the BRCA1-associated samples including all 11 transcripts that mapped to Xp11. In contrast, four of 178 total X chromosome transcripts showed significant differential expression between BRCA1-associated and sporadic tumors with a BRCA1-like molecular profile. All four mapped to Xp11 and showed higher mean expression in BRCA1-associated tumors. Re-expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell resulted in the repression of 21 transcripts. Eleven of the 21 (54.5%) transcripts mapped to Xp11. However, there was no significant overlap between these Xp11 genes and those found to be differentially expressed between BRCA1-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer samples. These results demonstrate that BRCA1 mediates the repression of several X chromosome genes, many of which map to the Xp11 locus. PMID:15383145

  12. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map.

  13. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map. PMID:26742857

  14. Characterization of mice lacking the gene for cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chun-Min; Samuelson, Linda C; Chambers, James Brad; King, Alexandra; Heiman, Justin; Jandacek, Ronald J; Sakai, Randall R; Benoit, Stephen C; Raybould, Helen E; Woods, Stephen C; Tso, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    CCK acts peripherally as a satiating peptide released during meals in response to lipid feeding and centrally functions in the modulation of feeding, exploratory, and memory activities. The present study determined metabolic parameters, food intake, anxiety-like behaviors, and cognitive function in mice lacking the CCK gene. We studied intestinal fat absorption, body composition, and food intake of CCK knockout (CCK-KO) mice by using the noninvasive measurement of intestinal fat absorption along with quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) imaging and the DietMax system, respectively. Additionally, exploratory and memory capacities were assessed by monitoring running wheel activity and conducting elevated plus-maze and Morris water-maze tests with these mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) littermate controls, CCK-KO mice had normal food intake, fat absorption, body weight, and body mass. CCK-KO mice ate more food than control animals during the light period and less food during the dark period. Energy expenditure was unchanged between the genotypes; however, CCK-KO mice displayed greater fatty acid oxidation. CCK-KO mice were as active as WT animals in the running wheel test. CCK-KO mice spent more time in the closed arms of an elevated plus-maze, indicative of increased anxiety. Additionally, CCK-KO mice exhibited attenuated performance in a passive avoidance task and impaired spatial memory in the Morris water maze test. We conclude that CCK is involved in metabolic rate and is important for memory and exploration. CCK is intimately involved in multiple processes related to cognitive function and food intake regulation. PMID:18160529

  15. X Chromosome Inactivation and Xist Evolution in a Rodent Lacking LINE-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Michael A.; Carstens, Bryan C.; Wichman, Holly A.

    2009-01-01

    Dosage compensation in eutherian mammals occurs by inactivation of one X chromosome in females. Silencing of that X chromosome is initiated by Xist, a large non-coding RNA, whose coating of the chromosome extends in cis from the X inactivation center. LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons have been implicated as possible players for propagation of the Xist signal, but it has remained unclear whether they are essential components. We previously identified a group of South American rodents in which L1 retrotransposition ceased over 8 million years ago and have now determined that at least one species of these rodents, Oryzomys palustris, still retains X inactivation. We have also isolated and analyzed the majority of the Xist RNA from O. palustris and a sister species retaining L1 activity, Sigmodon hispidus, to determine if evolution in these sequences has left signatures that might suggest a critical role for L1 elements in Xist function. Comparison of rates of Xist evolution in the two species fails to support L1 involvement, although other explanations are possible. Similarly, comparison of known repeats and potential RNA secondary structures reveals no major differences with the exception of a new repeat in O. palustris that has potential to form new secondary structures. PMID:19603076

  16. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Structural characterization and chromosomal location of the mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, M.; Gerard, C.; Kolakowski, L.F. Jr.

    1995-06-10

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, is a cytokine released by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and the pituitary gland that serves to integrate peripheral and central inflammatory responses. Ubiquitous expression and developmental regulation suggest that MIF may have additional roles outside of the immune system. Here we report the structure and chromosomal location of the mouse Mif gene and the partial characterization of five Mif pseudogenes. The mouse Mif gene spans less than 0.7 kb of chromosomal DNA and is composed of three exons. A comparison between the mouse and the human genes shows a similar gene structure and common regulatory elements in both promoter regions. The mouse Mif gene maps to the middle region of chromosome 10, between Bcr and S100b, which have been mapped to human chromosomes 22q11 and 21q22.3, respectively. The entire sequence of two pseudogenes demonstrates the absence of introns, the presence of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the cDNA, a 3{prime} poly(A) tail, and the lack of sequence similarity with untranscribed regions of the gene. The five pseudogenes are highly homologous to the cDNA, but contain a variable number of mutations that would produce mutated or truncated MIF-like proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of MIF genes and pseudogenes indicate several independent genetic events that can account for multiple genomic integrations. Three of the Mif pseudogenes were also mapped by interspecific backcross to chromosomes 1, 9, and 17. These results suggest that Mif pseudogenes originated by retrotransposition. 46 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Lack of evidence for association of meiotic nondisjunction with particular DNA haplotypes on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, N; Gusella, J F; Perroni, L; Bricarelli, F D; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis of a predisposition to meiotic nondisjunction for chromosome 21 carrying a specific molecular haplotype has been tested. The haplotype in question is defined by the restriction fragment length polymorphisms for the D21S1/D21S11 loci. Our results obtained on a sample of Northern Italian families with the occurrence of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) failed to support this hypothesis, contradicting a previous study [Antonarakis, S. E., Kittur, S. D., Metaxotou, C., Watkins, P. C. & Patel, A. S. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 3360-3364]. These findings rule out an association between any specific D21S1/D21S11 haplotype (as well as other haplotypes for the D21S13, ETS2, and D21S23 loci) and a putative cis-acting genetic element favoring the meiotic missegregation of chromosome 21. For this reason, no preventive screening for couples at risk for trisomy 21 may be based on any of the haplotypes tested. Images PMID:2898783

  19. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Takahito; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer. PMID:26729168

  20. Gene transcription and chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P; Bogan, J A; Welch, K; Pickett, S R; Wang, H J; Zaritsky, A; Helmstetter, C E

    1997-01-01

    Transcript levels of several Escherichia coli genes involved in chromosome replication and cell division were measured in dnaC2(Ts) mutants synchronized for chromosome replication by temperature shifts. Levels of transcripts from four of the genes, dam, nrdA, mukB, and seqA, were reduced at a certain stage during chromosome replication. The magnitudes of the decreases were similar to those reported previously ftsQ and ftsZ (P. Zhou and C. E. Helmstetter, J. Bacteriol. 176:6100-6106, 1994) but considerably less than those seen with dnaA, gidA, and mioC (P. W. Theisen, J. E. Grimwade, A. C. Leonard, J. A. Bogan, and C. E. Helmstetter, Mol. Microbiol. 10:575-584, 1993). The decreases in transcripts appeared to correlate with the estimated time at which the genes replicated. This same conclusion was reached in studies with synchronous cultures obtained with the baby machine in those instances in which periodicities in transcript levels were clearly evident. The transcriptional levels for two genes, minE and tus, did not fluctuate significantly, whereas the transcripts for one gene, iciA, appeared to increase transiently. The results support the idea that cell cycle timing in E. coli is not governed by timed bursts of gene expression, since the overall findings summarized in this report are generally consistent with cell cycle-dependent transient inhibitions of transcription rather than stimulations. PMID:8981994

  1. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human renal kallikrein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.A.; Yun, Z.X.; Close, J.A.; Tregear, G.W.; Kitamura, N.; Nakanish, S.; Callen, D.F.; Baker, E.; Hyland, V.J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I.

    1988-05-03

    Glandular kallikreins are a family of proteases encoded by a variable number of genes in different mammalian species. In all species examined, however, one particular kallikrein is functionally conserved in its capacity to release the vasoactive peptide, Lys-bradykinin, from low molecular weight kininogen. This kallikrein is found in the kidney, pancreas, and salivary gland, showing a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression relative to other members of the family. The authors have isolated a genomic clone carrying the human renal kallikrein gene and compared the nucleotide sequence of its promoter region with those of the mouse renal kallikrein gene and another mouse kallikrein gene expressed in a distinct cell type. They find four sequence elements conserved between renal kallikrein genes from the two species. They have also shown that the human gene is localized to 19q13, a position analogous to that of the kallikrein gene family on mouse chromosome 7.

  3. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Postzygotic isolation involves strong mitochondrial and sex-specific effects in Tigriopus californicus, a species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Foley, B R; Rose, C G; Rundle, D E; Leong, W; Edmands, S

    2013-11-01

    Detailed studies of the genetics of speciation have focused on a few model systems, particularly Drosophila. The copepod Tigriopus californicus offers an alternative that differs from standard animal models in that it lacks heteromorphic chromosomes (instead, sex determination is polygenic) and has reduced opportunities for sexual conflict, because females mate only once. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted on reciprocal F2 hybrids between two strongly differentiated populations, using a saturated linkage map spanning all 12 autosomes and the mitochondrion. By comparing sexes, a possible sex ratio distorter was found but no sex chromosomes. Although studies of standard models often find an excess of hybrid male sterility factors, we found no QTL for sterility and multiple QTL for hybrid viability (indicated by non-Mendelian adult ratios) and other characters. Viability problems were found to be stronger in males, but the usual explanations for weaker hybrid males (sex chromosomes, sensitivity of spermatogenesis, sexual selection) cannot fully account for these male viability problems. Instead, higher metabolic rates may amplify deleterious effects in males. Although many studies of standard speciation models find the strongest genetic incompatibilities to be nuclear-nuclear (specifically X chromosome-autosome), we found the strongest deleterious interaction in this system was mito-nuclear. Consistent with the snowball theory of incompatibility accumulation, we found that trigenic interactions in this highly divergent cross were substantially more frequent (>6×) than digenic interactions. This alternative system thus allows important comparisons to studies of the genetics of reproductive isolation in more standard model systems. PMID:23860232

  5. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  6. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B.; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:23547111

  7. Sex-biased gene expression at homomorphic sex chromosomes in emus and its implication for sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-04-16

    Sex chromosomes originate from autosomes. The accumulation of sexually antagonistic mutations on protosex chromosomes selects for a loss of recombination and sets in motion the evolutionary processes generating heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination suppression and differentiation are generally viewed as the default path of sex chromosome evolution, and the occurrence of old, homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as those of ratite birds, has remained a mystery. Here, we analyze the genome and transcriptome of emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) and confirm that most genes on the sex chromosome are shared between the Z and W. Surprisingly, however, levels of gene expression are generally sex-biased for all sex-linked genes relative to autosomes, including those in the pseudoautosomal region, and the male-bias increases after gonad formation. This expression bias suggests that the emu sex chromosomes have become masculinized, even in the absence of ZW differentiation. Thus, birds may have taken different evolutionary solutions to minimize the deleterious effects imposed by sexually antagonistic mutations: some lineages eliminate recombination along the protosex chromosomes to physically restrict sexually antagonistic alleles to one sex, whereas ratites evolved sex-biased expression to confine the product of a sexually antagonistic allele to the sex it benefits. This difference in conflict resolution may explain the preservation of recombining, homomorphic sex chromosomes in other lineages and illustrates the importance of sexually antagonistic mutations driving the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:23547111

  8. Chromosomal deletions and tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, J T

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal deletion appears to be the earliest as well as the most frequent somatic genetic alteration during carcinogenesis. It inactivates a tumor suppressor gene in three ways, that is, revealing a gene mutation through loss of heterozygosity as proposed in the two-hit theory, inducing haploinsufficiency through quantitative hemizygous deletion and associated loss of expression, and truncating a genome by homozygous deletion. Whereas the two-hit theory has guided the isolation of many tumor suppressor genes, the haploinsufficiency hypothesis seems to be also useful in identifying target genes of chromosomal deletions, especially for the deletions detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). At present, a number of chromosomal regions have been identified for their frequent deletions in prostate cancer, including 2q13-q33, 5q14-q23, 6q16-q22, 7q22-q32, 8p21-p22, 9p21-p22, 10q23-q24, 12p12-13, 13q14-q21, 16q22-24, and 18q21-q24. Strong candidate genes have been identified for some of these regions, including NKX3.1 from 8p21, PTEN from 10q23, p27/Kip1 from 12p13, and KLF5 from 13q21. In addition to their location in a region with frequent deletion, there are functional and/or genetic evidence supporting the candidacy of these genes. Thus far PTEN is the most frequently mutated gene in prostate cancer, and KLF5 showed the most frequent hemizygous deletion and loss of expression. A tumor suppressor role has been demonstrated for NKX3.1, PTEN, and p27/Kip1 in knockout mice models. Such genes are important targets of investigation for the development of biomarkers and therapeutic regimens. PMID:12085961

  9. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Conserved Genes and Genes Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  10. Molecular Evidence for Transcription of Genes on a B Chromosome in Crepis capillaris

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Carolyn R.; Houben, Andreas; Field, Bruce; Pistrick, Klaus; Demidov, Dmitri; Timmis, Jeremy N.

    2005-01-01

    Dispensable, supernumerary (B) chromosomes are found in diverse eukaryotic species. The origin and genetic consequences of B chromosomes have been the subjects of speculation for more than a century. Until now, there has been no molecular evidence that B chromosome DNA is transcribed and there is no unequivocal evidence as to their origin. B chromosomes are considered to be genetically inert although they appear to cause a variety of phenotypic effects. We report that members of one of two ribosomal RNA gene families that are confined to the B chromosomes of a plant, Crepis capillaris, are transcribed—thus providing the first molecular evidence of gene activity on B chromosomes. Sequence analysis of part of the A and B chromosome rRNA genes, together with comparisons with related species, indicates that the B chromosome rRNA genes originate from the A chromosome. PMID:15956665

  11. Positional cloning of disease genes on chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, N.; Bruening, M.; Callen, D.; Gardiner, M.; Lerner, T.

    1996-04-01

    The project seeks to elucidate the molecular basis of an important genetic disease (Batten`s disease) by molecular cloning of the affected gene by utilizing an overlapping clone map of chromosome 16. Batten disease (also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by progressive loss of vision, seizures, and psychomoter disturbances. The Batten disease gene was genetically mapped to the chromosome region 16p 12.1 in close linkage with the genetic markers D16S299 and D16S298. Exon amplification of a cosmid containing D16S298 yielded a candidate gene that was disrupted by a 1 kb genomic deletion in all patients containing the most common haplotype for the disease. Two separate deletions and a point mutation altering a splice site in three unrelated families have confirmed the gene as the Batten disease gene. The disease gene encodes a novel 438 amino acid membrane binding protein of unknown function.

  12. The mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Buenaventura, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The principle goal of our laboratory is the discovery of new genes on human chromosome 19. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is through the use of cDNA clones known as {open_quotes}expressed sequence tags{close_quotes} (ESTs). ESTs, short segments of sequence from a cDNA clone that correspond to the mRNA, occur as unique regions in the genome and, therefore, can be used as markers for specific positions. In collaboration with researchers from Genethon in France, fifteen cDNA clones from a normalized human infant brain cDNA library were tested and determined to map to chromosome 19. A verification procedure is then followed to confirm assignment to chromosome 19. First, primers for each cDNA clone are developed and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Next, a {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probe is made by polymerase chain reaction for each clone and then hybridized against filters containing an LLNL chromosome 19-specific cosmid library to find putative locations on the chromosome. The location is then verified by running a polymerase chain reactions from the positive cosmids. With the Browser database at LLNL, additional information about the positive cosmids can be found. Through use of the BLAST database at the National Library of Medicine, homologous sequences to the clones can be found. Among the fifteen cDNA clones received from Genethon, all have been amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Three have turned out as repetitive elements in the genome. Ten have been mapped to specific locations on chromosome 19. Putative locations have been found for the remaining two clones and thus verification testing will proceed.

  13. Postzygotic isolation involves strong mitochondrial and sex-specific effects in Tigriopus californicus, a species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B R; Rose, C G; Rundle, D E; Leong, W; Edmands, S

    2013-01-01

    Detailed studies of the genetics of speciation have focused on a few model systems, particularly Drosophila. The copepod Tigriopus californicus offers an alternative that differs from standard animal models in that it lacks heteromorphic chromosomes (instead, sex determination is polygenic) and has reduced opportunities for sexual conflict, because females mate only once. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping was conducted on reciprocal F2 hybrids between two strongly differentiated populations, using a saturated linkage map spanning all 12 autosomes and the mitochondrion. By comparing sexes, a possible sex ratio distorter was found but no sex chromosomes. Although studies of standard models often find an excess of hybrid male sterility factors, we found no QTL for sterility and multiple QTL for hybrid viability (indicated by non-Mendelian adult ratios) and other characters. Viability problems were found to be stronger in males, but the usual explanations for weaker hybrid males (sex chromosomes, sensitivity of spermatogenesis, sexual selection) cannot fully account for these male viability problems. Instead, higher metabolic rates may amplify deleterious effects in males. Although many studies of standard speciation models find the strongest genetic incompatibilities to be nuclear–nuclear (specifically X chromosome–autosome), we found the strongest deleterious interaction in this system was mito–nuclear. Consistent with the snowball theory of incompatibility accumulation, we found that trigenic interactions in this highly divergent cross were substantially more frequent (>6 × ) than digenic interactions. This alternative system thus allows important comparisons to studies of the genetics of reproductive isolation in more standard model systems. PMID:23860232

  14. Chromosomal locations of three Bacillus subtilis din genes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, K.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1987-07-01

    Previously isolated DNA damage-inducible (din) genes of Bacillus subtilis have been mapped on the bacterial chromosome by bacteriophage PBS1-mediated transduction. The din genes have been localized to three positions on the B. subtilis map. dinA cotransduction with the hisA locus was 80%, while dinC cotransduction with this marker was about 56%. dinB is unlinked to hisA, but its cotransduction with the dal-1 and purB loci was 84 and 22%, respectively.

  15. Chromosome substitution strains: gene discovery functional analysis and systems studies

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Joseph H.; Forejt, Jiri; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory mice are valuable in biomedical research in part because of the extraordinary diversity of genetic resources that are available for studies of complex genetic traits and as models for human biology and disease. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) are important in this resource portfolio because of their demonstrated use for gene discovery, genetic and epigenetic studies, functional characterizations, and systems analysis. CSSs are made by replacing a single chromosome in a host strain with the corresponding chromosome from a donor strain. A complete CSS panel involves a total of 22 engineered inbred strains, one for each of the 19 autosomes, one each for the X and Y chromosomes, and one for mitochondria. A genome survey simply involves comparing each phenotype for each of the CSSs with the phenotypes of the host strain. The CSS panels that are available for laboratory mice have been used to dissect a remarkable variety of phenotypes and to characterize an impressive array of disease models. These surveys have revealed considerable phenotypic diversity even among closely related progenitor strains, evidence for strong epistasis and for heritable epigenetic changes. Perhaps most importantly, and presumably because of their unique genetic constitution, CSSs, and congenic strains derived from them, the genetic variants underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are readily identified and functionally characterized. Together these studies show that CSSs are important resource for laboratory mice. PMID:22961226

  16. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in mice lacking a functional Kiss1 gene

    PubMed Central

    d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Fagg, Lisa A.; Dixon, John P. C.; Day, Kate; Leitch, Harry G.; Hendrick, Alan G.; Zahn, Dirk; Franceschini, Isabelle; Caraty, Alain; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Aparicio, Samuel A. J. R.; Colledge, William H.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (AXOR12, OT7T175) is central to acquisition of reproductive competency in mammals. Peptide ligands (kisspeptins) for this receptor are encoded by the Kiss1 gene, and administration of exogenous kisspeptins stimulates hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release in several species, including humans. To establish that kisspeptins are the authentic agonists of GPR54 in vivo and to determine whether these ligands have additional physiological functions we have generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Kiss1 gene. Kiss1-null mice are viable and healthy with no apparent abnormalities but fail to undergo sexual maturation. Mutant female mice do not progress through the estrous cycle, have thread-like uteri and small ovaries, and do not produce mature Graffian follicles. Mutant males have small testes, and spermatogenesis arrests mainly at the early haploid spermatid stage. Both sexes have low circulating gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) and sex steroid (β-estradiol or testosterone) hormone levels. Migration of GnRH neurons into the hypothalamus appears normal with appropriate axonal connections to the median eminence and total GnRH content. The hypothalamic–pituitary axis is functional in these mice as shown by robust luteinizing hormone secretion after peripheral administration of kisspeptin. The virtually identical phenotype of Gpr54- and Kiss1-null mice provides direct proof that kisspeptins are the true physiological ligand for the GPR54 receptor in vivo. Kiss1 also does not seem to play a vital role in any other physiological processes other than activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, and loss of Kiss1 cannot be overcome by compensatory mechanisms. PMID:17563351

  17. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the three human syntrophin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Feener, C.A.; Anderson, M.D.S.; Selig, S.

    1994-09-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus, is normally found to be associated with a complex of proteins. Among these dystrophin-associated proteins are the syntrophins, a group of 59 kDa membrane-associated proteins. When the syntrophins are purified based upon their association with dystrophin, they have been shown previously to form two distinct groups, the acidic ({alpha}) and basic ({beta}) forms. Based on peptide and rodent cDNA sequences, three separate syntrophin genes have been cloned and characterized from human tissues. The predicted amino acid sequences from these cDNA reveal that these proteins are related but are distinct with respect to charge, as predicted from their biochemistry. The family consists of one acidic ({alpha}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-1) and two basic ({beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin; and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-2) genes. Each of the three genes are widely expressed in a variety of human tissues, but the relative abundance of the three are unique with respect to each other. {alpha}-syntrophin is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and heart as a single transcript. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin is expressed widely in up to five distinct transcript sizes, and is most abundant in brain. The human chromosomal locations of the three syntrophins are currently being mapped. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin maps to chromosome 8q23-24 and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin to chromosome 16. The {alpha}-syntrophin gene will be mapped accordingly. Although all three genes are candidates for neuromuscular diseases, the predominant expression of {alpha}-syntrophin in skeletal muscle and heart makes it a strong candidate to be involved in a neuromuscular disease.

  18. Mouse chromosome 17 candidate modifier genes for thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Qila; Hart, Erika; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Two overlapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for clot stability, Hmtb8 and Hmtb9, were identified on mouse chromosome 17 in an F2 intercross derived from C57BL/6J (B6) and B6-Chr17A/J (B6-Chr17) mouse strains. The intervals were in synteny with a QTL for thrombotic susceptibility on chromosome 18 in a human study, and there were 23 homologs between mouse and human. The objective of this study was to determine whether any of these genes in the syntenic region are likely candidates as modifiers for clot stability. Seven genes, Twsg1, Zfp161, Dlgap1, Ralbp1, Myom1, Rab31, and Emilin2, of the 23 genes with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mRNA-UTR had differential expression in B6 and A/J mice. Dlgap1, Ralbp1, Myom1, and Emilin2 also had nonsynonymous SNPs. In addition, two other genes had nonsynonymous SNPs, Lama1 and Ndc80. Of these nine candidate genes, Emilin2 was selected for further analysis since other EMILIN (Elastin Microfibril Interface Located Protein) proteins have known functions in vascular structure and coagulation. Differences were found between B6 and A/J mice in vessel wall architecture and EMILIN2 protein in plasma, carotid vessel wall, and thrombi formed after ferric chloride injury. In B6-Chr17A/J mice both clot stability and Emilin2 mRNA expression were higher compared to those in B6 and A/J mice, suggesting the exposure of epistatic interactions. Although other homologous genes in the QTL region cannot be ruled out as causative genes, further investigation of Emilin2 as a candidate gene for thrombosis susceptibility is warranted. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00335-010-9274-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20700597

  19. Genomic Hallmarks of Genes Involved in Chromosomal Translocations in Hematological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shugay, Mikhail; Ortiz de Mendíbil, Iñigo; Vizmanos, José L.; Novo, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations (RCTs) leading to the formation of fusion genes are important drivers of hematological cancers. Although the general requirements for breakage and fusion are fairly well understood, quantitative support for a general mechanism of RCT formation is still lacking. The aim of this paper is to analyze available high-throughput datasets with computational and robust statistical methods, in order to identify genomic hallmarks of translocation partner genes (TPGs). Our results show that fusion genes are generally overexpressed due to increased promoter activity of 5′ TPGs and to more stable 3′-UTR regions of 3′ TPGs. Furthermore, expression profiling of 5′ TPGs and of interaction partners of 3′ TPGs indicates that these features can help to explain tissue specificity of hematological translocations. Analysis of protein domains retained in fusion proteins shows that the co-occurrence of specific domain combinations is non-random and that distinct functional classes of fusion proteins tend to be associated with different components of the gene fusion network. This indicates that the configuration of fusion proteins plays an important role in determining which 5′ and 3′ TPGs will combine in specific fusion genes. It is generally accepted that chromosomal proximity in the nucleus can explain the specific pairing of 5′ and 3′ TPGS and the recurrence of hematological translocations. Using recently available data for chromosomal contact probabilities (Hi-C) we show that TPGs are preferentially located in early replicated regions and occupy distinct clusters in the nucleus. However, our data suggest that, in general, nuclear position of TPGs in hematological cancers explains neither TPG pairing nor clinical frequency. Taken together, our results support a model in which genomic features related to regulation of expression and replication timing determine the set of candidate genes more likely to be translocated in

  20. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huiping; Cabrera, Robert M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bozinov, Daniel; Wang, Deli; Schwartz, Robert J; Finnell, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    redox status, which may contribute to cardiovascular abnormalities in mouse embryos lacking Folr1 gene activity. PMID:18028541

  1. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. )

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  3. Speciation with gene flow in equids despite extensive chromosomal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jónsson, Hákon; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Petersen, Lillian; Fumagalli, Matteo; Albrechtsen, Anders; Petersen, Bent; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Vilstrup, Julia T; Lear, Teri; Myka, Jennifer Leigh; Lundquist, Judith; Miller, Donald C; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Alquraishi, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Stagegaard, Julia; Strauss, Günter; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Antczak, Douglas F; Bailey, Ernest; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-12-30

    Horses, asses, and zebras belong to a single genus, Equus, which emerged 4.0-4.5 Mya. Although the equine fossil record represents a textbook example of evolution, the succession of events that gave rise to the diversity of species existing today remains unclear. Here we present six genomes from each living species of asses and zebras. This completes the set of genomes available for all extant species in the genus, which was hitherto represented only by the horse and the domestic donkey. In addition, we used a museum specimen to characterize the genome of the quagga zebra, which was driven to extinction in the early 1900s. We scan the genomes for lineage-specific adaptations and identify 48 genes that have evolved under positive selection and are involved in olfaction, immune response, development, locomotion, and behavior. Our extensive genome dataset reveals a highly dynamic demographic history with synchronous expansions and collapses on different continents during the last 400 ky after major climatic events. We show that the earliest speciation occurred with gene flow in Northern America, and that the ancestor of present-day asses and zebras dispersed into the Old World 2.1-3.4 Mya. Strikingly, we also find evidence for gene flow involving three contemporary equine species despite chromosomal numbers varying from 16 pairs to 31 pairs. These findings challenge the claim that the accumulation of chromosomal rearrangements drive complete reproductive isolation, and promote equids as a fundamental model for understanding the interplay between chromosomal structure, gene flow, and, ultimately, speciation. PMID:25453089

  4. Intraspecies Transfer of the Chromosomal Acinetobacter baumannii blaNDM-1 Carbapenemase Gene.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Thomas; Wibberg, Daniel; Maus, Irena; Winkler, Anika; Bontron, Séverine; Sczyrba, Alexander; Nordmann, Patrice; Pühler, Alfred; Poirel, Laurent; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The species Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important multidrug-resistant human pathogens. To determine its virulence and antibiotic resistance determinants, the genome of the nosocomial blaNDM-1-positive A. baumannii strain R2090 originating from Egypt was completely sequenced. Genome analysis revealed that strain R2090 is highly related to the community-acquired Australian A. baumannii strain D1279779. The two strains belong to sequence type 267 (ST267). Isolate R2090 harbored the chromosomally integrated transposon Tn125 carrying the carbapenemase gene blaNDM-1 that is not present in the D1279779 genome. To test the transferability of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene region, the clinical isolate R2090 was mated with the susceptible A. baumannii recipient CIP 70.10, and the carbapenem-resistant derivative R2091 was obtained. Genome sequencing of the R2091 derivative revealed that it had received an approximately 66-kb region comprising the transposon Tn125 embedding the blaNDM-1 gene. This region had integrated into the chromosome of the recipient strain CIP 70.10. From the four known mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer (conjugation, outer membrane vesicle-mediated transfer, transformation, and transduction), conjugation could be ruled out, since strain R2090 lacks any plasmid, and a type IV secretion system is not encoded in its chromosome. However, strain R2090 possesses three putative prophages, two of which were predicted to be complete and therefore functional. Accordingly, it was supposed that the transfer of the resistance gene region from the clinical isolate R2090 to the recipient occurred by general transduction facilitated by one of the prophages present in the R2090 genome. Hence, phage-mediated transduction has to be taken into account for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes within the species A. baumannii. PMID:26953198

  5. Genetic Linkage Localizes an Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis and Pectus Excavatum Gene to the 18q Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Gurnett, Christina A; Alaee, Farhang; Bowcock, Anne; Kruse, Lisa; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Bridwell, Keith H.; Kuklo, Timothy; Luhmann, Scott J.; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A single large family, in which adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and pectus excavatum (PE) segregate as an autosomal dominant condition, was evaluated. Genome-wide linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing were performed. Objective To map the disease-causing locus in a large Caucasian family in which AIS and PE co-segregate. Summary of Background Data AIS and PE are common musculoskeletal conditions known to have a genetic component, though few genes have been identified for either. Genetic studies have been confounded by a lack of large families in which the disorders segregate. Methods Clinical examinations were performed on the proband, who underwent posterior spinal fusion, and twelve additional affected family members. To map a gene causing AIS and PE, a genome-wide linkage analysis was performed with the Affymetrix Mapping 10K XbaI array on thirteen affected and ten unaffected family members. Candidate genes were sequenced. Results AIS was present in thirteen female family members and PE was present in three males and one female. Genome-wide linkage analysis resulted in a linkage peak on chromosome 18q with a maximum parametric multipoint logarithm of the odds (LOD) score of 3.86. Recombinants delineated the critical genetic region to an interval of 6.4 cM between SNP_A-1519369 and SNP_A-1507702, corresponding to a 7.06 Mb region (hg18: chr18:26342508-34395660). The chromosome 18q linkage region contains more than 30 genes. Re-sequencing of the coding regions of 21 candidate genes in the region did not reveal any causative mutation. Conclusion Linkage analysis in this large family demonstrated a novel locus for AIS and PE on chromosome 18q. Because of the increased frequency of PE in family members of AIS patients, consideration of family members with PE as affected may increase the power of AIS genetic linkage studies. PMID:19139660

  6. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Veronica J; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Waters, Paul D

    2012-03-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis-brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  7. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, Veronica J.; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L.; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S.; Pask, Andrew J.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall; Waters, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis–brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  8. Gene Dosage Imbalance Contributes to Chromosomal Instability-Induced Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Murillo-Maldonado, Juan M; Benhra, Najate; Barrio, Lara; Pérez, Lidia; Quiroga, Gonzalo; Nebreda, Angel R; Milán, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is thought to be a source of mutability in cancer. However, CIN often results in aneuploidy, which compromises cell fitness. Here, we used the dosage compensation mechanism (DCM) of Drosophila to demonstrate that chromosome-wide gene dosage imbalance contributes to the deleterious effects of CIN-induced aneuploidy and its pro-tumorigenic action. We present evidence that resetting of the DCM counterbalances the damaging effects caused by CIN-induced changes in X chromosome number. Importantly, interfering with the DCM suffices to mimic the cellular effects of aneuploidy in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, JNK-dependent cell death, and tumorigenesis upon apoptosis inhibition. We unveil a role of ROS in JNK activation and a variety of cellular and tissue-wide mechanisms that buffer the deleterious effects of CIN, including DNA-damage repair, activation of the p38 pathway, and cytokine induction to promote compensatory proliferation. Our data reveal the existence of robust compensatory mechanisms that counteract CIN-induced cell death and tumorigenesis. PMID:26859353

  9. CHROMOSOMAL LOCATION AND GENE PAUCITY IN THE MALE SPECIFIC REGION ON PAPAYA Y CHROMOSOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants evolved recently and many of them remain homomorphic, including those in papaya. We investigated the chromosomal location of papaya’s small male specific region of the hermaphrodite Y (Yh) chromosome (MSY) and its genomic features. We conducted chromosome fluoresc...

  10. Genetic regulation of cholesterol homeostasis: chromosomal organization of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Welch, C L; Xia, Y R; Shechter, I; Farese, R; Mehrabian, M; Mehdizadeh, S; Warden, C H; Lusis, A J

    1996-07-01

    As part of an effort to dissect the genetic factors involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the mouse model, we report the mapping of 12 new candidate genes using linkage analysis. The genes include: cytoplasmic HMG-CoA synthase (Hmgcs 1, Chr 13), mitochondrial synthase (Hmgcs 2, Chr 3), a synthase-related sequence (Hmgcs 1-rs, Chr 12), mevalonate kinase (Mvk, Chr 5), farnesyl diphosphate synthase (Fdps, Chr 3), squalene synthase (Fdft 1, Chr 14), acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (Acact, Chr 1), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (Srebf1, Chr 8) and -2 (Srebf2, Chr 15), apolipoprotein A-I regulatory protein (Tcfcoup2, Chr 7), low density receptor-related protein-related sequence (Lrp-rs, Chr 10), and Lrp-associated protein (Lrpap 1, Chr 5). In addition, the map positions for several lipoprotein receptor genes were refined. These genes include: low density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr, Chr 9), very low density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr, Chr 19), and glycoprotein 330 (Gp330, Chr 2). Some of these candidate genes are located within previously defined chromosomal regions (quantitative trait loci, QTLs) contributing to plasma lipoprotein levels, and Acact maps near a mouse mutation, ald, resulting in depletion of cholesteryl esters in the adrenals. The combined use of QTL and candidate gene mapping provides a powerful means of dissecting complex traits such as cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:8827514

  11. Human decorin gene: Intron-exon junctions and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, U.; Young, M.F.; Fisher, L.W. ); Vogel, W.; Just, W. )

    1993-01-01

    All of the protein-encoding exons and the 3[prime]flanking region of the human decorin gene have been cloned an partially sequenced. The locations of the intron-exon junctions within the coding portion of the gene were identical to those found for the homologous human gene, biglycan. The sizes of the introns in the decorin gene, however, were substantially larger than those of the same introns of the biglycan gene. Portions of introns 1, 2, and 3 as well as exon 1 were not found during our extensive screening process. The 5[prime] end of intron 2 was found to have an AG-rich region followed immediately by a CT-rich region. Furthermore, the 5[prime] end of intron 3 was very rich in thymidine, whereas the 3[prime] end of intron 7 was rich in adenosine. Several cDNA clones constructed from cultured human bone cell mRNA were found to contain a different sequence at the 5[prime] end compared to that previously published for mRNA from a human embryonic fibroblast cell line. We were also unable to find the alternate 3[prime] flanking region of the previously published cDNA sequence. We have mapped the human decorin gene by in situ methods to chromosome 12q2l.3. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Organization of human cardiovascular-expressed genes on chromosomes 21 and 22.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, A A; Pabalan, N; Tang, H C; Liew, C C

    2001-03-01

    The recent availability of the sequenced and annotated DNA sequences of chromosomes 21 and 22 has initiated the next phase in the human genome project: the application of this resource. One facet of these data is that they provide a list of ordered genes along the chromosome that can be capitalized upon to determine gene position effects. Specifically, the physical position and distribution of genes along the chromosomes may be related to gene expression in specific organs or organ systems. In this report we index the subset of genes constituting the human "cardiovascular genome" on chromosomes 21q and 22q as well as report the identification of several "cardiovascular gene" clusters. These gene clusters are suggestive of a higher order of tissue-specific gene regulation at the chromosomal level. PMID:11181026

  13. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrooks, L.L.; Lamb, A.N.; Kirkman, H.N.; Callanan, N.P.; Rao, K.W. )

    1992-11-01

    The authors report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. The families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. The authors speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The effects of chromosome rearrangements on the expression of heterochromatic genes in chromosome 2L of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, B.T.; Hearn, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The light (lt) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is located at the base of the left arm of chromosome 2, within or very near centromeric heterochromatin (2Lh). Chromosome rearrangements that move the lt{sup +} gene from its normal proximal position and place the gene in distal euchromatin result in mosaic or variegated expression of the gene. The cytogenetic and genetic properties of 17 lt-variegated rearrangements induced by X radiation are described in this report. The authors show that five of the heterochromatic genes adjacent to lt are subject to inactivation by these rearrangements and that the euchromatic loci in proximal 2L are not detectably affected. The properties of the rearrangements suggest that proximity to heterochromatin is an important regulatory requirement for at least six 2Lh genes. They discuss how the properties of the position effects on heterochromatic genes relate to other proximity-dependent phenomena such as transvection.

  15. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  16. Lack of imprinting of the human dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Propping, P.; Wolf, H.K.

    1996-04-09

    The term genomic imprinting has been used to refer to the differential expression of genetic material depending on whether it has come from the male or female parent. In humans, the chromosomal region 11p15.5 has been shown to contain 2 imprinted genes (H19 and IGF2). The gene for the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4), which is of great interest for research into neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopharmacology, is also located in this area. In the present study, we have examined the imprinting status of the DRD4 gene in brain tissue of an epileptic patient who was heterozygous for a 12 bp repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the DRD4 gene. We show that both alleles are expressed in equivalent amounts. We therefore conclude that the DRD4 gene is not imprinted in the human brain. 30 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Repair of chromosomal RAG-mediated DNA breaks by mutant RAG proteins lacking phosphatidylinositol 3-like kinase consensus phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Gapud, Eric J; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Mahowald, Grace K; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2011-08-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs) are members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-like family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate serines or threonines when positioned adjacent to a glutamine residue (SQ/TQ). Both kinases are activated rapidly by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulate the function of proteins involved in DNA damage responses. In developing lymphocytes, DSBs are generated during V(D)J recombination, which is required to assemble the second exon of all Ag receptor genes. This reaction is initiated through a DNA cleavage step by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which together comprise an endonuclease that generates DSBs at the border of two recombining gene segments and their flanking recombination signals. This DNA cleavage step is followed by a joining step, during which pairs of DNA coding and signal ends are ligated to form a coding joint and a signal joint, respectively. ATM and DNA-PKcs are integrally involved in the repair of both signal and coding ends, but the targets of these kinases involved in the repair process have not been fully elucidated. In this regard, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which each have several SQ/TQ motifs, have been implicated in the repair of RAG-mediated DSBs. In this study, we use a previously developed approach for studying chromosomal V(D)J recombination that has been modified to allow for the analysis of RAG1 and RAG2 function. We show that phosphorylation of RAG1 or RAG2 by ATM or DNA-PKcs at SQ/TQ consensus sites is dispensable for the joining step of V(D)J recombination. PMID:21742970

  18. Structure and chromosomal localization of the aminomethyltransferase gene (AMT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanao, Kenji; Takada, Goro; Komatsu, Yoriko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi ); Takahashi, Ei-ichi; Seki, Naohiko ); Okamura-Ikeda, Kazuko; Motokawa, Yutaro )

    1994-01-01

    The gene for human aminomethyltransferase (AMT), also known as the T-protein of the glycine cleavage system, was isolated from a human placental cosmid library and examined by restriction mapping, polymerase chain reaction analysis, and DNA sequencing. The gene is about 6 kb in length and consists of nine exons. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene lacks typical TATAA sequence but has a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. Two putative glucocorticoid-responsive elements and a putative thyroid hormone-responsive element are present. The AMT gene was assigned to subband 3p21.2-p21.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  20. Two genes substitute for the mouse Y chromosome for spermatogenesis and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Ruthig, Victor A; Ortega, Eglė A; Mitchell, Michael J; Ward, Monika A

    2016-01-29

    The mammalian Y chromosome is considered a symbol of maleness, as it encodes a gene driving male sex determination, Sry, as well as a battery of other genes important for male reproduction. We previously demonstrated in the mouse that successful assisted reproduction can be achieved when the Y gene contribution is limited to only two genes, Sry and spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. Here, we replaced Sry by transgenic activation of its downstream target Sox9, and Eif2s3y, by transgenic overexpression of its X chromosome-encoded homolog Eif2s3x. The resulting males with no Y chromosome genes produced haploid male gametes and sired offspring after assisted reproduction. Our findings support the existence of functional redundancy between the Y chromosome genes and their homologs encoded on other chromosomes. PMID:26823431

  1. Pilus genes of Neisseria gonorrheae: chromosomal organization and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T F; Billyard, E; Haas, R; Storzbach, S; So, M

    1984-10-01

    We have mapped two regions of the Neisseria gonorrheae genome, pilE1 and pilE2, which are involved in pilus expression. When the cells are in the piliated P+ state, these two loci carry sequences necessary for pilin production. A silent locus, pilS1, also maps near pilE1 and pilE2. pilS1 contains structural gene information but lacks pilus promoter sequences. The pilus gene sequences in pilE1 and pilE2 are identical in strain MS11. PMID:6148752

  2. Gene Duplication, Gene Conversion and the Evolution of the Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Nonrecombining chromosomes, such as the Y, are expected to degenerate over time due to reduced efficacy of natural selection compared to chromosomes that recombine. However, gene duplication, coupled with gene conversion between duplicate pairs, can potentially counteract forces of evolutionary decay that accompany asexual reproduction. Using a combination of analytical and computer simulation methods, we explicitly show that, although gene conversion has little impact on the probability that duplicates become fixed within a population, conversion can be effective at maintaining the functionality of Y-linked duplicates that have already become fixed. The coupling of Y-linked gene duplication and gene conversion between paralogs can also prove costly by increasing the rate of nonhomologous crossovers between duplicate pairs. Such crossovers can generate an abnormal Y chromosome, as was recently shown to reduce male fertility in humans. The results represent a step toward explaining some of the more peculiar attributes of the human Y as well as preliminary Y-linked sequence data from other mammals and Drosophila. The results may also be applicable to the recently observed pattern of tetraploidy and gene conversion in asexual, bdelloid rotifers. PMID:20551442

  3. Phase Transition in the Genome Evolution Favors Nonrandom Distribution of Genes on Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Jakub; Waga, Wojciech; Zawierta, Marta; Cebrat, Stanisław

    We have used the Monte Carlo-based computer models to show that selection pressure could affect the distribution of recombination hotspots along the chromosome. Close to the critical crossover rate, where genomes may switch between the Darwinian purifying selection or complementation of haplotypes, the distribution of recombination events and the force of selection exerted on genes affect the structure of chromosomes. The order of expression of genes and their location on chromosome may decide about the extinction or survival of competing populations.

  4. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  5. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  7. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  8. Role of Testis-Specific Gene Expression in Sex-Chromosome Evolution of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Dean A.; Russell, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression in Anopheles gambiae shows a deficiency of testis-expressed genes on the X chromosome associated with an excessive movement of retrogene duplication. We suggest that the degeneration of sex chromosomes in this monandrous species is likely the result of pressures from X inactivation, dosage compensation, and sexual antagonism. PMID:21890740

  9. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  10. Clusters of alpha satellite on human chromosome 21 are dispersed far onto the short arm and lack ancient layers.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, William; Zhao, Chongjian; Shepelev, Valery; Uralsky, Lev; Alexandrov, Ivan; Andreeva, Tatyana; Rogaev, Evgeny; Bun, Christopher; Miller, Emily; Putonti, Catherine; Doering, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Human alpha satellite (AS) sequence domains that currently function as centromeres are typically flanked by layers of evolutionarily older AS that presumably represent the remnants of earlier primate centromeres. Studies on several human chromosomes reveal that these older AS arrays are arranged in an age gradient, with the oldest arrays farthest from the functional centromere and arrays progressively closer to the centromere being progressively younger. The organization of AS on human chromosome 21 (HC21) has not been well-characterized. We have used newly available HC21 sequence data and an HC21p YAC map to determine the size, organization, and location of the AS arrays, and compared them to AS arrays found on other chromosomes. We find that the majority of the HC21 AS sequences are present on the p-arm of the chromosome and are organized into at least five distinct isolated clusters which are distributed over a larger distance from the functional centromere than that typically seen for AS on other chromosomes. Using both phylogenetic and L1 element age estimations, we found that all of the HC21 AS clusters outside the functional centromere are of a similar relatively recent evolutionary origin. HC21 contains none of the ancient AS layers associated with early primate evolution which is present on other chromosomes, possibly due to the fact that the p-arm of HC21 and the other acrocentric chromosomes underwent substantial reorganization about 20 million years ago. PMID:27430641

  11. Imprinted survival genes preclude loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 7 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boot, Arnoud; Oosting, Jan; de Miranda, Noel Fcc; Zhang, Yinghui; Corver, Willem E; van de Water, Bob; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The genomes of a wide range of cancers, including colon, breast, and thyroid cancers, frequently show copy number gains of chromosome 7 and rarely show loss of heterozygosity. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Strikingly, oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinomas can display an extreme genomic profile, with homozygosity of all chromosomes except for chromosome 7. The observation that homozygosity of chromosome 7 is never observed suggests that retention of heterozygosity is essential for cells. We hypothesized that cell survival genes are genetically imprinted on either of two copies of chromosome 7, which thwarts loss of heterozygosity at this chromosome in cancer cells. By employing a DNA methylation screen and gene expression analysis, we identified six imprinted genes that force retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Subsequent knockdown of gene expression showed that CALCR, COPG2, GRB10, KLF14, MEST, and PEG10 were essential for cancer cell survival, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, G1 -phase arrest, and increased apoptosis. We propose that imprinted cell survival genes provide a genetic basis for retention of chromosome 7 heterozygosity in cancer cells. The monoallelically expressed cell survival genes identified in this study, and the cellular pathways that they are involved in, offer new therapeutic targets for the treatment of tumours showing retention of heterozygosity on chromosome 7. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27265324

  12. General principles of single-construct chromosomal gene drive.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John M; Hay, Bruce A

    2012-07-01

    Gene drive systems are genetic elements capable of spreading into a population even if they confer a fitness cost to their host. We consider a class of drive systems consisting of a chromosomally located, linked cluster of genes, the presence of which renders specific classes of offspring arising from specific parental crosses unviable. Under permissive conditions, a number of these elements are capable of distorting the offspring ratio in their favor. We use a population genetic framework to derive conditions under which these elements spread to fixation in a population or induce a population crash. Many of these systems can be engineered using combinations of toxin and antidote genes, analogous to Medea, which consists of a maternal toxin and zygotic antidote. The majority of toxin-antidote drive systems require a critical frequency to be exceeded before they spread into a population. Of particular interest, a Z-linked Medea construct with a recessive antidote is expected to induce an all-male population crash for release frequencies above 50%. We suggest molecular tools that may be used to build these systems, and discuss their relevance to the control of a variety of insect pest species, including mosquito vectors of diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. PMID:22759292

  13. Conservation of Gene Order and Content in the Circular Chromosomes of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Other Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Kuykendall, L. David; Shao, Jonathan Y.; Hartung, John S.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ an insect-vectored, obligate intracellular bacterium associated with citrus-greening disease, also called “HLB," is a member of the Rhizobiales along with nitrogen-fixing microsymbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and facultative intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Comparative analyses of their circular chromosomes identified 514 orthologous genes shared among all five species. Shared among all five species are 50 identical blocks of microsyntenous orthologous genes (MOGs), containing a total of 283 genes. While retaining highly conserved genomic blocks of microsynteny, divergent evolution, horizontal gene transfer and niche specialization have disrupted macrosynteny among the five circular chromosomes compared. Highly conserved microsyntenous gene clusters help define the Rhizobiales, an order previously defined by 16S RNA gene similarity and herein represented by the three families: Bartonellaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Rhizobiaceae. Genes without orthologs in the other four species help define individual species. The circular chromosomes of each of the five Rhizobiales species examined had genes lacking orthologs in the other four species. For example, 63 proteins are encoded by genes of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ not shared with other members of the Rhizobiales. Of these 63 proteins, 17 have predicted functions related to DNA replication or RNA transcription, and some of these may have roles related to low genomic GC content. An additional 17 proteins have predicted functions relevant to cellular processes, particularly modifications of the cell surface. Seventeen unshared proteins have specific metabolic functions including a pathway to synthesize cholesterol encoded by a seven-gene operon. The remaining 12 proteins encoded by ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genes not shared with other Rhizobiales are of bacteriophage origin.

  14. The supernumerary chromosome of Nectria haematococca that carries pea-pathogenicity-related genes also carries a trait for pea rhizosphere competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Carres, M; White, G; Tsuchiya, D; Taga, M; VanEtten, H D

    2008-06-01

    Fungi are found in a wide range of environments, and the ecological and host diversity of the fungus Nectria haematococca has been shown to be due in part to unique genes on different supernumerary chromosomes. These chromosomes have been called "conditionally dispensable" (CD) since they are not needed for axenic growth but are important for expanding the host range of individual isolates. From a biological perspective, the CD chromosomes can be compared to bacterial plasmids that carry unique genes that can define the habits of these microorganisms. The current study establishes that the N. haematococca PDA1-CD chromosome, which contains the genes for pea pathogenicity (PEP cluster) on pea roots, also carries a gene(s) for the utilization of homoserine, a compound found in large amounts in pea root exudates. Competition studies demonstrate that an isolate that lacks the PEP cluster but carries a portion of the CD chromosome which includes the homoserine utilization (HUT) gene(s) is more competitive in the pea rhizosphere than an isolate without the CD chromosome. PMID:18408061

  15. Chromosomal localization, genomic structure, and allelic polymorphism of the human CD79a (lg-{alpha}/mb-1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, S.; Gregersen, P.K.; Chiorazzi, N. |; Mohrenweiser, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    The germline DNA sequence of the human CD79a (Ig-{alpha}/mb-1) gene was determined by polymerase chain reaction sequencing of a cosmid clone derived from an arrayed human chromosome 19 library. The CD79a gene was localized to chromosome 19q13.2; this localization places the gene within the CEA-like gene cluster with the following gene order: -CEA-CGM1-CD79a-RPS11-ATP1A3-BGP-CGM9-. The genomic organization of the human CD79a gene resembles the mouse counterpart with five exons interrupted by four introns. Computer analyses suggest the presence of transcription regulatory elements known to be important in the regulation of mouse CD79a (AP-1, EBF, AP-2, MUF2, and SP-1 sites), as well as elements not found in the mouse gene (an NK-kB binding site and a series of E-box motifs). Similar to the mouse gene, the 5{prime} flanking region of human CD79a lacks a TATA box; however, unlike mouse CD79a, a classical octamer motif could not be identified in the human gene. Finally, a new Rsa I restriction fragment length polymorphism was defined in the non-coding regions of the human gene. 64 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Gene expression variation and expression quantitative trait mapping of human chromosome 21 genes.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Samuel; Lyle, Robert; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Attar, Homa; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Gehrig, Corinne; Parand, Leila; Gagnebin, Maryline; Rougemont, Jacques; Jongeneel, C Victor; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2005-12-01

    Inter-individual differences in gene expression are likely to account for an important fraction of phenotypic differences, including susceptibility to common disorders. Recent studies have shown extensive variation in gene expression levels in humans and other organisms, and that a fraction of this variation is under genetic control. We investigated the patterns of gene expression variation in a 25 Mb region of human chromosome 21, which has been associated with many Down syndrome (DS) phenotypes. Taqman real-time PCR was used to measure expression variation of 41 genes in lymphoblastoid cells of 40 unrelated individuals. For 25 genes found to be differentially expressed, additional analysis was performed in 10 CEPH families to determine heritabilities and map loci harboring regulatory variation. Seventy-six percent of the differentially expressed genes had significant heritabilities, and genomewide linkage analysis led to the identification of significant eQTLs for nine genes. Most eQTLs were in trans, with the best result (P=7.46 x 10(-8)) obtained for TMEM1 on chromosome 12q24.33. A cis-eQTL identified for CCT8 was validated by performing an association study in 60 individuals from the HapMap project. SNP rs965951 located within CCT8 was found to be significantly associated with its expression levels (P=2.5 x 10(-5)) confirming cis-regulatory variation. The results of our study provide a representative view of expression variation of chromosome 21 genes, identify loci involved in their regulation and suggest that genes, for which expression differences are significantly larger than 1.5-fold in control samples, are unlikely to be involved in DS-phenotypes present in all affected individuals. PMID:16251198

  17. Postnatal survival of mice with maternal duplication of distal chromosome 7 induced by a Igf2/H19 imprinting control region lacking insulator function.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Szabó, Piroska E; Mann, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    The misexpressed imprinted genes causing developmental failure of mouse parthenogenones are poorly defined. To obtain further insight, we investigated misexpressions that could cause the pronounced growth deficiency and death of fetuses with maternal duplication of distal chromosome (Chr) 7 (MatDup.dist7). Their small size could involve inactivity of Igf2, encoding a growth factor, with some contribution by over-expression of Cdkn1c, encoding a negative growth regulator. Mice lacking Igf2 expression are usually viable, and MatDup.dist7 death has been attributed to the misexpression of Cdkn1c or other imprinted genes. To examine the role of misexpressions determined by two maternal copies of the Igf2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR)-a chromatin insulator, we introduced a mutant ICR (ICR(Delta)) into MatDup.dist7 fetuses. This activated Igf2, with correction of H19 expression and other imprinted transcripts expected. Substantial growth enhancement and full postnatal viability was obtained, demonstrating that the aberrant MatDup.dist7 phenotype is highly dependent on the presence of two unmethylated maternal Igf2/H19 ICRs. Activation of Igf2 is likely the predominant correction that rescued growth and viability. Further experiments involved the introduction of a null allele of Cdkn1c to alleviate its over-expression. Results were not consistent with the possibility that this misexpression alone, or in combination with Igf2 inactivity, mediates MatDup.dist7 death. Rather, a network of misexpressions derived from dist7 is probably involved. Our results are consistent with the idea that reduced expression of IGF2 plays a role in the aetiology of the human imprinting-related growth-deficit disorder, Silver-Russell syndrome. PMID:20062522

  18. Targeted Chromosomal Translocations and Essential Gene Knockout Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyang; Li, Mu; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2015-12-01

    Many genes play essential roles in development and fertility; their disruption leads to growth arrest or sterility. Genetic balancers have been widely used to study essential genes in many organisms. However, it is technically challenging and laborious to generate and maintain the loss-of-function mutations of essential genes. The CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been successfully applied for gene editing and chromosome engineering. Here, we have developed a method to induce chromosomal translocations and produce genetic balancers using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology and have applied this approach to edit essential genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. The co-injection of dual small guide RNA targeting genes on different chromosomes resulted in reciprocal translocation between nonhomologous chromosomes. These animals with chromosomal translocations were subsequently crossed with animals that contain normal sets of chromosomes. The F1 progeny were subjected to a second round of Cas9-mediated gene editing. Through this method, we successfully produced nematode strains with specified chromosomal translocations and generated a number of loss-of-function alleles of two essential genes (csr-1 and mes-6). Therefore, our method provides an easy and efficient approach to generate and maintain loss-of-function alleles of essential genes with detailed genetic background information. PMID:26482793

  19. Mapping the human growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRHR) gene to the short arm of chromosome 7(7p13-p21) near the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vamvakopoulos, N.C. ); Kunz, J.; Olberding, U. ); Scherer, S.W. ); Sioutopoulou, O.T. ); Schneider, V.; Durkin, A.S.; Nierman, W.C. )

    1994-03-15

    In this report, the authors have assigned the human GHRHR gene to chromosome 7p13-p21, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA from well-defined human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The GHRHR gene was assigned to human chromosome 7 by discordancy analysis (data not shown) of PCR amplification products from NIGMS mapping panel Nos. 1 and 2 DNA templates. The PCR primers (p[sub f], 5[prime]-GCTGCCTCATCACGCCACTGGAGTCCAC-3[prime]; and P[sub r], 5[prime]-CAGGTTTATTGGCTCCTCTGAGCCTTGG-3[prime]) amplified a 276-bp-long fragment from the 3[prime] untranslated region of the human GHRHR gene. Subsequently, they determined the location of the GHRHR gene within human chromosome 7 by PCR amplification of genomic DNA template from somatic cell hybrids that contain deletions of this chromosome. Amplification of the 276-bp DNA fragment was seen only in the cell lines that contained an intact chromosome 7 short arm. The lack of amplification using genomic DNA from 0044 Rag 1-15 and It A9 2-21-14 maps this gene to 7p13-p21. Additionally, the appropriate amplified product was observed from the human chromosome 4 containing NIGMS panel 2 cell line GM10115. This line was reported to have retained a small region of human chromosome 7 containing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that is mapped to 7p12-p13. The authors conclude that the human GHRHR gene maps to the small arm of chromosome 7 within 7p13-p21 and close to the EGFR gene. This assignment is consistent with the syntenic relationship between mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 7 in this region.

  20. Sexy gene conversions: locating gene conversions on the X-chromosome.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Mark J; Zhang, Liqing

    2009-08-01

    Gene conversion can have a profound impact on both the short- and long-term evolution of genes and genomes. Here, we examined the gene families that are located on the X-chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), mouse (Mus musculus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) for evidence of gene conversion. We identified seven gene families (WD repeat protein family, Ferritin Heavy Chain family, RAS-related Protein RAB-40 family, Diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase family, Transcription Elongation Factor A family, LDOC1-related family, Zinc Finger Protein ZIC, and GLI family) that show evidence of gene conversion. Through phylogenetic analyses and synteny evidence, we show that gene conversion has played an important role in the evolution of these gene families and that gene conversion has occurred independently in both primates and rodents. Comparing the results with those of two gene conversion prediction programs (GENECONV and Partimatrix), we found that both GENECONV and Partimatrix have very high false negative rates (i.e. failed to predict gene conversions), which leads to many undetected gene conversions. The combination of phylogenetic analyses with physical synteny evidence exhibits high resolution in the detection of gene conversions. PMID:19487239

  1. The 239AB gene on chromosome 22: a novel member of an ancient gene family.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, F; Ota, T

    1997-07-18

    A novel family of genes expressed in human brain has recently been identified. Gene 239FB, transcribed extensively in fetal brain, was isolated from the chromosome 11p13 region associated with mental retardation component of the WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation) syndrome. This report presents a cDNA sequence and expression profile of a related gene, 239AB, isolated from adult brain library, that was mapped to chromosome 22. While similar in structure, the two genes differ in their expression pattern and may have different roles in central nervous system development and function. In contrast to the 239FB, which is expressed predominantly in fetal brain, the 239AB gene is transcribed in adult tissues. Both human genes encode novel proteins of unknown function that are highly conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to birds and mammals. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the two lineages of the ancient gene family represented by 239FB and 239AB have been in existence prior to the emergence of modern animals. PMID:9266672

  2. Characterization of a candidate tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M.C.; Xiang, R.H.; Hensel, C.H.

    1994-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors frequently display deletions on the short arm of chromosome 3 suggesting the existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) within that region. The hybrid, HA(3)BB9F, contains a small fragment of human chromosome 3(p22-p21) in mouse A9 cells and is suppressed for tumor formation. Further we have identified a SCLC cell line, NCI H740, that bears a homozygous deletion involving the loss of 6 markers that map to the region 3p21.3-p21.2 and all but one are located within the 3p fragment exhibiting properties of tumor suppression in the HA(3)BB9F hybrid. A homozygous deletion overlapping found in NCI H740 has been identified in a Dutch SCLC cell line. To define the extent of the deletion in NCI H740, we have constructed a YAC and P1 contig spanning 2 Mb. The order of markers within the contig is as follows: -D8-(1,2)-D3S1235-ALU5-ALU342-ALU6-DDI-(3,4)-GNAI2. An SstII fragment corresponding to a CpG island from P1 170 was used to isolate 5 overlapping cDNA clones. These clones detect both DNA rearrangements and altered expression patterns in a proportion of SCLC cell lines. SSCP analysis is being used to identify mutations in those SCLC cell lines which express the gene as assessed by both Northern and RT-PCR analyses. As functional evidence is final proof for tumor suppressor activity, the P1 clones and cDNA have been transfected into a mouse fibrosarcoma (A9) and a human SCLC cell line. A9 transfectants containing the P1 170 clone exhibit both altered morphology and a high frequency of apoptosis when compared to the non-transfected A9 cells. Stable transfectants will be injected into nude mice to assess the ability of the P1 clones to suppress tumorigenesis in vivo.

  3. Integrated Genomic and Transcriptional Profiling Identifies Chromosomal Loci with Altered Gene Expression in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Saskia M.; de Wilde, Jillian; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berkhof, Johannes; Yi, Yajun; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J. M.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.

    2009-01-01

    For a better understanding of the consequences of recurrent chromosomal alterations in cervical carcinomas, we integrated genome-wide chromosomal and transcriptional profiles of 10 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 5 adenocarcinomas (AdCAs) and 6 normal controls. Previous genomic profiling showed that gains at chromosome arms 1q, 3q, and 20q as well as losses at 8q, 10q, 11q, and 13q were common in cervical carcinomas. Altered regions spanned multiple megabases, and the extent to which expression of genes located there is affected remains unclear. Expression analysis of these previously chromosomally profiled carcinomas yielded 83 genes with significantly differential expression between carcinomas and normal epithelium. Application of differential gene locus mapping (DIGMAP) analysis and the array CGH expression integration tool (ACE-it) identified hotspots within large chromosomal alterations in which gene expression was altered as well. Chromosomal gains of the long arms of chromosome 1, 3, and 20 resulted in increased expression of genes located at 1q32.1-32.2, 3q13.32-23, 3q26.32-27.3, and 20q11.21-13.33, whereas a chromosomal loss of 11q22.3-25 was related to decreased expression of genes located in this region. Overexpression of DTX3L, PIK3R4, ATP2C1, and SLC25A36, all located at 3q21.1-23 and identified by DIGMAP, ACE-it or both, was confirmed in an independent validation sample set consisting of 12 SCCs and 13 normal ectocervical samples. In conclusion, integrated chromosomal and transcriptional profiling identified chromosomal hotspots at 1q, 3q, 11q, and 20q with altered gene expression within large commonly altered chromosomal regions in cervical cancer. PMID:18618715

  4. Lack of the Drosophila BEAF insulator proteins alters regulation of genes in the Antennapedia complex.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swarnava; Jiang, Nan; Hart, Craig M

    2011-02-01

    In a screen based on a rough eye phenotype caused by a dominant negative form of the BEAF-32A and BEAF-32B insulator proteins, we previously identified 17 proteins that genetically interact with BEAF. Eleven of these are developmental transcription factors, seven of which are encoded by the Antennapedia complex (ANT-C). While investigating potential reasons for the genetic interactions, we obtained evidence that BEAF plays a role in the regulation of genes in the ANT-C. BEAF does not localize near the transcription start sites of any genes in the ANT-C, indicating that BEAF does not locally affect regulation of these genes. Although BEAF affects chromatin structure or dynamics, we also found no evidence for a general change in binding to polytene chromosomes in the absence of BEAF. However, because we were unable to detect proteins encoded by ANT-C genes in salivary glands, the DREF and MLE proteins were used as proxies to examine binding. This does not rule out limited effects at particular binding sites or the possibility that BEAF might directly interact with certain transcription factors to affect their binding. In contrast, the embryonic expression levels and patterns of four examined ANT-C genes were altered (bcd, Dfd, ftz, pb). A control gene, Dref, was not affected. A full understanding of the regulation of ANT-C genes during development will have to take the role of BEAF into account. PMID:21132442

  5. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2p25 and mouse chromosome 12C

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Yuichi; Onogi, Satoshi; Fujita, Teizo

    1995-02-10

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) plays a central role in thyroid gland function. The enzyme catalyzes two important reactions of thyroid hormone synthesis, i.e., the iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin and phenoxy-ester formation between pairs of iodinated tyrosines to generate the thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Previously, we isolated the cDNAs encoding human and mouse TPOs and assigned the human TPO gene to the short arm of chromosome 2 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. By a similar analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids, the human TPO gene was mapped to 2pter-p12. The mouse TPO gene was localized to chromosome 12 using a rat TPO cDNA as a probe to hybridize with mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrids. In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm the localization of human and mouse TPO genes to human chromosome 2 and mouse chromosome 12 and to assign them regionally to 2p25 and 12C, respectively. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories

    PubMed Central

    Mahy, Nicola L.; Perry, Paul E.; Gilchrist, Susan; Baldock, Richard A.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2002-01-01

    The position of genes within the nucleus has been correlated with their transcriptional activity. The interchromosome domain model of nuclear organization suggests that genes preferentially locate at the surface of chromosome territories. Conversely, high resolution analysis of chromatin fibers suggests that chromosome territories do not present accessibility barriers to transcription machinery. To clarify the relationship between the organization of chromosome territories and gene expression, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to analyze the spatial organization of a contiguous ∼1 Mb stretch of the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation syndrome region of the human genome and the syntenic region in the mouse. These regions contain constitutively expressed genes, genes with tissue-restricted patterns of expression, and substantial regions of intergenic DNA. We find that there is a spatial organization within territories that is conserved between mouse and humans: certain sequences do preferentially locate at the periphery of the chromosome territories in both species. However, we do not detect genes necessarily at the periphery of chromosome territories or at the surface of subchromosomal domains. Intraterritory organization is not different among cell types that express different combinations of the genes under study. Our data demonstrate that transcription of both ubiquitous and tissue-restricted genes is not confined to the periphery of chromosome territories, suggesting that the basal transcription machinery and transcription factors can readily gain access to the chromosome interior. PMID:11994314

  7. The promiscuous MLL gene links chromosomal translocations to cellular differentiation and tumour tropism.

    PubMed

    Collins, Emma C; Rabbitts, Terence H

    2002-09-01

    MLL is a promiscuous gene involved in a diversity of chromosomal fusions in haematological malignancies, usually resulting from chromosomal translocations. MLL-associated chromosomal rearrangements usually occur in tumours of specific haematological lineages, suggesting a crucial role for the MLL fusion partner in determining disease phenotype (or tumour tropism). The MLL gene is homologous to Drosophila trithorax, and is likewise involved in embryo pattern formation. Common themes linking several of the MLL partners include a possible involvement in embryo patterning via Hox gene regulation and chromatin remodelling. These findings reinforce the link between developmental regulation and chromosomal translocations, and indicate the role of chromosomal translocation in activating genes capable of determining tumour phenotype in leukaemias and sarcomas. PMID:12223315

  8. Chromosomal localization of actin genes in the malaria mosquito Anopheles darlingi

    PubMed Central

    BRIDI, L. C.; SHARAKHOVA, M. V.; SHARAKHOV, I. V.; CORDEIRO, J.; AZEVEDO, G. M.; TADEI, W. P.; RAFAEL, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical and genetic maps have been used for chromosomal localization of genes in vectors of infectious diseases. The availability of polytene chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes provides a unique opportunity to precisely map genes of interest. We report physical mapping of two actin genes on polytene chromosomes of the major malaria vector in Amazon Anopheles darlingi. The clones with the actin genes sequences were obtained from a cDNA library constructed from RNA isolated from adult females and males of An. darlingi. Each of the two clones was mapped to a unique site on the chromosomal arm 2L in subdivisions 21A (clone pl05-A04) and 23B (clone pl17-G06). The obtained results together with previous mapping data provide a suitable basis for comparative genomics and for establishing chromosomal homologies among major malaria vectors. PMID:22804344

  9. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS) cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement. PMID:22260333

  10. Adaptive Evolution of Genes Duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Richard P.; Hilldorfer, Benedict B.; Koch, Jessica L.; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to “escape” X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined—one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are

  11. The Amylase gene cluster on the evolving sex chromosomes of Drosophila miranda.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, S; Steinemann, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of chromosomal homology, the Amylase gene cluster in Drosophila miranda must be located on the secondary sex chromosome pair, neo-X (X2) and neo-Y, but is autosomally inherited in all other Drosophila species. Genetic evidence indicates no active amylase on the neo-Y chromosome and the X2-chromosomal locus already shows dosage compensation. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the Amy gene cluster has been lost already from the evolving neo-Y chromosome. This finding shows that a relatively new neo-Y chromosome can start to lose genes and hence gradually lose homology with the neo-X. The X2-chromosomal Amy1 is intact and Amy2 contains a complete coding sequence, but has a deletion in the 3'-flanking region. Amy3 is structurally eroded and hampered by missing regulatory motifs. Functional analysis of the X2-chromosomal Amy1 and Amy2 regions from D. miranda in transgenic D. melanogaster flies reveals ectopic AMY1 expression. AMY1 shows the same electrophoretic mobility as the single amylase band in D. miranda, while ectopic AMY2 expression is characterized by a different mobility. Therefore, only the Amy1 gene of the resident Amy cluster remains functional and hence Amy1 is the dosage compensated gene. PMID:9872956

  12. Genes determining pathogenicity to pea are clustered on a supernumerary chromosome in the fungal plant pathogen Nectria haematococca.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Liu, X; Benny, U; Kistler, H C; VanEtten, H D

    2001-02-01

    Three genes that contribute to the ability of the fungus Nectria haematococca to cause disease on pea plants have been identified. These pea pathogenicity (PEP) genes are within 25 kb of each other and are located on a supernumerary chromosome. Altogether, the PEP gene cluster contains six transcriptional units that are expressed during infection of pea tissue. The biochemical function of only one of the genes is known with certainty. This gene, PDA1, encodes a specific cytochrome P450 that confers resistance to pisatin, an antibiotic produced by pea plants. The three new PEP genes, in addition to PDA1, can independently increase the ability of the fungus to cause lesions on pea when added to an isolate lacking the supernumerary chromosome. Based on predicted amino acid sequences, functions for two of these three genes are hypothesized. The deduced amino acid sequence of another transcribed portion of the PEP cluster, as well as four other open reading frames in the cluster, have a high degree of similarity to known fungal transposases. Several of the features of the PEP cluster -- a cluster of pathogenicity genes, the presence of transposable elements, and differences in codon usage and GC content from other portions of the genome -- are shared by pathogenicity islands in pathogenic bacteria of plants and animals. PMID:11208022

  13. Construction and availability of human chromosome-specific gene libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fuscoe, J.C.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.

    1985-06-14

    This report briefly describes Phase I of the project, the production of complete digest fibraries. Each laboratory is currently in the process of sorting individual human chromosomes from normal human fibroblasts or human X hamster hybrids. The goal of 4 x 10/sup 6/ chromosomes for cloning purposes has been achieved. Each laboratory is also in the process of cloning the chromosomal DNA, after complete digestion with a 6-cutter, into the bacteriophage vector Charon 21A. 3 refs.

  14. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, and chromosomal localization of the human pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Dusetti, N.J.; Frigerio, J.M.; Dagorn, J.C.; Iovanna, J.L. ); Fox, M.F.; Swallow, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) is a secretory pancreatic protein present in small amounts in normal pancreas and overexpressed during the acute phase of pancreatitis. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PAP gene. The gene spans 2748 bp and contains six exons interrupted by five introns. The gene has a typical promoter containing the sequences TATAAA and CCAAT 28 and 52 bp upstream of the cap site, respectively. They found striking similarities in genomic organization as well as in the promoter sequences between the human and rat PAP genes. The human PAP gene was mapped to chromosome 2p12 using rodent-human hybrid cells and in situ chromosomal hybridization. This localization coincides with that of the reg/lithostathine gene, which encodes a pancreatic secretory protein structurally related to PAP, suggesting that both genes derived from the same ancestral gene by duplication. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Variable switching rates of malaria virulence genes are associated with chromosomal position and gene subclass

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Matthias; Dzikowski, Ron; Amulic, Borko; Deitsch, Kirk

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria is mediated by transcriptional switches between different members of the multicopy var gene family. Each var gene encodes a member of a group of heterogeneous surface proteins collectively referred to as PfEMP1. Mutually exclusive expression ensures that an individual parasite only transcribes a single var gene at a time. In this work we studied var gene switching to determine if transcriptional switches favor expression of particular subgroups of var genes and if var gene activation within a clonal population of parasites follows a predetermined order. We show that in clonal parasite populations, expression of var genes located in the central regions of chromosomes is remarkably stable and that they rarely undergo transcriptional switches in the absence of selection. In contrast, parasites expressing subtelomerically located var genes readily switched to alternative var loci. We confirmed these observations by generating transgenic parasites carrying drug selectable markers in subtelomeric and central var loci and monitoring switching after release from selection. Our data show that different var genes have different intrinsic switching rates that correlate with var gene subtype, and that there is no pre-determined order of expression. PMID:17555435

  16. Isolation and chromosomal mapping of a mouse homolog of the Batten disease gene CLN3

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Johnson, K.R.; Lerner, T.J. |

    1996-08-01

    We describe the isolation and chromosomal mapping of a mouse homology of the Batten disease gene, CLN3. Like its human counterpart, the mouse cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1314 bp encoding a predicted protein product of 438 amino acids. The mouse and human coding regions are 82 and 85% identical at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels, and respectively. The mouse gene maps to distal Chromosome 7, in a region containing genes whose homologs are on human chromosome 16p12, where CLN3 maps. Isolation of a mouse CLN3 homolog will facilitate the creation of a mouse model of Batten disease. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  17. The dispensable chromosome of Leptosphaeria maculans shelters an effector gene conferring avirulence towards Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Fudal, Isabelle; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Bally, Pascal; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Eber, Frédérique; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Leflon, Martine; Rouxel, Thierry

    2013-05-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi frequently contain dispensable chromosomes, some of which contribute to host range or pathogenicity. In Leptosphaeria maculans, the stem canker agent of oilseed rape (Brassica napus), the minichromosome was previously suggested to be dispensable, without evidence for any role in pathogenicity. Using genetic and genomic approaches, we investigated the inheritance and molecular determinant of an L. maculans-Brassica rapa incompatible interaction. Single gene control of the resistance was found, while all markers located on the L. maculans minichromosome, absent in the virulent parental isolate, co-segregated with the avirulent phenotype. Only one candidate avirulence gene was identified on the minichromosome, validated by complementation experiments and termed AvrLm11. The minichromosome was frequently lost following meiosis, but the frequency of isolates lacking it remained stable in field populations sampled at a 10-yr time interval, despite a yearly sexual stage in the L. maculans life cycle. This work led to the cloning of a new 'lost in the middle of nowhere' avirulence gene of L. maculans, interacting with a B. rapa resistance gene termed Rlm11 and introgressed into B. napus. It demonstrated the dispensability of the L. maculans minichromosome and suggested that its loss generates a fitness deficit. PMID:23406519

  18. The human tissue transglutaminase gene maps on chromosome 20q12 by in situ fluorescence hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, V.; Davies, P.J.A. ); Baldini, A. )

    1994-03-15

    A cDNA encoding for the human tissue transglutaminase gene has been used to identify the chromosomal localization of the corresponding structural gene. The precise chromosomal and subregional localizations have been established by using in situ fluorescence mapping with a recombinant [lambda]-Zap phage containing the full cDNA coding sequence. The study showed that the human tissue transglutaminase gene is localized on chromosome 20 and, more precisely, within the band 20q12. To date, this is the third member of the transglutaminase gene family to be mapped. Human factor XIIIa (plasma transglutaminase), human keratinocyte transglutaminase (type I), and human tissue transglutaminase (type II) genes, although codifying for homologous enzymes, are localized on three different chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Recent gene-capture on the UV sex chromosomes of the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Stuart F.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Payton, Adam C.; Quatrano, Ralph S.; Cove, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosomes evolve from ordinary autosomes through the expansion and subsequent degeneration of a region of suppressed recombination that is inherited through one sex. Here we investigate the relative timing of these processes in the UV sex chromosomes of the moss Ceratodon purpureus using molecular population genetic analyses of eight newly discovered sex-linked loci. In this system recombination is suppressed on both the female-transmitted (U) sex chromosome and the male-transmitted (V) chromosome. Genes on both chromosomes therefore should show the deleterious effects of suppressed recombination and sex-limited transmission, while purifying selection should maintain homologs of genes essential for both sexes on both sex chromosomes. Based on analyses of eight sex-linked loci, we show that the non-recombining portions of the U and V-chromosomes expanded in at least two events (~0.6 – 1.3 MYA and ~2.8 – 3.5 MYA), after the divergence of C. purpureus from its dioecious sister species, Trichodon cylindricus and Cheilothela chloropus. Both U and V-linked copies showed reduced nucleotide diversity and limited population structure, compared to autosomal loci, suggesting that the sex chromosomes experienced more recent selective sweeps that the autosomes. Collectively these results highlight the dynamic nature of gene composition and molecular evolution on non-recombining portions of the U and V sex chromosomes. PMID:24094335

  20. Mapping of aldose reductase gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, and 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.B.; Kojis, T. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S.; Klisak, I.; Diep, A. ); Carper, D. ); Nishimura, Chihiro ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.21) (AR) catalyzes the reduction of several aldehydes, including that of glucose, to the corresponding sugar alcohol. Using a complementary DNA clone encoding human AR, the authors mapped the gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 18 by somatic cell hybridization. By in situ hybridization analysis, sequences were localized to human chromosomes 1q32-q43, 3p12, 7q31-q35, 9q22, 11p14-p15, and 13q14-q21. As a putative functional AR gene has been mapped to chromosome 7 and a putative pseudogene to chromosome 3, the sequences on the other seven chromosomes may represent other active genes, non-aldose reductase homologous sequences, or pseudogenes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Genomic structure and chromosomal mapping of the human CD22 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.L.; Kozlow, E.; Kehrl, J.H. ); Najfeld, V. ); Menniger, J.; Ward, D. )

    1993-06-01

    The human CD22 gene is expressed specifically in B lymphocytes and likely has an important function in cell-cell interactions. A nearly full length human CD22 cDNA clone was used to isolate genomic clones that span the CD22 gene. The CD22 gene is spread over 22 kb of DNA and is composed of 15 exons. The first exon contains the major transcriptional start sites. The translation initiation codon is located in exon 3, which also encodes a portion of the signal peptide. Exons 4 to 10 encode the seven Ig domains of CD22, exon 11 encodes the transmembrane domain, exons 12 to 15 encode the intracytoplasmic domain of CD22, and exon 15 also contains the 3' untranslated region. A minor form of CD22 mRNA likely results from splicing of exon 5 to exon 8, skipping exons 6 and 7. A 4.6-kb Xbal fragment of the CD22 gene was used to map the chromosomal location of CD22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The hybridization locus was identified by combining fluorescent images of the probe with the chromosomal banding pattern generated by an Alu probe. The results demonstrate the CD22 is located within the band region q13.1 of chromosome 19. Two closely clustered major transcription start sites and several minor start sites were mapped by primer extension. Similarly to many other lymphoid-specific genes, the CD22 promoter lacks an obvious TATA box. Approximately 4 kb of DNA 5' of the transcription start sites were sequenced and found to contain multiple Alu elements. Potential binding sites for the transcriptional factors NF-kB, AP-1, and Oct-2 are located within 300 bp 5' of the major transcription start sites. A 400-bp fragment (bp -339 through +71) of the CD22 promoter region was subcloned into a pGEM-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase vector and after transfection into B and T cells was found to be active in both B and T cells. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Suppression of tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells by transfer of human chromosome 17 does not require transferred BRCA1 and p53 genes.

    PubMed

    Theile, M; Hartmann, S; Scherthan, H; Arnold, W; Deppert, W; Frege, R; Glaab, F; Haensch, W; Scherneck, S

    1995-02-01

    A number of candidate tumor suppressor genes located on the human chromosome 17 are thought to have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. In addition to the p53 gene on 17p13.1 and the BRCA1 gene mapped to 17q12-21, other chromosomal regions for tumor suppressor genes have been suggested to exist on 17p13.3 and both the central and the distal parts of 17q, although definitive functional proof of their involvement in breast cancer tumorigenesis is still lacking. In this report we show that microcell transfer of a human chromosome 17 into wild-type p53 breast cancer cells CAL51 results in loss of tumorigenicity and anchorage-independent growth, changes in cell morphology and a reduction of cell growth rates of the neo-selected microcell hybrids. In the hybrid cells, which express the p53 wild-type protein, only the p- and the distal parts of the q arm of donor chromosome 17 are transferred. Thus, our results provide functional evidence for the presence of one or more tumor suppressor gene(s) on chromosome 17, which are distinct from the p53 and the BRCA1 genes. PMID:7845668

  3. Chromosomal location of three spectrin genes: relationship to the inherited hemolytic anemias of mouse and man.

    PubMed Central

    Birkenmeier, C S; McFarland-Starr, E C; Barker, J E

    1988-01-01

    Three genetic loci in the mouse affect the synthesis and assembly of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. The spherocytosis and jaundiced loci affect the membrane skeletal protein known as spectrin. The normoblastosis locus affects the spectrin binding protein called ankyrin. We have obtained genetic data that define the linkage relationships among three spectrin genes and the spherocytosis and jaundiced loci. The erythroid alpha-spectrin gene is tightly linked to the spherocytosis locus on chromosome 1 and the jaundiced locus is on chromosome 12, tightly linked to the erythroid beta-spectrin gene. The brain alpha-spectrin (alpha-fodrin) gene is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 2 and is not closely linked to any previously mapped erythroid or neurological mutation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that defects in the alpha- and beta-spectrin genes cause the spherocytosis and jaundiced hemolytic anemias in mice. All five loci studied are located within chromosomal segments that are conserved between mouse and man. Analysis of the data from the chromosome 12 study defines a new order for the genes on that chromosome and delineates the largest mouse/human conserved chromosomal segment yet known. Images PMID:3186715

  4. Many maize genes are expressed in an oat background carrying a specific maize chromosome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat-maize addition (OMA) lines are derived from oat x maize sexual hybrids in which individual maize chromosomes have been retained in plants containing a full complement of oat chromosomes. Many of the OMA lines display specific phenotypes, which indicate that maize genes are likely expressed and c...

  5. Control of cell identity genes occurs in insulated neighborhoods in mammalian chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Dowen, Jill M; Fan, Zi Peng; Hnisz, Denes; Ren, Gang; Abraham, Brian J; Zhang, Lyndon N; Weintraub, Abraham S; Schuijers, Jurian; Lee, Tong Ihn; Zhao, Keji; Young, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    The pluripotent state of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is produced by active transcription of genes that control cell identity and repression of genes encoding lineage-specifying developmental regulators. Here, we use ESC cohesin ChIA-PET data to identify the local chromosomal structures at both active and repressed genes across the genome. The results produce a map of enhancer-promoter interactions and reveal that super-enhancer-driven genes generally occur within chromosome structures that are formed by the looping of two interacting CTCF sites co-occupied by cohesin. These looped structures form insulated neighborhoods whose integrity is important for proper expression of local genes. We also find that repressed genes encoding lineage-specifying developmental regulators occur within insulated neighborhoods. These results provide insights into the relationship between transcriptional control of cell identity genes and control of local chromosome structure. PMID:25303531

  6. The subtelomeric region of the Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome IIIR contains potential genes and duplicated fragments from other chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Ting; Ho, Chia-Hsing; Hseu, Ming-Jhy; Chen, Chung-Mong

    2010-09-01

    The subtelomere and a portion of the associated telomeric region (together named 3RTAS) of chromosome IIIR from the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Wassilewskija (Ws) were specifically amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently cloned and sequenced. The centromere-proximal portion of 3RTAS from both ecotypes contained two newly identified potential genes, one encoding the chloroplast luminal 19-kDa protein precursor and the other encoding three potential alternatively spliced CCCH-type zinc finger proteins. The telomere-proximal portion of 3RTAS from the Col ecotype contained short duplicated fragments derived from chromosomes I, II, and III, and that from the Ws ecotype contained a duplicated fragment derived from chromosome V. Each duplicated fragment has diverged somewhat in sequence from that of the ectopic template. Small patches of homologous nucleotides were found within the flanking sequences of both the duplicated fragments and the corresponding ectopic template sequences. The structural characteristics of these duplicated fragments suggest that they are filler DNAs captured by non-homologous end joining during double-strand break repair. Our characterization of 3RTAS not only filled up a gap in the chromosome IIIR sequence of A. thaliana but also identified new genes with unknown functions. PMID:20652368

  7. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  8. Human Artificial Chromosomes for Gene Delivery and the Development of Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Random integration of conventional gene delivery vectors such as viruses, plasmids, P1 phage-derived artificial chromosomes, bacterial artificial chromosomes and yeast artificial chromosomes can be associated with transgene silencing. Furthermore, integrated viral sequences can activate oncogenes adjacent to the insertion site resulting in cancer. Various human artificial chromosomes (HACs) exhibit several potential characteristics desired for an ideal gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance and the capacity to carry large genomic loci with their regulatory elements, thus allowing the physiological regulation of the introduced gene in a manner similar to that of native chromosomes. HACs have been generated mainly using either a “top-down approach” (engineered chromosomes), or a “bottom-up approach” (de novo artificial chromosomes). The recent emergence of stem cell–based tissue engineering has opened up new avenues for gene and cell therapies. This review describes the lessons learned and prospects identified mainly from studies in the construction of HACs and HAC-mediated gene expression systems in cultured cells, as well as in animals. PMID:21750534

  9. Identification of microsatellite markers linked to the human leptin receptor gene on chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, J.D.; Friedman, J.M.; Stoffel, M.

    1996-08-15

    This report describes the localization of the human leptin receptor gene to human chromosome 1 using polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrids. Leptin is a secreted protein important in the regulation of body weight. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Chromosomal localization and structure of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.; Huberman, E. |; Collart, F.; Varkony, T.; Drabkin, H.

    1994-05-01

    We determined the chromosomal localization and structure of the gene encoding human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205), an enzyme associated with cellular proliferation, malignant transformation, and differentiation. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for type II IMPDH, we screened a panel of human-Chinese hamster cell somatic hybrids and a separate deletion panel of chromosome 3 hybrids and localized the gene to 3p21.1{yields}p24.2. Two overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones containing the full gene for type II IMPDH were isolated and a physical map of 117 kb of human genomic DNA in this region of chromosome 3 was constructed. The gene for type II IMPDH was localized and oriented on this map and found to span no more than 12.5 kb.

  11. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  12. The prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) gene is localized to human chromosome 3q21-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.S.L.; Sharief, F.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) has been used as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. It is synthesized under androgen regulation and secreted by the epithelial cells of the prostate gland. The authors have confirmed the previous assignment of the ACPP gene to chromosome 3 by probing a panel of 25 human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, and they have further localized the ACPP gene to chromosome 3q21-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  13. The Ah receptor nuclear translocator gene (ARNT) is located on q21 of human chromosome 1 and on mouse chromosome 3 near Cf-3

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.; Brooks, B.A.; Heinzmann, C. ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors have mapped the Ah (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) gene to a conserved linkage group located on mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1. EcoRi-digested DNA from a panel of 17 human x mouse somatic cell hybrids was probed with a cDNA fragment of the human ARNT gene. Six of the 17 independent mouse x human hybrids were positive for human bands. Human chromosome 1 showed complete cosegregation with the gene, whereas discordant segregation was observed for all other human chromosomes. The human gene was localized to 1q21 by using DNA from mouse x human hybrid clones that retain translocations involving human chromosome 1, by segregation analysis in nine informative CEPH families, and by in situ hybridization. The mouse homologue was mapped to mouse chromosome 3 using a panel of 16 hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids. Six of 16 mouse x hamster hybrids were positive for mouse bands, showing complete concordance with mouse chromosome 3. The mouse Arnt gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 3, using linkage analysis in an interspecific backcross. The results indicate that the mouse gene resides about 40 cM from the centromere and about 10 cM proximal to Cf-3, the gene for tissue factor. 41 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Comparative gene identification 58/α/β hydrolase domain 5 lacks lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Derek; Dinh, Anna; Kurz, Daniel; Shah, Dharika; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.; Brasaemle, Dawn L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58)/α/β hydrolase domain 5 (ABHD5) cause Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, characterized by excessive triacylglycerol storage in cells and tissues. CGI-58 has been identified as a coactivator of adipose TG lipase (ATGL) and a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT). We developed a molecular model of CGI-58 structure and then mutated predicted active site residues and performed LPAAT activity assays of recombinant WT and mutated CGI-58. When mutations of predicted catalytic residues failed to reduce LPAAT activity, we determined that LPAAT activity was due to a bacterial contaminant of affinity purification procedures, plsC, the sole LPAAT in Escherichia coli. Purification protocols were optimized to reduce plsC contamination, in turn reducing LPAAT activity. When CGI-58 was expressed in SM2-1(DE3) cells that lack plsC, lysates lacked LPAAT activity. Additionally, mouse CGI-58 expressed in bacteria as a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein and human CGI-58 expressed in yeast lacked LPAAT activity. Previously reported lipid binding activity of CGI-58 was revisited using protein-lipid overlays. Recombinant CGI-58 failed to bind lysophosphatidic acid, but interestingly, bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] and phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate [PI(5)P]. Prebinding CGI-58 with PI(3)P or PI(5)P did not alter its coactivation of ATGL in vitro. In summary, purified recombinant CGI-58 that is functional as an ATGL coactivator lacks LPAAT activity. PMID:24879803

  15. Assignment of the {beta}B1 crystallin gene (CRYBB1) to human chromosome 22 and mouse chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsebos, T.J.M.; Westerveld, A.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A.; Copeland, N.G.

    1995-10-10

    By using primers complementary to the rat {beta}B1 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the orthologous human gene (CRYBB1). The amplified human segments displayed greater than 88% sequence homology to the corresponding rat and bovine sequences. CRYBB1 was assigned to the group 5 region in 22q11.2-q12.1 by hybridizing the exon 6 PCR product to somatic cell hybrids containing defined portions of human chromosome 22. The exon 5 and exon 6 PCR products of CRYBB1 were used to localize, by interspecific backcross mapping, the mouse gene (Crybb1) to the central portion of chromosome 5. Three other {beta} crystallin genes ({beta}B2(-l), {beta}B3, and {beta}A4) have previously been mapped to the same regions in human and mouse. We demonstrate that the {beta}B1 and {beta}A4 crystallin genes are very closely linked in the two species. These assignments complete the mapping and identification of the human and mouse homologues of the major {beta} crystallins genes that are expressed in the bovine lens. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Chromosome mapping of ribosomal genes and histone H4 in the genus Radacridium (Romaleidae)

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Allison; Loreto, Vilma; de Souza, Maria José

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two species of Romaleidae grasshoppers, Radacridium mariajoseae and R.nordestinum, were analyzed after CMA3/DA/DAPI sequential staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the location of the 18S and 5S rDNA and histone H4 genes. Both species presented karyotypes composed of 2n = 23, X0 with exclusively acrocentric chromosomes. CMA3+ blocks were detected after CMA3/DA/DAPI staining in only one medium size autosome bivalent and in the X chromosome in R. mariajoseae. On the other hand, all chromosomes, except the L1 bivalent, of R. nordestinum presented CMA3+ blocks. FISH analysis showed that the 18S genes are restricted to the X chromosome in R. mariajoseae, whereas these genes were located in the L2, S9 and S10 autosomes in R. nordestinum. In R. mariajoseae, the 5S rDNA sites were localized in the in L1 and L2 bivalents and in the X chromosome. In R. nordestinum, the 5S genes were located in the L2, L3, M4 and M5 pairs. In both species the histone H4 genes were present in a medium size bivalent. Together, these data evidence a great variability of chromosome markers and show that the 18S and 5S ribosomal genes are dispersed in the Radacridium genome without a significant correlation. PMID:24130439

  17. Chromosome localizations of genes for five cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Francke, U. ); Bolger, G.; Michaeli, T. )

    1994-03-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important second messengers that mediate a number of cellular responses to external signals. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases play a role in signal transduction by regulating the cellular concentrations of these messengers. Here, the authors have applied Southern analyses of somatic cell hybrid lines and of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains as well as fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomally localize five cAMP-specific nucleotide phosphodiesterase genes in human and mouse. Genes DPDE1, DPDE2, DPDE3, and DPDE4 that share sequence homology with the Drosophila dunce gene were assigned to human chromosomes 19 (DPDE1 and DPDE2), ga12 (DPDE3), and 1p31 (DPDE4) and to mouse chromosomes 8, 9, 13, and 4, respectively. The high-affinity cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase gene (HCP1) was mapped to human chromosome 8q13-q22. Since these genes are potential candidates for involvement in psychiatric or behavioral disorders, knowledge of their chromosomal localizations will facilitate the discovery of their association with disease genes as they are being mapped by linkage studies.

  18. The physical gene Hsp70 map on polytene chromosomes of Anopheles darlingi from the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Míriam Silva; Tadei, Wanderli Pedro; Hunter, Fiona F

    2004-05-01

    In situ hybridization was used to determine the physical location of the Hsp70 genes in salivary polytene chromosomes of Anopheles darlingi from Manaus and Macapá, Brazil, and to assess the usefulness of the Hsp70 locus as a genetic marker in A. darlingi populations. In both populations, the double markings corresponding to the Hsp70-12A and Hsp70-14A genes were located on the right arm of chromosome 2. The Hsp70 locus was considered to be an excellent marker for studying chromosomal evolution and relationships among A. darlingi populations. PMID:15098741

  19. The IPP gene is assigned to human chromosome 1p32-1p22

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Yeh, A.; Huang, R.C.C. ); Jabs, E.W.; Li, Xiang ); Dracopoli, N.C. )

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation and characterization of a novel mouse gene that is promoted by an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) LTR and is expressed in placental tissue (mouse IAP-promoted placenta gene, Ipp). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) studies using inbred strains and recombinant inbred (RI) mice, we have established the linkage between the Ipp gene and several loci on distal mouse chromosome 4. In this publication, we report the partial sequence of a human cDNA clone isolated from a human placental library that has 83% identity to the 3[prime]region of the Ipp cDNA. For human chromosome mapping, two 20-base oligonucleotides within the homologous region were used as primers for polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to chromosome-specific DNAs from two somatic cell hybrid panels and several hybrid cell lines carrying breakpoints on human chromosome 1p. We have assigned this human homolog of the Ipp (IPP) gene to chromosome 1 at 1p32-1p22, based on analysis of PCR products. With this assignment, the homology between mouse chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1 is maintained (5). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  20. The gene for human TATA-binding-protein-associated factor (TAFII) 170: structure, promoter and chromosomal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Knaap, J A; Van Den Boom, V; Kuipers, J; Van Eijk, M J; Van Der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    2000-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) plays a central role in eukaryotic transcription and forms protein complexes with TBP-associated factors (TAFs). The genes encoding TAF(II) proteins frequently map to chromosomal regions altered in human neoplasias. TAF(II)170 of B-TFIID is a member of the SF2 superfamily of putative helicases. Members of this superfamily have also been implicated in several human genetic disorders. In this study we have isolated human genomic clones encoding TAF(II)170 and we show that the gene contains 37 introns. Ribonuclease-protection experiments revealed that TAF(II)170 has multiple transcription start sites, consistent with the observation that the promoter lacks a canonical TATA box and initiator element. Deletion analysis of the promoter region showed that a fragment of 264 bp is sufficient to direct transcription. In addition, we determined the chromosomal localization by two independent methods which mapped the gene to human chromosome 10q22-q23 between the markers D10S185 and WI-1183. The region surrounding these markers has been implicated in several human disorders. PMID:10642510

  1. An apparent excess of sex- and reproduction-related genes on the human X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Saifi, G M; Chandra, H S

    1999-01-01

    We describe here the results of a search of Mendelian inheritance in man, GENDIAG and other sources which suggest that, in comparison with autosomes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 11, the X chromosome may contain a significantly higher number of sex- and reproduction-related (SRR) genes. A similar comparison between X-linked entries and a subset of randomly chosen entries from the remaining autosomes also indicates an excess of genes on the X chromosome with one or more mutations affecting sex determination (e.g. DAX1), sexual differentiation (e.g. androgen receptor) or reproduction (e.g. POF1). A possible reason for disproportionate occurrence of such genes on the X chromosome could be that, during evolution, the 'choice' of a particular pair of homomorphic chromosomes for specialization as sex chromosomes may be related to the number of such genes initially present in it or, since sex determination and sexual dimorphism are often gene dose-dependent processes, the number of such genes necessary to be regulated in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of these data shows that XAR, the region which has been added on to the short arm of the X chromosome subsequent to eutherian-marsupial divergence, has nearly as high a proportion of SRR genes as XCR, the conserved region of the X chromosome. These observations are consistent with current hypotheses on the evolution of sexually antagonistic traits on sex chromosomes and suggest that both XCR and XAR may have accumulated SRR traits relatively rapidly because of X linkage. PMID:10097393

  2. Assignment of Ptprn2, the gene encoding receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2beta, a major autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, to mouse chromosome region 12F.

    PubMed

    van den Maagdenberg, A M; Schepens, J T; Schepens, M T; Pepers, B; Wieringa, B; van Kessel, A G; Hendriks, W J

    1998-01-01

    The receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2beta gene (mouse gene symbol Ptprn2) encodes a major autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We physically mapped Ptprn2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization to band F of mouse chromosome 12, a region that lacks diabetes susceptibility loci. The mapping confirms the proposed synteny of mouse 12F with band q36 of human chromosome 7. PMID:9858807

  3. Investigation of the Relationship of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to the EKN1 Gene on Chromosome 15q21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigg, Karen G.; Couto, Jillian M.; Feng, Yu; Crosbie, Jennifer; Anderson, Barbara; Cate-Carter, Tasha; Tannock, Rosemary; Lovett, Maureen W.; Humphries, Tom; Kennedy, James L.; Ickowicz, Abel; Pathare, Tejaswee; Roberts, Wendy; Malone, Molly; Schachar, Russell; Barr, Cathy L.

    2005-01-01

    Recently a gene, termed EKN1, has been identified because of a chromosomal breakpoint that occurred in this gene. This chromosomal breakpoint was found in 4 family members that had specific reading disabilities (RDs), indicating that disruption of this gene may be contributing to the risk of developing RDs. This gene was further supported as…

  4. In Situ Gene Mapping of Two Genes Supports Independent Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Cold-Adapted Antarctic Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ghigliotti, Laura; Cheng, C.-H. Christina; Bonillo, Céline; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Pisano, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Two genes, that is, 5S ribosomal sequences and antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) genes, were mapped onto chromosomes of eight Antarctic notothenioid fish possessing a X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system, namely, Chionodraco hamatus and Pagetopsis macropterus (family Channichthyidae), Trematomus hansoni, T. newnesi, T. nicolai, T. lepidorhinus, and Pagothenia borchgrevinki (family Nototheniidae), and Artedidraco skottsbergi (family Artedidraconidae). Through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we uncovered distinct differences in the gene content of the Y chromosomes in the eight species, with C. hamatus and P. macropterus standing out among others in bearing 5S rDNA and AFGP sequences on their Y chromosomes, respectively. Both genes were absent from the Y chromosomes of any analyzed species. The distinct patterns of Y and non-Y chromosome association of the 5S rDNA and AFGP genes in species representing different Antarctic fish families support an independent origin of the sex heterochromosomes in notothenioids with interesting implications for the evolutionary/adaptational history of these fishes living in a cold-stable environment. PMID:23509694

  5. Sex-biased gene expression and evolution of the x chromosome in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Albritton, Sarah Elizabeth; Kranz, Anna-Lena; Rao, Prashant; Kramer, Maxwell; Dieterich, Christoph; Ercan, Sevinç

    2014-07-01

    Studies of X chromosome evolution in various organisms have indicated that sex-biased genes are nonrandomly distributed between the X and autosomes. Here, to extend these studies to nematodes, we annotated and analyzed X chromosome gene content in four Caenorhabditis species and in Pristionchus pacificus. Our gene expression analyses comparing young adult male and female mRNA-seq data indicate that, in general, nematode X chromosomes are enriched for genes with high female-biased expression and depleted of genes with high male-biased expression. Genes with low sex-biased expression do not show the same trend of X chromosome enrichment and depletion. Combined with the observation that highly sex-biased genes are primarily expressed in the gonad, differential distribution of sex-biased genes reflects differences in evolutionary pressures linked to tissue-specific regulation of X chromosome transcription. Our data also indicate that X dosage imbalance between males (XO) and females (XX) is influential in shaping both expression and gene content of the X chromosome. Predicted upregulation of the single male X to match autosomal transcription (Ohno's hypothesis) is supported by our observation that overall transcript levels from the X and autosomes are similar for highly expressed genes. However, comparison of differentially located one-to-one orthologs between C. elegans and P. pacificus indicates lower expression of X-linked orthologs, arguing against X upregulation. These contradicting observations may be reconciled if X upregulation is not a global mechanism but instead acts locally on a subset of tissues and X-linked genes that are dosage sensitive. PMID:24793291

  6. Sex-Biased Gene Expression and Evolution of the X Chromosome in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, Sarah Elizabeth; Kranz, Anna-Lena; Rao, Prashant; Kramer, Maxwell; Dieterich, Christoph; Ercan, Sevinç

    2014-01-01

    Studies of X chromosome evolution in various organisms have indicated that sex-biased genes are nonrandomly distributed between the X and autosomes. Here, to extend these studies to nematodes, we annotated and analyzed X chromosome gene content in four Caenorhabditis species and in Pristionchus pacificus. Our gene expression analyses comparing young adult male and female mRNA-seq data indicate that, in general, nematode X chromosomes are enriched for genes with high female-biased expression and depleted of genes with high male-biased expression. Genes with low sex-biased expression do not show the same trend of X chromosome enrichment and depletion. Combined with the observation that highly sex-biased genes are primarily expressed in the gonad, differential distribution of sex-biased genes reflects differences in evolutionary pressures linked to tissue-specific regulation of X chromosome transcription. Our data also indicate that X dosage imbalance between males (XO) and females (XX) is influential in shaping both expression and gene content of the X chromosome. Predicted upregulation of the single male X to match autosomal transcription (Ohno’s hypothesis) is supported by our observation that overall transcript levels from the X and autosomes are similar for highly expressed genes. However, comparison of differentially located one-to-one orthologs between C. elegans and P. pacificus indicates lower expression of X-linked orthologs, arguing against X upregulation. These contradicting observations may be reconciled if X upregulation is not a global mechanism but instead acts locally on a subset of tissues and X-linked genes that are dosage sensitive. PMID:24793291

  7. Chromosomal Organization and Sequence Diversity of Genes Encoding Lachrymatory Factor Synthase in Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Masamura, Noriya; McCallum, John; Khrustaleva, Ludmila; Kenel, Fernand; Pither-Joyce, Meegham; Shono, Jinji; Suzuki, Go; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) catalyzes the formation of lachrymatory factor, one of the most distinctive traits of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.). Therefore, we used LFS as a model for a functional gene in a huge genome, and we examined the chromosomal organization of LFS in A. cepa by multiple approaches. The first-level analysis completed the chromosomal assignment of LFS gene to chromosome 5 of A. cepa via the use of a complete set of A. fistulosum-shallot (A. cepa L. Aggregatum group) monosomic addition lines. Subsequent use of an F(2) mapping population from the interspecific cross A. cepa × A. roylei confirmed the assignment of an LFS locus to this chromosome. Sequence comparison of two BAC clones bearing LFS genes, LFS amplicons from diverse germplasm, and expressed sequences from a doubled haploid line revealed variation consistent with duplicated LFS genes. Furthermore, the BAC-FISH study using the two BAC clones as a probe showed that LFS genes are localized in the proximal region of the long arm of the chromosome. These results suggested that LFS in A. cepa is transcribed from at least two loci and that they are localized on chromosome 5. PMID:22690373

  8. Classification of Human Chromosome 21 Gene-Expression Variations in Down Syndrome: Impact on Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Aït Yahya-Graison, E. ; Aubert, J. ; Dauphinot, L. ; Rivals, I. ; Prieur, M. ; Golfier, G. ; Rossier, J. ; Personnaz, L. ; Créau, N. ; Bléhaut, H. ; Robin, S. ; Delabar, J. M. ; Potier, M.-C. 

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome caused by chromosome 21 trisomy is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in humans. Disruption of the phenotype is thought to be the result of gene-dosage imbalance. Variations in chromosome 21 gene expression in Down syndrome were analyzed in lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients and control individuals. Of the 359 genes and predictions displayed on a specifically designed high-content chromosome 21 microarray, one-third were expressed in lymphoblastoid cells. We performed a mixed-model analysis of variance to find genes that are differentially expressed in Down syndrome independent of sex and interindividual variations. In addition, we identified genes with variations between Down syndrome and control samples that were significantly different from the gene-dosage effect (1.5). Microarray data were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that 29% of the expressed chromosome 21 transcripts are overexpressed in Down syndrome and correspond to either genes or open reading frames. Among these, 22% are increased proportional to the gene-dosage effect, and 7% are amplified. The other 71% of expressed sequences are either compensated (56%, with a large proportion of predicted genes and antisense transcripts) or highly variable among individuals (15%). Thus, most of the chromosome 21 transcripts are compensated for the gene-dosage effect. Overexpressed genes are likely to be involved in the Down syndrome phenotype, in contrast to the compensated genes. Highly variable genes could account for phenotypic variations observed in patients. Finally, we show that alternative transcripts belonging to the same gene are similarly regulated in Down syndrome but sense and antisense transcripts are not. PMID:17701894

  9. Annotation of human chromosome 21 for relevance to Down syndrome: gene structure and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Slavov, Dobromir; Bechtel, Lawrence; Davisson, Muriel

    2002-06-01

    Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of human chromosome 21 and the resultant dosage-related overexpression of genes contained within it. To efficiently direct experiments to determine specific gene-phenotype correlations, it is necessary to identify all genes within 21q and assess their functional associations and expression patterns. Analysis of the complete finished sequence of 21q resulted in annotated 225 genes and gene models, most of which were incomplete and/or had little or no experimental verification. Here we correct or complete the genomic structures of 16 genes, 4 of which were not reported in the annotation of the complete sequence. Our data include the identification of six genes encoding short or ambiguous open reading frames; the identification of three cases in which alternative splicing produces two structurally unrelated protein sequences; and the identification of six genes encoding proteins with functional motifs, two genes with unusually low similarity to their orthologous mouse proteins, and four genes with significant conservation in Drosophila melanogaster. We further demonstrate that an additional nine gene models represent bona fide transcripts and develop expression patterns for these genes plus nine additional novel chromosome 21 genes and four paralogous genes mapping elsewhere in the human genome. These data have implications for generating complete transcript maps of chromosome 21 and for the entire human genome, and for defining expression abnormalities in Down syndrome and mouse models. PMID:12036298

  10. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J; Noma, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  11. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  12. Functional profiling and gene expression analysis of chromosomal copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Montaner, David; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Tárraga, Joaquín; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Contrarily to the traditional view in which only one or a few key genes were supposed to be the causative factors of diseases, we discuss the importance of considering groups of functionally related genes in the study of pathologies characterised by chromosomal copy number alterations. Recent observations have reported the existence of regions in higher eukaryotic chromosomes (including humans) containing genes of related function that show a high degree of coregulation. Copy number alterations will consequently affect to clusters of functionally related genes, which will be the final causative agents of the diseased phenotype, in many cases. Therefore, we propose that the functional profiling of the regions affected by copy number alterations must be an important aspect to take into account in the understanding of this type of pathologies. To illustrate this, we present an integrated study of DNA copy number variations, gene expression along with the functional profiling of chromosomal regions in a case of multiple myeloma. PMID:17597935

  13. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi )

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Six novel Y chromosome genes in Anopheles mosquitoes discovered by independently sequencing males and females

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Y chromosomes are responsible for the initiation of male development, male fertility, and other male-related functions in diverse species. However, Y genes are rarely characterized outside a few model species due to the arduous nature of studying the repeat-rich Y. Results The chromosome quotient (CQ) is a novel approach to systematically discover Y chromosome genes. In the CQ method, genomic DNA from males and females is sequenced independently and aligned to candidate reference sequences. The female to male ratio of the number of alignments to a reference sequence, a parameter called the chromosome quotient (CQ), is used to determine whether the sequence is Y-linked. Using the CQ method, we successfully identified known Y sequences from Homo sapiens and Drosophila melanogaster. The CQ method facilitated the discovery of Y chromosome sequences from the malaria mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae. Comparisons to transcriptome sequence data with blastn led to the discovery of six Anopheles Y genes, three from each species. All six genes are expressed in the early embryo. Two of the three An. stephensi Y genes were recently acquired from the autosomes or the X. Although An. stephensi and An. gambiae belong to the same subgenus, we found no evidence of Y genes shared between the species. Conclusions The CQ method can reliably identify Y chromosome sequences using the ratio of alignments from male and female sequence data. The CQ method is widely applicable to species with fragmented genome assemblies produced from next-generation sequencing data. Analysis of the six Y genes characterized in this study indicates rapid Y chromosome evolution between An. stephensi and An. gambiae. The Anopheles Y genes discovered by the CQ method provide unique markers for population and phylogenetic analysis, and opportunities for novel mosquito control measures through the manipulation of sexual dimorphism and fertility. PMID:23617698

  15. Chromosome Mapping of Dragline Silk Genes in the Genomes of Widow Spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghui; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2010-01-01

    With its incredible strength and toughness, spider dragline silk is widely lauded for its impressive material properties. Dragline silk is composed of two structural proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2, which are encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. While previous studies have characterized the genes that encode the constituent proteins of spider silks, nothing is known about the physical location of these genes. We determined karyotypes and sex chromosome organization for the widow spiders, Latrodectus hesperus and L. geometricus (Araneae, Theridiidae). We then used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the genomic locations of the genes for the silk proteins that compose the remarkable spider dragline. These genes included three loci for the MaSp1 protein and the single locus for the MaSp2 protein. In addition, we mapped a MaSp1 pseudogene. All the MaSp1 gene copies and pseudogene localized to a single chromosomal region while MaSp2 was located on a different chromosome of L. hesperus. Using probes derived from L. hesperus, we comparatively mapped all three MaSp1 loci to a single region of a L. geometricus chromosome. As with L. hesperus, MaSp2 was found on a separate L. geometricus chromosome, thus again unlinked to the MaSp1 loci. These results indicate orthology of the corresponding chromosomal regions in the two widow genomes. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple MaSp1 loci in a conserved gene cluster across species suggests that MaSp1 proliferated by tandem duplication in a common ancestor of L. geometricus and L. hesperus. Unequal crossover events during recombination could have given rise to the gene copies and could also maintain sequence similarity among gene copies over time. Further comparative mapping with taxa of increasing divergence from Latrodectus will pinpoint when the MaSp1 duplication events occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of silk gene linkage patterns. PMID:20877726

  16. Mapping the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster to a minimal deleted region in ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, I J; Aubele, M; Hartmann, E; Braungart, E; Werner, M; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    2001-04-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules has been implicated in tumor metastasis and progression. Eight family members have been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 16. Using radiation hybrid mapping, we have located six of these genes within a cluster at 16q21-q22.1. In invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast frequent LOH and accompanying mutation affect the CDH1 gene, which is a member of this chromosome 16 gene cluster. CDH1 LOH also occurs in invasive ductal carcinoma, but in the absence of gene mutation. The proximity of other cadherin genes to 16q22.1 suggests that they may be affected by LOH in invasive ductal carcinomas. Using the mapping data, microsatellite markers were selected which span regions of chromosome 16 containing the cadherin genes. In breast cancer tissues, a high rate of allelic loss was found over the gene cluster region, with CDH1 being the most frequently lost marker. In invasive ductal carcinoma a minimal deleted region was identified within part of the chromosome 16 cadherin gene cluster. This provides strong evidence for the existence of a second 16q22 suppressor gene locus within the cadherin cluster. PMID:11343777

  17. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A M; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes. PMID:26385968

  18. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A. M.; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes. PMID:26385968

  19. Differential gene expression in the murine gastric fundus lacking interstitial cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Daigo, Yataro; Takayama, Ichiro; Ponder, Bruce AJ; Caldas, Carlos; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M; Fujino, Masayuki A

    2003-01-01

    Background The muscle layers of murine gastric fundus have no interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the myenteric plexus and only possess intramuscular interstitial cells and this tissue does not generate electric slow waves. The absence of intramuscular interstitial cells in W/WV mutants provides a unique opportunity to study the molecular changes that are associated with the loss of these intercalating cells. Method The gene expression profile of the gastric fundus of wild type and W/WV mice was assayed by murine microarray analysis displaying a total of 8734 elements. Queried genes from the microarray analysis were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results Twenty-one genes were differentially expressed in wild type and W/WV mice. Eleven transcripts had 2.0–2.5 fold higher mRNA expression in W/WV gastric fundus when compared to wild type tissues. Ten transcripts had 2.1–3.9 fold lower expression in W/WV mutants in comparison with wild type animals. None of these genes have ever been implicated in any bowel motility function. Conclusions These data provides evidence that several important genes have significantly changed in the murine fundus of W/WV mutants that lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal and have reduced enteric motor neurotransmission. PMID:12795813

  20. The hierarchical relation between X-chromosomes and autosomal sex determining genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann-Zwicky, Monica; Nöthiger, Rolf

    1985-01-01

    The classical balance concept of sex determination in Drosophila states that the X-chromosome carries dispersed female-determining factors. Besides, a number of autosomal genes are known that, when mutant, transform chromosomal females (XX) into pseudomales (tra), or intersexes (ix, dsx, dsxD). To test whether large duplications of the X-chromosome have a feminizing effect on the sexual phenotype of these mutants, we constructed flies that were mutant for ix, dsx, dsxD or tra and had two X-chromosomes plus either a distal or a proximal half of an X-chromosome. These or even smaller X-chromosomal fragments had a strong feminizing effect when added to triploid intersexes (XX; AAA). In the mutants, however, no shift towards femaleness was apparent. We conclude that enhancing the female determining signal is ineffective in flies that are mutant for an autosomal sex determining gene, and therefore, that these genes are under hierarchical control of the signal given by the X:A ratio. Parallels between sex-determining and homeotic genes are drawn. ImagesFig. 3. PMID:16453598

  1. Maternal and paternal chromosomes 7 show differential methylation of many genes in lymphoblast DNA.

    PubMed

    Hannula, K; Lipsanen-Nyman, M; Scherer, S W; Holmberg, C; Höglund, P; Kere, J

    2001-04-01

    Genomic imprinting, the differential expression of paternal and maternal alleles, involves many chromosomal regions and plays a role in development and growth. Differential methylation of maternal and paternal alleles is a hallmark of imprinted genes, and thus methylation assays are widely used to support the identification of novel imprinted genes. Either blood or lymphoblast DNAs are most often used in these assays, even though methylation levels may change in cell culture. We undertook a systematic survey of parent-of-origin-specific methylation of chromosome 7 genes and ESTs by comparing DNA samples from cases of maternal and paternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 using DNA from fresh blood and lymphoblast cell lines. Our results revealed that up to 41% of genes and ESTs show parent-of-origin-specific methylation differences in lymphoblast DNA after only a short time in culture, whereas methylation differences were not seen in blood DNA. The methylation changes occurred most commonly on paternal chromosome 7, whereas alterations on maternal chromosome 7 were more infrequent and weaker. These findings indicate that methylation patterns may change significantly during cell culture in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and suggest that methylation is maintained differently on maternal and paternal chromosomes 7. PMID:11352560

  2. Evolution of mouse major histocompatibility complex genes borne by t chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, F; Golubić, M; Nizetić, D; Klein, J

    1985-01-01

    Virtually all wild mouse populations carry t haplotypes that cause embryonic lethality or semilethality, distortion of segregation ratios, suppression of crossing-over, and male sterility. The t complex of genes is located on chromosome 17, closely linked to the H-2, the major histocompatibility complex of the mouse. The t haplotypes differ from each other not only in lethal genes they carry but also in their linked H-2 haplotypes. In this study, we compared the class II H-2 genes present on 31 t chromosomes extracted from wild populations in different parts of the world. The comparison was based on the analysis of DNA fragments obtained after digestion with restriction endonucleases. The results reveal the existence of three major groups of class II alleles representing main branches on the evolutionary tree of the t chromosomes. Alleles within each group are similar if not identical, although they are borne by chromosomes that have been separated in time and space. The presence of similar alleles in Mus musculus and Mus domesticus suggests that some of them may have been separated for more than 1 million years. This must also be the minimal age of the t chromosomes but, because at least two of the three main branches appear to be related in their origin, the actual age of t chromosomes could be much greater. The observations support the proposal that H-2 genes evolve slowly. Images PMID:2986138

  3. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  4. Chromosome and cell genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: Chromosomes in differentiation; Chromosome axis; Nuclear and organelle split genes; Chemical mutagenesis; and Chromosome architecture and additional elements.

  5. Lack of an association between candidate gene loci and idiopathic generalized epilepsy in Kuwaiti Arab children.

    PubMed

    Haider, M Z; Habeeb, Y; Al-Nakkas, E; Al-Anzi, H; Zaki, M; Al-Tawari, A; Al-Bloushi, M

    2005-10-01

    analysis show a lack of association between three candidate genes and clinical expression of IGE in Kuwaiti Arab children. This is completely different from the findings reported from Caucasian populations of France, Australia and USA in which case a strong association has been reported between IGE and these genes. PMID:16205844

  6. Lack of association between schizophrenia and the CYP2D6 gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pirmohamed, M.; Wild, M.J.; Kitteringham, N.R.

    1996-04-09

    Approximately 5-10% of the Caucasian population lack the P450 isoform, CYP2D6. This polymorphism may be of importance in determining individual susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease. In this journal, Daniels et al. recently reported a negative association between the CYP2D6 gene locus and schizophrenia, a disease characterized by dopamine overactivity. It is important to exclude such an association because CYP2D6 is expressed in the brain and it is involved in dopamine catabolism. Between 1992 and 1993, we also performed a study similar to that, and reached the same conclusion. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Sequence Composition and Gene Content of the Short Arm of Rye (Secale cereale) Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Fluch, Silvia; Kopecky, Dieter; Burg, Kornel; Šimková, Hana; Taudien, Stefan; Petzold, Andreas; Kubaláková, Marie; Platzer, Matthias; Berenyi, Maria; Krainer, Siegfried; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lelley, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is to elucidate the sequence composition of the short arm of rye chromosome 1 (Secale cereale) with special focus on its gene content, because this portion of the rye genome is an integrated part of several hundreds of bread wheat varieties worldwide. Methodology/Principal Findings Multiple Displacement Amplification of 1RS DNA, obtained from flow sorted 1RS chromosomes, using 1RS ditelosomic wheat-rye addition line, and subsequent Roche 454FLX sequencing of this DNA yielded 195,313,589 bp sequence information. This quantity of sequence information resulted in 0.43× sequence coverage of the 1RS chromosome arm, permitting the identification of genes with estimated probability of 95%. A detailed analysis revealed that more than 5% of the 1RS sequence consisted of gene space, identifying at least 3,121 gene loci representing 1,882 different gene functions. Repetitive elements comprised about 72% of the 1RS sequence, Gypsy/Sabrina (13.3%) being the most abundant. More than four thousand simple sequence repeat (SSR) sites mostly located in gene related sequence reads were identified for possible marker development. The existence of chloroplast insertions in 1RS has been verified by identifying chimeric chloroplast-genomic sequence reads. Synteny analysis of 1RS to the full genomes of Oryza sativa and Brachypodium distachyon revealed that about half of the genes of 1RS correspond to the distal end of the short arm of rice chromosome 5 and the proximal region of the long arm of Brachypodium distachyon chromosome 2. Comparison of the gene content of 1RS to 1HS barley chromosome arm revealed high conservation of genes related to chromosome 5 of rice. Conclusions The present study revealed the gene content and potential gene functions on this chromosome arm and demonstrated numerous sequence elements like SSRs and gene-related sequences, which can be utilised for future research as well as in breeding of wheat and rye. PMID:22328922

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of single copy genes on Trichomonas vaginalis chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Krylov, Vladimír; Tachezy, Jan

    2011-04-01

    The highly repetitive nature of the Trichomonas vaginalis genome and massive expansion of various gene families has caused difficulties in genome assembly and has hampered genome mapping. Here, we adapted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for T. vaginalis, which is sensitive enough to detect single copy genes on metaphase chromosomes. Sensitivity of conventional FISH, which did not allow single copy gene detection in T. vaginalis, was increased by means of tyramide signal amplification. Two selected single copy genes, coding for serine palmitoyltransferase and tryptophanase, were mapped to chromosome I and II, respectively, and thus could be used as chromosome markers. This established protocol provides an amenable tool for the physical mapping of the T. vaginalis genome and other essential applications, such as development of genetic markers for T. vaginalis genotyping. PMID:21195113

  9. Use of gene fusions to determine the orientation of gene phoA on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Sarthy, A; Michaelis, S; Beckwith, J

    1981-01-01

    We present genetic evidence which demonstrates that the phoA gene is transcribed in the clockwise direction on the Escherichia coli chromosome, in contrast to an earlier proposal. Our conclusion is based on analysis of various genetic fusions between the lac operon and the phoA gene. PMID:7007316

  10. An analysis of the gene complement of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica: Evolution of lineage-specific genes and giant chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Webber, Caleb; Ponting, Chris P.

    2007-01-01

    The newly sequenced genome of Monodelphis domestica not only provides the out-group necessary to better understand our own eutherian lineage, but it enables insights into the innovative biology of metatherians. Here, we compare Monodelphis with Homo sequences from alignments of single nucleotides, genes, and whole chromosomes. Using PhyOP, we have established orthologs in Homo for 82% (15,250) of Monodelphis gene predictions. Those with single orthologs in each species exhibited a high median synonymous substitution rate (dS = 1.02), thereby explaining the relative paucity of aligned regions outside of coding sequences. Orthology assignments were used to construct a synteny map that illustrates the considerable fragmentation of Monodelphis and Homo karyotypes since their therian last common ancestor. Fifteen percent of Monodelphis genes are predicted, from their low divergence at synonymous sites, to have been duplicated in the metatherian lineage. The majority of Monodelphis-specific genes possess predicted roles in chemosensation, reproduction, adaptation to specific diets, and immunity. Using alignments of Monodelphis genes to sequences from either Homo or Trichosurus vulpecula (an Australian marsupial), we show that metatherian X chromosomes have elevated silent substitution rates and high G+C contents in comparison with both metatherian autosomes and eutherian chromosomes. Each of these elevations is also a feature of subtelomeric chromosomal regions. We attribute these observations to high rates of female-specific recombination near the chromosomal ends and within the X chromosome, which act to sustain or increase G+C levels by biased gene conversion. In particular, we propose that the higher G+C content of the Monodelphis X chromosome is a direct consequence of its small size relative to the giant autosomes. PMID:17495010

  11. LOCALIZATION OF THE MOUSE THYMIDINE KINASE GENE TO THE DISTAL PORTION OF CHROMOSOME 11

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the regional mapping of the thymidine kinase (tk-1) gene in the mouse using two complementary analyses: 1) investigation of chromosome aberrations associated with tx-1 gene inactivation in the L5178Y TX+/-3.7.2c cell line and (2) in situ molecular hybridization of a clo...

  12. Chromosome engineering for alien gene introgression in wheat: Progress and prospective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome engineering is a useful strategy for introgression of desirable genes from wild relatives into cultivated wheat. However, it has been a challenge to transfer a small amount of alien chromatin containing the gene of interest from one genome to another non-homologous genome through classic...

  13. Summary of the 1993 ASHG ancillary meeting recent research on chromosome 4p syndromes and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrooks, L.L.; Breg, W.R.; Hayden, M.R.

    1995-02-13

    The following is a summary of presentations given during an ancillary meeting to the 1993 American Society of Human Genetics Meeting in New Orleans, LA. This ancillary meeting, entitled Recent Research on Chromosome 4p Syndromes and Genes, reviewed the history of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), the natural history of patients with WHS, and the smallest region of deletion associated with the WHS. The proximal 4p deletion syndrome and the duplication 4p syndrome were also described and advice was offered regarding detection of chromosome 4p deletions, duplications, and rearrangements. The current status of the physical map of chromosome 4p with emphasis on the genes that map to the 4p16 region was presented along with a preliminary phenotypic map of 4p16. The goal of this format was to provide a comprehensive review of the clinical presentations, diagnostic capabilities, and genetic mapping advances involving chromosome 4p.

  14. Chromosome assignment of four photosynthesis-related genes and their variability in wheat species.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Y; Shimizu, H; Hasegawa, K; Tsujimoto, H; Sasakuma, T

    1994-06-01

    Copy numbers of four photosynthesis-related genes, PhyA, Ppc, RbcS and Lhcb1 (*)1, in wheat genomes were estimated by slot-blot analysis, and these genes were assigned to the chromosome arms of common wheat by Southern hybridization of DNA from an aneuploid series of the cultivar Chinese Spring. The copy number of PhyA was estimated to be one locus per haploid genome, and this gene was assigned to chromosomes 4AL, 4BS and 4DS. The Ppc gene showed a low copy number of small multigenes, and was located on the short arm of homoeologous group 3 chromosomes and the long arm of chromosomes of homoeologous group 7. RbcS consisted of a multigene family, with approximately 100 copies in the common wheat genome, and was located on the short arm of group 2 chromosomes and the long arm of group 5 chromosomes. Lhcb1 (*)1 also consisted of a multigene family with about 50 copies in common wheat. Only a limited number of restriction fragments (approximately 15%) were used to determine the locations of members of this family on the long arm of group 1 chromosomes owing to the multiplicity of DNA bands. The variability of hybridized bands with the four genes was less in polyploids, but was more in the case of multigene families. RFLP analysis of polyploid wheats and their presumed ancestors was carried out with probes of the oat PhyA gene, the maize Ppc gene, the wheat RbcS gene and the wheat Lhcb1 (*)1 gene. The RFLP patterns of common wheat most closely resembled those of T. Dicoccum (Emmer wheat), T. urartu (A genome), Ae. speltoides (S genome) and Ae. squarrosa (D genome). Diversification of genes in the wheat complex appear to have occurred mainly at the diploid level. Based on RFLP patterns, B and S genomes were clustered into two major groups. The fragment numbers per genome were reduced in proportion to the increase of ploidy level for all four genes, suggesting that some mechanism(s) might operate to restrict, and so keep to a minimum, the gene numbers in the polyploid

  15. Gene duplication of the human peptide YY gene (PYY) generated the pancreatic polypeptide gene (PPY) on chromosome 17q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hort, Y.; Shine, J.; Herzog, H.

    1995-03-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) are structurally related but functionally diverse peptides, encoded by separate genes and expressed in different tissues. Although the human NPY gene has been mapped to chromosome 7, the authors demonstrate here that the genes for human PYY and PP (PPY) are localized only 10 kb apart from each another on chromosome 17q21.1. The high degree of homology between the members of this gene family, both in primary sequence and exon/intron structure, suggests that the NYP and the PYY genes arose from an initial gene duplication event, with a subsequent tandem duplication of the PYY gene being responsible for the creation of the PPY gene. A second weaker hybridization signal also found on chromosome 17q11 and results obtained by Southern blot analysis suggest that the entire PYY-PPY region has undergone a further duplication event. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  17. Dopamine pathway imbalance in mice lacking Magel2, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Luck, Chloe; Vitaterna, Martha H; Wevrick, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    The etiology of abnormal eating behaviors, including binge-eating disorder, is poorly understood. The neural circuits modulating the activities of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are proposed to be dysfunctional in individuals suffering from eating disorders. Prader-Willi syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes extreme food seeking and binge-eating behaviors together with reduced satiety. One of the genes implicated in Prader-Willi syndrome, Magel2, is highly expressed in the regions of the brain that control appetite. Our objective was to examine behaviors relevant to feeding and the neural circuits controlling feeding in a mouse model of Prader-Willi syndrome that lacks expression of the Magel2 gene. We performed behavioral tests related to dopaminergic function, measuring cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion, binge eating, and saccharin-induced anhedonia in Magel2-deficient mice. Next, we analyzed dopaminergic neurons in various brain regions and compared these findings between genotypes. Finally, we examined biochemical markers in the brain under standard diet, high-fat diet, and withdrawal from a high-fat diet conditions. We identified abnormal behaviors and biomarkers reflecting dopaminergic dysfunction in mice lacking Magel2. Our results provide a biological framework for clinical studies of dopaminergic function in children with Prader-Willi syndrome, and may also provide insight into binge-eating disorders that occur in the general population. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27254754

  18. Long-Range Chromosome Interactions Mediated by Cohesin Shape Circadian Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yichi; Guo, Weimin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Meng; Fan, Zenghua; Zhao, Zhihu; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythm is established by the negative feedback loops consisting of a set of clock genes, which lead to the circadian expression of thousands of downstream genes in vivo. As genome-wide transcription is organized under the high-order chromosome structure, it is largely uncharted how circadian gene expression is influenced by chromosome architecture. We focus on the function of chromatin structure proteins cohesin as well as CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) in circadian rhythm. Using circular chromosome conformation capture sequencing, we systematically examined the interacting loci of a Bmal1-bound super-enhancer upstream of a clock gene Nr1d1 in mouse liver. These interactions are largely stable in the circadian cycle and cohesin binding sites are enriched in the interactome. Global analysis showed that cohesin-CTCF co-binding sites tend to insulate the phases of circadian oscillating genes while cohesin-non-CTCF sites are associated with high circadian rhythmicity of transcription. A model integrating the effects of cohesin and CTCF markedly improved the mechanistic understanding of circadian gene expression. Further experiments in cohesin knockout cells demonstrated that cohesin is required at least in part for driving the circadian gene expression by facilitating the enhancer-promoter looping. This study provided a novel insight into the relationship between circadian transcriptome and the high-order chromosome structure. PMID:27135601

  19. Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} gene in human and rat: Chromosomal localization and polymorphic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, A.; Simon, J.S.; Jacob, H.J.

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the chromosomal localization and a simple sequence repeat (SSR) in the cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) gene in both human and rat. A (CA){sub 18} repeat in the promoter of the rat gene was determined to exhibit length polymorphism when analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 19 different inbred rat strains. Genotyping for this marker in 234 F{sub 2} progeny of a SHRXBN intercross mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13. Using a PCR strategy, a fragment of the promoter for the human gene was isolated, and a (CA){sub 18} repeat was identified. Since this marker displayed a low heterozygosity index, they also identified a mononucleotide repeat in the promoter for cPLA{sub 2} that displayed a polymorphism information content value of 0.76. The human gene was mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosome 1q25. Of interest, the gene encoding the enzyme prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (cyclooxygenase-2), which acts on the arachidonic acid product of cPLA{sub 2}, was previously localized to this same chromosomal region, raising the possibility of coordinate regulation. Identification of intragenic markers may facilitate studies of polymorphic variants of these genes as candidates for disorders in which perturbations of the eicosanoid cascade may play a role. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Integration of biological data by kernels on graph nodes allows prediction of new genes involved in mitotic chromosome condensation.

    PubMed

    Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lees, Jon G; Morilla, Ian; Walter, Thomas; Petrova, Boryana; Roberti, M Julia; Hossain, M Julius; Adler, Priit; Fernández, José M; Krallinger, Martin; Haering, Christian H; Vilo, Jaak; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A; Orengo, Christine; Ellenberg, Jan

    2014-08-15

    The advent of genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi)-based screens puts us in the position to identify genes for all functions human cells carry out. However, for many functions, assay complexity and cost make genome-scale knockdown experiments impossible. Methods to predict genes required for cell functions are therefore needed to focus RNAi screens from the whole genome on the most likely candidates. Although different bioinformatics tools for gene function prediction exist, they lack experimental validation and are therefore rarely used by experimentalists. To address this, we developed an effective computational gene selection strategy that represents public data about genes as graphs and then analyzes these graphs using kernels on graph nodes to predict functional relationships. To demonstrate its performance, we predicted human genes required for a poorly understood cellular function-mitotic chromosome condensation-and experimentally validated the top 100 candidates with a focused RNAi screen by automated microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrated that the candidates were indeed strongly enriched in condensation genes, including the discovery of several new factors. By combining bioinformatics prediction with experimental validation, our study shows that kernels on graph nodes are powerful tools to integrate public biological data and predict genes involved in cellular functions of interest. PMID:24943848

  1. Integration of biological data by kernels on graph nodes allows prediction of new genes involved in mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lees, Jon G.; Morilla, Ian; Walter, Thomas; Petrova, Boryana; Roberti, M. Julia; Hossain, M. Julius; Adler, Priit; Fernández, José M.; Krallinger, Martin; Haering, Christian H.; Vilo, Jaak; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A.; Orengo, Christine; Ellenberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The advent of genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi)–based screens puts us in the position to identify genes for all functions human cells carry out. However, for many functions, assay complexity and cost make genome-scale knockdown experiments impossible. Methods to predict genes required for cell functions are therefore needed to focus RNAi screens from the whole genome on the most likely candidates. Although different bioinformatics tools for gene function prediction exist, they lack experimental validation and are therefore rarely used by experimentalists. To address this, we developed an effective computational gene selection strategy that represents public data about genes as graphs and then analyzes these graphs using kernels on graph nodes to predict functional relationships. To demonstrate its performance, we predicted human genes required for a poorly understood cellular function—mitotic chromosome condensation—and experimentally validated the top 100 candidates with a focused RNAi screen by automated microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrated that the candidates were indeed strongly enriched in condensation genes, including the discovery of several new factors. By combining bioinformatics prediction with experimental validation, our study shows that kernels on graph nodes are powerful tools to integrate public biological data and predict genes involved in cellular functions of interest. PMID:24943848

  2. Chromosomal clustering and GATA transcriptional regulation of intestine-expressed genes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Florencia; Liu, Yueyi; Kim, Yoona A; Chen, Pei-Jiun; Kim, Stuart K

    2006-01-01

    We used mRNA tagging to identify genes expressed in the intestine of C. elegans. Animals expressing an epitope-tagged protein that binds the poly-A tail of mRNAs (FLAG::PAB-1) from an intestine-specific promoter (ges-1) were used to immunoprecipitate FLAG::PAB-1/mRNA complexes from the intestine. A total of 1938 intestine-expressed genes (P<0.001) were identified using DNA microarrays. First, we compared the intestine-expressed genes with those expressed in the muscle and germline, and identified 510 genes enriched in all three tissues and 624 intestine-, 230 muscle- and 1135 germ line-enriched genes. Second, we showed that the 1938 intestine-expressed genes were physically clustered on the chromosomes, suggesting that the order of genes in the genome is influenced by the effect of chromatin domains on gene expression. Furthermore, the commonly expressed genes showed more chromosomal clustering than the tissue-enriched genes, suggesting that chromatin domains may influence housekeeping genes more than tissue-specific genes. Third, in order to gain further insight into the regulation of intestinal gene expression, we searched for regulatory motifs. This analysis found that the promoters of the intestine genes were enriched for the GATA transcription factor consensus binding sequence. We experimentally verified these results by showing that the GATA motif is required in cis and that GATA transcription factors are required in trans for expression of these intestinal genes. PMID:16354718

  3. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Evert; Dijkstra, Maurits J. J.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Sie, Daoud; Haan, Josien C.; Traets, Joleen J. H.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Carvalho, Beatriz; Ylstra, Bauke; Abeln, Sanne; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA) and structural variants (SVs). Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on carcinogenesis and patient outcome remains poorly understood. This study aimed to perform a systematic analysis of genes that are affected by CNA-associated chromosomal breaks in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to determine the clinical relevance of recurrent breakpoint genes. Methods Primary CRC samples of patients with metastatic disease from CAIRO and CAIRO2 clinical trials were previously characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization. These data were now used to determine the prevalence of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes across 352 CRC samples. In addition, mutation status of the commonly affected APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined for 204 CRC samples by targeted massive parallel sequencing. Clinical relevance was assessed upon stratification of patients based on gene mutations and gene breakpoints that were observed in >3% of CRC cases. Results In total, 748 genes were identified that were recurrently affected by chromosomal breaks (FDR <0.1). MACROD2 was affected in 41% of CRC samples and another 169 genes showed breakpoints in >3% of cases, indicating that prevalence of gene breakpoints is comparable to the prevalence of well-known gene point mutations. Patient stratification based on gene breakpoints and point mutations revealed one CRC subtype with very poor prognosis. Conclusions We conclude that CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes represent a highly prevalent and clinically relevant subset of SVs in CRC. PMID:26375816

  4. Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling dictates the chromosomal arrangement of bacterial genes

    PubMed Central

    Sobetzko, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Over the recent decade, the central importance of DNA supercoiling in chromosome organization and global gene regulation of bacteria became more and more visible. With a regulon comprising more than 2000 genes in Escherichia coli, DNA supercoiling is among the most influential regulators of gene expression found in bacteria so far. However, the mechanism creating thousands of diverse temporal gene expression patterns coordinated by DNA supercoiling remains unclear. In this study we show that a specific chromosomal arrangement of genes modulates the local levels of DNA supercoiling at gene promoters via transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) in the model organism E. coli. Our findings provide a consistent explanation for the strong positive coupling of temporal gene expression patterns of neighboring genes. Using comparative genomics we are furthermore able to provide evidence that TCDS is a driving force for the evolution of chromosomal gene arrangement patterns in other Enterobacteriaceae. With the currently available data of promoter supercoiling sensitivity we prove that the same principle is applicable also for the evolutionary distant gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, our findings are fully consistent with recent investigations concerning the regulatory impact of TCDS on gene pairs in eukaryots underpinning the broad applicability of our analysis. PMID:26783203

  5. Cell-by-Cell Dissection of Gene Expression and Chromosomal Interactions Reveals Consequences of Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The functional consequences of long-range nuclear reorganization were studied in a cell-by-cell analysis of gene expression and long-range chromosomal interactions in the Drosophila eye and eye imaginal disk. Position-effect variegation was used to stochastically perturb gene expression and probe nuclear reorganization. Variegating genes on rearrangements of Chromosomes X, 2, and 3 were probed for long-range interactions with heterochromatin. Studies were conducted only in tissues known to express the variegating genes. Nuclear structure was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes to the variegating gene and heterochromatin. Gene expression was determined alternately by immunofluorescence against specific proteins and by eye pigment autofluorescence. This allowed cell-by-cell comparisons of nuclear architecture between cells in which the variegating gene was either expressed or silenced. Very strong correlations between heterochromatic association and silencing were found. Expressing cells showed a broad distribution of distances between variegating genes and their own centromeric heterochromatin, while silenced cells showed a very tight distribution centered around very short distances, consistent with interaction between the silenced genes and heterochromatin. Spatial and temporal analysis of interactions with heterochromatin indicated that variegating genes primarily associate with heterochromatin in cells that have exited the cell cycle. Differentiation was not a requirement for association, and no differences in association were observed between cell types. Thus, long-range interactions between distal chromosome regions and their own heterochromatin have functional consequences for the organism. PMID:15737020

  6. Human creatine kinase genes on chromosomes 15 and 19, and proximity of the gene for the muscle form to the genes for apolipoprotein C2 and excision repair.

    PubMed Central

    Stallings, R L; Olson, E; Strauss, A W; Thompson, L H; Bachinski, L L; Siciliano, M J

    1988-01-01

    The human chromosomal assignments of genes of the creatine kinase (CK) family--loci for brain (CKBB), muscle (CKMM), and mitochondrial (CKMT) forms--were studied by Southern filter hybridization analysis of DNAs isolated from a human x rodent somatic cell hybrid clone panel. Probes for the 3'-noncoding sequences of human CKBB and CKMM hybridized concordantly only to DNAs from somatic cell hybrids containing chromosomes 14 and 19, respectively. Thus the earlier assignment of the gene coding for the CKBB isozyme to chromosome 14 was confirmed by molecular means, as was the provisional assignment of CKMM to the long arm of chromosome 19. A probe containing canine sequences for CKMM cross-hybridized with human sequences on chromosomes 14 and 19, a result consistent with the assignments of CKBB and CKMM. A probe containing human sequences for CKMT enabled the provisional assignment of CKMT to human chromosome 15. Independent hybrids with portions of the long arm of chromosome 19 missing indicated the order of genes on the long arm of chromosome 19 as being cen-GPI-(TGFB, CYP1)-[CKMM, (APOC2-ERCC1)]-(CGB, FTL). The unexpectedly more distal location of APOC2 among the genes on the long arm--and APOC2's close association with CKMM--is discussed with respect to the close linkage relationship of APOC2 to myotonic muscular dystrophy. Images Figure 1 PMID:3400641

  7. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jennifer F.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 36 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. PMID:23055411

  8. Unlocking Holocentric Chromosomes: New Perspectives from Comparative and Functional Genomics?

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Mauro; Manicardi, Gian Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The presence of chromosomes with diffuse centromeres (holocentric chromosomes) has been reported in several taxa since more than fifty years, but a full understanding of their origin is still lacking. Comparative and functional genomics are nowadays furnishing new data to better understand holocentric chromosome evolution thus opening new perspectives to analyse karyotype rearrangements in species with holocentric chromosomes in particular evidencing unusual common features, such as the uniform GC content and gene distribution along chromosomes. PMID:23372420

  9. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R). One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species. PMID:23194088

  10. Isolation, characterization, and chromosomal localization of mouse and human COUP-TF I and II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y.; Krishnan, V.; Zeng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs) are orphan members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. COUP-TF homologues have been cloned in many species, from Drosophila to human. The protein sequences of COUP-TFs are highly homologous across species, suggesting functional conservation. Two COUP-TF genes have been cloned from human, and their genomic organizations have been characterized. To determine whether the genomic organization is conserved between human and mouse, we isolated two mouse COUP-TF genes (I and II) and characterized their genomic structures. Both genes have relatively simple structures that are similar to those of their human counterparts. In addition, we mapped mouse COUP-TF I to the distal region of chromosome 13 and COUP-TF II to the central region of chromosome 7. Furthermore, we mapped human COUP-TF I to 5q14 of chromosome 5 and COUP-TF II to 15q26 of chromosome 15. The results demonstrate that COUP-TF genes are located in chromosomal regions that are syntenic between mouse and human. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Transferring Desirable Genes from Agropyron cristatum 7P Chromosome into Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanhuan; Pan, Cuili; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-Agropyron cristatum 7P disomic addition line Ⅱ-5-1, derived from the distant hybridization between A. cristatum (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) and the common wheat cv. Fukuhokomugi (Fukuho), displays numerous desirable agronomic traits, including enhanced thousand-grain weight, smaller flag leaf, and enhanced tolerance to drought. In order to transfer these traits into common wheat, Ⅱ-5-1 was induced by 60Co-γ ray, leading to the creation of 18 translocation lines and three deletion lines. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that multiple wheat chromosomes were involved in the translocation events, including chromosome 2A, 3A, 5A, 7A, 3B, 5B, 7B, 3D and 7D. A. cristatum 7P chromosome was divided into 15 chromosomal bins with fifty-five sequence-tagged site (STS) markers specific to A. cristatum 7P chromosome. Seven and eight chromosomal bins were located on 7PS and 7PL, respectively. The above-mentioned translocation and deletion lines each contained different, yet overlapping 7P chromosomal fragments, covering the entire A. cristatum 7P chromosome. Three translocation lines (7PT-13, 7PT-14 and 7PT-17) and three deletion lines (del-1, del-2 and del-3), which contained the common chromosomal bins 7PS1-3, displayed higher thousand-grain weigh than Fukuho, suggesting that potential genes conferring high thousand-grain weigh might be located on these chromosomal bins. Therefore, wheat-A. cristatum 7P translocation lines with elite traits will be useful as novel germplasms for wheat genetic improvement. PMID:27459347

  12. Transferring Desirable Genes from Agropyron cristatum 7P Chromosome into Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingjie; Lu, Yuqing; Li, Huanhuan; Pan, Cuili; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-Agropyron cristatum 7P disomic addition line Ⅱ-5-1, derived from the distant hybridization between A. cristatum (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) and the common wheat cv. Fukuhokomugi (Fukuho), displays numerous desirable agronomic traits, including enhanced thousand-grain weight, smaller flag leaf, and enhanced tolerance to drought. In order to transfer these traits into common wheat, Ⅱ-5-1 was induced by 60Co-γ ray, leading to the creation of 18 translocation lines and three deletion lines. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that multiple wheat chromosomes were involved in the translocation events, including chromosome 2A, 3A, 5A, 7A, 3B, 5B, 7B, 3D and 7D. A. cristatum 7P chromosome was divided into 15 chromosomal bins with fifty-five sequence-tagged site (STS) markers specific to A. cristatum 7P chromosome. Seven and eight chromosomal bins were located on 7PS and 7PL, respectively. The above-mentioned translocation and deletion lines each contained different, yet overlapping 7P chromosomal fragments, covering the entire A. cristatum 7P chromosome. Three translocation lines (7PT-13, 7PT-14 and 7PT-17) and three deletion lines (del-1, del-2 and del-3), which contained the common chromosomal bins 7PS1-3, displayed higher thousand-grain weigh than Fukuho, suggesting that potential genes conferring high thousand-grain weigh might be located on these chromosomal bins. Therefore, wheat-A. cristatum 7P translocation lines with elite traits will be useful as novel germplasms for wheat genetic improvement. PMID:27459347

  13. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  14. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  15. Localization of the murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene to chromosome 3 using interspecific backcross analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchberg, A M; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1989-08-01

    The chromosomal location of the murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor (Csfm) gene was determined by interspecific backcross analysis. We mapped Csfm to mouse chromosome 3, 2.5 cM distal to Ngfb and Nras and 1.3 cM proximal to Amy-2. CSFM maps to human chromosome 5q, while AMY2, NGFB, and NRAS map to human chromosome 1p. The chromosomal location of Csfm thus disrupts a previously identified conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1. The location of Csfm also identifies yet another mouse chromosome that shares synteny with human chromosome 5q, a region involved in several different types of myeloid disease. PMID:2676841

  16. Dosage compensation and gene expression on the mammalian X chromosome: one plus one does not always equal two

    PubMed Central

    Prothero, Katie E.; Stahl, Jill M.; Carrel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Counting chromosomes is not just simple math. Although normal males and females differ in sex chromosome content (XY vs. XX), X chromosome imbalance is tolerated because dosage compensation mechanisms have evolved to ensure functional equivalence. In mammals this is accomplished by two processes—X chromosome inactivation that silences most genes on one X chromosome in females, leading to functional X monosomy for most genes in both sexes, and X chromosome upregulation that results in increased gene expression on the single active X in males and females, equalizing dosage relative to autosomes. This review focuses on genes on the X chromosome, and how gene content, organization and expression levels can be influenced by these two processes. Special attention is given to genes that are not X inactivated, and are not necessarily fully dosage compensated. These genes that “escape” X inactivation are of medical importance as they explain phenotypes in individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies and may impact normal traits and disorders that differ between men and women. Moreover, escape genes give insight into how X chromosome inactivation is spread and maintained on the X. PMID:19802704

  17. Chromosomal localization and sequence variation of 5S rRNA gene in five Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Park, Y K; Park, K C; Park, C H; Kim, N S

    2000-02-29

    Chromosomal localization and sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA gene were carried out in five Capsicum species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that chromosomal location of the 5S rRNA gene was conserved in a single locus at a chromosome which was assigned to chromosome 1 by the synteny relationship with tomato. In sequence analysis, the repeating units of the 5S rRNA genes in the Capsicum species were variable in size from 278 bp to 300 bp. In sequence comparison of our results to the results with other Solanaceae plants as published by others, the coding region was highly conserved, but the spacer regions varied in size and sequence. T stretch regions, just after the end of the coding sequences, were more prominant in the Capsicum species than in two other plants. High G x C rich regions, which might have similar functions as that of the GC islands in the genes transcribed by RNA PolII, were observed after the T stretch region. Although we could not observe the TATA like sequences, an AT rich segment at -27 to -18 was detected in the 5S rRNA genes of the Capsicum species. Species relationship among the Capsicum species was also studied by the sequence comparison of the 5S rRNA genes. While C. chinense, C. frutescens, and C. annuum formed one lineage, C. baccatum was revealed to be an intermediate species between the former three species and C. pubescens. PMID:10774742

  18. Chromosome position effects on gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jack A; Sellars, Laura E; Busby, Stephen J W; Lee, David J

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the location of a gene on the chromosome is known to affect its expression, but such position effects are poorly understood in bacteria. Here, using Escherichia coli K-12, we demonstrate that expression of a reporter gene cassette, comprised of the model E. coli lac promoter driving expression of gfp, varies by ∼300-fold depending on its precise position on the chromosome. At some positions, expression was more than 3-fold higher than at the natural lac promoter locus, whereas at several other locations, the reporter cassette was completely silenced: effectively overriding local lac promoter control. These effects were not due to differences in gene copy number, caused by partially replicated genomes. Rather, the differences in gene expression occur predominantly at the level of transcription and are mediated by several different features that are involved in chromosome organization. Taken together, our findings identify a tier of gene regulation above local promoter control and highlight the importance of chromosome position effects on gene expression profiles in bacteria. PMID:25209233

  19. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M.

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Four paralogous protein 4.1 genes map to distinct chromosomes in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Peters, L L; Weier, H U; Walensky, L D; Snyder, S H; Parra, M; Mohandas, N; Conboy, J G

    1998-12-01

    Four highly conserved members of the skeletal protein 4.1 gene family encode a diverse array of protein isoforms via tissue-specific transcription and developmentally regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing. In addition to the prototypical red blood cell 4.1R (human gene symbol EPB41,) these include two homologues that are strongly expressed in the brain (4.1N, EPB41L1; and 4.1B, EPB41L3) and another that is widely expressed in many tissues (4.1G, EPB41L2). As part of a study on the structure and evolution of the 4.1 genes in human and mouse, we have now completed the chromosomal mapping of their respective loci by reporting the localization of mouse 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B, as well as human 4.1B. For the mouse 4.1 genes, Southern blot analysis of RFLPs in The Jackson Laboratory BSS interspecific backcross yielded the following assignments: 4.1N (Epb4.1l1,) chromosome 2; 4.1G (Epb4.1l2,) chromosome 10; and 4.1B (Epb4.1l3,) mouse chromosome 17. Human 4.1B was physically mapped to chromosome 18p11 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. All of the mouse genes mapped within or adjacent to regions of conserved synteny with corresponding human chromosomes. We conclude that a set of four paralogous 4.1 genes has been evolutionarily conserved in rodents and primates. PMID:9828140

  1. Ancestral Y-linked genes were maintained by translocation to the X and Y chromosomes fused to an autosomal pair in the Okinawa spiny rat Tokudaia muenninki.

    PubMed

    Murata, Chie; Kuroki, Yoko; Imoto, Issei; Kuroiwa, Asato

    2016-09-01

    Two species of the genus Tokudaia lack the Y chromosome and SRY, but several Y-linked genes have been rescued by translocation or transposition to other chromosomes. Tokudaia muenninki is the only species in the genus that maintains the Y owing to sex chromosome-autosome fusions. According to previous studies, many SRY pseudocopies and other Y-linked genes have evolved by excess duplication in this species. Using RNA-seq and RT-PCR, we found that ZFY, EIF2S3Y, TSPY, UTY, DDX3Y, USP9Y, and RBMY, but not UBA1Y, had high deduced amino acid sequence similarity and similar expression patterns with other rodents, suggesting that these genes were functional. Based on FISH and quantitative real-time PCR, all of the genes except for UTY and DDX3Y were amplified on the X and Y chromosomes with approximately 10-66 copies in the male genome. In a comparative analysis of the 372.4-kb BAC sequence and Y-linked gene transcripts from T. muenninki with the mouse Y genomic sequence, we observed that multiple-copy genes in the ancestral Y genome were nonfunctional, indicating that the gene functions were assumed by amplified copies. We also found a LTR sequence at the distal end of a SRY duplication unit, suggesting that unequal sister chromatid exchange mediated by retrotransposable elements could have been involved in SRY amplification. Our results revealed that the Y-linked genes were rescued from degeneration via translocations to other sex chromosomal regions and amplification events in T. muenninki. PMID:27333765

  2. The human alpha 2(IV) collagen gene, COL4A2, is syntenic with the alpha 1(IV) gene, COL4A1, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Hall, V; Kurkinen, M

    1987-05-01

    We have previously assigned the gene for the alpha 1 chain of type IV collagen to chromosome 13. In this report we show that the gene coding for the second chain of this heterotrimer is on the same chromosome. This is the first example of the genes for both chains of one collagen molecule being syntenic. PMID:3674752

  3. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Peck, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134-144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. PMID:26936890

  4. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Peck, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134–144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. PMID:26936890

  5. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s) occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female) were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement. PMID:20051104

  6. The Caulobacter crescentus smc gene is required for cell cycle progression and chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Rasmus B.; Shapiro, Lucy

    1999-01-01

    The highly conserved SMC (Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes) proteins function in chromosome condensation, segregation, and other aspects of chromosome dynamics in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A null mutation in the Caulobacter crescentus smc gene is conditionally lethal and causes a cell cycle arrest at the predivisional cell stage. Chromosome segregation in wild-type and smc null mutant cells was examined by monitoring the intracellular localization of the replication origin and terminus by using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In wild-type cells, the origin is located at the flagellated pole of swarmer cells and, immediately after the initiation of DNA replication in stalked cells, one of the origins moves to the opposite pole, giving a bipolar localization of the origins. The terminus moves from the end of the swarmer cell opposite the origin to midcell. A subpopulation of the smc null mutant cells had mislocalized origins or termini, showing that the smc null mutation gives DNA segregation defects. Nucleoid morphology was also abnormal. Thus, we propose that the Caulobacter chromosomal origins have specific cellular addresses and that the SMC protein plays important roles in maintaining chromosome structure and in partitioning. The specific cell cycle arrest in the smc null mutant indicates the presence of a cell cycle checkpoint that senses perturbations in chromosome organization or segregation. PMID:10485882

  7. Genetic Divergence in Domesticated and Non-Domesticated Gene Regions of Barley Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Songxian; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic divergence in the chromosomal regions with domesticated and non-domesticated genes. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of natural selection on shaping genetic diversity of chromosome region with domesticated and non-domesticated genes in barley using 110 SSR markers. Comparison of the genetic diversity loss between wild and cultivated barley for each chromosome showed that chromosome 5H had the highest divergence of 35.29%, followed by 3H, 7H, 4H, 2H, 6H. Diversity ratio was calculated as (diversity of wild type – diversity of cultivated type)/diversity of wild type×100%. It was found that diversity ratios of the domesticated regions on 5H, 1H and 7H were higher than those of non-domesticated regions. Diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 2H and 4H is similar to that of non-domesticated region. However, diversity ratio of the domesticated region on 3H is lower than that of non-domesticated region. Averaged diversity among six chromosomes in domesticated region was 33.73% difference between wild and cultivated barley, and was 27.56% difference in the non-domesticated region. The outcome of this study advances our understanding of the evolution of crop chromosomes. PMID:25812037

  8. Discordant phenotype of two overlapping deletions involving the PAX3 gene in chromosome 2q35.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, N G; Trask, B J; Sheldon, S; Gorski, J L

    1993-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS), the most common form of inherited congenital deafness, is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant condition with variable penetrance and expressivity. WS is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The basis for the phenotypic variability observed among and between WS families is unknown. However, mutations within the paired-box gene, PAX3, have been associated with a subset of WS patients. In this report we use cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to study a patient with WS type 3, a form of WS consisting of typical WS type 1 features plus mental retardation, microcephaly, and severe skeletal anomalies. Our results show that the WS3 patient has a de novo paternally derived deletion, del (2)(q35q36), that spans the genetic loci PAX3 and COL4A3. A molecular analysis of a chromosome 2 deletional mapping panel maps the PAX3 locus to 2q35 and suggests the locus order: centromere-(INHA, DES)-PAX3-COL4A3-(ALPI, CHRND)-telomere. Our analyses also show that a patient with a cleft palate and lip pits, but lacking diagnostic WS features, has a deletion, del (2)(q33q35), involving the PAX3 locus. This result suggests that not all PAX3 mutations are associated with a WS phenotype and that additional regional loci may modify or regulate the PAX3 locus and/or the development of a WS phenotype. PMID:8103404

  9. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  10. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human homeobox gene Prox 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovieva, R.D.; Duncan, M.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    The genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the human homeobox gene Prox 1 as well as its chromosomal localization have been determined. This gene spans more than 40 kb, consists of at least 5 exons, and encodes an 83-kDa protein. It shows 89% identity with the chicken sequence at the nucleotide level in the coding region, while the human and chicken proteins are 94% identical. Among the embryonic tissues analyzed (lens, brain, lung, liver, and kidney), the human Prox 1 gene is most actively expressed i the developing lens, similar to the expression pattern of the chicken Prox 1 gene. The Prox 1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 1q32.2-q32.3. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Distribution of the mammalian Stat gene family in mouse chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-09-01

    Studies of transcriptional activation by interferons and a variety of cytokines have led to the identification of a family of proteins that serve as signal transducers and activators of transcription, Stats. Here, we report that the seven mouse Stat loci map in three clusters, with each cluster located on a different mouse autosome. The data suggest that the family has arisen via a tandem duplication of the ancestral locus, followed by dispersion of the linked loci to different mouse chromosomes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Resilient emotionality and molecular compensation in mice lacking the oligodendrocyte-specific gene Cnp1.

    PubMed

    Edgar, N M; Touma, C; Palme, R; Sibille, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered oligodendrocyte structure and function is implicated in major psychiatric illnesses, including low cell number and reduced oligodendrocyte-specific gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD). These features are also observed in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of the illness, suggesting that they are consequential to environmental precipitants; however, whether oligodendrocyte changes contribute causally to low emotionality is unknown. Focusing on 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp1), a crucial component of axoglial communication dysregulated in the amygdala of MDD subjects and UCMS-exposed mice, we show that altered oligodendrocyte integrity can have an unexpected functional role in affect regulation. Mice lacking Cnp1 (knockout, KO) displayed decreased anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms (i.e., low emotionality) compared with wild-type animals, a phenotypic difference that increased with age (3-9 months). This phenotype was accompanied by increased motor activity, but was evident before neurodegenerative-associated motor coordination deficits (≤ 9-12 months). Notably, Cnp1(KO) mice were less vulnerable to developing a depressive-like syndrome after either UCMS or chronic corticosterone exposure. Cnp1(KO) mice also displayed reduced fear expression during extinction, despite normal amygdala c-Fos induction after acute stress, together implicating dysfunction of an amygdala-related neural network, and consistent with proposed mechanisms for stress resiliency. However, the Cnp1(KO) behavioral phenotype was also accompanied by massive upregulation of oligodendrocyte- and immune-related genes in the basolateral amygdala, suggesting an attempt at functional compensation. Together, we demonstrate that the lack of oligodendrocyte-specific Cnp1 leads to resilient emotionality. However, combined with substantial molecular changes and late-onset neurodegeneration, these results suggest the low Cnp1 seen in MDD may

  13. Resilient emotionality and molecular compensation in mice lacking the oligodendrocyte-specific gene Cnp1

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, N M; Touma, C; Palme, R; Sibille, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered oligodendrocyte structure and function is implicated in major psychiatric illnesses, including low cell number and reduced oligodendrocyte-specific gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD). These features are also observed in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of the illness, suggesting that they are consequential to environmental precipitants; however, whether oligodendrocyte changes contribute causally to low emotionality is unknown. Focusing on 2′-3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (Cnp1), a crucial component of axoglial communication dysregulated in the amygdala of MDD subjects and UCMS-exposed mice, we show that altered oligodendrocyte integrity can have an unexpected functional role in affect regulation. Mice lacking Cnp1 (knockout, KO) displayed decreased anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms (i.e., low emotionality) compared with wild-type animals, a phenotypic difference that increased with age (3–9 months). This phenotype was accompanied by increased motor activity, but was evident before neurodegenerative-associated motor coordination deficits (⩽9–12 months). Notably, Cnp1KO mice were less vulnerable to developing a depressive-like syndrome after either UCMS or chronic corticosterone exposure. Cnp1KO mice also displayed reduced fear expression during extinction, despite normal amygdala c-Fos induction after acute stress, together implicating dysfunction of an amygdala-related neural network, and consistent with proposed mechanisms for stress resiliency. However, the Cnp1KO behavioral phenotype was also accompanied by massive upregulation of oligodendrocyte- and immune-related genes in the basolateral amygdala, suggesting an attempt at functional compensation. Together, we demonstrate that the lack of oligodendrocyte-specific Cnp1 leads to resilient emotionality. However, combined with substantial molecular changes and late-onset neurodegeneration, these results suggest the low Cnp1 seen in MDD

  14. Isolation and chromosomal localization of the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.J.; Michel, T.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Endothelial NOS activity is a major determinant of vascular tone and blood pressure, and in several important (and sometimes hereditary) disease states, such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, the endothelial NO signaling system appears to be abnormal. To explore the relationship of the endothelial NOS activity, the authors isolated the human gene encoding the endothelial NOS. Genomic clones containing the 5[prime] end of this gene were identified in a human genomic library by applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach. Identification of the human gene for endothelial NOS (NOS3) was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the first coding exon, which was found to be identical to its cognate cDNA. The NOS3 gene spans at least 20 kb and appears to contain multiple introns. The transcription start site and promoter region of the NOS3 gene were identified by primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays. Sequencing of the putative promoter revealed consensus sequences for the shear stress-response element, as well as cytokine-responsive cis regulatory sequences, both possible important to the roles played by NOS3 in the normal and the diseased cardiovascular system. The authors also mapped the chromosomal location of the NOS3 gene. First, a chromosomal panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids was screened using PCR with oligonucleotide primers derived from the NOS3 genomic clone. The specificity of the amplified PCR product was confirmed by human and hamster genomic DNA controls, as well as by Southern blot analysis, using the NOS3 cDNA as probe. Definitive chromosomal assignment of the NOS3 gene to human chromosome 7 was based upon 0% discordancy; fluorescence in situ hybridization sublocalized the NOS3 gene to 7q36. The identification and characterization of the NOS3 gene may lead to further insights into heritable disease states associated with this gene product. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy. PMID:27251041

  17. Allelic analysis of stripe rust resistance genes on wheat chromosome 2BS.

    PubMed

    Luo, P G; Hu, X Y; Ren, Z L; Zhang, H Y; Shu, K; Yang, Z J

    2008-11-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiormis Westend f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important foliar diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Stripe rust resistance genes Yr27, Yr31, YrSp, YrV23, and YrCN19 on chromosome 2BS confer resistance to some or all Chinese P. striiormis f. sp. tritici races CYR31, CYR32, SY11-4, and SY11-14 in the greenhouse. To screen microsatellite (SSR) markers linked with YrCN19, F1, F2, and F3 populations derived from cross Ch377/CN19 were screened with race CYR32 and 35 SSR primer pairs. Linkage analysis indicated that the single dominant gene YrCN19 in cultivar CN19 was linked with SSR markers Xgwm410, Xgwm374, Xwmc477, and Xgwm382 on chromosome 2BS with genetic distances of 0.3, 7.9, 12.3, and 21.2 cM, respectively. Crosses of CN19 with wheat lines carrying other genes on chromosome 2B showed that all were located at different loci. YrCN19 is thus different from the other reported Yr genes in chromosomal location and resistance response and was therefore named Yr41. Prospects and strategies of using Yr41 and other Yr genes in wheat improvement for stripe rust resistance are discussed. PMID:18956025

  18. Common subtypes of idiopathic generalized epilepsies: Lack of linkage to D20S19 close to candidate loci (EBN1, EEGV1) on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, T.; Schmitz, B.; Janz, D.

    1996-02-16

    Hereditary factors play a major role in the etiology of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). A trait locus (EBN1) for a rare subtype of IGEs, the benign neonatal familial convulsions, and a susceptibility gene (EEGV1) for the common human low-voltage electroencephalogram have been mapped close together with D20S19 to the chromosomal region 20q13.2. Both loci are potential candidates for the susceptibility to IGE spectra with age-related onset beyond the neonatal period. The present study tested the hypothesis that a putative susceptibility locus linked to D20S19 predisposes to spectra of IGEs with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. Linkage analyses were conducted in 60 families ascertained through IGE patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy or childhood absence epilepsy. Our results provide evidence against linkage of a putative susceptibility gene for four hierarchically broadened IGE spectra with D20S19 assuming tentative single-locus genetic models. The extent of an {open_quotes}exclusion region{close_quotes} (lod scores below -2) varied from 0.5 cM up to 22 cM on either side of D2OSl9 depending on the trait assumed. These results are contrary to the expectation that a susceptibility gene in vicinity to D20S19 confers a common major gene effect to the expression of IGE spectra with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    PubMed

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution. PMID:27404402

  20. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline

    PubMed Central

    Landeen, Emily L.; Muirhead, Christina A.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower—approximately 3-fold or more—for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution. PMID:27404402

  1. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 gene maps to the Down syndrome region of human chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in mouse trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Pash, J.; Popescu, N.; Matocha, M.; Rapoport, S.; Bustin, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The gene for human high-mobility-group (HMG) chromosomal protein HMG-14 is located in region 21q22.3, a region associated with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, one of the most prevalent human birth defects. The expression of this gene is analyzed in mouse embryos that are trisomic in chromosome 16 and are considered to be an animal model for Down syndrome. RNA blot-hybridization analysis and detailed analysis of HMG-14 protein levels indicate that mouse trisomy 16 embryos have approximately 1.5 times more HMG-14 mRNA and protein than their normal littermates, suggesting a direct gene dosage effect. The HMG-14 gene may be an additional marker for the Down syndrome. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 is a nucleosomal binding protein that may confer distinct properties to the chromatin structure of transcriptionally active genes and therefore may be a contributing factor in the etiology of the syndrome.

  2. Linkage-dependent gene flow in a house mouse chromosomal hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Panithanarak, Thadsin; Hauffe, Heidi C; Dallas, John F; Glover, Anita; Ward, Richard G; Searle, Jeremy B

    2004-01-01

    In the alpine valley of Valtellina there are two Robertsonian chromosomal races of house mouse, the Poschiavo (POS: 2n = 24-26) characterized by metacentric 8.12 and acrocentrics 2 and 10 and the Upper Valtellina (UV: 2n = 22-24) characterized by metacentrics 2.8 and 10.12. The races inhabit separate villages in the valley except in Sommacologna and Sondalo, where they both occur together with hybrids. A total of 179 mice from 16 villages were typed at 13 microsatellite loci. Seven of these loci were localized close to the centromeres of chromosomes 10 and 12, with the prediction that these regions on the race-specific chromosomes would be the most likely to experience a barrier to gene flow. The remaining six loci were localized at the telomeres of chromosomes 10 and 12 and at the centromeres of chromosomes that do not differ between the races. Substantial differences in allelic frequencies were found between the villages with POS and UV races at five of the loci at the centromeres of chromosomes 10 and 12 but at none of the other loci. These differences were not found to distinguish the two races in Sommacologna and Sondalo. Therefore, the centromeric regions of race-specific chromosomes do appear to experience a barrier to gene flow, although this can break down under intense interbreeding between the races. These results are considered in the context of Harrison's (1990) concept of the semipermeability of hybrid zones to gene exchange and in relation to parapatric speciation. PMID:15058731

  3. Spermatogenesis Drives Rapid Gene Creation and Masculinization of the X Chromosome in Stalk-Eyed Flies (Diopsidae).

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard H; Narechania, Apurva; DeSalle, Rob; Johns, Philip M; Reinhardt, Josephine A; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2016-03-01

    Throughout their evolutionary history, genomes acquire new genetic material that facilitates phenotypic innovation and diversification. Developmental processes associated with reproduction are particularly likely to involve novel genes. Abundant gene creation impacts the evolution of chromosomal gene content and general regulatory mechanisms such as dosage compensation. Numerous studies in model organisms have found complex and, at times contradictory, relationships among these genomic attributes highlighting the need to examine these patterns in other systems characterized by abundant sexual selection. Therefore, we examined the association among novel gene creation, tissue-specific gene expression, and chromosomal gene content within stalk-eyed flies. Flies in this family are characterized by strong sexual selection and the presence of a newly evolved X chromosome. We generated RNA-seq transcriptome data from the testes for three species within the family and from seven additional tissues in the highly dimorphic species,Teleopsis dalmanni Analysis of dipteran gene orthology reveals dramatic testes-specific gene creation in stalk-eyed flies, involving numerous gene families that are highly conserved in other insect groups. Identification of X-linked genes for the three species indicates that the X chromosome arose prior to the diversification of the family. The most striking feature of this X chromosome is that it is highly masculinized, containing nearly twice as many testes-specific genes as expected based on its size. All the major processes that may drive differential sex chromosome gene content-creation of genes with male-specific expression, development of male-specific expression from pre-existing genes, and movement of genes with male-specific expression-are elevated on the X chromosome ofT. dalmanni This masculinization occurs despite evidence that testes expressed genes do not achieve the same levels of gene expression on the X chromosome as they do on

  4. Spermatogenesis Drives Rapid Gene Creation and Masculinization of the X Chromosome in Stalk-Eyed Flies (Diopsidae)

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard H.; Narechania, Apurva; DeSalle, Rob; Johns, Philip M.; Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout their evolutionary history, genomes acquire new genetic material that facilitates phenotypic innovation and diversification. Developmental processes associated with reproduction are particularly likely to involve novel genes. Abundant gene creation impacts the evolution of chromosomal gene content and general regulatory mechanisms such as dosage compensation. Numerous studies in model organisms have found complex and, at times contradictory, relationships among these genomic attributes highlighting the need to examine these patterns in other systems characterized by abundant sexual selection. Therefore, we examined the association among novel gene creation, tissue-specific gene expression, and chromosomal gene content within stalk-eyed flies. Flies in this family are characterized by strong sexual selection and the presence of a newly evolved X chromosome. We generated RNA-seq transcriptome data from the testes for three species within the family and from seven additional tissues in the highly dimorphic species, Teleopsis dalmanni. Analysis of dipteran gene orthology reveals dramatic testes-specific gene creation in stalk-eyed flies, involving numerous gene families that are highly conserved in other insect groups. Identification of X-linked genes for the three species indicates that the X chromosome arose prior to the diversification of the family. The most striking feature of this X chromosome is that it is highly masculinized, containing nearly twice as many testes-specific genes as expected based on its size. All the major processes that may drive differential sex chromosome gene content—creation of genes with male-specific expression, development of male-specific expression from pre-existing genes, and movement of genes with male-specific expression—are elevated on the X chromosome of T. dalmanni. This masculinization occurs despite evidence that testes expressed genes do not achieve the same levels of gene expression on the X chromosome as they

  5. Gene profiling of embryonic skeletal muscle lacking type I ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Dilyana; Walter, Anna M; Gaspar, John A; Brunn, Anna; Linde, Nina F; Ardestani, Mostafa A; Deckert, Martina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Sachinidis, Agapios; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    In mature skeletal muscle, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration rises dramatically upon membrane depolarization, constituting the link between excitation and contraction. This process requires Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1). However, RYR1's potential roles in muscle development remain obscure. We used an established RyR1- null mouse model, dyspedic, to investigate the effects of the absence of a functional RYR1 and, consequently, the lack of RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling, during embryogenesis. Homozygous dyspedic mice die after birth and display small limbs and abnormal skeletal muscle organization. Skeletal muscles from front and hind limbs of dyspedic fetuses (day E18.5) were subjected to microarray analyses, revealing 318 differentially expressed genes. We observed altered expression of multiple transcription factors and members of key signaling pathways. Differential regulation was also observed for genes encoding contractile as well as muscle-specific structural proteins. Additional qRT-PCR analysis revealed altered mRNA levels of the canonical muscle regulatory factors Six1, Six4, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG and MRF4 in mutant muscle, which is in line with the severe developmental retardation seen in dyspedic muscle histology analyses. Taken together, these findings suggest an important non-contractile role of RyR1 or RYR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling during muscle organ development. PMID:26831464

  6. Myogenic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells That Lack a Functional Pax7 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Grabowska, Iwona; Archacka, Karolina; Bem, Joanna; Swierczek, Barbara; Helinska, Anita; Streminska, Wladyslawa; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Koblowska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Overexpression of Pax7 has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. However, the effects of the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have not yet been directly tested. Herein, we studied mouse stem cells that lacked a functional Pax7 gene and characterized the differentiation of these stem cells under conditions that promoted the derivation of myoblasts in vitro. We analyzed the expression of myogenic factors, such as myogenic regulatory factors and muscle-specific microRNAs, in wild-type and mutant cells. Finally, we compared the transcriptome of both types of cells and did not find substantial differences in the expression of genes related to the regulation of myogenesis. As a result, we showed that the absence of functional Pax7 does not prevent the in vitro myogenic differentiation of ESCs. PMID:26649785

  7. Gene profiling of embryonic skeletal muscle lacking type I ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channel

    PubMed Central

    Filipova, Dilyana; Walter, Anna M.; Gaspar, John A.; Brunn, Anna; Linde, Nina F.; Ardestani, Mostafa A.; Deckert, Martina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Sachinidis, Agapios; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    In mature skeletal muscle, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises dramatically upon membrane depolarization, constituting the link between excitation and contraction. This process requires Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1). However, RYR1’s potential roles in muscle development remain obscure. We used an established RyR1- null mouse model, dyspedic, to investigate the effects of the absence of a functional RYR1 and, consequently, the lack of RyR1-mediated Ca2+ signaling, during embryogenesis. Homozygous dyspedic mice die after birth and display small limbs and abnormal skeletal muscle organization. Skeletal muscles from front and hind limbs of dyspedic fetuses (day E18.5) were subjected to microarray analyses, revealing 318 differentially expressed genes. We observed altered expression of multiple transcription factors and members of key signaling pathways. Differential regulation was also observed for genes encoding contractile as well as muscle-specific structural proteins. Additional qRT-PCR analysis revealed altered mRNA levels of the canonical muscle regulatory factors Six1, Six4, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG and MRF4 in mutant muscle, which is in line with the severe developmental retardation seen in dyspedic muscle histology analyses. Taken together, these findings suggest an important non-contractile role of RyR1 or RYR1-mediated Ca2+ signaling during muscle organ development. PMID:26831464

  8. Novel missense mutation in the FH gene in familial renal cell cancer patients lacking cutaneous leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a rare tumor predisposition syndrome characterized by cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cell cancer. Germline mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene is known to be associated with HLRCC. Case presentation We describe a 64-year-old father and his 39-year-old son with HLRCC who developed papillary type 2 RCCs lacking cutaneous leiomyomas at any site. A common missense mutation in the FH gene, (c.1021G > A, p.D341N) in exon 7, was detected in the 2 cases. Functional prediction with the bioinformatics programs, SIFT and Polyphen-2, reported “damaging (SIFT score 0.00)” and “probably damaging (PSIC score 1.621)” values, respectively. In 162 healthy individuals, there were no cases of a G transition to any base. Finally, (c.1021G > A) in exon 7, was identified as a point mutation. Conclusion We report a family with HLRCC in which a novel missense mutation was detected. A familial papillary type 2 renal cancer should be considered HLRCC unless typical cutaneous leiomyomas do not occur. PMID:24684806

  9. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A.; Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J.

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Dosage compensation and nuclear organization: cluster to control chromosome-wide gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Meister, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In many species, male and female animals differ in the number of X chromosomes they possess. As a consequence, large scale differences in gene dosage exist between sexes; a phenomenon that is rarely tolerated by the organism for changes in autosome dosage. Several strategies have evolved independently to balance X-linked gene dosage between sexes, named dosage compensation (DC). The molecular basis of DC differs among the three best-studied examples: mammals, fruit fly and nematodes. In this short review, we summarize recent microscopic and chromosome conformation capture data that reveal key features of the compensated X chromosome and highlight the events leading to the establishment of a functional, specialized nuclear compartment, the X domain. PMID:26748388

  11. Thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase gene (STM): Localization to human chromosome 16p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, I.A.; Her, C.; Weinshilboum, M.

    1994-09-01

    Thermolabile (TL) phenol sulfotransferase (PST) catalyzes the sulfate conjugation of phenolic monoamine neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. We recently cloned a cDNA for human liver TL PST and expressed it in COS-1 cells. We now report the chromosomal localization of the human TL PST gene (STM) as well as its partial sequence. DNA from NIGMS Human/Rodent Somatic Cell Hybrid Mapping Panels 1 and 2 was screened by use of the PCR, and the STM gene was mapped to chromosome 16. Regional localization to 16p11.2 was performed by PCR analysis of a high-resolution mouse/human somatic cell hybrid panel that contained defined portions of human chromosome 16. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Sources of gene tree discordance on oryza (poaceae) chromosome 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe new methods for characterizing gene tree discordance in phylogenomic datasets, which screen for deviations from neutral expectations, summarize variation in statistical support among gene trees, and allow comparison of the patterns of discordance induced by various analysis choices. Usin...

  13. First Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Containing a mecB-Carrying Gene Complex Independent of Transposon Tn6045 in a Macrococcus caseolyticus Isolate from a Canine Infection.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Schwendener, Sybille; Thomann, Andreas; Gobeli Brawand, Stefanie; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    A methicillin-resistant mecB-positive Macrococcus caseolyticus (strain KM45013) was isolated from the nares of a dog with rhinitis. It contained a novel 39-kb transposon-defective complete mecB-carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmecKM45013). SCCmecKM45013 contained 49 coding sequences (CDSs), was integrated at the 3' end of the chromosomal orfX gene, and was delimited at both ends by imperfect direct repeats functioning as integration site sequences (ISSs). SCCmecKM45013 presented two discontinuous regions of homology (SCCmec coverage of 35%) to the chromosomal and transposon Tn6045-associated SCCmec-like element of M. caseolyticus JCSC7096: (i) the mec gene complex (98.8% identity) and (ii) the ccr-carrying segment (91.8% identity). The mec gene complex, located at the right junction of the cassette, also carried the β-lactamase gene blaZm (mecRm-mecIm-mecB-blaZm). SCCmecKM45013 contained two cassette chromosome recombinase genes, ccrAm2 and ccrBm2, which shared 94.3% and 96.6% DNA identity with those of the SCCmec-like element of JCSC7096 but shared less than 52% DNA identity with the staphylococcal ccrAB and ccrC genes. Three distinct extrachromosomal circularized elements (the entire SCCmecKM45013, ΨSCCmecKM45013 lacking the ccr genes, and SCCKM45013 lacking mecB) flanked by one ISS copy, as well as the chromosomal regions remaining after excision, were detected. An unconventional circularized structure carrying the mecB gene complex was associated with two extensive direct repeat regions, which enclosed two open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF46 and ORF51) flanking the chromosomal mecB-carrying gene complex. This study revealed M. caseolyticus as a potential disease-associated bacterium in dogs and also unveiled an SCCmec element carrying mecB not associated with Tn6045 in the genus Macrococcus. PMID:25987634

  14. First Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Containing a mecB-Carrying Gene Complex Independent of Transposon Tn6045 in a Macrococcus caseolyticus Isolate from a Canine Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Schwendener, Sybille; Thomann, Andreas; Gobeli Brawand, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    A methicillin-resistant mecB-positive Macrococcus caseolyticus (strain KM45013) was isolated from the nares of a dog with rhinitis. It contained a novel 39-kb transposon-defective complete mecB-carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmecKM45013). SCCmecKM45013 contained 49 coding sequences (CDSs), was integrated at the 3′ end of the chromosomal orfX gene, and was delimited at both ends by imperfect direct repeats functioning as integration site sequences (ISSs). SCCmecKM45013 presented two discontinuous regions of homology (SCCmec coverage of 35%) to the chromosomal and transposon Tn6045-associated SCCmec-like element of M. caseolyticus JCSC7096: (i) the mec gene complex (98.8% identity) and (ii) the ccr-carrying segment (91.8% identity). The mec gene complex, located at the right junction of the cassette, also carried the β-lactamase gene blaZm (mecRm-mecIm-mecB-blaZm). SCCmecKM45013 contained two cassette chromosome recombinase genes, ccrAm2 and ccrBm2, which shared 94.3% and 96.6% DNA identity with those of the SCCmec-like element of JCSC7096 but shared less than 52% DNA identity with the staphylococcal ccrAB and ccrC genes. Three distinct extrachromosomal circularized elements (the entire SCCmecKM45013, ΨSCCmecKM45013 lacking the ccr genes, and SCCKM45013 lacking mecB) flanked by one ISS copy, as well as the chromosomal regions remaining after excision, were detected. An unconventional circularized structure carrying the mecB gene complex was associated with two extensive direct repeat regions, which enclosed two open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF46 and ORF51) flanking the chromosomal mecB-carrying gene complex. This study revealed M. caseolyticus as a potential disease-associated bacterium in dogs and also unveiled an SCCmec element carrying mecB not associated with Tn6045 in the genus Macrococcus. PMID:25987634

  15. Acid Sphingomyelinase Gene Knockout Ameliorates Hyperhomocysteinemic Glomerular Injury in Mice Lacking Cystathionine-β-Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Boini, Krishna M.; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M.; Xu, Ming; Li, Cai-xia; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) has been implicated in the development of hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys)-induced glomerular oxidative stress and injury. However, it remains unknown whether genetically engineering of ASM gene produces beneficial or detrimental action on hHcys-induced glomerular injury. The present study generated and characterized the mice lacking cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs) and Asm mouse gene by cross breeding Cbs+/− and Asm+/− mice. Given that the homozygotes of Cbs−/−/Asm−/− mice could not survive for 3 weeks. Cbs+/−/Asm+/+, Cbs+/−/Asm+/− and Cbs+/−/Asm−/− as well as their Cbs wild type littermates were used to study the role of Asm−/− under a background of Cbs+/− with hHcys. HPLC analysis revealed that plasma Hcys level was significantly elevated in Cbs heterozygous (Cbs+/−) mice with different copies of Asm gene compared to Cbs+/+ mice with different Asm gene copies. Cbs+/−/Asm+/+ mice had significantly increased renal Asm activity, ceramide production and O2.− level compared to Cbs+/+/Asm+/+, while Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice showed significantly reduced renal Asm activity, ceramide production and O2.− level due to increased plasma Hcys levels. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that colocalization of podocin with ceramide was much lower in Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice compared to Cbs+/−/Asm+/+ mice, which was accompanied by a reduced glomerular damage index, albuminuria and proteinuria in Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice. Immunofluorescent analyses of the podocin, nephrin and desmin expression also illustrated less podocyte damages in the glomeruli from Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice compared to Cbs+/−/Asm+/+ mice. In in vitro studies of podocytes, hHcys-enhanced O2.− production, desmin expression, and ceramide production as well as decreases in VEGF level and podocin expression in podocytes were substantially attenuated by prior treatment with amitriptyline, an Asm inhibitor. In conclusion, Asm gene knockout or

  16. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  17. Heterozygous screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies dosage-sensitive genes that affect chromosome stability.

    PubMed

    Strome, Erin D; Wu, Xiaowei; Kimmel, Marek; Plon, Sharon E

    2008-03-01

    Current techniques for identifying mutations that convey a small increased cancer risk or those that modify cancer risk in carriers of highly penetrant mutations are limited by the statistical power of epidemiologic studies, which require screening of large populations and candidate genes. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that mediate genomic stability, we performed a genomewide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterozygous mutations that increase chromosome instability in a checkpoint-deficient diploid strain. We used two genome stability assays sensitive enough to detect the impact of heterozygous mutations and identified 172 heterozygous gene disruptions that affected chromosome fragment (CF) loss, 45% of which also conferred modest but statistically significant instability of endogenous chromosomes. Analysis of heterozygous deletion of 65 of these genes demonstrated that the majority increased genomic instability in both checkpoint-deficient and wild-type backgrounds. Strains heterozygous for COMA kinetochore complex genes were particularly unstable. Over 50% of the genes identified in this screen have putative human homologs, including CHEK2, ERCC4, and TOPBP1, which are already associated with inherited cancer susceptibility. These findings encourage the incorporation of this orthologous gene list into cancer epidemiology studies and suggest further analysis of heterozygous phenotypes in yeast as models of human disease resulting from haplo-insufficiency. PMID:18245329

  18. Molecular structure and chromosomal mapping of the human homolog of the agouti gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H.Y.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Loeffler, C.; Hansmann, I.; Chen, W.J.; Furdon, P.J.; Wilkison, W.; Powell, J.G.; Usala, A.L.

    1994-10-11

    The agouti (a) locus in mouse chromosome 2 normally regulates coat color pigmentation. The mouse agouti gene was recently cloned and shown to encode a distinctive 131-amino acid protein with a consensus signal peptide. Here the authors describe the cloning of the human homolog of the mouse agouti gene using an interspecies DNA-hybridization approach. Sequence analysis revealed that the coding region of the human agouti gene is 85% identical to the mouse gene and has the potential to encode a protein of 132 amino acids with a consensus signal peptide. Chromosomal assignment using somatic-cell-hybrid mapping panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the human agouti gene maps to chromosome band 20q11.2. This result revealed that the human agouti gene is closely linked to several traits, including a locus called MODY (for maturity onset diabetes of the young) and another region that is associated with the development of myeloid leukemia. Initial expression studies with RNA from several adult human tissues showed that the human agouti gene is expressed in adipose tissue and testis.

  19. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY) receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs) showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains) and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events). RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate tetraploidizations forming a

  20. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  1. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  2. High School Students' Understanding of Chromosome/Gene Behavior during Meiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jim; Dale, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Investigates high school students' understanding of the physical relationship of chromosomes and genes as expressed in their conceptual models and in their ability to manipulate the models to explain solutions to dihybrid cross problems. Describes three typical models and three students' reasoning processes. Discusses four implications. (YP)

  3. Chromosome engineering of wheat stem rust resistance gene Sr47 in a tetraploid wheat background

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum) line DAS15 carries Sr47, a gene conferring resistance to races of stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici), including race TTKSK (Ug99). The Ae. speltoides segment harboring Sr47 accounts for most of the T2BL-2SL•2SS chromosome. Our objective was t...

  4. The Am Gene Controlling Resistance to Alfalfa mosaic virus in Tomato Is Located in the Cluster of Dominant Resistance Genes on Chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Moretti, André; Gognalons, Patrick; Lesage, Marie-Laure; Marchoux, George; Gebre-Selassie, Kashay; Caranta, Carole

    2004-04-01

    ABSTRACT The dominant gene Am from Lycopersicon hirsutum f. sp. glabratum PI134417 confers resistance to most strains of Alfalfa mosaic virus, including the recently identified necrotic strains. The phenotypic response includes a lack of symptom development following mechanical inoculation of leaves. To study the resistance mechanism controlled by Am, biological (back-inoculation to susceptible hosts), serological (double-antibody sandwich, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and molecular (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization with specific riboprobes) methods of virus detection have been conducted on mechanically inoculated PI134417 leaves. The virus was never recovered, indicating that Am acts by an inhibition of viral accumulation during the early events of the virus life cycle. Am has been mapped genetically to the short arm of tomato chromosome 6 in the resistance hotspot, which includes the R-genes Mi and Cf-2/Cf-5 and the quantitative resistance factors Ty-1, Ol-1, and Bw-5. PMID:18944110

  5. Strict evolutionary conservation followed rapid gene loss on human and rhesus Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Robert S; Dugan, Shannon; Ding, Yan; Buhay, Christian J; Kremitzki, Colin; Wang, Qiaoyan; Shen, Hua; Holder, Michael; Villasana, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne V; Cree, Andrew; Courtney, Laura; Veizer, Joelle; Kotkiewicz, Holland; Cho, Ting-Jan; Koutseva, Natalia; Rozen, Steve; Muzny, Donna M; Warren, Wesley C; Gibbs, Richard A; Wilson, Richard K; Page, David C

    2012-03-01

    The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes during the past 200-300 million years. The human MSY (male-specific region of Y chromosome) retains only three percent of the ancestral autosomes' genes owing to genetic decay. This evolutionary decay was driven by a series of five 'stratification' events. Each event suppressed X-Y crossing over within a chromosome segment or 'stratum', incorporated that segment into the MSY and subjected its genes to the erosive forces that attend the absence of crossing over. The last of these events occurred 30 million years ago, 5 million years before the human and Old World monkey lineages diverged. Although speculation abounds regarding ongoing decay and looming extinction of the human Y chromosome, remarkably little is known about how many MSY genes were lost in the human lineage in the 25 million years that have followed its separation from the Old World monkey lineage. To investigate this question, we sequenced the MSY of the rhesus macaque, an Old World monkey, and compared it to the human MSY. We discovered that during the last 25 million years MSY gene loss in the human lineage was limited to the youngest stratum (stratum 5), which comprises three percent of the human MSY. In the older strata, which collectively comprise the bulk of the human MSY, gene loss evidently ceased more than 25 million years ago. Likewise, the rhesus MSY has not lost any older genes (from strata 1-4) during the past 25 million years, despite its major structural differences to the human MSY. The rhesus MSY is simpler, with few amplified gene families or palindromes that might enable intrachromosomal recombination and repair. We present an empirical reconstruction of human MSY evolution in which each stratum transitioned from rapid, exponential loss of ancestral genes to strict conservation through purifying selection. PMID:22367542

  6. High-Resolution Chromosome Ideogram Representation of Currently Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Rafi, Syed K.; Manzardo, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, autism-related research has focused on the identification of various genes and disturbed pathways causing the genetically heterogeneous group of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The list of autism-related genes has significantly increased due to better awareness with advances in genetic technology and expanding searchable genomic databases. We compiled a master list of known and clinically relevant autism spectrum disorder genes identified with supporting evidence from peer-reviewed medical literature sources by searching key words related to autism and genetics and from authoritative autism-related public access websites, such as the Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute autism genomic database dedicated to gene discovery and characterization. Our list consists of 792 genes arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms, thereby enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists and genetic counsellors to access convenient visual images of the location and distribution of ASD genes. Meaningful correlations of the observed phenotype in patients with suspected/confirmed ASD gene(s) at the chromosome region or breakpoint band site can be made to inform diagnosis and gene-based personalized care and provide genetic counselling for families. PMID:25803107

  7. The gene encoding p120{sup cas}, a novel catenin, localizes on human chromosome 11q11 (CTNND) and mouse chromosome 2 (Catns)

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, A.B.; Daniel, J.M.; Shapiro, D.N.

    1996-01-01

    The p120{sub cas} gene encodes a protein tyrosine kinase substrate that associates with the cell-cell adhesion protein complex containing E-cadherin and its cytoplasmic cofactors {alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin, and plakoglobin. Like other components of the cadherin/catenin complex, defects in p120{sup cas} may contribute to cell malignancy. We have determined the chromosomal location of the p120{sup cas} gene in human and mouse using fluorescence in situ hybridization and interspecific backcross analysis, respectively. The human p120{sub cas} gene (CTNND) is localized immediately adjacent to the centromere on the long arm of chromosome 11 in band 11q11. The murine p120{sup cas} gene (Catns) was assigned to the middle of chromosome 2. Neither locus is currently known to be associated with disease or malignancy. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Localization of the receptor gene for type D simian retroviruses on human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Williams, B P; McKnight, A; Goodfellow, P N; Weiss, R A

    1990-01-01

    Simian retrovirus (SRV) serotypes 1 to 5 are exogenous type D viruses causing immune suppression in macaque monkeys. These viruses exhibit receptor interference with each other, with two endogenous type D viruses of the langur (PO-1-Lu) and squirrel monkey, and with two type C retroviruses, feline endogenous virus (RD114/CCC) and baboon endogenous virus (BaEV), indicating that each utilizes the same cell surface receptor (M. A. Sommerfelt and R. A. Weiss, Virology 176:58-69, 1990). Vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotype particles bearing envelope glycoproteins of RD114, BaEV, and the seven SRV strains were employed to detect receptors expressed in human-rodent somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes. The only human chromosome common to all the susceptible hybrids was chromosome 19. By using hybrids retaining different fragments of chromosome 19, a provisional subchromosomal localization of the receptor gene was made to 19q13.1-13.2. Antibodies previously reported to be specific to a BaEV receptor (L. Thiry, J. Cogniaux-Leclerc, R. Olislager, S. Sprecher-Goldberger, and P. Burkens, J. Virol. 48:697-708, 1983) did not block BaEV, RD114, or SRV pseudotypes or syncytia. Antibodies to known surface markers determined by genes mapped to chromosome 19 did not block virus-receptor interaction. The identity of the receptor remains to be determined. PMID:2173788

  9. Two chromosomal genes required for killing expression in killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wickner, R B; Leibowitz, M J

    1976-03-25

    The killer character of yeast is determined by a 1.4 X 10(6) molecular weight double-stranded RNA plasmid and at least 12 chromosomal genes. Wild-type strains of yeast that carry this plasmid (killers) secret a toxin which is lethal only to strains not carrying this plasmid (sensitives).--We have isolated 28 independent recessive chromosomal mutants of a killer strain that have lost the ability to secrete an active toxin but remain resistant to the effects of the toxin and continue to carry the complete cytoplasmic killer genome. These mutants define two complementation groups, kex1 and kex2. Kex1 is located on chromosome VII between ade5 and lys5. Kex2 is located on chromosome XIV, but it does not show meiotic linkage to any gene previously located on this chromosome.--When the killer plasmid of kex1 or kex2 strains is eliminated by curing with heat or cycloheximide, the strains become sensitive to killing. The mutant phenotype reappears among the meiotic segregants in a cross with a normal killer. Thus, the kex phenotype does not require an alteration of the killer plasmid.--Kex1 and kex2 strains each contain near-normal levels of the 1.4 x 10(6) molecular weight double-stranded RNA, whose presence is correlated with the presence of the killer genome. PMID:773743

  10. Genome-wide gene expression perturbation induced by loss of C2 chromosome in allotetraploid Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Shao, Yujiao; Pan, Qi; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy with loss of entire chromosomes from normal complement disrupts the balanced genome and is tolerable only by polyploidy plants. In this study, the monosomic and nullisomic plants losing one or two copies of C2 chromosome from allotetraploid Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, AACC) were produced and compared for their phenotype and transcriptome. The monosomics gave a plant phenotype very similar to the original donor, but the nullisomics had much smaller stature and also shorter growth period. By the comparative analyses on the global transcript profiles with the euploid donor, genome-wide alterations in gene expression were revealed in two aneuploids, and their majority of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) resulted from the trans-acting effects of the zero and one copy of C2 chromosome. The higher number of up-regulated genes than down-regulated genes on other chromosomes suggested that the genome responded to the C2 loss via enhancing the expression of certain genes. Particularly, more DEGs were detected in the monosomics than nullisomics, contrasting with their phenotypes. The gene expression of the other chromosomes was differently affected, and several dysregulated domains in which up- or downregulated genes obviously clustered were identifiable. But the mean gene expression (MGE) for homoeologous chromosome A2 reduced with the C2 loss. Some genes and their expressions on C2 were correlated with the phenotype deviations in the aneuploids. These results provided new insights into the transcriptomic perturbation of the allopolyploid genome elicited by the loss of individual chromosome. PMID:26442076

  11. Single exon-resolution targeted chromosomal microarray analysis of known and candidate intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Tracy; Zahir, Farah R; Griffith, Malachi; Delaney, Allen; Chai, David; Tsang, Erica; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Marra, Marco; Eydoux, Patrice; Langlois, Sylvie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Friedman, Jan M

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability affects about 3% of individuals globally, with∼50% idiopathic. We designed an exonic-resolution array targeting all known submicroscopic chromosomal intellectual disability syndrome loci, causative genes for intellectual disability, and potential candidate genes, all genes encoding glutamate receptors and epigenetic regulators. Using this platform, we performed chromosomal microarray analysis on 165 intellectual disability trios (affected child and both normal parents). We identified and independently validated 36 de novo copy-number changes in 32 trios. In all, 67% of the validated events were intragenic, involving only exon 1 (which includes the promoter sequence according to our design), exon 1 and adjacent exons, or one or more exons excluding exon 1. Seventeen of the 36 copy-number variants involve genes known to cause intellectual disability. Eleven of these, including seven intragenic variants, are clearly pathogenic (involving STXBP1, SHANK3 (3 patients), IL1RAPL1, UBE2A, NRXN1, MEF2C, CHD7, 15q24 and 9p24 microdeletion), two are likely pathogenic (PI4KA, DCX), two are unlikely to be pathogenic (GRIK2, FREM2), and two are unclear (ARID1B, 15q22 microdeletion). Twelve individuals with genomic imbalances identified by our array were tested with a clinical microarray, and six had a normal result. We identified de novo copy-number variants within genes not previously implicated in intellectual disability and uncovered pathogenic variation of known intellectual disability genes below the detection limit of standard clinical diagnostic chromosomal microarray analysis. PMID:24253858

  12. The IL-9 receptor gene (IL9R): Genomic structure, chromosomal localization in the pseudoautosomal region of the long arm of sex chromosomes, and identification of IL9R pseudogenes at 9qter, 10pter, 16pter, 18pter

    SciTech Connect

    Kermouni, A.; Godelaine, D.; Lurquin, C.; Szikora, J.P.

    1995-09-20

    Cosmids containing the human IL-9 receptor (R) gene (IL9R) have been isolated from a genomic library using the IL9R cDNA as a probe. We have shown that the human IL9R gene is composed of 11 exons and 10 introns, stretching over {approx} 17 kb, and is located within the pseudoautosomal region of the Xq and Yq chromosome, in the vicinity of the telomere. Analysis of the 5` flanking region revealed multiple transcription initiation sites as well as potential binding motifs for AP1, AP2, AP3, Sp1, and NF-kB, although this region lacks a TATA box. Using the human IL9R cosmid as a probe to perform fluorescence in situ hybridization, additional signals were identified in the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 9q, 10p, 16p, and 18p. IL9R homologs located on chromosomes 9 and 18 were partially characterized, while those located on chromosomes 16 and 10 were completely sequenced. Although they are similiar to the IL9R gene ({approx} 90% identity), none of these copies encodes a functional receptor: none of them contains sequences homologous to the 5` flanking region or exon 1 of the IL9R gene, and the remaining ORFs have been inactivated by various point mutations and deletions. Taken together, our results indicate that the IL9R gene is located at Xq28 and Yq12, in the long arm pseudoautosomal region, and that four IL9R pseudogenes are located on 9q34, 10p15, 16p13.3 and 18p11.3, probably dispersed as the result of translocations during evolution. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Phenotypic Variation across Chromosomal Hybrid Zones of the Common Shrew (Sorex araneus) Indicates Reduced Gene Flow

    PubMed Central

    Polly, P. David; Polyakov, Andrei V.; Ilyashenko, Vadim B.; Onischenko, Sergei S.; White, Thomas A.; Shchipanov, Nikolay A.; Bulatova, Nina S.; Pavlova, Svetlana V.; Borodin, Pavel M.; Searle, Jeremy B.

    2013-01-01

    Sorex araneus, the Common shrew, is a species with more than 70 karyotypic races, many of which form parapatric hybrid zones, making it a model for studying chromosomal speciation. Hybrids between races have reduced fitness, but microsatellite markers have demonstrated considerable gene flow between them, calling into question whether the chromosomal barriers actually do contribute to genetic divergence. We studied phenotypic clines across two hybrid zones with especially complex heterozygotes. Hybrids between the Novosibirsk and Tomsk races produce chains of nine and three chromosomes at meiosis, and hybrids between the Moscow and Seliger races produce chains of eleven. Our goal was to determine whether phenotypes show evidence of reduced gene flow at hybrid zones. We used maximum likelihood to fit tanh cline models to geometric shape data and found that phenotypic clines in skulls and mandibles across these zones had similar centers and widths as chromosomal clines. The amount of phenotypic differentiation across the zones is greater than expected if it were dissipating due to unrestricted gene flow given the amount of time since contact, but it is less than expected to have accumulated from drift during allopatric separation in glacial refugia. Only if heritability is very low, Ne very high, and the time spent in allopatry very short, will the differences we observe be large enough to match the expectation of drift. Our results therefore suggest that phenotypic differentiation has been lost through gene flow since post-glacial secondary contact, but not as quickly as would be expected if there was free gene flow across the hybrid zones. The chromosomal tension zones are confirmed to be partial barriers that prevent differentiated races from becoming phenotypically homogenous. PMID:23874420

  14. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome. PMID:25252301

  15. The human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) gene is located in the chromosome 2q14 region

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, D.; Jones, C.; Hart, I.; Bleskan, J.; Berger, R.; Geyer, D. ); Eisenberg, S.P. ); Smith, M.F. Jr.; Arend, W.P. )

    1993-01-01

    The gene for human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) has been assigned to chromosome 2 on the basis of Southern blot analysis of a series of human-Chinese hamster cell hybrids. Using a yeast artificial chromosome containing the IL1RN gene as a probe, the human IL1RN gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome 2 at band 2q14.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This site is near the positions of genes for human IL-l[alpha], IL-1[beta], and types I and II IL-1 receptors, as reported by other laboratories. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Imaging genes, chromosomes, and nuclear structures using laser-scanning confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Stephen G.

    1990-08-01

    For 350 years, the optical microscope has had a powerful symbiotic relationship with biology. Until this century, optical microscopy was the only means of examining cellular structure; in return, biologists have contributed greatly to the evolution of microscope design and technique. Recent advances in the detection and processing of optical images, together with methods for labelling specific biological molecules, have brought about a resurgence in the application of optical microscopy to the biological sciences. One of the areas in which optical microscopy is breaking new ground is in elucidating the large scale organization of chromatin in chromosomes and cell nuclei. Nevertheless, imaging the contents of the cell nucleus is a difficult challenge for light microscopy, for two principal reasons. First, the dimensions of all but the largest nuclear structures (nucleoli, vacuoles) are close to or below the resolving power of far field optics. Second, the native optical contrast properties of many important chromatin structures (eg. chromosome domains, centromere regions) are very weak, or essentially zero. As an extreme example, individual genes probably have nothing to distinguish them other than their sequence of DNA bases, which cannot be directly visualized with any current form of microscopy. Similarly, the interphase nucleus shows no direct visible evidence of focal chromatin domains. Thus, imaging of such entities depends heavily on contrast enhancement methods. The most promising of these is labelling DNA in situ using sequence-specific probes that may be visualized using fluorescent dyes. We have applied this method to detecting individual genes in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei, and to imaging a number of DNA-containing structures including chromosome domains, metaphase chromosomes and centromere regions. We have also demonstrated the applicability of in situ fluorescent labelling to detecting numerical and structural abnormalities both in

  17. Identification of human chromosome 9 specific genes using exon amplification.

    PubMed

    Church, D M; Banks, L T; Rogers, A C; Graw, S L; Housman, D E; Gusella, J F; Buckler, A J

    1993-11-01

    We have recently developed a method, exon amplification, that is designed for isolation of exon sequences from genomic DNA. To assess the efficacy of this method we have analyzed cosmid genomic clones derived from human chromosome 9, and have cloned several products from this analysis. Approximately 63% of cosmids produced at least one product derived from functioning splice sites within the target genomic fragment, and in many cases multiple products were isolated. In addition, an easily identifiable class of false positives was produced from 56% of cosmids analyzed; these are readily eliminated from subsequent study. Sequence analysis and database searches revealed that the majority (87%) of the putative exon clones were unique, the remainder being derived from repetitive sequences. Analysis of sequence conservation by Southern blotting in addition to cDNA screening experiments suggested that most, if not all, of these unique sequences represent true exons. The results of these studies indicate that exon amplification is a rapid and reliable approach for isolation of exon sequences from mammalian genomic DNA. PMID:7506603

  18. Karyotypic diversification in Mytilus mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) inferred from chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mussels of the genus Mytilus present morphologically similar karyotypes that are presumably conserved. The absence of chromosome painting probes in bivalves makes difficult verifying this hypothesis. In this context, we comparatively mapped ribosomal RNA and histone gene families on the chromosomes of Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. trossulus and M. californianus by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Major rRNA, core and linker histone gene clusters mapped to different chromosome pairs in the four taxa. In contrast, minor rRNA gene clusters showed a different behavior. In all Mytilus two of the 5S rDNA clusters mapped to the same chromosome pair and one of them showed overlapping signals with those corresponding to one of the histone H1 gene clusters. The overlapping signals on mitotic chromosomes became a pattern of alternate 5S rRNA and linker histone gene signals on extended chromatin fibers. Additionally, M. trossulus showed minor and major rDNA clusters on the same chromosome pair. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that at least some of the chromosomes bearing these sequences are orthologous and that chromosomal mapping of rRNA and histone gene clusters could be a good tool to help deciphering some of the many unsolved questions in the systematic classification of Mytilidae. PMID:25023072

  19. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype. PMID:26744914

  20. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Austen B; Rafi, Syed K; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G) negative euchromatic (light) bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark) bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN) 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD. PMID:27164088

  1. Morphometric Analysis of Recognized Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obesity in Relationship to the Distribution of Protein-Coding Genes on Human Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Austen B.; Rafi, Syed K.; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes are comprised of complex chromatin architecture with the specific assembly and configuration of each chromosome influencing gene expression and function in yet undefined ways by varying degrees of heterochromatinization that result in Giemsa (G) negative euchromatic (light) bands and G-positive heterochromatic (dark) bands. We carried out morphometric measurements of high-resolution chromosome ideograms for the first time to characterize the total euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome band length, distribution and localization of 20,145 known protein-coding genes, 790 recognized autism spectrum disorder (ASD) genes and 365 obesity genes. The individual lengths of G-negative euchromatin and G-positive heterochromatin chromosome bands were measured in millimeters and recorded from scaled and stacked digital images of 850-band high-resolution ideograms supplied by the International Society of Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN) 2013. Our overall measurements followed established banding patterns based on chromosome size. G-negative euchromatic band regions contained 60% of protein-coding genes while the remaining 40% were distributed across the four heterochromatic dark band sub-types. ASD genes were disproportionately overrepresented in the darker heterochromatic sub-bands, while the obesity gene distribution pattern did not significantly differ from protein-coding genes. Our study supports recent trends implicating genes located in heterochromatin regions playing a role in biological processes including neurodevelopment and function, specifically genes associated with ASD. PMID:27164088

  2. Identification of the human {beta}A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): Localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsebos, T.J.M.; Cerosaletti, K.M.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-08-10

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine {beta}A2 crystalline gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe. Regional localization to 2q34-q36 was established by hybridizing the CRYBA2 probe to microcell and radiation hybrids containing defined fragments of chromosome 2 as the only human contribution. The CRYBA2 probe was also used to localize, by interspecific backcross mapping, the mouse gene (Cryba2) to the central portion of chromosome 1 in a region of known human chromosome 2 homology. Finally, we demonstrate that in both species the {beta}A2 crystallin gene is linked but separable from the {gamma}A crystallin gene. The {beta}A2 crystallin gene is a candidate gene for human and mouse hereditary cataract. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Chromosomal mapping of the human M6 genes

    SciTech Connect

    Olinsky, S.; Loop, B.T.; DeKosky, A.

    1996-05-01

    M6 is a neuronal membrane glycoprotein that may have an important role in neural development. This molecule was initially defined by a monoclonal antibody that affected the survival of cultured cerebellar neurons and the outgrowth of neurites. The nature of the antigen was discovered by expression cDNA cloning using this monoclonal antibody. Two distinct murine M6 cDNAs (designated M6a and M6b) whose deduced amino acid sequences were remarkably similar to that of the myelin proteolipid protein human cDNA and genomic clones encoding M6a and M6b and have characterized them by restriction mapping, Southern hybridization with cDNA probes, and sequence analysis. We have localized these genes within the human genome by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). The human M6a gene is located at 4q34, and the M6b gene is located at Xp22.2 A number of human neurological disorders have been mapped to the Xp22 region, including Aicardi syndrome (MIM 304050), Rett syndrome (MIM 312750), X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (MIM 302801), and X-linked mental retardation syndromes (MRX1, MIM 309530). This raises the possibility that a defect in the M6b gene is responsible for one of these neurological disorders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Susceptibility to renal carcinoma in the Eker rat involves a tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 10.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, R S; Buetow, K H; Testa, J R; Knudson, A G

    1993-01-01

    Germ-line mutations of tumor suppressor genes confer strong predisposition to tumor formation. In the rat, a form of dominantly inherited renal carcinoma (RC) results in multiple chromophobe cell tumors that resemble the human disease, and heterozygous carriers (RC/+) are highly susceptible to environmental agents (radiation and chemical carcinogens), making it a desirable model to study epithelial carcinogenesis. By linkage analysis, the locus of the inherited RC mutation was mapped to rat chromosomal band 10q12, near the protamine locus (logarithm of odds score = 17.96). Renal tumors also showed a loss of heterozygosity at this locus, lending support to the recessive nature of this putative tumor suppressor gene. Our result suggested that the human homolog of the RC gene may reside on human chromosome 16, not known to be altered commonly in human RC. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8103600

  6. A second gene for cerulean cataracts maps to the {beta} crystallin region on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.; Yount, J.; Lovrien, E.

    1996-08-01

    Cogenital cataracts are one of the most common major eye abnormalities and often lead to blindness in infants. At least a third of all cases are familial. Within this group, highly penetrant, autosomal dominant forms of congenital cataracts (ADCC) are most common. ADCC is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, in which at least eight different loci have been identified for nine clinically distinct forms. Among these, Armitage et al. mapped a gene for cerulean blue cataracts to chromosome 17q24. Bodker et al. described a large family with cerulean blue cataracts, in which the affected daughter of affected first cousins was presumed to be homozygous for the purported gene. We report linkage in this family to the region on chromosome 22q that includes two {beta} crystallin genes (CRYBB2, CRYBB3) and one pseudogene (CRYBB2P1). The affected female in question is homozygous at all markers. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Chromosomal position shift of a regulatory gene alters the bacterial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Michael; Zaldastanishvili, Elisabed; Sobetzko, Patrick; Lafon, Corinne; Mourez, Michael; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-09-30

    Recent studies strongly suggest that in bacterial cells the order of genes along the chromosomal origin-to-terminus axis is determinative for regulation of the growth phase-dependent gene expression. The prediction from this observation is that positional displacement of pleiotropic genes will affect the genetic regulation and hence, the cellular phenotype. To test this prediction we inserted the origin-proximal dusB-fis operon encoding the global regulator FIS in the vicinity of replication terminus on both arms of the Escherichia coli chromosome. We found that the lower fis gene dosage in the strains with terminus-proximal dusB-fis operons was compensated by increased fis expression such that the intracellular concentration of FIS was homeostatically adjusted. Nevertheless, despite unchanged FIS levels the positional displacement of dusB-fis impaired the competitive growth fitness of cells and altered the state of the overarching network regulating DNA topology, as well as the cellular response to environmental stress, hazardous substances and antibiotics. Our finding that the chromosomal repositioning of a regulatory gene can determine the cellular phenotype unveils an important yet unexplored facet of the genetic control mechanisms and paves the way for novel approaches to manipulate bacterial physiology. PMID:26170236

  9. A gene for Holt-Oram syndrome maps to chromosome 12q24.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, D.; Pelet, A.; Sidi, D.

    1994-09-01

    Originally described in 1960, Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS, MIM:142900) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of unknown origin (1/100,000 live births) characterized by congenital septal heart defects with associated malformations of upper limbs. We have reported on the mapping of a gene causing HOS to the distal long arm of chromosome 12 (12q21-qter) by linkage analysis in 9 multiplex families (Zmax=8.19 at the D12S354 locus). In addition, multipoint linkage analysis provided evidence for mapping of the disease locus to the genetic interval (7cM) defined by loci D12S105 and D12S79. In situ hybridization of YACs containing the flanking loci D12S105 and D12S79 demonstrates that the HOS locus maps to 12q24.1 thus exluding the candidate genes KOX20 and KOX1. We tested three HOS multiplex families with polydactily or without heart defect and showed that they do not map to chromosome 12q (homog-test: {chi}{sup 2}=13.28, p=0.0001). This observation supports the view that genetic heterogeneity holds true for typical HOS only. The mapping of a gene for HOS is, to our knowledge, the first chromosomal localization of a gene responsible for congenital septal defect in human. The characterization of the disease causing gene will hopefully shed light on the molecular mechanisms that govern heart septation and limb development in the early stages of embryogenesis.

  10. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  12. Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice Lacking the Tas1r3 Taste Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled sweet taste receptor dimer T1R2/T1R3 is expressed in taste bud cells in the oral cavity. In recent years, its involvement in membrane glucose sensing was discovered in endocrine cells regulating glucose homeostasis. We investigated importance of extraorally expressed T1R3 taste receptor protein in age-dependent control of blood glucose homeostasis in vivo, using nonfasted mice with a targeted mutation of the Tas1r3 gene that encodes the T1R3 protein. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as behavioral tests measuring taste responses to sucrose solutions, were performed with C57BL/6ByJ (Tas1r3+/+) inbred mice bearing the wild-type allele and C57BL/6J-Tas1r3tm1Rfm mice lacking the entire Tas1r3 coding region and devoid of the T1R3 protein (Tas1r3-/-). Compared with Tas1r3+/+ mice, Tas1r3-/- mice lacked attraction to sucrose in brief-access licking tests, had diminished taste preferences for sucrose solutions in the two-bottle tests, and had reduced insulin sensitivity and tolerance to glucose administered intraperitoneally or intragastrically, which suggests that these effects are due to absence of T1R3. Impairment of glucose clearance in Tas1r3-/- mice was exacerbated with age after intraperitoneal but not intragastric administration of glucose, pointing to a compensatory role of extraoral T1R3-dependent mechanisms in offsetting age-dependent decline in regulation of glucose homeostasis. Incretin effects were similar in Tas1r3+/+ and Tas1r3-/- mice, which suggests that control of blood glucose clearance is associated with effects of extraoral T1R3 in tissues other than the gastrointestinal tract. Collectively, the obtained data demonstrate that the T1R3 receptor protein plays an important role in control of glucose homeostasis not only by regulating sugar intake but also via its extraoral function, probably in the pancreas and brain. PMID:26107521

  13. Brown and polar bear Y chromosomes reveal extensive male-biased gene flow within brother lineages.

    PubMed

    Bidon, Tobias; Janke, Axel; Fain, Steven R; Eiken, Hans Geir; Hagen, Snorre B; Saarma, Urmas; Hallström, Björn M; Lecomte, Nicolas; Hailer, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Brown and polar bears have become prominent examples in phylogeography, but previous phylogeographic studies relied largely on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or were geographically restricted. The male-specific Y chromosome, a natural counterpart to mtDNA, has remained underexplored. Although this paternally inherited chromosome is indispensable for comprehensive analyses of phylogeographic patterns, technical difficulties and low variability have hampered its application in most mammals. We developed 13 novel Y-chromosomal sequence and microsatellite markers from the polar bear genome and screened these in a broad geographic sample of 130 brown and polar bears. We also analyzed a 390-kb-long Y-chromosomal scaffold using sequencing data from published male ursine genomes. Y chromosome evidence support the emerging understanding that brown and polar bears started to diverge no later than the Middle Pleistocene. Contrary to mtDNA patterns, we found 1) brown and polar bears to be reciprocally monophyletic sister (or rather brother) lineages, without signals of introgression, 2) male-biased gene flow across continents and on phylogeographic time scales, and 3) male dispersal that links the Alaskan ABC islands population to mainland brown bears. Due to female philopatry, mtDNA provides a highly structured estimate of population differentiation, while male-biased gene flow is a homogenizing force for nuclear genetic variation. Our findings highlight the importance of analyzing both maternally and paternally inherited loci for a comprehensive view of phylogeographic history, and that mtDNA-based phylogeographic studies of many mammals should be reevaluated. Recent advances in sequencing technology render the analysis of Y-chromosomal variation feasible, even in nonmodel organisms. PMID:24667925

  14. A gene for familial psoriasis susceptibility maps to the distal end of human chromosome 17q

    SciTech Connect

    Bowcock, A.; Tomfohrde, J.; Barnes, R.

    1994-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis that affects approximately 2% of the population. A gene for psoriasis susceptibility was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 17q as a result of a genome wide linkage-analysis with polymorphic microsatellites and eight multiply affected psoriasis kindreds. With one large kindred a maximum two-point lod score with D17S784 was 5.70 at 15% recombination. Heterogeneity testing indicated that psoriasis susceptibility in 50% of the families was linked to distal 17q. Susceptibility to psoriasis has repeatedly been found to be associated with HLA-Cw6 and associated HLA alleles. We therefore genotyped the families for loci within and flanking HLA; these included PCR assays for susceptibility alleles. By lod score analysis no evidence of linkage of psoriasis susceptibility to HLA was detected. The distribution of HLA-Cw6 and HLA-Class II alleles showed that HLA-Cw6 was frequent among patients, particularly in 4 of the 5 unlinked families. All affected members of two of these unlinked families carried HLA-Cw6 (empirical P values of 0.027 and 0.004). In 2 other families 4 of 6 and 6 of 7 had HLA-Cw6. In some of these families, an inability to detect linkage to HLA may have been due to the occurrence of multiple haplotypes carrying the psoriasis associated allele, HLA-Cw6. Contrasting with these findings, we observed a lack of association between HLA-Cw6 and psoriasis in the 3 families in which 17q markers were linked to susceptibility. The ability to detect linkage to 17q confirms that some forms of familial psoriasis are due to molecular defects at a single major genetic locus other than HLA.

  15. Gene dosage methods as diagnostic tools for the identification of chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gouas, L; Goumy, C; Véronèse, L; Tchirkov, A; Vago, P

    2008-09-01

    Cytogenetics is the part of genetics that deals with chromosomes, particularly with numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, and their implications in congenital or acquired genetic disorders. Standard karyotyping, successfully used for the last 50 years in investigating the chromosome etiology in patients with infertility, fetal abnormalities and congenital disorders, is constrained by the limits of microscopic resolution and is not suited for the detection of subtle chromosome abnormalities. The ability to detect submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements that lead to copy-number changes has escalated progressively in recent years with the advent of molecular cytogenetic techniques. Here, we review various gene dosage methods such as FISH, PCR-based approaches (MLPA, QF-PCR, QMPSF and real time PCR), CGH and array-CGH, that can be used for the identification and delineation of copy-number changes for diagnostic purposes. Besides comparing their relative strength and weakness, we will discuss the impact that these detection methods have on our understanding of copy number variations in the human genome and their implications in genetic counseling. PMID:18513889

  16. Comparative cytogenetics in four species of Palinuridae: B chromosomes, ribosomal genes and telomeric sequences.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Susanna; Coluccia, Elisabetta; Deidda, Federica; Cau, Angelo; Cannas, Rita; Deiana, Anna Maria

    2012-12-01

    The evolutionary pathway of Palinuridae (Crustacea, Decapoda) is still controversial, uncertain and unexplored, expecially from a karyological point of view. Here we describe the South African spiny lobster Jasus lalandii karyotype: n and 2n values, heterochromatin distribution, nucleolar organizer region (NOR) location and telomeric repeat structure and location. To compare the genomic and chromosomal organization in Palinuridae we located NORs in Panulirus regius, Palinurus gilchristi and Palinurus mauritanicus: all species showed multiple NORs. In J. lalandii NORs were located on three chromosome pairs, with interindividual polymorphism. In P. regius and in the two Palinurus species NORs were located on two chromosome pairs. In the two last species 45S ribosomal gene loci were also found on B chromosomes. In addition, the nature and location of telomeric repeats were investigated by FISH in J. lalandii, P. gilchristi, P. mauritanicus Palinurus elephas, and P. regius (Palinuridae, Achelata), and in Scyllarus arctus (Scyllaridae, Achelata): all these Achelata species showed the (TTAGG)n pentameric repeats. Furthermore, in J. lalandii these repeats occurred in all the telomeres and in some interstitial chromosomal sites, associated with NORs. PMID:23224906

  17. Integration and expression of alpha-amylase and endoglucanase genes in the Lactobacillus plantarum chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Scheirlinck, T; Mahillon, J; Joos, H; Dhaese, P; Michiels, F

    1989-01-01

    A commercial grass silage starter strain of Lactobacillus plantarum was transformed by high-frequency electroporation with plasmids containing an alpha-amylase gene from Bacillus stearothermophilus and an endoglucanase gene from Clostridium thermocellum. Both genes were expressed from their native regulatory signals, and active enzymes were found in the supernatant. However, the segregational stability of the transforming plasmids was rather low. Therefore, the transforming genes were inserted in the L. plantarum chromosome by means of single homologous recombination. In the majority of the transformants, this led to extremely stable segregation and expression of the transforming genes, without generating secondary mutations in the host. Increased selective pressure led to tandem amplification of the transforming DNA. The transformed strains demonstrated the ability of L. plantarum to express heterologous gene products; they can be used to detect the inoculum in silage ecology studies; and they demonstrate the feasibility of engineering truly cellulolytic silage starter bacteria. Images PMID:2679379

  18. The human SOX11 gene: Cloning, chromosomal assignment and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, P.; Goze, C.; Marsollier, C.; Taviaux, S.

    1995-09-20

    The mammalian testis determining gene SRY contains an HMG box-related DNA binding motif. By analogy a family of genes related to SRY in the HMG domain have been called SOX (SRY box-related genes). We have cloned and characterized the human SOX11 gene using the partial cloning of both human and mouse SOX11 genes and mapped it to chromosome 2p25. The SOX11 sequence is strongly conserved with the chicken homologue and is related to SOX4. It contains several putative transcriptional either activator or repressor domains. SOX11 expression pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that this gene is important in the developing nervous system. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Chromosome localization analysis of genes strongly expressed in human visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Sheng; Song, Huai-Dong; Shi, Wen-Jing; Hu, Ren-Ming; Han, Ze-Guang; Chen, Jia-Lun

    2002-06-01

    To understand fully the physiologic functions of visceral adipose tissue and to provide a basis for the identification of novel genes related to obesity and insulin resistance, the gene expression profiling of human visceral adipose tissue was established by using cDNA array. The characterization and chromosome localization of 400 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) strongly expressed in visceral adipose tissue were analyzed by searching PubMed, UniGene, the Human Genome Draft Database, and Location Data Base. Two hundred eighty-nine clones were classified into known genes among the 400 ESTs strongly expressed in the tissue. Among them, <20% have been previously reported to be expressed in adipose tissue. The chromosome localization of 389 ESTs strongly expressed in visceral adipose tissue showed that their relative abundance was significantly increased on chromosomes 1, 16, 19, 20, and 22 compared with the expected distribution of the same number of random genes. The intrachromosome distribution of the genes strongly expressed in visceral adipose tissue was concentrated in certain regions, such as 1p36.2-1p36.3, 6p21.3-6p22.1, 19p13.3 and 19q13.1. Among them, the region of 1p36.2-1p36.3 appeared to be specific for visceral adipose tissue. Interestingly, some genes playing an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin signal transduction and adipocyte differentiation, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors; CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteina; and phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit, polypeptide 2 (p85beta), were also localized in the concentrated regions, which may provide clues to identifying novel genes closely related to adipocyte function with potential pathophysiologic implications. PMID:12166625

  20. Assignment of the {beta}-arrestin 1 gene (ARRB1) to human chromosome 11q13

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G.; Morizio, E.; Palka, G.

    1994-11-01

    Two types of proteins play a major role in determining homologous desensitization of G-coupled receptors: {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase ({beta}ARK), which phosphorylates the agonist-occupied receptor, and its functional cofactor, {beta}-arrestin. {beta}ARK is a member of a multigene family, consisting of six known subtypes, which have also been named G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK 1 to 6) due to the apparently unique functional association of such kinases with this receptor family. The gene for {beta}ARK1 has been localized to human chromosome 11q13. The four members of the arrestin/{beta}-arrestin gene family identified so far are arrestin, X-arrestin, {beta}-arrestin 1, and {beta}-arrestin 2. Here the authors report the chromosome mapping of the human gene for {beta}-arrestin 1 (ARRB1) to chromosome 11q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two-color FISH confirmed that the two genes coding for the functionally related proteins {beta}ARK1 and {beta}arrestin 1 both map to 11q13. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Chromosomal localization and genomic characterization of the mouse melastatin gene (Mlsn1).

    PubMed

    Hunter, J J; Shao, J; Smutko, J S; Dussault, B J; Nagle, D L; Woolf, E A; Holmgren, L M; Moore, K J; Shyjan, A W

    1998-11-15

    We recently described a novel gene, melastatin, whose expression is inversely correlated with melanoma aggressiveness. Chromosomal localization of this gene places it on mouse chromosome 7 and in the 15q13-q14 region of the human genome. Although expression patterns and chromosomal localization in the mouse are consistent with involvement of melastatin mutations in the mouse ruby-eye-2 defect, congenic analysis showed genetic segregation of the two loci. Cloning of the full-length human cDNA revealed a much larger transcript than we had previously identified, corresponding to a 1533-amino-acid protein product with homology to members of the transient receptor potential (Trp) family of calcium channels. The mouse melastatin gene contains 27 exons and spans at least 58 kb of genomic DNA. The promoter region of Mlsn1 contains four potential microphthalmia binding sites including an M box, a transcriptional regulatory element unique to genes with a restricted melanocytic expression pattern. A 1-kb PvuII fragment from this region was capable of driving high levels of luciferase expression in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:9806836

  2. Identification and characterization of the human XIST gene promoter: implications for models of X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrich, B D; Plenge, R M; Willard, H F

    1997-01-01

    The XIST gene in both humans and mice is expressed exclusively from the inactive X chromosome and is required for X chromosome inactivation to occur early in development. In order to understand transcriptional regulation of the XIST gene, we have identified and characterized the human XIST promoter and two repeated DNA elements that modulate promoter activity. As determined by reporter gene constructs, the XIST minimal promoter is constitutively active at high levels in human male and female cell lines and in transgenic mice. We demonstrate that this promoter activity is dependent in vitro upon binding of the common transcription factors SP1, YY1 and TBP. We further identify two cis -acting repeated DNA sequences that influence reporter gene activity. First, DNA fragments containing a set of highly conserved repeats located within the 5'-end of XIST stimulate reporter activity 3-fold in transiently transfected cell lines. Second, a 450 bp alternating purine-pyrimidine repeat located 25 kb upstream of the XIST promoter partially suppresses promoter activity by approximately 70% in transient transfection assays. These results indicate that the XIST promoter is constitutively active and that critical steps in the X inactivation process must involve silencing of XIST on the active X chromosome by factors that interact with and/or recognize sequences located outside the minimal promoter. PMID:9185579

  3. Gene Conversion Violates the Stepwise Mutation Model for Microsatellites in Y-Chromosomal Palindromic Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Balaresque, Patricia; King, Turi E; Parkin, Emma J; Heyer, Evelyne; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) contains eight large inverted repeats (palindromes), in which high-sequence similarity between repeat arms is maintained by gene conversion. These palindromes also harbor microsatellites, considered to evolve via a stepwise mutation model (SMM). Here, we ask whether gene conversion between palindrome microsatellites contributes to their mutational dynamics. First, we study the duplicated tetranucleotide microsatellite DYS385a,b lying in palindrome P4. We show, by comparing observed data with simulated data under a SMM within haplogroups, that observed heteroallelic combinations in which the modal repeat number difference between copies was large, can give rise to homoallelic combinations with zero-repeats difference, equivalent to many single-step mutations. These are unlikely to be generated under a strict SMM, suggesting the action of gene conversion. Second, we show that the intercopy repeat number difference for a large set of duplicated microsatellites in all palindromes in the MSY reference sequence is significantly reduced compared with that for nonpalindrome-duplicated microsatellites, suggesting that the former are characterized by unusual evolutionary dynamics. These observations indicate that gene conversion violates the SMM for microsatellites in palindromes, homogenizing copies within individual Y chromosomes, but increasing overall haplotype diversity among chromosomes within related groups. PMID:24610746

  4. Gene conversion violates the stepwise mutation model for microsatellites in y-chromosomal palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Balaresque, Patricia; King, Turi E; Parkin, Emma J; Heyer, Evelyne; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A

    2014-05-01

    The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) contains eight large inverted repeats (palindromes), in which high-sequence similarity between repeat arms is maintained by gene conversion. These palindromes also harbor microsatellites, considered to evolve via a stepwise mutation model (SMM). Here, we ask whether gene conversion between palindrome microsatellites contributes to their mutational dynamics. First, we study the duplicated tetranucleotide microsatellite DYS385a,b lying in palindrome P4. We show, by comparing observed data with simulated data under a SMM within haplogroups, that observed heteroallelic combinations in which the modal repeat number difference between copies was large, can give rise to homoallelic combinations with zero-repeats difference, equivalent to many single-step mutations. These are unlikely to be generated under a strict SMM, suggesting the action of gene conversion. Second, we show that the intercopy repeat number difference for a large set of duplicated microsatellites in all palindromes in the MSY reference sequence is significantly reduced compared with that for nonpalindrome-duplicated microsatellites, suggesting that the former are characterized by unusual evolutionary dynamics. These observations indicate that gene conversion violates the SMM for microsatellites in palindromes, homogenizing copies within individual Y chromosomes, but increasing overall haplotype diversity among chromosomes within related groups. PMID:24610746

  5. A Double-Edged Sword: How Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes Can Contribute to Chromosomal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Bernardo; Compton, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Most solid tumors are characterized by abnormal chromosome numbers (aneuploidy) and karyotypic profiling has shown that the majority of these tumors are heterogeneous and chromosomally unstable. Chromosomal instability (CIN) is defined as persistent mis-segregation of whole chromosomes and is caused by defects during mitosis. Large-scale genome sequencing has failed to reveal frequent mutations of genes encoding proteins involved in mitosis. On the contrary, sequencing has revealed that most mutated genes in cancer fall into a limited number of core oncogenic signaling pathways that regulate the cell cycle, cell growth, and apoptosis. This led to the notion that the induction of oncogenic signaling is a separate event from the loss of mitotic fidelity, but a growing body of evidence suggests that oncogenic signaling can deregulate cell cycle progression, growth, and differentiation as well as cause CIN. These new results indicate that the induction of CIN can no longer be considered separately from the cancer-associated driver mutations. Here we review the primary causes of CIN in mitosis and discuss how the oncogenic activation of key signal transduction pathways contributes to the induction of CIN. PMID:23825799

  6. Identification of a nonhistone chromosomal protein associated with heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster and its gene.

    PubMed Central

    James, T C; Elgin, S C

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a fraction of nuclear proteins of Drosophila melanogaster identified as tightly binding to DNA. Four of these antibodies were directed against a 19-kilodalton nuclear protein; immunofluorescence staining of the polytene chromosomes localized the antigen to the alpha, beta, and intercalary heterochromatic regions. Screening of a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library with one of the monoclonal antibodies identified a recombinant DNA phage clone that produced a fusion protein immunologically similar to the heterochromatin-associated protein. Polyclonal sera directed against the bacterial lacZ fusion protein recognized the same nuclear protein on Western blots. A full-length cDNA clone was isolated from a lambda gt10 library, and its DNA sequence was obtained. Analysis of the open reading frame revealed an 18,101-dalton protein encoded by this cDNA. Two overlapping genomic DNA clones were isolated from a Charon 4 library of D. melanogaster with the cDNA clone, and a restriction map was obtained. In situ hybridization with these probes indicated that the gene maps to a single chromosome location at 29A on the 2L chromosome. This general strategy should be effective for cloning the genes and identifying the genetic loci of chromosomal proteins which cannot be readily assayed by other means. Images PMID:3099166

  7. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the mouse homologue of rat OX40 protein.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, M L; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Barclay, A N

    1995-04-01

    The OX40 protein is expressed only on activated rat CD4+ T blasts and is a member of a superfamily of cell surface molecules which includes CD40, CD30, CD95 (Fas), CD27, 4-1BB antigens and the receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). The proteins of this group are related to each other by having three to six repeats of a cysteine-rich sequence in their extracellular domains. Members of this family of receptors have also been shown to bind to ligands which are structurally related to TNF. The mouse homologue of the rat OX40 protein was cloned at the cDNA and genomic levels. The gene structure shows that there are several intron/exon borders shared between OX40 and CD27, CD40, TNF receptor type I, CD95 and 4-1BB genes. This group of genes is less closely related structurally to the gene structure of the NGF receptor. The gene encoding murine OX40 has been placed on mouse chromosome 4, in an area which contains the genes for TNF receptor type II and 4-1BB, and is syntenic with a region of human chromosome 1 which contains human TNF receptor type II, OX40, and CD30 genes. PMID:7737295

  8. Male-specific region of the bovine Y chromosome is gene rich with a high transcriptomic activity in testis development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ti-Cheng; Yang, Yang; Retzel, Ernest F; Liu, Wan-Sheng

    2013-07-23

    The male-specific region of the mammalian Y chromosome (MSY) contains clusters of genes essential for male reproduction. The highly repetitive and degenerative nature of the Y chromosome impedes genomic and transcriptomic characterization. Although the Y chromosome sequence is available for the human, chimpanzee, and macaque, little is known about the annotation and transcriptome of nonprimate MSY. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of the MSY in cattle by direct testis cDNA selection and RNA-seq approaches. The bovine MSY differs radically from the primate Y chromosomes with respect to its structure, gene content, and density. Among the 28 protein-coding genes/families identified on the bovine MSY (12 single- and 16 multicopy genes), 16 are bovid specific. The 1,274 genes identified in this study made the bovine MSY gene density the highest in the genome; in comparison, primate MSYs have only 31-78 genes. Our results, along with the highly transcriptional activities observed from these Y-chromosome genes and 375 additional noncoding RNAs, challenge the widely accepted hypothesis that the MSY is gene poor and transcriptionally inert. The bovine MSY genes are predominantly expressed and are differentially regulated during the testicular development. Synonymous substitution rate analyses of the multicopy MSY genes indicated that two major periods of expansion occurred during the Miocene and Pliocene, contributing to the adaptive radiation of bovids. The massive amplification and vigorous transcription suggest that the MSY serves as a genomic niche regulating male reproduction during bovid expansion. PMID:23842086

  9. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for multi-copy testis genes exhibiting post-meiotic expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jacob L.; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Park, Peter J.; Warburton, Peter E.; Page, David C.; Turner, James M.A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the prevailing view, mammalian X chromosomes are enriched in spermatogenesis genes expressed before meiosis1–3 and deficient in spermatogenesis genes expressed after meiosis2,3. The paucity of post-meiotic genes on the X chromosome has been interpreted as a consequence of Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) – the complete silencing of genes on the XY bivalent at meiotic prophase4,5. Recent studies have concluded that MSCI-initiated silencing persists beyond meiosis6–8 and that most X-genes remain repressed in round spermatids7. We report here that 33 multi-copy gene families, representing ~273 mouse X-linked genes, are expressed in the testis and that this expression is predominantly in post-meiotic cells. RNA FISH and microarray analysis show that the maintenance of X chromosome post-meiotic repression is incomplete. Furthermore, X-linked multi-copy genes exhibit expression levels similar to those of autosomal genes. Thus, not only is the mouse X chromosome enriched for spermatogenesis genes functioning before meiosis, but in addition ~18% of mouse X-linked genes exhibit post-meiotic expression. PMID:18454149

  10. The physical map of wheat chromosome 1BS provides insights into its gene space organization and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The wheat genome sequence is an essential tool for advanced genomic research and improvements. The generation of a high-quality wheat genome sequence is challenging due to its complex 17 Gb polyploid genome. To overcome these difficulties, sequencing through the construction of BAC-based physical maps of individual chromosomes is employed by the wheat genomics community. Here, we present the construction of the first comprehensive physical map of chromosome 1BS, and illustrate its unique gene space organization and evolution. Results Fingerprinted BAC clones were assembled into 57 long scaffolds, anchored and ordered with 2,438 markers, covering 83% of chromosome 1BS. The BAC-based chromosome 1BS physical map and gene order of the orthologous regions of model grass species were consistent, providing strong support for the reliability of the chromosome 1BS assembly. The gene space for chromosome 1BS spans the entire length of the chromosome arm, with 76% of the genes organized in small gene islands, accompanied by a two-fold increase in gene density from the centromere to the telomere. Conclusions This study provides new evidence on common and chromosome-specific features in the organization and evolution of the wheat genome, including a non-uniform distribution of gene density along the centromere-telomere axis, abundance of non-syntenic genes, the degree of colinearity with other grass genomes and a non-uniform size expansion along the centromere-telomere axis compared with other model cereal genomes. The high-quality physical map constructed in this study provides a solid basis for the assembly of a reference sequence of chromosome 1BS and for breeding applications. PMID:24359668

  11. The sexually dimorphic on the Y-chromosome gene (sdY) is a conserved male-specific Y-chromosome sequence in many salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Ayaka; Nicol, Barbara; Jouanno, Elodie; Quillet, Edwige; Fostier, Alexis; Guyomard, René; Guiguen, Yann

    2013-01-01

    All salmonid species investigated to date have been characterized with a male heterogametic sex-determination system. However, as these species do not share any Y-chromosome conserved synteny, there remains a debate on whether they share a common master sex-determining gene. In this study, we investigated the extent of conservation and evolution of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) master sex-determining gene, sdY (sexually dimorphic on the Y-chromosome), in 15 different species of salmonids. We found that the sdY sequence is highly conserved in all salmonids and that sdY is a male-specific Y-chromosome gene in the majority of these species. These findings demonstrate that most salmonids share a conserved sex-determining locus and also strongly suggest that sdY may be this conserved master sex-determining gene. However, in two whitefish species (subfamily Coregoninae), sdY was found both in males and females, suggesting that alternative sex-determination systems may have also evolved in this family. Based on the wide conservation of sdY as a male-specific Y-chromosome gene, efficient and easy molecular sexing techniques can now be developed that will be of great interest for studying these economically and environmentally important species. PMID:23745140

  12. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Bu, X D; Rotter, J I

    1991-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, we show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, we have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11 +/- 0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus. PMID:1896469

  13. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  14. Molecular characterization of the AP2-like Q gene homoeoallele on chromosome 5D in hexaploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Q gene of wheat is responsible for many morphological traits associated with domestication. Q is located on wheat chromosome 5A and it is a member of the AP2 class of transcription factors. Genotypes harboring the q allele on chromosome 5A have speltoid spikes, which include non free-threshing...

  15. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with cotton fiber development in a chromosomal substitution line (CS-B22sh)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the impediments in the genetic improvement of cotton fiber is the paucity of information about genes associated with fiber development. Availability of chromosome arm substitution line CS-B22sh (chromosome 22 short arm substitution from 3-79 (Gossypium barbadense) into a TM-1 (G. hirsutum ba...

  16. Macrotene chromosomes provide insights to a new mechanism of high-order gene amplification in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Agnès; Khanna, Varun; Créno, Sophie; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Dujon, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation of chromosomal segments is now recognized as a major source of genetic polymorphism within natural populations of eukaryotes, as well as a possible cause of genetic diseases in humans, including cancer, but its molecular bases remain incompletely understood. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a variety of low-order amplifications (segmental duplications) were observed after adaptation to limiting environmental conditions or recovery from gene dosage imbalance, and interpreted in terms of replication-based mechanisms associated or not with homologous recombination. Here we show the emergence of novel high-order amplification structures, with corresponding overexpression of embedded genes, during evolution under favourable growth conditions of severely unfit yeast cells bearing genetically disabled genomes. Such events form massively extended chromosomes, which we propose to call macrotene, whose characteristics suggest the products of intrachromosomal rolling-circle type of replication structures, probably initiated by increased accidental template switches under important cellular stress conditions. PMID:25635677

  17. Physical mapping of the congenital chloride diarrhea gene region in human chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kere, J.; Hoeglund, P.; Haila, S.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD; MIM 214700) has been mapped to human chromosome 7 by a linkage study in Finnish families. The markers closest to the gene are D7S496 and D7S501, both with zero recombination fraction. In order to physically map the region and facilitate positional cloning, altogether 25 YAC clones have been isolated from the Washington University chromosome 7 collection of YACs. The clones form 2 contigs, 700 to 900 kb in size, around D7S496 and D7SS01. One YAC from the CEPH collection that bridges these contigs has been identified, but the link remains unconfirmed. Rare-cutter restriction mapping has identified as least 3 CpG islands within 50 to 200 kb of D7S496, supposed to map closest to CLD on the basis of linkage disequilibrium studies. Isolation of candidate cDNAs is in progress.

  18. Cloning of a human galactokinase gene (GK2) on chromosome 15 by complementation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R T; Peterson, C L; Calman, A F; Herskowitz, I; O'Donnell, J J

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) was isolated by complementation of a galactokinase-deficient (gal1-) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 458 amino acids with 29% identity to galactokinase of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Previous studies have mapped a human galactokinase gene (GK1) to chromosome 17q23-25, closely linked to thymidine kinase. The galactokinase gene that we have isolated (GK2) is located on chromosome 15. The relationship between the disease locus for galactokinase deficiency galactosemia, which is responsible for cataracts in newborns and possibly presenile cataracts in adults, and the two galactokinase loci is unknown. Images PMID:1438294

  19. The gene for human erythrocyte protein 4. 2 maps to chromosome 15q15

    SciTech Connect

    Najfeld, V. ); Ballard, S.G.; Menninger, J.; Ward, D.C. ); Bouhassira, E.E.; Schwartz, R.S.; Nagel, R.L.; Rybicki, A.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Protein 4.2 (P4.2), one of the major components of the red-blood-cell membrane, is located on the interior surface, where it binds with high affinity to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3. Individuals whose red blood cells are deficient in P4.2 have osmotically fragile, abnormally shaped cells and moderate hemolytic anemia. cDNA clones from both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} coding regions of the P4.2 gene were used to map its chromosomal location by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The probes, individually or in combination, gave specific hybridization signals on chromosome 15. The hybridization locus was identified by combining fluorescence images of the probe signals with fluorescence banding patterns generated by Alu-PCR (R-like) probe and by DAPI staining (G-like). The authors results demonstrate that the locus of the P4.2 gene is located within 15q15.

  20. Structure and chromosomal localization of a human water channel (AQP3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Sasaki, Sei; Saito, Fumiko

    1995-05-20

    A cDNA encoding rat AQP3, a water channel and a member of the MIP family, that is expressed predominantly in kidney medulla and colon was cloned recently. To determine the structure, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of the human AQP3 gene, the authors screened a human kidney cDNA library with rat AQP3 probe and isolated a cDNA coding for human AQP3 protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of human AQP3 was 91% identical to rat AQP3. Human AQP3 mRNA was expressed in colon, kidney, liver, pancreas, lung, peripheral leukocytes, spleen, and prostate. The human AQP3 gene was mapped to 7q36.2-q36.3 by chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Reconstruction of ancestral chromosome architecture and gene repertoire reveals principles of genome evolution in a model yeast genus.

    PubMed

    Vakirlis, Nikolaos; Sarilar, Véronique; Drillon, Guénola; Fleiss, Aubin; Agier, Nicolas; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Blanpain, Lou; Carbone, Alessandra; Devillers, Hugo; Dubois, Kenny; Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Graziani, Stéphane; Huu-Vang, Nguyen; Poirel, Marion; Reisser, Cyrielle; Schott, Jonathan; Schacherer, Joseph; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Llorente, Bertrand; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Fischer, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing genome history is complex but necessary to reveal quantitative principles governing genome evolution. Such reconstruction requires recapitulating into a single evolutionary framework the evolution of genome architecture and gene repertoire. Here, we reconstructed the genome history of the genus Lachancea that appeared to cover a continuous evolutionary range from closely related to more diverged yeast species. Our approach integrated the generation of a high-quality genome data set; the development of AnChro, a new algorithm for reconstructing ancestral genome architecture; and a comprehensive analysis of gene repertoire evolution. We found that the ancestral genome of the genus Lachancea contained eight chromosomes and about 5173 protein-coding genes. Moreover, we characterized 24 horizontal gene transfers and 159 putative gene creation events that punctuated species diversification. We retraced all chromosomal rearrangements, including gene losses, gene duplications, chromosomal inversions and translocations at single gene resolution. Gene duplications outnumbered losses and balanced rearrangements with 1503, 929, and 423 events, respectively. Gene content variations between extant species are mainly driven by differential gene losses, while gene duplications remained globally constant in all lineages. Remarkably, we discovered that balanced chromosomal rearrangements could be responsible for up to 14% of all gene losses by disrupting genes at their breakpoints. Finally, we found that nonsynonymous substitutions reached fixation at a coordinated pace with chromosomal inversions, translocations, and duplications, but not deletions. Overall, we provide a granular view of genome evolution within an entire eukaryotic genus, linking gene content, chromosome rearrangements, and protein divergence into a single evolutionary framework. PMID:27247244

  2. Asr genes belong to a gene family comprising at least three closely linked loci on chromosome 4 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Lijavetzky, D; Bernacchi, D; Hopp, H E; Iusem, N

    1996-09-25

    Asr1, Asr2 and Asr3 are three homologous clones isolated from tomato whose expression is believed to be regulated by abscisic acid (ABA); the corresponding genes thus participate in physiological and developmental processes such as responses of leaf and root to water stress, and fruit ripening. In this report, results obtained with Near Isogenic Lines reveal that Asr1, Asr2 and Asr3 represent three different loci. In addition, we map these genes on the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) map of the tomato genome by using an F2 population derived from an interspecific hybrid cross L. esculentum x L. penelli. RFLP data allow us to map these genes on chromosome 4, suggesting that they belong to a gene family. The elucidation of the genomic organization of the Asr gene family may help in understanding the role of its members in the response to osmotic stress, as well as in fruit ripening, at the molecular level. PMID:8879251

  3. First Identification of a Chromosomally Located Penicillinase Gene in Kingella kingae Species Isolated in Continental Europe

    PubMed Central

    Basmaci, Romain; Bidet, Philippe; Berçot, Béatrice; Jost, Christelle; Kwon, Thérésa; Gaumetou, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Kingella kingae is the major pathogen causing osteoarticular infections (OAI) in young children in numerous countries. Plasmid-borne TEM-1 penicillinase production has been sporadically detected in a few countries but not in continental Europe, despite a high prevalence of K. kingae infections. We describe here for the first time a K. kingae β-lactamase-producing strain in continental Europe and demonstrate the novel chromosomal location of the blaTEM-1 gene in K. kingae species. PMID:25049250

  4. Localization of the gene for branchiootorenal syndrome to chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.H.; Coppage, K.B.; Ankerstjerne, J.K.B.; Capper, D.T. ); Kumar, S.; Kenyon, J.; Tinley, S.; Comeau, K.; Kimberling, W.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Branchiootorenal syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects an estimated 2% of profoundly deaf children. In addition to hearing impairment, it is characterized by a lop-ear deformity, preauricular pits, bronchial cleft sinus tracts, and renal anomalies. The pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown; however, the defective gene has been localized to chromosome 8q by family linkage studies. 47 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Zhang, Peili; Liu, Jing; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catharine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenée; Verduzco, Daniel; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled, leading to a minimum of 921 syntenic blocks shared between the species. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 25–55 million years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences between the species—but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila. PMID:15632085

  6. Bovine Carboxylesterases: Evidence for Two CES1 and Five Families of CES Genes on Chromosome 18

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Roger S; Cox, Laura A; VandeBerg, John L

    2009-01-01

    Predicted bovine carboxylesterase (CES) protein and gene sequences were derived from bovine (Bos taurus) genomic sequence data. Two bovine CES1 genes (CES1.1 and CES1.2) were located on chromosome 18 encoding amino acid sequences that were 81% identical. Two forms of CES1.2 were also observed apparently caused by an indel polymorphism encoded at the C-terminus end. Two CES gene clusters were observed on chromosome 18: CES5-CES1.1-CES1.2 and CES2-CES3-CES6. Bovine CES1, CES2, CES3, CES5 and CES6 shared 39-45% identity with each other, but showed 71-76% identity with each of the five corresponding human CES family members. Phylogeny studies indicated that bovine CES genes originated from five ancestral gene duplication events which predated the eutherian mammalian common ancestor. In addition, a subsequent CES1 gene duplication event is proposed during mammalian evolution prior to the appearance of the Bovidae common ancestor ~ 20 MY ago. PMID:20161341

  7. Dystonia gene in Ashkenazi Jewish population is located on chromosome 9q32-34.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P L; de Leon, D; Ozelius, L; Risch, N; Bressman, S B; Brin, M F; Schuback, D E; Burke, R E; Kwiatkowski, D J; Shale, H

    1990-02-01

    Idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD) is a neurological disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions that appear as twisting movements of the limbs, trunk, and/or neck, which can progress to abnormal postures. Most familial forms of ITD follow autosomal dominant transmission with reduced penetrance. The frequency of ITD in the Ashkenazi Jewish population is five to ten times greater than that in other groups. Recently, a gene for ITD (DYT1) in a non-Jewish kindred was located on chromosome 9q32-34, with tight linkage to the gene encoding gelsolin (GSN). In the present study linkage analysis using DNA polymorphisms is used to locate a gene responsible for susceptibility to ITD in 12 Ashkenazi Jewish families. This dystonia gene exhibits close linkage with the gene encoding argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and appears by multipoint analysis to lie in the q32-34 region of chromosome 9, a region that also contains the loci for gelsolin and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. The same gene may be responsible for ITD both in the non-Jewish kindred mentioned above and in the Ashkenazi Jewish families presented here. However, because there is substantial difference between the penetrance of the dominant allele in these two groups, two different mutations may be operating to produce susceptibility to this disease in the two groups. PMID:2317008

  8. Structure, sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for USF2 transcription factors in mouse.

    PubMed

    Henrion, A A; Martinez, A; Mattei, M G; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1995-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed upstream stimulatory factor (USF) involved in the transcription of a wide variety of cellular genes is defined as dimers of c-myc-related proteins, composed of a basic helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper region. The USF family consists of different members that split into two groups: MLTF or USF1 and USF2 or FIP. We present here evidence that USF1 and USF2 are distinct closely related genes in human, rat, and mouse. Based on the recent cloning of rat and human new cDNAs, we have isolated genomic clones encompassing the murine USF2 gene, which consists of at least 10 exons spanning a minimum of 10 kb of genomic DNA. Unexpectedly, the organization of USF2 appears very split up by introns (0.08 to over 6 kb in size), compared to the myc gene structure. The entire gene (but the larger intron) and 1.6 kb of the 5' flanking region were sequenced. This 5' flanking region is GC-rich, contains several putative transcription binding sites, and has no apparent TATA box. Gene mapping of murine USF2 and USF1 has been determined by in situ hybridization, indicating the localization of USF2 on chromosome 7 and of USF1 on chromosomes 1 and 11. PMID:7774954

  9. The NACP/synuclein gene: Chromosomal assignment and screening for alterations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martin, C.; Charbonnier, F.

    1995-03-20

    The major component of the vascular and plaque amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease is the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}). A second intrinsic component of amyloid, the NAC (non-A{beta} component of amyloid) peptide, has recently been identified, and its precursor protein was named NACP. A computer homology search allowed us to establish that the human NACP gene was homologous to the rat synuclein gene. We mapped the NACP/synuclein gene to chromosome 4 and cloned three alternatively spliced transcripts in lymphocytes derived from a normal subject. We analyzed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing the entire coding region of the NACP/synuclein gene in a group of patients with familial early onset Alzheimer disease. No mutation was found in 26 unrelated patients. Further studies are required to investigate the implication of the NACP/synuclein gene in Alzheimer disease. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Genetic mapping of the human tryptophan hydroxylase gene on chromosome 11, using an intronic conformational polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, D.A.; Goldman, D. ); Dean, M. )

    1992-12-01

    The identification of polymorphic alleles at loci coding for functional genes is crucial for genetic association and linkage studies. Since the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) gene codes for the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin, it would be advantageous to identify a polymorphism in this gene. By examining introns of the human TPH gene by PCR amplification and analysis by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, an SSCP was revealed with two alleles that occur with frequencies of .40 and .60 in unrelated Caucasians. DNAs from 24 informative CEPH families were typed for the TPH intron polymorphism and analyzed with respect to 10 linked markers on chromosome 11, between p13 and p15, with the result that TPH was placed between D11S151 and D11S134. This region contains loci for several important genes, including those for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and tyrosine hydroxylase. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  12. A gene for autosomal dominant hearing loss on the short arm of chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Camp, G.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Hearing loss is the most common form of sensory impairment and many cases are attributable to genetic causes. The genetic defects underlying several syndromic forms of deafness have been identified, but little is known about the causes of non-syndromic hereditary deafness which accounts for the majority of inherited hearing loss. We report here a large Indonesian family with non-syndromal postlingual hearing loss starting in the high frequencies and showing autosomal dominant inheritance. To locate the gene responsible for the hearing loss in this family, we performed a genome search by genetic linkage analysis with microsatellite markers distributed over the whole genome. We have mapped the gene causing deafness in an extended Indonesian family to chromosome 1p with a multipoint lod score higher than 7. Two other smaller families, showing a similar hereditary hearing loss, were also tested for linkage with chromosome 1p. One family originating from the U.S. was linked to this new locus with a multipoint lod score exceeding 5. In another family from the Netherlands this locus was excluded. The flanking markers D1S255 and D1S211 define a region of 6 cM on chromosome 1p which is likely to contain the deafness gene present in the Indonesian and American family.

  13. Assignment of the appaloosa coat colour gene (LP) to equine chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Terry, R B; Archer, S; Brooks, S; Bernoco, D; Bailey, E

    2004-04-01

    A single autosomal dominant locus, leopard complex (LP) controls the presence of appaloosa pigmentation patterns in the horse. The causative gene for LP is unknown. This study was undertaken to map LP in the horse. Two paternal half sib families segregating for the LP locus and including a total of 47 offspring were used to perform a genome scan which localized LP to horse chromosome 1 (ECA1). LP was linked to ASB08 (LOD = 9.99 at Theta = 0.02) and AHT21 (LOD = 5.03 at Theta = 0.14). To refine the map position of LP, eight microsatellite markers on ECA1 (UM041, LEX77, 1CA41, TKY374, COR046, 1CA32, 1CA43, and TKY002) were analysed in the two half sib families. Results from this linkage analysis showed LP was located in the interval between ASB08 and 1CA43. Tight junction protein (TJP1), which lies within the LP interval on ECA1, was used to determine the homologous chromosomes in humans (HSA15) and mice (mouse chromosome 7). We propose that the pink eyed dilution (p) gene and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M, member 1 (TRPM1) are positional candidate genes for LP. PMID:15025575

  14. Linkage analysis of the Fanconi anemia gene FACC with chromosome 9q markers

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, A.D.; Shin, H.T.; Kaporis, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with at least four different complementation groups as determined by cell fusion studies. The gene for complementation group C, FACC, has been cloned and mapped to chromosome 9q22.3 by in situ hybridization, while linkage analysis has supported the placement of another gene on chromosome 20q. We have analyzed five microsatellite markers and one RFLP on chromosome 9q in a panel of FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) in order to place FACC on the genetic map. Polymorphisms were typed in 308 individuals from 51 families. FACC is tightly linked to both D9S151 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.025, Z{sub max}=7.75] and to D9S196 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.041, Z{sub max}=7.89]; multipoint analysis is in progress. We are currently screening a YAC clone that contains the entire FACC gene for additional microsatellite markers suitable for haplotype analysis of FA families.

  15. The human gene for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) is located on chromosome 9 but is not the familial dysautonomia gene

    SciTech Connect

    Slaugenhaupt, S.A. |; Liebert, C.B.; Lucente, D.E.

    1995-02-10

    The neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) gene is a member of the trk family of tyrosine protein kinases, which encode receptors for the nerve growth factor-related proteins known as neurotrophins. The neurotrophins and their receptors have long been considered candidate genes for familial dysautonomia (FD), a hereditary sensory neuropathy resulting from the congenital loss of both sensory and autonomic neurons. The DYS gene has recently been mapped to human chromosome 9q31-q33, and therefore we set out to determine the chromosomal localization of the candidate gene NTRK2. A mouse trkB probe was hybridized to both somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosome 9 and a human chromosome 9 flow-sorted cosmid library. The human homologue of trkB, NTRK2, was assigned to chromosome 9. To localize the NTRK2 gene further, a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism was identified within a cosmid that contains NTRK2 exon sequences. This marker was genotyped in the CEPH reference pedigrees and places the NTRK2 gene near D9S1 on the proximal long arm of human chromosome 9. The NTRK2 gene is located approximately 22 cm proximal to DYS and shows several recombinants in disease families. Therefore, the NTRK2 gene can now be excluded as a candidate gene for familial dysautonomia. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Characterization of a baculovirus lacking the DBP (DNA-binding protein) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Mikhailov, Victor S.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-08-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes two proteins that possess properties typical of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), late expression factor-3 (LEF-3), and a protein referred to as DNA-binding protein (DBP). Whereas LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein essential for viral DNA replication, transporting helicase into the nucleus, and forms a stable complex with the baculovirus alkaline nuclease, the role for DBP in baculovirus replication remains unclear. Therefore, to better understand the functional role of DBP in viral replication, a DBP knockout virus was generated from an AcMNPV bacmid and analyzed. The results of a growth curve analysis indicated that the dbp knockout construct was unable to produce budded virus indicating that dbp is essential. The lack of DBP does not cause a general shutdown of the expression of viral genes, as was revealed by accumulation of early (LEF-3), late (VP39), and very late (P10) proteins in cells transfected with the dbp knockout construct. To investigate the role of DBP in DNA replication, a real-time PCR-based assay was employed and showed that, although viral DNA synthesis occurred in cells transfected with the dbp knockout, the levels were less than that of the control virus suggesting that DBP is required for normal levels of DNA synthesis or for stability of nascent viral DNA. In addition, analysis of the viral DNA replicated by the dbp knockout by using field inversion gel electrophoresis failed to detect the presence of genome-length DNA. Furthermore, analysis of DBP from infected cells indicated that similar to LEF-3, DBP was tightly bound to viral chromatin. Assessment of the cellular localization of DBP relative to replicated viral DNA by immunoelectron microscopy indicated that, at 24 h post-infection, DBP co-localized with nascent DNA at distinct electron-dense regions within the nucleus. Finally, immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells transfected with the dbp knockout

  17. Characterization of a baculovirus lacking the DBP (DNA-binding protein) gene

    PubMed Central

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Mikhailov, Victor S.; Rohrmann, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes two proteins that possess properties typical of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), late expression factor-3 (LEF-3), and a protein referred to as DNA-binding protein (DBP). Whereas LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein essential for viral DNA replication, transporting helicase into the nucleus, and forms a stable complex with the baculovirus alkaline nuclease, the role for DBP in baculovirus replication remains unclear. Therefore, to better understand the functional role of DBP in viral replication, a DBP knockout virus was generated from an AcMNPV bacmid and analyzed. The results of a growth curve analysis indicated that the dbp knockout construct was unable to produce budded virus indicating that dbp is essential. The lack of DBP does not cause a general shutdown of the expression of viral genes, as was revealed by accumulation of early (LEF-3), late (VP39), and very late (P10) proteins in cells transfected with the dbp knockout construct. To investigate the role of DBP in DNA replication, a real-time PCR-based assay was employed and showed that, although viral DNA synthesis occurred in cells transfected with the dbp knockout, the levels were less than that of the control virus suggesting that DBP is required for normal levels of DNA synthesis or for stability of nascent viral DNA. In addition, analysis of the viral DNA replicated by the dbp knockout by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis failed to detect the presence of genome-length DNA. Furthermore, analysis of DBP from infected cells indicated that similar to LEF-3, DBP was tightly bound to viral chromatin. Assessment of the cellular localization of DBP relative to replicated viral DNA by immunoelectron microscopy indicated that, at 24 hours post-infection, DBP co-localized with replicated DNA at distinct electron-dense regions within the nucleus. Finally, immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells transfected with the dbp

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against a specific nonhistone chromosomal protein of Drosophila associated with active genes.

    PubMed

    Howard, G C; Abmayr, S M; Shinefeld, L A; Sato, V L; Elgin, S C

    1981-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies have been produced by fusion of NS-1 mouse myeloma cells with the spleen cells of mice inoculated with a 60-65,000-mol wt fraction of proteins released from Drosophila embryo nuclei treated with DNase I. The antibodies secreted by the hybridomas were examined with polytene chromosomes of formaldehyde-fixed salivary gland squashes by an immunofluorescence assay. Most of the clonal antibodies obtained resulted in specific staining of the chromosomes relative to the cytoplasmic debris. In the case of clone 28, the antibodies showed a preferential association with sites of gene activity, both puffs and loci identified as puffing at some time during the third instar and prepupal period. In larvae that were heat shocked (exposed to 35 degrees C for 15 min before removal and fixation of the glands), the antibodies of clone 28 stained preferentially the induced heat-shock loci while continuing to stain most of the normal set of loci. The antigen for clone 28 was identified as a single protein of approximately 62,000 mol wt by using the antibodies followed by 125I-rabbit anti-mouse Ig to stain nitrocellulose replicas of SDS polyacrylamide gels of total chromosomal proteins. This study demonstrates that monoclonal antibodies can be used successfully in immunofluorescence staining of formaldehyde-fixed polytene chromosomes. The results verify the hypothesis that a specific nonhistone chromosomal protein is preferentially associated with the set of loci that includes both active sites and those scheduled to be active at some time in this developmental program. Such proteins may play a general role in the mechanisms of cell determination and gene activation. PMID:6782108

  19. Modelling gene flow between oilseed rape and wild radish. I. Evolution of chromosome structure.

    PubMed

    Chèvre, A M; Adamczyk, K; Eber, F; Huteau, V; Coriton, O; Letanneur, J C; Laredo, C; Jenczewski, E; Monod, H

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of gene flow from crop species to weeds has found a new emphasis over the last years because of the marketing of transgenic crops and the possible selective advantage that crop (trans)gene may confer to the weeds. Several studies focused on the F1 interspecific hybrid production but few data are available on the factors affecting the genetic structure of advanced generations. It depends on the genomic structure of the species concerned as well as on the degree of their genome homology that affect the occurrence of intergenomic recombination. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC, 2n = 38)-wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum, RrRr, 2n = 18), a distantly related weed, is a good model to address such questions. From seven male sterile oilseed rape lines carrying an herbicide tolerance transgene, F1 interspecific hybrids and four advanced generations were produced under field conditions with wild radish as pollinator. Observation of hybrid chromosome numbers across four generations revealed a high variability, especially in the "BC1" generation. A regression model was fitted in order to describe the relationship between parent and offspring chromosome numbers. The effects of generation, transgenic line and selection pressure on the mean relationship were investigated. The first two factors had an influence on the rate of decrease of chromosome numbers, whereas selection pressure resulted in the presence of an additional chromosome in the herbicide treated plants. The model provided a convenient framework for analysing how chromosome numbers evolve over successive hybridization events and it may prove useful as a basis for simulation-based approaches. PMID:17091264

  20. Multicolor FISHs for simultaneous detection of genes and DNA segments on human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Asai, Satoko; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a convenient multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (five-, four-, three-, and two-color FISHs) for detecting specific genes/DNA segments on the human chromosomes. As a foundation of multicolor FISH, we first isolated 80 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes that specifically detect the peri-centromeres (peri-CEN) and subtelomeres (subTEL) of 24 different human chromosomes (nos. 1~22, X, and Y) by screening our homemade BAC library (Keio BAC library) consisting of 200,000 clones. Five-color FISH was performed using human DNA segments specific for peri-CEN or subTEL, which were labeled with five different fluorescent dyes [7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC): blue, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC): green, rhodamine 6G (R6G): yellow, TexRed: red, and cyanine5 (Cy5): purple]. To observe FISH signals under a fluorescence microscope, five optic filters were carefully chosen to avoid overlapping fluorescence emission. Five-color FISH and four-color FISH enabled us to accurately examine the numerical anomaly of human chromosomes. Three-color FISH using two specific BAC clones, that distinguish 5' half of oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from its 3' half, revealed the amplification and truncation of EGFR in EGFR-overproducing cancer cells. Moreover, two-color FISH readily detected a fusion gene in leukemia cells such as breakpoint cluster region (BCR)/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue (ABL) on the Philadelphia (Ph') chromosome with interchromosomal translocation. Some other successful cases such as trisomy 21 of Down syndrome are presented. Potential applications of multicolor FISH will be discussed. PMID:25947045

  1. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2012-12-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 38 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Should Y stay or should Y go: The evolution of non-recombining sex chromosomes Abstract. PMID:23055411

  2. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41–48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups. PMID:27354512

  3. Regional assignment of the human homebox-containing gene EN1 to chromosome 2q13-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, A.; Muenke, M. ); Logan, C. ); Joyner, A.L. Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto )

    1993-01-01

    The human homeobox-containing genes EN1 and EN2 are closely related to the Drosophila pattern formation gene engrailed (en), which may be important in brain development, as shown by gene expression studies during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we have refined the localization of EN1 to human chromosome 2q13-q21 using a mapping panel of rodent/human cell hybrids containing different regions of chromosome 2 and a lymphoblastoid cell line with an interstitial deletion, del(2) (q21-q23.2). This regional assignment of EN1 increases to 22 the number of currently known genes on human chromosome 2q that have homologs on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Mapping of the NEP receptor tyrosine kinase gene to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Sweetser, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) NEP, also called Ptk-3, is widely expressed, with high levels in proliferating neuroepithelia of mouse embryos. The recently described human discoidin domain receptor (DDR) has a predicted amino acid sequence 93% identical to that of murine NEP and may be its human homologue. We have mapped the gene encoding NEP in human and mouse by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a mouse cDNA probe. The NEP/Nep gene maps to human chromosome 6p21.3 and mouse chromosome 17C, respectively. This places the NEP/Nep gene at, or near, the major histocompatibility (MHC) locus-HLA in human and H2 in mouse, respectively. Based on its pattern of expression during development, NEP and Nep represent candidate genes for several MHC-linked developmental abnormalities in human and mouse. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Localization of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) to a gene cluster on chromosome 17q

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; Saenz, M.; O'Connell, P.; Leach, R.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) has been regionally localized to a gene cluster on human chromosome 17q. Genetic mapping through CEPH reference families demonstrated that GIP was tightly linked to NME1 and PPY and fully linked to HOXB6 and NGFR. High-resolution radiation hybrid mapping resolved the gene order as cen-PPY-HOXB6-NGFR-GIP-NME1-tel. GIP maps distal to NGFR with an estimated distance of 250 kb. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 fig.

  6. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO ); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. A 450-kb contig of defensin genes on human chromosome 8p23.

    PubMed

    Linzmeier, R; Ho, C H; Hoang, B V; Ganz, T

    1999-06-11

    Defensins are a large family of host defense peptides expressed in leukocytes and epithelia. Using P1 and BAC clones, we have determined the organization of the human alpha-defensin genes and the beta-defensin gene HDEFB1 on chromosome 8p23. From the telomere, the order of the genes (with encoded peptides in parentheses) is HDEFA5 (HD-5), HDEFA1/1A (HNP-1/3), HDEFA4 (HNP-4), HDEFA6 (HD-6), and HDEFB1 (HBD-1). These genes span a region of approximately 450kb. Genes encoding intestinal Paneth cell defensins (HDEFA5 and HDEFA6) flank the myeloid defensin gene cluster (HDEFA1, HDEFA1A, HDEFA4). Based on our previous studies, the remaining known defensin gene, HDEFB2 (HBD-2), is about 400kb centromeric to HDEFB1. This map supports the hypothesis, originally proposed because of sequence similarities, that myeloid alpha-defensin genes evolved by reduplication and divergence from Paneth cell defensin genes, and identifies regions and clones, which should be useful in the search for new defensin genes. PMID:10375637

  8. Lack of genetic diversity across diverse immune genes in an endangered mammal, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Morris, Katrina M; Wright, Belinda; Grueber, Catherine E; Hogg, Carolyn; Belov, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened with extinction due to the spread of devil facial tumour disease. Polymorphisms in immune genes can provide adaptive potential to resist diseases. Previous studies in diversity at immune loci in wild species have almost exclusively focused on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, these genes only account for a fraction of immune gene diversity. Devils lack diversity at functionally important immunity loci, including MHC and Toll-like receptor genes. Whether there are polymorphisms at devil immune genes outside these two families is unknown. Here, we identify polymorphisms in a wide range of key immune genes, and develop assays to type single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a subset of these genes. A total of 167 immune genes were examined, including cytokines, chemokines and natural killer cell receptors. Using genome-level data from ten devils, SNPs within coding regions, introns and 10 kb flanking genes of interest were identified. We found low polymorphism across 167 immune genes examined bioinformatically using whole-genome data. From this data, we developed long amplicon assays to target nine genes. These amplicons were sequenced in 29-220 devils and found to contain 78 SNPs, including eight SNPS within exons. Despite the extreme paucity of genetic diversity within these genes, signatures of balancing selection were exhibited by one chemokine gene, suggesting that remaining diversity may hold adaptive potential. The low functional diversity may leave devils highly vulnerable to infectious disease, and therefore, monitoring and preserving remaining diversity will be critical for the long-term management of this species. Examining genetic variation in diverse immune genes should be a priority for threatened wildlife species. This study can act as a model for broad-scale immunogenetic diversity analysis in threatened species. PMID:26119928

  9. High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation of recognized genes for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Lindsay N; McGuire, Austen B; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-07-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is genetically heterogeneous with a growing list of BPD associated genes reported in recent years resulting from increased genetic testing using advanced genetic technology, expanded genomic databases, and better awareness of the disorder. We compiled a master list of recognized susceptibility and genes associated with BPD identified from peer-reviewed medical literature sources using PubMed and by searching online databases, such as OMIM. Searched keywords were related to bipolar disorder and genetics. Our compiled list consisted of 290 genes with gene names arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with source documents and their chromosome location and gene symbols plotted on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms. The identified genes impacted a broad range of biological pathways and processes including cellular signaling pathways particularly cAMP and calcium (e.g., CACNA1C, CAMK2A, CAMK2D, ADCY1, ADCY2); glutamatergic (e.g., GRIK1, GRM3, GRM7), dopaminergic (e.g., DRD2, DRD4, COMT, MAOA) and serotonergic (e.g., HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR3B) neurotransmission; molecular transporters (e.g., SLC39A3, SLC6A3, SLC8A1); and neuronal growth (e.g., BDNF, IGFBP1, NRG1, NRG3). The increasing prevalence of BPD calls for better understanding of the genetic etiology of this disorder and associations between the observed BPD phenotype and genes. Visual representation of genes for bipolar disorder becomes a tool enabling clinical and laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors, and other health care providers and researchers easy access to the location and distribution of currently recognized BPD associated genes. Our study may also help inform diagnosis and advance treatment developments for those affected with this disorder and improve genetic counseling for families. PMID:27063557

  10. Effects of chromosomal gene copy number and locations on polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis by Escherichia coli and Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jin; Wang, Huan; Fu, Xiao-Zhi; Gao, Xue; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal integration and expression of heterologous gene(s) are favored in industrial biotechnology due to the inheriting expression stability. Yet, chromosomal expression is commonly weaker than plasmid one. The effect on gene expression level at 13 chromosomal locations in Escherichia coli was investigated using the polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthesis pathway encoded by a phaCAB operon as a reporter. When 11 copies of phaCAB were randomly integrated into 11 of the 13 chromosomal locations, respectively, 5.2 wt% of PHB was produced. PHB (34.1 wt%) was accumulated by a recombinant E. coli inserted chromosomally with 50 copies of phaCAB in the active asnB site using a Cre-loxP recombination method. This PHB accumulation level was equivalent to a medium-copy-number plasmid expression system, suggesting the importance of chromosomal gene copy number for PHB production by E. coli. This result was used to manipulate a Halomonas strain. One copy of genes scpAB encoding methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase was inserted into the strongest expression site porin in the chromosome of the 2-methylcitrate synthase (prpC) deleted mutant Halomonas TD08, leading to the synthesis of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from glucose as the sole carbon source. The chromosome-engineered strain produced PHBV consisting of 5-12 mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) stably compared with unstable fluctuation of 7-25 mol% 3HV by a medium-copy-number plasmid system. These results demonstrated that chromosome engineering based on active transcriptional site and gene copy number is more feasible for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis in Halomonas TD08 compared with in E. coli. PMID:25758961

  11. Gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia: evidence from the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Redd, Alan J; Roberts-Thomson, June; Karafet, Tatiana; Bamshad, Michael; Jorde, Lynn B; Naidu, J M; Walsh, Bruce; Hammer, Michael F

    2002-04-16

    Phenotypic similarities between Australian Aboriginal People and some tribes of India were noted by T.H. Huxley during the voyage of the Rattlesnake (1846-1850). Anthropometric studies by Birdsell led to his suggestion that a migratory wave into Australia included populations with affinities to tribal Indians. Genetic evidence for an Indian contribution to the Australian gene pool is contradictory; most studies of autosomal markers have not supported this hypothesis (; and references therein). On the other hand, affinities between Australian Aboriginal People and southern Indians were suggested based on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA. Here, we show additional DNA evidence in support of Huxley's hypothesis of an Indian-Australian connection using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and short tandem repeats (STRs) on the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY). Phylogenetic analyses of STR variation associated with a major Australian SNP lineage indicated tight clustering with southern Indian/Sri Lankan Y chromosomes. Estimates of the divergence time for these Indian and Australian chromosomes overlap with important changes in the archaeological and linguistic records in Australia. These results provide strong evidence for an influx of Y chromosomes from the Indian subcontinent to Australia that may have occurred during the Holocene. PMID:11967156

  12. Localization of the kappa opioid receptor gene to human chromosome band 8q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kazuki; Takeda, Jun; Bell, G.I.; Espinosa, R.; Le Beau, M.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Using the cloned mouse kappa opioid receptor cDNA clone as a probe, screened a human genomic library and isolated a clone containing part of the human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1), designated [lambda]hSR4-1. To determine the chromosomal localization of OPRK1, [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA was labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of bio-11-dUTP and hybridized to human metaphase cells prepared from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes as described previously. Hybridization of the OPRK1-specific probe [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA to normal human metaphase chromosomes resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 8. Specific labeling of 8q11 was observed on all 4 (6 cells), 3 (9 cells), 2 (9 cells), or 1 (1 cell) chromatid of the chromosome 8 homologs in 25 cells examined. Of 72 signals observed, 70 were located at 8q11. 1 signal was located at 7q11 and at 12p11. In most cells, the signal on 8q was located at 8q11.2. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Evidence for the evolutionary origin of human chromosome 21 from comparative gene mapping in the cow and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Threadgill, D.S.; Womack, J.E. ); Kraus, J.P. ); Krawetz, S.A. )

    1991-01-01

    To determine the extent of conservation between bovine syntenic group U10, human chromosome 21 (HSA 21), and mouse chromosome 16(MMU 16), 11 genes were physically mapped by segregation analysis in a bovine-hamster hybrid somatic cell panel. The genes chosen for study span MMU 16 and represent virtually the entire q arm of HSA 21. Because the somatostatin gene (SST), an HSA 3/MMU 16 locus, was previously shown to be in U10, the transferrin gene (TF), an HSA 3/MMU 9 marker, was also mapped to determine whether U10 contains any HSA 3 genes not represented on MMU 16. With the exception of the protamine gene PRM1 (HSA 16/MMU 16), all of the genes studies were syntenic on bovine U10. Thus, all homologous loci from HSA 21 that have been studied in the cow are on a single chromosome. The bovine homolog of HSA 21 also carries several HSA 3 genes, two of which have homologous loci on MMU 16. The syntenic association of genes from the q arm of HSA 3 with HSAS 21 genes in two mammalian species, the mouse and the cow, indicates that HSA 21 may have evolved from a larger ancestral mammalian chromosome that contained genes now residing on HSA 3. Additionally, the syntenic association of TF with SST in the cow permits the prediction that the rhodopsin gene (RHO) is proximal to TF on HSA 3q.

  14. Male infertility, genetic analysis of the DAZ genes on the human Y chromosome and genetic analysis of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Fox, M S; Reijo Pera, R A

    2001-11-26

    Many genes that are required for fertility have been identified in model organisms (). Mutations in these genes cause infertility due to defects in development of the germ cell lineage, but the organism is otherwise healthy. Although human reproduction is undoubtedly as complex as that of other organisms, very few fertility loci have been mapped (). This is in spite of the prevalence of human infertility, the lack of effective treatments to remedy germ cell defects, and the cost to couples and society of assisted reproductive techniques. Fifteen percent of couples are infertile and half of all cases can be traced to the male partner. Aside from defects in sperm production, most infertile men are otherwise healthy. This review is divided into two distinct parts to discuss work that: (i) led to the identification of several genes on the Y chromosome that likely function in sperm production; and (ii) implicates DNA repair in male infertility via increased frequency of mutations in DNA from men with meiotic arrest. PMID:11694340

  15. A targeted RNAi screen for genes involved in chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline.

    PubMed Central

    Colaiácovo, M P; Stanfield, G M; Reddy, K C; Reinke, V; Kim, S K; Villeneuve, A M

    2002-01-01

    We have implemented a functional genomics strategy to identify genes involved in chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization during meiotic prophase in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline. This approach took advantage of a gene-expression survey that used DNA microarray technology to identify genes preferentially expressed in the germline. We defined a subset of 192 germline-enriched genes whose expression profiles were similar to those of previously identified meiosis genes and designed a screen to identify genes for which inhibition by RNA interference (RNAi) elicited defects in function or development of the germline. We obtained strong germline phenotypes for 27% of the genes tested, indicating that this targeted approach greatly enriched for genes that function in the germline. In addition to genes involved in key meiotic prophase events, we identified genes involved in meiotic progression, germline proliferation, and chromosome organization and/or segregation during mitotic growth. PMID:12242227

  16. A cluster of cooperating tumor-suppressor gene candidates in chromosomal deletions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Kitzing, Thomas; Roessler, Stephanie; Zuber, Johannes; Krasnitz, Alexander; Schultz, Nikolaus; Revill, Kate; Weissmueller, Susann; Rappaport, Amy R.; Simon, Janelle; Zhang, Jack; Luo, Weijun; Hicks, James; Zender, Lars; Wang, Xin Wei; Powers, Scott; Wigler, Michael; Lowe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    The large chromosomal deletions frequently observed in cancer genomes are often thought to arise as a “two-hit” mechanism in the process of tumor-suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation. Using a murine model system of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and in vivo RNAi, we test an alternative hypothesis, that such deletions can arise from selective pressure to attenuate the activity of multiple genes. By targeting the mouse orthologs of genes frequently deleted on human 8p22 and adjacent regions, which are lost in approximately half of several other major epithelial cancers, we provide evidence suggesting that multiple genes on chromosome 8p can cooperatively inhibit tumorigenesis in mice, and that their cosuppression can synergistically promote tumor growth. In addition, in human HCC patients, the combined down-regulation of functionally validated 8p TSGs is associated with poor survival, in contrast to the down-regulation of any individual gene. Our data imply that large cancer-associated deletions can produce phenotypes distinct from those arising through loss of a single TSG, and as such should be considered and studied as distinct mutational events. PMID:22566646

  17. A Major Susceptibility Gene for Asthma Maps to Chromosome 14q24

    PubMed Central

    Hakonarson, Hakon; Bjornsdottir, Unnur S.; Halapi, Eva; Palsson, Snaebjorn; Adalsteinsdottir, Elva; Gislason, David; Finnbogason, Gudmundur; Gislason, Thorarinn; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Arnason, Thor; Birkisson, Illugi; Frigge, Michael L.; Kong, Augustine; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Stefansson, Kari

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disorder with a heterogeneous phenotype, largely attributed to the interactions among many genes and between these genes and the environment. Numerous loci and candidate genes have been reported to show linkage and association to asthma and atopy. Although some studies reporting these observations are compelling, no gene has been mapped that confers a sufficiently high risk of asthma to meet the stringent criteria for genomewide significance. Using 175 extended Icelandic families that included 596 patients with asthma, we performed a genomewide scan with 976 microsatellite markers. The families were identified by cross-matching a list of patients with asthma from the Department of Allergy/Pulmonary Medicine of the National University Hospital of Iceland with a genealogy database of the entire Icelandic nation. We detected linkage of asthma to chromosome 14q24, with an allele-sharing LOD score of 2.66. After we increased the marker density within the locus to an average of one microsatellite every 0.2 cM, the LOD score rose to 4.00. We designate this locus “asthma locus one” (AS1). Taken together, these results provide evidence of a novel susceptibility gene for asthma on chromosome 14q24. PMID:12119603

  18. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  19. Widespread Impact of Chromosomal Inversions on Gene Expression Uncovers Robustness via Phenotypic Buffering.

    PubMed

    Naseeb, Samina; Carter, Zorana; Minnis, David; Donaldson, Ian; Zeef, Leo; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    The nonrandom gene organization in eukaryotes plays a significant role in genome evolution and function. Chromosomal structural changes impact meiotic fitness and, in several organisms, are associated with speciation and rapid adaptation to different environments. Small sized chromosomal inversions, encompassing few genes, are pervasive in Saccharomyces "sensu stricto" species, while larger inversions are less common in yeasts compared with higher eukaryotes. To explore the effect of gene order on phenotype, reproductive isolation, and gene expression, we engineered 16 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying all possible paracentric and pericentric inversions between Ty1 elements, a natural substrate for rearrangements. We found that 4 inversions were lethal, while the other 12 did not show any fitness advantage or disadvantage in rich and minimal media. At meiosis, only a weak negative correlation with fitness was seen with the size of the inverted region. However, significantly lower fertility was seen in heterozygote invertant strains carrying recombination hotspots within the breakpoints. Altered transcription was observed throughout the genome rather than being overrepresented within the inversions. In spite of the large difference in gene expression in the inverted strains, mitotic fitness was not impaired in the majority of the 94 conditions tested, indicating that the robustness of the expression network buffers the deleterious effects of structural changes in several environments. Overall, our results support the notion that transcriptional changes may compensate for Ty-mediated rearrangements resulting in the maintenance of a constant phenotype, and suggest that large inversions in yeast are unlikely to be a selectable trait during vegetative growth. PMID:26929245

  20. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene (PCNT) to chromosome 21qter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Gos, A.; Morris, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Exon trapping was used to identify portions of genes from cosmid DNA of a human chromosome 21-specific library LL21NC02-Q. More than 650 potential exons have been cloned and characterized to date. Among these, 3 trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} showed strong homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse pericentrin (Pcnt) gene, indicating that these 3 exons are portions of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene. With PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis, and FISH, we have mapped this presumed human pericentrin gene (PCNT) to the long arm of chromosome 21 between marker PFKL and 21qter. Pericentrin is a conserved protein component of the filamentous matrix of the centrosome involved in the initial establishment of the organized microtubule array. No candidate hereditary disorder for pericentrin deficiency/abnormality has yet been mapped in the most distal region of 21q; in addition the role of triplication of the pericentrin gene in the pathophysiology or etiology of trisomy 21 is currently unknown. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Spread of a New Parasitic B Chromosome Variant Is Facilitated by High Gene Flow

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Poyato, María Inmaculada; López-León, María Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Perfectti, Francisco; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.

    2013-01-01

    The B24 chromosome variant emerged several decades ago in a Spanish population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans and is currently reaching adjacent populations. Here we report, for the first time, how a parasitic B chromosome (a strictly vertically transmitted parasite) expands its geographical range aided by high gene flow in the host species. For six years we analyzed B frequency in several populations to the east and west of the original population and found extensive spatial variation, but only a slight temporal trend. The highest B24 frequency was found in its original population (Torrox) and it decreased closer to both the eastern and the western populations. The analysis of Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers showed the existence of a low but significant degree of population subdivision, as well as significant isolation by distance (IBD). Pairwise Nem estimates suggested the existence of high gene flow between the four populations located in the Torrox area, with higher values towards the east. No significant barriers to gene flow were found among these four populations, and we conclude that high gene flow is facilitating B24 diffusion both eastward and westward, with minor role for B24 drive due to the arrival of drive suppressor genes which are also frequent in the donor population. PMID:24386259

  2. Asymmetric Distribution of Gene Expression in the Centromeric Region of Rice Chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Wu, Jianzhong; Katayose, Yuichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Takeshi; Sasaki, Takuji; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    There is controversy as to whether gene expression is silenced in the functional centromere. The complete genomic sequences of the centromeric regions in higher eukaryotes have not been fully elucidated, because the presence of highly repetitive sequences complicates many aspects of genomic sequencing. We performed resequencing, assembly, and sequence finishing of two P1-derived artificial chromosome clones in the centromeric region of rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 5 (Cen5). The pericentromeric region, where meiotic recombination is silenced, is located at the center of chromosome 5 and is 2.14 Mb long; a total of six restriction-fragment-length polymorphism markers (R448, C1388, S20487S, E3103S, C53260S, and R2059) genetically mapped at 54.6 cM were located in this region. In the pericentromeric region, 28 genes were annotated on the short arm and 45 genes on the long arm. To quantify all transcripts in this region, we performed massive parallel sequencing of mRNA. Transcriptional density (total length of transcribed region/length of the genomic region) and expression level (number of uniquely mapped reads/length of transcribed region) were calculated on the basis of the mapped reads on the rice genome. Transcriptional density and expression level were significantly lower in Cen5 than in the average of the other chromosomal regions. Moreover, transcriptional density in Cen5 was significantly lower on the short arm than on the long arm; the distribution of transcriptional density was asymmetric. The genomic sequence of Cen5 has been integrated into the most updated reference rice genome sequence constructed by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project. PMID:22639581

  3. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  4. The R-Operon: A Model of Repetitive DNA-Organized Transcriptional Compartmentation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes for Coordinated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to coordinate the activity of genes that function together to fulfill the same biological processes. Genomic organization likely plays a key role in coordinating transcription of different genes. However, little is known about how co-regulated genes are organized in the cell nucleus and how the chromosomal organization facilitates the co-regulation of different genes. I propose that eukaryotic genomes are organized into repeat assembly (RA)-based structural domains (“R-operons”) in the nuclear space. R-operons result from the interaction of homologous DNA repeats. In an R-operon, genes in different loci of the linear genome are brought into spatial vicinity and co-regulated by the same pool of transcription factors. This type of large-scale chromosomal organization may provide a mechanism for functional compartmentation of chromosomes to facilitate the transcriptional coordination of gene expression. PMID:27110825

  5. The R-Operon: A Model of Repetitive DNA-Organized Transcriptional Compartmentation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes for Coordinated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to coordinate the activity of genes that function together to fulfill the same biological processes. Genomic organization likely plays a key role in coordinating transcription of different genes. However, little is known about how co-regulated genes are organized in the cell nucleus and how the chromosomal organization facilitates the co-regulation of different genes. I propose that eukaryotic genomes are organized into repeat assembly (RA)-based structural domains ("R-operons") in the nuclear space. R-operons result from the interaction of homologous DNA repeats. In an R-operon, genes in different loci of the linear genome are brought into spatial vicinity and co-regulated by the same pool of transcription factors. This type of large-scale chromosomal organization may provide a mechanism for functional compartmentation of chromosomes to facilitate the transcriptional coordination of gene expression. PMID:27110825

  6. Variations of chromosomes 2 and 3 gene expression profiles among pulmonary telocytes, pneumocytes, airway cells, mesenchymal stem cells and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minghuan; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Zheng, Yonghua; Li, Meiyi; Cretoiu, Sanda M; Chen, Chengshui; Chen, Luonan; Cretoiu, Dragos; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Fang, Hao; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) were identified as a distinct cellular type of the interstitial tissue and defined as cells with extremely long telopodes (Tps). Our previous data demonstrated patterns of mouse TC-specific gene profiles on chromosome 1. The present study focuses on the identification of characters and patterns of TC-specific or TC-dominated gene expression profiles in chromosome 2 and 3, the network of principle genes and potential functional association. We compared gene expression profiles of pulmonary TCs, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway basal cells, proximal airway cells, CD8+T cells from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL), and CD8+ T cells from lungs (T-LL). We identified that 26 or 80 genes of TCs in chromosome 2 and 13 or 59 genes of TCs up-or down-regulated in chromosome 3, as compared with other cells respectively. Obvious overexpression of Myl9 in chromosome 2 of TCs different from other cells, indicates that biological functions of TCs are mainly associated with tissue/organ injury and ageing, while down-expression of Pltp implies that TCs may be associated with inhibition or reduction of inflammation in the lung. Dominant overexpression of Sh3glb1, Tm4sf1 or Csf1 in chromosome 3 of TCs is mainly associated with tumour promotion in lung cancer, while most down-expression of Pde5 may be involved in the development of pulmonary fibrosis and other acute and chronic interstitial lung disease. PMID:25278030

  7. Localization of the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1) to human chromosome 8p22-p23. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shechter, I.; Conrad, D.G.; Hart, I.; Berger, R.C.; McKenzie, T.L.; Bleskan, J.; Patterson, D. )

    1994-03-01

    Recently, the authors reported the isolation of a cDNA encoding the human enzyme squalene synthase, the first step of sterol biosynthesis uniquely committed to synthesis of cholesterol. As such, it is likely that this enzyme occupies a critical regulatory position in the synthesis of cholesterol. As part of continuing studies of the role of this gene in cellular metabolism, they undertook the mapping of this gene on the human chromosomes. To localize the gene, they first isolated a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing the squalene synthase gene. They then used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with yeast DNA containing the YAC to localize the gene to chromosome 8. Assignment to human chromosome 8 was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of a somatic cell hybrid containing human chromosome 8. Use of a somatic cell hybrid regional mapping panel dividing chromosome 8 into several fragments localized the gene to 8p21-pter. Fractional length analysis of the FISH mapping placed the signal generated with this YAC at 8p22-p23.1. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, K.; Kastury, K.; Druck, T.

    1994-07-15

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding {open_quotes}adapter{close_quotes} proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Analysis of HLA and disease susceptibility: Chromosome 6 genes and sex influence long-QT phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, L.R.; Moss, A.J.; Hall, W.J.; Robinson, J.L.; Guttormsen, S.A.; Lewis, R.A.; MacCluer, J.W.; Schwartz, P.J.; Locati, E.H.; Tzivoni, D.

    1994-12-01

    The long-QT (LQT) syndrome is a genetically complex disorder that is characterized by syncope and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. LQT syndrome, as defined by a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval, has a higher incidence in females than in males and does not exhibit Mendelian transmission patterns in all families. Among those families that are nearly consistent with Mendelian transmission, linkage between a locus for LQT syndrome and the H-ras-1 locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 has been reported in some families but not in others. Earlier analyses suggesting that LQT syndrome might be caused by a gene in the HLA region of chromosome 6 were not confirmed by standard linkage analyses. Here, we present an analysis of HLA haplotype sharing among affected pedigree members, showing an excess of haplotype sharing in a previously published Japanese pedigree and possibly also in 15 families of European descent. The haplotypes shared by affected individuals derive from both affected and unaffected parents. In an analysis of independent (unrelated) HLA haplotypes, we also found a nonrandom distribution of HLA-DR genes in LQT syndrome patients compared with controls, suggesting an association between the LQT phenotype and specific HLA-DR genes. Our data indicate that DR2 has a protective effect and, particularly in males, that DR7 may increase susceptibility to the LQT syndrome. Thus, LQT syndrome may be influenced by genes on chromosomes 11 and 6, possibly with a sex-specific effect. These results provide a model for an effect of HLA-region genes inherited from either parent on the expression of an illness that may be determined principally by alleles at loci not linked to HLA.

  10. Physical and genetic mapping of the muscle phosphofructokinase gene (PFKM): Reassignment to human chromosome 12q

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T.D.; Akots, G.; Bowden, D.W.

    1996-05-15

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a key rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis and represents a major control point in the metabolism of glucose. There are at least three known isoforms of PFK in humans, referred to as the muscle, platelet, and liver forms, each of which is differentially expressed in various tissues. The gene for muscle phosphofructokinase, PFKM, is mutated in Tarui disease and conceivably contributes to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Based on physical and genetic mapping, we have found that the gene for PFKM does not map to chromosome 1 as previously described, but instead maps to chromosome 12. PCR analysis with a somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using primers derived from intron 6 and exon 18 of the PFKM gene showed consistent amplification of cell lines containing chromosome 12 (concordance, 100%). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with CEPH YAC 762G4, isolated with exon 18 primers, indicated that this clone maps to 12q13, centromeric to the diacylglycerol kinase gene (DAGK) at 12q13.3. A highly informative genetic marker isolated from YAC 762G4 was used to map PFKM genetically between the CHLC framework markers D12S1090 and D12S390. This placement for 762G4 was significantly proximal to the recently reported locus for a third gene for maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The PFKM-associated microsatellite will be a valuable tool in the evaluation of PFKM in diabetic populations as well as in linkage analysis in families with Tarui disease. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Linkage analysis of the whirler deafness gene on mouse chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.; Rogers, M.J.C.; Steel, K.P. ); Brown, S.D.M. )

    1994-05-01

    The whirler mouse harbors an autosomal recessive mutation on mouse chromosome 4 that causes deafness and vestibular dysfunction in the adult that is manifested as head-bobbing and circling behavior. Although there is no obvious human homologue for this mutation as yet, whirler is a potential mouse model for human autosomal recessive deafness. Many genetic markers for this region of mouse chromosome 4 are now available, and the authors have used these to construct genetic linkage maps in both inter- and intraspecific backcrosses as the first step toward the cloning of the whirler gene. A total of 19 loci were analyzed in these crosses, giving the following gene orders: Interspecific cross, centromere-(D4Mit5, D4Mit38)-D4Mit6-(Lv,Tzn,D4Mit44)-wi-Hxb-(D4Mit25, D4Nds9)-(D4Mit7, D4Ler2)-b-D4Mit45-(D4Wsm1, D4Mit27b)-(D4Rck65, D4Mit15), and intraspecific cross, centromere-(Mup-1, wi, Hxb)-b-D4Wsm1. This analysis has positioned the wi locus in the interval between the genes for [delta]-aminolevulinate dehydratase (Lv) and hexabrachion (Hxb). The human homologues of these genes, ALAD and HXB, both lie on human chromosome 9q32-q34. They therefore predict that a human homologue of the wi gene, involved in autosomal recessive deafness, lies in this region of conserved homology on 9q32-q34. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The structure of the human intron-containing S8 ribosomal protein gene and determination of its chromosomal location at 1p32-p32. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.; Fried, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The intron-containing gene encoding human ribosomal protein SS (RPS8) has been cloned and characterized, and its chromosomal position determined. Using a PCR-based cloning strategy, we have isolated the intron-containing gene in the presence of its many processed pseudogenes and determined the DNA sequence of the entire gene and its upstream and downstream flanking regions. The human RPS8 gene is 3161 bp in length and comprises six exons. Despite lacking a consensus TATA box, primer extension analysis indicates that the start of transcription is precisely located at a C residue within an 11-bp oligopyrimidine tract. The first exon, which contains the ATG start codon, is just 27 bp in length. The DNA sequence 5[prime] to the RPS8 gene and within the first exon and intron shows several features of a CpG island. A combination of Southern blotting, PCR, and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses has enabled the chromosomal location of the human RPSS gene to be determined as lp32-p34.1. 51 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Localization of the human OB gene (OBS) to chromosome 7q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Geffroy, S.; Duban, B.; Martinville, B. de

    1995-08-10

    An important gene involved in the pathogenesis of obesity is the product of the human homologue of the murine obese gene (gene symbol OBS). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have localized the human OB gene to human chromosome 7, specifically to region 7q32.1. The FISH data of human OBS provide a gene-associated marker for genetic mapping. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Localisation of the gene for cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) to chromosome 9p12-13

    SciTech Connect

    Wooster, R.; Mangion, J.; Quirk, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Cylindromatosis (multiple cylindromas, tomato syndrome syndrome, turban tumor syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by the development of multiple, slow growing neoplasms of the skin appendages. The tumors, known as dermal cylindromas, exhibit histological features of eccrine or apocrine sweat glands and occur most commonly in the scalp area. Genetic linkage analysis of two families yielded a maximum two point LOD score of 3.2 at D9S169. Critical recombinants place the gene between D9S161 and IFN, a distance of approximately 9 cM. This region of chromosome 9 harbors a gene that encodes a 16 kD protein which is an inhibitor of cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK-4) and which is somatically mutated in many classes of cancer. However, the observation of recombinants between the disease and a polymorphic microsatellite repeat CT29 close to this gene, suggests that the CDK-4 inhibitor gene is unlikely to be responsible for cylindromatosis.

  15. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Nalbantoglu, J.; Sergovich, F.R.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-10-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease.

  16. Characterization of a gene from the EDM1-PSACH region of human chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, G.G.; Giorgi, D.; Martin, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage mapping has indicated that both multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a skeletal disorder associated with dwarfism, map to a 2-3 Mb region of human chromosome 19p. We have isolated a partial cDNA from this region using hybrid selection, and report on progress towards the characterization of the genomic structure and transcription of the corresponding gene. Sequence analysis of the cDNA to date indicates that this gene is likely to be expressed within extracellular matrix tissues. Defects in this gene or neighboring gene family members may therefore lead to EDM1, PSACH, or other connective tissue and skeletal disorders.

  17. Genomic organization and genetic mapping of the neuroimmune gene 12rf5 to mouse chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Autieri, M.V.; Kozak, C.A.; Cohen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems share many functional and molecular similarities, including shared surface antigens, secretions of soluble factors, and cross-modulatory effects. We have identified previously a novel mRNA termed F5, which is expressed only in activated T lymphocytes and mature, postmitotic neurons. Tissue specificity and sequence conservation suggest an important function for F5 in T-lymphocyte proliferation and neuronal maturation. The F5 gene product is an evolutionarily conserved, cytoskeletal-associated phosphoprotein. A full-length mouse genomic clone has been isolated. The protein coding region of the F5 gene is approximately 16 kb in length and is composed of 13 coding exons. The gene encoding F5, termed I2rf5, was mapped using interspecies mouse crosses in close proximity to a number of genes associated with neuronal defects on distal chromosome 4. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Assignment of the human pro-melanin-concentrating hormone gene (PMCH) to chromosome 12q23-q24 and two variant genes (PMCHL1 and PMCHL2) to chromosome 5p14 and 5q12-q13

    SciTech Connect

    Pedeutour, F. ); Szpirer, C. ); Nahon, J.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptide that has been isolated from salmon pituitary and rat hypothalamus. In mammals, pro-MCH (PMCH) encodes two putative peptides, named NEI and NGE, in addition to MCH. Those peptides are expressed predominantly in hypothalamus and display a broad array of functions in rat brain. The authors have previously mapped the PMCH locus on human chromosome 12q and rat chromosome 7. Genomic cloning has revealed the existence of two distinct MCH genes in human: one authentic and one variant. In this report, they describe Southern blotting analysis with DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrids and demonstrate that the authentic human MCH (hMCH) gene is located as expected on chromosome 12, while the variant form of hMCH gene is located on chromosome 5. Direct chromosomal assignment of the authentic and variant hMCH genes was obtained by using fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. A strong signal was observed in 12q23-q24 with the authentic HMCH genomic DNA probe. Surprisingly, two signals were conspicuously found in 5p14 and 5q12-q13 with different variant hMCH genomic DNA probes. These loci were designated PMCHL1 and PMCHL2. Evidence of physiological and pathological data in rodents together with locus linkage analyses in human suggests that hMCH authentic and variant genes may be involved in human brain disorders. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Localization of the L-glutamine synthetase gene to chromosome 1q23.

    PubMed

    Clancy, K P; Berger, R; Cox, M; Bleskan, J; Walton, K A; Hart, I; Patterson, D

    1996-12-15

    Glutamine synthetase (E.C. 6.3.1.2) is expressed throughout the body and plays an important role in controlling body pH and in removing ammonia from the circulation. The enzyme clears L-glutamate, the major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, from neuronal synapses. The enzyme is a very sensitive marker of many disease and aging processes, especially those involving reactive oxygen species. This report describes the localization of the enzyme to chromosome 1 by PCR analysis of a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid panel. We also describe the localization of a recently described pseudogene to chromosome 9. Further localization of the glutamine synthetase gene locus to 1q23 was accomplished by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The glutamine synthetase gene was mapped to five CEPH megaYACs between the polymorphic PCR markers D1S117 and D1S466 by analysis of the Whitehead Institute's recently described chromosome 1 contig map. PMID:8975719

  20. Mutation in the TCRα subunit constant gene (TRAC) leads to a human immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a lack of TCRαβ+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Neil V.; Goddard, Sarah; Cardno, Tony S.; McDonald, David; Rahman, Fatimah; Barge, Dawn; Ciupek, Andrew; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Pasha, Shanaz; Guckian, Mary; Anderson, Graham; Huissoon, Aarnoud; Cant, Andrew; Tate, Warren P.; Hambleton, Sophie; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited immunodeficiency disorders can be caused by mutations in any one of a large number of genes involved in the function of immune cells. Here, we describe two families with an autosomal recessive inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to infection and autoimmunity. Genetic linkage studies mapped the disorder to chromosomal region 14q11.2, and a homozygous guanine-to-adenine substitution was identified at the last base of exon 3 immediately following the translational termination codon in the TCRα subunit constant gene (TRAC). RT-PCR analysis in the two affected individuals revealed impaired splicing of the mRNA, as exon 3 was lost from the TRAC transcript. The mutant TCRα chain protein was predicted to lack part of the connecting peptide domain and all of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, which have a critical role in the regulation of the assembly and/or intracellular transport of TCR complexes. We found that T cells from affected individuals were profoundly impaired for surface expression of the TCRαβ complex. We believe this to be the first report of a disease-causing human TRAC mutation. Although the absence of TCRαβ+ T cells in the affected individuals was associated with immune dysregulation and autoimmunity, they had a surprising level of protection against infection. PMID:21206088

  1. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 10q23 and mutation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 tumor suppressor gene in Korean hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jei-Jun; Rho, Jin-Woo; Lee, Tae-Jin; Yun, Sung-Su; Kim, Hong-Jin; Choi, Joon-Hyuk; Jeong, Daewon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Lee, Tae-Yoon

    2007-10-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the 10q23 chromosomal region was analyzed in 18 tissue samples from Korean hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. LOH at the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) region (D10S215, AFMa086wg9 and D10S541) was found in 8 of the 18 (44.4%) HCCs. LOH (20%) and microsatellite instability (26.7%) were also frequently found at the D10S2177 locus, which is located on the telomere side of the PTEN region. LOH was found in other loci, such as AFM280we1 and D10S2281. The presence of LOH in regions other than the PTEN region on chromosome 10q23 suggested the presence of additional tumor suppressor gene(s). PTEN mutation was found in only a subset of HCCs: A single base insertion at the end of the 5'-end splice signal (AG-GUAAGUU) in intron 5 and a silent mutation in exon 6 (codon 188, CTG-Val to CTA). Our data collectively suggest that the genetic alterations of chromosome 10q23, including the PTEN gene, could be important in hepatocarcinogenesis in the Korean population. PMID:17786367

  2. Entropic effects in formation of chromosome territories: towards understanding of radiation-induced gene translocation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Ciesla, Michal

    2012-07-01

    A detailed understanding of structural organization of biological target, such as geometry of an inter-phase chromosome, is an essential prerequisite for gaining deeper insight into relationship between radiation track structure and radiation-induced biological damage [1]. In particular, coupling of biophysical models aimed to describe architecture of chromosomes and their positioning in a cell nucleus [2-4] with models of local distribution of ionizations caused by passing projectiles, are expected to result in more accurate estimates of aberration induction caused by radiation. There is abundant experimental evidence indicating that arrangements of chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nucleus is non-random and has been evolutionary conserved in specific cell types. Moreover, the radial position of a given chromosome territory (CT) within the cell nucleus has been shown to correlate with its size and gene density. Usually it is assumed that chromosomal geometry and positioning result from the action of specific forces acting locally, such as hydrogen bonds, electrostatic, Van der Waals or hydrophobic interactions operating between nucleosomes and within their interiors. However, it is both desirable and instructive to learn to what extend organization of inter-phase chromosomes is affected by nonspecific entropic forces. In this study we report results of a coarse-grained analysis of a chromatin structure modeled by two distinct approaches. In the first method, we adhere to purely statistical analysis of chromatin packing within a chromosome territory. On the basis of the polymer theory, the chromatin fiber of diameter 30nm is approximated by a chain of spheres, each corresponding to about 30 kbp. Random positioning of the center of the domain is repeated for 1000 spherical nuclei. Configuration of the domain is determined by a random packing of a polymer (a string of identical beads) in estimated fraction of space occupied by a chromosome of a given length and mass

  3. Molecular patterns of X chromosome-linked color vision genes among 134 men of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Drummond-Borg, M; Deeb, S S; Motulsky, A G

    1989-02-01

    We used Southern blot hybridization to study X chromosome-linked color vision genes encoding the apoproteins of red and green visual pigments in 134 unselected Caucasian men. One hundred and thirteen individuals (84.3%) had a normal arrangement of their color vision pigment genes. All had one red pigment gene; the number of green pigment genes ranged from one to five with a mode of two. The frequency of molecular genotypes indicative of normal color vision (84.3%) was significantly lower than had been observed in previous studies of color vision phenotypes. Color vision defects can be due to deletions of red or green pigment genes or due to formation of hybrid genes comprising portions of both red and green pigment genes [Nathans, J., Piantanida, T.P., Eddy, R.L., Shows, T.B., Jr., & Hogness, D.S. (1986) Science 232, 203-210]. Characteristic anomalous patterns were seen in 15 (11.2%) individuals: 7 (5.2%) had patterns characteristic of deuteranomaly (mild defect in green color perception), 2 (1.5%) had patterns characteristic of deuteranopia (severe defect in green color perception), and 6 (4.5%) had protan patterns (the red perception defects protanomaly and protanopia cannot be differentiated by current molecular methods). Previously undescribed hybrid gene patterns consisting of both green and red pigment gene fragments in addition to normal red and green genes were observed in another 6 individuals (4.5%). Only 2 of these patterns were considered as deuteranomalous. Thus, DNA testing detected anomalous color vision pigment genes at a higher frequency than expected from phenotypic color vision tests. Some color vision gene arrays associated with hybrid genes are likely to mediate normal color vision. PMID:2915991

  4. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shang-Lang; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug. PMID:26086592

  5. Lack of haplotype structuring for two candidate genes for trypanotolerance in cattle.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, I; Pérez-Pardal, L; Traoré, A; Fernández, I; Goyache, F

    2016-04-01

    Bovine trypanotolerance is a heritable trait associated to the ability of the individuals to control parasitaemia and anaemia. The INHBA (BTA4) and TICAM1 (BTA7) genes are strong candidates for trypanotolerance-related traits. The coding sequence of both genes (3951 bp in total) were analysed in a panel including 79 Asian, African and European cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus) to identify naturally occurring polymorphisms on both genes. In general, the genetic diversity was low. Nineteen of the 33 mutations identified were found just one time. Seventeen different haplotypes were defined for the TICAM1 gene, and 9 and 12 were defined for the exon 1 and the exon 2 of the INHBA gene, respectively. There was no clear separation between cattle groups. The most frequent haplotypes identified in West African taurine samples were also identified in other cattle groups including Asian zebu and European cattle. Phylogenetic trees and principal component analysis confirmed that divergence among the cattle groups analysed was poor, particularly for the INHBA sequences. The European cattle subset had the lowest values of haplotype diversity for both the exon1 (monomorphic) and the exon2 (0.077 ± 0.066) of the INHBA gene. Neutrality tests, in general, did not suggest that the analysed genes were under positive selection. The assessed scenario would be consistent with the identification of recent mutations in evolutionary terms. PMID:26365013

  6. Random monoallelic expression of genes on autosomes: Parallels with X-chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Marion-Poll, Lucile; Katoh, Kimiko; Heard, Edith

    2016-08-01

    Genes are generally expressed from their two alleles, except in some particular cases such as random inactivation of one of the two X chromosomes in female mammals or imprinted genes which are expressed only from the maternal or the paternal allele. A lesser-known phenomenon is random monoallelic expression (RME) of autosomal genes, where genes can be stably expressed in a monoallelic manner, from either one of the parental alleles. Studies on autosomal RME face several challenges. First, RME that is based on epigenetic mechanisms has to be distinguished from biased expression of one allele caused by a DNA sequence polymorphism in a regulatory element. Second, RME should not be confused with transient monoallelic expression often observed in single cell analyses, and that often corresponds to dynamic bursting of expression. Thanks to analyses on clonal cell populations, the existence of RME in cultured cells is now well established. Future studies of RME in vivo will have to overcome tissue heterogeneity and certain technical limitations. Here, we discuss current knowledge on autosomal RME, as well as possible mechanisms controlling these expression patterns and potential implications for development and disease, drawing parallels with what is known for X-chromosome inactivation, a paradigm of random monoallelic expression. PMID:27101886

  7. The human BARX2 gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hjalt, T A; Murray, J C

    1999-12-15

    The BARX genes 1 and 2 are Bar class homeobox genes expressed in craniofacial structures during development. In this report, we present the genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and polymorphic markers in BARX2. The gene has four exons, ranging in size from 85 to 1099 bp. BARX2 is localized on human chromosome 11q25, as determined by radiation hybrid mapping. In the mouse, Barx2 is coexpressed with Pitx2 in several tissues. Based on the coexpression, BARX2 was assumed to be a candidate gene for those cases of Rieger syndrome that cannot be associated with mutations of PITX2. Mutations in PITX2 cause some cases of Rieger syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder affecting eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. DNA from Rieger patients was subjected to single-strand conformation polymorphism screening of the BARX2 coding region. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in a normal population, although no etiologic mutations were detectable in over 100 cases of Rieger syndrome or in individuals with related ocular disorders. PMID:10644443

  8. Genetic variation in the major mitotic checkpoint genes associated with chromosomal aberrations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Försti, Asta; Frank, Christoph; Smolkova, Bozena; Kazimirova, Alena; Barancokova, Magdalena; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Kroupa, Michal; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchancova, Janka; Dusinska, Maria; Musak, Ludovit; Vodicka, Pavel; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Non-specific chromosomal aberrations (CAs) are microscopically detected in about 1% of lymphocytes drawn from healthy persons. Causes of CAs in general population are not known but they may be related to risk of cancer. In view of the importance of the mitotic checkpoint machinery on maintaining chromosomal integrity we selected 9 variants in main checkpoint related genes (BUB1B, BUB3, MAD2L1, CENPF, ESPL1/separase, NEK2, PTTG1/securin, ZWILCH and ZWINT) for a genotyping study on samples from healthy individuals (N = 330 to 729) whose lymphocytes had an increased number of CAs compared to persons with a low number of CAs. Genetic variation in individual genes played a minor importance, consistent with the high conservation and selection pressure of the checkpoint system. However, gene pairs were significantly associated with CAs: PTTG1-ZWILCH and PTTG1-ZWINT. MAD2L1 and PTTG1 were the most common partners in any of the two-way interactions. The results suggest that interactions at the level of cohesin (PTTG1) and kinetochore function (ZWINT, ZWILCH and MAD2L1) contribute to the frequency of CAs, suggesting that gene variants at different checkpoint functions appeared to be required for the formation of CAs. PMID:27424524

  9. Systematic search for major genes in schizophrenia: Methodological issues and results from chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, E.; Powell, J.F.; Sham, P.

    1995-10-09

    We describe a method of systematically searching for major genes in disorders of unknown mode of inheritance, using linkage analysis. Our method is designed to minimize the probability of missing linkage due to inadequate exploration of data. We illustrate this method with the results of a search for a locus for schizophrenia on chromosome 12 using 22 highly polymorphic markers in 23 high density pedigrees. The markers span approximately 85-90% of the chromosome and are on average 9.35 cM apart. We have analysed the data using the most plausible current genetic models and allowing for the presence of genetic heterogeneity. None of the markers was supportive of linkage and the distribution of the heterogeneity statistics was in accordance with the null hypothesis. 53 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. SCNN1, an epithelial cell sodium channel gene in the conserved linkage group on mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.; Barrow, L.L.; Canessa, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    SCNN1, a gene encoding a nonvoltage-gated sodium channel, was detected using a rat colon cDNA probe with homology to Caenorhabditis elegans degenerin genes. Human SCNN1 was assigned to chromosome 12 using the NIGMS hybrid mapping panel 2. Mouse SCNN1 was mapped to a conserved linkage group on distal chromosome 6. The observed order of mouse genes was centromere-Raf1-(2.1 {plus_minus} 2.1)Scnn1, Vwf-(1.9 {plus_minus} 1.9)-Ntf3, with 0/101 recombinants between Scnn1 and Vwf. No rearrangements of genomic DNA were detected in the linked mouse mutations deaf waddler (dfw) and opisthotonus (opt). 10 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human Coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Bowles, K R; Gibson, J; Wu, J; Shaffer, L G; Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    1999-10-01

    Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are common causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Many studies have implicated the enteroviruses and, particularly, the Coxsackievirus-B family as etiologic agents of the acquired forms of these diseases. However, we have shown the group-C adenoviruses to be as commonly detected as enteroviruses in the myocardium of children and adults with these diseases. It has remained something of a conundrum why two such divergent virus families cause these diseases. The recent description of the common human Coxsackievirus B-adenovirus receptor (CAR) offers at least a partial explanation. In order to characterize the CAR gene, we screened a bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) library (RPCI11) using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product derived from the 3' end of the CAR cDNA sequence. This identified 13 BACs that were further characterized by PCR amplification of seven contiguous regions of the entire cDNA sequence. Eleven of the BACs were determined to encode pseudogenes while the other two BACs (131J5 and 246M1) encoded the presumed functional gene. PCR amplification of a monochromosomal hybrid panel indicated the presence of pseudogenes on chromosomes 15, 18, and 21 while the functional gene is encoded on chromosome 21. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the gene is located at 21q11.2. DNA sequencing of BACs 131J5 and 246M1 revealed the presence of seven exons. The DNA sequences have been determined for each exon-intron boundary, and putative promoter sequences and transcription initiation sites identified. No consensus polyadenylation signal was identified. PMID:10543405

  12. Evidence for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Predisposition Genes on Chromosomes 10 and 17

    PubMed Central

    ALLEN-BRADY, Kristina; CANNON-ALBRIGHT, Lisa A.; FARNHAM, James M.; NORTON, Peggy A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis to identify pelvic organ prolapse (POP) predisposition genes using a resource of high-risk POP pedigrees. Study Design Cases are defined as women who reported bothersome symptoms of POP based on standardized symptom questions (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI), moderately or quite bothered), and/or received treatment for POP documented in medical records. Our complete pedigree resource contains 299 familial POP cases in 83 high-risk pedigrees. Genotype data were obtained from Illumina HumanHap550, 610Q, the Human1M-Duo, Human Omni1-Quad, or the Human Omni 2.5 platforms. A set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers common to all platforms was identified and markers in high linkage disequilibrium were removed. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis under general dominant and recessive models using a Markov Chain, Monte Carlo linkage analysis method implemented in MCLINK software. Because 70 individuals in 32 pedigrees were used in a previously published linkage analysis for a phenotype of POP requiring treatment/surgery, we also performed linkage only including the 225 newly recruited and genotyped cases in 61 pedigrees. Results Linkage analysis using our complete pedigree resource for the loosened criteria of bothersome POP showed evidence for significant genome-wide linkage on chromosome 10q24-26 (recessive model, max HLOD 3.4); suggestive evidence was identified on chromosomes 6, 17, and an additional region on chromosome 10. In the subset of only the newly recruited familial POP cases, significant evidence for genome-wide linkage was observed on chromosome 17q25 (recessive model, max HLOD 3.3), and suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosomes 10 and 11. Neither analysis duplicated the previously published linkage evidence for the POP-requiring-treatment/surgery phenotype observed on chromosome 9. Conclusion While the etiology of this common condition is unknown, this study

  13. The human actin-regulatory protein Cap G: Gene structure and chromosome location

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, V.S.; Southwick, F.S.; Henske, E.P.; Kwiatkowski, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    Cap G (formerly called macrophage capping protein or gCap39) is a member of the gelsolin/villin family of actin-regulatory proteins. Unlike all other members of this family, Cap G caps the barbed ends of actin filaments, but does not sever them. This protein is half the molecular weight and contains half the number of repeat subunits (3 vs. 6) of gelsolin and villin, suggesting that these two proteins may have arisen by gene duplication of the Cap G gene. To investigate this possibility we have cloned and sequenced the human Cap G gene (gene symbol CAPG). The gene is 16.6 kb in size, contains 10 exons and 9 introns, and is located on the proximal short arm of chromosome 2. The open reading frame is 6.9 kb, having 9 exons and 8 introns. This region contains 3 splice sites that are nearly identical to the human gelsolin gene, but shares only one with villin, indicating that CAPG is more closely related to gelsolin. Further comparisons of these three genes, however, indicate that the evolutionary steps resulting in human gelsolin and villin are likely to have been more complex than a simple tandem duplication of the Cap G gene. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Evolution of the Structure and Chromosomal Distribution of Histidine Biosynthetic Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Renato; Mori, Elena; Tamburini, Elena; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    A database of more than 100 histidine biosynthetic genes from different organisms belonging to the three primary domains has been analyzed, including those found in the now completely sequenced genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis sp., Methanococcus jannaschii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquity of his genes suggests that it is a highly conserved pathway that was probably already present in the last common ancestor of all extant life. The chromosomal distribution of the his genes shows that the enterobacterial histidine operon structure is not the only possible organization, and that there is a diversity of gene arrays for the his pathway. Analysis of the available sequences shows that gene fusions (like those involved in the origin of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisIE and hisB gene structures) are not universal. In contrast, the elongation event that led to the extant hisA gene from two homologous ancestral modules, as well as the subsequent paralogous duplication that originated hisF, appear to be irreversible and are conserved in all known organisms. The available evidence supports the hypothesis that histidine biosynthesis was assembled by a gene recruitment process.

  15. MEI4, a meiosis-specific yeast gene required for chromosome synapsis.

    PubMed Central

    Menees, T M; Ross-MacDonald, P B; Roeder, G S

    1992-01-01

    The MEI4 gene product is required for meiotic induction of recombination and viable spore production in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA sequence analysis shows that the MEI4 gene encodes a 450-amino-acid protein bearing no homology to any previously identified protein. The MEI4 coding region is interrupted by a small intron located near the 5' end of the gene. Efficient splicing of the MEI4 transcript is not dependent on the MER1 protein, which is required for splicing the transcript of another meiotic gene, MER2. Expression of a mei4::lacZ fusion gene is meiosis-specific and depends on both heterozygosity at the mating-type locus and nutrient limitation. Northern (RNA) blot hybridization analysis suggests that MEI4 gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. A functional MEI4 gene is not required for meiotic induction of transcription of the MER1, MER2, MEK1, RED1, SPO11, or RAD50 gene. Cytological analysis of mei4 mutant strains during meiotic prophase demonstrates that the chromosomes form long axial elements that fail to undergo synapsis. The meiosis II division is delayed in mei4 strains. Images PMID:1545815

  16. Analysis of protein gene products in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purpose of genetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkin, S.S.; Zakharov, S.F.; Gromov, P.S.; Shcheglova, M.V.; Kukharenko, V.I.; Shilov, A.G.; Matveeva, N.M.; Zhdanova, N.S.; Efimochkin, A.S.; Krokhina, T.B. |

    1994-12-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used for analyzing proteins in hybrid cells that contained single human chromosomes (chromosome 5, chromosome 21, or chromosomes 5 and 21) against the background of the mouse genome. By comparing the protein patterns of hybrid and parent cells (about 1000 protein fractions for each kind of cell), five fractions among proteins of hybrid cells were supposedly identified as human proteins. The genes of two of them are probably located on chromosome 5, and those of the other three on chromosome 21. Moreover, analysis of proteins in fibroblasts of patients with the cri-du-chat syndrome (5p-) revealed a decrease in the content of two proteins as compared with those in preparations of diploid fibroblasts. This fact was regarded as evidence that two corresponding genes are located on the short arm of chromosome 5. Methodological problems associated with the use of protein pattern analysis in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purposes of genetic mapping are discussed.

  17. Gene structure and chromosome localization to 7q21.3 of the human rod photoreceptor transducin {gamma}-subunit gene (GNGT1)

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, Lap-Chee |; Feinstein, D.S.

    1996-07-01

    The transducin {gamma}-subunit gene (GNGT1) encodes a member ({gamma}{sub 1}) of the family of heterotrimeric G-protein {gamma}-subunits that is specific to rod photoreceptors. In this report we have determined the complete structure of the GNGT1 gene and have localized it to human chromosome 7q21.3 using somatic cell hybrid and yeast artificial chromosome analysis. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Lack of NF1 gene expression in a sporadic schwannoma from a patient without neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, K.K.; Dowton, B.; Silow-Santiago, I.

    1994-09-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene encodes a tumor suppressor protein, neurofibromin, which is expressed at high levels in Schwann cells and other adult tissues. Loss of NF1 gene expression has been reported in Schwann cell tumors (neurofibrosarcomas) from patients with NF1 and its loss is associated with increased proliferation of these cells. We examined one spinal schwannoma from a patient without clinical features of neurofibromatosis type 1 or 2. The tumor was a typical schwannoma confirmed by standard neuropathologic criteria and expressed S100 by immunocytochemistry. NF1 gene expression in this tumor was examined by in situ hybridization using an NF1-specific riboprobe, Northern blot analysis and reverse-transcribed (RT) PCR. Little or no expression of NF1 RNA could be detected using these methods whereas abundant expression of S100, cyclophilin and beta-action RNA was found in the tumor. Fibroblast and Schwann cells were then individually cultured from this schwannoma and the RNA extracted for Northern blot and RT-PCR analysis. In these cultured Schwann cells both from early and late passages, abundant expression of NF1 RNA could be detected. It is unlikely that our culture technique preferentially expanded {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} Schwann cells, since NF1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene and its presence would not confer any growth advantage over the tumor-derived, neurofibromin-negative Schwann cells which presumably have an increased proliferation rate. Similarly, the conditions used to expand these Schwann cells do not result in increased NF1 gene expression as shown in previous studies. These results suggest that, in some tumors, expression of the NF1 gene can be downregulated by factors produced within the tumor and that this type of tumor suppressor gene downregulation may represent another mechanism other than mutation for turning off the expression of these growth-suppressing genes and allowing for cell proliferation in tumors.

  19. Multiple sclerosis retrovirus-like envelope gene: Role of the chromosome 20 insertion

    PubMed Central

    Varadé, Jezabel; García-Montojo, Marta; de la Hera, Belén; Camacho, Iris; García-Martínez, Mª. Ángel; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic basis involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility was not completely revealed by genome-wide association studies. Part of it could lie in repetitive sequences, as those corresponding to human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs). Retrovirus-like particles were isolated from MS patients and the genome of the MS-associated retrovirus (MSRV) was the founder of the HERV-W family. We aimed to ascertain which chromosomal origin encodes the pathogenic ENV protein by genomic analysis of the HERV-W insertions. Methods/results In silico analyses allowed to uncover putative open reading frames containing the specific sequence previously reported for MSRV-like envelope (env) detection. Out of the 261 genomic insertions of HERV-W env, only 9 copies harbor the specific primers and probe featuring MSRV-like env. The copy from chromosome 20 was further studied considering its size, a truncated homologue of the functional HERV-W env sequence encoding syncytin. High Resolution Melting analysis of this sequence identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms, subsequently genotyped by Taqman chemistry in 668 MS patients and 678 healthy controls. No significant association of these polymorphisms with MS risk was evidenced. Transcriptional activity of this MSRV-like env copy was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients and controls. RNA expression levels of chromosome 20-specific MSRV-like env did not show significant differences between MS patients and controls, neither were related to genotypes of the two mentioned polymorphisms. Conclusions The lack of association with MS risk of the identified polymorphisms together with the transcription results discard chromosome 20 as genomic origin of MSRV-like env. PMID:26675450

  20. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16.

    PubMed

    Polymeropoulos, M H; Ide, S E; Wright, M; Goodship, J; Weissenbach, J; Pyeritz, R E; Da Silva, E O; Ortiz De Luna, R I; Francomano, C A

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Zmax = 6.91 at theta = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. PMID:8661097

  1. Mapping of the gene specifying aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Okii, M; Iyobe, S; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    We examined the aminoglycoside inactivation enzymes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, seven clinical isolates and seven laboratory strains without plasmids. All strains were found to possess the enzyme aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II [APH(3')-II]. We isolated an APH(3')-II-deficient mutant from a PAO strain by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. By plasmid (FP5 or R68.45)-mediated conjugation, we determined the locus of the gene specifying the APH(3')-II between trp-6 and pro-82 on the PAO chromosome and designated this gene aphA. It was concluded that the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to kanamycins, neomycins, paromomycins, ribostamycin, and butirosins was due to this newly determined gene. PMID:6307974

  2. Epithelial expression and chromosomal location of human TLE genes: Implications for notch signaling and neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanling; Dehni, Ghassan; Stifani, S.

    1996-01-01

    The TLE genes are the human homologues of Drosophila groucho, a member of the Notch signaling pathway. This pathway controls a number of different cell-fate choices in invertebrates and vertebrates. We are interested in investigating the functions of the TLE gene family during epithelial determination and carcinogenesis. We show that expression of individual TLE genes correlates with immature epithelial cells that are progressing toward their terminally differentiated state, suggesting a role during epithelial differentiation. In both normal tissues and conditions resulting from incorrect or incomplete maturation events, such as metaplastic and neoplastic transformations, TLE expression is elevated and coincides with Notch expression, implicating these molecules in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state in epithelial cells. We also show that TLE1 and TLE2 are organized in a tandem array at chromosomal location 19p13.3, while TLE3 maps to 15q22. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  3. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16

    SciTech Connect

    Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Ide, S.E.; Wright, M.

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellisvan Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Z{sub max} = 6.91 at {theta} = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Inappropriate gene activation in FSHD: a repressor complex binds a chromosomal repeat deleted in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Gabellini, Davide; Green, Michael R; Tupler, Rossella

    2002-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a common myopathy, is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown molecular mechanism. Almost all FSHD patients carry deletions of an integral number of tandem 3.3 kilobase repeats, termed D4Z4, located on chromosome 4q35. Here, we find that in FSHD muscle, 4q35 genes located upstream of D4Z4 are inappropriately overexpressed. We show that an element within D4Z4 specifically binds a multiprotein complex consisting of YY1, a known transcriptional repressor, HMGB2, an architectural protein, and nucleolin. We demonstrate that this multiprotein complex binds D4Z4 in vitro and in vivo and mediates transcriptional repression of 4q35 genes. Based upon these results, we propose that deletion of D4Z4 leads to the inappropriate transcriptional derepression of 4q35 genes resulting in disease. PMID:12176321

  5. Chromosomal localization of a new mouse lens opacity gene (lop18)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Bo; Hawes, N.L.; Smith, R.S.

    1996-08-15

    Examination of mouse strains with a slit lamp and indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed that strain CBA/CaGnLe has a white cataract obvious at weaning age. It soon progresses to a large white nuclear cataract with mild cortical changes. Crosses with C57BL/GJ showed that this is inherited as a single recessive fully penetrant gene, which we have designated lop18 (lens opacity 18). Linkage analysis using visible marker T (brachyury), histocompatibility marker H2, and microsatellite markers D17MU21, D17MU28, D17MU38, and D17MU46 shows that the 1op18 gene is located, {approximately}16 cM from the centromere on mouse Chromosome 17. It is a likely candidate mutation for the {alpha}-crystallin (Cryal) gene. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Murine chromosomal location of five bHLH-Zip transcription factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrimsson, E.; Gilbert, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-07-20

    The genes for the bHLH-Zip transcription factors Tfap4, Mxi1, Tcfeb, Usf1, and Usf2 have been mapped in mouse by interspecific backcross analysis. Mxi1, Usf1, and Usf2 have been mapped previously by in situ hybridization, but their positions on the meiotic linkage map had not been determined. The other two genes have not previously been mapped in mouse. These transcription factors belong to a growing family of transcriptional regulators, some of which are known to form a complex network of interacting proteins that control cell proliferation and apoptosis. As expected, based on mapping studies of other bHLH-Zip genes, these loci were well distributed among mouse chromosomes. In addition, some of the probes used in this study detected multiple, independently segregating loci, suggesting the possible existence of additional family members or species-specific pseudogenes. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Mutations in the FUS/TLS gene on chromosome 16 cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, T J; Bosco, D A; Leclerc, A L; Tamrazian, E; Vanderburg, C R; Russ, C; Davis, A; Gilchrist, J; Kasarskis, E J; Munsat, T; Valdmanis, P; Rouleau, G A; Hosler, B A; Cortelli, P; de Jong, P J; Yoshinaga, Y; Haines, J L; Pericak-Vance, M A; Yan, J; Ticozzi, N; Siddique, T; McKenna-Yasek, D; Sapp, P C; Horvitz, H R; Landers, J E; Brown, R H

    2009-02-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal degenerative motor neuron disorder. Ten percent of cases are inherited; most involve unidentified genes. We report here 13 mutations in the fused in sarcoma/translated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS) gene on chromosome 16 that were specific for familial ALS. The FUS/TLS protein binds to RNA, functions in diverse processes, and is normally located predominantly in the nucleus. In contrast, the mutant forms of FUS/TLS accumulated in the cytoplasm of neurons, a pathology that is similar to that of the gene TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43), whose mutations also cause ALS. Neuronal cytoplasmic protein aggregation and defective RNA metabolism thus appear to be common pathogenic mechanisms involved in ALS and possibly in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19251627

  8. Novel sex-determining genes in fish and sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying many developmental events are conserved across vertebrate taxa, the lability at the top of the sex-determining (SD) cascade has been evident from the fact that four master SD genes have been identified: mammalian Sry; chicken DMRT1; medaka Dmy; and Xenopus laevis DM-W. This diversity is thought to be associated with the turnover of sex chromosomes, which is likely to be more frequent in fishes and other poikilotherms than in therian mammals and birds. Recently, four novel candidates for vertebrate SD genes were reported, all of them in fishes. These include amhy in the Patagonian pejerrey, Gsdf in Oryzias luzonensis, Amhr2 in fugu and sdY in rainbow trout. These studies provide a good opportunity to infer patterns from the seemingly chaotic picture of sex determination systems. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the master SD genes in fishes. PMID:23335327

  9. Chromosome-specific NOR inactivation explains selective rRNA gene silencing and dosage control in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Mohannath, Gireesha; Blevins, Todd; Pontvianne, Frederic; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, scores of excess ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are silenced by repressive chromatin modifications. Given the near sequence identity of rRNA genes within a species, it is unclear how specific rRNA genes are reproducibly chosen for silencing. Using Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype (strain) Col-0, a systematic search identified sequence polymorphisms that differ between active and developmentally silenced rRNA gene subtypes. Recombinant inbred mapping populations derived from three different ecotype crosses were then used to map the chromosomal locations of silenced and active RNA gene subtypes. Importantly, silenced and active rRNA gene subtypes are not intermingled. All silenced rRNA gene subtypes mapped to the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on chromosome 2 (NOR2). All active rRNA gene subtypes mapped to NOR4. Using an engineered A. thaliana line in which a portion of Col-0 chromosome 4 was replaced by sequences of another ecotype, we show that a major rRNA gene subtype silenced at NOR2 is active when introgressed into the genome at NOR4. Collectively, these results reveal that selective rRNA gene silencing is not regulated gene by gene based on mechanisms dependent on subtle gene sequence variation. Instead, we propose that a subchromosomal silencing mechanism operates on a multimegabase scale to inactivate NOR2. PMID:26744421

  10. Overexpression and lack of copy number variation in the BMI-1 gene in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    MADATHAN KANDY, SIBIN; ISHWARA BHAT, DHANANJAYA; CHOPPAVARAPU, LAVANYA; SUVATHA, ARATI; GHATI KASTURIRANGAN, CHETAN

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are neoplasms of the brain that are associated with a poor prognosis. The B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) gene is one of the major cancer stem cell factors responsible for treatment failure in glioma. In the present study, the DNA-RNA-protein alterations in the BMI-1 gene were assessed in 50 glioma samples. Copy number variations in the BMI-1 gene were analyzed using SYBR® Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression analysis was performed using a Taqman assay and protein quantitation was performed using western blotting. A comparative Ct analysis showed the absence of copy number variations in all glioma samples. BMI-1 mRNA expression was found to be overexpressed in 36 out of 50 samples (72.0%), and 37 out of 50 samples showed overexpression (74.0%) of BMI-1 protein; this was statistically significant when compared with non-glioma tissues. It was observed that the protein and RNA expression in glioma were concordant. In this study on the BMI-1 gene, transcription and translation in glioma were observed and BMI-1 overexpression was found to be a common phenomenon. PMID:26722333

  11. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: Structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K.; Dueker, M.; Stoffel, W.

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNA, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several bindings sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1. The ASCT1 gene (SLC1A4) structure reported here will facilitate the characterization of the genes of the other members of the GLAST-related transporter family and might be useful in the elucidation of amino acid transport-related defects. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. New methods for tightly regulated gene expression and highly efficient chromosomal integration of cloned genes for Methanosarcina species

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guss, Adam M.; Rother, Michael; Zhang, Jun Kai; Kulkkarni, Gargi; Metcalf, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient method for chromosomal integration of cloned DNA into Methanosarcina spp. was developed utilizing the site-specific recombination system from the Streptomyces phage φC31. Host strains expressing the φC31 integrase gene and carrying an appropriate recombination site can be transformed with non-replicating plasmids carrying the complementary recombination site at efficiencies similar to those obtained with self-replicating vectors. We have also constructed a series of hybrid promoters that combine the highly expressed M. barkeri P mcrB promoter with binding sites for the tetracycline-responsive, bacterial TetR protein. These promoters are tightly regulated by the presence or absence of tetracycline inmore » strains that express the tetR gene. The hybrid promoters can be used in genetic experiments to test gene essentiality by placing a gene of interest under their control. Thus, growth of strains with tetR -regulated essential genes becomes tetracycline-dependent. A series of plasmid vectors that utilize the site-specific recombination system for construction of reporter gene fusions and for tetracycline regulated expression of cloned genes are reported. These vectors were used to test the efficiency of translation at a variety of start codons. Fusions using an ATG start site were the most active, whereas those using GTG and TTG were approximately one half or one fourth as active, respectively. The CTG fusion was 95% less active than the ATG fusion.« less

  13. The large-X effect in plants: increased species divergence and reduced gene flow on the Silene X-chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Filatov, Dmitry A

    2016-06-01

    The disproportionately large involvement of the X-chromosome in the isolation of closely related species (the large-X effect) has been reported for many animals, where X-linked genes are mostly hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. The expression of deleterious recessive mutations is thought to drive the frequent involvement of the X-chromosome in hybrid sterility, as well as to reduce interspecific gene flow for X-linked genes. Here, we evaluate the role of the X-chromosome in the speciation of two closely related plant species - the white and red campions (Silene latifolia and S. dioica) - that hybridize widely across Europe. The two species evolved separate sexes and sex chromosomes relatively recently (~10(7)  years), and unlike most animal species, most X-linked genes have intact Y-linked homologs. We demonstrate that the X-linked genes show a very small and insignificant amount of interspecific gene flow, while gene flow involving autosomal loci is significant and sufficient to homogenize the gene pools of the two species. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of the large-X effect in Silene and comprise the first report of this effect in plants. Nonhemizygosity of many X-linked genes in Silene males indicates that exposure of recessive mutations to selection may not be essential for the occurrence of the large-X effect. Several possible causes of the large-X effect in Silene are discussed. PMID:26479725

  14. Localisation of the gene for achondroplasia to the telomeric region of chromosome 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilov, I.; Velinov, M.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common type of genetic dwarfism, is characterized by a variety of skeletal anomalies including disproportionate short stature and rhizomelic shortening of the extremities. The disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with a prevalence of 1-15 per 100,000 live births. The etiology of ACH remains unknown, although evidence points to a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. To determine the location of the gene responsible for ACH, a panel of 14 families with a total of 43 meioses was genotyped for 40 polymorphic markers for loci randomly distributed throughout the genome. The first significant positive Lod score was obtained for the locus D4S127 (Zmax=3.65 at {theta}=0.03). A series of 20 markers for chromosome 4p16.3 loci were then used to determine the most likely position of the ACH gene. Two additional loci, D4S412 and IDUA, showed strong linkage to the disease (Zmax=3.34 at {theta}=0.03 and Zmax=3.35 at {theta}=0.0, respectively). Multipoint analysis and direct counting of recombinants places the ACH gene in a 2.5 cM region between the marker D4S43 and the chromosome 4p telomere. No evidence was found for genetic heterogeneity. The ACH region contains a number of genes, including that for the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR3, which are being evaluated as candidates for the ACH gene. This identification of tightly linked polymorphic markers, as well as being the first step in the characterization of the ACH gene, offers the possibility of DNA based prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  15. The structure and chromosome location of the human chondroadherin gene (CHAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J. |; Chen, Xiao-Ning; Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-10-15

    The cDNA sequence of the human chondroadherin gene was cloned using PCR-based techniques. The gene encodes a protein of 359 amino acids, of which the first 21 amino acids represent a putative signal peptide sequence and which possesses 11 leucine-rich repeats flanked by cysteine-rich regions. The cDNA possesses a 5{prime} untranslated region of 149 bp, a coding region of 1080 hp including the stop codon, and a 3{prime} untranslated region of 561 bp terminating in a poly(A) tail. The cDNA hybridizes with a single messenger RNA of 1.9 kb, which is present in chondrocytes at all ages. Analysis of genomic DNA revealed that the chondroadherin gene possesses two introns, both of which reside within the coding region. The first intron has a length of about 2.3 kb and separates the codons for lysine(258) and phenylalanine(259). The second intron has a length of about 0.5 kb and splits the codon for tryptophan(314). This genomic organization results in exon 1 encoding the signal peptide, the amino-terminal cysteine-rich region, and the first 9 leucine-rich repeats; exon 2 encoding the last 2 leucine-rich repeats and part of the carboxy-terminal cysteine-rich region; and exon 3 encoding the remainder of the carboxy-terminal cysteine-rich region. The gene does not possess a TATA box prior to its transcription start site. Isolation of a cosmid clone spanning the chondroadherin gene enabled its chromosome location to be established. The gene was shown to reside at chromosome 17q21.33. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  16. A Telomeric Cluster of Antimony Resistance Genes on Chromosome 34 of Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Tejera Nevado, Paloma; Bifeld, Eugenia; Höhn, Katharina; Clos, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying the drug resistance of Leishmania spp. are manifold and not completely identified. Apart from the highly conserved multidrug resistance gene family known from higher eukaryotes, Leishmania spp. also possess genus-specific resistance marker genes. One of them, ARM58, was first identified in Leishmania braziliensis using a functional cloning approach, and its domain structure was characterized in L. infantum Here we report that L. infantum ARM58 is part of a gene cluster at the telomeric end of chromosome 34 also comprising the neighboring genes ARM56 and HSP23. We show that overexpression of all three genes can confer antimony resistance to intracellular amastigotes. Upon overexpression in L. donovani, ARM58 and ARM56 are secreted via exosomes, suggesting a scavenger/secretion mechanism of action. Using a combination of functional cloning and next-generation sequencing, we found that the gene cluster was selected only under antimonyl tartrate challenge and weakly under Cu(2+) challenge but not under sodium arsenite, Cd(2+), or miltefosine challenge. The selective advantage is less pronounced in intracellular amastigotes treated with the sodium stibogluconate, possibly due to the known macrophage-stimulatory activity of this drug, against which these resistance markers may not be active. Our data point to the specificity of these three genes for antimony resistance. PMID:27324767

  17. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  18. Identification of Chromosomal Shigella flexneri Genes Induced by the Eukaryotic Intracellular Environment

    PubMed Central

    Runyen-Janecky, L. J.; Payne, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    Upon entry into the eukaryotic cytosol, the facultative intracellular bacterium Shigella flexneri is exposed to an environment that may necessitate the expression of particular genes for it to survive and grow intracellularly. To identify genes that are induced in response to the intracellular environment, we screened a library containing fragments of the S. flexneri chromosome fused to a promoterless green fluorescent protein gene (gfp). Bacteria containing promoter fusions that had a higher level of gfp expression when S. flexneri was intracellular (in Henle cells) than when S. flexneri was extracellular (in Luria-Bertani broth) were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Nine different genes with increased expression in Henle cells were identified. Several genes (uhpT, bioA, and lysA) were involved in metabolic processes. The uhpT gene, which encoded a sugar phosphate transporter, was the most frequently isolated gene and was induced by glucose-6-phosphate in vitro. Two of the intracellularly induced genes (pstS and phoA) encode proteins involved in phosphate acquisition and were induced by phosphate limitation in vitro. Additionally, three iron-regulated genes (sufA, sitA, and fhuA) were identified. The sufA promoter was derepressed in iron-limiting media and was also induced by oxidative stress. To determine whether intracellularly induced genes are required for survival or growth in the intracellular environment, we constructed mutations in the S. flexneri uhpT and pstS genes by allelic exchange. The uhpT mutant could not use glucose-6-phosphate as a sole carbon source in vitro but exhibited normal plaque formation on Henle cell monolayers. The pstS mutant had no apparent growth defect in low-phosphate media in vitro but formed smaller plaques on Henle cell monolayers than the parent strain. Both mutants were as effective as the parent strain in inducing apoptosis in a macrophage cell line. PMID:12117948

  19. Induction by ionizing radiation of the gadd45 gene in cultured human cells: lack of mediation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasiou, M A; Kerr, N C; Robbins, J H; McBride, O W; Alamo, I; Barrett, S F; Hickson, I D; Fornace, A J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the expression of two DNA-damage-inducible genes, designated gadd45 and gadd153, was examined in cultured human cells. These genes have previously been shown to be strongly and coordinately induced by UV radiation and alkylating agents in human and hamster cells. We found that the gadd45 but not the gadd153 gene is strongly induced by X rays in human cells. The level of gadd45 mRNA increased rapidly after X rays at doses as low as 2 Gy. After 20 Gy of X rays, gadd45 induction, as measured by increased amounts of mRNA, was similar to that produced by the most effective dose of the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. No induction was seen after treatment of either human or hamster cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C (PKC). Therefore, gadd45 represents the only known mammalian X-ray-responsive gene whose induction is not mediated by PKC. However, induction was blocked by the protein kinase inhibitor H7, indicating that induction is mediated by some other kinase(s). Sequence analysis of human and hamster cDNA clones demonstrated that this gene has been highly conserved and encodes a novel 165-amino-acid polypeptide which is 96% identical in the two species. This gene was localized to the short arm of human chromosome 1 between p12 and p34. When induction in lymphoblast lines from four normal individuals was compared with that in lines from four patients with ataxia telangiectasia, induction by X rays of gadd45 mRNA was less in the cell lines from this cancer-prone radiosensitive disorder. Our results provide evidence for the existence of an X-ray stress response in human cells which is independent of PKC and which is abnormal in taxia telangiectasia. Images PMID:1990262

  20. Lack of feedback inhibition of V kappa gene rearrangement by productively rearranged alleles.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Yamagishi, H

    1991-02-01

    Circular DNAs excised by immunoglobulin kappa chain gene rearrangements were cloned and characterized. 16 of 17 clones examined were double recombination products containing a V kappa-J kappa rearrangement (coding joint) as well as the reciprocal element (signal joint) of another V kappa-J kappa rearrangement. These products suggested multiple recombination, primary inversion, and secondary excision. In primary events, 5 of 16 translational reading frames were in-phase. Thus, V kappa gene rearrangement may not be inhibited by the presence of a productively rearranged allele. An unusually large trinucleotide (P) insertion forming a palindrome of 12 nucleotides was also observed in one of the coding joints. PMID:1988542

  1. Characterization of the Chromosome 4 Genes That Affect Fluconazole-Induced Disomy Formation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Chang, Yun; Hansen, Bryan; Bugge, Cliff; Fischer, Elizabeth; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2012-01-01

    Heteroresistance in Cryptococcus neoformans is an intrinsic adaptive resistance to azoles and the heteroresistant phenotype is associated with disomic chromosomes. Two chromosome 1 (Chr1) genes, ERG11, the fluconazole target, and AFR1, a drug transporter, were reported as major factors in the emergence of Chr1 disomy. In the present study, we show Chr4 to be the second most frequently formed disomy at high concentrations of fluconazole (FLC) and characterize the importance of resident genes contributing to disomy formation. We deleted nine Chr4 genes presumed to have functions in ergosterol biosynthesis, membrane composition/integrity or drug transportation that could influence Chr4 disomy under FLC stress. Of these nine, disruption of three genes homologous to Sey1 (a GTPase), Glo3 and Gcs2 (the ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase activating proteins) significantly reduced the frequency of Chr4 disomy in heteroresistant clones. Furthermore, FLC resistant clones derived from sey1Δglo3Δ did not show disomy of either Chr4 or Chr1 but instead had increased the copy number of the genes proximal to ERG11 locus on Chr1. Since the three genes are critical for the integrity of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we used Sec61ß-GFP fusion as a marker to study the ER in the mutants. The cytoplasmic ER was found to be elongated in sey1Δ but without any discernable alteration in gcs2Δ and glo3Δ under fluorescence microscopy. The aberrant ER morphology of all three mutant strains, however, was discernable by transmission electron microscopy. A 3D reconstruction using Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) revealed considerably reduced reticulation in the ER of glo3Δ and gcs2Δ strains. In sey1Δ, ER reticulation was barely detectable and cisternae were expanded extensively compared to the wild type strains. These data suggest that the genes required for maintenance of ER integrity are important for the formation of disomic chromosomes in C

  2. Lack of FLT3-TKD835 gene mutation in toxicity of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Rafiee, Mohammad; Keramati, Mohammad-Reza; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Asgharzadeh, Ali; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Sheikhi, Maryam; Amini, Nafiseh; Zarmehri, Azam Moradi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Sulfur mustard (SM) was used by the Iraqi army against the Iranian troops in the Iran-Iraq war from 1983–1988. This chemical gas affects different organs including the skin, lungs and the hematopoietic system. Any exposure to SM increases the risk of chromosomal breaking, hyperdiploidy and hypodiploidy. Studies have shown that the risk for acute myeloblastic and lymphoblastic leukemia increases in veterans exposed to SM. FLT3 mutations including ITD and TKD mutations had been observed in some cases of leukemia. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the frequency of FLT3-TKD835 mutations in the veterans exposed to SM agent. Materials and Methods: We studied 42 patients who were exposed to SM during the war in Khorasan Razavi province, Mashhad, Iran in 2012. As control group, 30 healthy males were selected from first-degree relatives of the patients. For assessment of TKD835 mutation, DNA was extracted and RFLP-PCR was performed. Results: Analysis of RFLP-PCR data showed no FLT-3 TKD mutation in any of the patients. Conclusion: Although contact with SM can increase the risk of malignancy especially hematologic neoplasms, results of the study show that another mechanism of leukemogenesis, other than FLT3-TKD mutation, may be the reason for increased risk of leukemia in SM toxicity. PMID:26523218

  3. P-Element Insertion Alleles of Essential Genes on the Third Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster: Correlation of Physical and Cytogenetic Maps in Chromosomal Region 86e-87f

    PubMed Central

    Deak, P.; Omar, M. M.; Saunders, RDC.; Pal, M.; Komonyi, O.; Szidonya, J.; Maroy, P.; Zhang, Y.; Ashburner, M.; Benos, P.; Savakis, C.; Siden-Kiamos, I.; Louis, C.; Bolshakov, V. N.; Kafatos, F. C.; Madueno, E.; Modolell, J.; Glover, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have established a collection of 2460 lethal or semi-lethal mutant lines using a procedure thought to insert single P elements into vital genes on the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. More than 1200 randomly selected lines were examined by in situ hybridization and 90% found to contain single insertions at sites that mark 89% of all lettered subdivisions of the Bridges' map. A set of chromosomal deficiencies that collectively uncover ~25% of the euchromatin of chromosome 3 reveal lethal mutations in 468 lines corresponding to 145 complementation groups. We undertook a detailed analysis of the cytogenetic interval 86E-87F and identified 87 P-element-induced mutations falling into 38 complementation groups, 16 of which correspond to previously known genes. Twenty-one of these 38 complementation groups have at least one allele that has a P-element insertion at a position consistent with the cytogenetics of the locus. We have rescued P elements and flanking chromosomal sequences from the 86E-87F region in 35 lines with either lethal or genetically silent P insertions, and used these as probes to identify cosmids and P1 clones from the Drosophila genome projects. This has tied together the physical and genetic maps and has linked 44 previously identified cosmid contigs into seven ``supercontigs'' that span the interval. STS data for sequences flanking one side of the P-element insertions in 49 lines has identified insertions in the αγ element at 87C, two known transposable elements, and the open reading frames of seven putative single copy genes. These correspond to five known genes in this interval, and two genes identified by the homology of their predicted products to known proteins from other organisms. PMID:9409831

  4. Mapping of the phenol sulfotransferase gene (STP) to human chromosome 16p12. 1-p11. 2 and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, T.P.; Obermoeller, R.D. ); Leiter, E.H.; Chapman, H.D. ); Falany, C.N. ); Deng, Z.; Siciliano, M.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have recently cloned a cDNA encoding the human phenol-preferring phenol sulfotransferase (P-PST) enzyme. An oligonucleotide primer pair based on the human STP (representing sulfotransferase, phenol-preferring) cDNA sequence was synthesized and was employed in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of human genomic DNA to identify a 525-bp DNA fragment. The DNA sequence of this portion of the STP gene, near the 5[prime] end of the coding region, was determined. The amplified genomic fragment contained two small introns of 104 and 89 bp. When DNA samples from a human-hamster somatic cell hybrid panel were screened by PCR using these primers, only those hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 were positive for the 525-bp genomic fragment. To identify the specific region on chromosome 16 that contained the STP gene, PCR amplification reactions were performed on a human-mouse somatic cell hybrid panel containing defined portions of human chromosome 16. The results indicated that STP is localized proximal to the gene for protein kinase C, [beta]1 polypeptide (PRKCB1), in the region from the distal portion of 16p11.2 to p12.1. The human STP gene maps near the locus for Batten disease (CLN3). Furthermore, the authors have determined by genotyping of murine interspecific backcross progeny that the homologous gene in mouse (Stp) localizes to the syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7 near the D7Mit8 (at 54 cM) and D7Bir1 markers. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Exclusion of candidate genes from the chromosome 1q juvenile glaucoma region and mapping of the peripheral cannabis receptor gene (CNR2) to chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sunden, S.L.F.; Nichols, B.E.; Alward, W.L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma has been mapped by linkage to 1q21-q31. Several candidate genes were evaluated in the same family used to identify the primary linkage. Atrionatriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR1) and laminin C1 (LAMC1) have been previously mapped to this region and could putatively play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. A third gene, the peripheral cannabis receptor (CNR2) was not initially mapped in humans but was a candidate because of the relief that cannabis affords some patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Microsatellites associated with NPR1 and LAMC1 revealed multiple recombinations in affected members of this pedigree. CNR2 was shown to be on chromosome 1 by PCR amplification of a 150 bp fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region in monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids (NIGMS panel No. 2). These primers also revealed a two allele single strand conformation polymorphism which showed multiple recombinants with juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma in large pedigrees, segregating this disorder. The marker was then mapped to 1p34-p36 by linkage, with the most likely location between liver alkaline phosphatase (ALPL) and alpha-L-1 fucosidase (FUCA1).

  6. Genetic mapping of the polycystic kidney gene, pcy, on mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Shizuko; Ogiso, Noboru; Takahashi, Hisahide

    1995-12-01

    The murine polycystic kidney disease gene, pcy, is an autosomal recessive trait located on chromosome 9. To determine the genetic locus of pcy, 222 intraspecific backcross mice were obtained by mating C57BL/6FG-pcy and Mus molossinus. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 70 of the 222 backcross progeny showed that pcy, dilute coat color (d), and cholecystokinin (Cck) were located in the order d-pcy-Cck from the centromere. Simple sequence repeat length polymorphism analysis of DNA of all 222 backcross mice was carried out using four markers which were located near the central regions of d and Cck. One and eight recombinations were detected between D9Mit24 and pcy and between D9Mit16 and pcy, respectively. However, no recombinant was observed among pcy, D9Mit14, and D9Mit148. These findings strongly suggest that D9Mit14 and D9Mit148 are located near the pcy gene and are good markers for chromosomal walking to this gene. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. ); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A gene for nystagmus-associated episodic ataxia maps to chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.L.; Root, D.; Gancher, S.

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and relatively normal neurological function between attacks. Onset occurs in childhood or adolescence and persists through adulthood. Penetrance is nearly complete. EA is clinically heterogeneous, including at least two distinct entities: (1) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting hours to days, generally with interictal nystagmus (MIM 108500); (2) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting only minutes, with interictal myokymia (MMM 160120). The EA/nystagmus patients sometimes develop persistent ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Previously we reported linkage in four EA/myokymia families to a K{sup +} channel gene on chromosome 12p. We excluded this region in a large family with EA/nystagmus. We now report evidence for linkage to chromosome 19p in this and in one other EA/nystagmus family, based on eight microsatellite markers which span approximately 30 cM. The region is flanked distally by D19S209 and proximally by D19S226. All six markers within this region gave positive evidence for linkage; the highest total two-point lod scores occurred wtih D19S221 (3.98 at theta = 0.10) and D19S413 (3.37 at theta = 0.05). Interestingly, Joutel et al. (1993) mapped a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) to the region around D19S221. Some individuals in these families have ataxia, cerebellar atrophy and interictal nystagmus, but no episodic ataxia. These results demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity in EA reflects underlying genetic hetreogeneity. In addition, they suggest that EA/nystagmus and some FHM may represent different mutations in the same gene locus on chromosome 19p.

  9. A Causal Gene for Seed Dormancy on Wheat Chromosome 4A Encodes a MAP Kinase Kinase.

    PubMed

    Torada, Atsushi; Koike, Michiya; Ogawa, Taiichi; Takenouchi, Yu; Tadamura, Kazuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kawaura, Kanako; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2016-03-21

    Seed germination under the appropriate environmental conditions is important both for plant species survival and for successful agriculture. Seed dormancy, which controls germination time, is one of the adaptation mechanisms and domestication traits [1]. Seed dormancy is generally defined as the absence of germination of a viable seed under conditions that are favorable for germination [2]. The seed dormancy of cultivated plants has generally been reduced during domestication [3]. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Weak dormancy may be an advantage for the productivity due to uniform emergence and a disadvantage for the risks of pre-harvest sprouting (PHS), which decreases grain quality and yield [4]. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling natural variation of seed dormancy have been identified on various chromosomes [5]. A major QTL for seed dormancy has been consistently detected on chromosome 4A [6-13]. The QTL was designated as a major gene, Phs1, which could be precisely mapped within a 2.6 cM region [14]. Here, we identified a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) gene (designated TaMKK3-A) by a map-based approach as a candidate gene for the seed dormancy locus Phs1 on chromosome 4A in bread wheat. Complementation analysis showed that transformation of a dormant wheat cultivar with the TaMKK3-A allele from a nondormant cultivar clearly reduced seed dormancy. Cultivars differing in dormancy had a single nonsynonymous amino acid substitution in the kinase domain of the predicted MKK3 protein sequence, which may be associated with the length of seed dormancy. PMID:26948878

  10. Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Delbridge, Margaret L; Deakin, Janine E; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Kirby, Patrick J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from an ancient autosomal pair. Mapping of human X- and Y-borne genes in distantly related mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates has proved valuable to help deduce the evolution of this unique part of the genome. The platypus, a monotreme mammal distantly related to eutherians and marsupials, has an extraordinary sex chromosome system comprising five X and five Y chromosomes that form a translocation chain at male meiosis. The largest X chromosome (X1), which lies at one end of the chain, has considerable homology to the human X. Using comparative mapping and the emerging chicken database, we demonstrate that part of the therian X chromosome, previously thought to be conserved across all mammals, was lost from the platypus X1 to an autosome. This region included genes flanking the XIST locus, and also genes with Y-linked homologues that are important to male reproduction in therians. Since these genes lie on the X in marsupials and eutherians, and also on the homologous region of chicken chromosome 4, this represents a loss from the monotreme X rather than an additional evolutionary stratum of the human X. PMID:15973504

  11. Evolutionary Strata on the X Chromosomes of the Dioecious Plant Silene latifolia: Evidence From New Sex-Linked Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bergero, Roberta; Forrest, Alan; Kamau, Esther; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Despite its recent evolutionary origin, the sex chromosome system of the plant Silene latifolia shows signs of progressive suppression of recombination having created evolutionary strata of different X–Y divergence on sex chromosomes. However, even after 8 years of effort, this result is based on analyses of five sex-linked gene sequences, and the maximum divergence (and thus the age of this plant's sex chromosome system) has remained uncertain. More genes are therefore needed. Here, by segregation analysis of intron size variants (ISVS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we identify three new Y-linked genes, one being duplicated on the Y chromosome, and test for evolutionary strata. All the new genes have homologs on the X and Y chromosomes. Synonymous divergence estimated between the X and Y homolog pairs is within the range of those already reported. Genetic mapping of the new X-linked loci shows that the map is the same in all three families that have been studied so far and that X–Y divergence increases with genetic distance from the pseudoautosomal region. We can now conclude that the divergence value is saturated, confirming the cessation of X–Y recombination in the evolution of the sex chromosomes at ∼10–20 MYA. PMID:17287532

  12. A defined chromosome 6q fragment (at D6S310) harbors a putative tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Theile, M; Seitz, S; Arnold, W; Jandrig, B; Frege, R; Schlag, P M; Haensch, W; Guski, H; Winzer, K J; Barrett, J C; Scherneck, S

    1996-08-15

    Recent evidence obtained by cytogenetic and molecular studies indicates that in breast cancer chromosome 6q is often affected by genetic changes suggesting the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However the function of gene(s) on this chromosome in breast cancer suppression is not understood. To substantiate further the presence of breast cancer related TSGs at 6q and to define their location, we first performed microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 6 to CAL51 breast cancer cells for studying possible suppression of malignant phenotype and secondly, we analysed DNAs from 46 primary breast cancers for loss of constitutive heterozygosity (LOH) using 24 poly-morphic microsatellite markers. The chromosome transfer resulted in loss of tumorigenicity and reversion of other neoplastic properties of the microcell hybrids. Polymorphism analysis of single hybrids revealed that they harbored only a small donor chromosome fragment defined by the marker D6S310 (6q23.3-q25) and flanked by D6S292 and D6S311. The LOH data suggest that four tumor suppressor gene loci mapped to the central and distal portion of 6q may be independently deleted in breast cancer. One of these regions corresponds to the region identified by chromosome transfer. PMID:8761288

  13. A gene for Usher syndrome type I (USH1A) maps to chromosome 14q

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M.; Delrieu, O.; Briard, M.L.; Dollfus, H.; Frezal, J.; Munnich, A. ); Bonneau, D. ); Ghazi, I. )

    1992-12-01

    Usher syndrome (US) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in adults and accounts for 3 to 6% of deaf children. Here, the authors report the genetic mapping of a gene for US type I (USH1A), the most severe form of the disease, to the long arm of chromosome 14, by linkage to probe MLJ14 at the D14S13 locus in 10 families of Western France ancestry ([cflx Z] = 4.13 at [cflx [theta

  14. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of chromosomal mercury resistance genes from a Bacillus sp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Mahler, I.; Levinson, H.S.; Halvorson, H.O.

    1987-10-01

    A 7.9-kilobase (kb) chromosomal fragment was cloned from a mercury-resistant Bacillus sp. In Escherichia coli, in the presence of a second plasmid carrying functional transport genes, resistance to HgCl/sub 2/ and to phenylmercury acetate (PMA) was expressed. Shortening the cloned fragment to 3.8 kb abolished resistance to PMA but not to HgCl/sub 2/. In Bacillus subtilis, the 3.8-kb fragment produced mercuric reductase constitutively but did not produce resistance to HgCl/sub 2/ or to PMA.

  15. Lack of association of the M129V polymorphism of the PRNP gene with pseudoexfoliation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Marios P; Antonacopoulou, Anna G; Kottorou, Anastasia E; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Gartaganis, Sotirios P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this study we aimed to evaluate the polymorphism at codon 129 (M129V) of the PRNP gene as a secondary risk factor for pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX). Methods Two hundred and seventy-five unrelated subjects, including 156 patients with PEX and 119 unrelated control subjects, were recruited from the University Hospital of Patras, Greece. All patients and controls were of Caucasian or European ancestry. The PRNP M129V (A/G) single-nucleotide polymorphism was genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reactions. Association of the polymorphism with PEX was assessed using the two-sided Pearson’s chi-squared or Fisher’s exact test. Result No significant difference between patients and controls was observed in terms of frequencies of alleles and genotypes of the PRNP gene. Conclusion Polymorphism at M129V of the PRNP gene was evaluated as a secondary risk factor for developing PEX. Our results suggest that this PRNP gene polymorphism is not associated with PEX. PMID:27217717

  16. Lack of association between dopamine D4 receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kameda, K.; Ihda, S.

    1995-12-18

    An intriguing property of the dopamine D4 receptor gene is a hypervariable segment in the coding region characterized by a varying number of direct imperfect 48 bp repeats (2-8 or 10 repeats) in the third exon of the gene. The authors analyzed 70 unrelated schizophrenics and 70 normal controls to determine the allele and genotype frequencies created by length polymorphism of dopamine D4 receptor gene. All patients and controls were unrelated and from the Japanese population. Patients were divided into three groups with regard to age at onset, familial loading, and severity of symptoms assessed strictly with Manchester scale. There were no statistically significant differences if the distributions of alleles and genotypes were analyzed in consideration of those clinical subtypes. Lichter and colleagues [1993] have reported that at least 25 haplotypes exist for this polymorphic region of the dopamine receptor D4 gene. In this study only the alleles created by length polymorphism were analyzed, and further investigation to determine the haplotypes of patients and controls on using a much larger sample size will be required. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Impairments in Fear Conditioning in Mice Lacking the nNOS Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Jonathan B.; Balda, Mara A.; Anderson, Karen L.; Itzhak, Yossef

    2009-01-01

    The fear conditioning paradigm is used to investigate the roles of various genes, neurotransmitters, and substrates in the formation of fear learning related to contextual and auditory cues. In the brain, nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) functions as a retrograde neuronal messenger that facilitates synaptic…

  18. Acceleration of X-chromosome gene order evolution in the cattle lineage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woncheoul; Oh, Hee-Seok; Kim, Heebal

    2013-01-01

    The gene order on the X chromosome of eutherians is generally highly conserved, although an increase in the rate of rearrangement has been reported in the rodent lineage. Conservation of the X chromosome is thought to be caused by selection related to maintenance of dosage compensation. However, we herein reveal that the cattle (Btau4.0) lineage has experienced a strong increase in the rate of X-chromosome rearrangement, much stronger than that previously reported for rodents. We also show that this increase is not matched by a similar increase on the autosomes and cannot be explained by assembly errors. Furthermore, we compared the difference in two cattle genome assemblies: Btau4.0 and Btau6.0 (Bos taurus UMD3.1). The results showed a discrepancy between Btau4.0 and Btau6.0 cattle assembly version data, and we believe that Btau6.0 cattle assembly version data are not more reliable than Btau4.0. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(6): 310-315] PMID:23790974

  19. Acceleration of X-chromosome gene order evolution in the cattle lineage.

    PubMed

    Park, Woncheoul; Oh, Hee-Seok; Kim, Heebal

    2013-06-01

    The gene order on the X chromosome of eutherians is generally highly conserved, although an increase in the rate of rearrangement has been reported in the rodent lineage. Conservation of the X chromosome is thought to be caused by selection related to maintenance of dosage compensation. However, we herein reveal that the cattle (Btau4.0) lineage has experienced a strong increase in the rate of X-chromosome rearrangement, much stronger than that previously reported for rodents. We also show that this increase is not matched by a similar increase on the autosomes and cannot be explained by assembly errors. Furthermore, we compared the difference in two cattle genome assemblies: Btau4.0 and Btau6.0 (Bos taurus UMD3.1). The results showed a discrepancy between Btau4.0 and Btau6.0 cattle assembly version data, and we believe that Btau6.0 cattle assembly version data are not more reliable than Btau4.0. PMID:23790974

  20. The human XRCC9 gene corrects chromosomal instability and mutagen sensitivities in CHO UV40 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Lamerdin, J E; Tucker, J D; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Albala, J S; Busch, D B; Thompson, L H

    1997-08-19

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant UV40 cell line is hypersensitive to UV and ionizing radiation, simple alkylating agents, and DNA cross-linking agents. The mutant cells also have a high level of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations and 3-fold elevated sister chromatid exchange. We cloned and sequenced a human cDNA, designated XRCC9, that partially corrected the hypersensitivity of UV40 to mitomycin C, cisplatin, ethyl methanesulfonate, UV, and gamma-radiation. The spontaneous chromosomal aberrations in XRCC9 cDNA transformants were almost fully corrected whereas sister chromatid exchanges were unchanged. The XRCC9 genomic sequence was cloned and mapped to chromosome 9p13. The translated XRCC9 sequence of 622 amino acids has no similarity with known proteins. The 2.5-kb XRCC9 mRNA seen in the parental cells was undetectable in UV40 cells. The mRNA levels in testis were up to 10-fold higher compared with other human tissues and up to 100-fold higher compared with other baboon tissues. XRCC9 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that might operate in a postreplication repair or a cell cycle checkpoint function. PMID:9256465

  1. A gene for cleidocranial dysplasia maps to the short arm of chromosome 6.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, G J; Robin, N H; Brueton, L A; Robertson, E; Thompson, E M; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Gasser, D L; Bailey, L C; Zackai, E H; Muenke, M

    1995-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant generalized bone dysplasia characterized by mild-to-moderate short stature, clavicular aplasia or hypoplasia, supernumerary and ectopic teeth, delayed eruption of secondary teeth, a characteristic craniofacial appearance, and a variety of other skeletal anomalies. We have performed linkage studies in five families with CCD, with 24 affected and 20 unaffected individuals, using microsatellite markers spanning two candidate regions on chromosomes 8q and 6. The strongest support for linkage was with chromosome 6p microsatellite marker D6S282 with a two-point lod score of 4.84 (theta = .03). Furthermore, the multipoint lod score was 5.70 in the interval between D6S282 and D6S291. These data show that the gene for autosomal dominant CCD is located within a 19-cM interval on the short arm of chromosome 6, between D6S282 and D6S291. Images Figure 1 PMID:7717404

  2. A linkage and physical map of chromosome 22, and some applications to gene mapping.

    PubMed

    Julier, C; Lathrop, G M; Reghis, A; Szajnert, M F; Lalouel, J M; Kaplan, J C

    1988-02-01

    A genetic map of human chromosome 22 has been derived from physical assignments and multilocus linkage analysis. It consists of the loci for the immunoglobulin lambda light-chain variable (IGLV) and immunoglobulin lambda light-chain constant (IGLC) regions, myoglobin (MB), the sis proto-oncogene (SIS), and an arbitrary probe (D22S1). The first RFLPs at the loci for SIS, IGLV, and MB are described. The most likely gene order on the basis of multilocus analysis was cen-(IGLV-IGLC)-D22S1-MB-SIS. This map provides further evidence for localization of the P1 polymorphism of the P blood group to chromosome 22, close to the SIS locus. Analysis of families segregating recessive congenital methemoglobinemia (RCM), a disease in which the cytochrome b5 reductase is defective, as well as of families with cases of hereditary low levels of cytochrome b5 reductase activity, confirmed that the locus responsible for RCM is on chromosome 22. Biochemical studies had already suggested that mutation at the cytochrome b5 reductase locus (DIA1) is responsible for RCM. We found no evidence of genetic heterogeneity between the families segregating RCM and the families exhibiting cases of low cytochrome b5 reductase activity. Linkage analysis indicated that the most probable location of DIA1 lies between MB and SIS. PMID:2893546

  3. B chromosomes showing active ribosomal RNA genes contribute insignificant amounts of rRNA in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Badisco, Liesbeth; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Perfectti, Francisco; López-León, María Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic inertness of supernumerary (B) chromosomes has recently been called into question after finding several cases of gene activity on them. The grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans harbors B chromosomes containing large amounts of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, some of which are eventually active, but the amount of rRNA transcripts contributed by B chromosomes, compared to those of the standard (A) chromosomes, is unknown. Here, we address this question by means of quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two different ITS2 amplicons, one coming from rDNA units located in both A and B chromosomes (ITS2(A+B)) and the other being specific to B chromosomes (ITS2(B)). We analyzed six body parts in nine males showing rDNA expression in their B chromosomes in the testis. Amplification of the ITS2(B) amplicon was successful in RNA extracted from all six body parts analyzed, but showed relative quantification (RQ) values four orders of magnitude lower than those obtained for the ITS(A+B) amplicon. RQ values differed significantly between body parts for the two amplicons, with testis, accessory gland and wing muscle showing threefold higher values than head, gastric cecum and hind leg. We conclude that the level of B-specific rDNA expression is extremely low even in individuals where B chromosome rDNA is not completely silenced. Bearing in mind that B chromosomes carry the largest rDNA cluster in the E. plorans genome, we also infer that the relative contribution of B chromosome rRNA genes to ribosome biogenesis is insignificant, at least in the body parts analyzed. PMID:24997085

  4. Localization of human flavin-containing monooxygenase genes FMO2 and FMO5 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, R.R.; Shephard, E.A.; Dolphin, C.T.

    1996-06-15

    The human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family comprises at least five distinct members (FMO1 to FMO5) that code for enzymes responsible for the oxidation of a wide variety of soft nucleophilic substrates, including drugs and environmental pollutants. Three of these genes (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO4) have previously been localized to human chromosome 1q, raising the possibility that the entire gene family is clustered in this chromosomal region. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA isolated from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids demonstrates that the two remaining identified members of the FMO gene family, FMO2 and FMO5, also are located on chromosome 1q. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. The genes for secretion and maturation of lactococcins are located on the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed Central

    Venema, K; Dost, M H; Beun, P A; Haandrikman, A J; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1996-01-01

    Southern hybridization and PCR analysis were used to show that Lactococcus lactis IL1403, a plasmid-free strain that does not produce bacteriocin, contains genes on its chromosome that are highly homologous to lcnC and lcnD and encode the lactococcin secretion and maturation system. The lcnC and lcnD homologs on the chromosome of IL1403 were interrupted independently by Campbell-type integrations. Both insertion mutants were unable to secrete active lactococcin. Part of the chromosomal lcnC gene was cloned and sequenced. Only a few nucleotide substitutions occurred, compared with the plasmid-encoded lcnC gene, and these did not lead to changes in the deduced amino acid sequence. No genes homologous to those for lactococcin A, B, or M could be detected in IL1403, and the strain does not produce bacteriocin activity. PMID:8633867

  6. Currently recognized genes for schizophrenia: High-resolution chromosome ideogram representation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen B; Masoud, Humaira; Manzardo, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    A large body of genetic data from schizophrenia-related research has identified an assortment of genes and disturbed pathways supporting involvement of complex genetic components for schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders. Advances in genetic technology and expanding studies with searchable genomic databases have led to multiple published reports, allowing us to compile a master list of known, clinically relevant, or susceptibility genes contributing to schizophrenia. We searched key words related to schizophrenia and genetics from peer-reviewed medical literature sources, authoritative public access psychiatric websites and genomic databases dedicated to gene discovery and characterization of schizophrenia. Our list of 560 genes were arranged in alphabetical order in tabular form with gene symbols placed on high-resolution human chromosome ideograms. Genome wide pathway analysis using GeneAnalytics was carried out on the resulting list of genes to assess the underlying genetic architecture for schizophrenia. Recognized genes of clinical relevance, susceptibility or causation impact a broad range of biological pathways and mechanisms including ion channels (e.g., CACNA1B, CACNA1C, CACNA1H), metabolism (e.g., CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6), multiple targets of neurotransmitter pathways impacting dopamine, GABA, glutamate, and serotonin function, brain development (e.g., NRG1, RELN), signaling peptides (e.g., PIK3CA, PIK4CA) and immune function (e.g., HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1) and interleukins (e.g., IL1A, IL10, IL6). This summary will enable clinical and laboratory geneticists, genetic counselors, and other clinicians to access convenient pictorial images of the distribution and location of contributing genes to inform diagnosis and gene-based treatment as well as provide risk estimates for genetic counseling of families with affected relatives. PMID:26462458

  7. INSERTION OF A HETEROLOGOUS GENE CONSTRUCT INTO A NON-FUNCTIONAL ORF OF THE STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS CHROMOSOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vector was constructed to allow for the integration of recombinant genes within the chromosome of Streptococcus thermophilus. The vector, pINTRS, contained a temperature sensitive origin of replication and an erythromycin resistance gene for initial selection in S. thermophilus. The region of th...

  8. Physical mapping of puroindoline b-2 genes in wheat using the 'Chinese Spring' chromosome group 7 deletion lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The puroindoline genes (puroindoline a and puroindoline b), located on the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 5D, have a significant effect on grain hardness. Puroindoline b-2 was another puroindoline-like gene after Gsp-1 (Grain Softness Protein). The detail position Puroindoline b-2 is stil...

  9. Targeted introgression of a wheat stem rust resistance gene by DNA marker-assisted chromosome engineering genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), stem rust resistance gene Sr39, derived from Aegilops speltoides Tausch, is highly resistant to multiple stem rust races including TTKSK (Ug99). However, the gene has not been used in wheat breeding because of linkage drag associated with the large 2S chromosome segm...

  10. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  11. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Detection of the chimeric ABL/BCR gene located on chromosome 9 by the FISH technique in a Ph negative CML

    SciTech Connect

    Macera, M.J.; Frankel, E.; Szabo, P. ||

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelogeous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, which arises from a reciprical translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and is found in over 90% of all reported cases. This translocation results in the fusion of the chromosome 9 ABL gene with the chromosome 22 BCR gene forming a chimeric gene that encodes a unique protein. The chimeric gene has been demonstrated in variant translocations. In cases without Ph chromosomes, the ABL/BCR rearrangement was located on chromosome 22 at band q11. We report a case that presented with typical symptoms of classical CML. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a normal 46,XX karyotype in all his mitotic bone marrow cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a two color ABL/BCR probe (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD) showed the presence of two ABL genes located on both chromosome 9s, one BCR located on chromosome 22 and one located in tandem with one ABL gene on chromosome 9q34. Southern blotting using the transprobe (Oncogene Science, Uniondale, NY) confirmed that a break was located within the 5.8 Kb major BCR. This is one of the first cases where the chimeric ABL/BCR gene was demonstrated to be on chromosome 9q34. This variant stresses the importance of the ABL/BCR gene in the etiology of this disease as this patient was clinically indistinguishable from those CML patients with the standard Ph translocation.

  13. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  14. Widespread Impact of Chromosomal Inversions on Gene Expression Uncovers Robustness via Phenotypic Buffering

    PubMed Central

    Naseeb, Samina; Carter, Zorana; Minnis, David; Donaldson, Ian; Zeef, Leo; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The nonrandom gene organization in eukaryotes plays a significant role in genome evolution and function. Chromosomal structural changes impact meiotic fitness and, in several organisms, are associated with speciation and rapid adaptation to different environments. Small sized chromosomal inversions, encompassing few genes, are pervasive in Saccharomyces “sensu stricto” species, while larger inversions are less common in yeasts compared with higher eukaryotes. To explore the effect of gene order on phenotype, reproductive isolation, and gene expression, we engineered 16 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying all possible paracentric and pericentric inversions between Ty1 elements, a natural substrate for rearrangements. We found that 4 inversions were lethal, while the other 12 did not show any fitness advantage or disadvantage in rich and minimal media. At meiosis, only a weak negative correlation with fitness was seen with the size of the inverted region. However, significantly lower fertility was seen in heterozygote invertant strains carrying recombination hotspots within the breakpoints. Altered transcription was observed throughout the genome rather than being overrepresented within the inversions. In spite of the large difference in gene expression in the inverted strains, mitotic fitness was not impaired in the majority of the 94 conditions tested, indicating that the robustness of the expression network buffers the deleterious effects of structural changes in several environments. Overall, our results support the notion that transcriptional changes may compensate for Ty-mediated rearrangements resulting in the maintenance of a constant phenotype, and suggest that large inversions in yeast are unlikely to be a selectable trait during vegetative growth. PMID:26929245

  15. Reevaluating Human Gene Annotation: A Second-Generation Analysis of Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John E.; Goward, Melanie E.; Cole, Charlotte G.; Smink, Luc J.; Huckle, Elizabeth J.; Knowles, Sarah; Bye, Jacqueline M.; Beare, David M.; Dunham, Ian

    2003-01-01

    We report a second-generation gene annotation of human chromosome 22. Using expressed sequence databases, comparative sequence analysis, and experimental verification, we have extended genes, fused previously fragmented structures, and identified new genes. The total length in exons of annotation was increased by 74% over our previously published annotation and includes 546 protein-coding genes and 234 pseudogenes. Thirty-two potential protein-coding annotations are partial copies of other genes, and may represent duplications on an evolutionary path to change or loss of function. We also identified 31 non-protein-coding transcripts, including 16 possible antisense RNAs. By extrapolation, we estimate the human genome contains 29,000–36,000 protein-coding genes, 21,300 pseudogenes, and 1500 antisense RNAs. We suggest that our revised annotation criteria provide a paradigm for future annotation of the human genome. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org. The sequence data from this study have been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. , -3, , , -2, , , , , -8, -6, , -81, -81, , , , , -3, -2, -2, , , , , , , -5, , , , , -7, , -8, –. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: J. Seilhamer, L. Stuve, H. Roest-Crollius, A. Levine, G. Slater, and J. Kent.] PMID:12529303

  16. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  17. Identification of a chromosome 18q gene that is altered in colorectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fearon, E.R.; Nigro, J.M.; Simons, J.W.; Ruppert, J.M.; Preisinger, A.C.; Vogelstein, B.; Cho, K.R.; Kern, S.E.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Thomas, G. )

    1990-01-05

    A contiguous stretch of DNA comprising 370 kilobase pairs (kb) has now been cloned from a region of chromosome 18q suspected to reside near this gene. Potential exons in the 370-kb region were defined by human-rodent sequence identities, and the expression of potential exons was assessed by an exon-connection strategy based on the polymerase chain reaction. Expressed exons were used as probes for cDNA screening to obtain clones that encoded a portion of a gene termed DCC; this cDNA was encoded by at least eight exons within the 370-kb genomic region. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA specified a protein with sequence similarity to neural cell adhesion molecules and other related cell surface glycoproteins. While the DCC gene was expressed in most normal tissues, including colonic mucosa, its expression was greatly reduced or absent in most colorectal carcinomas tested. Somatic mutations within the DCC gene observed in colorectal cancers included a homozygous deletion of the 5{prime} end of the gene, a point mutation within one of the introns, and ten examples of DNA insertions within a 0.17-kb fragment immediately downstream of one of the exons. The DCC gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of human colorectal neoplasia, perhaps through alteration of the normal cell-cell interactions controlling growth.

  18. Sgs1 and Exo1 suppress targeted chromosome duplication during ends-in and ends-out gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Štafa, Anamarija; Miklenić, Marina; Zunar, Bojan; Lisnić, Berislav; Symington, Lorraine S; Svetec, Ivan-Krešimir

    2014-10-01

    Gene targeting is extremely efficient in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is performed by transformation with a linear, non-replicative DNA fragment carrying a selectable marker and containing ends homologous to the particular locus in a genome. However, even in S. cerevisiae, transformation can result in unwanted (aberrant) integration events, the frequency and spectra of which are quite different for ends-out and ends-in transformation assays. It has been observed that gene replacement (ends-out gene targeting) can result in illegitimate integration, integration of the transforming DNA fragment next to the target sequence and duplication of a targeted chromosome. By contrast, plasmid integration (ends-in gene targeting) is often associated with multiple targeted integration events but illegitimate integration is extremely rare and a targeted chromosome duplication has not been reported. Here we systematically investigated the influence of design of the ends-out assay on the success of targeted genetic modification. We have determined transformation efficiency, fidelity of gene targeting and spectra of all aberrant events in several ends-out gene targeting assays designed to insert, delete or replace a particular sequence in the targeted region of the yeast genome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that targeted chromosome duplications occur even during ends-in gene targeting. Most importantly, the whole chromosome duplication is POL32 dependent pointing to break-induced replication (BIR) as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, the occurrence of duplication of the targeted chromosome was strikingly increased in the exo1Δ sgs1Δ double mutant but not in the respective single mutants demonstrating that the Exo1 and Sgs1 proteins independently suppress whole chromosome duplication during gene targeting. PMID:25089886

  19. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis. PMID:26898890

  20. Lack of evidence of WNT3A as a candidate gene for congenital vertebral malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ghebranious, Nader; Raggio, Cathleen L; Blank, Robert D; McPherson, Elizabeth; Burmester, James K; Ivacic, Lynn; Rasmussen, Kristen; Kislow, Jennifer; Glurich, Ingrid; Jacobsen, F Stig; Faciszewski, Thomas; Pauli, Richard M; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Giampietro, Philip F

    2007-01-01

    Background Prior investigations have not identified a major locus for vertebral malformations, providing evidence that there is genetic heterogeneity for this condition. WNT3A has recently been identified as a negative regulator of Notch signaling and somitogenesis. Mice with mutations in Wnt3a develop caudal vertebral malformations. Because congenital vertebral malformations represent a sporadic occurrence, linkage approaches to identify genes associated with human vertebral development are not feasible. We hypothesized that WNT3A mutations might account for a subset of congenital vertebral malformations. Methods A pilot study was performed using a cohort of patients with congenital vertebral malformations spanning the entire vertebral column was characterized. DNA sequence analysis of the WNT3A gene in these 50 patients with congenital vertebral malformations was performed. Results A female patient of African ancestry with congenital scoliosis and a T12-L1 hemivertebrae was found to be heterozygous for a missense variant resulting in the substitution of alanine by threonine at codon 134 in highly conserved exon 3 of the WNT3A gene. This variant was found at a very low prevalence (0.35%) in a control population of 443 anonymized subjects and 1.1% in an African population. Conclusion These data suggest that WNT3A does not contribute towards the development of congenital vertebral malformations. Factors such as phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity may underlie our inability to detect mutations in WNT3A in our patient sample. PMID:17888180

  1. Lack of nifH gene in some endophytic bacteria isolated on RC solid medium.

    PubMed

    Pisarska, K; Adamski, M; Pietr, S J

    2011-01-01

    Presence of endophytic bacteria was reported in many crops including maize (Zea mays L.). Endophytes play a significant role in plant nutrient and pesticide uptake. Application of endophytic bacteria is a goal of sustainable agriculture. Occurrence of Azospirillum strains is often reported as tissue inhabiting bacteria of maize. The biological N2-fixation is one of most important processes assigned to this bacteria. The objective of this study was to examine the biodiversity of Azospirillum spp. isolated from the leaves of 6 cultivars of Zea mays L.. They were cultivated on two experimental fields at Smolice and Kobierzyce, (Poland). Strains of Azospirillum spp. were isolated on the solid RC medium. Forty four isolates grown as a small intensive red colonies were selected. To verify ability to N2-fixation isolates were analyzed based on nifH gene presence. Presence of nifH gene was tested using PCR method with PolF and PolR universal degenerate primers. The presence of nifH gene was found in 6 tested strains isolated from leaves of 3 cultivars (Cyrkon, Kosmo230, KB2704) from Smolice location, only. Our results suggest that selection of Azospirillum-like strains on RC solid medium based on appearance of colony is not correlated with theirs ability to nitrogen fixation or used degenerated primers (PolF, PolR) are not universal enough. PMID:22702189

  2. Localization of two metabotropic glutamate receptor genes, GRM3 and GRM8, to human chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.W.; Heng, H.H.Q.; Lap-Chee Tsui

    1996-01-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (GRMs) are neutrotransmitter receptors that respond to glutamate stimulations by activating GTP-binding proteins and modulating second-messenger cascades. Eight related GRMs have been identified to date. In this study, we have mapped GRM3 and GRM8 to human chromosome 7q21.1-q21.2 and 7q31.3-q32.1, respectively, using somatic cell hybrid and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. A yeast artificial chromosome contig was constructed surrounding the genes, allowing their location to be integrated into the genetic and physical map of chromosome 7. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Stephan, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  5. Gene leopard nuclei (len P103) participating in control of disjunction and coiling of chromosomes in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Omel`yanchuk, L.V.

    1995-12-01

    A lethal insertion of an element P[lArB], which caused nondisjunction and structural abnormalities in chromosomes in the neuroblasts of homozygous larvae, was found. The insertion was mapped to region 57B1-12 of the polytene map of chromosome 2 of Drosophila. The expression of the corresponding gene was found in testes, ovaries, and neural ganglia. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Two isotocin genes are present in the white sucker Catostomus commersoni both lacking introns in their protein coding regions.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J; Morley, S D; Heierhorst, J; Krentler, C; Lederis, K; Richter, D

    1989-01-01

    Two genes each encoding a distinct precursor protein to the hormone isotocin and a neurophysin-related protein are present in the teleost fish Catostomus commersoni. These precursors are referred to as isotocin 1 and 2. As shown by the polymerase chain reaction technique, both genes lack introns in their protein-coding sequences. Both genes are transcribed giving rise to mRNAs of 920 (isotocin 1) and 1020 (isotocin 2) bases, respectively. Based on the nucleotide sequences, the predicted isotocin precursors contain, besides the hormone moiety, a neurophysin-like protein that, in contrast to its mammalian counterpart, is extended at its C-terminus by a peptide which includes a leucine-rich core segment. This segment shows similarities to the copeptin of the mammalian vasopressin precursor that is known to possess prolactin-releasing activity. The data imply that the mammalian copeptin sequence was initially part of a larger ancestral neurophysin molecule. Images PMID:2583084

  7. Chromosome breakage at a major fragile site associated with P-glycoprotein gene amplification in multidrug-resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, M T; Vyas, R C; Jiang, L X; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies of several drug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines suggested that a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism is frequently involved in the amplification of drug resistance genes. These observations underscore the importance of chromosome breakage in the initiation of DNA amplification in mammalian cells. However, the mechanism of this breakage is unknown. Here, we propose that the site of chromosome breakage consistent with the initial event of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene amplification via the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle in three independently established multidrug-resistant CHO cells was located at 1q31. This site is a major chromosome fragile site that can be induced by methotrexate and aphidicolin treatments. Pretreatments of CHO cells with methotrexate or aphidicolin enhanced the frequencies of resistance to vinca alkaloid and amplification of the P-gp gene. These observations suggest that chromosome fragile sites play a pivotal role in DNA amplification in mammalian cells. Our data are also consistent with the hypothesis that gene amplification can be initiated by stress-induced chromosome breakage that is independent of modes of action of cytotoxic agents. Drug-resistant variants may arise by their growth advantage due to overproduction of cellular target molecules via gene amplification. Images PMID:7913517

  8. Chromosome breakage at a major fragile site associated with P-glycoprotein gene amplification in multidrug-resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M T; Vyas, R C; Jiang, L X; Hittelman, W N

    1994-08-01

    Recent studies of several drug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines suggested that a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism is frequently involved in the amplification of drug resistance genes. These observations underscore the importance of chromosome breakage in the initiation of DNA amplification in mammalian cells. However, the mechanism of this breakage is unknown. Here, we propose that the site of chromosome breakage consistent with the initial event of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene amplification via the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle in three independently established multidrug-resistant CHO cells was located at 1q31. This site is a major chromosome fragile site that can be induced by methotrexate and aphidicolin treatments. Pretreatments of CHO cells with methotrexate or aphidicolin enhanced the frequencies of resistance to vinca alkaloid and amplification of the P-gp gene. These observations suggest that chromosome fragile sites play a pivotal role in DNA amplification in mammalian cells. Our data are also consistent with the hypothesis that gene amplification can be initiated by stress-induced chromosome breakage that is independent of modes of action of cytotoxic agents. Drug-resistant variants may arise by their growth advantage due to overproduction of cellular target molecules via gene amplification. PMID:7913517

  9. GSP-1 genes are linked to the grain hardness locus (Ha) on wheat chromosome 5D.

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, C J; Glenn, G M; Rahman, S

    1996-01-01

    An important determinant of wheat grain quality is the hardness of the grain. The trait is controlled by a major locus, Ha, on the short arm of chromosome 5D. Purified starch granules from soft-grained wheats have associated with them 15-kDa polypeptides called grain softness proteins (GSPs) or "friabilins." Genes that encode one family of closely related GSP polypeptides - GSP-1 genes - were mapped using chromosome substitution lines to the group 5 chromosomes. An F2 population segregating for hard and soft alleles at the Ha locus on a near-isogenic background was used in a single-seed study of the inheritance of grain softness and of GSP-1 alleles. Grain softness versus grain hardness was inherited in a 3:1 ratio. The presence versus absence of GSPs in single seed starch preparations was coinherited with grain softness versus hardness. This showed that grain softness is primarily determined by seed, and not by maternal, genotype. In addition, no recombination was detected in 44 F2 plants between GSP-1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms and Ha alleles. Differences between hard and soft wheat grains in membrane structure and lipid extractability have been described and, of the three characterized proteins that are part of the mixture of 15-kDa polypeptides called GSPs, at least two, and probably all three, are proteins that bind polar lipids. The data are interpreted to suggest that the Ha locus may encode one or more members of a large family of lipid-binding proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8637887

  10. Genomics of Natural Populations: How Differentially Expressed Genes Shape the Evolution of Chromosomal Inversions in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Zachary L.; Haynes, Gwilym D.; Richards, Stephen; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can shape the structure of genetic variation in the genome directly through alteration of genes at breakpoints or indirectly by holding combinations of genetic variants together due to reduced recombination. The third chromosome of Drosophila pseudoobscura is a model system to test hypotheses about how rearrangements are established in populations because its third chromosome is polymorphic for >30 gene arrangements that were generated by a series of overlapping inversion mutations. Circumstantial evidence has suggested that these gene arrangements are selected. Despite the expected homogenizing effects of extensive gene flow, the frequencies of arrangements form gradients or clines in nature, which have been stable since the system was first described >80 years ago. Furthermore, multiple arrangements exist at appreciable frequencies across several ecological niches providing the opportunity for heterokaryotypes to form. In this study, we tested whether genes are differentially expressed among chromosome arrangements in first instar larvae, adult females and males. In addition, we asked whether transcriptional patterns in heterokaryotypes are dominant, semidominant, overdominant, or underdominant. We find evidence for a significant abundance of differentially expressed genes across the inverted regions of the third chromosome, including an enrichment of genes involved in sensory perception for males. We find the majority of loci show additivity in heterokaryotypes. Our results suggest that multiple genes have expression differences among arrangements that were either captured by the original inversion mutation or accumulated after it reached polymorphic frequencies, providing a potential source of genetic variation for selection to act upon. These data suggest that the inversions are favored because of their indirect effect of recombination suppression that has held different combinations of differentially expressed genes together in the

  11. Physical linkage of the human growth hormone gene cluster and the skeletal muscle sodium channel {alpha}-subunit gene (SCN4A) on chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Bennani-Baiti, I.M.; Jones, B.K.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Cooke, N.E.

    1995-10-10

    The human growth hormone (GH) locus, a cluster of five genes, spans 47 kb on chromosome 17q22-q24. The skeletal muscle sodium channel {alpha}-subunit locus (SCN4A), a 32.5-kb gene, has previously been mapped to 17q23.1-q25.3. We demonstrate that both the GH gene cluster and the SCN4A gene colocalize to a single 525-kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing DNA derived from human chromosome 17. Restriction maps of two cosmids encompassing the 5{prime} terminus of the GH locus and including up to 40 kb of 5{prime}-flanking sequences demonstrate a perfect 20-kb overlap with previously published maps of the SCN4A gene. A 720-bp DNA segment, encompassing sequences 32.3 to 31.6 kb 5{prime} to GH, was sequenced and found to be identical to exon 14 of SCN4A. These data demonstrate that the SCN4A gene and the entire GH gene cluster are contained within 100 kb on chromosome 17 and are separated by only 21.5 kb. Remarkably, this physical linkage between GH and SCN4A also reveals that multiple elements critical to tissue-specific transcriptional activation of the GH gene lie within the SCN4A gene. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined. Images PMID:2027750

  13. Structure and chromosomal localization of the murine coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Wen; Ghosh, Ruma; Finberg, Robert W; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2003-04-01

    We analyzed BAC genomic clones encoding the murine coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (mCAR). The mCAR gene is situated on the distal portion of murine chromosome 16, and is composed of at least eight exons, with intron-exon boundaries similar to those reported for the human CAR gene. We previously described two cDNAs encoding mCAR isoforms: the extracellular and transmembrane portions of both are encoded by exons 1-6; the cytoplasmic domain of mCAR 1 is encoded by exon 7, whereas mCAR 2 results from an RNA splice linking the proximal portion of exon 7 to an alternative exon 8. RT-PCR analysis of the mCAR RNA 5'-terminus suggests that transcription may begin 141-161 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translational start site. PMID:12823902

  14. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Cote, G.J.; Hallman, D.M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [{theta} = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. The gene for Nijmegen breakage syndrome (V2) is not located on chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Kenshi Komatsu; Shinya Matsuura; Hiroshi Tauchi; Satoru Endo

    1996-04-01

    Ataxia telanglectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous telangiectasia and cerebellar ataxia. Individuals with this disorder display immunological impairments, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and a predisposition to cancer. There has been reported genetic heterogeneity in AT, which appeared to include four genetic complementation groups in classical AT - i.e., A, B/C, D, E - and two variants, so-called Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), V1 and V2. Among the four groups of classical AT, no significant differences in clinical appearance have been seen. Familial linkage analyses have produced evidence that genes for all four complementation groups in classical AT reside in a narrow region on chromosome 11q22-23. On the other hand, NBS patients have neither cerebellar ataxia nor telanglectasia but do display microcephaly and a developmental delay. However, patients share features with AT, such as high radiosensitivity, radioresistant DNA synthesis (RDS), and chromosome instability, suggesting that the same pathway (or part thereof) is impaired in both syndromes. The underlying gene for NBS has not yet been identified, and its location in the human genome is still unknown. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Mutation of the proteolipid protein gene PLP in a human X chromosome-linked myelin disorder.

    PubMed

    Hudson, L D; Puckett, C; Berndt, J; Chan, J; Gencic, S

    1989-10-01

    Myelin is a highly specialized membrane unique to the nervous system that ensheaths axons to permit the rapid saltatory conduction of impulses. The elaboration of a compact myelin sheath is disrupted in a diverse spectrum of human disorders, many of which are of unknown etiology. The X chromosome-linked human disorder Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous group of disorders that demonstrate a striking failure of oligodendrocyte differentiation. This disease appears pathologically and genetically to be similar to the disorder seen in the dysmyelinating mouse mutant jimpy, which has a point mutation in the gene encoding an abundant myelin protein, proteolipid protein (PLP). We report that the molecular defect in one Pelizaeus-Merzbacher family is likewise a point mutation in the PLP gene. A single T----C transitio