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Sample records for chronic chagasic cardiopathy

  1. Transplanted Bone Marrow Cells Repair Heart Tissue and Reduce Myocarditis in Chronic Chagasic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Milena B. P.; Lima, Ricardo S.; Rocha, Leonardo L.; Takyia, Christina M.; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    A progressive destruction of the myocardium occurs in ∼30% of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, causing chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, a disease so far without effective treatment. Syngeneic bone marrow cell transplantation has been shown to cause repair and improvement of heart function in a number of studies in patients and animal models of ischemic cardiopathy. The effects of bone marrow transplant in a mouse model of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, in the presence of the disease causal agent, ie, the T. cruzi, are described herein. Bone marrow cells injected intravenously into chronic chagasic mice migrated to the heart and caused a significant reduction in the inflammatory infiltrates and in the interstitial fibrosis characteristics of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. The beneficial effects were observed up to 6 months after bone marrow cell transplantation. A massive apoptosis of myocardial inflammatory cells was observed after the therapy with bone marrow cells. Transplanted bone marrow cells obtained from chagasic mice and from normal mice had similar effects in terms of mediating chagasic heart repair. These results show that bone marrow cell transplantation is effective for treatment of chronic chagasic myocarditis and indicate that autologous bone marrow transplant may be used as an efficient therapy for patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:14742250

  2. Quantitative analysis of cardiac lesions in chronic canine chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; do Pilar Machado, Raquel; de Lana, Marta; Caja, Rosângela Aparecida França; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Bahia, Maria Teresinha; dos Santos, César Augusto Bueno; Magalhaes, Gustavo Albergaria; Sampaio, Ivan Barbosa Machado; Tafuri, Washington Luiz

    2002-01-01

    Lesions observed in chronic chagasic cardiopathy frequently produce electrocardiographic alterations and affect cardiac function. Through a computerized morphometrical analysis we quantified the areas occupied by cardiac muscle, connective and adipose tissues in the right atrium of dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. All of the infected dogs showed chronic myocarditis with variable reduction levels of cardiac muscle, fibrosis and adipose tissue replacement. In the atrial myocardium of dogs infected with Be78 and Be62 cardiac muscle represented 34 and 50%, fibrosis 28 and 32% and adipose tissue 38 and 18%, respectively. The fibrosis observed was both diffuse and focal and mostly intrafascicular, either partially or completely interrupting the path of muscle bundles. Such histological alterations probably contributed to the appearance of electrocardiographic disturbances verified in 10 out 11 dogs which are also common in human chronic chagasic cardiopathy. Fibrosis was the most important microscopic occurrence found since it produces rearrangements of collagen fibers in relation to myocardiocytes which causes changes in anatomical physiognomy and mechanical behavior of the myocardium. These abnormalities can contribute to the appearance of cardiac malfunction, arrythmias and congestive cardiac insufficiency as observed in two of the analyzed dogs. Strain Be78 caused destruction of atrial cardiac muscle higher than that induced by strain Be62. PMID:12436168

  3. Chronic Chagas cardiopathy in Chile. Importance of Trypanosoma cruzi burden and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Apt, Werner; Arribada, Arturo; Zulantay, Inés; Saavedra, Miguel; Muñoz, Catalina; Toro, Bruno; Vega, Bastián; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Currently there are no biological markers to indicate which individuals with chronic indeterminate period of Chagas disease develop heart disease and who will remain all his life in this phase. The aim of this survey was to determine if Trypanosoma cruzi burden is related to the presence of heart disease in patients with chronic Chagas disease. 200 patients who had not been treated, 100 with cardiopathy and 100 without, groups A and B respectively, were submitted to clinical study and electrocardiogram, Echo-Doppler was performed for group A in which all important known causes of cardiopathy were discarded. In both groups xenodiagnosis, conventional PCR and quantitative PCR were undertaken. The 100 cardiopaths had 133 electrocardiographic alterations most of them in grade II of the New York Heart Association classification. 98 cardiopaths were classified in grade I by Echo-Doppler and only 2 cases were in grade III due to low ejection fraction. The difference in average parasitemia in patients of group A and B was not significant and no statistically differences were observed between average parasitemia of cardiopaths grade II versus grade I of NYHA. This results allow to characterize same clinical, electrocardiographical and parasitological features in chagasic cardiopaths of Chile. PMID:27353063

  4. [Migration flow and imported diseases: chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, Roberto A; Di Girolamo, Chiara; Ciannameo, Anna; Milei, José

    2009-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is transmitted by triatomine bugs in endemic regions of the American continent and less frequently by blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Immigration rates explain why the disease can be found worldwide. Non-endemic countries that receive a significant amount of Latin American immigrants should be familiarized with the disease to allow prevention, diagnosis and early treatment. In Italy, where no serologic screening is routinely performed to detect Trypanosoma cruzi in blood donations, a special consideration must be held. Accordingly, attention to congenital transmissions of the disease should be drawn considering the lack of newborn screening. Though commonly unrecognized, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is the most common type of chronic myocarditis in the world. PMID:19475878

  5. [Psychopathology of chronic diseases in children and adolescents. Congenital cardiopathies].

    PubMed

    Masi, G; Brovedani, P

    1996-10-01

    A most significant life event in the first years of life is a disease, especially if it is of early onset, severe, life threatening, with an uncertain prognosis, and with the necessity of frequent diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Psychological implications are a significant parts of the illness, not a marginal component; they can affect prognosis and outcome. The authors describe the different psychological implications of an experience of chronic disease in children and adolescents and their families (parents and siblings). Congenital disease (for example congenital heart failure) has a peculiar significance: since it is diagnosed early, it influences mother-infant interactions from the beginning, in a crucial moment of the infant's psychological development; diagnostic and therapeutical interventions are early and frequent; congenital defects determine the strongest guilt feelings in the parents. Some specific psychological aspects can be described: the weakening of the Bodily self, the inhibition of thinking, the theories the child and the family formulates on the disease, the death feelings. Emotional features in children and adolescents with congenital cardiopathy are described: inhibition of emotions, marked anxiety, depressive reaction, with loneliness, low self-esteem and inadequacy, emotional lability, with oscillation between omnipotence and inadequacy; impulsiveness; weakness of self identity; especially in bodily Self. Some psychopathological aspects in children and adolescents with heart transplant and their families are also described. Intellectual level of patients with congenital heart disease is in the normal range, although significantly lower than normal controls. There is a positive correlation between worsening of intellectual functioning and clinical severity of the heart disease; this clinical severity is related both to restrictions in normal daily life activities, and blood oxygen saturation. It is hard to tease apart the role of

  6. [Risk factors associated with the diagnosis of chronic Chagasic miocardiopathy in seropositive individuals from Barinas state, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    González, Beatriz; Silva, Martha; Al-Atrache, Yusra; Delgado, Yelitze; Serrano, José Luis; Doccimo, Angelina; Hernández, Huber; Verde, Juan; Morillo, Daniela; Marín, Jaime; Concepción, Juan Luis; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Rodríguez-Bonfante, Claudina

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluates the risk factors associated with the diagnosis of chronic chagasic miocardiopathy (CChM) in 115 seropositive individuals to anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies, in Barinas state, Venezuela. Serology was performed with ELISA and MABA; while the CChM diagnosis was established by electrocardiography and echocardiography. A complete clinical history including epidemiological, personal/familiar antecedents and psychobiological habits, plus socioeconomic, psychosocial and alimentary habits interviews were performed for each individual. Risk factors were determined through binary logistic regression. Results showed that 81 patients (70,4%; CI 95% = 66.4-74.4) had criteria for CChM, of which 74 (64.4%; IC 95% = 60.2-68.6) were in phase II; while 34 (29.6%; IC 95% = 25.5-33.5) were in phase I of the disease and 7 (6.1%; IC 95% = 4.0-8.2) in phase III. In a one year period, two patients in phase III died of heart failure. The diagnosis of CChM was associated with hunting practice, maternal history of cardiopathies, chewing chimó, medical history of hypertension and apex beat visible; it was negatively associated with canned and preserved foods ingest. In conclusion the CChM diagnosis has high frequency in seropositive individuals in Barinas and heart failure prevention must be based on an early medical attention and educative strategies in order to control risk factors. PMID:24974628

  7. Increased CD4+/CD8+ Double-Positive T Cells in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Nicolas A.; Bolaños, Natalia I.; Cuellar, Adriana; Guzman, Fanny; Uribe, Ana Maria; Bedoya, Astrid; Olaya, Natalia; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Roa, Nubia; Rosas, Fernando; Velasco, Víctor; Puerta, Concepción J.; González, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Background CD4+/CD8+ double positive (DP) T cells have been described in healthy individuals as well as in patients with autoimmune and chronic infectious diseases. In chronic viral infections, this cell subset has effector memory phenotype and displays antigen specificity. No previous studies of double positive T cells in parasite infections have been carried out. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventeen chronic chagasic patients (7 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic) and 24 non-infected donors, including 12 healthy and 12 with non-chagasic cardiomyopathy donors were analyzed. Peripheral blood was stained for CD3, CD4, CD8, HLA-DR and CD38, and lymphocytes for intracellular perforin. Antigen specificity was assessed using HLA*A2 tetramers loaded with T. cruzi K1 or influenza virus epitopes. Surface expression of CD107 and intracellular IFN-γ production were determined in K1-specific DP T cells from 11 chagasic donors. Heart tissue from a chronic chagasic patient was stained for both CD8 and CD4 by immunochemistry. Chagasic patients showed higher frequencies of DP T cells (2.1%±0.9) compared with healthy (1.1%±0.5) and non-chagasic cardiomyopathy (1.2%±0.4) donors. DP T cells from Chagasic patients also expressed more HLA-DR, CD38 and perforin and had higher frequencies of T. cruzi K1-specific cells. IFN-γ production in K1-specific cells was higher in asymptomatic patients after polyclonal stimulation, while these cells tended to degranulate more in symptomatic donors. Immunochemistry revealed that double positive T cells infiltrate the cardiac tissue of a chagasic donor. Conclusions Chagasic patients have higher percentages of circulating double positive T cells expressing activation markers, potential effector molecules and greater class I antigenic specificity against T. cruzi. Although K1 tetramer positive DP T cell produced little IFN-γ, they displayed degranulation activity that was increased in symptomatic patients. Moreover, K1-specific DP T cells can

  8. Analysis of association of FOXO3 gene with Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, D A; González, C I; Martin, J

    2016-06-01

    FOXO3, a member of the Forkhead family of proteins, plays a role in controlling immune response. FOXO3 gene variant rs12212067 has been associated to differential severity of infectious diseases like malaria. In this study, we assessed whether this FOXO3 gene polymorphism is related to susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy. A total of 1171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy (n = 401) were genotyped for the FOXO3 rs12212067 using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Our results showed no statistically significantly differences between allelic and genotypic frequencies of rs12212067 in seronegative individuals compared with seropositive individuals. Similarly, we observed no evidence of association when asymptomatic individuals were compared with chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy patients. Our data suggest that the FOXO3 genetic variant rs12212067 do not play an important role in Chagas disease. PMID:27125259

  9. Chagas Cardiomyopathy Manifestations and Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes Circulating in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Rendón, Lina María; Rosas, Fernando; Marin-Neto, Jose A.; Morillo, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a complex disease that is endemic and an important problem in public health in Latin America. The T. cruzi parasite is classified into six discrete taxonomic units (DTUs) based on the recently proposed nomenclature (TcI, TcII, TcIII, TcIV, TcV and TcVI). The discovery of genetic variability within TcI showed the presence of five genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id and Ie) related to the transmission cycle of Chagas disease. In Colombia, TcI is more prevalent but TcII has also been reported, as has mixed infection by both TcI and TcII in the same Chagasic patient. The objectives of this study were to determine the T. cruzi DTUs that are circulating in Colombian chronic Chagasic patients and to obtain more information about the molecular epidemiology of Chagas disease in Colombia. We also assessed the presence of electrocardiographic, radiologic and echocardiographic abnormalities with the purpose of correlating T. cruzi genetic variability and cardiac disease. Molecular characterization was performed in Colombian adult chronic Chagasic patients based on the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of satellite DNA, whereby the presence of T.cruzi I, II, III and IV was detected. In our population, mixed infections also occurred, with TcI-TcII, TcI-TcIII and TcI-TcIV, as well as the existence of the TcI genotypes showing the presence of genotypes Ia and Id. Patients infected with TcI demonstrated a higher prevalence of cardiac alterations than those infected with TcII. These results corroborate the predominance of TcI in Colombia and show the first report of TcIII and TcIV in Colombian Chagasic patients. Findings also indicate that Chagas cardiomyopathy manifestations are more correlated with TcI than with TcII in Colombia. PMID:21152056

  10. QRS slopes for assessment of myocardial damage in chronic chagasic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, E.; Laciar, E.; Anzuola, E.; Laguna, P.; Jané, R.

    2007-11-01

    In this study the slopes of the QRS complex are evaluated for determination of the degree of myocardial damage in chronic chagasic patients. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the slope indices to reflect alterations in the conduction velocity of the cardiac impulse. Results obtained in the present study show that chronic chagasic patients have significantly flatter QRS slopes as compared to healthy subjects. Not only that but the extent of slope lessening turns out to be proportional to the degree of myocardial damage caused by the disease. Additionally, when incorporating the slope indices into a classification analysis together with other indices indicative of the presence of ventricular late potentials obtained from high resolution electrocardiography, results show that the percentages of correct classification increase up to 62.5%, which means eight points above the percentages obtained prior to incorporation of the slope indices. It can be concluded that QRS slopes have great potential for assessing the degree of severity associated with Chagas' disease.

  11. Gene expression changes associated with myocarditis and fibrosis in hearts of mice with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; de Lima, Ricardo Santana; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Iacobas, Sanda; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Iacobas, Dumitru Andrei; Tanowitz, Herbert Bernard; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Spray, David Conover

    2010-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure in Latin American countries. About 30% of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop this severe symptomatic form of the disease, characterized by intense inflammatory response accompanied by fibrosis in the heart. We performed an extensive microarray analysis of hearts from a mouse model of this disease and determined significant alterations in expression of ∼12% of the sampled genes. Extensive upregulations were associated with immune-inflammatory responses (chemokines, adhesion molecules, cathepsins and MHC molecules) and fibrosis (extracellular matrix components, lysyl oxidase and Timp-1). Our results indicate potentially relevant factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease that may provide new therapeutic targets in chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:20565256

  12. Elevated levels of antibodies against sulphatide are present in all chronic chagasic and dilated cardiomyopathy sera.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M; Carrasco, H

    1993-01-01

    A natural anti-sulphatide antibody was found to be present in the serum of every normal individual studied. The reactivity of the antibody was assessed by its interaction with galactosylceramide-I3-sulphate. Antigen-antibody binding was strongly blocked by 1 mM heparin, dextran sulphate and chondroitin sulphate A, and by 5 mM chondroitin sulphate B. Antibodies avidly absorb to rabbit erythrocytes, but discretely to rat erythrocytes, suggesting that they are different from galactocerebroside antibodies. Elevated levels of sulphatide antibodies were present in all of 102 chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients studied, but not in other patients having cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis, T. rangeli infection or several other protozoal, helminthic or mycotic infections. Interestingly, 100% of 40 dilated cardiomyopathy patients also have elevated levels of sulphatide antibodies. As T. cruzi is rich in galactocerebroside sulphate, it is proposed that in chagasic patients this glycolipid could act as an immunogen, inducing elevated titres of sulphatide antibodies, which could be important in the pathogenesis of cardiac or peripheral nerve symptoms. PMID:8513577

  13. Antibodies with beta-adrenergic activity from chronic chagasic patients modulate the QT interval and M cell action potential duration

    PubMed Central

    Medei, Emiliano Horacio; Nascimento, José H.M.; Pedrosa, Roberto C.; Barcellos, Luciane; Masuda, Masako O.; Sicouri, Serge; Elizari, Marcelo V.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate whether the sera from chronic chagasic patients (CChPs) with beta-1 adrenergic activity (Ab-β) can modulate ventricular repolarization. Beta-adrenergic activity has been described in CChP. It increases the L-type calcium current and heart rate in isolated hearts, but its effects on ventricular repolarization has not been described. Methods and results In isolated rabbit hearts, under pacing condition, QT interval was measured under Ab-β perfusion. Beta-adrenergic activity was also tested in guinea pig ventricular M cells. Furthermore, the immunoglobulin fraction (IgG-β) of the Ab-β was tested on Ito, ICa, and Iks currents in rat, rabbit, and guinea pig myocytes, respectively. Beta-adrenergic activity shortened the QT interval. This effect was abolished in the presence of propranolol. In addition, sera from CChP without beta-adrenergic activity (Ab-β) did not modulate QT interval. The M cell action potential duration (APD) was reversibly shortened by Ab-β. Atenolol inhibited this effect of Ab-β, and Ab- did not modulate the AP of M cells. Ito was not modulated by isoproterenol nor by IgG-β. However, IgG-β increased ICa and IKs. Conclusion The shortening of the QT interval and APD in M cells and the increase of IKs and ICa induced by IgG-β contribute to repolarization changes that may trigger malignant ventricular arrhythmias observed in patients with chronic chagasic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy. PMID:18515284

  14. Multicenter randomized trial of cell therapy in cardiopathies – MiHeart Study

    PubMed Central

    Tura, Bernardo R; Martino, Helena F; Gowdak, Luis H; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Dohmann, Hans F; Krieger, José E; Feitosa, Gilson; Vilas-Boas, Fábio; Oliveira, Sérgio A; Silva, Suzana A; Bozza, Augusto Z; Borojevic, Radovan; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos

    2007-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of death in the world. Current treatments have not been able to reverse this scenario, creating the need for the development of new therapies. Cell therapies have emerged as an alternative for cardiac diseases of distinct causes in experimental animal studies and more recently in clinical trials. Method/Design We have designed clinical trials to test for the efficacy of autologous bone marrow derived mononuclear cell therapies in four different cardiopathies: acute and chronic ischemic heart disease, and Chagasic and dilated cardiomyopathy. All trials are multicenter, randomized, double-blind and placebo controlled. In each trial 300 patients will be enrolled and receive optimized therapy for their specific condition. Additionally, half of the patients will receive the autologous bone marrow cells while the other half will receive placebo (saline with 5% autologous serum). For each trial there are specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and the method for cell delivery is intramyocardial for the chronic ischemic heart disease and intracoronary for all others. Primary endpoint for all studies will be the difference in ejection fraction (determined by Simpson's rule) six and twelve months after intervention in relation to the basal ejection fraction. The main hypothesis of this study is that the patients who receive the autologous bone-marrow stem cell implant will have after a 6 month follow-up a mean increase of 5% in absolute left ventricular ejection fraction in comparison with the control group. Discussion Many phase I clinical trials using cell therapy for cardiac diseases have already been performed. The few randomized studies have yielded conflicting results, rendering necessary larger well controlled trials to test for efficacy of cell therapies in cardiopathies. The trials registration numbers at the NIH registry are the following: Chagasic cardiomyopathy (NCT00349271), dilated cardiomyopathy (NCT

  15. Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is an inflammatory disease that occurs in approximately 30% of patients infected by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and it has a profile of high morbidity and mortality. The worst prognosis and the progression of this cardiomyopathy are associated with an exacerbated immune response and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which also occur in other cardiomyopathies. Some nutrients, including omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), promote the inhibition and/or stimulation of cytokine production. The objective of this trial is to study the effects of omega-3 PUFA supplementation on the inflammatory response and lipid profile in patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Methods/Design This is a parallel, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with 40 patients that will be conducted at a reference unit for Chagas disease patients, where the patients will be selected. The study will include patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy who are 18 years of age or older. The exclusion criteria are (a) ongoing diarrheal disease, (b) inflammatory bowel disease, (c) diabetes or other endocrine disease, (d) use of fibrates, niacin, or statins, (e) use of anti-inflammatory drugs, (f) pregnant and lactating women, (g) use of vitamin, mineral, or omega-3 supplementation during the previous 30 days, (h) hospital admission during the study, and (i) other associated cardiomyopathies. The intervention will be treatment with omega-3 PUFAs at a dose of 3 g/day for 8 weeks, compared to placebo (corn oil). The primary endpoints will be the concentrations of inflammatory markers (interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interferon (IFN)γ, and transforming growth factor (TGF)β). Secondary endpoints will be the fasting glucose, lipid, and anthropometric profiles. For statistical analysis, we plan to run either a t test or Wilcoxon test (numerical variables) and

  16. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E−03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals. PMID:27502545

  17. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E-03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals. PMID:27502545

  18. Cardiac condition in young chagasic women

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, O; Dotto, G; Ojeda, S; Garutti, A; Bertolotto, P; Tabares, S; Gallerano, R; Sembaj, A

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Chagas disease is a complex disorder caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Most patients remain asymptomatic for several years and 30% of them progress quietly to developing cardiomyopathy. The factors that lead to chronic myocardial lesions are not fully understood. Objective: To investigate the association between clinical symptoms and single nucleotide polymorphisms in chagasic and non-chagasic women younger and older than 55 years of age. Methods and Results: we analyzed Ala-9Val and Ile58Thr polymorphisms of the SOD-Mn gene, 138ex1ins/del A of the endothelin-1 gene (ET-1) and H323H (T/C) of the endothelin receptor A gene (ETA), by PCR-RFLP using genomic DNA from leukocyte of 85 women. We also evaluated serum lipid profile, renal and liver function, chest X-rays, electrocardiograms (ECGs) and echocardiography (EchoCG). Biochemical profiling did not show differences between chagasic and non-chagasic patients. The polymorphisms analyses showed a significant association in the distribution of frequencies of the Mn-SOD Ile58Thr gene between both groups. Young chagasic patients had a significantly higher prevalence of abnormalities in X-rays, in ECGs and they showed grade II and III of NYHA functional classes. The chance of having an abnormal EchoCG was 5.87 higher in young chagasic patients (OR=5.87, 95% CI 1.47-23.4). Discussion: We concluded that the parasite affects young females by accelerating the deterioration of cardiac function, independent of other cardiovascular risk factors and the cardioprotective action of estrogens present in the premenopausal stage. PMID:23904881

  19. Low Frequency of Circulating CD8+ T Stem Cell Memory Cells in Chronic Chagasic Patients with Severe Forms of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mateus, Jose; Lasso, Paola; Pavia, Paula; Rosas, Fernando; Roa, Nubia; Valencia-Hernández, Carlos Andrés; González, John Mario; Puerta, Concepción J.; Cuéllar, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background CD8+ T cells have been shown to play a crucial role in Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Memory CD8+ T cells can be categorised based on their distinct differentiation stages and functional activities as follows: stem cell memory (TSCM), central memory (TCM), transitional memory (TTM), effector memory (TEM) and terminal effector (TTE) cells. Currently, the immune mechanisms that control T. cruzi in the chronic phase of the infection are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To characterise the CD8+ T cell subsets that could be participating in the control of T. cruzi infection, in this study, we compared total and T. cruzi-specific circulating CD8+ T cells with distinctive phenotypic and functional features in chronic chagasic patients (CCPs) with different degrees of cardiac dysfunction. We observed a decreased frequency of total TSCM along with an increased frequency of TTE in CCPs with severe disease. Antigen-specific TSCM cells were not detectable in CCPs with severe forms of the disease. A functional profile of CD8+ T cell subsets among CCPs revealed a high frequency of monofunctional CD8+ T cells in the most severe patients with IFN-γ+- or TNF-α+-producing cells. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that CD8+ TSCM cells may be associated with the immune response to T. cruzi and outcome of Chagas disease, given that these cells may be involved in repopulating the T cell pool that controls infection. PMID:25569149

  20. Do lymphocytes from Chagasic patients respond to heart antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Todd, C W; Todd, N R; Guimaraes, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation studies of nonadherent lymphocytes from chronic Chagasic and uninfected persons demonstrated that responses of all individuals to a mouse heart homogenate showed a correlation with responses to streptococcal antigens. Considering the known cross-reactions between streptococcal and cardiac antigens and the high reactivity of Chagasic patients to streptococcal antigens, it is possible that positive lymphocyte transformation to unfractionated heart antigen preparations may not represent specific reactivity to heart antigens. PMID:6404836

  1. [Nuclear magnetic resonance in ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Meave, Aloha

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is the "gold standard" technique to quantify the ventricular volume, the ejection fraction, and the myocardial mass. In patients suffering from ischemic cardiopathy, the ejection fraction is the most important prognostic parameter, even above from lessoned arteries index. An adequate diagnose between a non-viable and a viable myocardium is of great importance in the therapeutic approach for ischemic cardiopathy. By administrating a paramagnetic contrast media named gadolinium, fist pass and late-reinforcement techniques, are applied. With these, it is possible to evaluate the perfusion as well as necrotic areas. In order to identify sub-endocardium ischemia, drugs such as adenosine and dipiridamol, are employed as vasodilators. This technique allows the definition of reinforcement extension, being sub-endocardiac, which is an ailment which affects 50% of the myocardium depth, or even, transmural compromise. PMID:18938717

  2. HLA antigens in cardiomyopathic Chilean chagasics.

    PubMed Central

    Llop, E; Rothhammer, F; Acuña, M; Apt, W

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of HLA antigens in a sample of 124 Chagas serologically positive Chilean individuals was studied. The sample was subdivided according to the presence or absence of chagasic cardiomyopathy, in order to search for genetic differences associated with this pathological condition. The frequency of antigen B40 in the presence of antigen Cw3 was found to be significantly lower in subjects with cardiomyopathy. We tentatively suggest that the presence of these antigens among noncardiomyopathics is associated with a decreased susceptibility to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy in the Chilean population. PMID:3189340

  3. Electrophysiological and pharmacological evaluation of the nicotinic cholinergic system in chagasic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two theories attempt to explain the changes observed in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in chagasic cardiomyopathy. The neurogenic theory proposes that receptor changes are due to loss of intracardiac ganglia parasympathetic neurons. The immunogenic theory proposes that the nAChRs changes are the result of autoantibodies against these receptors. Both theories agreed that nAChRs functional expression could be impaired in Chagas disease. Methods We evaluated nAChRs functional integrity in 54 Sprague Dawley rats, divided in two groups: healthy and chronic chagasic rats. Rats were subjected to electrocardiographic studies in the whole animal under pentobarbital anesthesia, by isolation and stimulation of vagus nerves and in isolated beating hearts (Langendorff’s preparation). Results Nicotine, 10 μM, induced a significant bradycardia in both groups. However, rats that had previously received reserpine did not respond to nicotine stimulation. β-adrenergic stimulation, followed by nicotine treatment, induced tachycardia in chagasic rats; while inducing bradycardia in healthy rats. Bilateral vagus nerve stimulation induced a significantly higher level of bradycardia in healthy rats, compared to chagasic rats; physostigmine potentiated the bradycardic response to vagal stimulation in both experimental groups. Electric stimulation (e.g., ≥ 2 Hz), in the presence of physostigmine, produced a comparable vagal response in both groups. In isolated beating-heart preparations 1 μM nicotine induced sustained bradycardia in healthy hearts while inducing tachycardia in chagasic hearts. Higher nicotine doses (e.g.,10 – 100 uM) promoted the characteristic biphasic response (i.e., bradycardia followed by tachycardia) in both groups. 10 nM DHβE antagonized the effect of 10 μM nicotine, unmasking the cholinergic bradycardic effect in healthy rats only. 1 nM α-BGT alone induced bradycardia in healthy hearts but antagonized the 10 μM nicotine

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%–30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26574156

  5. Gene expression analysis in mitochondria from chagasic mice: alterations in specific metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling in chagasic disease might be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we characterized the cardiac metabolic responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and progressive disease severity using a custom-designed mitoarray (mitochondrial function-related gene array). Mitoarrays consisting of known, well-characterized mitochondrial function-related cDNAs were hybridized with 32P-labelled cDNA probes generated from the myocardium of mice during immediate early, acute and chronic phases of infection and disease development. The mitoarray successfully identified novel aspects of the T. cruzi-induced alterations in the expression of the genes related to mitochondrial function and biogenesis that were further confirmed by real-time reverse transcriptase–PCRs. Of note is the up-regulation of transcripts essential for fatty acid metabolism associated with repression of the mRNAs for pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in infected hearts. We observed no statistically significant changes in mRNAs for the enzymes of tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results suggest that fatty acid metabolism compensates the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiencies for the supply of acetyl-CoA for a tricarboxylic acid cycle, and chagasic hearts may not be limited in reduced energy (NADH and FADH2). The observation of a decrease in mRNA level for several subunits of the respiratory chain complexes by mitoarray as well as global genome analysis suggests a limitation in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation-mediated ATP-generation capacity as the probable basis for cardiac homoeostasis in chagasic disease. PMID:15101819

  6. Lower oesophageal sphincter response to pentagastrin in chagasic patients with megaoesophagus and megacolon.

    PubMed Central

    Padovan, W; Godoy, R A; Dantas, R O; Meneghelli, U G; Oliveira, R B; Troncon, L E

    1980-01-01

    Intraluminal manometric studies were performed in 14 chagasic patients with megaoesophagus, 10 chagasic patients with megacolon, and 15 control subjects. Basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was 20.27+/-1.16 mmHg (mean+/-SEM) in controls as compared wtih 15.16+/-1.53 mmHg in chagasics with megaoesophagus and 14.38+/-1.50 mmHg in chagasics with megacolon. Dose-response studies to intravenous pentagastrin showed that the chagasic patients exhibited a lower sensitivity to the stimulant than did the controls, as demonstrated by shifting of the dose-response curve to the right and higher individual values of the dose for half maximal contraction (D50). No difference was noted between the calculated maximal contraction (Vmax) of oesophageal sphincter of controls and chagasics. These data are compatible with the hypothesis of an interaction between pentagastrin and cholinergic nervous excitation on oesophageal sphincteric smooth muscle. PMID:6769753

  7. [The Oradea study regarding the epidemiology factors in ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Pop, E; Popa, I; Bolcaş, D; Sirca, D; Simon, F; Costin, V; Balaj, V; Micle, T; Săvulescu, I H; Elenes, S; Negru, M; Cazacu, G; Popper, A; Gerhardt, L; Zavornic, E; Anton, N; Erdös, I; Frăţilă, H; Nica, V; Mesaroş, P; Jozsa, P; Lupu, D; David, D; Derecskey, E; Man, C; Palfi, E; Vass, H L

    1981-01-01

    Cholesterolemia in a population of 100482 inhabitants of the Bihor district, subjected to screening for the risk factors in ischemic cardiopathy were studied. Together with hyperlipidemias other risk factors were detected: arterial hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, smoking, ischemic alterations of the electrocardiogram, the influence of the noxious agents present at the working place, of the blood groups and disturbances of the menstrual cycle. The mean cholesteremia is of 205 ± 43.7 mgr% (M = 207 ± 43.7 mgr%; F = 204 ± 43.5 mgr%). The prevalence of cholesterolemia, in comparison with the higher normal limits in each age group over 15 years of age, is in the entire studied series, of 13.5%. The population in whom cholesterolemia exceeds 250 mgr% represents 13.92%. PMID:25528799

  8. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and anti-laminin antibodies in chagasic patients after specific treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Gazzinelli, R T; Galvão, L M; Cardoso, J E; Cançado, J R; Krettli, A U; Brener, Z; Gazzinelli, G

    1988-01-01

    The antibody response to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote and trypomastigote stages, as well as to laminin, was studied in several groups of chagasic patients. In six patients who were cured of the parasite, the serum antibody titers as revealed by indirect immunofluorescence and hemagglutination tests against epimastigotes (conventional serology) and a complement-mediated lysis test with living trypomastigotes did not differ from those of normal individuals. In seven presumably cured patients, although the complement-mediated lysis test turned negative, conventional serology remained positive. Sera from this group of so-called "dissociated" patients presented significant lower mean antibody titers against epimastigote but not trypomastigote stages than did sera from 14 untreated patients (P less than 0.01). Most of the antibodies against trypomastigotes, including the residual levels found in cured patients, were absorbed by mouse laminin. In fact, significantly higher titers of anti-laminin antibodies were observed in sera from untreated chagasic patients (1.131 +/- 0.458) and cured patients (1.103 +/- 0.572) than in sera from eight normal individuals (0.459 +/- 0.402) (P less than 0.01). The anti-laminin titers were higher in sera of patients of blood group A or O than in those of patients of group B or AB. In Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis against trypomastigotes, sera from chronic untreated patients recognized many polypeptide bands ranging from 26 to 160 kilodaltons, whereas no protein bands were observed with sera from cured patients. Only faint bands of parasite proteins were observed with sera of dissociated patients. In conjunction, the above data suggest that the anti-trypomastigote antibodies which persist after parasitological cure of patients with Chagas' disease are due mainly to cross-reactive epitopes from mouse laminin. PMID:3141467

  9. Clinical and Echocardiographic Predictors of Mortality in Chagasic Cardiomyopathy - Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Clodoval de Barros; Markman, Brivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis, prognosis and evaluation of death risk in Chagas cardiomyopathy still constitute a challenge due to the diversity of manifestations, which determine the importance of using echocardiography, tissue Doppler and biomarkers. To evaluate, within a systematic review, clinical and echocardiographic profiles of patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, which may be related to worse prognosis and major mortality risk. To perform the systematic review, we used Medline (via PubMed), LILACS and SciELO databases to identify 82 articles published from 1991 to 2012, with the following descriptors: echocardiography, mortality and Chagas disease. We selected 31 original articles, involving diagnostic and prognostic methods. The importance of Chagas disease has increased due to its emergence in Europe and United States, but most evidence came from Brazil. Among the predictors of worse prognosis and higher mortality risk are morphological and functional alterations in the left and right ventricles, evaluated by conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler, as well as the increase in brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I concentrations. Recently, the evaluations of dyssynchrony, dysautonomia, as well as strain, strain rate and myocardial twisting were added to the diagnostic arsenal for the early differentiation of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Developments in imaging and biochemical diagnostic procedures have enabled more detailed cardiac evaluations, which demonstrate the early involvement of both ventricles, allowing a more accurate assessment of the mortality risk in Chagas disease. PMID:25004422

  10. [Vectorcardiographic manifestations of the W-P-W syndrome with associated cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1989-01-01

    Electro-vectorcardiographic curves corresponding to Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with cardiopathy are analyzed on the basis of the sequence of the ventricular depolarization phenomenon as well as of the heart's position and rotation. A more than 30 msc interval between the end of the initial slurring and the vertex of the R loop, or of that of the R wave in the left leads, permits us to infer the coexistence of left ventricular hypertrophy. Segmental irregularities or distortions of the vectorcardiographic ventricular curves suggest the presence of a limited inactivable+ zone. Extensive deformations are more suggestive of diffuse myocardial damage. Sometimes primary disturbances of ventricular repolarization, probably due to antiarrhythmic medication, are observed. PMID:2675788

  11. Atrial Cardiopathy: A Broadened Concept of Left Atrial Thromboembolism Beyond Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Hooman; Okin, Peter M.; Longstreth, W. T.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has long been associated with a heightened risk of ischemic stroke and systemic thromboembolism, but recent data require a re-evaluation of our understanding of the nature of this relationship. New findings about the temporal connection between AF and stroke, alongside evidence linking markers of left atrial abnormalities with stroke in the absence of apparent AF, suggest that left atrial thromboembolism may occur even without AF. These observations undermine the hypothesis that the dysrhythmia that defines AF is necessary and sufficient to cause thromboembolism. In this commentary, we instead suggest that the substrate for thromboembolism may often be the anatomic and physiological atrial derangements associated with AF. Therefore, our understanding of cardioembolic stroke may be more complete if we shift our representation of its origin from AF to the concept of atrial cardiopathy. PMID:26021638

  12. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  13. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos, Camila França; Cangussú, Silvia Dantas; Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  14. [A missing name in the history of chagasic megaesophagus: Joseph Cooper Reinhardt (1809/10-1873)].

    PubMed

    Meneghelli, U G; de Rezende, J M; Troncon, L E; Madrid, N; de Moura, M L

    1998-01-01

    The book entitled "Brazil and the Brasilians", written by the Reverends Kidder and Fletcher and firstly published in the United States in 1857, reports the travels of these two missionaries throughout Brazil and includes a section entitled "A new disease". This section contains data regarding the clinical picture, the natural history and the epidemiology of a commom disease in Brazilian hinterland, which was known as "mal de engasgo". These informations were collected in 1855 by Rev. Fletcher from an anonymous North American physician, who worked in Limeira, State of São Paulo, and is called in the book merely as "Dr.-". The present work reports the results of an investigation carried out aiming at the identification of "Dr.-" and discloses documental evidence that "Dr.-" was actually Dr. Joseph Cooper Reinhardt (1809/10-1883). Dr. Reinhardt worked for many years in the citites of Limeira and Campinas, State of São Paulo, and probably had an extensive knowledge regarding the main features of this particular disease, which would be known, nearly 100 years later, as chagasic megaesophagus. The authors point out that, from now on, any account of the history of chagasic megaesophagus must include the name of Dr. Joseph Cooper Reinhardt. PMID:9711306

  15. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  16. Serum Proteomic Signature of Human Chagasic Patients for the Identification of Novel Potential Protein Biomarkers of Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Zago, M. Paola; Nuñez, Sonia; Gupta, Shivali; Burgos, Federico Nuñez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is initiated upon infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Among the health consequences is a decline in heart function, and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this manifestation are not well understood. To explore the possible mechanisms, we employed IgY LC10 affinity chromatography in conjunction with ProteomeLab PF2D and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to resolve the proteome signature of high and low abundance serum proteins in chagasic patients. MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis yielded 80 and 14 differentially expressed proteins associated with cardiomyopathy of chagasic and other etiologies, respectively. The extent of oxidative stress-induced carbonyl modifications of the differentially expressed proteins (n = 26) was increased and coupled with a depression of antioxidant proteins. Functional annotation of the top networks developed by ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome database identified dysregulation of inflammation/acute phase response signaling and lipid metabolism relevant to production of prostaglandins and arachidonic acid in chagasic patients. Overlay of the major networks identified prothrombin and plasminogen at a nodal position with connectivity to proteome signature indicative of heart disease (i.e., thrombosis, angiogenesis, vasodilatation of blood vessels or the aorta, and increased permeability of blood vessel and endothelial tubes), and inflammatory responses (e.g., platelet aggregation, complement activation, and phagocyte activation and migration). The detection of cardiac proteins (myosin light chain 2 and myosin heavy chain 11) and increased levels of vinculin and plasminogen provided a comprehensive set of biomarkers of cardiac muscle injury and development of clinical Chagas disease in human patients. These results provide an impetus for biomarker validation in large cohorts of clinically characterized chagasic patients. PMID:22543060

  17. Chagasic Thymic Atrophy Does Not Affect Negative Selection but Results in the Export of Activated CD4+CD8+ T Cells in Severe Forms of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morrot, Alexandre; Terra-Granado, Eugênia; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Silva-Barbosa, Suse Dayse; Milićević, Novica M.; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; De Meis, Juliana; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Beloscar, Juan; Wang, Xiaoping; Kont, Vivian; Peterson, Pärt; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Extrathymic CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells are increased in some pathophysiological conditions, including infectious diseases. In the murine model of Chagas disease, it has been shown that the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironment and the lymphoid compartment. In the acute phase, this results in a severe atrophy of the organ and early release of DP cells into the periphery. To date, the effect of the changes promoted by the parasite infection on thymic central tolerance has remained elusive. Herein we show that the intrathymic key elements that are necessary to promote the negative selection of thymocytes undergoing maturation during the thymopoiesis remains functional during the acute chagasic thymic atrophy. Intrathymic expression of the autoimmune regulator factor (Aire) and tissue-restricted antigen (TRA) genes is normal. In addition, the expression of the proapoptotic Bim protein in thymocytes was not changed, revealing that the parasite infection-induced thymus atrophy has no effect on these marker genes necessary to promote clonal deletion of T cells. In a chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic system, the administration of OVA peptide into infected mice with thymic atrophy promoted OVA-specific thymocyte apoptosis, further indicating normal negative selection process during the infection. Yet, although the intrathymic checkpoints necessary for thymic negative selection are present in the acute phase of Chagas disease, we found that the DP cells released into the periphery acquire an activated phenotype similar to what is described for activated effector or memory single-positive T cells. Most interestingly, we also demonstrate that increased percentages of peripheral blood subset of DP cells exhibiting an activated HLA-DR+ phenotype are associated with severe cardiac forms of human chronic Chagas disease. These cells may contribute to the

  18. Physical activity, opportunity for reinfection, and sibling history of heart disease as risk factors for Chagas' cardiopathy.

    PubMed

    Zicker, F; Smith, P G; Netto, J C; Oliveira, R M; Zicker, E M

    1990-11-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine whether physical activity, sibling history of heart disease (HHD), and length of residence in an area endemic for Chagas' disease were associated with the risk of developing Chagas' cardiopathy. Two hundred forty-seven cases of Chagas' heart disease and 345 seropositive subjects with normal ECG (controls) were selected in a population survey in Goiânia, Brazil. Prevalence ratios for exposure variables were estimated for cases in relation to controls and for subgroups of seropositives with selected ECG abnormalities in relation to controls. Increasing age and male sex were consistently and significantly related to an increased risk of ECG abnormalities. HHD was significantly associated with ECG alterations in 3 of the 5 comparison subgroups (any ECG alteration, right bundle branch block, and left anterior hemiblock). No association was found between length of residence in an area endemic, physical activity, and ECG abnormalities. A sample of 529 seronegative subjects were also examined and the interaction between exposure variables and seropositivity was tested to assess whether the associations found were specific for seropositives. Males were at greater risk of any ECG alteration and left anterior hemiblock in relation to females if they were seropositive. An increasing risk of ventricular premature beats with age was clearer for seropositive than for seronegative subjects. Subjects with HHD were at an increased risk of ECG abnormalities and this was greater in those with a positive serological test (P less than 0.05). The findings suggest a possible geographical clustering or a familial aggregation of cases of Chagas' heart disease. PMID:2240374

  19. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA

    PubMed Central

    BUCCHERI, Renata; KASSAB, Maria José; de FREITAS, Vera Lucia Teixeira; da SILVA, Sheila Cristina Vicente; BEZERRA, Rita C.; KHOURY, Zarifa; SHIKANAI-YASUDA, Maria Aparecida; VIDAL, José E.

    2015-01-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:27049711

  20. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Renata; Kassab, Maria José; Freitas, Vera Lucia Teixeira de; Silva, Sheila Cristina Vicente da; Bezerra, Rita C; Khoury, Zarifa; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Vidal, José E

    2015-12-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:27049711

  1. Cardiopathies congénitales: aspects épidémiologiques et échocardiographies à propos de 109 cas au centre hospitalier universitaire pédiatrique Charles de Gaulle (CHUP-CDG) de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Kinda, Georges; Millogo, Georges Rosario Christian; Koueta, Fla; Dao, Lassina; Talbousouma, Sollimy; Cissé, Hassane; Djiguimdé, Aristide; Yé, Diarra; Sorgho, Claudine Lougue

    2015-01-01

    Notre travail avait pour objectif d’étudier les aspects épidémiologiques et écho-cardiographiques des cardiopathies congénitales au CHUP-CDG afin d'y faire l’état des lieux. Pour se faire, nous avons mené sur une période de 27 mois d'aout 2009 à mai 2010 et d'octobre 2011 à décembre 2011, une étude rétrospective des comptes rendus d’échocardiographies Doppler des patients admis dans le service d'imagerie médicale. Nous avons utilisé une sonde cardiaque de 5MHz sur appareil Aloka Prosound 4000 Plus. Durant la période d’étude, 380 examens écho-cardiographiques ont été réalisés et ont permis de mettre en évidence 109 cas de cardiopathies congénitales avec 138 entités nosologiques différentes. Les cardiopathies congénitales représentaient 0,98% des 11169 entrées. Les souffles étaient au premier rang des motifs de demande de l’échographie Doppler cardiaque (121 cas sur 380) soit 39,53%. Les CIV étaient au premier plan des cardiopathies congénitales (28,26%), suivies des CIA (23,19%), des sténoses pulmonaires (19,57%), des Tétralogie de Fallot (9,42%). Dans leur forme isolée, les CIA étaient les plus fréquentes avec 21,95% des cas, suivies des CIV avec 20,73%. Sur 138 cas de cardiopathies congénitales (chez 109 enfants), 53 cas ont été observés chez des enfants de sexe féminin et 56 cas chez des enfants de sexe masculin soit un sexe ration de 1,1. La tranche d’âge présentant une fréquence élevée de cardiopathie congénitale est celle de 1mois- 30 mois avec 55% des cas. Les cardiopathies congénitales de l'enfant sont une réalité en Afrique, leurs fréquences dans toutes les séries rapportées sont certainement sous estimées en raison de l'inaccessibilité de l’échocardiographie doppler. PMID:26090039

  2. Temporal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase in experimental acute Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, B.; Melby, P. C.; Troyer, D. A.; Colston, J. T.; Freeman, G. L.

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the kinetics of myocardial cytokine and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in acute Chagasic cardiomyopathy, we studied a rat model of acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Rats were euthanized 36 hours and 5, 10, and 15 days after infection, and hearts were collected for histology, mRNA, and protein analyses. Histological analysis of myocardium showed a progressive increase in the number of amastigotes and mononuclear inflammatory cells. Organisms were first detected 5 days after intraperitoneal inoculation as isolated nests and became numerous by day 15. Northern blot analysis of total RNA revealed no signal for interleukin (IL)-1beta or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and a weak signal for IL-6 in control hearts. High levels of expression for the three genes were detected in the infected animals at 36 hours after infection. Although IL-1beta and IL-6 levels increased steadily up to 10 days, TNF-alpha levels were the highest at 5 days, remained high at 10 days, and declined thereafter. Western blot analysis showed similar results to that of mRNA expression. No signal was detected for iNOS in the controls, but both its mRNA and protein were found in the infected animals, with levels being highest at 15 days after infection. Immunohistochemistry revealed no iNOS immunoreactivity in uninfected animals, but intense iNOS staining was detected in blood vessels of infected animals, which decreased progressively with period of infection. Positive staining for iNOS in cardiomyocytes was first detected at 36 hours after infection (at a time when there was no histological inflammatory reaction), which steadily increased, being the highest at 15 days after infection. These results indicate that, in addition to mechanical damage by T. cruzi, substantial pro-inflammatory cytokine production within the myocardium is likely to participate in the pathophysiology of acute Chagasic cardiomyopathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7

  3. 8p23.1 Interstitial Deletion in a Patient with Congenital Cardiopathy, Neurobehavioral Disorders, and Minor Signs Suggesting 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Molck, Miriam C; Monteiro, Fabíola P; Simioni, Milena; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Copy number variation studies of known disorders have the potential to improve the characterization of clinical phenotypes and may help identifying candidate genes and their pathways. The authors described a child with congenital heart disease, microcephaly, facial dysmorphisms, developmental delay, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. There was initially a clinical suspicion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS), but molecular cytogenetic analysis (array genomic hybridization [aGH]) showed the presence of a de novo 3.6-Mb interstitial microdeletion in 8p23.1. The main features of 8p23.1 DS include congenital heart disease and behavioral problems, in addition to minor dysmorphisms and mental delay. Therefore, this article highlights the application of aGH to investigate 8p23.1 deletion in nonconfirmed 22q11.2 DS patients presenting neurobehavioral disorders, congenital cardiopathy, and minor dysmorphisms. PMID:26263419

  4. Treatment with Benznidazole during the Chronic Phase of Experimental Chagas' Disease Decreases Cardiac Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Simone; Ramos, Carolina O.; Senra, Juliana F. V.; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2005-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is one of the main causes of death due to heart failure in Latin American countries. Benznidazole, the chemotherapeutic agent most often used for the treatment of chagasic patients, is highly toxic and has limited efficacy, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. In the present study we used a mouse model of chronic Chagas' disease to investigate the effects of benznidazole treatment during the chronic phase on disease progression. The hearts of benznidazole-treated mice had decreased parasitism and myocarditis compared to the hearts of untreated chagasic mice. Both groups of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice had significant alterations in their electrocardiograms compared to those of the healthy mice. However, untreated mice had significantly higher cardiac conduction disturbances than benznidazole-treated mice, including intraventricular conduction disturbances, atrioventricular blocks, and extrasystoles. The levels of antibodies against T. cruzi antigens (epimastigote extract, P2β, and trans-sialidase) as well as antibodies against peptides of the second extracellular loops of β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors were also lower in the sera from benznidazole-treated mice than in the sera from untreated mice. These results demonstrate that treatment with benznidazole in the chronic phase of infection prevents the development of severe chronic cardiomyopathy, despite the lack of complete parasite eradication. In addition, our data highlight the role of parasite persistence in the development of chronic Chagas' disease and reinforce the importance of T. cruzi elimination in order to decrease or prevent the development of severe chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:15793134

  5. Immunodominance: a new hypothesis to explain parasite escape and host/parasite equilibrium leading to the chronic phase of Chagas' disease?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M M; Alencar, B C G de; Claser, C; Tzelepis, F

    2009-03-01

    Intense immune responses are observed during human or experimental infection with the digenetic protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The reasons why such immune responses are unable to completely eliminate the parasites are unknown. The survival of the parasite leads to a parasite-host equilibrium found during the chronic phase of chagasic infection in most individuals. Parasite persistence is recognized as the most likely cause of the chagasic chronic pathologies. Therefore, a key question in Chagas' disease is to understand how this equilibrium is established and maintained for a long period. Understanding the basis for this equilibrium may lead to new approaches to interventions that could help millions of individuals at risk for infection or who are already infected with T. cruzi. Here, we propose that the phenomenon of immunodominance may be significant in terms of regulating the host-parasite equilibrium observed in Chagas' disease. T. cruzi infection restricts the repertoire of specific T cells generating, in some cases, an intense immunodominant phenotype and in others causing a dramatic interference in the response to distinct epitopes. This immune response is sufficiently strong to maintain the host alive during the acute phase carrying them to the chronic phase where transmission usually occurs. At the same time, immunodominance interferes with the development of a higher and broader immune response that could be able to completely eliminate the parasite. Based on this, we discuss how we can interfere with or take advantage of immunodominance in order to provide an immunotherapeutic alternative for chagasic individuals. PMID:19287899

  6. Abcès cérébral compliquant une cardiopathie congénitale: à propos de 7 cas à l'institut de cardiologie d'Abidjan

    PubMed Central

    N'goran, Yves N'da Kouakou; Tano, Micesse; Traore, Fatoumata; Angoran, Inès; Roland, N'guetta; Traboulsi, Aké Evelyne; Yao, Konan Serge; Kramoh, Kouadio Euloge; Kakou, Maurice Guikahue

    2015-01-01

    Le diagnostic précoce des cardiopathies congénitales (C.C) a une incidence positive sur leur évolution. En effet diagnostiquées tard ou non traitées elles peuvent se compliquer. L'abcès cérébral est une complication des C.C cyanogènes qui est rare dans les pays développés. Notre objectif était d'analyser à travers une revue bibliographique les particularités de 7 cas de C.C compliquées d'abcès cérébral découvertes et prises en charge dans un service de cardiologie pédiatrique de l'Institut de Cardiologie d'Abidjan. La tétralogie de Fallot était la cardiopathie congénitale la plus fréquente. Le traitement a été médical et/ou chirurgical. Seule la réalisation de la cure complète des cardiopathies congénitales peut permettre la prévention de l'abcès cérébral. PMID:26848356

  7. The identification and characterization of epitopes in the 30-34 kDa Trypanosoma cruzi proteins recognized by antibodies in the serum samples of chagasic patients.

    PubMed

    Verissimo da Costa, Giovani Carlo; Lery, Leticia Miranda Santos; da Silva, Manuela Leal; Moura, Hércules; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; von Krüger, Wanda Maria Almeida; Bisch, Paulo Mascarello; Barr, John R; Peralta, José Mauro

    2013-03-27

    Trypanosoma cruzi proteins with molecular weight between 30 and 34 kDa have shown high reactivity in western blot assays with serum samples from chagasic individuals. However, in-depth analysis of the constituents of these protein fractions has not been performed. This is the first report of an immunoaffinity proteomic approach to identify the immunodominant 30-34 kDa proteins of T. cruzi that could eventually be used for the diagnosis of Chagas disease. We used two different sample preparation protocols for protein digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the protein fraction. The immunodominant proteins and their respective epitopes were then identified by co-immunoprecipitation and excision-epitope mapping/mass spectrometry, using human sera followed by the prediction and three-dimensional structural modeling of reactive epitopes. The use of different sample preparation methods allowed the identification of a relatively high number of proteins, some of which were only identified after one or multiple sample preparation and digestion protocols. Seven immunodominant proteins were identified by co-immunoprecipitation with purified IgGs from chagasic serum samples. Moreover, six reactive peptide epitopes were detected in four of these proteins by excision-epitope mapping/mass spectrometry. Three-dimensional structural models were obtained for the immunoreactive peptides, which correlated well with the linear B-cell epitope prediction tools. PMID:23159400

  8. Use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in fulminant chagasic myocarditis as a bridge to heart transplant

    PubMed Central

    Durães, André Rodrigues; Figueira, Fernando Augusto Marinho dos Santos; Lafayette, André Rabelo; Martins, Juliana de Castro Solano; Juliano Cavalcante de, Sá

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old Brazilian male presented with progressive dyspnea for 15 days, worsening in the last 24 hours, and was admitted in respiratory failure and cardiogenic shock, with multiple organ dysfunctions. Echocardiography showed a left ventricle ejection fraction of 11%, severe diffuse hypokinesia, and a systolic pulmonary artery pressure of 50mmHg, resulting in the need for hemodynamic support with dobutamine (20mcg/kg/min) and noradrenaline (1.7mcg/kg/min). After 48 hours with no clinical or hemodynamic improvement, an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was implanted. The patient presented with hemodynamic, systemic perfusion and renal and liver function improvements; however, his cardiac function did not recover after 72 hours, and he was transfer to another hospital. Air transport was conducted from Salvador to Recife in Brazil. A heart transplant was performed with rapid recovery of both liver and kidney functions, as well as good graft function. Histopathology of the explanted heart showed chronic active myocarditis and amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. The estimated global prevalence of T. cruzi infections declined from 18 million in 1991, when the first regional control initiative began, to 5.7 million in 2010. Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease due to infectious or non-infectious conditions. Clinical manifestation is variable, ranging from subclinical presentation to refractory heart failure and cardiogenic shock. Several reports suggest that the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients presenting with severe refractory myocarditis is a potential bridging therapy to heart transplant when there is no spontaneous recovery of ventricular function. In a 6-month follow-up outpatient consult, the patient presented well and was asymptomatic. PMID:26761479

  9. Elevated Serum Levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Are Associated with Progressive Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cutrullis, Romina A.; Petray, Patricia B.; Schapachnik, Edgardo; Sánchez, Rubén; Postan, Miriam; González, Mariela N.; Martín, Valentina; Corral, Ricardo S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of chronic Chagas disease occur in around 30% of the individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and are characterized by heart inflammation and dysfunction. The pathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) is not completely understood yet, partially because disease evolution depends on complex host-parasite interactions. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that promotes numerous pathophysiological processes. In the current study, we investigated the link between MIF and CCC progression. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated MIF overexpression in the hearts from chronically T. cruzi-infected mice, particularly those showing intense inflammatory infiltration. We also found that MIF exogenously added to parasite-infected murine macrophage cultures is capable of enhancing the production of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species, both with pathogenic roles in CCC. Thus, the integrated action of MIF and other cytokines and chemokines may account for leukocyte influx to the infected myocardium, accompanied by enhanced local production of multiple inflammatory mediators. We further examined by ELISA the level of MIF in the sera from chronic indeterminate and cardiomyopathic chagasic patients, and healthy subjects. CCC patients displayed significantly higher MIF concentrations than those recorded in asymptomatic T. cruzi-infected and uninfected individuals. Interestingly, increased MIF levels were associated with severe progressive Chagas heart disease, in correlation with elevated serum concentration of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and also with several echocardiographic indicators of left ventricular dysfunction, one of the hallmarks of CCC. Our present findings represent the first evidence that enhanced MIF production is associated with progressive cardiac impairment in chronic human infection with T. cruzi, strengthening the relationship between inflammatory response and parasite

  10. Perturbed T cell IL7 receptor-signaling in chronic Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, M. Cecilia; Perez-Mazliah, Damián; Natale, M. Ailén; Castro-Eiro, Melisa; Alvarez, María G.; Viotti, Rodolfo; Bertocchi, Graciela; Lococo, Bruno; Tarleton, Rick L; Laucella, Susana A.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that immune responses in subjects with chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection display features common to other persistent infections with signs of T cell exhaustion. Alterations in cytokine receptor signal transduction have emerged as one of the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of T cell exhaustion. Herein, we performed an analysis of the expression of IL-7R components (CD127 and CD132) on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and evaluated IL-7-dependent signaling events in patients at different clinical stages of chronic chagasic heart disease. Subjects with no signs of cardiac disease showed a decrease in CD127+CD132+ cells and a reciprocal gain of CD127-CD132+ in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells compared to either patients exhibiting heart enlargement or uninfected controls. T. cruzi infection, in vitro, was able to stimulate the downregulation of CD127 and the upregulation of CD132 on T cells. IL-7-induced phosphorylation of STAT5 as well as Bcl-2 and CD25 expression were lower in T. cruzi-infected subjects compared with uninfected controls. The serum levels of IL-7 was also increased in chronic chagasic patients. The present study highlights perturbed IL-7/IL-7R T cell signaling through STAT5 as a potential mechanism of T cell exhaustion in chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:25769928

  11. Delusional Infestation in a Patient with Renal Failure, Metabolic Syndrome, and Chronic Cerebrovascular Disease Treated with Aripiprazole: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Carpiniello, Bernardo; Pinna, Federica; Tuveri, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    Delusional infestation is an aspecific psychiatric condition manifested either as a primary psychotic disorder or a secondary disorder induced by a wide range of very different medical conditions. Both primary and secondary delusional infestations seem to respond to typical and atypical antipsychotics. The latter are considered the first-line treatment although the use of second-generation antipsychotics featuring a higher metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal tolerability is preferable in secondary cases, which often occur in patients with multiple, severe medical conditions. We report a case of a 72-year-old patient affected by delusional infestation associated with severe renal failure, metabolic syndrome, hypertensive cardiopathy, and chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:22174718

  12. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and Their HLA Ligands are Related with the Immunopathology of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Dalalio, Márcia Machado de Oliveira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Oliveira, Camila de Freitas; de Araújo, Silvana Marques; de Oliveira Marques, Divina Seila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) ligands in the susceptibility of chronic Chagas disease. This case-control study enrolled 131 serologically-diagnosed Chagas disease patients (59 men and 72 women, mean age of 60.4 ± 9.8 years) treated at the University Hospital of Londrina and the Chagas Disease Laboratory of the State University of Maringa. A control group was formed of 165 healthy individuals - spouses of patients or blood donors from the Regional Blood Bank in Maringa (84 men and 81 women, with a mean age of 59.0 ± 11.4 years). Genotyping of HLA and KIR was performed by PCR-SSOP. KIR2DS2-C1 in the absence of KIR2DL2 (KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/C1+) was more frequent in Chagas patients (P = 0.020; Pc = 0.040; OR = 2.14) and, in particular, those who manifested chronic chagasic cardiopathy—CCC (P = 0.0002; Pc = 0.0004; OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 2.30–18.60) when compared to the control group, and when CCC group was compared to the patients without heart involvement (P = 0.010; Pc = 0.020; OR = 3.97). The combination pair KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/KIR2DL3+/C1+ was also positively associated with chronic chagasic cardiopathy. KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 were related to immunopathogenesis in Chagas disease. The combination of KIR2DS2 activating receptor with C1 ligand, in the absence of KIR2DL2, may be related to a risk factor in the chronic Chagas disease and chronic chagasic cardiopathy. PMID:25978047

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction performance using Mexican and Guatemalan discrete typing unit I strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha; Reyes, Pedro Antonio; Mejia-Dominguez, Ana; López, Ruth; Matta, Vivian; Monteón, Victor M

    2011-12-01

    Thirteen Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from different geographic regions of Mexico and Guatemala belonging to discrete typing unit (DTU) I and a reference CL-Brener (DTU VI) strain were used to perform enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A panel of 57 Mexican serum samples of patients with chronic chagasic cardiopathy and asymptomatic infected subjects (blood bank donors) were used in this study. DNA from the above 14 T. cruzi strains were extracted and analyzed by PCR using different sets of primers designed from minicircle and satellite T. cruzi DNA. The chronic chagasic cardiopathy serum samples were easily recognized with ELISA regardless of the source of antigenic extract used, even with the CL-Brener TcVI, but positive serum samples from blood bank donors in some cases were not recognized by some Mexican antigenic extracts. On the other hand, PCR showed an excellent performance despite the set of primers used, since all Mexican and Guatemalan T. cruzi strains were correctly amplified. In general terms, Mexican, Guatemalan, and CL-Brener T. cruzi strains are equally good sources of antigen when using the ELISA test to detect Mexican serum samples. However, there are some strains with poor performance. The DTU I strains are easily detected using either kinetoplast or satellite DNA target designed from DTU VI strains. PMID:21867413

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  15. [Severe myocardial damage caused by leptospirosis. Report of a fatal case in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Velasco-Castrejón, Oscar; Rivas-Sánchez, Beatriz; Soriano-Rosas, Juan; Rivera-Reyes, Héctor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Chagasic cardiomyopathy is a common disease in Latin America, however similar clinical pictures exist that can be confused with this, as they give negative results to the tests that detects T. cruzi, like non Chagasic rural endemic chronic cardiopathy, highly common in Venezuela. Using histopathology techniques, "idiopathic cardiomyopathy" is frequently found as the cause of death when the etiology of this disease is not known. This paper presents the case of a man of 26-years-old who died of dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to leptospirosis. Clinically, in addition to the cardiac failure, jaundice, hyperbilirubinemia, transaminases increase, proteinuria and hematuria were present. Initially it was suspected Chagasic cardiomyopathy but the epidemiologic background and the parasitologic and serologic tests for T. cruzi gave negative results. The dark field microscopy videorecording of blood and urine samples, argentic impregnation and immunohistochemistry tests as well as haemoculture in EMJH medium were positive for L. interrogans serovar Pomona. Postmortem we confirmed the presence of leptospira in different tissues through of histopathology, argentic impregnation, indirect immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. PMID:20191987

  16. Effect of mild aerobic training on the myocardium of mice with chronic Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Preto, Emerson; Lima, Nathalia EA; Simardi, Lucila; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Filho, Abílio Augusto Fragata; Maifrino, Laura Beatriz Mesiano

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic chagasic heart disease represents extensive remodeling of the cardiovascular system, manifested as cardiac denervation, interstitial mononuclear infiltrate, myocyte and vascular degenerative changes, fibrosis, and hypertrophy. Moreover, aerobic exercises are widely indicated for the treatment of various disorders of the cardiovascular system. Purpose To evaluate the right and left ventricles of BALB/c mice with chronic Chagas disease, undergoing mild exercise, by using morphometric and stereological methods. Materials and methods A total of 20 male mice at 4 months of age were used for experiments. The animals were divided into four groups (n=5 in each group): untrained control, trained control, untrained infected (UI), and trained infected (TI). Animals of UI and TI groups were inoculated with 1,000 trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain), and after 40 days, animals entered chronic phase of the disease. Physical exercise, which included swimming, was performed for 30 minutes daily, five times a week for 8 consecutive weeks at a bath temperature of 30°C. After the trial period, euthanasia and subsequent withdrawal of the heart were done. The organ was prepared by histological staining procedures with hematoxylin–eosin and picrosirius red. Results We found that the physical training used in our experimental model promoted increase in volume density of capillaries and decrease in volume density of collagen fibers and cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in chagasic animals (TI group). By histopathological analysis, we found differences in the inflammatory infiltrate, which was lower in animals of TI group. The training program promoted a recovery of these parameters in the TI group. Conclusion Our results suggest that low-intensity aerobic exercise acts on morphological and morphometric parameters of the left and right ventricles in mice infected with T. cruzi, reducing the changes caused by the organism and making the results

  17. Chronic cholecystitis

    MedlinePlus

    Cholecystitis - chronic ... Most of the time, chronic cholecystitis is caused by repeated attacks of acute (sudden) cholecystitis. Most of these attacks are caused by gallstones in the gallbladder. These ...

  18. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Chronic bronchitis is one type ...

  19. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... carry air to your lungs. It causes a cough that often brings up mucus. It can also cause shortness of breath, wheezing, a low fever, and chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Chronic bronchitis is one type of COPD (chronic ...

  20. [Syphilitic aortic regurgitation: a sexually transmissible cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Madani, M; Rissoul, K; Ajjaja, M R; Moutaouakkil, E M; Arji, M; Chikhaoui, Y; Rahali, M; Slaoui, A

    2013-04-01

    Syphilitic cardiovascular complications are currently rare. It concerns the tertiary phase of the disease and results in sacciform aneurysm of the thoracic aorta or ostial coronary artery stenosis. Syphilitic aortic regurgitation is even more rare. We illustrate it by a clinical observation and discuss its diagnosis and its treatment. PMID:21663893

  1. alpha 4 Integrins and sialyl Lewis x modulation in chronic Chagas disease: further evidence of persistent immune activation.

    PubMed

    Laucella, S A; Riarte, A; Prado, N; Zapata, J; Segura, E L

    2001-05-01

    We have previously shown that titers of soluble platelet selectin (s-P-selectin) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (s-VCAM-1) were increased in sera of patients with chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD49d-integrins, that bind to VCAM-1, and sialyl Lewis x (SLe(x)), which binds selectins, in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 27 patients with Chagas' disease at different levels of disease severity. Patients with a mild form of Chagas' disease showed a lower number of CD49d(+) cells, in comparison with those with severe chronic cardiopathy. Decreased levels of CD49d(+) cells were detected in CD3(-) cell populations. Conversely, SLe(x) expression was found to be decreased in patients with severe Chagas' disease. Levels of soluble platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (s-PECAM-1) were significantly increased in the plasma of patients with severe Chagas' disease while unaltered levels of MCP-1 were recorded. These data show that VCAM-1 and P-Selectin ligands are differentially expressed during the chronic phase of the Trypanosoma cruzi infection. These findings also reinforce a role of the P-selectin/SLe(x) adhesion pathway rather than very late antigen-4 (VLA-4)/VCAM-1, in the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease. PMID:11309161

  2. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling neurologic condition that affects 2% of the general population. Patients with chronic migraine have headaches on at least 15 days a month, with at least eight days a month on which their headaches and associated symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for migraine. Chronic migraine places an enormous burden on patients owing to frequent headaches; hypersensitivity to visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli; nausea; and vomiting. It also affects society through direct and indirect medical costs. Chronic migraine typically develops after a slow increase in headache frequency over months to years. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of transforming to chronic migraine. The diagnosis requires a carefully performed patient interview and neurologic examination, sometimes combined with additional diagnostic tests, to differentiate chronic migraine from secondary headache disorders and other primary chronic headaches of long duration. Treatment takes a multifaceted approach that may include risk factor modification, avoidance of migraine triggers, drug and non-drug based prophylaxis, and abortive migraine treatment, the frequency of which is limited to avoid drug overuse. This article provides an overview of current knowledge regarding chronic migraine, including epidemiology, risk factors for its development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and guidelines. The future of chronic migraine treatment and research is also discussed. PMID:24662044

  3. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  4. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  5. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  6. Chronic cholecystitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods may relieve symptoms in people. However, the benefit of a low-fat diet has not been proven. Alternative Names Cholecystitis - chronic Images Cholecystitis, CT scan Cholecystitis, cholangiogram Cholecystolithiasis Gallstones, cholangiogram Cholecystogram References Wang ...

  7. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ... If your doctor recommends an over-the-counter pain reliever, read and follow the instructions on the box. ...

  8. Promiscuous Recognition of a Trypanosoma cruzi CD8+ T Cell Epitope among HLA-A2, HLA-A24 and HLA-A1 Supertypes in Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Fanny; Rosas, Fernando; Thomas, M. Carmen; López, Manuel Carlos; González, John Mario; Cuéllar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J.

    2016-01-01

    Background TcTLE is a nonamer peptide from Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein that is conserved among different parasite strains and that is presented by different HLA-A molecules from the A2 supertype. Because peptides presented by several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) supertypes are potential targets for immunotherapy, the aim of this study was to determine whether MHC molecules other than the A2 supertype present the TcTLE peptide. Methodology/Principal Findings From 36 HLA-A2-negative chagasic patients, the HLA-A genotypes of twenty-eight patients with CD8+ T cells that recognized the TcTLE peptide using tetramer (twenty) or functional (eight) assays, were determined. SSP-PCR was used to identify the A locus and the allelic variants. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the frequency of TcTLE-specific CD8+ T cells, and their functional activity (IFN-γ, TNFα, IL-2, perforin, granzyme and CD107a/b production) was induced by exposure to the TcTLE peptide. All patients tested had TcTLE-specific CD8+ T cells with frequencies ranging from 0.07–0.37%. Interestingly, seven of the twenty-eight patients had HLA-A homozygous alleles: A*24 (5 patients), A*23 (1 patient) and A*01 (1 patient), which belong to the A24 and A1 supertypes. In the remaining 21 patients with HLA-A heterozygous alleles, the most prominent alleles were A24 and A68. The most common allele sub-type was A*2402 (sixteen patients), which belongs to the A24 supertype, followed by A*6802 (six patients) from the A2 supertype. Additionally, the A*3002/A*3201 alleles from the A1 supertype were detected in one patient. All patients presented CD8+ T cells producing at least one cytokine after TcTLE peptide stimulation. Conclusion/Significance These results show that TcTLE is a promiscuous peptide that is presented by the A24 and A1 supertypes, in addition to the A2 supertype, suggesting its potential as a target for immunotherapy. PMID:26974162

  9. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  10. Chronic Chagas Disease Diagnosis: A Comparative Performance of Commercial Enzyme Immunoassay Tests.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Barros, Michelle da Silva; Nakazawa, Mineo; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Gomes, Yara de Miranda

    2016-05-01

    There is a significant heterogeneity in reported performance of serological assays for Chagas disease diagnosis. The conventional serology testing in laboratory diagnosis and in blood banks is unsatisfactory because of a high number of inconclusive and misclassified results. We aimed to assess the quality of four commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests for their ability to detect Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 685 sera samples. Cross-reactivity was assessed by using 748 sera from patients with unrelated diseases. Initially, we found that the reactivity index against T. cruzi antigen was statistically higher in sera from Chagas disease patients compared with those from non-chagasic patients, supporting the notion that all evaluated tests have a good discriminatory ability toward the diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in patients in the chronic phase of the disease. Although all tests were similarly sensitive for diagnosing T. cruzi infection, there were significant variations in terms of specificity and cross-reactivity among them. Indeed, we obtained divergent results when testing sera from patient with unrelated diseases, particularly leishmaniasis, with the levels of cross-reactivity being higher in tests using whole T. cruzi extracts compared with those using recombinant proteins. Our data suggest that all four tests may be used for the laboratory diagnosis and routine blood screening diagnose for Chagas disease. We also emphasize that, despite their general good performance, caution is needed when analyzing the results when these tests are performed in areas where other diseases, particularly leishmaniasis, are endemic. PMID:26976886

  11. Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Adalberto; de Diego, Alfredo; Domingo, Christian; Lamas, Adelaida; Gutierrez, Raimundo; Naberan, Karlos; Garrigues, Vicente; López Vime, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Chronic cough (CC), or cough lasting more than 8 weeks, has attracted increased attention in recent years following advances that have changed opinions on the prevailing diagnostic and therapeutic triad in place since the 1970s. Suboptimal treatment results in two thirds of all cases, together with a new notion of CC as a peripheral and central hypersensitivity syndrome similar to chronic pain, have changed the approach to this common complaint in routine clinical practice. The peripheral receptors involved in CC are still a part of the diagnostic triad. However, both convergence of stimuli and central nervous system hypersensitivity are key factors in treatment success. PMID:26165783

  12. Development of Peptide-Based Lineage-Specific Serology for Chronic Chagas Disease: Geographical and Clinical Distribution of Epitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Falconar, Andrew K.; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Costales, Jaime A.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Lewis, Michael D.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Tran, Trang T.; Ramirez, Juan-David; Guhl, Felipe; Carrasco, Hernan J.; Diosque, Patricio; Garcia, Lineth; Litvinov, Sergey V.; Miles, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America. Genetically diverse, the species is sub-divided into six lineages, known as TcI–TcVI, which have disparate geographical and ecological distributions. TcII, TcV, and TcVI are associated with severe human disease in the Southern Cone countries, whereas TcI is associated with cardiomyopathy north of the Amazon. T. cruzi persists as a chronic infection, with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal symptoms developing years or decades after initial infection. Identifying an individual's history of T. cruzi lineage infection directly by genotyping of the parasite is complicated by the low parasitaemia and sequestration in the host tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings We have applied here serology against lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface antigen TSSA, as an indirect approach to allow identification of infecting lineage. Chagasic sera from chronic patients from a range of endemic countries were tested by ELISA against synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific TSSA epitopes bound to avidin-coated ELISA plates via a biotin labelled polyethylene glycol-glycine spacer to increase rotation and ensure each amino acid side chain could freely interact with their antibodies. 79/113 (70%) of samples from Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina recognised the TSSA epitope common to lineages TcII/TcV/TcVI. Comparison with clinical information showed that a higher proportion of Brazilian TSSApep-II/V/VI responders had ECG abnormalities than non-responders (38% vs 17%; p<0.0001). Among northern chagasic sera 4/20 (20%) from Ecuador reacted with this peptide; 1/12 Venezuelan and 1/34 Colombian samples reacted with TSSApep-IV. In addition, a proposed TcI-specific epitope, described elsewhere, was demonstrated here to be highly conserved across lineages and therefore not applicable to lineage-specific serology. Conclusions

  13. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  14. Humoral Immune Response against P2β from Trypanosoma cruzi in Persons with Chronic Chagas Disease: Its Relationship with Treatment Against Parasites and Myocardial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Diana L.; Olivera, Verónica; Bizai, Maria Laura; Denner, Susana; Diez, Cristina; Mancipar, Iván; Streiger, Mirtha; Arias, Enrique; del Barco, Mónica; Mendicino, Diego; Bottasso, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between potentially pathogenic antibodies against a Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal protein (P2β) and the evolution of Chagas disease and the effect of trypanocidal treatment on these variables. Seventy-eight patients with chronic Chagas disease who were followed-up for more than 20 years were divided into three groups: 30 asymptomatic persons undergoing specific treatment (group A), 37 asymptomatic persons not undergoing specific treatment (group B), and 11 patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) who were not treated. Five patients in group B showed evolution to myocardial abnormalities. Among persons with CCC, six showed no changes; the remaining persons showed progression of cardiac involvement. Levels of antibodies to P2β in persons in group A decreased from their initial values. This finding was not observed in persons in groups B and C. Comparisons at the end of the follow-up showed lower amounts of antibodies to P2β in groups A and C. These findings support the benefits of specific treatment during chronic infection. PMID:21460013

  15. Severity of chronic experimental Chagas' heart disease parallels tumour necrosis factor and nitric oxide levels in the serum: models of mild and severe disease

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2014-01-01

    Heart tissue inflammation, progressive fibrosis and electrocardiographic alterations occur in approximately 30% of patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, 10-30 years after infection. Further, plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with the degree of heart dysfunction in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Thus, our aim was to establish experimental models that mimic a range of parasitological, pathological and cardiac alterations described in patients with chronic Chagas’ heart disease and evaluate whether heart disease severity was associated with increased TNF and NO levels in the serum. Our results show that C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain have more severe cardiac parasitism and inflammation than C57BL/6 mice. In addition, connexin 43 disorganisation and fibronectin deposition in the heart tissue, increased levels of creatine kinase cardiac MB isoenzyme activity in the serum and more severe electrical abnormalities were observed in T. cruzi-infected C3H/He mice compared to C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, T. cruzi-infected C3H/He and C57BL/6 mice represent severe and mild models of CCC, respectively. Moreover, the CCC severity paralleled the TNF and NO levels in the serum. Therefore, these models are appropriate for studying the pathophysiology and biomarkers of CCC progression, as well as for testing therapeutic agents for patients with Chagas’ heart disease. PMID:24937048

  16. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk for emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)? What medicines will help relieve my symptoms? What lifestyle changes should I make at home to help relieve my symptoms? Is it safe for me to exercise? What kind of exercise should I do? What ...

  17. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  18. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  19. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  20. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  1. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  2. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Burrall, B A; Halpern, G M; Huntley, A C

    1990-03-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  3. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Burrall, B. A.; Halpern, G. M.; Huntley, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  4. [Association of encephalic vascular accidents and Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Lopes, E R; Marquez, J O; da Costa Neto, B; Menezes, A A; Chapadeiro, M E

    1991-01-01

    The frequency of strokes was studied in chronic chagasic and years of age, non-chagasic patients, older than 15 coming to necropsy in Uberaba, from 1979 than 1988. The study consisted of paired sex and age matched controls. Two hundred and eight pairs were analysed. Either ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes were found in 41 (19.7%) of the chagasics and in 55 (26.4%) of the non-chagasic, a difference not significant at the level of 5%. Twelve (75%) of the former had infarcts and 4 (25%) had brain hemorrhage; five (31.3%) of the non-chagasics had ischemic strokes and 11 (68.7%) had hemorrhagic strokes. The differences were significant to the level of 5%. The results indicate a high frequency of ischemic strokes in human Chagas' disease and demonstrate a lesser frequency of hemorrhagic stroke in chagasics when compared with non-chagasics. PMID:1841424

  5. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  6. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  7. [Chronic constipation].

    PubMed

    Degen, L

    2007-04-01

    Complaints of chronic constipation may substantially impair the quality of life of a patient. The disease feeling is shaped not only by objective parameters but also by subjective perceptions. This is along-considered into the so-called Rome-III-criteria. In the majority of the patients no distinct pathology can be found. A smaller group of patients however exhibit isolated or in combination a slow colonic transit or a pelvic floor dysfunction. Secondary extraintestinal causes are to be looked for particularly during a first clinical evaluation. Apart from general clinical investigations if necessary combined with a colonscopy, specific function tests (transit measurements, defecography) may be applied. Different laxative agents are the primary cornerstone of treatment. In selected cases biofeedback training or even surgical intervention can be successfully adopted. PMID:17663207

  8. Genome-Wide Screening and Identification of New Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens with Potential Application for Chronic Chagas Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; de Almeida Lourdes, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Daihana Rodrigues dos Santos; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo Andrez; de Oliveira Tavares, Maykon; Lemos, Denise Silveira; Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Olórtegui, Carlos Chavez; de Lana, Marta; da Cunha Galvão, Lúcia Maria; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, an infection that afflicts approximately 8 million people in Latin America. Diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is currently based on serological tests because this condition is usually characterized by high anti-T. cruzi IgG titers and low parasitemia. The antigens used in these assays may have low specificity due to cross reactivity with antigens from related parasite infections, such as leishmaniasis, and low sensitivity caused by the high polymorphism among T. cruzi strains. Therefore, the identification of new T. cruzi-specific antigens that are conserved among the various parasite discrete typing units (DTUs) is still required. In the present study, we have explored the hybrid nature of the T. cruzi CL Brener strain using a broad genome screening approach to select new T. cruzi antigens that are conserved among the different parasite DTUs and that are absent in other trypanosomatid species. Peptide arrays containing the conserved antigens with the highest epitope prediction scores were synthesized, and the reactivity of the peptides were tested by immunoblot using sera from C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with T. cruzi strains from the TcI, TcII or TcVI DTU. The two T. cruzi proteins that contained the most promising peptides were expressed as recombinant proteins and tested in ELISA experiments with sera from chagasic patients with distinct clinical manifestations: those infected with T. cruzi from different DTUs and those with cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis. These proteins, named rTc_11623.20 and rTc_N_10421.310, exhibited 94.83 and 89.66% sensitivity, 98.2 and 94.6% specificity, respectively, and a pool of these 2 proteins exhibited 96.55% sensitivity and 98.18% specificity. This work led to the identification of two new antigens with great potential application in the diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:25225853

  9. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve pain from diabetes Read More "Chronic Pain" Articles Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and ...

  10. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  11. CHRONIC URTICARIA

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Sandeep; Gupta, Vibhanshu; Amin, Syed Suhail; Tahseen, Mohd

    2011-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a disturbing allergic condition of the skin. Although frequently benign, it may sometimes be a red flag sign of a serious internal disease. A multitude of etiologies have been implicated in the causation of CU, including physical, infective, vasculitic, psychological and idiopathic. An autoimmune basis of most of the ‘idiopathic’ forms is now hypothesized. Histamine released from mast cells is the major effector in pathogenesis and it is clinically characterized by wheals that have a tendency to recur. Laboratory investigations aimed at a specific etiology are not always conclusive, though may be suggestive of an underlying condition. A clinical search for associated systemic disease is strongly advocated under appropriate circumstances. The mainstay of treatment remains H1 antihistaminics. These may be combined with complementary pharmacopeia in the form of H2 blockers, doxepin, nifedipine and leukotriene inhibitors. More radical therapy in the form of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide may be required for recalcitrant cases. Autologous transfusion and alternative remedies like acupuncture have prospects for future. A stepwise management results in favorable outcomes. An update on CU based on our experience with patients at a tertiary care centre is presented. PMID:22345759

  12. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  14. Serological based monitoring of a cohort of patients with chronic Chagas disease treated with benznidazole in a highly endemic area of northern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Niborski, Leticia L; Grippo, Vanina; Lafón, Sonia O; Levitus, Gabriela; García-Bournissen, Facundo; Ramirez, Juan C; Burgos, Juan M; Bisio, Margarita; Juiz, Natalia A; Ayala, Vilma; Coppede, María; Herrera, Verónica; López, Crescencia; Contreras, Ana; Gómez, Karina A; Elean, Juan C; Mujica, Hugo D; Schijman, Alejandro G; Levin, Mariano J; Longhi, Silvia A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate well-documented diagnostic antigens, named B13, 1F8 and JL7 recombinant proteins, as potential markers of seroconversion in treated chagasic patients. Prospective study, involving 203 patients treated with benznidazole, was conducted from endemic areas of northern Argentina. Follow-up was possible in 107 out of them and blood samples were taken for serology and PCR assays before and 2, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after treatment initiation. Reactivity against Trypanosoma cruzi lysate and recombinant antigens was measured by ELISA. The rate of decrease of antibody titers showed nonlinear kinetics with an abrupt drop within the first three months after initiation of treatment for all studied antigens, followed by a plateau displaying a low decay until the end of follow-up. At this point, anti-B13, anti-1F8 and anti-JL7 titers were relatively close to the cut-off line, while anti-T. cruzi antibodies still remained positive. At baseline, 60.8% (45/74) of analysed patients tested positive for parasite DNA by PCR and during the follow-up period in 34 out of 45 positive samples (75.5%) could not be detected T. cruzi DNA. Our results suggest that these antigens might be useful as early markers for monitoring antiparasitic treatment in chronic Chagas disease. PMID:27223650

  15. Serological based monitoring of a cohort of patients with chronic Chagas disease treated with benznidazole in a highly endemic area of northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Niborski, Leticia L; Grippo, Vanina; Lafón, Sonia O; Levitus, Gabriela; García-Bournissen, Facundo; Ramirez, Juan C; Burgos, Juan M; Bisio, Margarita; Juiz, Natalia A; Ayala, Vilma; Coppede, María; Herrera, Verónica; López, Crescencia; Contreras, Ana; Gómez, Karina A; Elean, Juan C; Mujica, Hugo D; Schijman, Alejandro G; Levin, Mariano J; Longhi, Silvia A

    2016-05-24

    This study aimed to evaluate well-documented diagnostic antigens, named B13, 1F8 and JL7 recombinant proteins, as potential markers of seroconversion in treated chagasic patients. Prospective study, involving 203 patients treated with benznidazole, was conducted from endemic areas of northern Argentina. Follow-up was possible in 107 out of them and blood samples were taken for serology and PCR assays before and 2, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after treatment initiation. Reactivity against Trypanosoma cruzi lysate and recombinant antigens was measured by ELISA. The rate of decrease of antibody titers showed nonlinear kinetics with an abrupt drop within the first three months after initiation of treatment for all studied antigens, followed by a plateau displaying a low decay until the end of follow-up. At this point, anti-B13, anti-1F8 and anti-JL7 titers were relatively close to the cut-off line, while anti-T. cruzi antibodies still remained positive. At baseline, 60.8% (45/74) of analysed patients tested positive for parasite DNA by PCR and during the follow-up period in 34 out of 45 positive samples (75.5%) could not be detected T. cruzi DNA. Our results suggest that these antigens might be useful as early markers for monitoring antiparasitic treatment in chronic Chagas disease. PMID:27223650

  16. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  17. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  18. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called ... some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long- ...

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  20. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start at age 5 or 6 and get worse until age 12. They often improve during adulthood.

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... Ling GSF. Traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  2. Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is Chronic V enous I nsufficiency (CVI)? Varicose veins are hereditary most of the time and generally ... members of the same family. Much less commonly, varicose veins develop after Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a ...

  3. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    MedlinePlus

    CLL; Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL) ... Byrd JC, Flynn JM. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  4. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  5. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder. PMID:24192597

  6. Soluble cell adhesion molecules in human Chagas' disease: association with disease severity and stage of infection.

    PubMed

    Laucella, S; De Titto, E H; Segura, E L; Orn, A; Rottenberg, M E

    1996-12-01

    Formation of inflammatory lesions, one of the pathologic consequences of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, involves intricate cell-cell interactions in which cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are involved. Sera from 56 Chagas' disease patients grouped according to disease severity were studied for the presence of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1), soluble endothelial selectin (s-E-selectin), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (s-VCAM-1), soluble platelet selectin (s-P-selectin), and s-CD44 were studied to determine if they could be used alone or in different combinations as markers for specific diagnostic procedures. Comparisons were made between congenitally, acutely, and chronically infected patients and aged-matched, noninfected individuals, as well as between patients with chronic Chagas' disease grouped according to the severity of their heart-related pathology. No differences in levels of s-CAMs were detected between sera from children with congenital T. cruzi infection and sera from noninfected infants born from chagasic mothers. In contrast, titers of s-ICAM-1, s-VCAM-1, s-selectin, and s-CD44 but not s-P-selectin were significantly increased in sera from patients during the acute phase of infection with T. cruzi. Titers of s-VCAM-1 and s-P-selectin were increased in chronically infected patients. A positive association with disease severity in sera from patients with chronic disease was observed for the levels of s-P-selectin. In contrast, we found no association between clinical symptoms and levels of s-VCAM-1. Patients with chronic disease with severe cardiopathy also showed diminished levels of s-CD44 in comparison with healthy controls or patients with mild disease. The results are discussed in the context of pathology of Chagas' disease. PMID:9025689

  7. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  8. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  9. Chronic silent otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Michael M; Schachern, Patricia A; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2002-01-01

    Otitis media occurs along a continuum. For example, otitis media with effusion characterized by fluid pathology can lead to chronic otitis media plus chronic mastoiditis, characterized by the presence of intractable tissue pathology such as cholesteatoma, cholesterol granuloma or granulation tissue. The literature defines chronic otitis media as having a tympanic membrane perforation and otorrhea. Amongst many other sequelae, which can result from the continuum, an important common one is chronic silent otitis media. This overlooked entity which includes pathology beneath an intact tympanic membrane is commonly seen in our human temporal bone laboratory and in patients. The clinical pathological correlates of this important disease are discussed herein. PMID:12021496

  10. Treatment of chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Jurakić Toncić, Ruzica; Lipozencić, Jasna; Marinović, Branka

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria is a disorder characterized by rapid onset of localized swelling of the skin or mucosa, called wheals or urtica. According to frequency and duration, urticaria can be divided into acute and chronic type. Chronic urticaria is any type of urticaria occurring every day or twice per week, lasting longer than 6 weeks. Chronic urticaria is a common disorder and estimated prevalence is 1% of the population. Also, it is not rare in childhood. The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria has not yet been completely understood. Chronic urticaria is a heterogeneous group of disorders, and according to the etiology and cause, several groups of chronic urticaria are distinguished, i.e. autoimmune, pseudoallergic, infection-related, physical urticaria, vasculitis urticaria and idiopathic urticaria. Treatment and management of chronic urticaria can be non-pharmacological and pharmacological, and sometimes it is not possible to control the disease with antihistamines only, which are considered to be the mainstay of treatment. In severe cases of chronic urticaria, especially if autoimmunity has been proven, several authors describe different modules of immunomodulation: cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate-mofetil, omalizumab, plasmapheresis, systemic corticosteroids, and immunoglobulin therapy. This article primarily addresses the treatment of chronic idiopathic and autoimmune urticaria. PMID:20021986

  11. [Chronic wounds: differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja

    2013-10-01

    Wound is a disruption of anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. According to the healing process, wounds are classified as acute and chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if standard medical procedures do not lead to the expected healing, or if the wound does not heal within six weeks. Chronic wounds are classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic wounds. Diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers stand out as a specific entity among typical wounds. About 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder are mostly neuropathic ulcers. About 95 percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above-mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds are atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome). Although atypical wounds are a rare cause of chronic wounds, it should always be taken in consideration during diagnostic procedure. PMID:24371971

  12. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males. PMID:16861848

  13. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  14. Chronic cough: an update.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Vivek N; Lim, Kaiser G

    2013-10-01

    Cough persisting beyond 8 weeks (ie, chronic cough) is one of the most common reasons for an outpatient visit. A protracted cough can negatively affect one's quality of life by causing anxiety, physical discomfort, social isolation, and personal embarrassment. Herein, the anatomy and physiology of the cough reflex are reviewed. Upper airway cough syndrome, asthma, eosinophilic bronchitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease account for most chronic cough after excluding smoking, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, and chronic bronchitis. Many patients have more than one reason for chronic cough. Treating the underlying cause(s) resolves cough in most instances. There are some coughs that seem refractory despite an extensive work-up. The possibility of a hypersensitive cough reflex response has been proposed to explain these cases. Several clinical algorithms to evaluate chronic cough are presented. PMID:24079681

  15. Chronic daily headaches

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Fayyaz; Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Khalil, Modar

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches. PMID:23024563

  16. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm. PMID:25999227

  17. [Chronic lower back pain].

    PubMed

    Werber, A; Schiltenwolf, M

    2012-02-01

    Poor efficiency in terms of treatment of unspecific back pain and related chronic pain syndromes has led to the necessity of general care guidelines addressing evidence-based strategies for treatment of lower back pain (LBP). Systematically validated and reviewed algorithms have been established for all kinds of unspecific back pain, covering both acute and chronic syndromes. Concerning the impact of psychosocial risk factors in the development of chronic LBP, multimodal treatment is preferred to monomodal strategies. Self-responsible acting on the part of the patient should be supported while invasive methods in particular, i.e. operative treatment, should be avoided due to lacking evidence in outcome efficiency. PMID:22349772

  18. HIV: A Chronic Condition.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    By virtue of the success of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has evolved into a chronic disease in which the typical complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are no longer the dominant problem. Rather than dealing with acute and potentially life-threatening complications, clinicians are now confronted with managing a chronic disease that, in the absence of a cure, will persist for many decades. (1) This review will focus on the longer term sequelae and consequences of chronic HIV infection. PMID:27584920

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  20. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... found. How is chronic pelvic pain diagnosed? Your health care provider will ask about your medical history. You will have a physical exam, including a pelvic exam . Tests also may be done to find the cause. ...

  1. Chronic rhinosinusitis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Lee, Robert J; Schleimer, Robert P; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. In particular, CRS can be divided into 2 major subgroups based on whether nasal polyps are present or absent. Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue-deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and might be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review, with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in patients with cystic fibrosis, CRS without nasal polyps, or CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:26654193

  2. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  3. Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerves outside the brain or spinal cord ( peripheral neuropathy ). Polyneuropathy means several nerves are involved. It usually ... demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common chronic neuropathy caused by an abnormal immune response. CIDP occurs ...

  4. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Sleep and Sleep Disorders Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep and Chronic Disease How Much Sleep Do ...

  5. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  6. Chronic appendicitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David; Butterworth, Sonia A.; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question While the diagnosis of acute appendicitis is relatively straightforward, chronic appendicitis is an entity that can be controversial and is often misdiagnosed. How and when should clinicians be investigating chronic appendicitis as a cause of chronic and recurrent abdominal pain in the pediatric population? Answer Chronic appendicitis is a long-standing inflammation or fibrosis of the appendix that presents clinically as prolonged or intermittent abdominal pain. It is often a challenging diagnosis and might result in complications such as intra-abdominal infections or bowel obstruction or perforation. Clinical presentation, along with imaging studies, can help the clinician rule out other conditions, and among those who are diagnosed, for many children, appendectomy results in partial or complete resolution of pain symptoms. PMID:27303020

  7. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland that often results in reduced thyroid function ( hypothyroidism ). Causes Chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto disease is a ... TSH). This condition is also known as subclinical hypothyroidism. If there is no evidence of thyroid hormone ...

  8. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduction techniques can help manage chronic (long-term) pain and fatigue. They are not used as the primary treatment for CFS. Relaxation techniques include: Biofeedback Deep breathing exercises Hypnosis Massage therapy Meditation Muscle relaxation techniques Yoga Newer ...

  9. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACPA Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  10. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  11. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Yousef; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Balaan, Marvin; Lega, Mark; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic smoking-related lung disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. It carries an enormous economic burden on the health care system. This results in a significant social impact on affected patients and their families. In this article, we review COPD in general, critical care management of patients presenting with acute exacerbation of COPD, and methods of prevention. PMID:26919673

  12. Which parameters differ in very old patients with chronic atrial fibrillation treated by anticoagulant or aspirin? Antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Jean; Gréboval-Furstenfeld, Emmanuelle; Tavildari, Alain; M'bello, Luc; Delaunay, Olympe; Pesqué, Thierry; Moirot, P; Mouton-Schleifer, Dominique

    2008-10-01

    The objective was to determine the main parameters taken into account for the decision of antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) by vitamin K antagonist or aspirin. This was a prospective clinical study of four clinical services of geriatric medicine. Two hundred and nine inpatients, 84.7 +/- 7 years (women 60.8%), with chronic AF were included. The patients were distributed into two groups (anticoagulant or aspirin) according to medical decision. All the decision criteria for treatment were recorded: cardiopathy, conditions of life, clinical examination (nutrition and autonomy, mini-mental state examination (MMSE), walking evaluation, comorbidity), subjective evaluation of risk of falls and glomerular filtration rate. The thromboembolic risk and the bleeding risk, evaluated subjectively for each patient, were compared with two scores of thrombo-embolic risk and bleeding risk. The evolution of the patients was recorded after 3 months. Student's t-test and chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. One hundred and two patients (48.8%) received anticoagulant and 107 patients received aspirin. Patients in the aspirin group were significantly older (86.5 +/- 6.5 vs. 82.9 +/- 7.1 years), with more frequent social isolation, higher systolic blood pressure, and had more important subjective bleeding risk and risk of falls. Patients in the anticoagulant group had significantly more valvulopathies and a more important subjective thromboembolic risk. Thrombo-phlebitis antecedents, dementia, denutrition and walking alterations were only slightly more frequent in patients in the aspirin group. Physicians underestimated thromboembolic risk (one-third of patients) and they overestimated bleeding risk (half of the patients). After 3 months, the two groups did not significantly differ for death, bleeding or ischaemic events. In common practice, the decision of antithrombotic treatment for AF should take into account not only cardiovascular but also

  13. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  14. Autoantibodies enhance agonist action and binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Nascimento, Jose H; Chaves, Elen A; Costa, Patricia C; Masuda, Masako O; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos DE Carvalho, Antonio C; Gimenez, Luis E

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(2)AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M(2)AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M(2)AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [(3)H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M(2)AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [(3)H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [(3)H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC(50) of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 x 10(- 8), 1.33 x 10(- 7), and 2.0 x 10(- 7) mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M(2)AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  15. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  16. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  17. [Chronic migraine: treatment].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2012-04-10

    We define chronic migraine as that clinical situation in which migraine attacks appear 15 or more days per month. Until recently, and in spite of its negative impact, patients with chronic migraine were excluded of the clinical trials. This manuscript revises the current treatment of chronic migraine. The first step should include the avoidance of potential precipitating/aggravating factors for chronic migraine, mainly analgesic overuse and the treatment of comorbid disorders, such as anxiety and depression. The symptomatic treatment should be based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and triptans (in this case < 10 days per month). It is necessary to avoid the use of combined analgesics, opioids and ergotamine-containing medications. Preventive treatment includes a 'transitional' treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or steroids, while preventive treatment exerts its actions. Even though those medications efficacious in episodic migraine prevention are used, the only drugs with demonstrated efficacy in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine are topiramate and pericranial infiltrations of Onabotulinumtoxin A. PMID:22532241

  18. [Chronic exertional compartment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rom, Eyal; Tenenbaum, Shay; Chechick, Ofir; Burstein, Gideon; Amit, Yehuda; Thein, Ran

    2013-10-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is an uncommon phenomenon first reported in the mid 50's. This condition is characterized by sharp pain during physical activity, causing reduction in activity frequency or intensity and even abstention. This syndrome is caused by elevation of the intra-compartmental pressure which leads to decreased tissue perfusion, thus ischemic damage to the tissue ensues. Chronic exertional syndrome is usually related to repetitive physical activity, usually in young people and athletes. The physical activity performed by the patient causes a rise in intra-compartmental pressure and thereby causes pain. The patient discontinues the activity and the pain subsides within minutes of rest. Chronic exertional syndrome is reported to occur in the thigh, shoulder, arm, hand, foot and gluteal region, but most commonly in the leg, especially the anterior compartment. The diagnosis of chronic exertional syndrome is primarily based on patients' medical history, supported by intramuscular pressure measurement of the specific compartment involved. Treatment of chronic exertional syndrome, especially the anterior and lateral compartment of the leg is mainly by surgery i.e. fasciotomy. If the patient is reluctant to undergo a surgical procedure, the conservative treatment is based on abstention from the offending activity, changing footwear or using arch support. However, the conservative approach is not as successful as surgical treatment. PMID:24450036

  19. [Chronic pain and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Berker, Ender; Dinçer, Nilay

    2005-04-01

    The perception and interpretation of pain is the end point of an interaction of cognitive, cultural, and environmental factors and this complex interaction effects the pain response and quality of life of each person which shows that pain perception and the verbal and behavioral response shows variations and is specific for each patient. Chronic pain can be due to Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Neuropathic Pain (NP) where the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are being revealed or it can be chronic low back pain (CLBP) where pain persists in spite of healing of tissue and no underlying pathologic mechanism can be defected. Central sensitization, inhibition of descending pain inhibitory systems, functional changes in autonomic nervous system amd neurotransmitter as well as changes in stress response system are factors contributing to the initiation and maintenance of pain and cognitive, behavioral factors are also important contributors in chronic pain. Biopsychosocial and biomedical mechanisms should be assessed in the rehabilitation interventions. The aims of rehabilitation in chronic pain are to increase activity tolerance, functional capacity and to decrease socio-economic loads. The targets of activity should be physical, functional and social. Psychologic based programs as cognitive-behavioral techniques and operant conditioning are also valid procedures in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Rehabilitation should be multidisciplinary and of long-term targeted to valid out-come for success. PMID:15977088

  20. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  1. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  2. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  3. Chronic urticaria: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Malcolm W; Tan, Kian Teo

    2007-10-01

    Chronic urticaria is an umbrella term, which encompasses physical urticarias, chronic "idiopathic" urticaria and urticarial vasculitis. It is important to recognize patients with physical urticarias as the investigation and treatment differs in important ways from patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria or urticarial vasculitis. Although relatively uncommon, urticarial vasculitis is an important diagnosis to make and requires histological confirmation by biopsy. Underlying systemic disease and systemic involvement, especially of the kidneys, should be sought. It is now recognized that chronic "idiopathic" urticaria includes a subset with an autoimmune basis caused by circulating autoantibodies against the high affinity IgE receptor (FceR1) and less commonly against IgE. Although the autologous serum skin test has been proven useful in prompting search for and characterization of circulating wheal-producing factors in chronic urticaria, its specificity as a screening test for presence of functional anti-FceR1 is low, and confirmation by demonstration of histamine-releasing activity in the patient's serum must be the benchmark test in establishing this diagnosis. Improved screening tests are being sought; for example, ability of the chronic urticaria patient's serum to evoke expression of CD 203c on donor human basophils is showing some promise. The strong association between autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune urticaria is also an area of ongoing research. Drug treatment continues to be centered on the H1 antihistamines, and the newer second-generation compounds appear to be safe and effective even in off-label dosage. Use of systemic steroids should be confined to special circumstances such as tapering regimens for acute flare-ups. Use of leukotriene antagonists is becoming popular, but the evidence for efficacy is conflicting. Cyclosporin is also effective and can be used in selected cases of autoimmune urticaria, and it is also effective in non

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.5 MB] More Data Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin (chronic lower respiratory disease includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, and other ...

  5. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  6. EBV Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Eligio, Pizzigallo; Delia, Racciatti; Valeria, Gorgoretti

    2010-01-01

    The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpes viruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS) aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”. Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA), really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis. The etiopathogenetic role of EBV is demonstrated only in a well-examined subgroup of patients, while in most of the remaining cases this role should be played by other infectious agents - able to remain in a latent or persistent way in the host – or even by not infectious agents (toxic, neuroendocrine, methabolic, etc.). However, the pathogenetic substrate of the different etiologic forms seems to be the same, much probably represented by the oxidative damage due to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines as a response to the triggering event (infectious or not infectious). Anyway, recently the scientists turned their’s attention to the genetic predisposition of the subjects affected by the syndrome, so that in the last years the genetic studies, together with those of molecular biology, received a great impulse. Thanks to both

  7. [Chronic lichenoid keratosis].

    PubMed

    Skorupka, M; Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G

    1992-02-01

    We report on a 41-year-old woman with keratosis lichenoides chronica, a disorder first described by Kaposi in 1886 as "lichen moniliformis", who later also developed chronic lymphatic leukaemia. Since Kaposi's original report, 38 additional cases have been reported. Occurrence of keratosis lichenoides chronica associated with malignant disorders has not previously been described. PMID:1548136

  8. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  10. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  11. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  13. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  14. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  15. Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytogenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Pineo, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a relatively common cause of an acquired hemostatic defect. It is important for family physicians to recognize this disorder, because of its insidious onset and the fact that it most commonly affects women of childbearing age. Chronic ITP is due to an antibody in the plasma which attaches to platelets and leads to their destruction in the reticuloendothelial system. The antibody can cross the placenta and affect the fetus. Although the condition may not disappear, in the vast majority of patients it can be controlled with current therapy, including prednisone, splenectomy and immunosuppressive agents. Although the mortality rate is low, patients with severe thrombocytopenia may have significant bleeding problems requiring special measures such as platelet transfusions, intravenous gammaglobulin, plasmapheresis and emergency splenectomy. Upon diagnosis, these patients should be referred to a large, specialized centre. PMID:21279099

  16. Assessment of chronic snorers.

    PubMed Central

    Golding-Wood, D G; Brockbank, M J; Swanston, A R; Croft, C B

    1990-01-01

    Snorers represent a heterogenous group that require adequate assessment before recommending surgical treatment. There are unfortunately no specific features either in the history or physical examination that might predict those chronic snorers with obstructive sleep apnoea. We have used trained observation together with pulse oximetry ('sleep screening') and fibreoptic nasendoscopy with Muller manoeuvre in our unit to assess snorers. This combination is a reliable means of distinguishing apnoeic patients from simple snorers and determining the level of the obstructing segment. We report our experience in using these methods in the management of 71 chronic snorers. We stress the value of conservative management, and emphasize that obesity, habitual alcohol ingestion and nasal obstruction should be corrected before embarking on pharyngeal surgery. PMID:2380965

  17. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  18. Management of Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Grahame, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Effective treatment of chronic urticaria depends on identification of the etiologic factor, if possible, and its subsequent elimination, although symptoms may be suppressed by appropriate medication. The investigation of the patient who presents with chronic urticaria is discussed, with emphasis on the need for a detailed history, meticulous physical examination (including a search for occult infection) and full routine hematologic, biochemical and radiologic monitoring. The author discusses the use of intradermal skin tests, scratch tests for inhalants and the need for skin biopsy and gastro-intestinal tract screening. Dietary treatments reviewed include the elimination diet and the elemental diet, which is used in combination with gradual re-introduction of foods. Symptomatic treatments, including antihistamines, the newer H1-histamine receptor antagonists, used with tricyclic antidepressants and with combination therapy, and systemic corticosteroid therapy are also discussed. PMID:21263827

  19. Infectious Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sumit; Grammer, Leslie C; Peters, Anju T

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a persistent inflammatory disease that affects a multitude of people worldwide. The pathogenesis of CRS involves many factors including genetics, status of the sinonasal microbiome, infections, and environmental influences. Comorbidities associated with CRS include asthma, allergic rhinitis, bronchiectasis, and certain kinds of immunodeficiency. CRS can be divided into different subtypes based on endotypes and phenotypes. Infectious CRS is one such category. The etiology of infectious CRS is usually secondary to chronic bacterial infection that commonly begins with a viral upper respiratory tract infection. Humoral antibody deficiencies can underlie difficult-to-treat or recurrent CRS. Infectious CRS can be treated with antimicrobials, topical or oral corticosteroids, and nasal saline irrigations. Patients with CRS and humoral immunodeficiency may require an aggressive treatment approach including immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Despite advancements in the field of CRS, targeted therapies and reliable biomarkers are still lacking. PMID:27393772

  20. Veterans and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Summary points 1. Musculoskeletal problems are the commonest reason for medical discharge in all the British armed forces. By definition, these problems are chronic and resistant to treatment. 2. Pain is also common in veterans who have experienced severe injuries (polytrauma), often accompanied by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) orpostconcussive syndrome. 3. In veterans seeking treatment for chronic pain, PTSD is common. There is also evidence for elevated levels of alcohol misuse in veterans who have been deployed to conflict. However, most veterans do not have pain, PTSD or alcohol problems. 4. Pain clinicians would benefit from training in meeting veterans’ needs, in order to promote their engagement and successful treatment. This should include countering stereotypes, information about the military and support for the assessment and onward referral of PTSD and alcohol problems. PMID:26516504

  1. Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braver, Richard T

    2016-04-01

    Increased tissue pressure within a fascial compartment may be the result from any increase in volume within its contents, or any decrease in size of the fascial covering or its distensibility. This may lead to symptoms of leg tightness, pain or numbness brought about by exercise. There are multiple differential diagnoses of exercise induced leg pain and the proper diagnoses of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is made by a careful history and by exclusion of other maladies and confirmed by compartment syndrome testing as detailed in this text. Surgical fasciotomies for the anterior, lateral, superficial and deep posterior compartments are described in detail along with ancillary procedures for chronic shin splints that should allow the athlete to return to competitive activity. PMID:27013413

  2. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosman, N.

    1979-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is surveyed. Treatment comprises topical antifungal treatment which is insufficient, systemic antifungal treatment which is often followed by a rapid relapse, and specific immunotherapy with live tissue or transfer factor. Combination of systemic antifungal therapy and immunotherapy seems to be the most promising approach. However, no permanent cure has so far been achieved. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:392477

  3. Canine chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Rozanski, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis is a syndrome defined by cough on most days for at least 2 months where no specific cause can be identified. Older small breed dogs are most commonly affected, but bronchitis is also documented in midsized and larger breed dogs. Diagnostic testing includes physical examination, laboratory testing, radiography, and airway evaluation via bronchoscopy, cytology, and culture. Treatment is directed at reducing exposure to irritants, reducing airway inflammation, and controlling cough. PMID:24268336

  4. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Edward; Pross, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effect of certain herbal and homeopathic preparations on symptoms, lymphocyte markers, and cytotoxic function of the lymphocytes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, we studied six outpatients diagnosed with the disease by their family physicians. Patients were given herbal and homeopathic preparations after a 3-week symptom-recording period. After treatment, symptoms were again recorded. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment. None of the values showed any significant change after treatment. PMID:21221272

  5. Chronic cough in children.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johana B Castro; Pine, Harold S

    2013-08-01

    The management of chronic cough, a common complaint in children, is challenging for most health care professionals. Millions of dollars are spent every year on unnecessary testing and treatment. A rational approach based on a detailed interview and a thorough physical examination guides further intervention and management. Inexpensive and simple homemade syrups based on dark honey have proved to be an effective measure when dealing with cough in children. PMID:23905830

  6. Approach to Chronic Lymphocytic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Nadkarni, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    Chronic meningitis is a common clinical problem. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is important in improving the overall outcome and to prevent long-lasting sequels. As many etiological agents lead to the development of chronic lymphocytic meningitis, it is important to develop a systematic approach to the diagnosis; taking clues from history, examination and laboratory tests, to make an accurate diagnosis and institute appropriate therapy. This review focuses on the diagnostic approach towards the commonly encountered situation of chronic lymphocytic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation that persists for more than 4 weeks. Chronic meningitis accounts for less than 10% of all the cases of meningitis.1 Causes of chronic lymphocytic meningitis are mainly divided into infectious and non-infectious listed in Table 1.2 Due to advancement in investigations, diseases causing chronic meningitis may be diagnosed earlier than 4 weeks and hence the definition should be considered as a rough guideline. PMID:27608867

  7. Evaluation of chronic dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Karnani, Neel G; Reisfield, Gary M; Wilson, George R

    2005-04-15

    Chronic dyspnea is defined as dyspnea lasting more than one month. In approximately two thirds of patients presenting with dyspnea, the underlying cause is cardiopulmonary disease. Establishing an accurate diagnosis is essential because treatment differs depending on the underlying condition. Asthma, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, cardiac ischemia, interstitial lung disease, and psychogenic causes account for 85 percent of patients with this principal symptom. The history and physical examination should guide selection of initial diagnostic tests such as electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, pulse oximetry, spirometry, complete blood count, and metabolic panel. If these are inconclusive, additional testing is indicated. Formal pulmonary function testing may be needed to establish a diagnosis of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or interstitial lung disease. High-resolution computed tomography is particularly useful for diagnosing interstitial lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiectasis, or pulmonary embolism. Echocardiography and brain natriuretic peptide levels help establish a diagnosis of congestive heart failure. If the diagnosis remains unclear, additional tests may be required. These include ventilation perfusion scans, Holter monitoring, cardiac catheterization, esophageal pH monitoring, lung biopsy, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. PMID:15864893

  8. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  9. Approach to chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Keya Rani; Landge, Amruta Avinash

    2014-10-01

    Chronic cough does affect quality of life in children. Most of the times it is treated with over-the-counter cough syrups and antibiotics. The etiology of chronic cough is so diverse, that treatment needs to be directed to the specific etiology, rather than treating symptomatically. Grossly, chronic cough is classified as specific and non-specific cough. Allergic conditions, followed by tuberculosis are more commonly encountered etiologies in India. Baseline investigations to be performed are chest radiograph and peak flow metry. If specific cause of cough is not obvious, then therapeutic trial with β2 agonist, followed by peak flowmetry to evaluate reversibility of airway hypersensitivity, is useful to label the child asthmatic or non-asthmatic. Rampant uses of antibiotics need to be avoided for conditions like asthma. If tuberculosis is diagnosed or suspected, it is better to treat the child, rather than giving therapeutic trial. Over-the-counter cough syrups are as good as placebo, and should be avoided. Trial of anti asthma, anti allergic rhinitis and anti reflux therapies are avoided, unless the diagnosis is one of these conditions. If the child is distressed or the case seems to be complicated, it is best to refer the child to a tertiary care centre and keep a close follow up. PMID:24752628

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  11. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  12. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  13. Interventions for chronic blepharitis

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, Kristina; Matsumura, Sueko; Hatef, Elham; Akpek, Esen K

    2012-01-01

    Background Blepharitis, an inflammatory condition associated with itchiness, redness, flaking, and crusting of the eyelids, is a common eye condition that affects both children and adults. It is common in all ethnic groups and across all ages. Although infrequent, blepharitis can lead to permanent alterations to the eyelid margin or vision loss from superficial keratopathy (abnormality of the cornea), corneal neovascularization, and ulceration. Most importantly, blepharitis frequently causes significant ocular symptoms such as burning sensation, irritation, tearing, and red eyes as well as visual problems such as photophobia and blurred vision. The exact etiopathogenesis is unknown, but suspected to be multifactorial, including chronic low-grade infections of the ocular surface with bacteria, infestations with certain parasites such as demodex, and inflammatory skin conditions such as atopy and seborrhea. Blepharitis can be categorized in several different ways. First, categorization is based on the length of disease process: acute or chronic blepharitis. Second, categorization is based on the anatomical location of disease: anterior, or front of the eye (e.g. staphylococcal and seborrheic blepharitis), and posterior, or back of the eye (e.g. meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD)). This review focuses on chronic blepharitis and stratifies anterior and posterior blepharitis. Objectives To examine the effectiveness of interventions in the treatment of chronic blepharitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1950 to February 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We searched the reference lists of included studies for any

  14. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  15. Sexuality and chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Elaine E

    2013-11-01

    Sexual function is often affected in individuals living with chronic illness and their partners, and multiple comorbidities increase the likelihood of sexual dysfunction. This review focuses on the areas of cardiovascular disease, respiratory conditions, and cancer, all areas for which there are practical, evidence-based strategies to guide sexual counseling. Although nurses have been reluctant to address the topic of sexuality in practice, a growing number of studies suggest that patients want nurses to address their concerns and provide resources to them. Thus, nurses must be proactive in initiating conversations on sexual issues to fill this gap in practice. PMID:24066783

  16. Chronic Pain in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Grodofsky, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    This review includes a summary of contemporary theories of pain processing and advocates a multimodal analgesia approach for providing perioperative care. A summary of various medication classes and anesthetic techniques is provided that highlights evidence emerging from neurosurgical literature. This summary covers opioid management, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, ketamine, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine, corticosteroids, gabapentin, and regional anesthesia for neurosurgery. At present, there is not enough investigation into these areas to describe best practices for treating or preventing chronic pain in neurosurgery; but providers can identify a wider range of options available to personalize perioperative care strategies. PMID:27521193

  17. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy. PMID:19826982

  18. Chronic cough hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cough has been suggested to be due to three conditions, asthma, post nasal drip, and reflux disease. A different paradigm has evolved in which cough is viewed as the primary condition characterised by afferent neuronal hypersensitivity and different aspects of this syndrome are manifest in the different phenotypes of cough. There are several advantages to viewing cough hypersensitivity as the unifying diagnosis; Communication with patients is aided, aetiology is not restricted and therapeutic avenues opened. Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome is a more applicable label to embrace the clinical manifestations of this disabling disease. PMID:23668427

  19. [Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Keskitalo, Paula; Remes-Pakarinen, Terhi; Vähäsalo, Paula; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Kröger, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis is an autoinflammatory disease occurring mainly in children and adolescents, typically involving recurrent or persistent osteitic foci. The symptom is bone pain, possibly accompanied by soft tissue tenderness. Some patients exhibit symptoms of systemic inflammation. The. precise etiology of the disease is not known, but an imbalance of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is presumed to play a role in the development of the disease. While an anti-inflammatory analgesic is in most cases sufficient to calm down the osteitis, the use of corticosteroids, anti- TNF-a inhibitors or bisphosphonates is required in some cases. PMID:26939487

  20. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  1. Pathogenesis of chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, A P; Greaves, M

    2009-06-01

    Chronic urticaria is defined as the presence of urticaria (hives) for at least 6 weeks with the assumption that it occurs daily or close to it. If we eliminate physical urticarias and urticarial vasculitis from consideration, the remainder can be divided into autoimmune chronic urticaria (45%) and idiopathic chronic urticaria (55%). The autoimmune subgroup is associated with the IgG anti-IgE receptor alpha subunit in 35-40% of patients and IgG anti-IgE in an additional 5-10%. These autoantibodies have been shown to activate blood basophils and cutaneous mast cells in vitro with augmentation of basophil activation by complement and release of C5a, in particular. Binding methods (immunoblot and ELISA) yield positives in many autoimmune diseases as well as occasional normal subjects or patients with other forms of urticaria but most such sera are non-functional. Activation of basophils or mast cells causing histamine release is quite specific for chronic urticaria and defines the autoimmune subgroup. Although pathogenicity is not formally proven, the antibodies cause wealing upon intradermal injection, and removal of the autoantibody leads to remission. A cellular infiltrate is seen to be characterized by mast cell degranulation and infiltration of CD4+ T lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. The intensity of the infiltrate and clinical severity of the disease (including accompanying angio-oedema) is more severe in the autoimmune subpopulation. This latter group also has a higher evidence of human leucocyte antigen DR alleles associated with autoimmunity and a 25% incidence of antithyroid antibodies with diagnosed hypothyroidism in some. Hypo-responsiveness of patients' basophils to anti-IgE and hyperresponsiveness to serum defines another subpopulation (at least 50%) that overlaps the idiopathic and autoimmune subgroups. Hypo-responsiveness to anti-IgE has been shown to be associated with elevated levels of cytoplasmic phosphatases that

  2. Managing chronic pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Janette; Loughlin, Diane

    2014-10-21

    The management of chronic pain is complex. Services and support for people living with chronic pain are variable despite the publication of a number of reports highlighting the problem. Due to the epidemiology of pain, nurses deliver care to patients with persistent pain in a variety of settings. It is important that nurses have the knowledge, skills and correct attitude to deliver compassionate, person-centred care, in line with best practice in chronic pain management. PMID:25315569

  3. Chronic suicidality and borderline personality.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A

    2004-06-01

    Suicidal ideation is a complex clinical event. In this article, acute suicidal ideation is compared with chronic suicidal ideation, specifically their different meanings, relationships with Axis I and Axis II disorders, intrapsychic functions, approaches to assessment, and interventions. The potential risks of acute hospitalization of the chronically suicidal borderline personality disorder patient are discussed as well as a longitudinal, multidimensional treatment strategy for the chronically suicidal individual. PMID:15237042

  4. [Psychosomatic approach for chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    From psychosomatic view point, the psychological or social stresses and depressive or anxiety disorders are very important factors in the course and the maintenance for migraine patients. These factors are very complex, and often lead the migraine becoming chronic. In the psychosomatic approach, not only the physical assessment for chronic migraine but also the assessments for stress and mental states are done. As the psychosomatic therapies for chronic migraine, autogenic training, biofeedback therapy and cognitive therapy are effective. PMID:22277516

  5. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed. PMID:26722211

  6. Diagnostic dilemmas in chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Toubi, E; Grattan, C; Zuberbier, T

    2015-06-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)/Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2) LEN)/European Dermatology Forum (EDF)/World Allergy Organization (WAO) recently published updated recommendations for the classification, diagnosis and management of chronic urticaria (CU). This article discusses several cases of CU that provide examples of how the recommendations in the guidelines can be implemented in the diagnosis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) (also called chronic idiopathic urticaria [CIU]), chronic inducible urticaria (CINDU) or CU with comorbidities. PMID:26053291

  7. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation. PMID:26758863

  8. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  9. Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tram T.; Martin, Paul

    2001-12-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 40% of cases of chronic liver disease in the United States and is now the most common indication for liver transplantation. Estimates suggest that 4 million people (1.8%) of the American population are or have been infected with HCV. Currently, the treatment of choice for patients with chronic HCV infection is recombinant interferon alfa with ribavirin. Pegylated interferons are a promising new development, and in combination with ribavirin, they will rapidly become the standard of care. The goals of therapy are to slow disease progression, improve hepatic histology, reduce infectivity, and reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Sustained virologic response, which generally implies the absence of viremia for 6 months or more following completion of therapy, is increasingly being regarded as a cure, with evidence of slowing or even regression of fibrosis on follow-up liver biopsy. A number of factors have been shown to be predictive of a sustained response, including viral genotype other than 1, low serum HCV RNA levels, absence of cirrhosis, younger age, female gender, and shorter duration of infection. Disease severity as assessed by liver biopsy, comorbidities, and possible contraindications to therapy should be weighed in the decision to begin treatment. Counseling patients regarding transmission, natural history, and drug and alcohol abstinence also should be included in management. Close monitoring should be done during treatment for side effects of interferon, including depression and bone marrow suppression. Hemolytic anemia is the major side effect of ribavirin. PMID:11696276

  10. ICON: chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bachert, Claus; Pawankar, Ruby; Zhang, Luo; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Fokkens, Wytske J; Hamilos, Daniel L; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Kern, Robert; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Joaquim; Naclerio, Robert; Pilan, Renata; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Suzaki, Harumi; Voegels, Richard; Blaiss, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a public health problem that has a significant socio-economic impact. Moreover, the complexity of this disease due to its heterogeneous nature based on the underlying pathophysiology - leading to different disease variants - further complicates our understanding and directions for the most appropriate targeted treatment strategies. Several International/national guidelines/position papers and/or consensus documents are available that present the current knowledge and treatment strategies for CRS. Yet there are many challenges to the management of CRS especially in the case of the more severe and refractory forms of disease. Therefore, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), a collaboration between EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI, and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus (ICON) on Chronic Rhinosinusitis. The purpose of this ICON on CRS is to highlight the key common messages from the existing guidelines, the differences in recommendations as well as the gaps in our current knowledge of CRS, thus providing a concise reference. In this document we discuss the definition of the disease, its relevance, pharmacoeconomics, pathophysiology, phenotypes and endotypes, genetics and risk factors, natural history and co-morbidities as well as clinical manifestations and treatment options in both adults and children comprising pharmacotherapy, surgical interventions and more recent biological approaches. Finally, we have also highlighted the unmet needs that wait to be addressed through future research. PMID:25379119

  11. [Chronic infection following osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Ochsner, P E

    1990-07-01

    The chronic infection following internal fixation may develop in a different pattern, according to the risk factor involved. There is no doubt that direct trauma on bone and soft tissue is an important risk factor. The pattern of each infection may differ according to the technique of internal fixation used, i.e. external fixator, plate or intramedullary nailing. The damages are minimized by using the appropriate technique. While bone necrosis in osteomyelitis is present, the pattern of it may be changing. An infected non-union may occur in osteomyelitis (osteitis) when present before bone-healing took place. Should infection overlast the bone-healing period, the localization of the main focus is determinant for the outcome of the infection. The assessment of an osteomyelitis consists in the evaluation of the patient's general aspect and the extension of the infectious disease. Assessing it by plain radiographs, it might be accompanied by leucocyte scanning, CT-scan or MRI. The indication of a more aggressive treatment of chronic osteomyelitis is given in all cases of infected nonunion, chronicle fistulation and in presence of pain and contractures. Antibiotics should only be used in addition to a surgical procedure. PMID:2202078

  12. Canine chronic inflammatory rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Rebecca C; Johnson, Lynelle R

    2006-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory rhinitis is commonly found in dogs with chronic nasal disease and is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in the nasal mucosa in the absence of an obvious etiologic process. The pathogenesis of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis remains unknown. Animals respond poorly to antibiotics, oral glucocorticoids, and antihistamines, making primary infectious, immune-mediated, or allergic etiologies unlikely. Aberrant immune response to inhaled organisms or allergens may induce inflammation in some animals. Common clinical signs include nasal discharge, sneezing, coughing, epistaxis, and stertor. Diagnosis is made by performing a thorough history, physical examination, radiography or advanced imaging (via computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging), rhinoscopy, and nasal mucosal biopsy to rule out primary etiologies of nasal discharge. Treatment strategies have included various antibiotics, antihistamines, oral and inhalant steroids, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, and antifungal medications. Some dogs may respond partially to doxycycline or azithromycin, although it is unclear whether response is related to antimicrobial or antiinflammatory properties of these drugs. Hydration of the nasal cavity through nasal drops or aerosols may limit nasal discharge, and some animals may improve with inhalant (but rarely oral) glucocorticoids. PMID:16711613

  13. [Toilet of chronic wound].

    PubMed

    Strok, Nevenka; Huljev, Dubravko

    2013-10-01

    Chronic wound toilet, with appropriate care of the surrounding skin, is one of the basic steps that must be performed in the treatment of patients with chronic wound. On wound cleaning and bandaging, it is of utmost importance to choose an appropriate technique of cleansing, select an appropriate solution for leaching and choose an appropriate wound dressing. In this way, the wound is protected from dirt from the environment and microorganisms, while protecting the surrounding tissue from the wound exudate, providing optimal conditions for better and faster wound healing and contributing to improved patient quality of life. The frequency of dressing change is individual and must be tailored to each patient in correlation with the psychosocial status of the patient, the type of the wound, the amount and type of wound exudate, as well as what is to be put on the wound. One of the most important elements in wound toilet is appropriate care for the surrounding skin. Basic guidelines for skin care must meet three basic criteria: adequate washing and cleansing of the skin, maintain the physiological balance of the skin and protect the skin from external damage. PMID:24371977

  14. Olfaction in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Rombaux, Philippe; Huart, C; Levie, P; Cingi, C; Hummel, T

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a frequent complaint in chronic rhinosinusitis patients and has a significant impact on quality of life. Therefore, it is essential that clinicians are aware of the importance of olfactory dysfunction in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients and know how to deal with it. Notably, the evaluation of olfactory function (i.e., using psychophysical testing) and imagery of olfactory bulb play an important role in the evaluation of patients and give essential information about the "baseline" olfactory function. Because the high impact of olfactory function on quality of life and medical and/or surgical treatment should be proposed to patients. However, it remains difficult to predict the outcome of treatment as well as long-term efficacy. The first section of this review is dedicated to the assessment of olfactory function. Secondly, we will discuss the etiopathology of olfactory dysfunction in CRS with and without nasal polyps. Finally, we will review literature findings about the efficacy of different treatments on olfactory function. PMID:27131498

  15. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  16. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) affects between 0.006% and 3% of the population depending on the criteria of definition used, with women being at higher risk than men. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 45 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antidepressants, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), corticosteroids, dietary supplements, evening primrose oil, galantamine, graded exercise therapy, homeopathy, immunotherapy, intramuscular magnesium, oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and prolonged rest. PMID:19445810

  17. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) affects between 0.006% and 3% of the population depending on the criteria of definition used, with women being at higher risk than men. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 46 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antidepressants, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), corticosteroids, dietary supplements, evening primrose oil, galantamine, graded exercise therapy, homeopathy, immunotherapy, intramuscular magnesium, oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and prolonged rest. PMID:21615974

  18. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  19. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adam B; Macejko, Amanda; Taylor, Aisha; Nadler, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain. It is diagnosed by means of localization cultures that are 90% accurate in localizing the source of recurrent infections within the lower urinary tract. Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis comprises NIH category IV. This entity is, by definition, asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally during the evaluation of infertility or prostate cancer. The clinical significance of category IV prostatitis is unknown and it is often left untreated. Category III prostatitis is called chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). It is characterized by pelvic pain for more than 3 of the previous 6 months, urinary symptoms and painful ejaculation, without documented urinary tract infections from uropathogens. The syndrome can be devastating, affecting 10-15% of the male population, and results in nearly 2 million outpatient visits each year. The aetiology of CP/CPPS is poorly understood, but may be the result of an infectious or inflammatory initiator that results in neurological injury and eventually results in pelvic floor dysfunction in the form of increased pelvic muscle tone. The diagnosis relies on separating this entity from chronic bacterial prostatitis. If there is no history of documented urinary tract infections with a urinary tract pathogen, then cultures should be taken when patients are symptomatic. Prostatic localization cultures, called the

  20. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  1. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  2. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  3. Responding to Students' Chronic Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Steven R.; Glaser, Sarah E.; Stern, Melissa; Sferdenschi, Corina; McCabe, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic illnesses are long-term or permanent medical conditions that have recurring effects on everyday life. Large and growing number of students have chronic illnesses that affect their emotional development, physical development, academic performance, and family interactions. The primary error in educating those students is assuming that the…

  4. Children Coping with Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Lissette M.

    Children who live with chronic illness are confronted with challenges that frequently force them to cope in myriad ways. The ways in which children face chronic illness are summarized in this literature review. Also covered, are how the effects of family can influence coping strategies and how family members, especially parents, cope with their…

  5. [Chronic monstrous urine retention].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frederik Gustav; Holm, Mette Lind

    2015-01-26

    A 75-year-old male was diagnosed with renal mass at a computed tomography during an examination for extended abdominal girth. A large mesenterical cyst was also detected. The patient had infrequent voiding, which he had trained over many years as a taxi driver. A basic physical examination led to suspect urinary retention. His creatinine level was normal and he had no hydronephrosis. A renography showed equal function, but prolonged bilateral outflow. The volume extracted by urethral catheter passed 15 l. Absence of hydronephrosis and normal S-creatinine level has not been described in chronic urinary retention of this extent. Hydronephrosis is seen, but in much smaller volume of retention. Infrequent voiding is easily diagnosed. Urinary retention should be suspected when finding median cystic processes. PMID:25612956

  6. Chronicity of orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Gerschman, J A

    2000-10-01

    Acute and chronic orofacial pain continues to be poorly understood and managed. The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) 1999 report on acute pain management promotes the development of evidence based clinical practice guidelines aimed at improving both the quality of health care and health outcomes in medical and dental practice in Australia. Nerve signals arising from sites of tissue or nerve injury lead to long term changes in the central nervous system and the amplification and persistence of pain. These nociceptor activity-induced neuronal changes known as central sensitization, have important clinical implications in the development of new approaches to the management of persistent pain. These findings and implications are discussed in relationship to poorly managed and understood conditions such as oral dysaesthesia, burning mouth syndrome, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia, peripheral nerve injury, deafferentation and phantom tooth syndrome. PMID:11709938

  7. Approaching chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-02-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient's daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker's cough and nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. A detailed history-taking and physical examination will provide a diagnosis in most patients, even at the primary care level. Some cases may need further investigations or specialist referral for diagnosis. PMID:26892615

  8. [Chronic osteomyelitis of mandibulae].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, J; Nameta, K

    1994-02-01

    As the human lower jaw (mandibula) itself is a hard bone, and when bacterial inflammation occurs in it by pericoronal infection of the 3rd molar or apical infection of caries tooth, the inflammation remains in the bone marrow and often progresses to acute osteomyelitis. The prominent sign of acute osteomyelitis in the lower jaw is mental nerve palsy which is the so-called Vincent's Syndrome. The causative organisms are not different from those of the common odontogenic infections. Recently, we have identified some strains of Oral Streptococci tolerant against PCs and Cefems and also ones capable of biofilm formation. When antimicrobial agents or drainage proves unsuccessful, acute osteomyelitis may become chronic, which is more difficult to treat. Surgical procedures, such as, debridement or decortication of cortex bone are necessary in most cases. If these surgical procedures do not give satisfactory result, the amputation of the jaw is not rare. PMID:8126911

  9. Chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of chronic kidney disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26030647

  10. Approaching chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient’s daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker’s cough and nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. A detailed history-taking and physical examination will provide a diagnosis in most patients, even at the primary care level. Some cases may need further investigations or specialist referral for diagnosis. PMID:26892615

  11. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Scarfò, Lydia; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Ghia, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most common leukaemia among the adults in the Western World. CLL (and the corresponding nodal entity small lymphocytic lymphoma, SLL) is classified as a lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by the relentless accumulation of mature B-lymphocytes showing a peculiar immunophenotype in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen. CLL clinical course is very heterogeneous: the majority of patients follow an indolent clinical course with no or delayed treatment need and with a prolonged survival, while others experience aggressive disease requiring early treatment followed by frequent relapses. In the last decade, the improved understanding of CLL pathogenesis shed light on premalignant conditions (i.e., monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, MBL), defined new prognostic and predictive markers, improving patient stratification, but also broadened the therapeutic armamentarium with novel agents, targeting fundamental signaling pathways. PMID:27370174

  12. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    George, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2012-04-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a relatively common, but often overlooked cause of leg pain in athletes. A careful history and physical examination is essential in the diagnosis of CECS. Affected individuals have recurrent, activity-related leg pain that recurs at a consistent duration or intensity and is only relieved by rest. Measurement of baseline and postexercise compartment pressures confirms the diagnosis and helps in the planning of treatment. Surgical treatment with fasciotomy of the involved compartments is successful in allowing patients to return to full activity levels. With surgical treatment, it is critical to address all affected compartments as well as releasing any fascial defects, both of which may cause recurrent symptoms if neglected. With appropriate diagnosis and treatment, excellent outcomes can be achieved and allow athletes to return to full, unrestricted activity levels. PMID:22341019

  13. [Chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Henningsen, P; Martin, A

    2013-01-01

    Enduring and disabling fatigue that cannot be explained by a known disease is the main characteristic of chronic fatigue syndrome. Several definitions do exist, and classification approaches vary regarding supplementary symptoms, time course, and by implicit concepts of aetiology. CFS can be considered as a functional somatic syndrome, e. g. supported by the high rates of comorbid bodily complaints and syndromes that lack clear medical explanation. Accordingly the diagnostic process should not be limited to the thorough physical examination, but also address additional somatic complaints, psychosocial factors (specifically subjective illness beliefs), and impairments. Recently German medical and psychological societies provided treatment guidelines for functional somatic syndromes. Cognitive behavioural therapy and graded activity are evidence based treatment methods for CFS. PMID:23250694

  14. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  15. 'Chronic' identities in mental illness.

    PubMed

    von Peter, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The term 'chronicity' is still widely used in psychiatric discourse and practice. A category employed in political, administrative and therapeutic contexts, it guides practitioners' beliefs and actions. This paper attempts a review of the attitudes and procedures that result as a consequence of identifying 'chronically' disturbed identities in clinical practice. An essentially social, relational and materialist understanding of mental illness is used to highlight the kind of thinking underlying the notion of 'chronic' identities in day-to-day psychiatric routines. Problematising the notions of singularity and expressiveness, as well as mind/body- and self/other-distinctions, it claims the category itself is responsible for creating a 'chronic' kind of being. A spatial metaphor is presented in the conclusion, illustrating a mental strategy by which we can re-shape our thinking about 'chronic' identities. It attempts to describe how the shift from an epistemological to a praxeographic approach could build a more complete understanding of mental illness. PMID:23528064

  16. Chronic Pruritus: Clinics and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grundmann, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pruritus, one of the main symptoms in dermatology, is often intractable and has a high impact on patient's quality of life. Beyond dermatologic disorders, chronic pruritus is associated with systemic, neurologic as well as psychologic diseases. The pathogenesis of acute and chronic (>6 weeks duration) pruritus is complex and involves in the skin a network of resident (e.g., sensory neurons) and transient inflammatory cells (e.g., lymphocytes). In the skin, several classes of histamine-sensitive or histamine-insensitve C-fibers are involved in itch transmission. Specific receptors have been discovered on cutaneous and spinal neurons to be exclusively involved in the processing of pruritic signals. Chronic pruritus is notoriously difficult to treat. Newer insights into the underlying pathogenesis of pruritus have enabled novel treatment approaches that target the pruritus-specific pathophysiological mechanism. For example, neurokinin-1 antagonists have been found to relieve chronic pruritus. PMID:21738356

  17. Control, culture and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Bates, M S; Rankin-Hill, L

    1994-09-01

    In the past decade, the literature on chronic pain shows an increasing interest in the relationship between patients' locus of control (LOC) beliefs and their responses to the chronic pain experience [1-5]. However, few of these studies assess the relationships between ethnic or cultural background and LOC style in the chronic pain experience--despite research suggesting that culture affects chronic pain responses [6-8]. This report of two quantitative and qualitative research projects among chronic pain sufferers in New England and in Puerto Rico, shows significant relationships between patients' LOC style and variations in reported chronic pain intensity and responses. Our studies also demonstrate a relationship between LOC style and ethnic or cultural background and an interaction between LOC style and cultural identity in variations in reported pain intensity. In addition, we found intra-ethnic/cultural-group variations in the pain experience related to LOC style. In these chronic pain populations, the qualitative data further suggests that LOC style may not be a permanent, unchanging characteristic or cognitive interpretation. Instead, an individual's LOC style may be altered by the chronic pain experience and such a style may change at various stages in the chronic pain 'career'. These studies also show that in many ethnic/cultural groups, an increased sense of control may contribute to an increased ability to cope successfully with the chronic pain experience. In light of these findings, we suggest that it may be possible to alter a patient's sense of control through the development of deliberate culturally appropriate and personally relevant programs designed to help the patients establish a sense of control over their lives and their pain. PMID:7973863

  18. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  19. Neuroimmune interactions in itch: Do chronic itch, chronic pain, and chronic cough share similar mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-12-01

    Itch and pain are closely related but also clearly distinct sensations. Pain is known to suppress itch, while analgesics such as morphine can provoke itch. However, in pathological and chronic conditions, pain and itch also have similarities. Dysfunction of the nervous system, as manifested by neural plastic changes in primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system (peripheral sensitization) and spinal cord and brain stem neurons in the central nervous system (central sensitization) will result in chronic pain and itch. Importantly, these diseases also result from immune dysfunction, since inflammatory mediators can directly activate or sensitize nociceptive and pruriceptive neurons in the peripheral and central nervous system, leading to pain and itch hypersensitivity. In this mini-review, I discuss the roles of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel, and Nav1.7 sodium channel in regulating itch and inflammation, with special emphasis of neuronal TLR signaling and the interaction of TLR7 and TRPA1. Chronic pain and chronic itch are debilitating diseases and dramatically impact the life quality of patients. Targeting TLRs for the control of inflammation, neuroinflammation (inflammation restricted in the nervous system), and hyperexcitability of nociceptors and pruriceptors will lead to new therapeutics for the relief of chronic pain and chronic itch. Finally, given the shared mechanisms among chronic cough, chronic pain, and chronic itch and the demonstrated efficacy of the neuropathic pain drug gabapentin in treating chronic cough, novel therapeutics targeting TRPA1, Nav1.7, and TLRs may also help to alleviate refractory cough via modulating neuron-immune interaction. PMID:26351759

  20. Predicting transition to chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Apkarian, A. Vania; Baliki, Marwan N.; Farmer, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Most individuals who develop pain following an inciting event will return to a healthy state as the injury heals. However, a small percentage continue to suffer, that is, transition to chronic pain. Chronic pain may persist for years and is accompanied by cognitive abnormalities, as well as diminished quality of life. In animals, persistent pain is characterized by peripheral and spinal cord reorganization, and recent evidence in humans also indicates cortical reorganization. Yet, despite more than 30 years of research, there is little agreement on the neural mechanisms that mediate the transition from acute to chronic pain. Recent findings In a longitudinal brain-imaging study, individuals who developed an intense back pain episode were followed over a 1-year period, during which pain and brain parameters were collected repeatedly. A smaller number of healthy individuals and chronic back pain patients were also studied concomitantly, as positive and negative controls. At the time of entry into the study, strength of synchrony between the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens (i.e. functional connectivity) was predictive (>80% accuracy) of individuals who subsequently transition to chronicity 1 year later. Summary Properties of the brain’s emotional learning circuitry predict the transition to chronic pain. The involvement of this circuitry in pain remains mostly unexplored. Future human and animal model studies are necessary to unravel underlying mechanisms driving pain chronicity, with the potential of advancing novel therapeutics for preventing pain chronification. PMID:23823463

  1. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. [Mnemonic complaints and chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Morandeira-Rivas, C; Lopez Del Val, L J; Bellosta-Diago, E; Velazquez-Benito, A

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Patients with chronic migraine often report lower cognitive performance, which affects their quality of life. AIMS. To analyse whether the mnemonic capacity of patients with chronic migraine is altered or not. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with chronic migraine evaluated consecutively in our unit, and paired by age (18-60 years) and gender with a control group consisting of cognitively healthy volunteers. The following cognitive instruments were administered: Folstein Minimental State Examination (MMSE), Memory Alteration Test (M@T), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and working memory. RESULTS. A total of 30 patients with chronic migraine were included (mean age: 49.33 ± 10.05 years) paired with a control group of 30 healthy volunteers (mean age: 44.83 ± 10.91 years). The mean elapsed time since onset of the patients with chronic migraine was 4.47 ± 2.74 years. On performing a comparative analysis between the two groups, significant differences were found with overall lower scores in the group of patients with chronic migraine in the MoCA (24.16 versus 29), M@T (43.76 versus 48.8) and working memory tests (17.5 versus 24.26). Performance in the MMSE was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with chronic migraine can have lower cognitive performance regardless of distracting elements, such as pharmacological factors or psychiatric comorbidity, since chronic migraine can be understood as yet another element within the spectrum of chronic pain. PMID:23884868

  3. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Fukuda, Asami; Kusunoki, Yuji; Narato, Ritsuko; Saito, Hitoshi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is one of the leading causes of severe pulmonary hypertension. According to previously reported studies in the pertinent literature, chronic inflammatory conditions may be implicated in the development of CTEPH. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CTEPH in association with chronic infection. The patient had experienced five episodes of pneumonia in the five years prior to the diagnosis of CTEPH. Blood tests from the previous five years of outpatient follow-up demonstrated that the C-reactive protein level was slightly elevated. This case suggests that a relationship exists between chronic inflammation and CTEPH, and furthermore, may contribute towards elucidating the pathophysiology of CTEPH. PMID:27250055

  4. Chronic paronychia in a hairdresser.

    PubMed

    Allouni, A; Yousif, A; Akhtar, S

    2014-09-01

    Chronic paronychia is a common occupational disease. It is multifactorial and affects a number of different groups of workers. However, the condition is not described as affecting hairdressers although hairdressing is associated with a range of other occupation-related hand conditions. We report an unusual case of chronic paronychia in a female hairdresser which occurred as a consequence of a hair shaft penetrating beneath the nail fold. Personal hygiene with thorough removal of any hairs that have penetrated the epidermis and wearing clean gloves can prevent the condition. We suggest that clinicians should be aware of the types of occupation and mechanisms involved in patients developing chronic paronychia. PMID:24985481

  5. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  6. Neurostimulation for chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Kaube, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Neurostimulation techniques for the treatment of primary headache syndromes, particularly of chronic cluster headache, have received much interest in recent years. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has yielded favourable clinical results and, despite the limited numbers of published cases, is becoming a routine treatment for refractory chronic cluster headache in specialized centres. Meanwhile, other promising techniques such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or sphenopalate ganglion stimulation have emerged. In this article the current state of clinical research for neurostimulation techniques for chronic cluster headache is reviewed. PMID:22590481

  7. [Neurosurgical treatment of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Denys

    2013-06-01

    Neurosurgical treatment of pain is based on 3 concepts: 1) lesional techniques interrupt the transmission of nociceptive neural input by lesionning the nociceptive pathways (cordotomy, radicotomy...), they are indicated to treat morphine-resistant cancer pain; 2) neuromodulation techniques try to decrease pain by reinforcing inhibitory mechanisms, using chronic electrical stimulation of the nervous system (peripheral nerve stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, motor cortex stimulation...) to treat chronic neuropathic pain; 3) intrathecal infusion of analgesics (morphine, ziconotide), using implantable pumps, allows to increase their efficacy and to reduce their side effects. These techniques can improve, sometimes dramatically, patients with severe and chronic pain, refractory to all other treatments. PMID:23923757

  8. Diagnosing and Treating Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Norman

    1972-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is differentiated from the acute type by its persistence and by its causative agents. It can result from histamine, and other chemical mediators, released from damaged mast cells either by an antigen-antibody reaction or some other mechanism. The cause, often elusive, may be common foods or medications. External temperature changes can be manifested by urticaria through various mechanisms. The endogenous causes include chronic foci of infections such as in teeth, sinuses or tonsils, endocrine changes, parasitic infestations. Chronic urticaria may be a symptom of underlying more serious systemic diseases such as lymphomas. PMID:20468756

  9. Chronic leg pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Burrus, M Tyrrell; Werner, Brian C; Starman, Jim S; Gwathmey, F Winston; Carson, Eric W; Wilder, Robert P; Diduch, David R

    2015-06-01

    Chronic leg pain is commonly treated by orthopaedic surgeons who take care of athletes. The sources are varied and include the more commonly encountered medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, nerve entrapment, Achilles tightness, deep vein thrombosis, and complex regional pain syndrome. Owing to overlapping physical examination findings, an assortment of imaging and other diagnostic modalities are employed to distinguish among the diagnoses to guide the appropriate management. Although most of these chronic problems are treated nonsurgically, some patients require operative intervention. For each condition listed above, the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management option, and outcomes are discussed in turn. PMID:25157051

  10. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shreya

    2015-05-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective functioning of NADPH oxidase enzyme in the phagocytes. This leads to recurrent infections by catalase positive organisms and later, granuloma formation in multiple organs. This condition usually presents in the age group of 2-5 y and is uncommon in neonates. In this case report, we describe a rare case of CGD in a 40-day-old male child who initially presented with a history of erythematous pustular rash on left forearm and refusal to feeds. He remained unresponsive to regular antibiotics. CT chest and abdomen revealed multiple ill-defined lesions suggestive of granulomas or developing abscesses. Immunodeficiency workup showed negative Nitroblue Tetrazolium test and positive Dihydrorhodamine test (flow cytometry). A diagnosis of CGD was then made and treated accordingly. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that although it is rare for CGD to present at such an early age, but in a neonate with multiple granulomas or abscesses, it should be considered as a differential and worked up accordingly. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis. PMID:26155526

  11. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  12. Primary chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, L; Remagen, W

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-cell osteomyelitis is a histological diagnosis and, in the opinion of some authors, is a disease entity which can be differentiated from the sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré and Brodie's abscess. Our investigation of 12 patients with plasma-cell osteomyelitis leads us to a different conclusion. The radiological appearances are not specific and do not allow a definitive diagnosis of the type of osteomyelitis or the exclusion of other bone disorders. Although there were always an increased number of plasma cells in the specimens from our patients, there were frequently transitional appearances varying from sclerosing osteomyelitis to Brodie's abscess. For this reason, we suggest that the term "primary chronic osteomyelitis" should be used. This makes it possible to distinguish the condition from acute and secondary osteomyelitis as well as from other diseases, such as bone tumours. All our patients were treated by local resection of the osteomyelitis lesion and they all recovered uneventfully; there were no local recurrences. PMID:6543824

  13. Microbiology of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, I

    2016-07-01

    Most sinus infections are viral and only a small percentage develop bacterial infection. Rhino-, influenza, and para-influenza viruses are the most frequent viral causes of sinusitis. The most common bacterial isolates from children and adult patients with community-acquired acute bacterial sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic organisms (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the commonest isolates in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Aerobic and anaerobic beta lactamase-producing bacteria (BLPB) were recovered from over a third of these patients. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for over 60 % of S. aureus isolates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative Gram-negative rods are frequently recovered in nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and in cystic fibrosis. The CRS infection evolves the formation of a biofilm that might play a significant role in the pathogenesis and persistence of CRS. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens. Recognition of the unique microbiology of CRS and their antimicrobial susceptibility is of great importance when selecting antimicrobial therapy. PMID:27086363

  14. Chronic hiccups and sleep.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Boisteanu, D; Whitelaw, W A; Cabane, J; Garma, L; Derenne, J P

    1996-04-01

    To explore the effect of sleep on hiccups, we studied eight patients aged 20-81 years, all males with chronic hiccups lasting 7 days to 7 years, by means of overnight polysomnography. The incidence of new bouts of hiccups and the likelihood of hiccups being present were both highest in wakefulness and became progressively lower through stages I-IV of slow wave sleep (SWS) to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). There was a significant tendency for hiccups to disappear at sleep onset and REMS onset. Of all 21 bouts of hiccups that were observed to stop, 10/21 did so during an apnea or hypopnea. Frequency of hiccups within a bout slowed progressively from wakefulness through the stages of SWS to REMS. For the whole group, mean frequency decreased significantly from wakefulness [(25.6 +/- 12.1), (mean +/- SD)] to sleep onset or stage I (22.3 +/- 12.2). Sleep latency was increased from 8 +/- 16.3 minutes when hiccups were absent to 16.35 +/- 19.9 minutes when it was present. Sleep efficiency was poor because of long waking periods, and there were deficiencies of both SWS and REMS. Hiccups themselves were not responsible for any arousals or awakenings. We conclude that neural mechanisms responsible for hiccups are strongly influenced by sleep state and that hiccups disrupt sleep onset but not established sleep. PMID:8723381

  15. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective functioning of NADPH oxidase enzyme in the phagocytes. This leads to recurrent infections by catalase positive organisms and later, granuloma formation in multiple organs. This condition usually presents in the age group of 2-5 y and is uncommon in neonates. In this case report, we describe a rare case of CGD in a 40-day-old male child who initially presented with a history of erythematous pustular rash on left forearm and refusal to feeds. He remained unresponsive to regular antibiotics. CT chest and abdomen revealed multiple ill-defined lesions suggestive of granulomas or developing abscesses. Immunodeficiency workup showed negative Nitroblue Tetrazolium test and positive Dihydrorhodamine test (flow cytometry). A diagnosis of CGD was then made and treated accordingly. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that although it is rare for CGD to present at such an early age, but in a neonate with multiple granulomas or abscesses, it should be considered as a differential and worked up accordingly. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis. PMID:26155526

  16. [Chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sadao

    2016-03-01

    Currently, several novel drugs are available for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Western countries. Of these drugs, those that inhibit the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are the most promising. Ibrutinib inhibits BTK in the BCR pathway and can be administered orally. The results of several clinical trials suggest that ibrutinib is highly effective against relapsed/resistant (RR) and treatment-naïve CLL. Furthermore, ibrutinib shows equivalent efficacy on CLL with the 17p deletion. Idelalisib, which also blocks the BCR pathway, inhibits PIK3delta and induces CLL cell death. Clinical trials have shown outstanding efficacy of idelalisib against RR-CLL, especially when administered with antiCD20 antibodies. This drug is also effective against CLL with the 17p deletion. ABT-199 is another novel drug; it inhibits BCL2 signaling, not the BCR pathway, and can be administered orally. The efficacy of ABT-199 against RR-CLL has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. These drugs have only mild toxicity and can be used for patients in poor general condition. Unfortunately, none of these drugs have yet been approved in Japan. Rapid resolution of the 'drug lag' problem is necessary. PMID:27076234

  17. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research. PMID:23314081

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  19. How to investigate: Chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hague, Matthew; Shenker, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience persisting longer than the normal process of healing, usually longer than 3 months. About a fifth of the world's population is believed to suffer from chronic pain. In Europe, chronic pain accounts for nearly 500 m lost working days, and it costs the European economy >€34 billion (£28 billion) every year. Establishing a reliable diagnosis is the primary challenge in evaluating a patient with chronic pain. Common diagnoses not to miss include seronegative spondyloarthritides, endocrine abnormalities including severe vitamin D deficiency and polymyalgia rheumatica. Once important or treatable diagnoses have been ruled out, the history can be used as a tool to establish a therapeutic plan for shared decision-making using the biopsychosocial model. Onward referral to pain clinics can be helpful for more involved patient management, but often good outcomes are achieved with the support of primary care. PMID:26096090

  20. Management of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Richard L; Roberts, Timothy T; Papaliodis, Dean N; Mulligan, Michael T; Dubin, Andrew H

    2014-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain results from a complex interplay of mechanical, biochemical, psychological, and social factors. Effective management is markedly different from that of acute musculoskeletal pain. Understanding the physiology of pain transmission, modulation, and perception is crucial for effective management. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies such as psychotherapy and biofeedback exercises can be used to manage chronic pain. Evidence-based treatment recommendations have been made for chronic pain conditions frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons, including low back, osteoarthritic, posttraumatic, and neuropathic pain. Extended-release tramadol; select tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and anticonvulsants; and topical medications such as lidocaine, diclofenac, and capsaicin are among the most effective treatments. However, drug efficacy varies significantly by indication. Orthopaedic surgeons should be familiar with the widely available safe and effective nonnarcotic options for chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24486756

  1. Chronic Nosebleeds: What to Do

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  2. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  3. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia? Next Topic Normal bone marrow and blood What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  4. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and legs, loss of deep tendon reflexes (areflexia), fatigue, and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart of that acute disease. Is there any ...

  5. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  6. Chronic urticaria: new management options.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is defined as episodic or daily hives lasting for at least 6 weeks and impairs quality of life. Two main subtypes include chronic idiopathic (spontaneous) urticaria and inducible (physical) urticaria, but some patients have urticarial vasculitis. "Autoimmune chronic urticaria" implies the presence of histamine releasing or mast cell activating autoantibodies to IgE or FcϵRI, the high affinity receptor on mast cells and basophils. In patients not readily controlled with labeled dosages of second generation H1 receptor antagonists (antihistamines), there is evidence for reduction of urticaria using up to 4 fold increases in labeled dosages. The biologic modifier, omalizumab, helps to reduce lesions of chronic urticaria within 1-2 weeks. PMID:25383135

  7. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  8. Tai chi and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Peng, Philip W H

    2012-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, a growing body of research aimed at investigating the health benefits of Tai Chi in various chronic health conditions has been recognized in the literature. This article reviewed the history, the philosophy, and the evidence for the role of Tai Chi in a few selected chronic pain conditions. The ancient health art of Tai Chi contributes to chronic pain management in 3 major areas: adaptive exercise, mind-body interaction, and meditation. Trials examining the health benefit of Tai Chi in chronic pain conditions are mostly low quality. Only 5 pain conditions were reviewed: osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, low back pain, and headache. Of these, Tai Chi seems to be an effective intervention in osteoarthritis, low back pain, and fibromyalgia. The limitations of the Tai Chi study design and suggestions for the direction of future research are also discussed. PMID:22609642

  9. What Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... In this way CMML is more like a myeloproliferative disease ( myelo -- bone marrow, proliferative -- excessive growth). Chronic myeloid leukemia is an example of a myeloproliferative disease where there is an overproduction of white ...

  10. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  11. Chronic illness and smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Schlundt, David; Larson, Celia; Wang, Hong; Brown, Anne; Hargreaves, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is among the leading causes of premature mortality and preventable death in the United States. Although smoking contributes to the probability of developing chronic illness, little is known about the relationship between quitting smoking and the presence of chronic illness. The present study investigated the association between diagnoses of one or more chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, or high cholesterol) and smoking status (former or current smoker). Methods The data analyzed were a subset of questions from a 155-item telephone-administered community survey that assessed smoking status, demographic characteristics, and presence of chronic disease. The study sample consisted of 3,802 randomly selected participants. Results Participants with diabetes were more likely to report being former smokers, after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, whereas having hypertension or high cholesterol was not associated significantly with smoking status. The likelihood of being a former smoker did not increase as number of diagnosed chronic diseases increased. Participants who were women, older (aged 65+), or single were significantly less likely to be former smokers. Participants with at least a college degree, those with incomes of US$50,000+, and those who were underweight or obese were more likely to be former smokers. Discussion These findings were inconsistent with research that has suggested that having a chronic illness or experiencing a serious medical event increases the odds of smoking cessation. Supporting prior research, we found that being male, having a higher income, and being obese were associated with greater likelihood of being a former smoker. PMID:19516050

  12. Guideline of Chronic Urticaria Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Urticaria is a relatively common condition that if chronic can persist for weeks, months or years and affect quality of life significantly. The etiology is often difficult to determine, especially as it becomes chronic. Many cases of chronic urticaria are thought to be autoimmune, although there is no consensus that testing for autoimmunity alters the diagnostic or management strategies or outcomes. Many times, urticaria is easily managed with antihistamines and/or short courses of oral corticosteroids, but too often control is insufficient and additional therapies must be added. For years, immune modulating medications, such as cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil, have been used in cases refractory to antihistamines and oral corticosteroids, although the evidence supporting their efficacy and safety has been limited. Omalizumab was recently approved for the treatment of chronic urticaria unresponsive to H1-antagonists. This IgG anti-IgE monoclonal antibody has been well demonstrated to safely and effectively control chronic urticaria at least partially in approximately 2/3 of cases. However, the mechanism of action and duration of treatment for omalizumab is still unclear. It is hoped that as the pathobiology of chronic urticaria becomes better defined, future therapies that target specific mechanistic pathways will be developed that continue to improve the management of these often challenging patients. PMID:27334777

  13. Guideline of Chronic Urticaria Beyond.

    PubMed

    Fine, Lauren M; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Urticaria is a relatively common condition that if chronic can persist for weeks, months or years and affect quality of life significantly. The etiology is often difficult to determine, especially as it becomes chronic. Many cases of chronic urticaria are thought to be autoimmune, although there is no consensus that testing for autoimmunity alters the diagnostic or management strategies or outcomes. Many times, urticaria is easily managed with antihistamines and/or short courses of oral corticosteroids, but too often control is insufficient and additional therapies must be added. For years, immune modulating medications, such as cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil, have been used in cases refractory to antihistamines and oral corticosteroids, although the evidence supporting their efficacy and safety has been limited. Omalizumab was recently approved for the treatment of chronic urticaria unresponsive to H1-antagonists. This IgG anti-IgE monoclonal antibody has been well demonstrated to safely and effectively control chronic urticaria at least partially in approximately 2/3 of cases. However, the mechanism of action and duration of treatment for omalizumab is still unclear. It is hoped that as the pathobiology of chronic urticaria becomes better defined, future therapies that target specific mechanistic pathways will be developed that continue to improve the management of these often challenging patients. PMID:27334777

  14. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Bramanti, Placido; Osculati, Francesco; Flonta, Maria-Luisa; Radu, Mihai; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU) has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23840097

  15. Complaining about chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kugelmann, R

    1999-12-01

    This paper examines how a group of working class people describes and experiences chronic pain. This hermeneutical-phenomenological study concentrates on the lived body of pain from three perspectives, drawing on interviews with 14 people who were attending a pain management program. First I consider the terms in which pain is circumscribed in the narratives, stories told in the context of learning to manage pain. These terms are polarities, ways of specifying and legitimating pain in relation to "mind" and "body." Pain, in the discursive polarities that define it, is the private property of an individual, who must in some fashion prove that pain exists in an objective manner. The speaker, in this discourse, stands as the one responsible for the production of pain. In the second part, the analysis turns to what this discourse reveals about pain as a lived body phenomenon. Here the analysis centers upon the torment of having to inhabit the intolerable, upon how pain unmakes the lifeworld of the sufferer, and how, simultaneously, people make pain. The place of pain is the body, as body-in-place. The place of pain is at the boundaries of human dwelling, a kind of non-place, expressed metaphorically as "prison" or "homelessness." Finally, after these considerations of how pain is described, in part three, I turn to the act of "saying" pain, that is, to the narratives as addressed to someone else. The participants were not simply dispensing information; they were saying something to me. The narratives had the form of complaints. The form of the narratives, in the context of the pain program, was a quasi-legal call to rectify wrongs. PMID:10574237

  16. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-γ, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  17. Chronic autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Litta Modignani, R; Barantani, E; Mazzolari, M; Pincetti Nervi, M; Macchi, R

    1991-01-01

    A total of 67 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroid disease were followed, mainly as outpatients, for a period of a few months to over 15 years. The diagnosis was euthyroidism (n = 16, 23.8%), subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 20, 29.8%), primary hypothyroidism (n = 28, 41.7%) or hashitoxicosis (n = 3, 4.47%). Patients with goiters fit Hashimoto's original description of "struma lymphomatosa". The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds and the usual laboratory hormonal tests. Histological examination was carried out at surgery or by fine needle aspiration in 35 patients (52.2%), and a clinical diagnosis was made in 32 (47.7%). Three patients had juvenile Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Most patients were in the fourth, fifth or sixth decade (64.8%), and of these 12 (18%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, which should be suspected when thyrotropin (TSH) is twice the upper normal limit. In these cases thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) testing and evaluation of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and anti-microsomal antigen antibodies (MsAb) are mandatory. Hypothyroidism with few symptoms develops insidiously in young or elderly patients; the most sensitive test is TSH assay in conjunction with tests for TgAb and MsAb. L-thyroxine administration may be harmful in older patients with late diagnosed primary hypothyroidism. Thyroid supplementation is suggested for patients with subclinical hypothyroidism if TSH values are above 10 mU/L; otherwise they should be followed up annually, as should patients with positive thyroid autoantibodies who are still euthyroid. PMID:1804288

  18. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  19. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Amit; Bhattad, Sagar; Singh, Surjit

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is the most common symptomatic phagocytic defect. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding protein subunits of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex. CGD is characterized by a defective intracellular killing of phagocytosed organisms due to a defective oxidative burst in the neutrophils and macrophages. It is inherited in either X-linked recessive or autosomal recessive pattern. Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus species are the most common organisms reported. Infections with Burkholderia, Serratia, and Nocardia warrant a screen for CGD. Suppurative lymphadenitis, cutaneous abscesses, pneumonia and diarrhea constitute the most common problems in children with CGD. A small percentage of children develop autoimmune manifestations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, colitis, autoimmune hepatitis) and warrant immunosuppression. X-linked carriers of CGD are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Nitroblue-tetrazolium dye reduction test and dihydro-rhodamine assay by flow cytometry are the screening tests for this disorder. While most children do well on long term antibiotic and antifungal prophylaxis, those with severe forms warrant hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The role of regular interferon-γ injections is debatable. Evidence for white cell transfusions is sparse, and gene therapy is under trial.This current review highlights various aspects and studies in CGD. X-linked form of CGD has been noted to carry a poorer prognosis compared to autosomal recessive variants. However, recent evidence suggests that outcome in CGD is determined by the amount of residual NADPH oxidase activity irrespective of mode of inheritance. PMID:26865172

  20. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role. PMID:23146613

  1. Role of Histomorphology and Chronic Inflammation Score in Chronic Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Banerjee, Manas; Pal, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diseases of lacrimal drainage system account for nearly 3% of visits to eye clinic. Chronic dacryocystitis is a frequently encountered disorder among these patients. Histomorphology of specimens obtained after Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is a pertinent indicator of prognostic outcome. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate histopathology of specimens obtained after DCR and to elucidate patterns and score of chronic inflammation encountered. Materials and Methods The study was conducted for a period of one year. Total of 50 patients who were clinically diagnosed as Chronic Dacryocystitis and underwent DCR were included. Following DCR, specimens of lacrimal sac, nasal mucous membrane and nasal bone were collected. Histopathological slides were examined for chronic inflammatory cell infiltration, fibrosis and capillary proliferation and were graded according to severity, in each specimen. A Chronic Inflammation Score (CIS) was recorded for each case. Results The average age of patients was 39.04±14.22 years and their age ranged between 13 and 62 years. There were 28 (56%) females and 22 (44%) males in the study group. The nasal bone did not reveal any abnormality in any case. The nasal mucous membrane showed mild chronic inflammatory cell infiltration in 46 (92%) cases and moderate degree in 4 (8%) patients. Chronic inflammation with granulation tissue formation was noted in lacrimal sacs of all patients. The CIS revealed that 14 (28%) cases belonged to “mild” group, 26 (52%) to “moderate” group and 10 (20%) to “severe” category. Conclusion The inclusion of CIS in histomorphological evaluation of DCR specimens is recommended since it is one of the parameters that influence course of the disease.

  2. 40 CFR 798.3260 - Chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chronic toxicity. 798.3260 Section 798.3260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3260 Chronic toxicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a chronic...

  3. [Chronic illness and contraception].

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, S

    1987-01-01

    In recent years sterilization that can cause problems of the psyche and marital life has been recommended much less frequently with respect to chronic diseases. As regards heart and hypertensive diseases pregnancy is always contraindicated in case of 3rd and 4th disease categories and sterilization is recommended according to the New York Heart Association. As far as 1st and 2nd category patients are concerned if the load carrying capacity is normal pregnancy could be undertaken. Combination pills are not recommended for contraception because they can cause fluid retention or increase the risk of thrombosis. If the patient has a higher-than-normal risk of developing thrombosis or infection, for instance, those who wear pacemakers only tablets containing progesterone or subdermal capsule implants can be used. In those with blood pressure problems the additional use of the IUD is also advised. Among diseases of neurological and psychic origin the effect of hormonal contraceptives is weakened by antiepileptics, but even in such cases older combination pills of larger doses of active ingredients can be employed. Migraine is exacerbated in 1/3 of patients; here IUDs can be used. Even the contraceptive tablets themselves can induce depression. In psychosis methods requiring regular attention can be easily forgotten, therefore the IUD is the most suitable device. In diabetes progesterone and other progestogens reduce insulin response, harm carbohydrate metabolism; therefore in young people the IUD is preferred an in older women with children even sterilization can be employed. Hormonal tablets must not be used in hyperlipidemia and liver diseases. Caution must be exercised in hyperthyroidism and in endocrine disorders (e.g., Cushing's syndrome); if it is accompanied by blood pressure disorders appropriate treatment is required. In kidney diseases pregnancy is contraindicated if it is accompanied by blood pressure increase or a higher level of creatine. On the other hand

  4. Chronic physical illness: a psychophysiological approach for chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that psychological risk variables can contribute to physical disease. In an effort to thoroughly investigate potential etiological origins and optimal interventions, this broad review is divided into five sections: the stress response, chronic diseases, mind-body theoretical models, psychophysiological interventions, and integrated health care solutions. The stress response and its correlation to chronic disorders such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, autoimmune, metabolic syndrome, and chronic pain are comprehensively explored. Current mind-body theoretical models, including peripheral nerve pathway, neurophysiological, and integrative theories, are reviewed to elucidate the biological mechanisms behind psychophysiological interventions. Specific interventions included are psychotherapy, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and psychopharmacology. Finally, the author advocates for an integrated care approach as a means by which to blur the sharp distinction between physical and psychological health. Integrated care approaches can utilize psychiatric nurse practitioners for behavioral assessment, intervention, research, advocacy, consultation, and education to optimize health outcomes. PMID:23483831

  5. Chronic Physical Illness: A Psychophysiological Approach for Chronic Physical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that psychological risk variables can contribute to physical disease. In an effort to thoroughly investigate potential etiological origins and optimal interventions, this broad review is divided into five sections: the stress response, chronic diseases, mind-body theoretical models, psychophysiological interventions, and integrated health care solutions. The stress response and its correlation to chronic disorders such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, autoimmune, metabolic syndrome, and chronic pain are comprehensively explored. Current mind-body theoretical models, including peripheral nerve pathway, neurophysiological, and integrative theories, are reviewed to elucidate the biological mechanisms behind psychophysiological interventions. Specific interventions included are psychotherapy, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and psychopharmacology. Finally, the author advocates for an integrated care approach as a means by which to blur the sharp distinction between physical and psychological health. Integrated care approaches can utilize psychiatric nurse practitioners for behavioral assessment, intervention, research, advocacy, consultation, and education to optimize health outcomes. PMID:23483831

  6. Epigenetic regulation of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain arising from peripheral inflammation and tissue or nerve injury is a common clinical symptom. Although intensive research on the neurobiological mechanisms of chronic pain has been carried out during previous decades, this disorder is still poorly managed by current drugs such as opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Inflammation, tissue injury and/or nerve injury-induced changes in gene expression in sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion, spinal cord dorsal horn and pain-associated brain regions are thought to participate in chronic pain genesis; however, how these changes occur is still elusive. Epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications control gene expression. Recent studies have shown that peripheral noxious stimulation changes DNA methylation and histone modifications and that these changes may be related to the induction of pain hypersensitivity under chronic pain conditions. This review summarizes the current knowledge and progress in epigenetic research in chronic pain and discusses the potential role of epigenetic modifications as therapeutic antinociceptive targets in this disorder. PMID:25942533

  7. Therapy efficacy in chronic aphasia.

    PubMed

    Basso, Anna; Macis, Margherita

    2011-01-01

    There is good evidence that aphasia therapy is effective if sufficiently prolonged or intensive and that chronic aphasic individuals can also benefit from therapy, but data on chronic aphasia are scanty. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether chronic aphasia benefits from a very intensive therapeutic regimen. We revised the files (January 2000 to December 2008) of the chronic subjects whom we suggested have periodic sessions in our Unit (generally once a week) and 2-3 hours daily of homework with the help of a family member, supervised and controlled by the speech-therapist. Treatment would go on as long as amelioration is evident. Results for 23 chronic aphasic subjects are reported. All subjects had undergone previous therapy and 10 had been dismissed because no further recovery was expected. Recovery was significant in oral and written nouns and actions naming, oral and written sentence production and Token Test scores. Only 4 subjects did not improve. Severity of the disorder did not predict success or failure. We conclude that recovery was due to the intense work done. Further, we believe such a regimen could be successful in a number of patients for whom a less intensive regimen would not be effective. PMID:22063820

  8. Management of chronic refractory cough.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter G; Vertigan, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise. PMID:26666537

  9. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  10. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  11. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  12. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  13. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  14. Lytic anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies from patients with chronic Chagas' disease recognize novel O-linked oligosaccharides on mucin-like glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, I C; Ferguson, M A; Schenkman, S; Travassos, L R

    1994-01-01

    Sera of patients with chronic Chagas' disease (American trypanosomiasis) contain elevated levels of anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies that are lytic to Trypanosoma cruzi. The T. cruzi trypomastigote F2/3 antigen complex recognized by these antibodies runs as a broad smear on SDS/PAGE [Almeida, Krautz, Krettli and Travassos (1993) J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 7, 307-316]. Treatment of T. cruzi trypomastigote cells with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) abolished most of their reactivity to chronic Chagas'-disease ((Chagasic, Ch) anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies (anti-Gal). The F2/3 antigen complex, purified by solvent extraction and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, contained 60% carbohydrate by weight and substantial amounts of Thr, Ser, Glx, Asx, Gly, Ala and Pro, but relatively few hydrophobic amino acids. The presence of myoinositol, ethanolamine and 1-O-hexadecylglycerol suggested the presence of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchors. This was confirmed by PI-PLC treatment, which rendered the F2/3 molecules hydrophilic and reactive to anti-(cross-reacting determinant) antibodies. The majority of the GlcNAc content of the F2/3 antigens was found at the reducing termini of oligosaccharides in O-glycosidic linkage to Thr residues. These O-linked oligosaccharides could be released by beta-elimination and by mild hydrazinolysis. The smallest released oligosaccharitol that was reactive with the Ch anti-Gal was Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAcol (where GlcNAcol is N-acetyl-glucosaminitol). Several other Gal-containing oligosaccharitols were observed, most of which were branched and contained 4,6-di-O-substituted GlcNAcol at their reducing termini. About half of the total released oligosaccharitols could bind to immobilized Ch anti-Gal, but none of them bound to the anti-Gal isolated from normal human sera. These data suggest that the specificities of the Ch anti-Gal are quite different from the natural anti-Gal isolated from normal

  15. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christine N; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2013-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a common clinical syndrome characterized by genital/pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. There is also growing recognition of the association of sexual dysfunction with CP/CPPS including erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory pain, and premature ejaculation. In this review, we discuss the association between CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction, potential mechanisms for sexual dysfunction, and treatment strategies for erectile dysfunction in CP/CPPS. PMID:23579441

  16. Peripheral neuromodulation in chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Perini, F; De Boni, A

    2012-05-01

    Patients with chronic migraines are often refractory to medical treatment. Therefore, they might need other strategies to modulate their pain, according to their level of disability. Neuromodulation can be achieved with several tools: meditation, biofeedback, physical therapy, drugs and electric neurostimulation (ENS). ENS can be applied to the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), either invasively (cortical or deep brain) or non-invasively [cranial electrotherapy stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation]. Among chronic primary headaches, cluster headaches are most often treated either through deep brain stimulation or occipital nerve stimulation because there is a high level of disability related to this condition. ENS, employed through several modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential currents and pulsed radiofrequency, has been applied to the peripheral nervous system at several sites. We briefly review the indications for the use of peripheral ENS at the site of the occipital nerves for the treatment of chronic migraine. PMID:22644166

  17. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

  18. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  19. Chronic Cough: A Gastroenterology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Andrew J.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to highlight recent work and provide recommendations on the approach for diagnosis and management of chronic cough in a gastroenterology clinic. Recent findings Chronic cough is a burdensome symptom affecting a large number of patients and contributes significant cost to the healthcare system. Recent work has shown that select patients may benefit from acid suppressive therapy and even surgery when there is true pathologic evidence of reflux disease with cough. However, judicious use and proper interpretation of diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux in the setting of cough is important to avoid unnecessary or inappropriate therapy. Summary Chronic cough remains a vexing problem for many physicians, including gastroenterologists. It is important that physicians approach refractory cough in a multi-disciplinary manner. Future research is needed to better understand the likely central hypersensitivity response mediating reflux related cough and potential alternative approaches to therapy. PMID:24240130

  20. [Neurosurgical treatment of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Fontaine, D; Blond, S; Mertens, P; Lanteri-Minet, M

    2015-02-01

    Neurosurgical treatment of pain used two kind of techniques: 1) Lesional techniques interrupt the transmission of nociceptive neural input by lesionning the nociceptive pathways (drezotomy, cordotomy, tractotomy…). They are indicated to treat morphine-resistant cancer pain and few cases of selected neuropathic pain. 2) Neuromodulation techniques try to decrease pain by reinforcing inhibitory and/or to limit activatory mechanisms. Chronic electrical stimulation of the nervous system (peripheral nerve stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, motor cortex stimulation…) is used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Intrathecal infusion of analgesics (morphine, ziconotide…), using implantable pumps, allows to increase their efficacy and to reduce their side effects. These techniques can improve, sometimes dramatically, selected patients with severe and chronic pain, refractory to all other treatments. The quality of the analgesic outcome depends on the relevance of the indications. PMID:25681114

  1. Chronic gout in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bolzetta, Francesco; Veronese, Nicola; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    Gout is the most common cause of inflammatory arthritis in men over 40 years old; it is a debilitating disease and, if untreated, can result in a chronic progressive disease, including tophaceous gout. In the elderly it represents a special issue, with notable clinical and therapeutic differences from the classical form with a systemic involvement. The burden of the disease increases particularly in the very old people, in whom arthritis, impaired gait and eyesight problems may enhance the related disability. Chronic gout moreover could aggravate heart and kidney disease and increase overall mortality and organ-related damage. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important goals for the clinician that should to rely on the cooperation of specialists working together through the methodology of comprehensive geriatric assessment. The aim of the present review was to analyze chronic gout in old people in terms of epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical approach, and current treatment. PMID:23739897

  2. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  3. Exercise therapy for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Heather R

    2015-05-01

    The benefit of exercise for pain control likely comes from the impact of exercise on the endogenous opioid system and on central pain modulatory systems. Patients with some chronic pain conditions seem to have a dysfunctional endogenous pain modulatory system, which should be considered when prescribing exercise. The prescription of exercise for chronic pain must address the biomechanical issues and the psychosocial factors that contribute to the patient's pain and disability. Patient education, coordination of care within the health care team, and selecting an exercise regimen that is meaningful to and achievable by the patient are all important components to promote a successful rehabilitation program. PMID:25952064

  4. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  5. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient. PMID:25240668

  6. Chronic pancreatitis: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Sinead N; Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Lawal, Oladapo; O’Connor, Donal B; Conlon, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Typical clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are vague and non-specific and therefore diagnostic tests are required, none of which provide absolute diagnostic certainly, especially in the early stages of disease. Recently-published guidelines bring much needed structure to the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. In addition, novel diagnostic modalities bring promise for the future. The assessment and diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency remains challenging and this review contests the accepted perspective that steatorrhea only occurs with > 90% destruction of the gland. PMID:26900292

  7. Can Chronic Pain Be Prevented?

    PubMed

    Badiola, Ignacio J

    2016-06-01

    All chronic pain begins at some discrete point in time. Significant strides in the understanding of mechanisms and risk factors associated with the transition from a new, or acute, pain experience to a chronic pain condition have been made over the past 20 years. These insights provide the hope of one day being able to modify or even halt this pathophysiologic progression. This article reviews some of the current knowledge of this transition as well as the evidence currently available to best prevent and treat it using persistent surgical pain as a model. PMID:27208712

  8. Aetiology of chronic constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, S; Bonar, S; O'Neill, H; Hanly, P; Drury, I; Flanagan, M; Garrett, J

    1983-01-01

    In a consecutive series of 32 cases of chronic constrictive pericarditis treated by pericardiectomy during the past 25 years, four were attributable to rheumatoid disease, two to trauma, one to sarcoidosis, and four, at a maximum, to tuberculosis. In the remaining 21 cases of undetermined aetiology there was no evidence of tuberculosis. It appears, therefore, that tuberculosis was not a common cause of chronic constrictive pericarditis during the period under review, which included the 1950s and early 1960s when tuberculosis was widespread. PMID:6615663

  9. [Angle-closure chronic glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of chronic angle closure glaucoma is considerably greater than the incidence of the acute type. This type of glaucoma may mimic primary open angle glaucoma with visual field deterioration, optic nerve alteration and intraocular pressure elevation with a quiet painless eye. Its diagnosis is based on indentation gonioscopy showing peripheral anterior synechiae. The mechanisms of angle closure are the pupillary block, the plateau iris configuration and the creeping form. The treatment of chronic angle closure glaucoma is based on laser peripheral iridotomy. PMID:14646832

  10. Initial validation of the Argentinean Spanish version of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales in children and adolescents with chronic diseases: acceptability and comprehensibility in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Roizen, Mariana; Rodríguez, Susana; Bauer, Gabriela; Medin, Gabriela; Bevilacqua, Silvina; Varni, James W; Dussel, Veronica

    2008-01-01

    Background To validate the Argentinean Spanish version of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales in Argentinean children and adolescents with chronic conditions and to assess the impact of socio-demographic characteristics on the instrument's comprehensibility and acceptability. Reliability, and known-groups, and convergent validity were tested. Methods Consecutive sample of 287 children with chronic conditions and 105 healthy children, ages 2–18, and their parents. Chronically ill children were: (1) attending outpatient clinics and (2) had one of the following diagnoses: stem cell transplant, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV/AIDS, cancer, end stage renal disease, complex congenital cardiopathy. Patients and adult proxies completed the PedsQL™ 4.0 and an overall health status assessment. Physicians were asked to rate degree of health status impairment. Results The PedsQL™ 4.0 was feasible (only 9 children, all 5 to 7 year-olds, could not complete the instrument), easy to administer, completed without, or with minimal, help by most children and parents, and required a brief administration time (average 5–6 minutes). People living below the poverty line and/or low literacy needed more help to complete the instrument. Cronbach Alpha's internal consistency values for the total and subscale scores exceeded 0.70 for self-reports of children over 8 years-old and parent-reports of children over 5 years of age. Reliability of proxy-reports of 2–4 year-olds was low but improved when school items were excluded. Internal consistency for 5–7 year-olds was low (α range = 0.28–0.76). Construct validity was good. Child self-report and parent proxy-report PedsQL™ 4.0 scores were moderately but significantly correlated (ρ = 0.39, p < 0.0001) and both significantly correlated with physician's assessment of health impairment and with child self-reported overall health status. The PedsQL™ 4.0 discriminated between healthy and chronically ill children (72

  11. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  12. Prevention of Blindness: Chronic Glaucoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Kenneth T.

    1970-01-01

    An evaluation of present screening procedures for chronic open-angle glaucoma includes suggestions for improvement: greater distribution of screening and education, conversion from monophasic to multiphasic screen, and examination of visual fields, optic nerve, and medical history in addition to the tonometry currently done. (KW)

  13. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  14. Chronic sequelae of foodborne disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the past decade the complexity of foodborne pathogens, as well as their adaptability and ability to cause acute illness, and in some cases chronic (secondary) complications, have been newly appreciated. This overview examines long-term consequences of foodborne infections and intoxications to emphasize the need for more research and education. PMID:9366595

  15. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women.

    PubMed

    Speer, Linda M; Mushkbar, Saudia; Erbele, Tara

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is defined as persistent, noncyclic pain perceived to be in structures related to the pelvis and lasting more than six months. Often no specific etiology can be identified, and it can be conceptualized as a chronic regional pain syndrome or functional somatic pain syndrome. It is typically associated with other functional somatic pain syndromes (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome, nonspecific chronic fatigue syndrome) and mental health disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder, depression). Diagnosis is based on findings from the history and physical examination. Pelvic ultrasonography is indicated to rule out anatomic abnormalities. Referral for diagnostic evaluation of endometriosis by laparoscopy is usually indicated in severe cases. Curative treatment is elusive, and evidence-based therapies are limited. Patient engagement in a biopsychosocial approach is recommended, with treatment of any identifiable disease process such as endometriosis, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and comorbid depression. Potentially beneficial medications include depot medroxyprogesterone, gabapentin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists with add-back hormone therapy. Pelvic floor physical therapy may be helpful. Behavioral therapy is an integral part of treatment. In select cases, neuromodulation of sacral nerves may be appropriate. Hysterectomy may be considered as a last resort if pain seems to be of uterine origin, although significant improvement occurs in only about one-half of cases. Chronic pelvic pain should be managed with a collaborative, patient-centered approach. PMID:26926975

  16. [Chronic prostatitis and Bechterew's disease].

    PubMed

    Kohlicek, J; Svec, V

    1977-11-01

    A group of patients between 35 and 65 years old with chronic prostatitis were examined for the presence of Becherew's disease. In this connection the New York and Roman criterions for morbus Bechterew were applied. There were found one ankyosing spondylarthritis, one ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, and 11 times a tentative sacroileitis were stated. Altogether the proved and tentative findings were only 3.68 per cent of all examinations. In our countries the morbus Bechterew is found in 0,21 per cent of the normal population. So the protion of the Bechterew's disease in patients with chronic prostatitis is indeed a little higher than average, but not so frequent as often pretended in recent times. After a second series 58 patients being treated because of Bechterew's disease of different stages and different terms were examined for the possibility of a simultaneously elapsing chronic prostatitis. A chronic prostatitis was found in 38 per cent of these patients which correspondents to the incidence published in literature for the medium-age manhood. Nobody of the test persons had complaints on the part of the urologenital tract. PMID:602457

  17. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  18. Counseling the Chronic Pain Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Richard S.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the provision of counseling services for chronic pain patients within comprehensive, multifaceted treatment program. Describes the counseling process, including orientation, evaluation, and clarification of client concerns. Cites the use of coping techniques such as relaxation training, biofeedback training, and pain coping skills. (RC)

  19. Immediate versus chronic tissue expansion.

    PubMed

    Machida, B K; Liu-Shindo, M; Sasaki, G H; Rice, D H; Chandrasoma, P

    1991-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the effects on tissues is performed between chronic tissue expansion, intraoperative expansion, and load cycling in a guinea pig model. Intra-operative expansion, which was developed by Sasaki as a method of immediate tissue expansion for small- to medium-sized defects, and load cycling, which was described by Gibson as a method using intraoperative pull, are compared with chronic tissue expansion on the basis of the following four parameters: amount of skin produced, flap viability, intraoperative tissue pressures, and histological changes. The chronically expanded group, which included booster and nonbooster expansions, produced a 137% increase in surface area, or a 52% increase in flap arc length, whereas intraoperative expansion resulted in a 31% increase in surface area, or a 15% increase in flap arc length. The load-cycled group, however, resulted in an almost negligible amount of skin increase. All three techniques exhibit immediate postexpansion stretchback. Flap viability is not impaired by any of the three techniques, in spite of the elevated pressures observed during expansion. Therefore, intraoperative expansion is effective primarily for limited expansion of small defects, whereas chronic tissue expansion still provides the greatest amount of skin increase when compared with other techniques. PMID:2029132

  20. Psychosocial Antecedents of Chronic Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towberman, Donna B.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined associations between selected characteristics and background historical events of subjects and chronic delinquency, defined as the number of adjudicated offenses. Results indicate that family functioning had a strong association. Other factors include early age at first adjudication, out-of-home placements, having been abused,…

  1. Multiculturalism, chronic illness, and disability.

    PubMed

    Groce, N E; Zola, I K

    1993-05-01

    To gain at least an initial understanding of the underlying beliefs and attitudes in a cross-cultural situation, we believe that the three key points discussed in this paper should prove a significant point of departure: 1. Traditional beliefs about the cause of chronic illness or disability will play a significant role in determining family and community attitudes toward individuals with a disability and will influence when, how, and why medical input is sought. 2. The expectation of survival on the part of parents and community will have an effect on the amount of time, energy, and cooperation shown by family and community for the individual who has an impairment. 3. The expectations by family and community for the social role(s) and individual with a chronic illness or disability will hold will affect a broad range of issues, including education, social integration, and independence. Furthermore, although chronic illness and disability are often considered as issues distinct from the full range of problems encountered in society for immigrant and minority groups, in fact, these issues could not be more closely tied. The frequently discussed concerns within the ethnic and minority community about the role of the family, integration and acculturation, social articulation with the greater American society, stress, cross-cultural misunderstanding, and outright prejudice can all compound the problems encountered for the chronically ill or disabled individual in a multicultural society. PMID:8479830

  2. Chronic Pain and Exercise Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raithel, Kathryn Simmons

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and resistance exercise are currently prescribed by physicians to treat chronic pain. However, patient fitness level must improve before he/she feels better. Pain management programs help patients become more active so they can function at work and home. (SM)

  3. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  4. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. Epclusa Approved for Chronic Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159609.html Epclusa Approved for Chronic Hepatitis C Combination drug treats six major forms of ... to treat the six major strains of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Epclusa combines sofosbuvir, FDA-approved ...

  6. Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160011.html Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness Feeling they have control over their ... News) -- Children and teens who feel confident handling a chronic illness on their own appear better able ...

  7. Epclusa Approved for Chronic Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159609.html Epclusa Approved for Chronic Hepatitis C Combination drug treats six major forms of HCV ... treat the six major strains of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Epclusa combines sofosbuvir, FDA-approved in ...

  8. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Print to PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Approved by the ... Platelets that help the blood to clot About leukemia Types of leukemia are named after the specific ...

  9. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    deCastro, F.J.

    1990-04-01

    Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

  10. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain. PMID:8471902

  11. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials. PMID:25970869

  12. Probiotics in the treatment of chronic rhinoconjunctivitis and chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (CRS) are relevant health conditions affecting significant percentages of the western population. They are frequently coexisting and aggravating diseases. Both are chronic, noninfectious, and inflammatory conditions sharing to a certain extent important pathophysiologic similarities. Beneficial effects of probiotics are long known to mankind. Research is beginning to unravel the true nature of the human microbiome and its interaction with the immune system. The growing prevalence of atopic diseases in the developed world led to the proposition of the "hygiene hypothesis." Dysbiosis is linked to atopic diseases; probiotic supplementation is able to alter the microbiome and certain probiotic strains have immunomodulatory effects in favour of a suppression of Th-2 and stimulation of a Th1 profile. This review focuses on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating clinical parameters in the treatment of chronic rhinitis and CRS. An emerging number of publications demonstrate beneficial effects using probiotics in clinical double-blind placebo-controlled (dbpc) trials in allergic rhinitis (AR). Using probiotics as complementary treatment options in AR seems to be a promising concept although the evidence is of a preliminary nature to date and more convincing trials are needed. There are no current data to support the use of probiotics in non-AR or CRS. PMID:24872820

  13. Category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: insights from the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network studies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J Curtis; Alexander, Richard B; Anderson, Rodney; Berger, Richard; Comiter, Craig V; Datta, Nand S; Fowler, Jackson E; Krieger, John N; Landis, J Richard; Litwin, Mark S; McNaughton-Collins, Mary; O'Leary, Michael P; Pontari, Michel A; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Shoskes, Daniel A; White, Paige; Kusek, John; Nyberg, Leroy

    2008-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome remains an enigmatic medical condition. Creation of the National Institutes of Health-funded Chronic Prostatitis Collaborative Research Network (CPCRN) has stimulated a renewed interest in research on and clinical aspects of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Landmark publications of the CPCRN document a decade of progress. Insights from these CPCRN studies have improved our management of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and offer hope for continued progress. PMID:18765132

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Bean, A. G.; Bowles, M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years) and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship. PMID:9184877

  15. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rosshandler, Yasmin; Shen, Ann Q; Cortes, Jorge; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2016-05-01

    Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase resistant to two or more tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of omacetaxine mepesuccinate. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has activity in chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the chronic phase, regardless of the presence of ABL1 kinase domain mutations. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has distinct but manageable adverse events profile. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is a treatment option for a subset of patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:26853281

  16. [Chronic cough: common problem, discontended patients].

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki; Purokivi, Minna

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic cough is 10 to 15%. It has a strong negative impact on the patients' quality of life and it often causes depression. Many patients find medications unhelpful. Successful management of chronic cough requires the identification of the underlying condition like chronic rhinosinusitis, asthma, and asthma-like syndrome, and esophageal reflux disease. If the underlying condition cannot be identified or if the drug trials fail to help, the patient probably suffers from idiopathic chronic cough. A new paradigm has been introduced in which chronic cough is regarded as a primary condition. PMID:25558624

  17. Basophil responsiveness in chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sarbjit S

    2009-07-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common skin disease without an etiology in the majority of cases. The similarity of symptoms and pathology to allergen-induced skin reactions supports the idea that skin mast cell and blood basophil IgE receptor activation is involved; however, no exogenous allergen trigger has been identified. Recent evidence supports a role for blood basophils in disease expression. Specifically, blood basopenia is noted in active disease with the recruitment of blood basophils to skin lesional sites. In addition, blood basophils display altered IgE receptor-mediated degranulation that reverts in disease remission. In active chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) subjects, changes in IgE receptor-signaling molecule expression levels accompany the altered degranulation function in blood basophils. The arrival of therapies targeting IgE has further shown that altered blood basophil degranulation behavior has potential use as a disease biomarker in CIU. PMID:19656475

  18. Antidepressants in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Yasharpour, Michelle R; Randhawa, Inderpal

    2011-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is a common disease estimated to affect 0.1% of the population and can be very difficult to treat. Many psychotropic medications have been reported to be successful in treating refractory CIU. The purpose of this article was to discuss the pathophysiology of chronic urticaria and provide practicing allergists and dermatologists alternative treatment options in the management of refractory CIU, especially in those who have concurrent psychiatric comorbidity. A review was performed of pertinent literature pertaining to the pathophysiology of CIU and the many psychotropic medications reportedly successful in disease management. Although more research is needed, this article serves to broaden the mind of the physician treating CIU. PMID:22221435

  19. Endometriosis and Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bloski, Terri; Pierson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Nurses often encounter patients with chronic pelvic pain associated with endometriosis, which is a puzzling and problematic gynecologic condition that has continued to plague women and baffle doctors and researchers worldwide since it was first identified by Dr. J. Sampson in the 1920s (Sampson, 1940). Endometriosis is defined as the growth, adhesion and progression of endometrial glands and stroma outside of the uterine cavity, with cellular activity evident in lesions, nodules, cysts or endometriomas (Audebert et al., 1992). Although it typically appears benign on histopathology, endometriosis has been likened to a malignant tumor since the lesions grow, infiltrate and adhere to adjacent tissues and interfere with physiologic processes (Kitawaki et al., 2002; Noble, Simpson, Johns, & Bulun, 1996). Ectopic endometriotic growths respond to cyclic changes of estrogen and proliferate and shed in a manner similar to eutopic endometrium. This cyclic ectopic activity results in internal bleeding, formation of scar tissue, inflammation and sometimes debilitating chronic pain (Kitawaki et al.). PMID:18837717

  20. Insomnia and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Anstead, Michael I; Ho, Julia; Phillips, Barbara A

    2009-09-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease including chronic heart failure (CHF) and is a significant contributing factor to fatigue and poor quality of life. The pathophysiology of CHF often leads to fatigue, due to nocturnal symptoms causing sleep disruption, including cough, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and nocturia. Inadequate cardiac function may lead to hypoxemia or poor perfusion of the cerebrum, skeletal muscle, or visceral body organs, which result in organ dysfunction or failure and may contribute to fatigue. Sleep disturbances negatively affect all dimensions of quality of life and is related to increased risk of comorbidities, including depression. This article reviews insomnia in CHF, cardiac medication side-effects related to sleep disturbances, and treatment options. PMID:18758945

  1. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  2. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  3. [Chronic closed-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2004-06-01

    Five times more frequent than the acute form, chronic closed-angle glaucoma often goes unrecognized for a long time, resulting in considerable visual field deficiencies, even in loss of the eye. It is sometimes confused with chronic glaucoma and treated as such, which is inadequate to halt the progression of the disease. Only gonioscopy can diagnose it. If doubt persists, UBM (ultrasound biomicroscopy) can detect goniosynechiae, a malposition of the ciliary body or of the lens, or the existence of iridociliary cysts. Nine times out of ten, pupillary block initiates the process and an iridotomy should always be done to remediate it, even if this procedure alone does not always suffice to solve the problem. PMID:15319750

  4. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    All providers, regardless of specialty, should perform screening for HBV on high-risk persons, especially those born in endemic countries. The primary care physician can perform the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with chronic HBV by following the algorithm in this article and consulting with specialists when appropriate. Chronically infected patients should be followed on a regular basis, preferably every 6 months, with liver function tests, and when appropriate, HBV DNA levels. Those who meet the criteria for high risk for HCC should undergo liver ultrasound every 6 months. Powerful antiviral medications are available that can suppress but not cure HBV and result in resolution of liver inflammation and fibrosis, even cirrhosis, as well as decrease the risk of developing HCC. They should be used in those patients who meet the criteria outlined in the practice guidelines of the major liver societies. PMID:24266913

  5. Bacteria in chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Karma, P; Jokipii, L; Sipilä, P; Luotonen, J; Jokipii, A M

    1979-07-01

    Sixty-one chronically inflamed maxillary sinuses produced 131 bacterial strains from mucosal pieces that were taken during a Caldwell-Luc operation and cultured aerobically and anaerobically. Sinus secretions showed only 62 and nasal secretions 106 bacterial strains. Fourteen mucosal strains, including 11 Haemophilus influenzae, grew heavily. None of 24 mucosal anaerobes showed heavy growth. Of 52 antral mucosae with culturable bacteria, 37 disclosed mixed and 15 pure growth. The bacteriological characteristics of the diseased sinus and the nose did not correlate. The duration or extent of the disease, the macroscopic appearance of the diseased sinus, or the presence or absence of allergy were unrelated to bacteriological findings, except that H influenzae was concentrated in purulent sinuses. Intraoperative culture of antral mucosa seems to give the most reliable picture of the bacteriological condition in chronic maxillary sinusitis. PMID:313206

  6. [Antidiarrheal drugs for chronic diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Vohmann, B; Hoffmann, J C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic diarrhea can be caused by multiple disease entities. Basic diagnostic tests are required in order to administer specific therapies whenever possible. If no specific treatment can be used, a symptomatic management should be initiated in order to prevent massive electrolyte- and water losses. Substances that can be used are loperamide, cholestyramine, bulking agents, probiotics, anticholinergic agents and in severe cases opioids. If used properly these agents can be prescribed longterm with an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:24163167

  7. Chronic Infection and Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tara F; Kraft, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Chronic bacterial infection is implicated in both the development and severity of asthma. The atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae have been identified in the airways of asthmatics and correlated with clinical features such as adult onset, exacerbation risks, steroid sensitivity, and symptom control. Asthmatic patients with evidence of bacterial infection may benefit from antibiotic treatment directed towards these atypical organisms. Examination of the airway microbiome may identify microbial communities that confer risk for or protection from severe asthma. PMID:27401621

  8. [Differential diagnosis of chronic diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Louis, E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diarrhoea is a frequent clinical presentation in our population. It may correspond to many gastrointestinal or systemic pathologies. Most frequent causes are irritable bowel syndrome, functional intestinal disorders or lactose intolerance, but organic diseases have also to be searched. Focused patient questioning and some specific aspects of clinical examination play a key-role in diagnosis orientation and the use of complementary explorations. The present paper proposes a structured diagnostic procedure aiming at an optimal use of complementary explorations. PMID:24640309

  9. [Chronic kidney disease and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities of mineral metabolism develop with decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is called as a CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The standard approach for management of CKD-MBD is to keep serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone in the reference range by dietary intervention and medications. It has been recently pointed out that starting the treatment from early CKD is important for suppressing CKD-MBD. PMID:26923973

  10. Remodeling of the heart (membrane proteins and collagen) in hypertensive cardiopathy.

    PubMed

    Sainte Beuve, C; Leclercq, C; Rannou, F; Oliviero, P; Mansier, P; Chevalier, B; Swynghedauw, B; Charlemagne, D

    1992-06-01

    The basis for impaired left ventricular function of hearts in moderate to severe stages of hypertrophy and congestive heart failure remains uncertain. At the cellular level, the mechanisms governing the movements of calcium in the myocardium are actually depressed and might at least in part account for the slowing of the maximum shortening velocity and the impaired relaxation. These alterations of membrane proteins seem particularly important in species where the slowing of Vmax cannot be a consequence of the myosin heavy chain shift. They lead to an unstable equilibrium of calcium homeostasis and to calcium overload in heart failure. On the other hand, the enhanced density and remodeling of collagen in the hypertrophied heart, which would depend on elevation in circulating aldosterone, impair myocardial stiffness with diastolic dysfunction and lead to altered pumping capacity of the heart. Disturbances of calcium metabolism and matrix collagen remodeling enhance early afterdepolarizations and arrhythmias. PMID:1385839

  11. The Murine Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB Develops Cardiopathies over Time Leading to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Valeria; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Paciello, Orlando; Avallone, Luigi; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Iacobellis, Francesca; Di Napoli, Daniele; Magliulo, Fabio; Perrino, Cinzia; Trimarco, Bruno; Esposito, Giovanni; Di Natale, Paola; Pavone, Luigi Michele

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a lysosomal disease due to the deficiency of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) required for heparan sulfate (HS) degradation. The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological disorders. Very little is known on the cardiac dysfunctions in MPS IIIB. In this study, we used the murine model of MPS IIIB (NAGLU knockout mice, NAGLU-/-) in order to investigate the cardiac involvement in the disease. Echocardiographic analysis showed a marked increase in left ventricular (LV) mass, reduced cardiac function and valvular defects in NAGLU-/- mice as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The NAGLU-/- mice exhibited a significant increase in aortic and mitral annulus dimension with a progressive elongation and thickening of anterior mitral valve leaflet. A severe mitral regurgitation with reduction in mitral inflow E-wave-to-A-wave ratio was observed in 32-week-old NAGLU-/- mice. Compared to WT mice, NAGLU-/- mice exhibited a significantly lower survival with increased mortality observed in particular after 25 weeks of age. Histopathological analysis revealed a significant increase of myocardial fiber vacuolization, accumulation of HS in the myocardial vacuoles, recruitment of inflammatory cells and collagen deposition within the myocardium, and an increase of LV fibrosis in NAGLU-/- mice compared to WT mice. Biochemical analysis of heart samples from affected mice showed increased expression levels of cardiac failure hallmarks such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, connexin43, α-smooth muscle actin, α-actinin, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, and myosin heavy polypeptide 7. Furthermore, heart samples from NAGLU-/- mice showed enhanced expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP2), and the autophagic markers Beclin1 and LC3 isoform II (LC3-II). Overall, our findings demonstrate that NAGLU-/- mice develop heart disease, valvular abnormalities and cardiac failure associated with an impaired lysosomal autophagic flux. PMID:26147524

  12. Chronic ketosis and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    DeVivo, D C; Leckie, M P; Ferrendelli, J S; McDougal, D B

    1978-04-01

    The effects of chronic ketosis on cerebral metabolism were determined in adult rats maintained on a high-fat diet for approximately three weeks and compared to a control group of animals. The fat-fed rats had statistically significantly lower blood glucose concentrations and higher blood beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate concentrations; higher brain concentrations of bound glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, alanine, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP); lower brain concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate, aspartate, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), creatine, cyclic nucleotides, succinyl coenzyme A (CoA), acid-insoluble CoA, and total CoA; and similar brain concentrations of glucose, malate, calculated oxaloacetate, glutamate, glutamine, adenosine monophosphate, phosphocreatine, reduced CoA, acetyl CoA, sodium, potassium, chloride, and water content. The metabolite data in the chronically ketotic rats demonstrate an increase in the cerebral energy reserve and energy charge. These data also suggest negative modification of the enzymes phosphofructokinase, pyruvic dehydrogenase, and alpha-ketoglutaric dehydrogenase; positive modification of glycogen synthase; and possible augmentation of the hexose transport system. There was no demonstrable difference in brain pH, water content, or electrolytes in the two groups of animals. We speculate that the increased brain ATP/ADP ratio is central to most, if not all, the observed metabolic perturbations and may account for the increased neuronal stability that accompanies chronic ketosis. PMID:666275

  13. [Behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshiko; Yamagami, Toshiko

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of non-pharmacological intervention for chronic insomnia has been proven by several meta-analytic reviews, an NIH report, an American Academy of Sleep Medicine review, and numerous clinical trials. Behavior therapy for chronic insomnia consists of relaxation, stimulus control, sleep restriction, cognitive restructuring and sleep hygiene education, which has produced reliable and durable changes in total sleep time, sleep onset latency, number and duration of awakening. These studies also showed that the post-treatment effect of behavior therapy is equal to that of hypnotic therapy, and that these effects were maintained for 6 months on follow-up assessment. Elderly insomniac patients would gain considerable benefit from behavioral treatments because there are no adverse physical effects as there are from pharmacological therapy. The authors present the basic theory, techniques of behavior therapy for insomnia, and the results of two important key meta-analytic reviews. Any behavioral approach such as convenient education, self-care enhancement by bibliotherapy, and individual face-to-face counseling, seem to be fruitful not only for American but also Japanese insomnia patients. Nonetheless, there are no currently actual intervention studies using behavior therapy in Japan. We have discussed the methodology of intervention study and published a behavioral self-help manual for people with sleep problems. Development of a behavioral approach to chronic insomnia seemed to be very beneficial and a useful contribution to mental health services. PMID:12373807

  14. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  15. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  16. Chronic Hemodialysis in Small Children.

    PubMed

    Novljan, Gregor; Rus, Rina R; Premru, Vladimir; Ponikvar, Rafael; Battelino, Nina

    2016-06-01

    When peritoneal dialysis is inapplicable, chronic hemodialysis (HD) becomes the only available treatment option in small children. Due to small patient size, central venous catheters (CVC) are mainly used for vascular access. Over the past 4 years, four children weighing less than 15 kg received chronic HD in our unit. A total of 848 dialysis sessions were performed. Altogether, 21 catheters were inserted. In all but one occasion, uncuffed catheters were used. Catheter revision was performed 15 times during the study period, either due to infection or catheter malfunction. The median number of catheter revisions and the median line survival was 3.0/patient-year and 53 days (range; 6-373 days), respectively. There were 14 episodes of catheter related infections requiring 11 CVC revisions (78.6%). The median rate of line infections was 2.8/patient-year. Chronic HD in small children is demanding and labor intensive. Issues pertain mainly to CVCs and limit its long-term use. PMID:27312919

  17. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  18. Economic implications of chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Gliklich, R E; Metson, R

    1998-03-01

    An approach to cost analysis useful in understanding the economic implications of surgical intervention on chronic sinusitis is break-even time analysis. The break-even time is the time until cost savings associated with improved health status after surgery equal the up-front costs of the operation itself. Data from 100 consecutive patients undergoing sinus operation were obtained by survey before surgery and at quarterly intervals for 1 year with statistically validated outcome measures (Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Chronic Sinusitis Survey). Direct and indirect costs were obtained or derived for this cohort. The cost of sinus medications, including over-the-counter remedies, nasal steroid sprays, and antibiotics, averaged $1220 per patient per year before surgery and $629 after surgery (p < 0.0001), which is a 48% reduction. Surgical costs averaged $6490 per patient. Economic modeling predicted a break-even time of approximately 7 years assuming a 3% surgical revision rate per year, a 3% decrease in sickness-related disability, and a 5% discount rate. The model was sensitive to changes in the total cost of operation, the surgical revision rate, and the anticipated disability benefit. We conclude that significant direct and indirect medical cost savings may be achieved after surgical intervention for chronic sinusitis and these savings eventually break even with the total cost of surgery itself. PMID:9527115

  19. [Smoking habits in chronic schizophrenics].

    PubMed

    Fukui, K; Kobayashi, T; Hayakawa, S; Koga, E; Okazaki, S; Kawashima, Y; Kawakami, F; Fukui, Y; Tani, N; Kato, A

    1995-12-01

    The smoking habits of 48 chronic schizophrenics who were inpatients of private psychiatric were examined. Subjects were divided into three groups; non-smokers, moderate smokers and heavy smokers, and tested by Fagerstrom's Tolerance Questionnaire (FTQ) as a tobacco dependence evaluation, and Bender Gestalt Test (BGT) and Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) as a neuropsychological battery. In addition, we used the Scales for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) to evaluate the degree of schizophrenic negative symptoms, confirming the correlation between SANS score and the amount of nicotine intake or FTQ item. From the results of FTQ scores and their correlation with SANS scores, the amount of nicotine intake was significantly related to the severity of schizophrenic negative symptoms including affective blunting, poverty of thinking and attention impairment. BGT and BVRT showed disturbances in visual-motor gestalt function, and attention and memory, in chronic schizophrenics who smoked, especially in heavy smokers. These results suggest that smoking behavior in chronic schizophrenics might increase the individual vigilance against negative symptoms, from the perspective of self-medication. PMID:8588752

  20. Superoxide dismutases in chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Švagelj, Dražen; Terzić, Velimir; Dovhanj, Jasna; Švagelj, Marija; Cvrković, Mirta; Švagelj, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Human gastric diseases have shown significant changes in the activity and expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms. The aim of this study was to detect Mn-SOD activity and expression in the tissue of gastric mucosa, primarily in chronic gastritis (immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis, without other pathohistological changes) and to evaluate their possible connection with pathohistological diagnosis. We examined 51 consecutive outpatients undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were classified based on their histopathological examinations and divided into three groups: 51 patients (archive samples between 2004-2009) with chronic immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis (mononuclear cells infiltration were graded as absent, moderate, severe) divided into three groups. Severity of gastritis was graded according to the updated Sydney system. Gastric tissue samples were used to determine the expression of Mn-SOD with anti-Mn-SOD Ab immunohistochemically. The Mn-SOD expression was more frequently present in specimens with severe and moderate inflammation of gastric mucosa than in those with normal mucosa. In patients with normal histological finding, positive immunoreactivity of Mn-SOD was not found. Our results determine the changes in Mn-SOD expression occurring in the normal gastric mucosa that had undergone changes in the intensity of chronic inflammatory infiltrates in the lamina propria. PMID:26765960

  1. Widespread pain in chronic epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Pienimäki, Tuomo; Siira, Pertti; Vanharanta, Heikki

    2011-10-01

    We studied the associations of widespread pain with other pain and functional measures among patients with chronic epicondylitis. A total of 190 patients (66% females) participated in the study; with a mean age 43.7, mean duration of symptoms 48weeks, chronic lateral (n=160) and medial (n=30) epicondylitis. We analysed clinical status, grip strength and cubital pain thresholds and interviewed pain and disability, leisure time physical activity, strenuous hobby activities for arms, duration of symptoms, other systemic and upper extremity disorders, arm operations, and work ability. The location of pain was analysed using a whole-body pain drawing, categorized into three groups; the highest of which was classified as widespread pain. A total of 85 patients (45%) reported widespread pain. It was highly associated with female gender, high pain scores, decreased grip strength and pain thresholds (p<0.001 for all), with increased number of positive manual tests, low level of hobby strain for arms and physical activity, long duration of symptoms, and sick leave (p for all <0.05). It was also related to upper extremity disorders and arm surgery, but not with operated epicondylitis, other systemic diseases, workload or work ability. In addition, 39% of patients without other disease reported widespread pain. Widespread pain is common in chronic epicondylitis with and without other diseases, and is related to high pain scores, decreased function of the arm, long duration of symptoms, sick leave, and with a low level of physical activity. PMID:21565536

  2. Meditation's impact on chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Ramita

    2003-01-01

    Meditation is becoming widely popular as an adjunct to conventional medical therapies. This article reviews the literature regarding the experience of chronic illness, theories about meditation, and clinical effects of this self-care practice. Eastern theories of meditation include Buddhist psychology. The word Buddha means the awakened one, and Buddhist meditators have been called the first scientists, alluding to more than 2500 years of precise, detailed observation of inner experience. The knowledge that comprises Buddhist psychology was derived inductively from the historical figure's (Prince Siddhartha Gautama) diligent self-inquiry. Western theories of meditation include Jungian, Benson's relaxation response, and transpersonal psychology. Clinical effects of meditation impact a broad spectrum of physical and psychological symptoms and syndromes, including reduced anxiety, pain, and depression, enhanced mood and self-esteem, and decreased stress. Meditation has been studied in populations with fibromyalgia, cancer, hypertension, and psoriasis. While earlier studies were small and lacked experimental controls, the quality and quantity of valid research is growing. Meditation practice can positively influence the experience of chronic illness and can serve as a primary, secondary, and/or tertiary prevention strategy. Health professionals demonstrate commitment to holistic practice by asking patients about use of meditation, and can encourage this self-care activity. Simple techniques for mindfulness can be taught in the clinical setting. Living mindfully with chronic illness is a fruitful area for research, and it can be predicted that evidence will grow to support the role of consciousness in the human experience of disease. PMID:14650573

  3. Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis and Thalidomide in Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Martín-Nalda, Andrea; Roca, Isabel; Fontecha, Cesar Galo; Fernández-Polo, Aurora; Barber, Ignasi; Martinez-Gallo, Mónica; Soler-Palacin, Pere

    2016-08-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency that leads to severe recurrent infection and inflammatory complications that are usually difficult to diagnose and treat. Several hyperinflammation mechanisms, such as decreased neutrophil apoptosis, toll-like receptor activation imbalance, Th17 cell induction, Nrf2 activity deficiency, and inflammasome activation, have been described in CGD patients However, there have been no reports of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis as an inflammatory complication in CGD, and the differential diagnosis of this condition with infectious osteomyelitis is challenging. Thalidomide has been used to treat several inflammatory manifestations in CGD patients with good clinical results. Here, we report the case of a previously asymptomatic 11-year-old boy who consulted for difficulty walking and pain at the back of the right thigh, with increased inflammatory markers. Multifocal bone involvement was seen on bone scintigraphy, and acute-phase reactants were elevated. On the basis of a suspected diagnosis of infectious osteomyelitis, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was started, with no clinical response. Bone biopsy and microbiological tests yielded negative results; at that point, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis was suspected. The patient was unresponsive to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. Thalidomide was started, and within 6 months, clinical and radiologic resolution of the condition was achieved with no adverse effects. More than 1 year after stopping thalidomide, the patient remained free of symptoms and inflammatory parameters are within normal levels. Thalidomide has a favorable safety profile compared with other alternatives and could be considered a feasible therapeutic option for this type of condition in selected patients. PMID:27436506

  4. Physical Activity and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wu, Kana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a prevalent urologic disorder among men, but its etiology is still poorly understood. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of CP/CPPS in a large cohort of male health professionals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed from 1986 to 2008. The study population included 20,918 men who completed all CP/CPPS questions on the 2008 questionnaire. Leisure-time physical activity, including type and intensity of activity, was measured by questionnaire in 1986. A National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain score was calculated based on the responses on the 2008 questionnaire. Participants with pain scores ≥ 8 were considered CP/CPPS cases (n=689). Results Higher leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risk of CP/CPPS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing >35.0 to ≤3.5 MET-h/wk of physical activity was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56, 0.92, p for trend <0.001). Observed inverse associations between physical activity and CP/CPPS were similar for both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Sedentary behavior, measured as time spent watching television, was not associated with risk of CP/CPPS (p for trend 0.64). Conclusions Findings from this study, the first large scale and most comprehensive study to date on this association, suggest that higher levels of leisure-time physical activity may lower risk of CP/CPPS in middle-aged and older men. PMID:25116086

  5. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    PubMed

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:26596632

  6. Risk factors of chronic daily headache or chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Chu, Min Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a common neurological condition that affects 1-4 % of the general population. Most individuals with CDH originally suffered from episodic headaches, but over time, this developed into CDH. Although the pathophysiology of CDH is not fully understood, recent clinical and epidemiological studies suggest some risk factors that are associated with an increased risk of transformation from episodic headaches. If risk factors can be identified, they could provide a base for aggressive preventive intervention and thus decrease the transformation from episodic headaches to eventual CDH. In this article, we review and summarize the current data on risk factors for CDH. PMID:25416458

  7. Brain Functional and Anatomical Changes in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Chanda, Mona L.; Parks, Elle L.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Research into the pathophysiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome has primarily focused on markers of peripheral dysfunction. We present the first neuroimaging investigation to our knowledge to characterize brain function and anatomy in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Materials and Methods We collected data from 19 male patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and 16 healthy age and gender matched controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained from 14 patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome as they rated spontaneous pain inside the scanner. Group differences (16 patients per group) in gray matter total volume and regional density were evaluated using voxel-based morphometry, and white matter integrity was studied with diffusion tensor imaging to measure fractional anisotropy. Functional and anatomical imaging outcomes were correlated with the clinical characteristics of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Results Spontaneous pelvic pain was uniquely characterized by functional activation within the right anterior insula, which correlated with clinical pain intensity. No group differences were found in regional gray matter volume, yet density of gray matter in pain relevant regions (anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices) positively correlated with pain intensity and extent of pain chronicity. Moreover the correlation between white matter anisotropy and neo-cortical gray matter volume was disrupted in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Conclusions We provide novel evidence that the pain of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is associated with a chronic pelvic pain syndrome specific pattern of functional brain activation and brain anatomical reorganization. These findings necessitate further investigations into the role of central mechanisms in the initiation and maintenance of chronic prostatitis/chronic

  8. The Association between Endometriosis and Chronic Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Akie; Kimura, Fuminori; Kishi, Yohei; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Takahashi, Akimasa; Yamanaka, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Kentaro; Suginami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between endometriosis and chronic endometritis. Methods Endometrial specimens were obtained from 71 patients, 34 with endometriosis (endometriosis group) and 37 without endometriosis (non-endometriosis group), who underwent hysterectomy, and the specimens were immunostained for the plasmacyte marker CD138. The rate of chronic endometritis was compared between the endometriosis group and the non-endometriosis group. Furthermore, the 71 patients were also divided into two groups, 28 with chronic endometritis (chronic endometritis group) and 43 without chronic endometritis (non-chronic endometritis group). Logistic regression analysis was performed with variables including age, body mass index (BMI), gravidity and parity, and diagnoses of leiomyoma, adenomyosis, and endometriosis on pathology to examine the independent effect of each variable on chronic endometritis. Patients suffering from cervical invasive carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, and endometrial polyps or treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, progestins, or oral contraceptives before surgery were excluded. Results Chronic endometritis was identified in 52.94% of the endometriosis group and 27.02% of the non-endometriosis group (p<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that endometriosis was associated with chronic endometritis. Conclusions This result suggests a strong association between endometriosis and chronic endometritis. PMID:24558386

  9. Chronic migraine: risk factors, mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    May, Arne; Schulte, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic migraine has a great detrimental influence on a patient's life, with a severe impact on socioeconomic functioning and quality of life. Chronic migraine affects 1-2% of the general population, and about 8% of patients with migraine; it usually develops from episodic migraine at an annual conversion rate of about 3%. The chronification is reversible: about 26% of patients with chronic migraine go into remission within 2 years of chronification. The most important modifiable risk factors for chronic migraine include overuse of acute migraine medication, ineffective acute treatment, obesity, depression and stressful life events. Moreover, age, female sex and low educational status increase the risk of chronic migraine. The pathophysiology of migraine chronification can be understood as a threshold problem: certain predisposing factors, combined with frequent headache pain, lower the threshold of migraine attacks, thereby increasing the risk of chronic migraine. Treatment options include oral medications, nerve blockade with local anaesthetics or corticoids, and neuromodulation. Well-defined diagnostic criteria are crucial for the identification of chronic migraine. The International Headache Society classification of chronic migraine was recently updated, and now allows co-diagnosis of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache. This Review provides an up-to-date overview of the classification of chronic migraine, basic mechanisms and risk factors of migraine chronification, and the currently established treatment options. PMID:27389092

  10. Economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Hoang; Lan Huong, Dao; Bao Giang, Kim; Byass, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There remains a lack of information on economic aspects of chronic diseases. This paper, by gathering available and relevant research findings, aims to report and discuss current evidence on economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. Methods Data used in this paper were obtained from various information sources: international and national journal articles and studies, government documents and publications, web-based statistics and fact sheets. Results In Vietnam, chronic diseases were shown to be leading causes of deaths, accounting for 66% of all deaths in 2002. The burdens caused by chronic disease morbidity and risk factors are also substantial. Poorer people in Vietnam are more vulnerable to chronic diseases and their risk factors, other than being overweight. The estimated economic loss caused by chronic diseases for Vietnam in 2005 was about US$20 million (0.033% of annual national GDP). Chronic diseases were also shown to cause economic losses for families and individuals in Vietnam. Both population-wide and high-risk individual interventions against chronic disease were shown to be cost-effective in Vietnam. Conclusion Given the evidence from this study, actions to prevent chronic diseases in Vietnam are clearly urgent. Further research findings are required to give greater insights into economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. PMID:20057939

  11. [Chronic wounds as a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja; Redzepi, Gzim; Antolić, Slavko

    2014-10-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals and the entire health care system. Regarding the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within the expected period according to the wound etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. The majority of wounds (95 percent) are typical ones, which include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcers and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubital ulcers. Eighty percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the rest are mostly neuropathic ulcers. Chronic wounds significantly decrease the quality of life of patients by requiring continuous topical treatment, causing immobility and pain in a high percentage of patients. Chronic wounds affect elderly population. Chronic leg ulcers affect 0.6-3 percent of those aged over 60, increasing to over 5 percent of those aged over 80. Emergence of chronic wounds is a substantial socioeconomic problem as 1-2 percent of western population will suffer from it. This estimate is expected to rise due to the increasing proportion of elderly population along with the diabetic and obesity epidemic. It has been proved that chronic wounds account for the large proportion of costs in the health care system, even in rich societies. Socioeconomically, the management of chronic wounds reaches a total of 2-4 percent of the health budget in western countries. Treatment costs for some other diseases are not irrelevant, nor are the method and materials used for treating these wounds. Considering etiologic factors, a chronic wound demands a multidisciplinary approach with great efforts of health care professionals to treat it more efficiently, more simply and more painlessly for the patient, as well as more inexpensively for

  12. Chronic neutrophilic leukemia associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Usuki, K; Iki, S; Urabe, A

    1998-07-01

    We report on an 83-year-old male with chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) associated initially with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and later with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), in which the clone differed from that of the preceding monoclonal gammopathy. At initial presentation, the patient had hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis (29100 x 10(6)/l) with an increase of mature neutrophils (83%), 20q- chromosomal abnormality, an increased leukocyte alkaline phosphatase score, elevated serum levels of vitamin B12 and uric acid, a low serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and high serum IgM (1015 mg/dl: lambda type M protein). Thereafter, lymphocytosis developed gradually. Three years after the initial presentation, the patient had no serum M protein, but showed evidence of leukocytosis (36600 x 10(6)/l) with 20q- chromosomal abnormality and an increase of mature neutrophils (51%) and small lymphocytes (43.5%), CD5+/19+/20+/HLA-DR+ and surface membrane IgM+/D+/kappa+. Gene rearrangements of the immunoglobulin heavy and kappa light chains were also present. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CNL associated with CLL. PMID:9713172

  13. Nonpharmacologic Management of Chronic Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

    2015-12-15

    Insomnia affects 10% to 30% of the population with a total cost of $92.5 to $107.5 billion annually. Short-term, chronic, and other types of insomnia are the three major categories according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd ed. The criteria for diagnosis are difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or early awakening despite the opportunity for sleep; symptoms must be associated with impaired daytime functioning and occur at least three times per week for at least one month. Factors associated with the onset of insomnia include a personal or family history of insomnia, easy arousability, poor self-reported health, and chronic pain. Insomnia is more common in women, especially following menopause and during late pregnancy, and in older adults. A comprehensive sleep history can confirm the diagnosis. Psychiatric and medical problems, medication use, and substance abuse should be ruled out as contributing factors. Treatment of comorbid conditions alone may not resolve insomnia. Patients with movement disorders (e.g., restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder), circadian rhythm disorders, or breathing disorders (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea) must be identified and treated appropriately. Chronic insomnia is associated with cognitive difficulties, anxiety and depression, poor work performance, decreased quality of life, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Insomnia can be treated with nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies. Nonpharmacologic therapies include sleep hygiene, cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation therapy, multicomponent therapy, and paradoxical intention. Referral to a sleep specialist may be considered for refractory cases. PMID:26760592

  14. Canadian guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) that includes recommendations relevant for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of CRS is based on type and duration of symptoms and an objective finding of inflammation of the nasal mucosa or paranasal sinuses. Chronic rhinosinusitis is categorized based on presence or absence of nasal polyps, and this distinction leads to differences in treatment. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is treated with intranasal corticosteroids. Antibiotics are recommended when symptoms indicate infection (pain or purulence). For CRS without nasal polyps, intranasal corticosteroids and second-line antibiotics (ie, amoxicillin– clavulanic acid combinations or fluoroquinolones with enhanced Gram-positive activity) are recommended. Saline irrigation, oral steroids, and allergy testing might be appropriate. Failure of response should prompt consideration of alternative diagnoses and referral to an otolaryngologist. Patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery require postoperative treatment and follow-up. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide diagnosis and treatment approaches based on the current understanding of the disease and available evidence. Additionally, the guidelines provide the expert opinion of a diverse group of practice and academic experts to help guide clinicians

  15. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  16. Treatment of Refractory Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aayushi; Godse, Kiran; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2015-01-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria is a distressing disease encountered frequently in clinical practice. The current mainstay of therapy is the use of second-generation, non-sedating antihistamines. However, in patients who do not respond satisfactorily to these agents, a variety of other drugs are used. This article examines the available literature for frequently used agents including systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, dapsone, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, H2 antagonists, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, omalizumab, autologous serum therapy, and mycophenolate mofetil, with an additional focus on publications in Indian literature. PMID:26120147

  17. Chronic Constipation and Its Complications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Michelle; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Roth, Antoinette; Chawla, Soni C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fecalomas are hard dense masses separate from surrounding fecal material or bowel contents. This case report intends to provide a brief review of the literature and differential diagnosis for a pelvic mass in a pediatric patient. Case Presentation. The patient is a 5-year-old male presenting with worsening constipation and stool leakage over several months, found to have a rare calcified pelvic mass on abdominal X-ray consistent with a fecaloma. Conclusion. Fecalomas should be considered on the differential diagnosis of pediatric patients who present with chronic constipation and a calcified pelvic mass.

  18. Oligodendroglioma presenting as chronic mania

    PubMed Central

    SAHA, Rahul; JAKHAR, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Summary Oligodendrogliomas may present with a variety of psychological symptoms but it only rarely presents with mania. The patient described in this case report is a 55-year-old man with a three year history of progressive mania who was initially diagnosed as chronic mania but a subsequent MRI identified a brain tumor. This report highlights the importance of considering differential organic diagnosis when patients present with atypical presentations of psychiatric disorders. A brain tumor should be considered and brain imaging studies conducted for patients with a late age of onset who do not respond to appropriate medication.     PMID:26300601

  19. Chronic hepatitis B in hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, N H; Song, I H; Chung, Y-H

    2006-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world, and has a wide geographical variation. Eighty per cent of HCC is attributed to hepatitis B virus (HBV). The predominant carcinogenic mechanism of HBV associated HCC is through the process of liver cirrhosis, but direct oncogenic effects of HBV may also contribute. Prevention of HBV infections as well as effective treatment of chronic hepatitis B is still needed for the global control of HBV associated HCC. Continued investigation of the mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis will refine our current understanding of the molecular and cellular basis for neoplastic transformation in the liver. PMID:16891440

  20. Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome Testing.

    PubMed

    Flick, David; Flick, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is diagnosed based on historical and physical exam findings combined with elevated intracompartmental pressures. Direct static testing with a large bore needle device is the most common instrument used for diagnosis. Based on the most recent systematic reviews, there is poor evidence for the traditional diagnostic pressures used in practice with no standardization of the procedure. New research has introduced a standardized approach with dynamic testing of the limb with transducer-tipped catheters. Less invasive methods of testing using radiologic techniques are currently under investigation. A detailed understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the limb is paramount in executing a safe and accurate procedure. PMID:26359839

  1. CHRONIC FECAL IMPACTION IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Feigen, Gerald Mason

    1957-01-01

    In seventeen cases of chronic fecal impaction in children the main symptoms were severe constipation, pain and bleeding on defecation, soiling of the underpants, and anxiety. The main findings were large impactions in the rectum, minor injuries of the anal canal, some degree of patulous anus and soiling of the perianal skin. Good results were obtained in all cases with treatment that included giving dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate and flavored petrolatum, attention to diet, encouragement of the patient and advice to the parents. PMID:13383391

  2. Chronic Wound Biofilms: Pathogenesis and Potential Therapies.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Allie; Carter, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a growing medical problem that cause high rates of morbidity and mortality, costing the healthcare industry in the United States millions of dollars annually. Chronic wound healing is hampered by the presence of bacterial infections that form biofilms, in which the bacteria are encased in exopolysaccharide (EPS) and are less metabolically active than their free-living counterparts. Bacterial biofilms make chronic wounds more refractory to treatment and slow tissue repair by stimulating chronic inflammation at the wound site. Bacterial species communicate through a mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS) to regulate and coordinate the gene expression that is important for virulence-factor production, including biofilm formation. This review focuses on the relationships between chronic wounds, biofilms, and QS in the virulence of chronic-wound pathogens. PMID:26489671

  3. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Cho, Jae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions. PMID:26194075

  4. Bone morbidity in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Sarah; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Vestergaard, Hanne; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2015-08-01

    Patients with the classical Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms including essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis often suffer from comorbidities, in particular, cardiovascular diseases and thrombotic events. Apparently, there is also an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures among these patients. However, the true prevalence, mechanisms involved and therapeutic implications are not well described. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about possible associations between bone disease and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Chronic inflammation has been suggested to explain the initiation of clonal development and progression in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Decreased bone mineral density and enhanced fracture risk are well-known manifestations of many chronic systemic inflammatory diseases. As opposed to systemic mastocytosis (SM) where pathogenic mechanisms for bone manifestations probably involve effects of mast cell mediators on bone metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for increased fracture risk in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are not known. PMID:26036168

  5. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, Mark W

    2015-05-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling brain disorder. Chronic migraine, a condition characterized by the experience of migrainous headache on at least 15 days per month, is highly disabling. Patients with chronic migraine present to primary care, are often referred for management to secondary care, and make up a large proportion of patients in specialist headache clinics. Many patients with chronic migraine also have medication overuse, defined as using a compound analgesic, opioid, triptan or ergot derivative on at least 10 days per month. All doctors will encounter patients with chronic headaches. A basic working knowledge of the common primary headaches, and a rational manner of approaching the patient with these conditions, allows a specific diagnosis of chronic migraine to be made quickly and safely, and by making this diagnosis one opens up a substantial number of acute and preventive treatment options. This article discusses the current state of management of chronic migraine. PMID:25954496

  6. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling brain disorder. Chronic migraine, a condition characterized by the experience of migrainous headache on at least 15 days per month, is highly disabling. Patients with chronic migraine present to primary care, are often referred for management to secondary care, and make up a large proportion of patients in specialist headache clinics. Many patients with chronic migraine also have medication overuse, defined as using a compound analgesic, opioid, triptan or ergot derivative on at least 10 days per month. All doctors will encounter patients with chronic headaches. A basic working knowledge of the common primary headaches, and a rational manner of approaching the patient with these conditions, allows a specific diagnosis of chronic migraine to be made quickly and safely, and by making this diagnosis one opens up a substantial number of acute and preventive treatment options. This article discusses the current state of management of chronic migraine. PMID:25954496

  7. Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania-tic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukerman, E; Peres, M F; Kaup, A O; Monzillo, P H; Costa, A R

    2000-04-11

    The association of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and ticlike pain-chronic paroxysmal hemicrania-tic (CPH-tic)-is a recently described syndrome. The authors found only two previously reported cases. They report three new cases of this rare syndrome with both chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and ticlike pain concurrently and ipsilaterally. The trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgias (TAC) are considered as differential diagnoses. CPH-tic syndrome could be a different clinical entity. PMID:10751271

  8. Radiofrequency Wire Recanalization of Chronically Thrombosed TIPS.

    PubMed

    Majdalany, Bill S; Elliott, Eric D; Michaels, Anthony J; Hanje, A James; Saad, Wael E A

    2016-07-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) guide wires have been applied to cardiac interventions, recanalization of central venous thromboses, and to cross biliary occlusions. Herein, the use of a RF wire technique to revise chronically occluded transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is described. In both cases, conventional TIPS revision techniques failed to revise the chronically thrombosed TIPS. RF wire recanalization was successfully performed through each of the chronically thrombosed TIPS, demonstrating initial safety and feasibility in this application. PMID:26902703

  9. Bacterial Adaptation during Chronic Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Louise; McClean, Siobhán

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality for individuals with underlying respiratory conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The process of chronic colonisation allows pathogens to adapt over time to cope with changing selection pressures, co-infecting species and antimicrobial therapies. These adaptations can occur due to environmental pressures in the lung such as inflammatory responses, hypoxia, nutrient deficiency, osmolarity, low pH and antibiotic therapies. Phenotypic adaptations in bacterial pathogens from acute to chronic infection include, but are not limited to, antibiotic resistance, exopolysaccharide production (mucoidy), loss in motility, formation of small colony variants, increased mutation rate, quorum sensing and altered production of virulence factors associated with chronic infection. The evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection has been widely studied. More recently, the adaptations that other chronically colonising respiratory pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex and Haemophilus influenzae undergo during chronic infection have also been investigated. This review aims to examine the adaptations utilised by different bacterial pathogens to aid in their evolution from acute to chronic pathogens of the immunocompromised lung including CF and COPD. PMID:25738646

  10. Chronic cough due to occupational factors

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A; Nowak, Dennis; Wussow, Anke; Fischer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Within the large variety of subtypes of chronic cough, either defined by their clinical or pathogenetic causes, occupational chronic cough may be regarded as one of the most preventable forms of the disease. Next to obstructive airway diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which are sometimes concomitant with chronic cough, this chronic airway disease gains importance in the field of occupational medicine since classic fiber-related occupational airway diseases will decrease in the future. Apart from acute accidents and incidental exposures which may lead to an acute form of cough, there are numerous sources for the development of chronic cough within the workplace. Over the last years, a large number of studies has focused on occupational causes of respiratory diseases and it has emerged that chronic cough is one of the most prevalent work-related airway diseases. Best-known examples of occupations related to the development of cough are coal miners, hard-rock miners, tunnel workers, or concrete manufacturing workers. As chronic cough is often based on a variety of non-occupational factors such as tobacco smoke, a distinct separation into either occupational or personally -evoked can be difficult. However, revealing the occupational contribution to chronic cough and to the symptom cough in general, which is the commonest cause for the consultation of a physician, can significantly lead to a reduction of the socioeconomic burden of the disease. PMID:16722562

  11. Bacterial Adaptation during Chronic Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Louise; McClean, Siobhán

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality for individuals with underlying respiratory conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The process of chronic colonisation allows pathogens to adapt over time to cope with changing selection pressures, co-infecting species and antimicrobial therapies. These adaptations can occur due to environmental pressures in the lung such as inflammatory responses, hypoxia, nutrient deficiency, osmolarity, low pH and antibiotic therapies. Phenotypic adaptations in bacterial pathogens from acute to chronic infection include, but are not limited to, antibiotic resistance, exopolysaccharide production (mucoidy), loss in motility, formation of small colony variants, increased mutation rate, quorum sensing and altered production of virulence factors associated with chronic infection. The evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection has been widely studied. More recently, the adaptations that other chronically colonising respiratory pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex and Haemophilus influenzae undergo during chronic infection have also been investigated. This review aims to examine the adaptations utilised by different bacterial pathogens to aid in their evolution from acute to chronic pathogens of the immunocompromised lung including CF and COPD. PMID:25738646

  12. [Imaging of brain changes in chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Nuutti; Forss, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Modern methods of brain imaging have enabled objective measurements of functional and structural brain changes associated with chronic pain conditions. According to recent investigations, chronic pain is not only associated with abnormally strong or prolonged activity of regions processing acute pain, but also with activation of brain networks that are characteristic for each pain state, changes in cortical remodeling, as well as local reduction of grey matter in several regions of the brain. Brain changes associated with chronic pain facilitate the understanding of mechanisms of various chronic pain conditions. PMID:25211820

  13. Sexual abuse, physical abuse, chronic fatigue, and chronic fatigue syndrome: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R R; Jason, L A

    2001-10-01

    Using a randomly selected community-based sample, this investigation examined whether histories of childhood sexual, physical, and death threat abuse predicted adulthood outcomes of specific medical and psychiatric conditions involving chronic fatigue. This study also tested prior suggestions that most individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome report a past history of interpersonal abuse. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between abuse history and chronic fatigue group outcomes while controlling for the effects of sociodemographics. Compared with healthy controls, childhood sexual abuse was significantly more likely to be associated with outcomes of idiopathic chronic fatigue, chronic fatigue explained by a psychiatric condition, and chronic fatigue explained by a medical condition. None of the abuse history types were significant predictors of chronic fatigue syndrome. A closer examination of individuals in the chronic fatigue syndrome group revealed that significantly fewer individuals with CFS reported abuse as compared with those who did not. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:11708672

  14. Unpredictable chronic mild stress not chronic restraint stress induces depressive behaviours in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shenghua; Shi, Ruoyang; Wang, Junhui; Wang, Jun-Feng; Li, Xin-Min

    2014-10-01

    The chronic stress model was developed on the basis of the stress-diathesis hypothesis of depression. However, these behavioural responses associated with different stress paradigms are quite complex. This study examined the effects of two chronic stress regimens on anxiety-like and depressive behaviours. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress or to chronic restraint stress for 4 weeks. Subsequently, both anxiety-like behaviours (open field, elevated plus maze and novelty suppressed feeding) and depression-like behaviours (tail suspension, forced swim and sucrose preference) were evaluated. Both chronic stress models generated anxiety-like behaviours, whereas only unpredictable chronic mild stress could induce depressive behaviours such as increased immobility and decreased sucrose consumption. These results of the present study provide additional evidence on how chronic stress affects behavioural responses and point to the importance of the validity of animal models of chronic stress in studying depression. PMID:25089805

  15. [Dietotherapy of the chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Chekhonina, Iu G; Gapparov, M M; Shakhovskaia, A K

    2006-01-01

    A modern pahtogenetic and etiological classification of pancreatic diseases is observed in the review and the questions of dietotherapy concerning the main forms of the disease are under consideration. There are numerous sources given from literature where the question is discussed on the fiber level, quantitative and qualitative structure of the fatty part of the ration in case of chronic pancreatitis. The majority of native and foreign authors consider it inexpedient to reduce fiber lover than 120 g per day, however there is a number of works where it is recommended to increase in the ration the quantity of carbohydrates up to 400 g, reducing some fiber at the same time. There has appeared a number of works for the recent years, where it is recommended to include mixes for enteral nutrition into the diets recommended both for acute and chronic course of the disease. Such diets are emphasized to be well bearable and high effective during the treatment of this disease. PMID:17313040

  16. Pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis: inflammation.

    PubMed

    Van Crombruggen, Koen; Zhang, Nan; Gevaert, Philippe; Tomassen, Peter; Bachert, Claus

    2011-10-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases of the nasal and paranasal cavities either accompanied by polyp formation (CRSwNP) or without polyps (CRSsNP). CRSsNP and CRSwNP are prevalent medical conditions associated with substantial impaired quality of life, reduced workplace productivity, and serious medical treatment costs. Despite recent research evidence that contributes to further unveiling the pathophysiology of these chronic airway conditions, the cause remains poorly understood and appears to be multifactorial. A diverse spectrum of alterations involving histopathology, inflammatory cell and T-cell patterns, remodeling parameters (eg, TGF-β), eicosanoid and IgE production, microorganisms, and epithelial barrier malfunctions is reported in the search to describe the pathogenesis of this heterogeneous group of upper airway diseases. Furthermore, novel evidence indicates considerable heterogeneity within the CRSwNP subgroup determining the risk of comorbid asthma. The characterization of specific disease subgroups is a challenging scientific and clinical task of utmost importance in the development of diagnostic tools and application of individualized treatments. This review focuses on recent evidence that sheds new light on our current knowledge regarding the inflammatory process of CRS to further unravel its pathogenesis. PMID:21868076

  17. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. PMID:21644200

  18. Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Schleimer, Robert P; Kern, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an important clinical entity diagnosed by the presence of both subjective and objective evidence of chronic sinonasal inflammation. Symptoms include anterior or posterior rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, hyposmia, and/or facial pressure or pain that last for a duration of more than 12 weeks. Nasal polyps are inflammatory lesions that project into the nasal airway, are typically bilateral, and originate from the ethmoid sinus. Males are more likely to be affected than females, but no specific genetic or environmental factors have been strongly linked to the development of this disorder to date. CRSwNP is frequently associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the clinical symptoms are not fully understood. Defects in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, increased exposure to pathogenic and colonized bacteria, and dysregulation of the host immune system are all thought to play prominent roles in disease pathogenesis. Additional studies are needed to further explore the clinical and pathophysiological features of CRSwNP so that biomarkers can be identified and novel advances can be made to improve the treatment and management of this disease. PMID:27393770

  19. The Purpose in Chronic Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    I argue that addiction is not a chronic, relapsing, neurobiological disease characterized by compulsive use of drugs or alcohol. Large-scale national survey data demonstrate that rates of substance dependence peak in adolescence and early adulthood and then decline steeply; addicts tend to “mature out” in their late twenties or early thirties. The exceptions are addicts who suffer from additional psychiatric disorders. I hypothesize that this difference in patterns of use and relapse between the general and psychiatric populations can be explained by the purpose served by drugs and alcohol for patients. Drugs and alcohol alleviate the severe psychological distress typically experienced by patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders and associated problems. On this hypothesis, consumption is a chosen means to ends that are rational to desire: Use is not compulsive. The upshot of this explanation is that the orthodox view of addiction as a chronic, relapsing neurobiological disease is misguided. I delineate five folk psychological factors that together explain addiction as purposive action: strong and habitual desire; willpower; motivation; functional role; and decision and resolve. I conclude by drawing lessons for research and effective treatment. PMID:22724074

  20. Hydrocodone bitartrate for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, L; Atluri, S; Kaye, A M; Kaye, A D

    2015-07-01

    Hydrocodone bitartrate is the most commonly used drug for acute and chronic pain in the U.S. with over 135 million prescriptions in 2012. The U.S. is the primary consumer of hydrocodone, using 99% of the global supply for 4.4% of the global population. With its easy availability and abuse patterns, hydrocodone has been touted as a primary driver of opioid-related abuse and misuse. There are no clinical efficacy studies of hydrocodone in short-acting form in combination with acetaminophen or ibuprofen in chronic pain. Hydrocodone has been approved with two long-term formulations since 2014. The FDA has rescheduled hydrocodone from Schedule III to Schedule II which went into effect on October 6, 2014, along with a limit on added acetaminophen of 325 mg for each dose of hydrocodone. This review examines the evolution of hydrocodone into a common and yet controversial drug in the U.S. with its pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and efficacy. PMID:26261844

  1. Chronic Inflammation in Skin Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked to the development and progression of multiple cancers, including those of the lung, stomach, liver, colon, breast and skin. Inflammation not only drives the oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells under the stress of chronic infection and autoimmune diseases, but also promotes the growth, progression and metastatic spread of cancers. Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are comprised of a diverse population of myeloid and immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, T and B cells, and others. Different myeloid and lymphoid cells within tumor microenvironment exert diverse, often contradicting, effects during skin cancer development and progression. The nature of tumor-immune interaction determines the rate of cancer progression and the outcome of cancer treatment. Inflammatory environment within skin tumor also inhibits naturally occurring anti-tumor immunity and limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. In this article we aim to give an overview on the mechanism by which inflammation interferes with the development and therapeutic intervention of cancers, especially those of the skin.

  2. Placental Origins of Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Burton, Graham J; Fowden, Abigail L; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence links an individual's susceptibility to chronic disease in adult life to events during their intrauterine phase of development. Biologically this should not be unexpected, for organ systems are at their most plastic when progenitor cells are proliferating and differentiating. Influences operating at this time can permanently affect their structure and functional capacity, and the activity of enzyme systems and endocrine axes. It is now appreciated that such effects lay the foundations for a diverse array of diseases that become manifest many years later, often in response to secondary environmental stressors. Fetal development is underpinned by the placenta, the organ that forms the interface between the fetus and its mother. All nutrients and oxygen reaching the fetus must pass through this organ. The placenta also has major endocrine functions, orchestrating maternal adaptations to pregnancy and mobilizing resources for fetal use. In addition, it acts as a selective barrier, creating a protective milieu by minimizing exposure of the fetus to maternal hormones, such as glucocorticoids, xenobiotics, pathogens, and parasites. The placenta shows a remarkable capacity to adapt to adverse environmental cues and lessen their impact on the fetus. However, if placental function is impaired, or its capacity to adapt is exceeded, then fetal development may be compromised. Here, we explore the complex relationships between the placental phenotype and developmental programming of chronic disease in the offspring. Ensuring optimal placentation offers a new approach to the prevention of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, which are reaching epidemic proportions. PMID:27604528

  3. [Chronic pain management: societal impact].

    PubMed

    Serrie, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a real issue of public health, quality and evolution of a system of health test: this is a major social problem. Pain management meets a humanistic, ethical purpose and dignity of man because of the physical and psychological implications. It induces a disability which excludes the patient of society gradually or suddenly. The physical pain and mental suffering to all ages of life make more vulnerable people weakened by disease. Rebel chronic pain are sources of disability, disabilities, disability and major alterations in the quality of life. All of these data shows the impact of pain and its intensity on the professional conditions, on professional activity and productivity, on the use of care systems (very significant increase in medical consultations, hospitalizations), as well as on the mental and physical health. These results confirmed analyses which consider that the unrelieved pain has a major economic impact on care systems and constitutes a public health problem with around two thirds of persons professionally impacted by pain. The progress of medicine has helped the healing of certain serious diseases, but also favoured acute diseases to turn to chronic diseases. The result is an increase in of lifetime sometimes without disease, but this survival may be also accompanied by disease or disability. Progress, pain and suffering, the end of life, ethics will be the core of the basic thoughts of tomorrow. PMID:27509674

  4. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  5. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  6. Chronic Pain in the Classroom: Teachers' Attributions about the Causes of Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Catanese, Sarah P.; Coakley, Rachael M.; Scharff, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Background: School absenteeism and other impairments in school function are significant problems among children with chronic pain syndromes; yet, little is known about how chronic pain is perceived in the school setting. The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' attributions about the causes of chronic pain in adolescent students.…

  7. Acroangiodermatitis secondary to chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Benjamin; Xia, Yang; Cho, Sunghun; Lewis, Felisa S; Lewis, Felicia S

    2010-11-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AAD) is a benign uncommon vasoproliferative disorder that affects the lower extremities. It appears to be a reactive phenomenon related to severe chronic Venous insufficiency and stasis of the lower extremities. The clinical presentation of this condition often is similar to Kaposi sarcoma. We report a case of AAD in a patient with severe hypertension and chronic venous insufficiency. PMID:21214123

  8. Towards a theory of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Apkarian, A. Vania; Baliki, Marwan N.; Geha, Paul Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we integrate recent human and animal studies from the viewpoint of chronic pain. First, we briefly review the impact of chronic pain on society and address current pitfalls of its definition and clinical management. Second, we examine pain mechanisms via nociceptive information transmission cephalad and its impact and interaction with the cortex. Third, we present recent discoveries on the active role of the cortex in chronic pain, with findings indicating that the human cortex continuously reorganizes as it lives in chronic pain. We also introduce data emphasizing that distinct chronic pain conditions impact on the cortex in unique patterns. Fourth, animal studies regarding nociceptive transmission, recent evidence for supraspinal reorganization during pain, the necessity of descending modulation for maintenance of neuropathic behavior, and the impact of cortical manipulations on neuropathic pain is also reviewed. We further expound on the notion that chronic pain can be reformulated within the context of learning and memory, and demonstrate the relevance of the idea in the design of novel pharmacotherapies. Lastly, we integrate the human and animal data into a unified working model outlining the mechanism by which acute pain transitions into a chronic state. It incorporates knowledge of underlying brain structures and their reorganization, and also includes specific variations as a function of pain persistence and injury type, thereby providing mechanistic descriptions of several unique chronic pain conditions within a single model. PMID:18952143

  9. Chronic Lyme; diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, U; Mygland, Å

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we aim to discuss the definition, clinical and laboratory features, diagnostics, and management of chronic Lyme. Chronic Lyme is a rare condition caused by long-lasting and ongoing infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). The most common manifestations are progressive encephalitis, myelitis, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans with or without neuropathy, and arthritis. Chronic Lyme is not considered to present with isolated subjective symptoms. Direct detection of Bb has low yield in most manifestations of chronic Lyme, while almost 100% of the cases are seropositive, that is, have detectable Bb IgG antibodies in serum. Detection of Bb antibodies only with Western blot technique and not with ELISA and detection of Bb IgM antibodies without simultaneous detection of Bb IgG antibodies should be considered as seronegativity in patients with long-lasting symptoms. Patients with chronic Lyme in the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) have, with few exceptions, pleocytosis and production of Bb antibodies in their cerebrospinal fluid. Strict guidelines should be applied in diagnostics of chronic Lyme, and several differential diagnoses, including neurological disease, rheumatologic disease, post-Lyme disease syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and psychiatric disease, should be considered in the diagnostic workup. Antibiotic treatment with administration route and dosages according to current guidelines are recommended. Combination antimicrobial therapy or antibiotic courses longer than 4 weeks are not recommended. Patients who attribute their symptoms to chronic Lyme on doubtful basis should be offered a thorough and systematic diagnostic approach, and an open and respectful dialogue. PMID:23190290

  10. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  11. Syndrome Analysis: Chronic Alcoholism in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendorf, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Provides outline narrative of most possible outcomes of regular heavy alcohol use, regular alcohol abuse, or chronic alcoholism. A systems analysis approach is used to expose conditions that may result when a human organism is subjected to excessive and chronic alcohol consumption. Such an approach illustrates the detrimental effects which alcohol…

  12. CHRONIC RESPIRATORY EFFECTS OF INDOOR FORMALDEHYDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6 - 15 years of age) and 613 adults. CHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. ata on chronic cough and phlegm...

  13. Counseling the Chronically Health Impaired Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Brian, Comp.; And Others

    The role of counselors in working with chronically health impaired students is examined, and illustrations of the Chronic Health Impaired/Sickle Cell Anemia Program in Baltimore (MD) are presented. The importance of setting goals with the student is underlined, as is the necessity for counselors to have proper flexibility and time to devote to…

  14. Chronic Illness and the Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Stephanie A.; Morgan, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the hidden epidemic in higher education. They describe the stigma of chronic illness and argue that the invisibility of chronic illness may elicit particularly problematic responses from others, especially when faculty work in a context where people are expected to be highly productive and have unlimited…

  15. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes data on chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and deaths across the U.S. for the time periods 1997-2009 and 1979-2007, respectively. COPD, also known as chronic lung disease, may be partly caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures such as ...

  16. USER GUIDE: ACUTE TO CHRONIC ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute and chronic toxicity testing plays a major role in ecological risk assessment requirements involved in several environmental laws. Chronic toxicity tests commonly include the measurement of long-term effects of a contaminant on the survival, growth, and reproduction of test...

  17. Chronic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Laura M.; Baum, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relationship between chronic stress and symptoms of posttraumatic stress syndrome in people living within five miles of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power station. Results provided evidence of substantive links between chronic stress and development of mild symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. (Author/BL)

  18. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Who's at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Who's at Risk? More than ... to explore this possibility Related Links Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Print page View page in: Español (Spanish) Contact ...

  19. Counseling Adult Clients Experiencing Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Stephanie T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain affects 35% to 57% of the adult population in the United States and results in billions of dollars spent annually in direct health-care costs and lost productivity. Extensive research confirms the considerable role psychological factors play in the experience and expression of chronic pain. The author discusses implications for…

  20. UDIS: Deinstitutionalizing the Chronic Juvenile Offender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Charles A.; And Others

    The report describes the Unified Delinquency Intervention Services (UDIS) program, a demonstration project to provide services for the chronic inner-city delinquent. Part I provides introductory information on the program and the chronic delinquent, design of the study (including staff, general design characteristics, archival data and interview…

  1. [Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Mannil, M; Andreisek, G; Weishaupt, D; Fischer, M A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint are common and mainly caused by repetitive (micro) trauma and exertion. Chronic insertion tendinopathies and avulsion fractures and symptoms related to entrapment, friction and impingement can be pathophysiologically distinguished in athletes. In this review, we depict the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the most commonly occurring pathologies. PMID:27118369

  2. [Chronic urticaria: what problems for the physicians?].

    PubMed

    Collet, E

    2003-05-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common disorder which can be extremely distressing and disabling for the patients. Anamnesis and clinical investigations are very helpful for the diagnosis. Bacterial, viral or parasitic infections can be associated with chronic urticaria, although the mechanisms which may link infectious diseases and chronic urticaria remain unclear. Recently, direct relationship between chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis C virus and Toxocara canis infections have been postulated. Numerous studies have also shown that chronic urticaria and angiodema are significantly associated with thyroid autoimmunity. A connective tissue disorder should be investigated if skin biopsy shows histologic evidences of vasculitis or if the patient has signs of systemic disease. Despite extensive laboratory investigations, 60 to 80% of chronic urticaria remain idiopathic. Large clinical studies have shown that extensive screening is unnecessary. Second-generation, low-sedation H1-antihistamines are the treatment of choice in chronic idiopathic urticaria. Combined therapies with first and second-generation H1-antihistamines or with H1 and H2-antihistamines have been proposed and found to be effective. Systemic corticoids and immunosuppressive agents should be reserved for patients with severe and disabling chronic urticaria but they cause undesirable effects and toxicity. PMID:12843803

  3. [Gamma glutamly transpeptidase in chronic anicteric hepatopathies].

    PubMed

    Magris, D; Mian, G; Minutillo, S; D'Agnolo, B

    1975-09-01

    Serum levels of gammaGT were determined in 51 patients suffering from bioptically verified chronic anictereric liber disease. GammaGT proved to be much more sensitive than the other enzymes studied and presented a significant increase particularly in cases of steatosis and chronic "alcoholic" liver disease with a markedly steatosic character. PMID:241034

  4. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  5. Medicare Pays for Chronic Care Management.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-09-01

    As of January, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began paying for chronic care management of patients with two or more conditions under its Chronic Care Management program. The payment applies to patients in traditional fee-for-service and noncapitated Medicare Advantage plan arrangements. Texas Medical Association leaders caution the program has some hefty requirements. PMID:26360339

  6. [Chronic migraine: its epidemiology and impact].

    PubMed

    Pozo-Rosich, Patricia

    2012-04-10

    Chronic migraine (that is to say, cases where migraine is suffered on 15 or more days per month) is an illness that affects approximately 0.5-2.5% of the population, depending on the statistics that are analysed and the definition of chronic migraine used. The incidence of transformation from episodic to chronic migraine is 3% per year, and 6% go from low-frequency (1-9 days/month) to high-frequency migraine (10-14 days/month). The risk factors for developing chronic migraine are genetic, frequent use of painkillers, being female, having poor hygienic-dietary habits, developing anxiety/depression, having a low socioeconomic status, suffering from obesity and being divorced or widowed. Despite the modification of the risk factors, it has still not been proved that the chances of developing chronic migraine can be lowered. Chronic migraine has an important impact on patients' quality of life, as measured on disability, quality of life and impact on daily activities scales. These patients have twice the chance of suffering from depression, anxiety and chronic pain, which means they therefore need greater health care. Many have still to be diagnosed and treated, however. In a Spanish epidemiological study, a follow-up was carried out on patients with chronic daily headache after undergoing a therapeutic intervention and up to 60% of the patients showed improvement. In other words, with increased interest and diagnosis of this illness, many patients would benefit from suitable treatments. PMID:22532240

  7. Chronic stress causes amygdala hyperexcitability in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, J. Amiel; Venheim, Emily R.; Padival, Mallika

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic stress is a major health concern, often leading to depression, anxiety or when severe enough, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While many studies demonstrate that the amygdala is hyper-responsive in patients with these disorders, the cellular neurophysiological effects of chronic stress on the systems that underlie psychiatric disorders, such as the amygdala, are relatively unknown. Methods In this study, we examined the effects of chronic stress on the activity and excitability of amygdala neurons in vivo in rats. We used in vivo intracellular recordings from single neurons of the lateral amygdala (LAT) to measure neuronal properties, and determine the cellular mechanism for the effects of chronic stress on LAT neurons. Results We found a mechanism for the effects of chronic stress on amygdala activity, specifically that chronic stress increased excitability of LAT pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo. This hyperexcitability was caused by a reduction of a regulatory influence during action potential firing, facilitating LAT neuronal activity. The effects of stress on excitability were occluded by agents that block KCa channels, and reversed by pharmacological enhancement of KCa channels. Conclusions These data demonstrate a specific channelopathy that occurs in the amygdala after chronic stress. This enhanced excitability of amygdala neurons after chronic stress may explain the observed hyper-responsiveness of the amygdala in patients with PTSD, and may facilitate the emergence of depression or anxiety in other patients. PMID:20378100

  8. Chronic Unemployment: A Social Work Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherraden, Michael W.

    1985-01-01

    To address chronic unemployment more effectively, social workers can describe the problem accurately, collect data by type of unemployment (frictional, structural, cyclical and chronic), document negative human effects, emphasize economic consequences, document the unequal burden on nonwhites, and lobby for long-term employment policy…

  9. [Chronic hepatitis B: current therapy].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Catherine

    2008-11-01

    HBV cannot be fully eradicated from the body because of the persistence of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in the nucleus of infected hepatocytes. True cure is infrequent, but persistent suppression of HBV DNA slows liver disease progression and helps to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatment options for chronic hepatitis B include pegylated interferon and 4 licensed oral nucleosides/nucleotides (lamivudine, adefovir entecavir and tenofovir). Interferon is the only drug with a defined duration of treatment. It is effective in 30% to 40% of patients but is poorly tolerated. In contrast to interferon, nucleotide/nucleoside analogs have only minor adverse effects. However, a resurgence of the infection may occur when these drugs are withdrawn, implying that treatment may have to continue indefinitely. The onset of viral resistance to these agents also limits their long-term use but can be minimized by ensuring potent suppression of viral replication. PMID:19445377

  10. Psychosocial factors in chronic disability.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2002-12-01

    If adopted without adequate cause, the lifestyle of an invalid is a grave misfortune for the patient and for its reflection on current social attitudes that foster such states. Psychological illnesses are frequently invoked and are often a genuine source of suffering and disability. However, patients who may be rewarded by large financial settlements in courts, may also on occasion exaggerate their claims. Modern society has established systems of support, and rulings in court proceedings that conduce to illness behaviour. To some extent the portentous diagnostic labels given to these patients fosters rather than alleviates illness. It is probable that biological factors deriving from the primary event initiate the process. In medical terms, the symptoms and disabilities are often discrepant with the initial illness or injury. The patients' behaviour arises out of a desire to attain the sick role for secondary gain. If society eliminated the stigma of psychological illness, and opposed exaggeration and simulation of illness, then such chronic disability with 'retreat into illness' might disappear. Sometimes an assumed illness becomes an adopted way of life. The unfortunate patients may come to believe they are ill; symptoms then persist after settlement. It is wrong to blame everything on society and to deny the free choice of the individual. Nevertheless, the pressures of society can be difficult to withstand for those not gifted with resilience. We should also recognise and try to eliminate the contribution made by doctors and health workers who mistakenly aid and abet a 'culture' that promotes this state of chronic disability. If adopted without adequate cause, the lifestyle of an invalid is a grave misfortune for the patient and for its reflection on current social attitudes that foster such states. Psychological illnesses are frequently invoked and are often a genuine source of suffering and disability. However, patients who may be rewarded by large financial

  11. Embryonic development during chronic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments carried out on chicken eggs indicate that the embryo is affected during very early development, especially over the first four days, and during hatching. In the first four days, the brain develops as well as the anlage for all other organs. In addition, the heart commences to function and the extraembryonic membranes that compartmentalize the egg contents form. The latter require an appreciable extension and folding of tissue which may be disrupted by the mechanical load. Observations of embryonic abnormalities that occur during chronic acceleration suggest an inhibition of development of the axial skeleton, which is rarely seen otherwise, a general retardation of embryonic growth, and circulatory problems. The final stages of development (after 18 days) involve the uptake of fluids, the transition to aerial respiration, and the reorientation of the embryo into a normal hatching position. At 4 G mortality is very high during this period, with a majority of embryos failing to reorient into the normal hatching position.

  12. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  13. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships. PMID:26449269

  14. Chronic Pruritus: a Paraneoplastic Sign

    PubMed Central

    Yosipovitch, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Chronic itch could be a presenting sign of malignancy. Pruritus of lymphoma is the common prototype of paraneoplastic itch and can precede other clinical signs by weeks and months. Paraneopalstic pruritus has also been associated with solid tumors and is an important clinical symptom in paraneoplastic skin diseases such as erythroderma, Grovers disease, malignant acanthosis nigricans, generalized granuloma annulare, Bazex syndrome and dermatomyositis. In any case with high index of suspicion a thorough work-up is required. This review highlights the association between itch and malignancy and presents new findings related to pathophysiological mechanisms and the treatment of itch associated with malignancy. Combinative therapies reducing itch sensitization and transmission using selective serotonin and neuroepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, Kappa opioids and Neuroleptics are of prime importance in reducing this bothersome symptom. PMID:21054705

  15. Chronic acceleration and brain density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, L. F.; Smith, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Tests carried out on rabbits show that the effect of chronic acceleration is not uniform among the various tissues studied. Although body mass is reduced by the treatment, as expected, no change is apparent in brain mass or in the density of cerebrospinal fluid. Acceleration-induced changes are encountered in tissue density, the myocardium exhibiting a transient increase followed by an exponential decrease toward a limit and the brain showing an arithmetic increase in density with continued exposure to 2.5 G. The data are seen as suggesting that a specific brain load is not a regulated phenomenon and that no physiological processes occur to attenuate the increased load imposed by the hyperdynamic environment. An equation is derived indicating that the stimulus potential per unit of brain load increases with body size, even though brain density decreases and cerebrospinal fluid density increases.

  16. Personal perception of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Dean, P R

    1999-04-01

    Nurses caring for patients in the home must see them as a complex collection of many parts that require a holistic approach. With the plethora of therapies blending the relationship between mind and body, patients are seeking to be treated as a whole person rather than a physical illness. A diagnosis of cancer or other serious illness affects the physical, psychologic, spiritual, and economic aspects of the person's life, and patients with these diagnoses know the illness and its treatment will decrease many of their normal activities and limit their effectiveness. Because of this disruption, chronic illness causes stress and anxiety in both patient and the family. Therefore nurses must be ready to assess, intervene, and monitor the ongoing progress of both patient and family. PMID:10418394

  17. Rat growth during chronic centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, G. C.; Oyama, J.

    1978-01-01

    Female weanling rats were chronically centrifuged at 4.15 G with controls at terrestrial gravity. Samples were sacrificed for body composition studies at 0, 28, 63, 105 and 308 days of centrifugation. The centrifuged group approached a significantly lower mature body mass than the controls (251 and 318g) but the rate of approach was the same in both groups. Retirement to 1G on the 60th day resulted in complete recovery. Among individual components muscle, bone, skin, CNS, heart, kidneys, body water and body fat were changed in the centrifuged group. However, an analysis of the growth of individual components relative to growth of the total fat-free compartment revealed that only skin (which increased in mass) was responding to centrifugation per se.

  18. [Biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Föll, D

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders of childhood, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a challenge for laboratory diagnostics. Firstly, the classical inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) often inadequately reflect disease activity but on the other hand there are few specific biomarkers that can be helpful in managing these diseases. Acute phase proteins reflect the systemic inflammatory response insufficiently as their increase is only the indirect result of local inflammatory processes. Modern inflammation diagnostics aim to reflect these local processes and to allow precise monitoring of disease activity. Experimental biomarkers, such as S100 proteins can detect subclinical inflammatory activity. In addition, established laboratory parameters exist for JIA [antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP)] and for chronic IBD (fecal calprotectin) that are useful in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26608264

  19. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eun-Mi; Kittai, Adam; Tabbara, Imad A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults, and while in early, asymptomatic stages treatment is not indicated, the threat to the quality of life and increased mortality of patients posed by more advanced-stage disease necessitate therapeutic intervention. Guidelines of when and how to treat are not well-established because CLL is a disease of the elderly and it is important to balance preservation of functional status and control of the disease. Advances in molecular and genetic profiling has led to the ability to identify sub-groups of patients with CLL whose disease may respond to selected therapy. This review discusses current standard therapies in the major sub-groups of CLL based on age and functional status, in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings. It also provides a concise review of novel agents that have shown considerable efficacy in CLL. PMID:26408673

  20. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  1. Alexithymia in Chronic Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Tella, Marialaura; Castelli, Lorys

    2016-07-01

    This review proposes a critical discussion of the recent studies investigating the presence of alexithymia in patients suffering from different chronic pain (CP) conditions. The term CP refers to pain that persists or progresses over time, while alexithymia is an affective dysregulation, largely observed in psychosomatic diseases. Overall, the examined studies showed a high prevalence of alexithymia, especially difficulties in identifying feelings, in all the different CP conditions considered. However, the association between alexithymia and pain intensity was not always clear and in some studies this relationship appeared to be mediated by negative effect, especially depression. The role of alexithymia in CP should be clarified by future studies, paying particular attention to two aspects: the use of additional measures, in addition to the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, to assess alexithymia, and the analysis of the potential differences in the evolution of different CP conditions with reference to the presence or absence of alexithymia. PMID:27215759

  2. [Anemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grau-Amorós, J; Formiga, F; Urrutia, A

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward. However, although there is evidence supporting its treatment to improve the functional capacity of the patients and to reduce the new admissions rate, the clinical practice guidelines do not provide any directives regarding its approach. This is an ideal clinical problem for the internist due to its multifactorial origin and the comprehensive point of view needed to approach the group of syndromes that occur in these patients (anemia, heart failure, geriatric syndromes, diabetes, etc.) The choice of treatment strategy, if such treatment is decided, should always begin after correcting the congestive signs in the outpatient with optimal treatment of heart failure. PMID:21620391

  3. Parasites and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi Manesh, Reza; Hosseini Safa, Ahmad; Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Jafari, Rasool; Bahadoran, Mehran; Yousefi, Morteza; Nasri, Hamid; Yousofi Darani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of the human immune system results in an increase in susceptibility to infection by various infectious agents. Conditions such as AIDS, organ transplantation and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) are the most important cause of insufficient immune response against infections. Long term renal disorders result in uremia, which can suppress human immune system. Parasitic infections are one of the most important factors indicating the public health problems of the societies. These infections can be more hostile and life threatening in susceptible individuals than in the normal people. In these patients some parasitic infections such as blastocystiosis, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis have been reported to be more prevalent. This review aimed to give an overview about parasitic infections in patients with renal disorders. PMID:25610885

  4. Alexithymia in chronic urticaria patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Filipe; Freitas, João; Barbosa, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Alexithymia has been described as an important dimension in several medical and psychiatric diseases. Chronic urticaria (CU) is a chronic condition, in which treatment is difficult. Our aim is to determine the prevalence of alexithymia traits in patients with CU, and to identify the relationships between alexithymia and psychological variables and quality-of-life dimensions. Fifty-five sequential CU patients in a faculty ambulatory specialized consultation, with an average age of 44.92, were compared with 31 healthy volunteers. Both groups were studied by means of validated scales for alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale [TAS-20]), attachment (Adult Attachment Scale-R [AAS-R]), psychopathology (Brief Symptom Inventory [BSI]), personality dimensions (The NEO Five-Factor inventory [NEO-FFI]) and quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). The classification of CU reactions was obtained from the patient's history, physical examination, laboratory assessment and histopathologic findings. All the patients were under treatment with sedating H1-antihistamines, non-sedating H1-antihistamines combination of H1 and H2 blocker, 2 H1-antihistamines and 3 H1-antihistamines. High traits of alexithymia were found on CU patients (56.9%) as well as high symptom rates of anxiety. Alexithymia traits were significantly positively correlated with insecure attachment styles, with psychopathological symptoms, and with the defense mechanism turn against self. We also reported a significant negative correlation between alexithymia traits and the dimensions of quality of life. Insecure attachment styles were positively correlated with psychopathological symptoms and negatively correlated with quality of life. We did not find significant statistical correlations between alexithymia and clinical variables. CU patients present serious difficulty in dealing with emotion arousal. There is strong evidence of a psychosomatic specificity in CU, with marked alexithymic traits. PMID:21328149

  5. [Pathogenesis of alcoholic chronic hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Saito, Takashi; Kakuda, Masahiro; Matsue, Yasuhiro; Minato, Takashiro; Fukumura, Atsushi; Ozaki, Kazuaki; Tsuchisima, Mutsumi; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro

    2014-10-01

    In 1983, Nei et al. reported that alcoholic chronic hepatitis (ACH)(chronic hepatitis induced tal area. Recently, the number of alcoholics patients diagnosed with ACH has been increased In this review, we discussed the characteristics of liver histopathology and blood chemistry of ACH patients. In ACH, pericellular fibrosis, ballooned hepatocytes and/or bridging fibrosis, and infiltration of mononuclear lymphocytes is decreased after 6 to 8 weeks of abstinence from results suggest that ACH could be one type of alcoholic liver disease. The precise mechanism by alcohol) as one type of alcoholic liver disease. Since then, it has been discussed whether alcohol abuse, suggesting that alcohol may play a role in the infiltration of mononuclear lym ACH is one type of alcoholic liver disease, because there could be infection of unknown hepatitis virus in alcoholics and it is not clear why mononuclear lymphocytes infiltrate into the porphocytes in portal region. After abstinence of alcohol, serum levels of AST, ALT, and γ-GTP in patients with ACH returned to normal as in other types of alcoholic liver disease such as alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic fibrosis, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic liver cirrhosis. These results suggest that ACH could be one type of alcoholic liver disease. The precise mechanism of the infiltration of mononuclear lymphocytes into portal areas of ACH patients is not known. We propose that the reason for the infiltration of natural killer (T) cells into portal areas could be due to the influx of endotoxin into portal vein resulting from the increased permeability of gut induced by alcohol. PMID:25651616

  6. Endoscopic diagnostic of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous inflammatory pancreatic disease, one characterized by irreversible morphological changes, often associates with pain and sometimes with the loss of endocrine and exocrine function. As a histological confirmation of chronic pancreatitis is often unavailable, the diagnosis is traditionally based on imaging methods such as computerized tomography (CT) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and recently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) as a noninvasive alternative to ERCP. Developments in the classification system of CP include the Marseille classification of 1963 which offered histopathologic criteria for CP, the Cambridge classification of 1984 which introduced imaging features of computed tomography (CT), transabdominal ultrasound (TUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for classification of CP as well as Rosemont classification system of 2007 which presented the endoscopic ultrasonography diagnosis of CP. Endoscopic ultra-sonography (EUS) was first introduced as a diagnostic method for evaluation of pancreatic disease in 1986. It has experienced significant improvements since then and allowed for an alternative approach in diagnosing patients with pancreatic diseases. In patients with suspected pancreatic masses EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the best method for obtaining tissue diagnosis and differentiating CP from pancreatic carcinoma. The recent studies indicate that EUS is the method of choice when compared with other imaging methods such as ERCP because it frequently provides more accurate diagnostics. The aim of this review is to discuss the findings in endoscopic diagnostics up to the present moment and to indicate advantages, limitations and possible complications along with the current recommendations in CP diagnostics. PMID:25842773

  7. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Veeral M; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common gastrointestinal illness, which affects the quality of life with substantial morbidity and mortality. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. However, at the time of this publication, guidelines to establish care of these patients are lacking. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the various treatment options available, including medical, surgical and endoscopic options. In addition, technological advances such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrophy, endoscopic shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic ultrasound can now be offered with reasonable success for pancreatic decompression, stricture dilatation with stent placement, stone fragmentation, pseudocyst drainage, and other endoscopic interventions such as celiac plexus block for pain relief. We emphasize the endoscopic options in this review, and attempt to extract the most up to date information from the current literature. The treatment of CP and its complications are discussed extensively. Complications such as biliary strictures. pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pain are common issues that arise as long-term complications of CP. These often require endoscopic or surgical management and possibly a combination of approaches, however choosing amongst the various therapeutic and palliative modalities while weighing the risks and benefits, makes the management of CP challenging. Treatment goals should be not just to control symptoms but also to prevent disease progression. Our aim in this paper is to advocate and emphasize an evidence based approach for the management of CP and associated long term complications. PMID:23330050

  8. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Panganamamula, Kashyap V; Parkman, Henry P

    2005-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder characterized by chronic symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a fixed, lumen-occluding lesion. Radiographic findings consist of dilated bowel with air-fluid levels. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary or secondary causes. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. The principles of management of patients with CIP involve 1) establishing a correct clinical diagnosis and excluding mechanical obstruction; 2) differentiating between idiopathic and secondary forms; 3) performing a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involved by manometric and whole gut transit scintigraphic studies; 4) careful assessment of nutritional status of the patient; and 5) developing a therapeutic plan addressing the patient's symptoms and nutritional status. Treatment of CIP includes frequent small meals with a low-fat, low-fiber diet, liquid nutritional supplements may be needed; prokinetic agents such as metoclopramide may help to reduce upper GI symptoms. Trials of drugs such as erythromycin, domperidone, cisapride, and tegaserod may be considered if there is no response. Subcutaneous octreotide may be helpful to improve small bowel dysmotility especially in patients with scleroderma. In patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth, courses of antibiotics such as metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline may be needed. Nutritional assessment and support is an important aspect of management. Enteral nutrition is usually preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Complications associated with total parenteral nutrition include

  9. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  10. Fundoplication in chronic intractable cough

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway reflux is a common cause of chronic cough and this is often refractory to medical therapy. Surgery in the form of Nissen fundoplication has been highly successful in the treatment of the classic reflux symptoms of heartburn and dyspepsia. There is a paucity of data regarding response to fundoplication in patients presenting with chronic cough. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the case notes of patients from the Hull Cough Clinic who had undergone Nissen fundoplication over the past 6 years. Demographic details, duration of symptoms, presence of other symptoms, results of oesophageal studies, outcome and complications were recorded. Patients were contacted by post and asked to complete a questionnaire detailing current symptoms. In a subgroup with continued troublesome cough 24 hour pharyngeal pH measurements were undertaken. Results Forty seven patients underwent fundoplication. The average duration of pre-operative cough was 8 years. Gastro intestinal symptoms were present in the majority. In 30 (64%) patients a positive response to treatment was recorded. Mild dysphagia or bloating was seen in 18 patients following surgery. Four patients needed repeat surgical intervention for modification of fundoplication. One patient developed aspiration pneumonia eight weeks following surgery and died of a myocardial infarction. Two thirds of patients with persisting cough had evidence of airway reflux on pharyngeal pH monitoring. Conclusion In these patients with intractable cough a long term response rate of 63% represents a useful therapeutic option. Treatment failure is more frequent than for classic peptic symptoms and may be related to persistent gaseous reflux. PMID:22812601

  11. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  12. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, except during acute exacerbations of chronic lung disease or when multiple co-morbidities are present. Treatment is targeted at correcting hypoxia and improving pulmonary gas exchange and mechanics. There are presently no convincing data to support the use of pulmonary hypertension-specific therapies in patients with right ventricular dysfunction secondary to chronic lung disease. PMID:22548815

  13. Evidence Based Practice of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Joshi, Saurabh; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2012-01-01

    The patients with chronic pain are increasingly reporting to the physicians for its management. Chronic pain are associated with head, neck and shoulder pain, spinal pain, pain in the joints and extremities, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom pain. The chronic pain is being managed worldwide. The different specialty of medicine is producing a lot of evidence through the published literature but the same is not being published in the field of chronic pain management. Though some evidence is being reported as to different aspects of pain management from different parts of the world but same is lacking from Indian subcontinent. This is in contrast to much done clinical work in this field as well. We present here the available evidence in relation to chronic pain management. PMID:23439674

  14. Tailoring of chronic lymphatic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Elhefni, Ashraf M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, with all patients who require therapy destined to relapse and understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has advanced significantly. It is now clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a relatively proliferative disorder that requires the help of its microenvironment to be maintained and to progress. The stimulation of the chronic lymphatic leukemia cell occurs in most, if not all, patients through antigen stimulation via the B cell receptors. In addition, there is now a appreciation of the role of the p53 pathway leading to chemoresistance and the elucidation of the molecular and intracellular signaling mechanisms of disease is just beginning to facilitate the development of several targeted small molecules that promise to revolutionize the treatment of Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:23997983

  15. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  16. Psychiatric aspects of chronic disease in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Magen, J

    1990-06-01

    In adolescents with chronic illnesses, the rate of behavioral disorders is 10% to 20% higher than that in their well peers. Rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, and many other chronic illnesses constitute risk factors for behavioral disorders in adolescents. Because they are now living longer, more productive lives, adolescents with chronic illnesses are more often seen by their primary care physicians with behavioral disorders that can interfere with disease control. Risk-taking behaviors, difficulties with parents, noncompliance, depression, and isolation may all be manifestations of behavioral disorders. Parents and siblings may also be at risk for disorder. Particular constellations of family and individual characteristics may be associated with behavior disorder. So that these behaviors may be discovered as early as possible, it is important that the primary care physician conceptualize chronically ill adolescents and their families as "at risk." PMID:2190958

  17. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged. PMID:26567717

  18. Bacteriology of chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis, and paranasal mucopyocele in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Ito, Y; Mizuta, K; Ogawa, H; Suzuki, T; Miyata, H; Kato, N; Watanabe, K; Ueno, K

    1995-06-01

    A bacteriologic study of cases of chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis, and paranasal mucopyocele diagnosed at Gifu University Hospital was performed between 1989 and 1992. Bacteria were isolated from all of 13 samples of discharge from the ears of patients with chronic otitis media, all of 14 mucosal biopsy specimens from patients with chronic sinusitis, 8 of 10 aspirate samples from patients with chronic sinusitis, and 9 of 15 aspirates samples from patients with mucopyocele. Cultures often yielded polymicrobial growth, with an average of 3.1, 3.8, and 4.2 species per positive specimen from chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis, and mucopyocele, respectively. The most commonly encountered anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus, Propionibacterium, and Prevotella species; the most common aerobes were Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. One strain of Prevotella melaninogenica highly resistant to ampicillin and two strains of Peptostreptococcus resistant to cefaclor were found. PMID:7548557

  19. Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

  20. Safely Managing Chronic Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Chronic Pain Safely Managing Chronic Pain Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents Helping ... can help, as well. The Two Faces of Pain: Acute and Chronic What is pain? The International ...

  1. What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic lymphocytic leukemia What`s new in chronic lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New drugs for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Dozens of new ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description PDGFRB -associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a type of cancer of blood-forming ...

  3. Common and unique associated factors for medically unexplained chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue☆

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, J.; Tomenson, B.; Chew-Graham, C.A.; Macfarlane, G.J.; Jackson, J.; Littlewood, A.; Creed, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue share common associated factors but these associations may be explained by the presence of concurrent depression and anxiety. Methods We mailed questionnaires to a randomly selected sample of people in the UK to identify participants with chronic widespread pain (ACR 1990 definition) and those with chronic fatigue. The questionnaire assessed sociodemographic factors, health status, healthcare use, childhood factors, adult attachment, and psychological stress including anxiety and depression. To identify persons with unexplained chronic widespread pain or unexplained chronic fatigue; we examined participant's medical records to exclude medical illness that might cause these symptoms. Results Of 1443 participants (58.0% response rate) medical records of 990 were examined. 9.4% (N = 93) had unexplained chronic widespread pain and 12.6% (N = 125) had unexplained chronic fatigue. Marital status, childhood psychological abuse, recent threatening experiences and other somatic symptoms were commonly associated with both widespread pain and fatigue. No common effect was found for few years of education and current medical illnesses (more strongly associated with chronic widespread pain) or recent illness in a close relative, neuroticism, depression and anxiety scores (more strongly associated with chronic fatigue). Putative associated factors with a common effect were associated with unexplained chronic widespread pain or unexplained chronic fatigue only when there was concurrent anxiety and/or depression. Discussion This study suggests that the associated factors for chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue need to be studied in conjunction with concurrent depression/anxiety. Clinicians should be aware of the importance of concurrent anxiety or depression. PMID:26652592

  4. Educational session: managing chronic myeloid leukemia as a chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has transformed this disease from being invariably fatal to being the type of leukemia with the best prognosis. Median survival associated with CML is estimated at > 20 years. Nevertheless, blast crisis occurs at an incidence of 1%-2% per year, and once this has occurred, treatment options are limited and survival is short. Due to the overall therapeutic success, the prevalence of CML is gradually increasing. The optimal management of this disease includes access to modern therapies and standardized surveillance methods for all patients, which will certainly create challenges. Furthermore, all available TKIs show mild but frequent side effects that may require symptomatic therapy. Adherence to therapy is the key prerequisite for efficacy of the drugs and for long-term success. Comprehensive information on the nature of the disease and the need for the continuous treatment using the appropriate dosages and timely information on efficacy data are key factors for optimal compliance. Standardized laboratory methods are required to provide optimal surveillance according to current recommendations. CML occurs in all age groups. Despite a median age of 55-60 years, particular challenges are the management of the disease in children, young women with the wish to get pregnant, and older patients. The main challenges in the long-term management of CML patients are discussed in this review. PMID:22160024

  5. Discharge Planning in Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McMartin, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronically ill people experience frequent changes in health status accompanied by multiple transitions between care settings and care providers. Discharge planning provides support services, follow-up activities, and other interventions that span pre-hospital discharge to post-hospital settings. Objective To determine if discharge planning is effective at reducing health resource utilization and improving patient outcomes compared with standard care alone. Data Sources A standard systematic literature search was conducted for studies published from January 1, 2004, until December 13, 2011. Review Methods Reports, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses with 1 month or more of follow-up and limited to specified chronic conditions were examined. Outcomes included mortality/survival, readmissions and emergency department (ED) visits, hospital length of stay (LOS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and patient satisfaction. Results One meta-analysis compared individualized discharge planning to usual care and found a significant reduction in readmissions favouring individualized discharge planning. A second meta-analysis compared comprehensive discharge planning with postdischarge support to usual care. There was a significant reduction in readmissions favouring discharge planning with postdischarge support. However, there was significant statistical heterogeneity. For both meta-analyses there was a nonsignificant reduction in mortality between the study arms. Limitations There was difficulty in distinguishing the relative contribution of each element within the terms “discharge planning” and “postdischarge support.” For most studies, “usual care” was not explicitly described. Conclusions Compared with usual care, there was moderate quality evidence that individualized discharge planning is more effective at reducing readmissions or hospital LOS but not mortality, and very low quality evidence that it is more

  6. Impairment in episodic and chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim P; Gaul, Charly; Lindwurm, Andrea; Dresler, Thomas; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Lürding, Ralf; Henkel, Karsten; Leinisch, Elke

    2011-04-01

    Despite being an excruciating headache, little is known about the burden of cluster headache (CH) regarding its various subtypes. In a multicentre, prospective study, patients with chronic CH (n = 27), with episodic CH in the active (n = 26) and outside the active period (n = 22), migraine patients (n = 24) and healthy controls (n = 31) were included. Epidemiological data, the German version of the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and a screening for psychiatric complaints were applied. About 25% of chronic CH patients in our study received invalidity allowance due to CH. HDI scores (total and subscales emotion and function) indicated a severe headache-specific disability (one-way ANOVA: P < 0.01). Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were significantly more affected than patients with inactive CH and migraine. Healthy volunteers were significantly less affected than all headache patients. Symptoms suggestive of psychiatric co-morbidity were found predominantly in chronic CH: depressive symptoms (56%), signs of agoraphobia (33%) and suicidal tendencies (25%) were frequently reported. Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were severely impaired in non-economic and economic domains such as disability, working life and psychiatric complaints. Remarkably, psychiatric co-morbidity was highest in chronic CH. Thus, especially chronic CH warrants special medical and further supportive care. PMID:21123629

  7. Perioperative Interventions to Reduce Chronic Postsurgical Pain

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ian; Hah, Jennifer; Mackey, Sean; Ottestad, Einar; Kong, Jiang Ti; Lahidji, Sam; Tawfik, Vivianne; Younger, Jarred; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 10% of patients following a variety of surgeries develop chronic postsurgical pain. Reducing chronic postoperative pain is especially important to reconstructive surgeons because common operations such as breast and limb reconstruction have even higher risk for developing chronic postsurgical pain. Animal studies of posttraumatic nerve injury pain demonstrate that there is a critical time frame before and immediately after nerve injury in which specific interventions can reduce the incidence and intensity of chronic neuropathic pain behaviors–so called “preventative analgesia.” In animal models, perineural local anesthetic, systemic intravenous local anesthetic, perineural clonidine, systemic gabapentin, systemic tricyclic antidepressants, and minocycline have each been shown to reduce pain behaviors days to weeks after treatment. The translation of this work to humans also suggests that brief perioperative interventions may protect patients from developing new chronic postsurgical pain. Recent clinical trial data show that there is an opportunity during the perioperative period to dramatically reduce the incidence and severity of chronic postsurgical pain. The surgeon, working with the anesthesiologist, has the ability to modify both early and chronic postoperative pain by implementing an evidence-based preventative analgesia plan. PMID:23463498

  8. Neurovegetative symptoms in chronic pain and depression.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J; Krishnan, R; France, R; Pelton, S

    1985-11-01

    The pattern and frequency of neurovegetative symptoms was studied in 57 patients with chronic pain. Seventy-nine percent of these patients had a diagnosable depressive illness, but endogenous depression was rare (5%). Patients with chronic pain were divided into major depressives, minor/intermittent depressives and patients with no depression. A control group of nonendogenous major depressives without pain was also utilized. Major depressives differed from the other two chronic pain groups in that there was more frequent or severe early waking, weight loss, anorexia, diminished libido and initial insomnia. Diurnal variation of mood was not a characteristic of major depression with chronic pain, and did not differ in frequency from the other two chronic pain groups. Major depressives exhibited a profile of neurovegetative symptoms very similar to that found in the control group of major depressives. Over one-third of minor/intermittent depressed patients with chronic pain exhibited atypical (reversed) vegetative symptoms of hyperphagia and weight gain. This finding, together with our review of the literature, suggests an important and previously unrecognized link between atypical depression and chronic pain. PMID:2934454

  9. Chronic non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Unwin, N; Alberti, K G M M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for almost 60% of global mortality, and 80% of deaths from NCD occur in low- and middle-income countries. One quarter of these deaths--almost 9 million in 2005--are in men and women aged <60 years. Taken together, NCD represent globally the single largest cause of mortality in people of working age, and their incidences in younger adults are substantially higher in the poor countries of the world than in the rich. The major causes of NCD-attributable mortality are cardiovascular disease (30% of total global mortality), cancers (13%), chronic respiratory disease (7%) and diabetes (2%). These conditions share a small number of behavioural risk factors, which include a diet high in saturated fat and low in fresh fruit and vegetables, physical inactivity, tobacco smoking, and alcohol excess. In low- and middle-income countries such risk factors tend to be concentrated in urban areas and their prevalences are increasing as a result of rapid urbanization and the increasing globalisation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries. Because NCD have a major impact on men and women of working age and their elderly dependents, they result in lost income, lost opportunities for investment, and overall lower levels of economic development. Reductions in the incidences of many NCD and their complications are, however, already possible. Up to 80% of all cases of cardiovascular disease or type-2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer, for example, are probably preventable based on current knowledge. In addition, highly cost-effective measures exist for the prevention of some of the complications of established cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Achieving these gains will require a broad range of integrated, population-based interventions as well as measures focused on the individuals at high risk. At present, the international-assistance community provides scant resources for the control of NCD in poor countries, partly, at least

  10. Chronic stress and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lisa Dawn; Meston, Cindy M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic stress is known to have negative effects on reproduction, but little is known about how it affects the sexual response cycle. The present study examined the relationship between chronic stress and sexual arousal and the mechanisms that mediate this relationship. Aim To test the relationship between chronic stress and sexual arousal and identify mechanisms that may explain this relationship. We predicted that women experiencing high levels of chronic stress would show lower levels of genital arousal & DHEAS and higher levels of cortisol and cognitive distraction compared to women with average levels of stress. Methods Women who were categorized as high in chronic stress (high stress group, n = 15) or average in chronic stress (average stress group; n = 15) provided saliva samples and watched an erotic film while having their genital and psychological arousal measured. Main Outcome Measures Main outcome measures were vaginal pulse amplitude, psychological arousal, salivary cortisol, salivary DHEAS, and heart rate and compared them between women with high and average levels of chronic stress. Results Women in the high stress group had lower levels of genital, but not psychological arousal, had higher levels of cortisol, and reported more distraction during the erotic film than women in the average stress group. The main predictor of decreased genital sexual arousal was participants’ distraction scores. Conclusions High levels of chronic stress were related to lower levels of genital sexual arousal. Both psychological (distraction) and hormonal (increased cortisol) factors were related to the lower levels of sexual arousal seen in women high in chronic stress, but distraction was the only significant predictor when controlling for other variables. PMID:23841462

  11. Chronic Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manangi, Mallikarjuna; Shivashankar, Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting >6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complications occurring after inguinal hernia repair, which occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Material and Methods. Patients undergoing elective inguinal hernioplasty in Victoria Hospital from November 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. A total of 227 patients met the inclusion criteria and were available for followup at end of six months. Detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative details of cases were recorded according to proforma. The postoperative pain and pain at days two and seven and at end of six months were recorded on a VAS scale. Results. Chronic pain at six-month followup was present in 89 patients constituting 39.4% of all patients undergoing hernia repair. It was seen that 26.9% without preoperative pain developed chronic pain whereas 76.7% of patients with preoperative pain developed chronic pain. Preemptive analgesia failed to show statistical significance in development of chronic pain (P = 0.079). Nerve injury was present in 22 of cases; it was found that nerve injury significantly affected development of chronic pain (P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, it was found that development of chronic pain following hernia surgery was dependent upon factors like preoperative pain, type of anesthesia, nerve injury, postoperative local infiltration, postoperative complication, and most importantly the early postoperative pain. Conclusions. In the present study, we found that chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair causes significant morbidity to patients and should not be ignored. Preemptive analgesia and operation under local anesthesia significantly affect pain. Intraoperative identification and preservation of all inguinal nerves are very important. Early diagnosis and management of chronic pain can remove suffering of the patient.

  12. Chronic fatigue syndrome: a review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Goshorn, R K

    1998-01-01

    Syndromes characterized by persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, and subjective cognitive impairment have been common problems in clinical practice for decades. The chronic fatigue syndrome case definition was created to standardize the patient population in research studies and to foster a systematic and comprehensive approach to the attempt to define the etiology and pathophysiology of these syndromes. The pathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome remains unknown, though it does appear to be associated with subtle neuroendocrine and immunologic abnormalities. Treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome is empirical. Significant palliation is often possible, though treatment success requires skillful practice of the art of medicine. PMID:9608620

  13. [Clinical and instrumental characteristics of chronic neuroborreliosis].

    PubMed

    Baranova, N S; Spirin, N N; Nizovtseva, L A; Pakhomova, Iu A; Fadeeva, O A

    2012-01-01

    The impairment of the nervous system is the main clinical presentation of chronic Lyme borreliosis. Frequency and characteristics of neuroborreliosis in Russia are still under-investigated. The article contains the analysis of 160 cases of chronic Lyme borreliosis with detailed descriptions of different neurologic syndromes - radiculopathy, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy and encephalomyelitis. Epidemiology of this disease as well as its laboratory and instrumental diagnosis are discussed. Extraneural signs and symptoms of late stages of neuroborreliosis are presented. The results of antibacterial treatment of different forms of chronic neuroborreliosis are outlined. PMID:23235423

  14. Chronic Bacterial Pathogens: Mechanisms of Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Byndloss, Mariana X.; Tsolis, Renee M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many bacterial pathogens can cause acute infections that are cleared with onset of adaptive immunity, however a subset of these pathogens can establish persistent, and sometimes lifelong infections. While bacteria causing chronic infections are phylogenetically diverse, they share common features in their interactions with the host that enable a protracted period of colonization. This chapter will compare the persistence strategies of two chronic pathogens from the Proteobacteria, Brucella abortus, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) to consider how these two pathogens, which are very different at the genomic level, can utilize common strategies to evade immune clearance to cause chronic intracellular infections of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:27227304

  15. Eradication Strategies for Chronic Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor M P; Tang, Lydia; Kottilil, Shyam

    2016-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection affects >300 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver failure and cancer. Current approaches to treatment for chronic hepatitis B involve suppression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA with the use of nucleoside analogues. Chronic suppressive therapy rarely results in a "functional cure" or absence of detectable HBV DNA in plasma and loss of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen after cessation of therapy. The major obstacles to achieving a functional cure are the presence of covalently closed circular DNA and ineffective/exhaustive immune system. This review focuses on novel approaches to target viral life cycle and host immunity to achieve a functional cure. PMID:27190322

  16. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired. PMID:3843499

  17. Pseudomelanosis duodeni associated with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcia Henriques de Magalhães; Pegado, Maria da Gloria Fernandes; Vargas, Cleber; Castro, Maria Elizabeth C; Madi, Kalil; Nunes, Tiago; Zaltman, Cyrla

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomelanosis duodeni (PD) is a rare dark speckled appearance of the duodenum associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension, chronic heart failure, chronic renal failure and consumption of different drugs. We report four cases of PD associated with chronic renal failure admitted to the gastroenterology outpatient unit due to epigastric pain, nausea, melena and progressive reduction of hemoglobin index. Gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed erosions in the esophagus and stomach, with no active bleeding at the moment. In addition, the duodenal mucosa presented marked signs of melanosis; later confirmed by histopathological study. Even though PD is usually regarded as a benign condition, its pathogenesis and clinical significance is yet to be defined. PMID:22493558

  18. Pericytes, microvasular dysfunction and chronic rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Kubiak, Jacek Z.; Li, Xian C.; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rejection of transplanted organs remains the main obstacle in the long-term success of organ transplantation. Thus, there is a persistent quest for development of anti-chronic rejection therapies and identification of novel molecular and cellular targets. One of the potential targets is the pericytes, the mural cells of microvessels, which regulate microvascular permeability, development and maturation by controlling endothelial cell functions and regulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory response. In this review we discuss the potential of targeting pericytes in development of microvasular dysfunction and the molecular pathways involved in regulation of pericyte activities for anti-chronic rejection intervention. PMID:25793439

  19. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of facioscapulohumeral type.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T; Toyokura, Y

    1976-01-01

    Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type affecting a mother and her son and daughter is reported. The relevant literature is reviewed and the relation between this conditon and Kugelberg-Welander (K-W) disease is discussed. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type is considered to be a different entity from the eponymous K-W disease. Each type of muscular dystrophy, e.g. limb-girdle, FSH, distal, ocular, or oculopharyngeal type, has its counterpart of nuclear origin. A classification of the chronic spinal muscular atrophies is suggested following the classification of muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:957378

  20. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases. PMID:26888190

  1. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Witte, K K; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with weight loss, and cachexia is a well-recognized complication. Patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and lose muscle bulk early in the course of the disease. Basal metabolic rate is increased in HF, but general malnutrition may play a part in the development of cachexia, particularly in an elderly population. There is evidence for a possible role for micronutrient deficiency in HF. Selective deficiency of selenium, calcium and thiamine can directly lead to the HF syndrome. Other nutrients, particularly vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, are antioxidants and may have a protective effect on the vasculature. Vitamins B6, B12 and folate all tend to reduce levels of homocysteine, which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and creatine supplementation have resulted in improved exercise capacity in patients with HF in some studies. In this article, we review the relation between micronutrients and HF. Chronic HF is characterized by high mortality and morbidity, and research effort has centered on pharmacological management, with the successful introduction of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-adrenergic antagonists into routine practice. There is sufficient evidence to support a large-scale trial of dietary micronutrient supplementation in HF. PMID:11401109

  2. New concepts in chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Vonakis, Becky M; Saini, Sarbjit S

    2008-12-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common skin disease without a clear etiology in the vast majority of cases. The similarity of symptoms and lesion pathology to allergen-induced skin reactions supports the idea that skin mast cell and blood basophil IgE receptor activation is involved; however, no exogenous allergen trigger has been identified. The presence of serum IgG autoantibodies targeting IgE or the IgE receptor in approximately 40% of CIU cases supports the theory of an autoimmune basis for the disease. However, issues remain with the assays to detect autoantibodies among other serum factors, the relationship of autoantibodies to CIU disease activity, and the occurrence of autoantibodies in healthy subjects. Other studies have identified altered IgE receptor degranulation that reverts in disease remission and is accompanied by changes in signaling molecule expression and function in mast cells and basophils in active CIU subjects. The arrival of therapies targeting IgE and the IgE receptor pathway elements has potential use in CIU. PMID:18832031

  3. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  4. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  5. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)].

    PubMed

    Schilling, F

    1998-02-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an unusual clinical entity. More than 200 cases are described in the literature and it is presented here with special reference to its radiological aspects. It is an acquired disease of the skeleton which occurs predominantly during childhood and adolescence. About ten per cent of cases begin in early or, rarely, in later adult life. This variant is described here for the first time and is discussed as "adult CRMO". The underlying pathology is a bland, predominantly lympho-plasma cellular osteomyelitis which is self-limiting and leads to bone sclerosis (Garrè). It probably involves an abnormal immune process which follows an infection but remains clinically latent and remains aseptic and sterile. In a quarter of cases there is an association with pustulosis palmo-plantaris and its relationship with psoriatic arthropathy is discussed. The clinical, histopathological and imaging features (radiological and particularly MRT) and the bone changes are described. This provides a spectrum of symptoms; the radiological differential diagnosis and the relationship with hyperostotic spondyloarthroses during adult life are discussed. The relationship between CRMO, the SAPHO syndrome and acquired hyperostosis syndrome are analysed. PMID:9519042

  6. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  7. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  8. Treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, Suman W; Kirkpatrick, Angelia C

    2007-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) results from venous hypertension secondary to superficial or deep venous valvular reflux. Treatment modalities are aimed at reducing venous valvular reflux, thereby inhibiting the ensuing pathologic inflammatory process. Compression therapy using pumps, bandaging, and/or graded compression stockings is the mainstay of treatment for CVI. Compression therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing venous hypertension retarding the development of inflammation and pathologic skin changes. Pharmacologic agents such as diuretics and topical steroid creams reduce swelling and pain short term but offer no long-term treatment advantage. Herbal supplements may reduce the inflammatory response to venous hypertension, but are not licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration, and vary in their efficacy, quality, and safety. However, several randomized controlled trials using the herbal horse chestnut seed extract containing aescin have shown short-term improvement in signs and symptoms of CVI. Endovascular and surgical techniques aimed at treatment of primary and secondary venous valvular reflux have been shown to improve venous hemodynamics promoting healing of venous ulcers and improving quality of life. The newer endovascular treatments of varicose veins using laser, radiofrequency ablation, and chemical foam sclerotherapy show some promise. PMID:17484814

  9. Pycnogenol in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, P

    2000-06-01

    Forty patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and varices of the legs were selected and double-blindly randomly assigned to a treatment with Pycnogenol (French maritime pine bark extract), 100 mg x 3/day or a placebo for 2 months, according to a double-blind experimental design. The effects of the treatment were evaluated by scoring the symptomatology with a semi-quantitative scale, and the venous blood flow by means of a hand-held Doppler ultrasound. The tolerability was evaluated by recording the adverse effects and by means of hematology and blood chemistry parameters, before and at the end of the treatment. Pycnogenol treatment induced a significant reduction in subcutaneous edema as well as heaviness and pain in the legs, on both after 30 and 60 days, the evaluation time periods. Approximately 60% of patients treated with Pycnogenol(R) experienced a complete disappearance of edema (the most rapidly disappearing symptom) and pain at the end of the treatment, while almost all the patients reported a reduction in leg heaviness which disappeared in approximately 33% of patients. These changes were statistically significant. No effect was observed in the placebo-treated subjects. No effect on the venous blood flow was observed in either of the experimental groups. PMID:10844161

  10. Risk Factors For Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jin-Young; Tan, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the recent literature on risk factors for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with an emphasis on genetic, comorbid diseases and environmental factors associated with CRS. Through identifying potential risk factors for CRS, we glean insights into the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies. Recent findings Recent findings demonstrate that genetics, comorbid medical conditions including airway diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and various demographic and environmental factors are associated with having a CRS diagnosis. Limitations of current studies include, variable application of disease definitions, lack of prospective longitudinal studies and a disproportionate focus on tertiary care populations. Summary CRS has a broad spectrum of associations ranging from genetics to comorbid diseases and environmental factors. These predisposing factors provide valuable information for possible designing therapeutic and preventive interventions. However, to better understand whether these associations cause CRS, further studies are needed to independently replicate findings, establish temporal relationships between exposure and disease onset, evaluate the influence of exposure dose on disease severity, and to understand the biological effects of these risk factors in the context of CRS. PMID:25479315

  11. Chronic open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Feisal A.; Damji, Karim F.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide, including in Canada. It presents a challenge in diagnosis, as disease often progresses without symptoms; an estimated 50% of cases are undetected. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE searches, reference lists of articles, and expert knowledge from one of the authors (K.F.D.), a glaucoma specialist, were used. MAIN MESSAGE A casefinding approach using early referral to optometrists and ophthalmologists for early detection of COAG is helpful for patients with risk factors such as age above 50, a positive family history, black race, and myopia. Moderate evidence for referral also exists for the following risk factors: hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and sleep apnea. Treatment with intraocular pressure–lowering medication can arrest or slow the course of the disease, permitting patients to retain good visual function. Family physicians should be aware that some intraocular pressure–lowering medications, particularly topical beta-blockers, can pose iatrogenic harm to patients and result in or exacerbate such conditions as asthma, cardiovascular disturbances, depression, and sexual dysfunction. CONCLUSION Appropriate referral patterns and an understanding of common as well as serious side effects of glaucoma medications are important in optimizing management of patients at risk of developing, or who have, COAG. PMID:16190176

  12. Multimodal therapy for chronic tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Ales; Radkova, Lenka; Achiemere, Gabriela; Klement, Vladislav; Alpini, Dario; Strouhal, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    From 2001 to 2006, we performed a retrospective study of patients suffering from chronic unilateral or bilateral tinnitus that was previously ineffectively treated by oral drugs [betahistine (Betaserc), extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761), tanakan (Tebokan), and cinnarizine-dimenhydrinate (Arlevert), singly or in combination]. We divided 150 tinnitus patients (80 men, 70 women) into seven treatment groups. Treatments consisted of application of intravenous pentoxifylline, lidocaine, or vinpocetine (Cavinton) and combination of these agents with physiotherapy and soft laser. Mean duration (+/- standard deviation) of tinnitus in these patients was 7.4 +/- 6.0 years; their mean age was 55.6 +/- 12.5 years. The aim of our study was to compare treatment modalities and define their effectiveness for tinnitus relief. The most effective treatment was defined as a combination of Cavinton and physiotherapy. We evaluated pure lidocaine infusion therapy as ineffective. None of the treatment modalities had an objective correlate of improvement, though improvement was reported by a visual analog scale. PMID:18616089

  13. [Troponins and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Bellasi, Antonio; Cozzolino, Mario; De Pascalis, Antonio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis was recognized since 19th century as clinical entity with bad outcomes; only in 1912 it was reported that acute myocardial infarction had to been distinguished from angina pectoris. First diagnostic test was electrocardiogram, while white blood cells count and erythrocytes sedimentation rate were the only available laboratory tests. Late in the 60s and 70s glutammic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyravate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were added to biomarkers pool to provide a diagnosis of myocardial infarction related to myocardial cells injury. Only in 1987 assays for cardiac troponin were developed to assess structural damage of myocardial cells and in 2010 high sensibility troponins first dosage kits became available. It is well known that the population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than the general population. The use and interpretation of high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays have been particularly challenging in these patients with the majority having elevated levels at baseline. Aim of this review is to evaluate hs-cTn in patients with CKD for the diagnosis of AMI and for the prognostic significance of elevated levels in CKD patients without AMI. PMID:26252257

  14. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Cancer chronicity: new research and policy challenges.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, Nancy; Gusmano, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Cancer centers are organized to serve the needs of patients who can benefit from medical and surgical interventions aimed at curing cancer and preventing recurrence. However, comprehensive cancer care must also encompass the needs of patients with incurable but treatable cancers, some of which can potentially be managed as chronic diseases through outpatient care and self-management. Treating cancer as a chronic disease, and helping patients to live with cancer as a chronic disease, calls for health care that complements services that exist for patients with curable disease, for patients who have completed treatment, and for patients whose disease no longer responds to treatment. Research should focus on the chronic cancer patients to understand how cancer treatment can better serve this growing patient population. PMID:21378064

  16. Ethical considerations in chronic musculoskeletal disease.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, C Ronald; de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    Chronic diseases compromise the life of the sufferer, encumber their families, and exert intractable burdens on the health-care system. With the aging of the population, such conditions have become the primary determinants of morbidity and mortality and the leading cause of disability in our society. Despite the serious challenges they impose, the ethical discourse engendered by them has lagged behind that of acute care medicine. Of particular relevance are the challenges to individual autonomy, as the dilemmas arising in the chronic care setting have not only medical but personal and societal dimensions, may require the input of multiple participants, and resolve over longer periods of time. As such, the conventional model of autonomy is often inadequate to address problems in the chronic care setting. This paper deals with this dilemma through an examination of a clinical scenario. A framework for the exploration of ethical problems in the chronic care setting is thus presented. PMID:25864103

  17. Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and Medications Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... this page please turn Javascript on. What Is Pain? You know it at once. It may be ...

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit when they're all better. Save Your Energy at Home Place items you use often in ... or the skin around your fingernails are blue Alternative Names COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - ...

  19. Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be made much worse by environmental and psychological factors. Chronic pain persists over a longer period ... flow and oxygen to muscles and relieve stress. Psychological methods These include counseling, hypnosis, and cognitive-behavioral ...

  20. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  1. Living with a Chronic Illness or Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  2. Male chronic pelvic pain: An update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome collectively referred to as urologic CPPS (UCPPS) is defined by the absence of identifiable bacterial infection as a cause for the chronic pain and urinary symptoms. Methods: A PubMed search of all recent relevant articles using the keywords/phrases: CPPS, CPPS, and male pelvic pain, was conducted. Results: CPPS has a high worldwide prevalence and its negative impact on quality of life compares with or exceeds common chronic morbidities. Triggers include certain comestibles as well as psychosocial factors that promote catastrophizing and illness focused behavior. Several validated tools are currently available to help diagnose and direct targeted therapy. Treatment should begin with the most simple and least invasive based on the presenting clinical phenotype. Conclusions: Although no gold-standard treatment exists, a multidisciplinary approach with multimodal therapy gives the UCPPS patient the best chance of symptom relief. PMID:26941492

  3. Management and treatment of chronic urticaria (CU).

    PubMed

    Maurer, M; Church, M K; Gonçalo, M; Sussman, G; Sánchez-Borges, M

    2015-06-01

    Developments increasing our understanding of chronic urticaria have resulted in the simplification and improvement of available treatments. Currently, many treatments target mast cell mediators, but we can now disrupt mast cell activation with the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab, which has markedly advanced the treatment landscape for patients with difficult-to-treat urticaria. Current guidelines provide a framework for the management and treatment of patients with CU but, as each patient is different, knowledge and experience of specialist dermatologists and allergists are key to effective pharmacotherapy. This article reviews the different therapeutic options for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (also called chronic idiopathic urticaria) or chronic inducible urticaria and discusses management of special populations or special circumstances related to CU. PMID:26053292

  4. Neurologic manifestations of chronic methamphetamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rusyniak, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Chronic methamphetamine abuse has devastating effects on the central nervous system. The degree to which addicts will tolerate the dysfunction in the way they think, feel, move, and even look, is a powerful testimony to the addictive properties of this drug. While the mechanisms behind these disorders are complex, at their heart they involve the recurring increase in the concentrations of central monoamines with subsequent dysfunction in dopaminergic neurotransmission. The mainstay of treatment for the problems associated with chronic methamphetamine abuse is abstinence. However, by recognizing the manifestations of chronic abuse, clinicians will be better able to help their patients get treatment for their addiction and to deal with the neurologic complications related to chronic abuse. PMID:21803215

  5. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

  6. Chronic gastrointestinal haemorrhage controlled by antifibrinolytic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used chiefly for control of acute haemorrhage. Their applicability to chronic bleeding from inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract is illustrated by two case histories. PMID:2813242

  7. Chronic Hepatitis E Virus Infection and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well accepted that hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can induce chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis in immunosuppressed patients. Chronic genotype-3 HEV infections were first reported in patients with a solid-organ transplant. Thereafter, cases of chronic HEV infection have been reported in patients with hematological disease and in those who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. HEV-associated extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological symptoms, kidney injuries, and hematological disorders, have been also reported. In transplant patients, reducing the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs allows the virus to be cleared in some patients. In the remaining patients, as well as hematological patients and patients who are HIV-positive, anti-viral therapies, such as pegylated interferon and ribavirin, have been found to be efficient in eradicating HEV infection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of chronic HEV infection, its treatment, and the extra-hepatic manifestations induced by HEV. PMID:25755487

  8. [Brain MR imaging of chronic alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Vargas, M I; Lenz, V; Bin, J F; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Jacques, C; Marin, H; Kindo, S; Zöllner, G; Dietemann, J L

    2003-04-01

    Brain complications from chronic alcoholism (Wernicke encephalopathy, central pontine myelinolysis, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, Korsakoff's syndrome, hepatic encephalopathy, cerebellar atrophy, hemorrhagic and ischemic brain lesions) may be diagnosed by MR imaging. PMID:12759650

  9. Total body irradiation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Nair, C.N.; Ramakrishnan, G.

    1983-04-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI), given as 10 rad daily for five days a week for a total dose of 150 rad has been used in an attempt to control the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Thirteen patients with CML received fractionated TBI leading to rapid and good control of WBC count without any adverse reaction. The chronic phase of CML could also be controlled with TBI, even in three patients who were resistant to busulfan. Following TBI, WBC count remained under control for a period of 32 weeks as compared to 40 weeks following vusulfan alone. Repeat TBI was also well tolerated with good response. It appears that TBI is an effective and safe therapy for controlling the chronic phase of CML.

  10. Chronic pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Juhan, V

    2015-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is defined as disabling pain of at least six months duration. Chronic pelvic pain has often multiple causative factors. Careful analysis of clinical history and detailed clinical examination must be carried out to guide further imaging investigations. Endometriosis is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain, although there is no correlation between the severity of lesions and pain intensity. Pelvic ultrasonography should be the first line imaging examination to search for causative conditions that include endometriosis, adenomyosis, pelvic varices and chronic infection. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for making the positive diagnosis and assessing the spread of endometriosis. MRI is more accurate than ultrasonography for the diagnosis of tubo-ovarian abscess when an adnexal mass is identified. Duplex and color Doppler ultrasonography as well as MR angiography are the best imaging technique for the diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome. In patients with pudendal neuralgia, cross-sectional imaging help exclude nerve compression. PMID:26441020

  11. Mortality among workers with chronic radiation sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Shilnikova, N.S.; Koshurnikova, N.A.; Bolotnikova, M.G.; Kabirova, N.R.

    1996-07-01

    This study is based on a registry containing medical and dosimetric data of the employees who began working at different plants of the Mayak nuclear complex between 1948 and 1958 who developed chronic radiation sickness. Mayak is the first nuclear weapons plutonium production enterprise built in Russia and includes nuclear reactors, a radiochemical plant for plutonium separation, and a plutonium production enterprise built in Russia and includes nuclear reactors, a radiochemical plant for plutonium separation, and a plutonium production plant.Workers whose employment began between 1948 and 1958 exhibited a 6-28% incidence of chronic radiation sickness at the different facilities. There were no cases of chronic radiation sickness among those who began working after 1958. Data on doses of external whole-body gamma-irradiation and mortality in workers with chronic radiation sickness are presented. 6 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Chronic Opioid Therapy in Chronic Noncancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Roger; Fanciullo, Gilbert J.; Fine, Perry G.; Adler, Jeremy A.; Ballantyne, Jane C.; Davies, Pamela; Donovan, Marilee I.; Fishbain, David A.; Foley, Kathy M.; Fudin, Jeffrey; Gilson, Aaron M.; Kelter, Alexander; Mauskop, Alexander; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Passik, Steven D.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Portenoy, Russell K.; Rich, Ben A.; Roberts, Richard G.; Todd, Knox H.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Use of chronic opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain has increased substantially. The American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine commissioned a systematic review of the evidence on chronic opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain and convened a multidisciplinary expert panel to review the evidence and formulate recommendations. Although evidence is limited, the expert panel concluded that chronic opioid therapy can be an effective therapy for carefully selected and monitored patients with chronic noncancer pain. However, opioids are also associated with potentially serious harms, including opioid-related adverse effects and outcomes related to the abuse potential of opioids. The recommendations presented in this document provide guidance on patient selection and risk stratification; informed consent and opioid management plans; initiation and titration of chronic opioid therapy; use of methadone; monitoring of patients on chronic opioid therapy; dose escalations, high-dose opioid therapy, opioid rotation, and indications for discontinuation of therapy; prevention and management of opioid-related adverse effects; driving and work safety; identifying a medical home and when to obtain consultation; management of breakthrough pain; chronic opioid therapy in pregnancy; and opioid-related polices. Perspective: Safe and effective chronic opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain requires clinical skills and knowledge in both the principles of opioid prescribing and on the assessment and management of risks associated with opioid abuse, addiction, and diversion. Although evidence is limited in many areas related to use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain, this guideline provides recommendations developed by a multidisciplinary expert panel following a systematic review of the evidence. PMID:19187889

  13. Chronic pain: a non-use disease.

    PubMed

    Pruimboom, L; van Dam, A C

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems in modern medicine is to find remedies for the group of people with chronic pain syndromes. Low back pain is one of the most frequent syndromes and perhaps the most invalidating of all of them. Chronic pain seems to develop through several pathways affecting the spinal cord and the brain: (1) neuro-anatomical reorganisation, (2) neuro-physiological changes, and (3) activation of glia cells (immune reaction in the central nervous system). Although all of these pathways seem to provide a (partial) plausible explanation for chronic pain, treatments influencing these pathways often fail to alleviate chronic pain patients. This could be because of the probability that chronic pain develops by all three mechanisms of disease. A treatment influencing just one of these mechanisms can only be partially successful. Other factors that seem to contribute to the development of chronic pain are psychosocial. Fear, attention and anxiety are part of the chronic pain syndrome being cause or consequence. The three pathways and the psycho-emotional factors constitute a psycho-neuro-immunological substrate for chronic pain syndromes; a substrate which resembles the substrate for phantom pain and functional invalidity after stroke. Both phantom pain and functional invalidity are considered non-use syndromes. The similarity of the substrate of both these two neurological disorders and chronic pain makes it reasonable to consider chronic pain a non-use disease (the hypothesis). To test this hypothesis, we developed a "paradoxal pain therapy". A therapy which combines the constraint induced movement therapy and strategies to dissociate pain from conditioning factors like fear, anxiety and attention. The aim of the therapy is to establish a behaviour perpendicular on the pathological pain-behaviour. Clinically, the treatment seems promising, although we just have preliminary results. Further clinical and laboratory studies are needed to measure eventual changes at

  14. Chronic hepatitis C: latest treatment options.

    PubMed

    Iosue, Kathleen

    2002-04-01

    The most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most frequent reason for liver transplantation. Unfortunately, most infected individuals don't realize they're HCV positive and only discover the disease after severe liver damage has occurred. Here, update your knowledge on the epidemiology, transmission and risk factors, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and management of chronic HCV. Insight on counseling and quality of life issues for infected patients is also included. PMID:11984417

  15. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lanny

    2012-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topics addressed in this issue are Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and associated chronic pain; the information is meant to help readers understand the mechanisms for pain in this connective tissue disorder as well as general treatment principles for chronic pain management. PMID:22616833

  16. Chronic and integrated care in Catalonia

    PubMed Central

    Contel, Juan Carlos; Ledesma, Albert; Blay, Carles; Mestre, Assumpció González; Cabezas, Carmen; Puigdollers, Montse; Zara, Corine; Amil, Paloma; Sarquella, Ester; Constante, Carles

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Chronicity Prevention and Care Programme set up by the Health Plan for Catalonia 2011–2015 has been an outstanding and excellent opportunity to create a new integrated care model in Catalonia. People with chronic conditions require major changes and transformation within the current health and social system. The new and gradual context of ageing, increase in the number of chronic diseases and the current fragmented system requires this transformation to be implemented. Method The Chronicity Prevention and Care Programme aims to implement actions which drive the current system towards a new scenario where organisations and professionals must work collaboratively. New tools should facilitate this new context- or work-like integrated health information systems, an integrative financing and commissioning scheme and provide a new approach to virtual care by substituting traditional face-to-face care with transfer and shared responsibilities between patients, citizens and health care professionals. Results It has been observed some impact reducing the rate of emergency admissions and readmission related to chronic conditions and better outcome related to better chronic disease control. Some initiative like the Catalan Expert Patient Program has obtained good results and an appropriate service utilization. Discussion The implementation of a Chronic Care Program show good results but it is expected that the new integrated health and social care agenda could provoke a real change and transformation. Some of the results related to better health outcomes and a decrease in avoidable hospital admissions related to chronic conditions confirm we are on the right track to make our health and social system more sustainable for the decades to come. PMID:26150763

  17. Chronic ocular lesions in Bhopal gas tragedy.

    PubMed

    Raizada, J K; Dwivedi, P C

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive eye checkup programme was carried out in 1140 cases of affected community to evaluate the exposure response and exposure effect with Methyl Isocynate on human eyes. The final evaluation of these cases was made with standard control group of same socioeconomic status in a non-gas affected slum area of Bhopal. The main chronic lesions noticed were chronic conjunctivitis, refractive changes, deficiency of tear secretion and persistent corneal opacities of various forms. PMID:3508833

  18. Gabapentin for Chronic Refractory Cancer Cough.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Shrikant; Kumar, Gaurav; Datta, Soumitra Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Vagal sensory neuropathy or vagal hypersensitivity has been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic cough. Earlier reports have shown gabapentin to be effective in sensory laryngeal neuropathy and symptom conditions that have a proven neural origin. We present a case report of a patient with chronic refractory cough due to a soft tissue mass in the lung that caused compression of the mediastinal structures. The patient was successfully treated with gabapentin with reduction in the cough intensity, duration, and frequency. PMID:26962287

  19. Perioperative management in children with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Meredith R; Golianu, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    Children with chronic pain often undergo surgery and effective perioperative management of their pain can be challenging. Identification of the pediatric chronic pain patient preoperatively and development of a perioperative pain plan may help ensure a safer and more comfortable perioperative course. Successful management usually requires multiple different classes of analgesics, regional anesthesia, and adjunctive nonpharmacological therapies. Neuropathic and oncological pain can be especially difficult to treat and usually requires an individualized approach. PMID:27370517

  20. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods Exhaled breath condensate samples were obtained in 43 non-smoking patients with chronic cough and 15 healthy subjects. Exclusion criteria included a doctor’s diagnosis of any lung disorders and any abnormality in lung x-ray. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the patients filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent hypertonic saline cough provocation test, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, and histamine airway challenge. In a subgroup of patients the measurements were repeated during 12 weeks’ treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 ug/day. Results The 8-isoprostane concentrations were higher in the cough patients than in the healthy subjects (24.6 ± 1.2 pg/ml vs. 10.1 ± 1.7 pg/ml, p = 0.045). The 8-isoprostane concentration was associated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.044) but not with the cough sensitivity to saline or other tests. Budesonide treatment did not affect the 8-isoprostane concentrations. Conclusions Chronic cough seems to be associated with airway oxidative stress in subjects with chronic cough but without chronic lung diseases. This finding may help to develop novel antitussive drugs. Trial registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (KUH5801112), identifier NCT00859274. PMID:24294924