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Sample records for chronic cyclosporine nephropathy

  1. Delayed treatment with oleanolic acid attenuates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in chronic cyclosporine nephropathy through Nrf2/HO-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is known to protect against tissue injury by orchestrating antioxidant and detoxification responses to oxidative stress. This study investigated whether upregulation of Nrf2-dependent signaling by oleanolic acid (OA), which is known to activate Nrf2, could attenuate renal inflammation and fibrosis in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced kidney injury. Methods Male ICR mice were divided into four treatment groups: Vehicle (VH, n = 6), VH + OA (n = 6), CsA (n = 8), and CsA + OA (n = 8). For the OA-treated groups, OA (25 mg/kg/day) was administered by intraperitoneal injection for the final week of the 4-week experimental period. Renal function, morphologies and signaling were evaluated at the end of the study. Results Treatment with CsA resulted in decreased kidney function and urine osmolality and increased urine volume and urinary albumin levels. The CsA-induced changes were improved by OA treatment. Specifically, administration of OA decreased tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation scores that were increased in CsA-treated mice. Furthermore, OA treatment decreased urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels. The beneficial effects of OA were attributed to an increased ratio of nuclear/total Nrf2 and subsequently enhanced expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, as well as a stable level of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) expression, indicating that OA enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Increased apoptotic cell death and a high ratio of B cell leukaemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) to Bcl-2 in CsA-treated mice were also significantly ameliorated by OA treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that OA activates Nrf2/HO-1 signaling in chronic CsA nephropathy, which may have beneficial effects on inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24559268

  2. Cyclosporine nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Grinyó, J M; Cruzado, J M

    2004-03-01

    The polypeptide immunosuppressant cyclosporine is a prodrug that binds an intracellular immunophilin. The complex cyclosporine-cyclophilin binds and inhibits the phosphatase activity of calcineurin interfering with the dephosphorilation of members of the nuclear factor of activated T cells, which is involved in the regulation of genes encoding many cytokines. However, calcineurin is not exclusive from T cells; it is also present in many organs, such as the kidney, and their inhibition accounts for both the immunosuppressive and the nephrotoxic effects of cyclosporine. In renal transplantation, it was shown that graft survival improved progressively between 1998 to 1996, mainly due to reduction of acute rejection episodes. There is no doubt that cyclosporine contributed to that success. After 20 years, cyclosporine targets for maintenance immunosuppression have not been defined and the magnitude of chronic cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in renal allografts is not known, in part by the limitations of histologic classification of chronic allograft nephropathy. In the future, the new technology based on DNA microarrays can be a valuable tool to separate chronic drug toxicity from other causes of graft deterioration. On the other hand, in the cyclosporine era, chronic renal failure has emerged as a frequent adverse event after transplantation of nonrenal organs and it is associated with increased risk of death. Although there is not yet enough evidence to support a generalization of calcineurin-free immunosuppression, we should open our minds to the upcoming new concepts on immunosuppression. PMID:15041345

  3. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration. PMID:19384181

  4. Chronic hypokalemic nephropathy: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Bock, K D; Cremer, W; Werner, U

    1978-01-01

    Description of 23 patients (21 women, 2 men) with an average age of 36.6 (19--68) years, who were hypokalemic during 6.5 years on the average (range 1/2--16 years). The cause of the potassium depletion was malnutrition (anorexia nervosa, vomiting) and/or abuse of laxatives and/or diuretics. With increasing duration of potassium depletion renal function deteriorated; in two cases terminal renal failure developed. Histology of the kidneys (9 cases) showed the picture of chronic abacterial interstitial nephritis. Urinalysis was negative or non-specific. The blood pressure levels were normal or low, hypertensive values being exceptional. Aside of hypokalemia a tendency to hyponatriemia, hypochloremia and metabolic alcalosis was observed, the latter turning into hypokalemic normochloremic acidosis with advancing renal insufficiency. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration or excretion frequently were elevated, but no close correlation was found between these parameters or with the blood pressure. Bacterial infection of the urinary tract occured, if at all, in the late phase and seems to be complication rather than the cause of the kidney disease. The discussion of other possible pathogenetic factors leads to the conclusion that the term "chronic kaliopenic nephropathy" is justified. Some diagnostic and therapeutic consequences are mentioned. PMID:732256

  5. Viper bites complicate chronic agrochemical nephropathy in rural Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite is a common occupational health hazard among Sri Lankan agricultural workers, particularly in the North Central Province. Viperine snakes, mainly Russell’s viper envenomation, frequently lead to acute renal failure. During the last two decades, an agrochemical nephropathy, a chronic tubulointerstitial disease has rapidly spread over this area leading to high morbidity and mortality. Most of the epidemiological characteristics of these two conditions overlap, increasing the chances of co-occurrence. Herein, we describe four representative cases of viperine snakebites leading to variable clinical presentations, in patients with chronic agrochemical nephropathy, including two patients presented with acute and delayed anuria. These cases suggest the possibility of unusual manifestations of snakebite in patients with Sri Lankan agrochemical nephropathy, of which the clinicians should be aware. It could be postulated that the existing scenario in the Central America could also lead to similar clinical presentations. PMID:25136354

  6. Treatment of chronic dry eye: focus on cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kymionis, George D; Bouzoukis, Dimitrios I; Diakonis, Vassilios F; Siganos, Charalambos

    2008-01-01

    To review the current treatment of chronic dry eye syndrome, focusing on cyclosporine A (CsA), a systematic literature search was performed using PubMed databases in two steps. The first step was oriented to articles published for dry eye. The second step was focused on the use of CsA in dry eye. A manual literature search was also undertaken based on citations in the published articles. The knowledge on the pathogenesis of dry eye syndrome has changed dramatically during the last few years. Inflammation and the interruption of the inflammatory cascade seem to be the main focus of the ophthalmologic community in the treatment of dry eye, giving the anti-inflammatory therapy a new critical role. The infiltration of T-cells in the conjuctiva tissue and the presence of cytokines and proteasis in the tear fluid were the main reason introducing the use of immunomodulator agents such as corticosteroids, cyclosporine, and doxycicline in order to treat dry eye syndrome. CsA emulsion is approved by the FDA for the treatment of dry eye, while clinical trials of this agent have demonstrated efficacy and safety of CsA. CsA seems to be a promising treatment against dry eye disease. New agents focused on the inflammatory pathogenesis of this syndrome in combination with CsA may be the future in the quest of treating dry eye. More studies are needed to determine the efficacy, safety, timing, and relative cost/effect of CsA. PMID:19668437

  7. Cyclosporin-A efficacy in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, E; Nettis, E; Aloia, A M; Moschetta, M; Carbonara, M; Dammacco, F; Vacca, A

    2011-01-01

    Common drugs in the therapy of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) include antihistamines alone or combined with corticosteroids, but severe unresponsive patients require alternative treatments. This retrospective study aims to evaluate clinical response and safety of low-dose and long-term oral Cyclosporin-A (CyA) in unresponsive patients. One hundred and ten CIU patients, unresponsive to a previous treatment (antihistamines plus prednisone 0.2 mg/kg/day), received additional oral CyA 1–3 mg/kg/day for 6 months. The patients were subdivided into three groups (A, B, C) according to the different CyA doses. Parameters of clinical efficacy including pruritus, and size and number of wheals were evaluated at baseline, after three and six months. All adverse events were recorded. The mean total symptom severity score decreased by 63% in Group A, 76% in Group B, and 85% in Group C after 6 months. Total disappearance of the symptoms was recorded in 43 patients (39.1%): 7 (28%) of Group A; 12 (37.5%) of Group B and 24 (45%) of Group C. After a mean of 2 months from CyA suspension, 14 patients (11%) had recurrence of symptoms. Minor side effects were noted in 8 patients (7%). Our study indicates that low-dose, long-term CyA therapy is efficacious and safe in severe unresponsive CIU. PMID:21496403

  8. Cyclosporin A-mediated cholestasis in patients with chronic hepatitis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Myara, A; Cadranel, J F; Dorent, R; Lunel, F; Bouvier, E; Gerhardt, M; Bernard, B; Ghoussoub, J J; Cabrol, A; Gandjbakhch, I; Opolon, P; Trivin, F

    1996-03-01

    Viral chronic hepatitis often occurs in heart transplant recipients receiving cyclosporin. This essential immunosuppressive drug may induce cholestasis. We investigated the effect of treatment with cyclosporin on serum conjugated bile acids in patients with chronic hepatitis developing after heart transplantation. Fifty-nine patients were studied: 17 with chronic hepatitis, 15 heart transplant patients with normal alanine aminotransferase activity, and 27 heart transplant patients with chronic hepatitis, the last two groups receiving cyclosporin. Hepatic biochemical tests and total bile acid concentration were determined on fasting blood samples. The individual glyco- and tauroconjugated bile acids were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and direct spectrometry. In patients taking cyclosporin the bilirubin concentration and the alkaline phosphatase activity were increased only when hepatitis was present, in association with a slight increase in cholic acid level (5.13 microM vs. 0.68 microM; P < 0.01). Conjugated lithocholate concentration was dramatically higher when hepatitis and immunosuppression with cyclosporin were associated (1.17 microM vs. 0.03 and 0.04 microM; P < 0.01). Chenodeoxycholate was the main circulating bile acid only in the heart transplant patients treated with cyclosporin but without hepatitis. These results suggest that the mechanisms which explain the cyclosporin-associated modifications of the bile acid pool are different according to the presence or absence of hepatitis. The occurrence of hepatitis in patients on cyclosporin led to an increase in serum lithocholate and primary bile acid concentrations. Further studies are required to assess the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid for this cholestasis. PMID:8724029

  9. Smad7 protects against chronic aristolochic acid nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Ru; Fu, Ping; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Aristolochic Acid Nephropathy (AAN) is a progressive chronic kidney disease related to herb medicine. However, treatment for chronic AAN remains ineffective. We report here that Smad7 is protective and has therapeutic potential for chronic AAN. In a mouse model of chronic AAN, progressive renal injury was associated with a loss of renal Smad7 and disruption of Smad7 largely aggravated the severity of chronic AAN as demonstrated by a significant increase in levels of 24-hour urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine, and progressive renal fibrosis and inflammation. In contrast, restored Smad7 locally in the kidneys of Smad7 knockout mice prevented the progression of chronic AAN. Further studies revealed that worsen chronic AAN in Smad7 knockout mice was associated with enhanced activation of TGF-β/Smad3 and NF-κB signaling pathways, which was reversed when renal Smad7 was restored. Importantly, we also found that overexpression of Smad7 locally in the kidneys with established chronic AAN was capable of attenuating progressive chronic AAN by inactivating TGF-β/Smad3-medated renal fibrosis and NF-κB-driven renal inflammation. In conclusion, Smad7 plays a protective role in the pathogenesis of chronic AAN and overexpression of Smad7 may represent a novel therapeutic potential for chronic AAN. PMID:25883225

  10. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  11. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Pazarín-Villaseñor, Leonardo; Yanowsky-Escatell, Francisco Gerardo; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60-89 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  12. [DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY AS A CAUSE OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Kos, Ivan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage chronic kidney disease in most developed countries. Hyperglycemia, hypertension and genetic predisposition are the main risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Elevated serum lipids, smoking habits, and the amount and origin of dietary protein also seem to play a role as risk factors. Clinical picture includes a progressive increase in albuminuria, decline in glomerular filtration, hypertension, and a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening for albuminuria should be performed yearly, starting 5 years after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes or earlier in the presence of adolescence or poor metabolic control. In patients with type 2 diabetes, screening should be performed at diagnosis and yearly thereafter. Patients with albuminuria should undergo evaluation regarding the presence of associated comorbidities, especially retinopathy and macrovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control (HbA1c < 7%), treating hypertension (target blood pressure < 140/85 mm Hg), using drugs with blockade effect on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, treating dyslipidemia and anemia are effective strategies for preventing the development of albuminuria, delaying the progression to more advanced stages of nephropathy and reducing cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26285470

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Cyclosporine in the Treatment of Chronic Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Clyde

    2014-01-01

    Dry-eye syndrome (DES) is a multifactorial disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Various factors, including age, hormonal status, genetics, sex, immune status, innervation status, nutrition, pathogens, and environmental stress, can alter the cellular and molecular structure or function of components of the ocular surface system. The resulting imbalance increases susceptibility to desiccation and epithelial damage, leading to a vicious circle in which inflammation amplifies and sustains further damage by chronic deregulation of the system. Lubricating agents and steroids have been used as treatment options. However, as the causes of the disease become better elucidated, the more chemically complex cyclosporine A has become an increasingly useful treatment option and in the United States is currently the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescription drug for the treatment of dry eye. The safety and efficacy of cyclosporine have been shown in numerous studies. PMID:25002818

  14. Assessment of the Siksika chronic disease nephropathy-prevention clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ward, David R.R.; Novak, Ellen; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Brar, Sony; White, Melvin; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if a community-based multifactorial intervention clinic led by a nurse practitioner would improve management of First Nations people at risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Design Qualitative descriptive study. Setting A nephropathy-prevention clinic in Siksika Nation, Alta. Participants First Nations people with diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia who were referred to the clinic. Main outcome measures Changes in blood pressure (BP), hemoglobin A1c, and low-density lipoprotein levels, as well as in use of antiplatelet therapy, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker medications, and statin therapy. Results Members of the Siksika Nation were treated according to clinical practice guidelines. A total of 78 patients had at least 2 visits to the clinic and were included in this analysis (61.5% were women; mean age 56 years). Among those initially above target, a significant reduction was achieved in mean hemoglobin A1c (0.96%; P < .01), systolic BP (15.84 mm Hg; P < .05), diastolic BP (7.16 mm Hg; P < .001), and low-density lipoprotein (0.62 mmol/L; P < .01) levels. There was a significant increase in the proportion of patients with clinical indications who were treated with acetylsalicylic acid (42.4%; P < .01), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker medications (35.9%; P < .01), or statin therapy (35.9%; P < .01). Conclusion A community-based, nurse practitioner–led clinic can improve many clinically relevant factors in patients at risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Studies have shown that achieving treatment targets is associated with a reduced risk of early death and cardiovascular events; the effect in the First Nations population on these hard clinical end points remains to be determined. PMID:23341675

  15. Chronic cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity, P-glycoprotein overexpression, and relationships with intrarenal angiotensin II deposits.

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, R. G.; Andujar, M.; Ramírez, C.; Gómez-Morales, M.; Masseroli, M.; Aguilar, M.; Olmo, A.; Arrebola, F.; Guillén, M.; García-Chicano, M. J.; Nogales, F. F.; O'Valle, F.

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expels hydrophobic substances from the cell, including chemotherapeutic agents and immunosuppressants such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Exposure of cultured renal tubular cells to CsA induces P-gp overexpression in cell membranes. Angiotensin II has recently been implicated as the principal factor responsible for progression of interstitial fibrosis induced by CsA. To investigate the in vivo relationships between histological lesions, P-gp overexpression, and intrarenal angiotensin II deposits, we developed a model of chronic CsA toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats treated with 25 mg/kg/day CsA for 28 and 56 days and fed either a standard maintenance diet or a low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the expression of P-gp in renal tubular cells and the appearance of intrarenal angiotensin II deposits. Rats treated with CsA developed chronic nephrotoxicity lesions that were more evident in the group fed the low-salt diet. Treatment with CsA induced overexpression of P-gp in tubular cells of the kidney that increased with time. We found that immunohistochemical expression of P-gp was slightly more severe in rats fed a low-salt diet. Intrarenal deposits of angiotensin II were more evident in rats treated with CsA; these deposits also increased with time. This finding was also more relevant in rats given the low-salt diet. The up-regulation of P-gp was inversely related to the incidence of hyaline arteriopathy (r = -0.65; P < 0.05), periglomerular (r = -0.58; P < 0.05) and peritubular fibrosis (r = -0.63; P < 0.05), and intrarenal angiotensin H deposits in animals with severe signs of nephrotoxicity (r = -0.65; P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that the role of P-gp as a detoxicant in renal cells may be related to mechanisms that control the cytoplasmic removal of both toxic metabolites from CsA and those originating from the catabolism of signal transduction proteins (methylcysteine esters), which are produced

  16. Posing the Question Again: Does Chronic Uric Acid Nephropathy Exist?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The question of whether hyperuricemia can induce chronic direct renal injury has been argued for many decades. Despite continued efforts and strong motivations to seek an answer, the current evidence still cannot definitively prove or refute the hypothesis. Recent data in rodents do favor causality between hyperuricemia and renal disease. Human epidemiologic data are quite varied, but positive studies do exist. Pathophysiologic models of biology for this entity are sparse in animals and nonexistent in humans. PMID:19729442

  17. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to calcineurin inhibitors. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy with declining glomerular filtration rate (GFR), defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m(2)/min, steadily increasing serum creatinine and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kg bodyweight (BW), followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. Calcineurin inhibitors were reduced to 50% at the start of sirolimus and discontinued at median 7 days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five out of eight patients (p = 0.026), and only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean serum creatinine improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, or on time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, and serum lipids increased transiently. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy-proven chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:16712606

  18. Cyclosporine Ophthalmic

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmic cyclosporine is used to increase tear production in people with dry eye disease. Cyclosporine is in a class of medications called immunomodulators. It works by decreasing swelling in the eye ...

  19. [Analgesic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Pintér, I; Nagy, J

    1998-11-22

    Analgesic nephropathy is a slowly progressive disease caused by the chronic abuse of analgesic mixtures containing two analgesic components combined with potentially addictive substances (coffeine and/or codeine). Pathologically, the nephropathy is characterized by renal papillary necrosis with calcification and chronic interstitial nephritis sometimes in association with transitional-cell carcinoma of the uroepithelium. In the early stage, the clinical characteristics are polyuria, sterile pyuria, sometimes renal colic and haematuria. With further progression of the disease, there are the nonspecific symptoms of advanced renal failure. The incidence of classic analgesic nephropathy among Hungarian patients on chronic renal replacement therapy has proven. There is an urgent need for the estimation of analgesic nephropathy among patients with chronic renal disease and among patients with chronic pain presumably regularly taking analgesics in Hungary. As long as analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin or paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and addictive substances are available "over-the-counter", analgesic nephropathy will continue to be a problem also in our country. PMID:9846064

  20. Effect of nephrotoxic drugs on the development of radiation nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1994-03-01

    Chronic renal failure is a significant cause of late morbidity in bone marrow transplant patients whose conditioning regimen includes total body irradiation (TBI). Radiation is a major cause of this syndrome (bone marrow transplant nephropathy), but it may not be the only cause. These studies use a rat syngeneic bone marrow transplant model to determine whether nephrotoxic agents used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be enhancing or accelerating the development of radiation nephropathy. Rats received 11-17 Gy TBI in six fractions over 3 days followed by syngeneic bone marrow transplant. In conjunction with the bone marrow transplants, animals received either no drugs, cyclosporine, amphotericin, gentamicin, or busulfan. Drugs were given in schedules analogous to their use in clinical bone marrow transplantation. Drug doses were chosen so that the drug regimen alone caused detectable acute nephrotoxicity. Animals were followed for 6 months with periodic renal function tests. Gentamicin had no apparent interactions with TBI. Amphotericin increased the incidence of engraftment failure, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Cyclosporin with TBI caused late morbidity that appeared to be due to neurological problems, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Busulfan resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation nephropathy. Of the nephrotoxins used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation only radiation and busulfan were found to be risk factors for bone marrow transplant nephropathy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. [Topical administration of cyclosporin in psoriasis vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Bunse, T; Schulze, H J; Mahrle, G

    1990-06-01

    Two groups of patients with chronic plaque psoriasis were topically treated either with 10% cyclosporin in a jelly base or with 5% cyclosporin in an ointment base under occlusion. We found that cyclosporin penetrates into the lower epidermis and the dermis, when it is applied under occlusion. Obviously, the target cells are neutrophil granulocytes, since they decrease in number under cyclosporin, whereas the other inflammatory cells as well as the epidermal proliferation remain unchanged. In contrast to systemic application of cyclosporin, we did not observe any clinical differences between plaques treated with cyclosporin and those treated with placebo. PMID:2202163

  2. Targeting c-fms kinase attenuates chronic aristolochic acid nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao Y; Huang, Xiao R; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Lin; Fu, Ping; Manthey, Carl; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui Y

    2016-03-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) is a progressive kidney disease caused by some Chinese herbal medicines, but treatment remains ineffective. Macrophage accumulation is an early feature in human and experimental AAN; however, the role of macrophages in chronic AAN is unknown. We report here that targeting macrophages with fms-I, a selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activity of the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, suppressed disease progression in a mouse model of chronic AAN. Treatment with fms-I (10mg/kg/BID) from day 0 to 28 (prevention study) or from day 14 to 28 (intervention study) substantially inhibited macrophage accumulation and significantly improved renal dysfunction including a reduction in proteinuria and tubular damage. Progressive interstitial fibrosis (myofibroblast accumulation and collagen deposition) and renal inflammation (increased expression of MCP-1, MIF, and TNF-α) were also attenuated by fms-I treatment. These protective effects involved inhibition of TGF-β/Smad3 and NF-kB signaling. In conclusion, the present study establishes that macrophages are key inflammatory cells that exacerbates progressive tubulointerstitial damage in chronic AAN via mechanisms associated with TGF-β/Smad3-mediated renal fibrosis and NF-κB-driven renal inflammation. Targeting macrophages via a c-fms kinase inhibitor may represent a novel therapy for chronic AAN. PMID:26909597

  3. Targeting c-fms kinase attenuates chronic aristolochic acid nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Zhang, Lin; Fu, Ping; Manthey, Carl; Nikolic-Paterson, David J.; Lan, Hui Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) is a progressive kidney disease caused by some Chinese herbal medicines, but treatment remains ineffective. Macrophage accumulation is an early feature in human and experimental AAN; however, the role of macrophages in chronic AAN is unknown. We report here that targeting macrophages with fms-I, a selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activity of the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, suppressed disease progression in a mouse model of chronic AAN. Treatment with fms-I (10mg/kg/BID) from day 0 to 28 (prevention study) or from day 14 to 28 (intervention study) substantially inhibited macrophage accumulation and significantly improved renal dysfunction including a reduction in proteinuria and tubular damage. Progressive interstitial fibrosis (myofibroblast accumulation and collagen deposition) and renal inflammation (increased expression of MCP-1, MIF, and TNF-α) were also attenuated by fms-I treatment. These protective effects involved inhibition of TGF-β/Smad3 and NF-kB signaling. In conclusion, the present study establishes that macrophages are key inflammatory cells that exacerbates progressive tubulointerstitial damage in chronic AAN via mechanisms associated with TGF-β/Smad3-mediated renal fibrosis and NF-κB-driven renal inflammation. Targeting macrophages via a c-fms kinase inhibitor may represent a novel therapy for chronic AAN. PMID:26909597

  4. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  5. Serum Hepcidin Predicts Uremic Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Feng, Su-Juan; Su, Lu-Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Shi-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepcidin, as a regulator of body iron stores, has been recently discovered to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most common complication and the leading cause of death in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients. In the current study, we aimed to explore the relationship between serum hepcidin and uremic accelerated atherosclerosis (UAAS) in CHD patients with diabetic nephropathy (CHD/DN). Methods: A total of 78 CHD/DN and 86 chronic hemodialyzed nondiabetic patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CHD/non-DN) were recruited in this study. The level of serum hepcidin-25 was specifically measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: High serum level of hepcidin-25 was seen in CHD patients. Serum hepcidin-25 in CHD/DN was significantly higher than that in CHD/non-DN patients. Serum hepcidin-25 was positively correlated with ferritin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), TNF-α, and IL-6 in CHD/DN patients. CHD/DN patients exhibited higher common carotid artery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT), hs-CRP, and hepcidin-25 levels than that in CHD/non-DN patients. Moreover, in CHD/DN patients, CCA-IMT was positively correlated with serum hepcidin, hs-CRP, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. On multiple regression analysis, serum hepcidin and hs-CRP level exhibited independent association with IMT in CHD/DN patients. Conclusions: These findings suggest possible linkage between iron metabolism and hepcidin modulation abnormalities that may contribute to the development of UAAS in CHD/DN patients. PMID:25963357

  6. The protective effect of vildagliptin in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A; Nader, Manar A

    2016-03-01

    The study examined the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups treated for 28 days: control (vehicle), vildagliptin (10 mg/kg, orally), CsA (20 mg/kg, s.c.), and CsA-vildagliptin group. Liver function was assessed by measuring serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyltransferase (γGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and albumin, and histopathological changes of liver were examined. Oxidative stress markers were evaluated. Assessment of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in hepatic nuclear extract, serum DPP-4, and expression of Bax and Bcl2 were also done. CsA-induced hepatotoxicity was evidenced by increase in serum levels of AST, ALT, and γGT; a decrease in serum albumin; and a significant alteration in hepatic architecture. Also, significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) levels, increased expression Bax proteins with deceased expression of Bcl2, and increased hepatic activity of NF-κB and serum DPP-4 level were observed upon CsA treatment. Vildagliptin significantly improved all altered parameters induced by CsA administration. Vildagliptin has the potential to protect the liver against CsA-induced hepatotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, DPP-4 activity, apoptosis, and inflammation. PMID:26632647

  7. Cyclosporine Ophthalmic

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to increase tear production in people with dry eye disease. Cyclosporine is in a class of medications ... Be sure to mention other eye drops for dry eye disease.if you are using artificial tears, instill ...

  8. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. RESULTS After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  9. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Material/Methods Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. Results After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. Conclusions Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  10. Corticosteroids in Patients with IgA Nephropathy and Severe Chronic Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Claudio; Ferrario, Francesca; Visciano, Bianca; Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the utility of treating patients with advanced IgA nephropathy (IgAN). From 2001 to 2005, four patients came to our observation because of serum creatinine higher than 3 mg/dL, proteinuria ranging from 1.8 to 5.1 g/day, and a histological picture of diffuse sclerotic lesions. A corticosteroid course of 12 months was given. Patients were observed for a mean follow up of 84 months. At the end of the steroid course, proteinuria lowered quickly below 1 g/day in two patients, whereas the other two experienced a slower and less persistent decrease of proteinuria. Despite similar lesion severity at renal biopsy, renal function stabilized only in these two ones. In conclusion, these preliminary observations suggest a possible efficacy of corticosteroids in slowing down the progression of renal disease and in postponing the need of dialysis in IgAN patients with stage IV CKD and severe chronic histological lesions. PMID:24533200

  11. Low-dose and short-term cyclosporine treatment in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria: a clinical and immunological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Serhat Inaloz, H; Ozturk, Savas; Akcali, Cenk; Kirtak, Necmettin; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet

    2008-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 2.5 mg/kg/day cyclosporin (CsA) treatment in patients with severe chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and the impact of CsA treatment on several cytokines involved in the etiopathogenesis of CIU. Twenty-seven CIU patients and 24 healthy control subjects were included in the study. The autologous serum skin test (ASST) for autoantibodies and urticaria activity scoring (UAS) were measured for the evaluation of the clinical severity and the response to therapy, and the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-2 receptor, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-5 were measured. The mean UAS score was 32.07 +/- 7.05 and 6.22 +/- 3.84 before and after CsA treatment, respectively. The serum IL-2 receptor, TNF-alpha and IL-5 levels of patients before CsA treatment were statistically higher than those of the control group (P = 0.001), and after 4 weeks of CsA therapy the mean IL-2R, TNF-alpha and IL-5 levels were significantly decreased. The data from this study demonstrate that CsA therapy is efficient and safe for CIU patients. Increase in clinical efficacy and marked decreases in serum cytokine levels suggest that inhibition of cytokine generation is involved in the action of the drug in this clinical setting. PMID:18477227

  12. Ocular surface and tear functions after topical cyclosporine treatment in dry eye patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Ogawa, Y; Dogru, M; Kawai, M; Tatematsu, Y; Uchino, M; Okada, N; Igarashi, A; Kujira, A; Fujishima, H; Okamoto, S; Shimazaki, J; Tsubota, K

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the effect of 0.05% topical cyclosporine (Cys) on the ocular surface and tear functions in dry eye patients with chronic GVHD (cGVHD) in a prospective comparative study. Thirty eyes of 15 patients refractory to baseline treatment were recruited and the patients assigned for topical Cys treatment group (14 eyes of 7 patients) and control group (12 eyes of 6 patients) respectively. Two patients dropped out because of intolerable irritation while using topical Cys eye drops. Visual analog scale symptom scores, corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, tear film break-up time (TBUT), tear evaporation rate and ocular surface vital staining scores were recorded at baseline and at the end of the following one month. Conjunctival impression and brush cytology were performed before and after the treatment. After topical Cys treatment, significant improvements were found in symptom scores, corneal sensitivity, tear evaporation rate, TBUT, vital staining scores, goblet cells density, conjunctival squamous metaplasia grade, inflammatory cell numbers and the MUC5AC expression. Our study suggests that 0.05% topical Cys may be an effective treatment for dry eye patients with cGVHD. The improvements in the ocular surface and tear functions resulted presumably from the decreased inflammation, increased goblet cell density and MUC5AC mRNA expression. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2008) 41, 293-302; doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1705900; published online 5 November 2007. PMID:17982500

  13. Campath, calcineurin inhibitor reduction and chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) study: background, rationale, and study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for patients with end-stage renal failure, but uncertainty remains about the best immunosuppression strategy. Long-term graft survival has not improved substantially, and one possible explanation is calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) nephrotoxicity. CNI exposure could be minimized by using more potent induction therapy or alternative maintenance therapy to remove CNIs completely. However, the safety and efficacy of such strategies are unknown. Methods/Design The Campath, Calcineurin inhibitor reduction and Chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) Study is a multicentre, open-label, randomized controlled trial with 852 participants which is addressing two important questions in kidney transplantation. The first question is whether a Campath (alemtuzumab)-based induction therapy strategy is superior to basiliximab-based therapy, and the second is whether, from 6 months after transplantation, a sirolimus-based maintenance therapy strategy is superior to tacrolimus-based therapy. Recruitment is complete, and follow-up will continue for around 5 years post-transplant. The primary endpoint for the induction therapy comparison is biopsy-proven acute rejection by 6 months, and the primary endpoint for the maintenance therapy comparison is change in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline to 2 years after transplantation. The study is sponsored by the University of Oxford and endorsed by the British Transplantation Society, and 18 centers for adult kidney transplant are participating. Discussion Late graft failure is a major issue for kidney-transplant recipients. If our hypothesis that minimizing CNI exposure with Campath-based induction therapy and/or an elective conversion to sirolimus-based maintenance therapy can improve long-term graft function and survival is correct, then patients should experience better graft function for longer. A positive outcome could change clinical practice in kidney transplantation. Trial

  14. [Membranous nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Mercadal, Lucile

    2013-12-01

    Membranous nephropathy is characterized by immune complex deposits on the outer side of the glomerular basement membrane. Activation of complement and of oxidation lead to basement membrane lesions. The most frequent form is idiopathic. At 5 and 10 years, renal survival is around 90 and 65% respectively. A prognostic model based on proteinuria, level and duration, progression of renal failure in a few months can refine prognosis. The urinary excretion of C5b-9, β2 and α1 microglobuline and IgG are strong predictors of outcome. Symptomatic treatment is based on anticoagulation in case of nephrotic syndrome, angiotensin conversion enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and statins. Immunosuppressive therapy should be discussed for patients having a high risk of progression. Corticoids alone has no indication. Treatment should include a simultaneous association or more often alternating corticoids and alkylant agent for a minimum of 6 months. Adrenocorticoid stimulating hormone and steroids plus mycophenolate mofetil may be equally effective. Steroids plus alkylant decrease the risk of end stage renal failure. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus decrease proteinuria but are associated with a high risk of recurrence at time of withdrawal and are nephrotoxic. Rituximab evaluated on open studies needs further evaluations to define its use. PMID:24315535

  15. Silica nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, N

    2010-07-01

    Occupational exposure to heavy metals, organic solvents and silica is associated with a variety of renal manifestations. Improved understanding of occupational renal disease provides insight into environmental renal disease, improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis. Silica (SiO2) is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. Workers exposed to silica include sandblasters, miners, quarry workers, masons, ceramic workers and glass manufacturers. New cases of silicosis per year have been estimated in the US to be 3600-7300. Exposure to silica has been associated with tubulointerstitial disease, immune-mediated multisystem disease, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. A rare syndrome of painful, nodular skin lesions has been described in dialysis patients with excessive levels of silicon. Balkan endemic nephropathy is postulated to be due to chronic intoxication with drinking water polluted by silicates released during soil erosion. The mechanism of silica nephrotoxicity is thought to be through direct nephrotoxicity, as well as silica-induced autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. The renal histopathology varies from focal to crescentic and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with aneurysm formation suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. The treatment for silica nephrotoxicity is non-specific and depends on the mechanism and stage of the disease. It is quite clear that further research is needed, particularly to elucidate the pathogenesis of silica nephropathy. Considering the importance of diagnosing exposure-related renal disease at early stages, it is imperative to obtain a thorough occupational history in all patients with renal disease, with particular emphasis on exposure to silica, heavy metals, and solvents. PMID:23022796

  16. Topical cyclosporine to control ocular surface disease in patients with chronic glaucoma after long-term usage of topical ocular hypotensive medications

    PubMed Central

    Saini, M; Dhiman, R; Dada, T; Tandon, R; Vanathi, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate changes in ocular surface and central corneal sub-basal nerve fiber layer (SBNFL) after topical cyclosporin therapy in chronic glaucoma patients on long-term topical antiglaucoma therapy. Methods A prospective comparative study of ocular surface evaluation of chronic glaucoma patients on long-term topical therapy treated concurrently with a topical cyclosporine 0.05% twice daily for 6 months and controls was done. The study parameters evaluated at recruitment and at the 6-month follow-up included details of topical antiglaucoma medications, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, ocular surface evaluation parameters (TBUT, Schirmers I, ocular surface staining scores and ocular surface disease (OSD) index score (OSDI)), central corneal sensation (Cochet Bonnett aesthesiometer), and central confocal microscopy to study the SBNFL density (SBNFLD). Results Thirty-two eyes of 16 patients with chronic glaucoma and 30 eyes of 15 normal subjects as controls were studied. Mean TBUT, pre/post CsA treatment was 8.67±3.01/12.24±1.83 s (P=0.007). Mean conjunctival/corneal staining scores pre/post CsA treatment were 3.38±1.93/1.50±0.718 (P=0.00) /5.19±1.82/1.81±0.78 (P=0.098), respectively. Mean OSDI pre/post CsA treatment scores were 30.63±14.61/14.76±6.06 (P=0.007). Mean corneal sensations scores pre/post CsA treatment were 4.64±0.46/4.94±0.39 (P=0.002). Central corneal SBNFLD pre and post CsA treatment was 8811.35±2985.29/10335.13±4092.064 μm/mm2 (P=0.0001). Conclusions Schirmer's test, ocular surface staining scores, OSDI, corneal sensations, and corneal SBNFLD showed a statistically significant improvement following a 6-month concurrent topical CsA therapy. PMID:25857609

  17. Kaliopenic nephropathy revisited.

    PubMed

    Elitok, Saban; Bieringer, Markus; Schneider, Wolfgang; Luft, Friedrich C

    2016-08-01

    In the 'older' literature, a definitive renal pathology was described in patients with long-standing hypokalaemia and depletion of the body's potassium reserves. The topic is relevant because possibly a quite cheaply reversible element in the course of chronic kidney disease progression could be addressed. Earlier, pathologists drew attention to vacuolar changes in renal tubular epithelium accompanied by inflammatory interstitial changes in patients with potassium losses. The diagnostic term 'kaliopenic nephropathy' was coined to describe such patients. Kaliopenic nephropathy now receives less emphasis than in earlier times. However, with eating disorders, laxative abuse and other potential causes, we suggest that the syndrome should be resurrected. PMID:27478593

  18. Influence of cyclosporine A on glomerular growth and the effect of mizoribine and losartan on cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in young rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hong; Lee, Yeon Hee; Lim, Beom Jin; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Kim, Pyung Kil; Shin, Jae Il

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cyclosporine A (CsA) on glomerular growth and the effect of mizoribine (MZR) and losartan (LSAR) on CsA-induced nephropathy in young rats. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained on a low salt diet were given CsA (15 mg/kg), CsA and LSRT (30 mg/kg/day), CsA and MZR (5 mg/kg), or a combination of CsA, LSRT, and MZR for 4 and 7 weeks (two experiments) and compared with control group (olive oil-treated). Histopathology and glomerular size, inflammatory and fibrotic factors were studied. The score of acute CsA toxicity significantly decreased in the CsA + MZR group compared to the CsA group (p < 0.01). MZR and MZR + LSRT reduced tubulointerstitial fibrosis and TGF-β1 mRNA expression at 7 weeks. Osteopontin (OPN) mRNA expression was decreased at 7 weeks in MZR + LSRT (p < 0.01). Glomerular area decreased CsA group and recovered in MZR (p < 0.01) and MZR + LSRT (p < 0.01) at 7weeks. This study demonstrated that MZR and LSRT had suppressive effects on inflammatory process in chronic CsA nephropathy and led to improvement of tubular damage, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and arteriolopathy by down regulation of OPN and TGF-β1 and glomerular size contraction. PMID:26947764

  19. Membranous nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels (most often statins) may be recommended. A low-salt diet may ... of membranous nephropathy Your symptoms get worse or don't go away You develop new symptoms You have ...

  20. Diabetic nephropathy – complications and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andy KH

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

  1. Neoral: the new cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Corbett, J; Ross, K

    1998-02-01

    Neoral is an improved formulation of cyclosporine which, through microemulsion technology, provides a more consistent rate of absorption and exposure. If patients are able to take less Neoral and still maintain the same cyclosporine level, there will also be a cost savings involved. A dose reduction of 30% yields pharmacoeconomic savings. With a more consistent rate of absorption, the risks of nephrotoxicity may be reduced. PMID:9543913

  2. The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio is a reliable indicator for evaluating complications of chronic kidney disease and progression in IgA nephropathy in China

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Lu; Yuezhong, Luo; Chao, Wang; HaiTao, Tu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the correlation between the albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the urine and 24-hour urine proteinuria and whether the ratio can predict chronic kidney disease progression even more reliably than 24-hour proteinuria can, particularly in primary IgA nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 182 patients with primary IgA nephropathy were evaluated. Their mean urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria were determined during hospitalization. Blood samples were also analyzed. Follow-up data were recorded for 44 patients. A cross-sectional study was then conducted to test the correlation between these parameters and their associations with chronic kidney disease complications. Subsequently, a canonical correlation analysis was employed to assess the correlation between baseline proteinuria and parameters of the Oxford classification. Finally, a prospective observational study was performed to evaluate the association between proteinuria and clinical outcomes. Our study is registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, and the registration number is ChiCTR-OCH-14005137. RESULTS: A strong correlation (r=0.81, p<0.001) was found between the ratio and 24-hour proteinuria except in chronic kidney disease stage 5. First-morning urine albumin-to-creatinine ratios of ≥125.15, 154.44 and 760.31 mg/g reliably predicted equivalent 24-hour proteinuria ‘thresholds’ of ≥0.15, 0.3 and 1.0 g/24 h, respectively. In continuous analyses, the albumin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly associated with anemia, acidosis, hypoalbuminemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia, hypercholesterolemia and higher serum cystatin C. However, higher 24-hour proteinuria was only associated with hypoalbuminemia and hypercholesterolemia. Higher tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scores were also associated with a greater albumin-to-creatinine ratio, as observed in the canonical correlation analysis. Finally, the albumin-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour

  3. [Selected work-related nephropathies].

    PubMed

    Wołyniec, Wojciech; Renke, Marcin; Wójcik-Stasiak, Małgorzata; Renke, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Infections, high temperature and many of the toxic substances can cause kidney damage. Acute kidney injury is a well known complication of some work-related diseases, e.g., lead intoxication. Chronic kidney disease can also be caused by some occupational factors. Three work-related nephropathies, in which causal connection with work has been proved, are discussed in this article. There are different risk factors of nephrolithiasis, lead nephropathy and silica nephropathy, but each of them can cause chronic kidney disease. Prevention of these nephropaties seems to be relatively simple. The principles of protection from the toxic effects of heavy metals and silica dust are very specific. The most important prevention of kidney stones is correct fluid intake. In addition to providing adequate quantities of drinking water, it is also important to educate exposed workers and assure enough rest breaks at work. PMID:26536975

  4. IgA nephropathy and psoriatic arthritis that improved with steroid pulse therapy and mizoribine in combination with treatment for chronic tonsillitis and epipharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tomohiro; Mii, Akiko; Fukui, Megumi; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Shimizu, Akira; Tsuruoka, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with edema and renal dysfunction. He had received a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis at 50 years of age. As a renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy (IgAN), bilateral tonsillectomy was performed, and one course of steroid pulse therapy with an oral steroid and mizoribine were subsequently administered. The patient's proteinuria gradually reduced in association with an improvement in the renal function. In addition, the rash and arthralgia were ameliorated. In this case, adding treatment for chronic epipharyngitis accelerated the curative effects, and focal infection therapy consisting of immunosuppressive drugs was effective for both IgAN and psoriatic arthritis. PMID:25948353

  5. Thrombocytopenia and Anemia with Anti-c-Mpl antibodies Effectively Treated with Cyclosporine in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akari; Kanisawa, Yuji; Fujimi, Akihito; Nakajima, Chisa; Hayasaka, Naotaka; Yamada, Shota; Okuda, Toshinori; Minami, Shinya; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Iwasaki, Sari; Suzuki, Akira; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis who was undergoing hemodialysis for end-stage renal failure was transferred to our hospital due to severe thrombocytopenia and anemia. A bone marrow biopsy showed the complete absence of megakaryocytes and erythroblasts. Cyclosporine treatment resulted in the improvement of her megakaryocyte and erythroblast levels, and a decrease in her serum level of anti-c-Mpl (thrombopoietin receptor) antibodies. After this initial improvement, her anemia progressively worsened, despite the continuous administration of immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine. Her platelet and leukocyte counts remained stable. This is the first report of a probable case of anti-c-Mpl antibody-associated pure red cell aplasia and acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura. PMID:26984091

  6. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Vaden, S L

    1997-08-01

    Cyclosporine and tacrolimus are potent immunosuppressant agents that have been used extensively in humans, primarily for prevention of transplant rejection but also for the treatment of autoimmune disorders. Both agents have similar mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic profiles. However, the expected toxicity of the agents is dissimilar. Although cyclosporine usage in veterinary medicine is limited, it has been used enough for therapeutic guidelines to be established. Tacrolimus, however, has undergone limited use in veterinary medicine. The drug is too toxic in dogs for its use to be recommended in most clinical situations. This article reviews the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, expected drug interactions and toxicities, and clinical usage of cyclosporine and tacrolimus in veterinary medicine. PMID:9283240

  7. Kaliopenic nephropathy revisited

    PubMed Central

    Elitok, Saban; Bieringer, Markus; Schneider, Wolfgang; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2016-01-01

    In the ‘older’ literature, a definitive renal pathology was described in patients with long-standing hypokalaemia and depletion of the body's potassium reserves. The topic is relevant because possibly a quite cheaply reversible element in the course of chronic kidney disease progression could be addressed. Earlier, pathologists drew attention to vacuolar changes in renal tubular epithelium accompanied by inflammatory interstitial changes in patients with potassium losses. The diagnostic term ‘kaliopenic nephropathy’ was coined to describe such patients. Kaliopenic nephropathy now receives less emphasis than in earlier times. However, with eating disorders, laxative abuse and other potential causes, we suggest that the syndrome should be resurrected. PMID:27478593

  8. [Cyclosporin A--dermatologic indications].

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Schulze, H J

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacology, the biological action, as well as the clinical indications for systemic or topical application of cyclosporin A (CSA) is reviewed. Our studies yielded the following results: In chronic stationary psoriasis, systemic treatment with CSA in very low doses (2.5 mg/kg/d, 13 patients, 10 weeks) led to a 75% reduction of the PASI score without any side reactions. After topical application of CSA (40 patients, 1/5/10% gel and ointment), we observed a subclinical effect. CSA permeated into the deeper layers of the skin and accumulated up to a concentration of 3.880 ng/g (80-39.000 ng/g, polyclonal RIA); these quantities correspond with those found after systemic administration. In spite of this, CSA was not measurable in the blood. Topical CSA reduced the neutrophils in psoriatic skin both selectively and significantly, but did not affect the epidermal synthesis of DNA. PMID:2183505

  9. Non-Proteinuric Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Nicolas Roberto; Villa, Juan; Hernandez Gallego, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy patients traditionally show significant macroalbuminuria prior to the development of renal impairment. However, this clinical paradigm has recently been questioned. Epidemiological surveys confirm that chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosed by a low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is more common in diabetic patients than in the non-diabetic population but a low number of patients had levels of proteinuria above that which traditionally defines overt diabetic nephropathy (>500 mg/g). The large number of patients with low levels of proteinuria suggests that the traditional clinical paradigm of overt diabetic nephropathy is changing since it does not seem to be the underlying renal lesion in most of diabetic subjects with CKD. PMID:26371050

  10. Association between the presence of anti-HLA antibodies with acute rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy in the first year after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toresan, R; Manfro, R C; Proença, M C C; Veronese, F J V; Salim, P H; da Silva, D M; Ribeiro, A R; Edelweiss, M I A; Pegas, K L; Jobim, L F J

    2008-04-01

    The clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies following kidney transplantation has been a recent focus of research. Patients who present anti-HLA antibodies in the posttransplantation period have shown higher incidences of acute rejection episodes (ARE) and chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-HLA antibodies during the first year after kidney transplantation and their association with the occurrence of ARE and CAN. Eighty-eight kidney transplant recipients were evaluated for the presence of IgG anti-HLA antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAT-M and LAT-1240, One Lambda Inc, Calif, United States). Protocol kidney biopsies were performed in consenting patients. ARE and CAN were diagnosed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathological criteria. Anti-HLA antibodies were observed in 20 (22.7%) patients. At 1 year follow-up, 26.1% presented ARE and 51.2% developed CAN. Nine patients (45%) with antibodies developed ARE as opposed to 20.6% without antibodies and 64.7% developed CAN as opposed to 47.8% of those without antibodies. In the histological analysis, the anti-HLA antibodies were associated with Banff IIA ARE (P = .001) and Banff grade II CAN (P = .012). Routine posttransplantation search for antibodies may identify cases at higher risk for acute and chronic rejection, and perhaps help to tailor the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:18454996

  11. Chronic Running Exercise Alleviates Early Progression of Nephropathy with Upregulation of Nitric Oxide Synthases and Suppression of Glycation in Zucker Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Cao, Pengyu; Kakihana, Takaaki; Sato, Emiko; Suda, Chihiro; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Hu, Gaizun; Ishii, Tadashi; Ito, Osamu; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training is known to exert multiple beneficial effects including renal protection in type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. However, the mechanisms regulating these actions remain unclear. The present study evaluated the effects of chronic running exercise on the early stage of diabetic nephropathy, focusing on nitric oxide synthase (NOS), oxidative stress and glycation in the kidneys of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Male ZDF rats (6 weeks old) underwent forced treadmill exercise for 8 weeks (Ex-ZDF). Sedentary ZDF (Sed-ZDF) and Zucker lean (Sed-ZL) rats served as controls. Exercise attenuated hyperglycemia (plasma glucose; 242 ± 43 mg/dL in Sed-ZDF and 115 ± 5 mg/dL in Ex-ZDF) with increased insulin secretion (plasma insulin; 2.3 ± 0.7 and 5.3 ± 0.9 ng/mL), reduced albumin excretion (urine albumin; 492 ± 70 and 176 ± 11 mg/g creatinine) and normalized creatinine clearance (9.7 ± 1.4 and 4.5 ± 0.8 mL/min per body weight) in ZDF rats. Endothelial (e) and neuronal (n) NOS expression in kidneys of Sed-ZDF rats were lower compared with Sed-ZL rats (p<0.01), while both eNOS and nNOS expression were upregulated by exercise (p<0.01). Furthermore, exercise decreased NADPH oxidase activity, p47phox expression (p<0.01) and α-oxoaldehydes (the precursors for advanced glycation end products) (p<0.01) in the kidneys of ZDF rats. Additionally, morphometric evidence indicated renal damage was reduced in response to exercise. These data suggest that upregulation of NOS expression, suppression of NADPH oxidase and α-oxoaldehydes in the kidneys may, at least in part, contribute to the renal protective effects of exercise in the early progression of diabetic nephropathy in ZDF rats. Moreover, this study supports the theory that chronic aerobic exercise could be recommended as an effective non-pharmacological therapy for renoprotection in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. PMID:26379244

  12. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography to Evaluate Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats and Correlations between Time-Intensity Curve Parameters and Allograft Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Zexing; Xu, Yue; Zeng, Song; Zhang, Zijian; Xue, Wenrui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-07-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed changes in the hemodynamic characteristics of renal allografts at different stages in a rat chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) model as well as the relationship between hemodynamic parameters and renal allograft fibrosis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The experimental group used a CAN rat model (n = 30), and the control group used an orthotopic syngeneic renal transplant model (n = 30). After surgery, creatinine clearance rates were regularly monitored every 2 wk. The checking times were set at 4, 12 and 24 wk after surgery, which represent early, middle and late stage of CAN, respectively. At different stages of CAN, eight rats from each group were randomly selected for CEUS examination. Time-intensity curve (TIC) parameters, including rise time, peak intensity, mean transit time, area under the curve, wash-in slope, time-to-peak and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression; Vimentin expression; and chronic allograft damage index scores were evaluated by linear correlation analysis. Before the creatinine clearance rate showed significant abnormalities, the renal allografts in the experimental group had already presented pathologic changes associated with CAN. In the early stage after surgery, compared to the TIC curve of the control group, the experimental group showed increased rise time, mean transit time, area under the curve and time-to-peak, and decreased wash-in slope (p < 0.05). Chronic allograft damage index scores and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin proteins in renal allografts were correlated with TIC parameters (p < 0.05). Compared to creatinine clearance rate, CEUS can detect CAN at earlier stages. The correlations between TIC-related parameters and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin in renal allografts indicate that CEUS is a feasible way to assess the degree of renal allograft fibrosis quantitatively. PMID:27056611

  13. Retinoids, methotrexate and cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Dubertret, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Acitretin alone is efficient (PASI 90: 40%). In responders, it is the best long-term maintenance treatment (up to 29 years of continuous treatment). The main side effect is its teratogenicity in females. It is necessary to begin retinoid treatment at low doses (10 mg/day), increasing the dose step by step, looking for the maximum well-tolerated dose (usually defined as a mild cheilitis). Doses higher than the highest well-tolerated dose are frequently responsible for the Kobner phenomenon. In children, retinoids are very efficient and nearly always well tolerated, but it seems important to never give more than 0.5 mg/kg/day. Methotrexate is the best treatment for severe psoriasis. Given at low doses once a week, it is a safe, cheap, convenient and efficient treatment, if carefully monitored. The main problem is the possible long-term liver toxicity of methotrexate. The risk is very low in patients not at risk (no liver disease). In these cases, liver biopsies are dangerous and useless. In the other cases, the need for liver biopsy is very rare, decided only by the hepatologist, and should be replaced by FibroTest and FibroScan. The old American guidelines should not be followed, and new guidelines are needed. Cyclosporine at low doses is an outstanding emergency treatment. It was first used as the last possible systemic treatment, but long-term continuous treatments are seldom possible due to alterations in kidney functions. A careful follow-up of kidney functions, with measurement of the glomerular filtration rate after each year of cumulative treatment, is necessary. The cyclosporine dose must be calculated according to the theoretical body weight in obese patients to avoid overdosage. Cyclosporine is mainly used now as a short-term treatment that is very efficient for young people, who find this illness particularly difficult. Cyclosporine is not contraindicated during pregnancy. PMID:19710551

  14. Reflux nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and there may be signs and symptoms of chronic kidney disease. Blood and urine tests will be done, and ... infections. If needed, people will be treated for chronic kidney disease. Outlook (Prognosis) Outcome varies, depending on the severity ...

  15. Percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion improved prognosis in patients with renal insufficiency at high risk of contrast-induced nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Yuanhui; Li, Hualong; Zhou, Yingling; Guo, Wei; Duan, Chongyang; Chen, Shiqun; Chen, Pingyan; Tan, Ning; Chen, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether attempted percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) would improve the prognosis in patients with renal insufficiency at high risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). We analyzed 2,330 consecutive patients with renal insufficiency with or without CTOs who underwent coronary angiography or PCI from prospectively collected data. The long-term death and risk of CIN were evaluated among three groups: patients without CTOs (group A, n = 1,829), patients with un-attempted PCI for CTOs (group B, n = 142), and patients who underwent attempted PCI for CTOs (group C, n = 359). Overall, group B and group C (successful rate, 89%) patients had similar renal function and were not significantly associated with an increased risk of CIN (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.41–1.93, P = 0.758). During a 2.33-year period (median), multivariate analysis demonstrated that attempted PCI for CTOs was independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted hazard ratio for death: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18–0.83; P = 0.015). Attempted PCI for CTOs improved the long-term prognosis in patients with high-risk renal insufficiency and did not increase the risk of CIN. PMID:26899017

  16. Juvenile nephropathy in two related Pembroke Welsh corgi puppies.

    PubMed

    McKay, L W; Seguin, M A; Ritchey, J W; Levy, J K

    2004-11-01

    Juvenile nephropathy has been documented in many breeds. Two related Pembroke Welsh corgi puppies presented at three and five months of age, respectively, for evaluation of lethargy, diarrhoea, poor body condition, polyuria and proteinuria. Based upon the clinical presentation, urinalysis and serum biochemistry, chronic renal failure was diagnosed. Renal histopathology was consistent with juvenile nephropathy, revealing lesions similar to the juvenile renal disease of dobermann dogs. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of juvenile nephropathy in related Pembroke Welsh corgi dogs. Familial nephropathy should now be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of young Pembroke Welsh corgi dogs presenting with clinical signs indicating renal failure. PMID:15553196

  17. Karyomegalic interstitial nephropathy following ifosfamide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jayasurya, R.; Srinivas, B. H.; Ponraj, M.; Haridasan, S.; Parameswaran, S.; Priyamvada, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Ifosfamide (IFO), an alkylating agent used for the management of solid organ tumors, can cause reversible Fanconi's syndrome and acute kidney injury. Karyomegalic interstitial nephropathy (KIN) is a rare form of chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, initially described as a familial nephropathy in adults. So far, four cases of KIN have been reported in pediatric and adolescent population following treatment with IFO. We report a 22-year-old man who developed renal dysfunction following IFO therapy for relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma. Renal biopsy revealed chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis with atypical tubular epithelial cells showing nuclear enlargement and hyperchromasia, consistent with a diagnosis of KIN. The renal function improved following a short course of corticosteroids. PMID:27512305

  18. Crystalglobulin-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy. PMID:25190731

  19. [A case of nephrotic syndrome achieving remission with cyclosporine monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nagatoya, Katsuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The case was a female in her early 80's. Due to abdominal bloating and lower limb edema, she visited a nearby doctor, was diagnosed to have nephrotic syndrome, and then was referred to our department. Upon initial consultation, TP of 4.1 g/dl, Alb of 1.7 g/dl, UN of 73 mg/dl, and Cr of 1.43 mg/dl, along with pleural effusion were observed by chest X-ray. A renal biopsy was not performed because permission could not be obtained. Despite the fact that management of the edema was performed using diuretic agents and albumin preparations, a reduced renal function and deterioration of the fluid retention were gradually observed. She originally displayed lower back pain and digestive symptoms and, therefore, cyclosporine monotherapy was initiated in order to address concerns of side effects such as osteoporosis and peptic ulcer due to adrenocortical steroid drugs (hereinafter abbreviated as steroid). Subsequently, hemodialysis was temporarily required but reduced urine protein and an improved renal function were gradually observed and she eventually achieved a complete remission. The possibility of a spontaneous remission of membranous nephropathy, etc. was considered, but a relapse occurred when the amount of cyclosporine was reduced. Thereafter, a complete remission was obtained with an increased dosage. As a result, the effectiveness of cyclosporine was thus confirmed. In treating nephrotic syndrome, steroid therapy is commonly performed and it is common for cyclosporine to be limited to steroid-resistant cases and/or steroid-dependent cases. However, it is believed that monotherapy could also be an option in cases in which the use of steroids is difficult, such as in cases of elderly patients. PMID:21116092

  20. Clinical and pathological aspects of analgesic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nanra, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    1 Analgesic nephropathy is part of the analgesic syndrome which has gastrointestinal, haematological, cardiovascular, psychological and psychiatric, and pregnancy and gonadal manifestations; premature ageing may also be a feature. 2 Analgesic nephropathy is a form of renal disease characterized by renal papillary necrosis, secondary chronic interstitial nephritis and renal failure with features of predominant tubulointerstitial dysfunction. 3 The percentage of patients with analgesic nephropathy who present with terminal renal failure is 12%. With appropriate management, 17% of analgesic nephropathy patients improve, 50% remain stable and 23% deteriorate. The 6 year cumulative survival is 70%. The major factors influencing deterioration are malignant hypertension, persistent proteinuria and small initial renal size. 4 The risk of renal papillary carcinoma in patients who regularly take analgesics is 8 per 100,000 patients per year. 5 Renal papillary necrosis is a consequence of the chronic toxicity of all non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and results from medullary ischaemia secondary to suppression of prostaglandin E2 synthesis and from direct cellular toxicity. 6 Analgesic nephropathy is a preventable form of renal disease and renal failure. It can be prevented by limiting the abuse potential of analgesics rather than by making minor modifications in the composition of analgesic mixtures. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:7002190

  1. Long-Term and Interactive Effects of Pay-For-Performance Interventions among Diabetic Nephropathy Patients at the Early Chronic Kidney Disease Stage.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-Ju; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Ching; Ting, Ming-Kuo; Wu, I-Wen; Huang, Hsin-Tsung; Wang, Fu-Chung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide because of the aging population and lifestyle changes. One of the important etiologies of CKD is diabetes mellitus (DM). The long-term effects of pay-for-performance (P4P) on disease progression have not been thoroughly examined.This study is a retrospective population-based patient cohort design to examine the continuous effects of diabetes and CKD P4P interventions. This study used the health insurance claims database to conduct a longitudinal analysis. A total of 32,084 early CKD patients with diabetes were extracted from the outpatient claims database from January 2011 to December 2012, and the follow-up period was extended to August 2014. A 4-group matching design, including both diabetes and early CKD P4P interventions, with only diabetes P4P intervention, with only early CKD P4P intervention, and without any P4P interventions, was performed according to their descending intensity. The primary outcome of this study was all-cause mortality and the causes of death. The statistical methods included a Chi-squared test, ANOVA, and multi-variable Cox regression models.A dose-response relationship between the intervention groups and all-cause mortality was observed as follows: comparing to both diabetes and early CKD P4P interventions (reference), hazard ratio (HR) was 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.50) for patients with only a diabetes P4P intervention; HR was 2.00 (95% CI, 1.66-2.42) for patients with only an early CKD P4P intervention; and HR was 2.42 (95% CI, 2.02-2.91) for patients without any P4P interventions. The leading cause of death of the total diabetic nephropathy patient cohort was infectious diseases (34.32%) followed by cardiovascular diseases (17.12%), acute renal failure (1.50%), and malignant neoplasm of liver (1.40%).Because the earlier interventions have lasting long-term effects on the patient's prognosis regardless of disease course, an integrated early intervention

  2. Beneficial effects of nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor on cyclosporine-A induced renal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Nader, Manar A; Attia, Ghalia M

    2016-04-01

    Nilotinib is a known tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for treatment of leukemia. The possible protective effect of nilotinib on cyclosporine A-induced nephropathy was investigated in this study and the possible underlying mechanism was explored. Nilotinib (25mg/kg, orally) and cyclosporine A (15 mg/kg/day, subcutaneous) were given to male SD rats for 28 days. Cyclosporine A alone was found to significantly increase serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, urinary micrototal protein, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, Bax, cytosol cytochrome c release and nuclear factor kappa B activation. Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly reduced serum albumin, creatinine clearance, urinary total antioxidant, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and Bcl2 protein levels. Pathological results showed that in the model group; there was an obvious shrinkage and congestion of the glomeruli and widening of urinary spaces of renal corpuscles, in addition to marked renal tubular injury and fibrosis, while in the group pretreated with nilotinib all measured serum, renal and pathological changes were significantly reduced. This protective effect of nilotinib is linked to the enhanced antioxidant status and reduced inflammation and apoptosis induced by cyclosporine A. PMID:26844915

  3. Renal function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-05-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. Cardiovascular and renal complications share common risk factors such as blood pressure, blood lipids, and glycemic control. Thus, chronic kidney disease may predict cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of diabetes on renal impairment changes with increasing age. Serum markers of glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria identify renal impairment in different segments of the diabetic population, indicating that serum markers as well as microalbuminuria tests should be used in screening for nephropathy in diabetic older people. The American Diabetes Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from serum creatinine at least once a year in all people with diabetes for detection of kidney dysfunction. eGFR remains an independent and significant predictor after adjustment for conventional risk factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, obesity, blood pressure, and glycemic and lipid control, as well as presence of diabetic retinopathy. Cystatin-C (Cys C) may in future be the preferred marker of diabetic nephropathy due differences in measurements of serum creatinine by various methods. The appropriate reference limit for Cys C in geriatric clinical practice must be defined by further research. Various studies have shown the importance of measurement of albuminuria, eGFR, serum creatinine and hemoglobin level to further enhance the prediction of end stage renal disease. PMID:21537427

  4. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    PubMed

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  5. The role of peroxisome-proliferator-activating receptor gamma agonists: rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Korolczuk, A; Maciejewski, M; Smolen, A; Dudka, J; Czechowska, G; Widelska, I

    2014-12-01

    Cyclosporine A(CsA) is an immunosuppressor frequently used in the transplant surgery and in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The therapeutic benefits of CsA are often limited by it's main side effect-nephrotoxicity. Mechanisms of chronic CsA- induced renal damage include: activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, upregulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARs-γ) agonists: rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (PGDJ2), against CsA-induced kidney injury in male Wistar rats. CsA was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 15 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Both PPAR-γ agonists were given for 28 days 0.5 hour before the administration of CsA. Rosiglitazone was administered orally at a dose of 8 mg/kg/day and PGDJ2 was given intraperitoneally at a dose of 30 μg/kg/day. CsA induced renal failure was evidenced by increased serum levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine. Serum concentrations of GSH and GSSG, lipid peroxidation products as well as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH and ADP/ATP ratios showed, that CsA induced oxidative stress and evoked an imbalanced red-ox state in the kidney. Light and electron microscope studies showed degenerative changes within renal tubules with damage to their mitochondria, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolopathy. Immunohistochemical expression of profibrotic TGF-β was assessed. The biochemical and morphological changes induced by CsA were limited by administration of both rosiglitazone and PGDJ2. Ultrastructural examination of renal tubular epithelial cells showed marked improvement within mitochondria. Our results indicate that both PPAR-γ agonists used in the experiment may play an important role in protecting against CsA-induced damage in the kidney. PMID:25554991

  6. IgA nephropathy and infections.

    PubMed

    Rollino, Cristiana; Vischini, Gisella; Coppo, Rosanna

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we concentrate on the role of infections in IgA nephropathy both from a pathogenetic and clinic point of view. The current hypotheses as regards the role of infections in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy are: (a) role of particular pathogens, (b) chronic exposure to mucosal infections, (c) abnormal handling of commensal microbes (gut microbiota). We also focus on particular infections reported in association with classic IgA nephropathy (HIV, malaria, Chlamydia, Lyme disease), as well as on IgA dominant-infection-associated glomerulonephritis. This is a unique form of glomerulonephritis, where IgA deposition is dominant. It is mostly recognized in old, diabetic patients and in association with staphylococcal infection. PMID:26800970

  7. IgA Nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure . [ Top ] How is kidney disease diagnosed? A health care provider diagnoses kidney disease ... levels Control Blood Pressure and Slow Progression of Kidney Disease People with IgA nephropathy that is causing high ...

  8. Triamterene crystalline nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Milliner, Dawn S; Wooldridge, Thomas D; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Medications can cause a tubulointerstitial insult leading to acute kidney injury through multiple mechanisms. Acute tubular injury, a dose-dependent process, occurs due to direct toxicity on tubular cells. Acute interstitial nephritis characterized by interstitial inflammation and tubulitis develops from drugs that incite an allergic reaction. Other less common mechanisms include osmotic nephrosis and crystalline nephropathy. The latter complication is rare but has been associated with several drugs, such as sulfadiazine, indinavir, methotrexate, and ciprofloxacin. Triamterene crystalline nephropathy has been reported only rarely, and its histologic characteristics are not well characterized. We report 2 cases of triamterene crystalline nephropathy, one of which initially was misdiagnosed as 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalline nephropathy. PMID:23958399

  9. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... family history of IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schonlein purpura , a form of vasculitis that affects many parts ... End-stage kidney disease Hypersensitivity vasculitis Nephrotic syndrome Purpura Urine - bloody Update Date 9/22/2015 Updated ...

  10. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  11. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection. PMID:26875963

  12. Cyclosporine A-Induced Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Craig; Campbell, Eric; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A, which has been the foremost immunosuppressive agent since the early 1980’s, significantly improves the success of organ transplantation. However, common complications of cyclosporine A therapy, such as severe renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, limit the drug’s clinical use. Although the exact mechanisms driving cyclosporine A-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis remain elusive, we hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a major role. We investigated this in vitro by treating human proximal tubular cells with cyclosporine A. Morphological changes were observed after cyclosporine A treatment, including cell elongation (with a large degree of detachment), cytoskeletal rearrangement, and junctional disruption. In addition, expression of the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin was detected in treated cells. These observations are consistent with events described during EMT. Using Affymetrix gene microarrays, we identified 128 genes that were differentially regulated in renal tubular cells after cyclosporine A treatment, including known profibrotic factors, oncogenes, and transcriptional regulators. Cyclosporine A induced a dose-dependent increase in transforming growth factor-β secretion from proximal tubular cells. Subsequent functional studies revealed that protein kinase C-β isoforms play a key role in cyclosporine A-induced effects. These findings provide novel insights into cyclosporine A-induced renal fibrosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT, events that may be relevant in other disease states. PMID:16049326

  13. [Diabetic nephropathy: emerging treatments].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Gauthier, Marion; Cazenave, Maud; Izzedine, Hassane

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The mainstay of treatment has been management of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and proteinuria using hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Since 2000, new therapeutic strategies began to emerge targeting the biochemical activity of glucose molecules on the renal tissue. Various substances have been studied with varying degrees of success, ranging from vitamin B to camel's milk. Silymarin reduces urinary excretion of albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and malondialdehyde in patients with diabetic nephropathy and may be considered as a novel addition to the anti-diabetic nephropathy armamentarium. Although some results are promising, studies on a larger scale are needed to validate the utility of these molecules in the treatment of the DN. PMID:24938412

  14. MYH9 nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taehoon; Jung Seo, Hyun; Taek Lee, Kyu; Jo Kim, Han; Jun Kim, Hwi; Lee, Ji-Hye; Il Cheong, Hae; Young Lee, Eun

    2014-01-01

    MYH9-related disorder is an autosomal dominant disease caused by a mutation in the MYH9 gene, which encodes nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA). This disease is characterized by giant platelets, thrombocytopenia, granulocyte inclusion bodies, proteinuria, and high-pitch sensorineural deafness. Nephropathy has been observed in 30% of patients with MYH9-related disorder. The characteristic features are early onset proteinuria and rapidly progressing renal disorder. However, the prognosis of MYH9 nephropathy remains unclear. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old woman who presented with proteinuria and was diagnosed with MYH9 nephropathy via renal biopsy and gene analysis. Her proteinuria improved after administration of an angiotensin II receptor blocker, but was aggravated after changing to a calcium channel blocker. PMID:26484020

  15. Prognosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Parving, H. H.; Hommel, E.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of long term antihypertensive treatment on prognosis in diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN--Prospective study of all insulin dependent diabetic patients aged under 50 with onset of diabetes before the age of 31 who developed diabetic nephropathy between 1974 and 1978 at Steno Memorial Hospital. SETTING--Outpatient diabetic clinic in tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--Forty five patients (20 women) with a mean age of 30 (SD 7) years and a mean duration of diabetes of 18 (7) years at onset of persistent proteinuria were followed until death or for at least 10 years. INTERVENTIONS--Antihypertensive treatment was started a median of three (0-13) years after onset of nephropathy. Four patients (9%) received no treatment, and 9 (20%), 13 (29%), and 19 (42%) were treated with one, two, or three drugs, respectively. The median follow up was 12 (4-15) years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Arterial blood pressure and death. RESULTS--Mean blood pressure at start of antihypertensive treatment was 148/95 (15/50) mm Hg. Systolic blood pressure remained almost unchanged (slope -0.01 (95% confidence interval -0.39 to 0.37) mm Hg a year) while diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly (0.87 (0.65 to 1.10) mm Hg a year) during antihypertensive treatment. The cumulative death rate was 18% (8 to 32%) 10 years after onset of nephropathy, in contrast to previous reports of 50% to 77% 10 years after onset of nephropathy. As in previous studies, uraemia was the main cause of death (9 patients; 64%). CONCLUSIONS--The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy has improved during the past decade largely because of effective antihypertensive treatment. PMID:2504376

  16. Early Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Rewers, Marian; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of mortality in type 1 diabetes. Reduced insulin sensitivity is a well-documented component of type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that baseline insulin sensitivity would predict development of DN over 6 years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed the relationship between insulin sensitivity at baseline and development of early phenotypes of DN—microalbuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio [ACR] ≥30 mg/g) and rapid renal function decline (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] loss >3 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year)—with three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations over 6 years. Subjects with diabetes (n = 449) and without diabetes (n = 565) in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study had an estimated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) at baseline and 6-year follow-up. RESULTS The ISI was lower in subjects with diabetes than in those without diabetes (P < 0.0001). A higher ISI at baseline predicted a lower odds of developing an ACR ≥30 mg/g (odds ratio 0.65 [95% CI 0.49–0.85], P = 0.003) univariately and after adjusting for HbA1c (0.69 [0.51–0.93], P = 0.01). A higher ISI at baseline conferred protection from a rapid decline of GFR as assessed by CKD-EPI cystatin C (0.77 [0.64–0.92], P = 0.004) and remained significant after adjusting for HbA1c and age (0.80 [0.67–0.97], P = 0.02). We found no relation between ISI and rapid GFR decline estimated by CKD-EPI creatinine (P = 0.38) or CKD-EPI combined cystatin C and creatinine (P = 0.50). CONCLUSIONS Over 6 years, a higher ISI independently predicts a lower odds of developing microalbuminuria and rapid GFR decline as estimated with cystatin C, suggesting a relationship between insulin sensitivity and early phenotypes of DN. PMID:24026551

  17. Production of cyclosporins by Tolypocladium niveum strains.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, C E; Jones, A; Pickard, M A

    1990-01-01

    Nine strains of Tolypocladium niveum (= inflatum) were compared for their production of cyclosporins. Two of the strains, which were originally from the parental NRRL 8044 strain, were among the lower producers, while seventeen Tolypocladium strains belonging to seven other species produced no detectable cyclosporins. Variable cyclosporin production was observed initially. Once extraction and quantitation methods had been established, spore inoculum density and cultural morphology and carbon and nitrogen sources were found to be among the variables affecting cyclosporin production. Cyclosporin A was identified by cochromatography by using high-performance liquid chromatography, and cyclosporins A, B, and C were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy; all three compounds exhibited biological activity. They were routinely produced as a mixture in the ratio 7:1:2 in T. niveum UAMH 2472, which was selected on the basis of single-spore isolate total cyclosporin production and was used for most studies. This strain routinely produced total cyclosporin levels of 150 to 200 mg.liter-1 after 12 days of growth on a 2% sorbose-1% vitamin assay Casamino Acids medium. PMID:2327746

  18. Recombinant Brain Natriuretic Peptide for the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Nonemergent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention or Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinming; Xie, Yanan; He, Fang; Gao, Zihan; Hao, Yuming; Zu, Xiuguang; Chang, Liang; Li, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    The role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is unknown. This study aimed to investigate BNP's effect on CIN in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary angiography (CAG). The patients were randomized to BNP (0.005 μg/kg/min before contrast media (CM) exposure and saline hydration, n = 106) or saline hydration alone (n = 103). Cystatin C, serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) were assessed at several time points. The primary endpoint was CIN incidence; secondary endpoint included changes in cystatin C, SCr, and eGFR. CIN incidence was significantly lower in the BNP group compared to controls (6.6% versus 16.5%, P = 0.025). In addition, a more significant deterioration of eGFR, cystatin C, and SCr from 48 h to 1 week (P < 0.05) was observed in controls compared to the BNP group. Although eGFR gradually deteriorated in both groups, a faster recovery was achieved in the BNP group. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that using >100 mL of CM (odds ratio: 4.36, P = 0.004) and BNP administration (odds ratio: 0.21, P = 0.006) were independently associated with CIN. Combined with hydration, exogenous BNP administration before CM effectively decreases CIN incidence in CKD patients. PMID:26949703

  19. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  20. An Interleukin-6 Neutralizing Antibody Prevents Cyclosporine Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    LaSpina, Mark; Tripathi, Sudipta; Gatto, Louis A.; Bruch, David; Maier, Kristopher G.; Kittur, Dilip S.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Chronic use of cyclosporine A (CyA) induces nephrotoxicity primarily due to endothelial dysfunction. In our previous studies, potential mechanisms were identified in vitro and implicated NADPH oxidase and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as key components in causing endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NADPH oxidase activity and IL-6 are key components in renal damage in an in vivo model. Methods Male mice C57B/6 mice from JAX Laboratories at 6–8 weeks were subjected to a low salt diet throughout the trial. After one week on a low salt diet, the mice were injected daily with treatments in 50µL vehicle composed of 75% cremaphor and Ethanol for five weeks. A vehicle alone group was also set aside. Mice were weighed and 25mg/kg/day cyclosporine was injected daily. Apocynin 20mg/kg were injected either alone or concomitantly with CyA. Another group of mice were administered IL-6 Antibody at 2µg/day along with CyA. The kidneys were removed en bloc immediately and submitted in formalin for paraffin sections. Trichrome stains were performed. Slides were blinded and ten photographs of cortical areas per treatment group were taken, which covered an estimate of 10% surface area in random fashion. Areas of renal damage, which were determined by tubular necrosis, were identified and quantified by amount of necrosis per photograph. Each photograph was divided into ten blocks, and the number of blocks that contained necrotic tubules per photo was recorded. Results The two control mice (low salt only) had no damage. The four vehicle mice had trace amounts of tubular necrosis. CyA treatment group demonstrated the highest amount of damage (29/70; 41%). CyA with apocynin, a specific NADPH oxidase inhibitor, was found to have 36% (22/60) damage, whereas the CyA with IL-6 antibody only was observed to have 15% (6/40) damage. Comparing imaging analysis, there was no difference between mice treated with CyA alone and with CyA with apocynin. However

  1. Derivatives of cyclosporin compatible with antibody-based assays. I. The generation of (/sup 125/I)-labeled cyclosporin

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, W.C.; Orf, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, has been successfully iodinated to a specific activity of 300 Ci per gram. /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporin and (/sup 3/H)cyclosporin are nearly equivalent as tracers in a radioimmunoassay in producing standard lines (suppression by unlabeled cyclosporin) and in assigning values to clinical samples. In addition, the (/sup 125/I)-labeled cyclosporin has greater than twice the sensitivity, and it is stable to long-term storage. Use of a (/sup 125/I)-labeled cyclosporin tracer is more convenient, more reproducible, more precise, and easier than the tritiated-cyclosporin alternative in radioimmunoassay of this compound.

  2. Cyclosporine

    MedlinePlus

    ... modified) is also used to treat psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches form on some ... as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this ...

  3. Cyclosporine

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral solution may be mixed with milk, chocolate milk, or orange juice. You should choose one drink from the appropriate list and always mix your medication with that drink.To take either type of oral solution, follow these steps: Fill a glass (not plastic) cup with the drink you have chosen. Remove ...

  4. Potential interest of anti-ischemic agents for limiting cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Simon, N; Tillement, J P; Albengres, E; Jaber, K; Hestin, D; Roux, F; Olivier, P; d'Athis, P; Kessler, M; Berland, Y; Crevat, A

    1997-01-01

    Chronic administration of cyclosporin A induces nephrotoxicity in humans. This is related to a cyclosporin A-induced constriction of afferent glomerular arterioles and mesangial cells, which leads to a decrease in filtration pressure and creatinine clearance. Afterwards, cellular lesions are observed involving mainly tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis, both of which are nonspecific. The initial mechanism of its toxicity is not clearly explained. The current pharmacological approach is symptomatic in order to counteract or minimize the consequences of a prime cause, which still remains to be defined. However, cyclosporin A has a deletereous effect on mitochondrial functions and mainly on ATP synthesis, which occurs when Ca2+ accumulates in matrix mitochondria. The effects of trimetazidine, an antischemic drug used in the treatment of angina pectoris, have been assessed. This drug is effective in experimental models of hypoxia induced by cyclosporin A: it restores ATP synthesis previously decreased by Ca2+ and cyclosporin A, and releases a part of Ca2+ excess accumulated by mitochondria at concentrations reached in humans at usual dosage regimens. At higher concentrations, it reverses the mitochondrial permeability transition previously generated (opened) by Ca2+ and a pro-oxidant such as terbutylperoxide (t-BH). It was also observed that trimetazidine does not modify the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A in various models. These data suggest that nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin A is not irrevocably linked to its immunosuppressive effect but that it may be possible to counteract at least partly its nephrotoxic effects without altering its effectiveness in preventing graft rejection. PMID:9526174

  5. Exposure to Nerve Growth Factor Worsens Nephrotoxic Effect Induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lofaro, Danilo; Toteda, Giuseppina; Lupinacci, Simona; Leone, Francesca; Gigliotti, Paolo; Papalia, Teresa; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkANTR and p75NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A. PMID:24244623

  6. Perinatal obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2004-04-01

    Significant advances have been made recently in elucidating the cellular consequences of urinary tract obstruction during renal development. Urinary tract obstruction impairs growth and maturation of the kidney, and can also cause renal maldevelopment. This includes a reduction in the number of nephrons, tubular atrophy, and progressive interstitial fibrosis. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) accounts for much of the loss of tubular epithelial cells. Factors contributing to apoptosis include stretching of cells in dilated tubules, altered renal production of growth factors, and infiltration of the renal interstitium by macrophages. Two major controversies remain regarding the surgical management of congenital obstructive nephropathy: first, which fetuses with bladder outlet obstruction should undergo prenatal intervention, and second, which infants should undergo early pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction? Even after successful surgery for congential obstructive nephropathy, all patients should be followed for hypertension, proteinuria, or renal deterioration. PMID:15200251

  7. Histological changes of kidney in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pourghasem, Mohsen; Shafi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of chronic renal disorders and end-stage kidney disease in developed countries. It is the major cause of dialysis and transplantation. Failure in renal function causes wide disorders in the body. Diabetes results in wide range of alterations in the renal tissue. It is believed that early histological changes in diabetic nephropathy are detectable 2 years after diabetes is diagnosed. The glomerular alterations are the most important lesions in the diabetic nephropathy (DN). The Renal Pathology Society provides a new pathological classification for the detection of histopathology of DN. It divides diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions. Alloxan or streptozotocin induced diabetic rat is the one most widely used specie to study DN. Histological changes in the rat DN closely resemble the human disease and the most information of this review was obtained through the study of rat DN. All cell types of the kidney such as mesangial cells, podocytes and tubulointerstitial cells are liable to be affected in the event of DN. Severity of renal lesions is associated to the clinical aspect of renal outcome, but the aim of this article was only to review the histological changes of kidney in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26644877

  8. Light chain nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Bettaieb, Ilhem; Aouadia, Raja; Hedri, Hafedh; Abderrahim, Ezzeddine; Goucha, Rym; Khedher, Adel

    2015-01-01

    Light chain deposition disease (LCDD) is characterized by the tissue deposition of monotypic immunoglobulin light chains of either kappa or lambda isotype. It is the archetypal systemic disease that is most frequently diagnosed on a kidney biopsy, although the deposits may involve several other organs. This brief review focuses on the clinicopathological features of LCDD-associated nephropathy with an emphasis on the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties related to this elusive condition. PMID:26022011

  9. Kimura's disease with eosinophilic panniculitis - treated with cyclosporine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Kimura's disease is a rare, benign, slow growing chronic inflammatory swelling with a predilection for the head and neck region and almost always with peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE levels. Here, we report a 25-year-old male patient with asthma, Reynaud phenomenon, eosinophilic panniculitis, bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy and peripheral blood eosinophilia. He responded initially to oral prednisolone with the subsidence of peripheral blood eosinophilia, asthma and the Reynaud phenomenon. But with tapering of prednisolone symptoms reappeared and hereby he was treated with cyclosporine. He has been symptom free for 6 months of follow up while taking cyclosporine 25 mg orally per day. Eosinophilia has resolved. This case shows that in addition to previously reported associations, Kimura disease may be associated with eosinophilic panniculitis and that cyclosporine could be effective in its treatment. PMID:20236545

  10. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine analog.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwirth, B; Billich, A; Datema, R; Donatsch, P; Hammerschmid, F; Harrison, R; Hiestand, P; Jaksche, H; Mayer, P; Peichl, P

    1994-01-01

    (Me-Ile-4)cyclosporin (SDZ NIM 811) is a 4-substituted cyclosporin which is devoid of immunosuppressive activity but retains full capacity for binding to cyclophilin and exhibits potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. SDZ NIM 811 selectively inhibits HIV-1 replication in T4 lymphocyte cell lines, in a monocytic cell line, and in HeLa T4 cells. Furthermore, its antiviral activity against laboratory strains and against clinical isolates from geographically distinct regions in primary T4 lymphocytes and in primary monocytes (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.011 to 0.057 micrograms/ml) was demonstrated. SDZ NIM 811 does not inhibit proviral gene expression or virus-specific enzyme functions, either free or bound to cyclophilin. The compound does not influence CD4 expression or inhibit fusion between virus-infected and uninfected cells. SDZ NIM 811 was, however, found to block formation of infectious particles from chronically infected cells. Oral administration to mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys resulted in levels in blood considerably exceeding the drug concentration, which completely blocked virus replication in primary cells. SDZ NIM 811 caused changes of toxicity parameters in rats to a smaller degree than cyclosporine (formerly cyclosporin A). Thus, the potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity of SDZ NIM 811 and its favorable pharmacokinetic behavior together with its lower nephrotoxicity than that of cyclosporine make this compound a promising candidate for development as an anti-HIV drug. PMID:7527198

  11. Identification of novel indicators of cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity in a CD-1 mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Sein; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2011-04-15

    The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) is a widely used immunosuppressive agent. However, nephrotoxicity is a serious side effect observed in patients which limits clinical use of CsA. CsA nephrotoxicity is associated with tubulointerstitial injury progressing to nephropathy. This is typically diagnosed by invasive renal biopsy and is often only detected when the disease process is well advanced. Therefore identification of novel, early indicators of CsA nephrotoxicity could be clinically advantageous. This study aimed to establish a murine model of CsA nephrotoxicity and to identify urinary proteins that may indicate the onset of CsA-induced nephropathy using 2-D gel electrophoresis. CsA nephrotoxicity was induced in CD-1 mice by daily CsA administration for 4 weeks. By week 4, elevated serum creatinine and proteinuria were observed after CsA treatment indicating significant renal dysfunction. Decreased cadherin-1, increased {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and fibroblast specific protein 1 in kidney tissue indicated disruption of normal tubular architecture. Alterations in podocin and uromodulin were also observed which may indicate damage to other segments of the nephron. Proteomic analysis of urine identified a number of differentially regulated proteins that may be involved in early CsA nephropathy including cadherin 1, superoxide dismutase and vinculin. These findings suggest novel mechanisms of CsA nephrotoxicity and identify novel potential markers of the disease.

  12. The effect of systemic cyclosporin A on a hairless mouse model of photoaging.

    PubMed

    Moloney, S J; Learn, D B

    1992-10-01

    The mechanisms that cause skin wrinkling in response to chronic exposure to sunlight are unknown. We investigated the possibility that wrinkling of Skh-1 hairless mice is associated with an ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunologic alteration. Exposing Skh-1 hairless mice to a regimen of nonerythemal UV-B (290-320 nm) radiation induced skin wrinkles after 6-7 weeks. Concomitant treatment with cyclosporin A decreased the time to the onset of wrinkles to approximately 4 weeks. Exposing HRS/J hairless mice or athymic nude mice to a similar nonerythemal UV-B radiation regimen for 10 weeks failed to induce skin wrinkles. Concomitant administration of cyclosporin A and UV-B radiation for 7 weeks to HRS/J hairless mice induced no skin wrinkles. Ultraviolet-B or UV-B plus cyclosporin A exposure caused increased immunohistochemical staining for Ia and F4/80 antigens in the upper dermis of tissue from Skh-1 mice, as compared to controls. Treating Skh-1 mice with UV-B radiation plus cyclosporin A was also associated with a large increase in the number of CD3+ cells in the dermis. These staining patterns were absent in similarly treated HRS/J hairless mice. Dermal mast cell numbers in Skh-1 mice were 2-3-fold higher than in HRS/J, athymic nude or NSA mice. Treatment with cyclosporin A increased Skh-1 dermal mast cell numbers approximately 2-fold but had no effect on the dermal mast cell numbers in HRS/J or NSA mice. Based on these findings we postulate that UV-B light and cyclosporin A exacerbate an immunological condition in Skh-1 mice, one consequence of which is manifested as skin wrinkles. Thus, the induction of skin wrinkles in this mouse strain may have no relevance to the wrinkles observed in human skin after chronic exposure to sunlight. PMID:1454879

  13. Beethoven's nephropathy and death: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P J

    1993-01-01

    The autopsy description of Beethoven's nephropathy is so typical of renal papillary necrosis, that the diagnosis is as near to certain as is possible, in the absence of a histological examination. A review of the symptoms and clinical course of Beethoven's final illness is consistent with this diagnosis. It is proposed that the cause was an acute onset diabetes mellitus, complicating chronic pancreatitis. Beethoven's case appears to be the first report in the literature of an autopsy proven case of renal papillary necrosis. PMID:8459382

  14. Analyzing antibody activity in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is a chronic kidney disease defined by deposition of IgA in the glomeruli. An abnormality in the glycosylation of the hinge region of the IgA1 isotype of IgA is fundamental to the origins of this very common form of glomerulonephritis. In this issue of the JCI, Suzuki and coworkers describe the characteristics of IgG autoantibodies to the abnormally glycosylated IgA1 secreted by immortalized B cells derived from patients with sporadic forms of IgA nephropathy (see the related article beginning on page 1668). These IgG autoantibodies displayed remarkably restricted heterogeneity. These observations offer new insights into disease pathogenesis and may lead to new methods of diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy for patients with IgA nephropathy. PMID:19504718

  15. Novel Oxidation of Cyclosporin A: Preparation of Cyclosporin Methyl Vinyl Ketone (Cs-MVK)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) was converted into cyclosporin methyl vinyl ketone (Cs-MVK) by either a biocatalytic method utilizing 1-hydroxybenzotriazole-mediated laccase oxidation or by a chemical oxidation using t-butyl hydroperoxide and potassium ­periodate as co-oxidants. Cs-MVK is a novel, versatile sy...

  16. Partial response to cyclosporine in a patient with Schnitzler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carbone, J; Paravisini, A; Sarmiento, E; Rodríguez-Molina, J; Fernández-Cruz, E

    2007-01-01

    Schnitzler's syndrome is an unusual clinical association of chronic urticaria, intermittent fever and monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) gammopathy. The pathogenesis of the urticaria is unclear and treatment is problematic. We describe the case of a 61-year-old woman with a long history of chronic urticaria with severe pruritus, spiking fever and malaise. The IgM-kappa monoclonal component was detected in the patient's serum 4 years after symptom onset. After ineffective treatment with antihistamines and systemic corticosteroids, oral cyclosporine resulted in complete remission of the fever and malaise, which has persisted after an 18-month follow-up. Partial but maintained remission of the urticaria was also observed, allowing corticosteroid doses to be decreased. PMID:17428403

  17. Heroin crystal nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy. PMID:26034599

  18. Scorpion sting nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    Scorpion envenomations are ubiquitous, but nephropathy is a rare manifestation, reported mainly from the Middle East and North Africa. Rapid venom redistribution from blood, delayed excretion from the kidneys, direct toxicity of venom enzymes, cytokine release and afferent arteriolar constriction have been seen in experimental animals. Haemoglobinuria, acute tubular necrosis, interstitial nephritis and haemolytic–uraemic syndrome have been documented in human victims of scorpion envenomation. Epidemiology, venom components and toxins, effects on the laboratory mammals especially the kidneys and reports of renal failure in humans are reviewed in this article. PMID:25984198

  19. Cyclosporine and Herbal Supplement Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, D.; Lunardon, L.; Bellia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CyA) is a well-known immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic window. Its bioavailability is affected by many other traditional drugs and herbal extracts. Cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 and protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are involved in CyA bioavailability. Interactions of CyA with herbal extracts are not well known, but, given their increased concomitant use, it is important to know which extracts, many of which are commonly self-prescribed, can affect CyA blood concentrations. Decreased CyA blood concentration has been shown with St John's wort in case reports and, in vivo animal studies, with ginger, liquorice, scutellariae radix, and quercetin. Increased CyA concentration has been reported in patients with grapefruit juice, chamomile, or berberine, and with cannabidiol or resveratrol in animal studies. Effects of Echinacea and Serenoa repens on CyA levels have not been shown consistently, but concomitant use should be avoided. Although findings from animal studies cannot be directly translated into humans, avoiding concomitant use of herbal extracts is prudent until human clinical studies have ruled out any possible interaction. Clinicians should interview their patients carefully about their use of herbal supplements before CyA administration, and those receiving CyA should be warned about possible interactions between herbal preparations and CyA. PMID:24527031

  20. Morphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the effect of bromocriptine and cyclosporine on the vasospastic femoral artery of rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Başocak, Kahan; Canaz, Hüseyin; Canaz, Gökhan; İplikçioğlu, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm is the main causes of mortality and morbidity in patiens with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The arterial narrowing mechanism that develops after SAH is not yet fully understood but many studies showed that hypotension, neurogenic reflexes, clots in the subarachnoidal space, spasmogenic agents, humoral and celluler immunity play a role in the etiology. In this study we investigate the effects of Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A in vasospasm secondary to SAH on rat femoral artery from ultrastructural and morphometric perspectives. 120 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 12 groups: Vasospasm (V), control (K), surgical control (CK) groups, vasospasm+Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A groups (VCyA, VBr, VBr+CyA), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A control groups (CK, BK, Br+CyAK), Bromocriptine and/or Cyclosporine-A surgical control groups (BCK, CyCK, Br+CyACK). In order to create SAH model, 0, 1 cm3 blood injected into silastic sheath wrapped rat femoral artery. Bromocriptine (2 mg/kg/d) and Cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg/d) combinations applied to control, surgical control and vasospastic models. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy used during this study. Statistical evaluation of the morphometric measurement data concerning vascular wall thickness and luminal cross-sectional areas of all groups were performed using Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon-signed rank, and Student-t tests. Cyclosporine A, whose effects in the prevention of vasospasm have been demonstrated in previous studies. In this study we discovered that Bromocriptine demonstrated strong effects similar to Cyclosporine-A. Bromocriptine and Cyclosporine A markedly prevent the development of chronic morphologic vasospasm following SAH. The combined use of both drugs does not change this preventive effect. PMID:26770311

  1. Immunopathology of nephropathies associated with malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Houba, V.

    1975-01-01

    Immune complexes play an important role in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated nephropathies. Two main types of lesion are demonstrable: (a) acute (transient—reversible) lesions typical of falciparum infections in man, with mild clinical symptoms developing a week or two after infection. Renal biopsies at that time show deposits of immunoglobulins, complement, and sometimes antigen. The lesions respond to antimalarials. (b) Chronic (progressive) lesions characteristic of quartan infections in man, developing slowly into a chronic stage with persistent proteinuria and gradually deteriorating renal function and hypertension. Renal biopsies at the onset of the disease show deposits of immunoglobulins, complement, and P. malariae antigens in glomerular capillary walls. Antimalarial therapy has no effect. Recent immunochemical findings confirm that these lesions are of the immune-complex type and are associated with malaria infection. However, several questions remain to be solved. PMID:1083308

  2. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  3. Treatment of Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Exciting progress recently has been made in our understanding of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, as well as treatment of this disease. Here, we review important advances regarding the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. We will also review the current approach to treatment and its limitations and will highlight new therapies that are currently being explored for this disease including Rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, with an emphasis on results of the most recent clinical trials. PMID:22859855

  4. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  5. Angiopoietins and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the main cause of end-stage renal failure in the Western world. In diabetes, metabolic and haemodynamic perturbations disrupt the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier, leading to ultrastructural alterations of the glomeruli, including podocyte foot process fusion and detachment, glomerular basement membrane thickening, reduced endothelial cell glycocalyx, and mesangial extracellular matrix accumulation and glomerulosclerosis, ultimately leading to albuminuria and end-stage renal disease. Many vascular growth factors, such as angiopoietins, are implicated in glomerular biology. In normal physiology angiopoietins regulate the function of the glomerular filtration barrier. When they are dysregulated, however, as they are in diabetes, they drive the cellular mechanisms that mediate diabetic glomerular pathology. Modulation of angiopoietins expression and signalling has been proposed as a tool to correct the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular disease, such as retinopathy in humans. Future work might evaluate whether this novel therapeutic approach should be extended to diabetic kidney disease. PMID:27207083

  6. Diabetic nephropathy in Africa: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Naidoo, Jashira; Kengne, Andre P

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and incidence of diabetic nephropathy in Africa. METHODS: We performed a systematic narrative review of published literature following the MOOSE Guidelines for Meta-Analysis and Systematic Reviews of Observational Studies. We searched PubMed-MEDLINE for all articles published in English and French languages between January 1994 and July 2014 using a predefined strategy based on the combination of relevant terms and the names of each of the 54 African countries and African sub-regions to capture the largest number of studies, and hand-searched the reference lists of retrieved articles. Included studies reported on the prevalence, incidence or determinants of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes within African countries. RESULTS: Overall, we included 32 studies from 16 countries; two being population-based studies and the remaining being clinic-based surveys. Most of the studies (90.6%) were conducted in urban settings. Methods for assessing and classifying CKD varied widely. Measurement of urine protein was the most common method of assessing kidney damage (62.5% of studies). The overall prevalence of CKD varied from 11% to 83.7%. Incident event rates were 94.9% for proteinuria at 10 years of follow-up, 34.7% for end-stage renal disease at 5 years of follow-up and 18.4% for mortality from nephropathy at 20 years of follow-up. Duration of diabetes, blood pressure, advancing age, obesity and glucose control were the common determinants of kidney disease. CONCLUSION: The burden of CKD is important among people with diabetes in Africa. High quality data from large population-based studies with validated measures of kidney function are still needed to better capture the magnitude and characteristics of diabetic nephropathy in Africa. PMID:26069725

  7. What's New in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic myeloid leukemia What`s new in chronic myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Studies ... such as cyclosporine or hydroxychloroquine, with a TKI. New drugs for CML Because researchers now know the ...

  8. Concomitant administration of cyclosporin and ketoconazole in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Alexander, J W; Pesce, A J

    1989-11-18

    18 renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporin, prednisone, and azathioprine were given ketoconazole, a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Within a month ketoconazole-induced blockade of cyclosporin metabolism allowed a significant reduction (451 vs 106 mg/day; 77%) of the mean dose of cyclosporin without altering cyclosporin whole blood trough levels, although maximum blood levels were almost halved. This dose reduction was maintained in patients followed up for up to 13 months. Renal and hepatic function were unchanged after the addition of ketoconazole. This drug interaction has the potential to reduce dramatically expenditure on cyclosporin in transplant recipients. PMID:2572912

  9. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. However, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective. PMID:25741648

  10. Correlation of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Song, Hai-Yan; Liu, Kai; An, Meng-Meng

    2015-01-01

    To detect the serum concentrations of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in patients with diabetic nephropathy and SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in renal tissue of db/db mice (C57BL/KsJ, diabetic nephropathy mice), thus preliminary exploration on the role of secreted protein acidic riches in cysteine in the development of diabetic nephropathy were carried out. Serum SPARC levels in normal subjects, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without diabetic nephropathy), chronic renal failure (without diabetes mellitus), and diabetic nephropathy were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. 12-week-old db/db mice (db/db group) and its littermate wild-type control mice (NC group) were selected with 6 from each group, and the kidney tissue were taken. RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence were used to detect the mRNA, targeted protein expressions of SPARC and the staining of renal tissue. The serum level of SPARC in diabetic nephropathy group was significantly higher than those in normal group, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and chronic renal failure group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The SPARC level in the type 2 diabetes mellitus group was higher than that in normal group (P < 0.05), but there was no difference between normal group and chronic renal failure. SPARC mRNA and protein levels in renal tissue of db/db mice were higher compared with the normal control group (P < 0.05). The long term hyperglycemic state in patients with diabetic nephropathy causes pathological change of renal tissue. Simultaneously, increased secretion of SPARC from renal tissue results in elevation of serum SPARC level. SPARC correlates with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, and it may play a role in pathological change of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26550188

  11. Association of Haemostatic and Inflammatory Biomarkers with Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Domingueti, Caroline Pereira; Fóscolo, Rodrigo Bastos; Reis, Janice Sepúlveda; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Dusse, Luci Maria S.; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Braga Gomes, Karina; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the association between haemostatic biomarkers, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines with chronic kidney disease in type 1 diabetic patients. Patients were divided into two groups: with nephropathy (albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g and/or GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2), n = 65; and without nephropathy (albuminuria < 30 mg/g and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m2), n = 60. INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α plasma levels were determined by flow cytometry. VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, and D-Dimer plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ADAMTS13 activity was assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Elevated levels of INF-γ, VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, D-Dimer, and reduced ADAMTS13 activity/antigen ratio were observed in patients with nephropathy as compared to those without nephropathy (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, resp.). Cytokines and haemostatic biomarkers remained associated with nephropathy after adjustments (use of statin, acetylsalicylic acid, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and angiotensin antagonist). INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10 significantly correlated with haemostatic biomarkers. Inflammatory and hypercoagulability status are associated with nephropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus and an interrelationship between them may play an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26770985

  12. Association of Haemostatic and Inflammatory Biomarkers with Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Domingueti, Caroline Pereira; Fóscolo, Rodrigo Bastos; Reis, Janice Sepúlveda; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Dusse, Luci Maria S; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Braga Gomes, Karina; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the association between haemostatic biomarkers, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines with chronic kidney disease in type 1 diabetic patients. Patients were divided into two groups: with nephropathy (albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g and/or GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), n = 65; and without nephropathy (albuminuria < 30 mg/g and GFR ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), n = 60. INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α plasma levels were determined by flow cytometry. VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, and D-Dimer plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ADAMTS13 activity was assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Elevated levels of INF-γ, VWF, ADAMTS13 antigen, D-Dimer, and reduced ADAMTS13 activity/antigen ratio were observed in patients with nephropathy as compared to those without nephropathy (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, resp.). Cytokines and haemostatic biomarkers remained associated with nephropathy after adjustments (use of statin, acetylsalicylic acid, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and angiotensin antagonist). INF-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10 significantly correlated with haemostatic biomarkers. Inflammatory and hypercoagulability status are associated with nephropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus and an interrelationship between them may play an important role in pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26770985

  13. Posterior encephalopathy subsequent to cyclosporin A presenting as irreversible abulia.

    PubMed

    Nishie, Makoto; Kurahashi, Kozo; Ogawa, Masaya; Yoshida, Yasuji; Midorikawa, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    A case of cyclosporin A (Cys A)-induced posterior encephalopathy developed into persistent abulia despite rapid and marked improvement of abnormal T2- and FLAIR MRI hyperintense regions. Diffusion-weighted MRI signal intensity was also high at the onset. This change is atypical in Cys A-induced encephalopathy and was thought to predict poor recovery from the encephalopathy. Persistent abulia was probably due to marked hypoperfusion in the whole cortex including bilateral frontal lobes and basal ganglia as detected by SPECT. Apart from the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, direct toxicity of Cys A to the brain may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic, irreversible encephalopathy. PMID:12924507

  14. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  15. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  16. Analgesic nephropathy as a cause of end-stage renal disease in a 55 year-old Nigerian.

    PubMed

    Okafor, U H; Unuigbe, E I; Onwuchekwa, A C; Emem-Chioma, P

    2012-01-01

    Analgesic nephropathy is a subtle but significant cause of chronic renal failure. There is paucity of data on analgesic nephropathy in Nigeria. This case presentation is to highlight the need to have high index of suspicion in patients at risk of developing analgesic nephropathy. In March 2009 a 55-year-old businessman was referred to the renal unit on account of azotemia by the hematologist who had hitherto managed the patient as a case of refractory anemia. The patient had osteoarthritis for over 10 years and was managed with several analgesic drugs over the same period. He was found to have features suggestive of analgesic nephropathy and had end-stage renal disease. He was commenced on appropriate therapy, and he had a live related kidney transplant six months later. Analgesic nephropathy is preventable and morbidity/mortality can be remarkably reduced with appropriate and prompt intervention. PMID:22718180

  17. IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Ralph C.; Abramowsky, Carlos R.; Tisher, C. Craig

    1974-01-01

    From a series of 470 specimens of renal tissue examined by immunofluorescence microscopy, 20 specimens were identified and studied in detail from patients without evidence of systemic disease in which IgA was the predominant localizing immunoglobulin. All patients presented with hematuria which was recurrent or persistent, often being exacerbated by upper respiratory infection. Most of the group pursued a benign clinical course with little evidence of decline in renal function. Histopathologic changes in renal biopsy specimens of most of the group consisted of a proliferative glomerulonephritis of variable intensity. Characteristic alterations were seen by electron microscopy which included the presence of electron-dense deposits within the mesangium, the hilar regions of the glomerulus and the basement membrane of Bowman's capsule. Evidence for activation of complement by the alternate pathway at C3 was found with properdin localization in 14 of 15 specimens and with the absence of detectable Clq and C4 in 15 specimens studied for these early acting components. It is concluded that the combined clinical, morphologic and immunologic findings warrant consideration of IgA nephropathy as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:4601708

  18. Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Cristina; Cavallo, Rossana

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses BK and JC are ubiquitous viruses with high seroprevalence rates in general population. Following primary infection, polyomaviruses BK and JC persist latently in different sites, particularly in the reno-urinary tract. Reactivation from latency may occur in normal subjects with asymptomatic viruria, while it can be associated to nephropathy (PVAN) in kidney transplantat recipients. PVAN may occur in 1%-10% of renal transplant patients with loss of the transplanted organ in 30% up to 80% of the cases. Etiology of PVAN is mainly attributable to BK virus, although approximately 5% of the cases may be due to JC. Pathogenesis of PVAN is still unknown, although viral replication and the lack of immune control play a major role. Immunosuppression represents the condicio sine qua non for the development of PVAN and the modulation of anti-rejection treatment represents the first line of intervention, given the lack of specific antiviral agents. At moment, an appropriate immunemodulation can only be accomplished by early identification of viral reactivacation by evaluation of polyomavirus load on serum and/or urine specimens, particularly in the first year post-trasplantation. Viro-immunological monitoring of specific cellular immune response could be useful to identify patients unable to recover cellular immunity posttransplantation, that are at higher risk of viral reactivation with development of PVAN. Herein, the main features of polyomaviruses BK and JC, biological properties, clinical characteristics, etiopathogenesis, monitoring and diagnosing of PVAN will be described and discussed, with an extended citation of related relevant literature data. PMID:24175200

  19. Autophagy in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Choi, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Increasing prevalence of diabetes has made the need for effective treatment of DN critical and thereby identifying new therapeutic targets to improve clinical management. Autophagy is a highly conserved 'self-eating' pathway by which cells degrade and recycle macromolecules and organelles. Autophagy serves as an essential mechanism to maintain homeostasis of glomeruli and tubules, and plays important roles in human health and diseases. Impairment of autophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of DN. Emerging body of evidence suggests that targeting the autophagic pathway to activate and restore autophagy activity may be renoprotective. In this review, we examine current advances in our understanding of the roles of autophagy in diabetic kidney injury, focusing on studies in renal cells in culture, human kidney tissues, and experimental animal models of diabetes. We discuss the major nutrient-sensing signal pathways and diabetes-induced altered intracellular metabolism and cellular events, including accumulation of advanced glycation end-products, increased oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system, which modulate autophagic activity and contribute to the development of DN. We also highlight recent studies of autophagy and transforming growth factor-β in renal fibrosis, the final common response to injury that ultimately leads to end-stage kidney failure in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest the possibility that autophagy can be a therapeutic target against DN. PMID:25349246

  20. Cobrotoxin from Naja naja atra Venom Ameliorates Adriamycin Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Zhi; Xu, Yin-li; Zhu, Qi; Kou, Jian-qun; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) becomes a global health problem with high morbidity and mortality. Adriamycin- (ADR-) induced rodent chronic nephropathy is a classic experimental model of human minimal lesion nephrotic syndrome. The present study investigated the effect of cobrotoxin (CTX) on ADR-induced nephropathy. Rats were given 6 mg/kg ADR once through the tail vein to replicate ADR nephropathy model. CTX was administered to rats daily by placing a fast dissolving CTX membrane strip under the tongue starting from 5 days prior to ADR administration until the end of experiment. The results showed that CTX ameliorated the symptoms of ADR nephropathy syndrome with reduced body weight loss, proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, dyslipidemia, serum electrolyte imbalance, oxidative stress, renal function abnormities, and kidney pathological lesions. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 expression was elevated after CTX administration in ADR nephropathy model. CTX inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Meanwhile, CTX upregulated the protein level of podocyte-specific nephrin and downregulated the level of fibrosis-related TGF-β. These findings suggest that CTX may be a potential drug for chronic kidney diseases. PMID:26640497

  1. [Use of cyclosporine 0.05% in various ocular surface disorders].

    PubMed

    Maĭchuk, D Iu; Vasil'eva, O A; Shokirova, M M

    2014-01-01

    It is proved that chronic ocular surface inflammatory disease (including allergic blepharitis, recurrent chalyazia, punctuate keratitis, recurrent herpetic corneal erosions, late stages of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis, etc.) takes part in the development of secondary dry eye syndrome (DES). However, therapies for inflammation-induced impairment of tear production do not provide long-term control of inflammatory process. Cyclosporine 0.05% eye drops are an option. Their effect is well-studied in foreign practice. Local application experience of cyclosporine 0.05% eye drops was summarized at a meeting of the Russian expert group on DES and conclusions were made on their effectiveness in treatment of dry eye syndrome associated with certain ocular surface inflammatory disorders, such as allergic blepharoconjunctivitis, late stages of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis, and others. PMID:24864503

  2. Cyclosporine for the Treatment of HTLV-1-Induced HAM/TSP

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Salvador, Fernando; Caballero, Estrella; Molina, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) remains a challenging disease. Treatment options are scarce, and their safety and efficacy are currently a matter of concern. We present a case report describing our experience using cyclosporine in a patient with early HAM/TSP who started with a gait disturbance at Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona) from August 2012 to October 2013. After 62 weeks of treatment, clinical improvement was observed and proviral load diminished. No safety concerns were observed. Cyclosporine seems to be effective in new-onset HAM/TSP or in chronic HAM/TSP that develops a relapse. However, the duration and safety profile of this steroid-sparing therapy remain unknown and should be further investigated. PMID:25569667

  3. Pathophysiological role and therapeutic implications of inflammation in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Luis-Rodríguez, Desirée; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Górriz, José Luis; De-Álvaro, Fernando; Navarro-González, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are becoming one of the most important health problems in the world. Diabetic nephropathy is now the main cause of end-stage renal disease. The mechanisms leading to the development and progression of renal injury are not well known. Therefore, it is very important to find new pathogenic pathways to provide opportunities for early diagnosis and targets for novel treatments. At the present time, we know that activation of innate immunity with development of a chronic low grade inflammatory response is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have shown the participation of different inflammatory molecules and pathways in the pathophysiology of this complication. PMID:22253941

  4. [C1Q NEPHROPATHY: CASE REPORTS AND LITERATURE REVIEW].

    PubMed

    Galešić, Krešimir; Horvatić, Ivica; Batinić, Danica; Milošević, Danko; Saraga, Marijan; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Ljubanović, Danica Galešić

    2015-01-01

    C1q nephropathy is considered a form of glomerulonephritis, defined by histological findings of dominant Clq immune deposits in renal biopsy. It is a rare disease, most often manifested in children and young adults. The most common clinical manifestation of the disease is nephrotic syndrome, but other renal syndromes could also be found. The cause of the disease is not known, but the immune pathogenesis could be assumed. Often, resistance to glucocorticoid or other immunosuppressive therapy is present, potentially leading to chronic renal insufficiency. We present ten patients with renal biopsy and clinical findings of Clq nephropathy. None of the patients had clinical or serological manifestations of systemic lupus. All patients had normal findings of C3 and C4 components of complement, as well as normal ANF, anti-dsD-NA and ANCA antibodies. PMID:26749950

  5. Membranous nephropathy in sibling cats.

    PubMed

    Nash, A S; Wright, N G

    1983-08-20

    Membranous nephropathy was diagnosed in two sibling cats from the same household. Both cases presented with the nephrotic syndrome but 33 months elapsed before the second cat became ill, by which time the first cat had been in full clinical remission for over a year. PMID:6623883

  6. Current Challenges in Diabetic Nephropathy: Early Diagnosis and Ways to Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is often associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is the primary cause of kidney failure in half of patients who receive dialysis therapy. Given the increasing prevalence of diabetes and its high morbidity and mortality, diabetic nephropathy is a serious drawback in individual patients and a tremendous socioeconomic burden on society. Despite growing concern for the management of diabetic nephropathy, the prevalence of CKD with diabetes is the same today as it was 20 years ago. The current strategy to manage diabetic nephropathy, including the control of hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure and the wide-spread use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, is well established to be beneficial in the early stages of diabetic nephropathy. However, the effects are uncertain in patients with relatively progressed CKD. Therefore, early diagnosis or risk verification is extremely important in order to reduce the individual and socioeconomic burdens associated with diabetic nephropathy by providing appropriate management to prevent the development and progression of this condition. This review focuses on recent research and guidelines regarding risk assessment, advances in medical treatment, and challenges of and future treatments for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27246284

  7. Management of Membranous Nephropathy in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    Alfaadhel, Talal; Cattran, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN) is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome (NS) in adults in Western countries. In 2012, the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) working group published guidelines for the management of glomerulonephritis, thus providing a template for the treatment of this condition. While being aware of the impact of the clinicians' acumen and that patients may choose a different therapeutic option due to the risks of specific drugs and also of the evolving guidelines, this review details our approach to the management of patients with IMN in a Western center (Toronto). Summary Based on studies published in Europe and North America, we included recent advances in the diagnosis and management of patients with membranous nephropathy similar to our practice population. We highlight the importance of establishing the idiopathic nature of this condition before initiating immunosuppressive therapy, which should include the screening for secondary causes, especially malignancy in the elderly population. The expected outcomes with and without treatment for patients with different risks of progression will be discussed to help guide clinicians in choosing the appropriate course of treatment. The role of conservative therapy as well as of established immunosuppressive treatment, such as the combination of cyclophosphamide and prednisone, and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), as well as of newer agents such as rituximab will be reviewed. Key Messages Appropriate assessment is required to exclude secondary conditions causing membranous glomerulonephritis. The role of antibodies to phospholipase A2 receptor (anti-PLA2R) in establishing the primary disease is growing, though more data are required. The increase in therapeutic options supports treatment individualization, taking into account the availability, benefits and risks, as well as patient preference. Facts from East and West (1) The prevalence of IMN is increasing worldwide

  8. Exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis during immunosuppression with cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Prignano, F; Bonciolini, V; Bonciani, D; Lotti, T

    2010-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is one of the commonest occupational diseases in industrialized countries, where it comprises 20-70% of all occupational diseases. Recent studies found out the top ten allergens, but there are some differences in their frequency in relation to gender and age of patients: Myroxylon pereirae and Carba mix resulted the most prevalent allergens in men, while in women the most common sensitizers were nickel sulfate, PPD, fragrance mix and cobalt chloride. ACD is an inflammatory skin disease caused by repeated skin exposure to contact allergens, in which the lesions are due to T CD8+ cells in a type IV, delayed or cell-mediated, immune reaction. The typical skin lesions of ACD in general outburst in contact areas with the specific allergens and they are erythematosus-squamous lesions with other little differences in relation to localization, for example edema, vesicular-exuding lesions or onychodystrophy. Different treatment options exist and are applied according to the severity of the lesions. Topical treatments consist of bland emollients, corticosteroids ointments, topical immunomodulators such as tacrolimus and pimecrolimus ointments, coal tar and derivatives and irradiation with ultraviolet lights or X-rays; while azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, oral retinoids or oral corticosteroids represent systemic options of therapy. Nevertheless, the control of chronic ACD is often difficult, overall in patients with chronic ACD. PMID:20823796

  9. Effect of cyclosporin on immune complex deposition in murine glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, D G; Fennell, J S; Sheils, O; Gaffney, E F; Feighery, C F

    1991-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN) was induced in N/M mice by daily injections of human serum albumin (HSA). The glomerular lesion was similar to that observed in human membranous GN and was characterized by intense mesangial and capillary loop immunofluorescent staining for HSA, IgG and C3. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous electron-dense deposits in the mesangium and along the subepithelial side of the glomerular basement membrane, the latter deposits being associated with membranous spikes. Chronically injected mice that had been treated with cyclosporin (CsA) from Day 1 had different patterns of immune complex deposition. Mesangial deposition was apparently unaltered but no subepithelial deposits or spikes were evident. In addition, only two out of 21 HSA-injected mice which began CsA treatment on Day 21 had subepithelial deposits. There was no significant difference in serum levels of HSA-specific IgG between the three groups of mice. CsA treatment would therefore appear to ameliorate the immunopathology of antigen-induced glomerulonephritis in this model without affecting serum antibody levels, and may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of human membranous GN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1828056

  10. Three-year outcomes from BENEFIT-EXT: a phase III study of belatacept versus cyclosporine in recipients of extended criteria donor kidneys.

    PubMed

    Pestana, J O Medina; Grinyo, J M; Vanrenterghem, Y; Becker, T; Campistol, J M; Florman, S; Garcia, V D; Kamar, N; Lang, P; Manfro, R C; Massari, P; Rial, M D C; Schnitzler, M A; Vitko, S; Duan, T; Block, A; Harler, M B; Durrbach, A

    2012-03-01

    Recipients of extended-criteria donor (ECD) kidneys have poorer long-term outcomes compared to standard-criteria donor kidney recipients. We report 3-year outcomes from a randomized, phase III study in recipients of de novo ECD kidneys (n = 543) assigned (1:1:1) to either a more intensive (MI) or less intensive (LI) belatacept regimen, or cyclosporine. Three hundred twenty-three patients completed treatment by year 3. Patient survival with a functioning graft was comparable between groups (80% in MI, 82% in LI, 80% in cyclosporine). Mean calculated GFR (cGFR) was 11 mL/min higher in belatacept-treated versus cyclosporine-treated patients (42.7 in MI, 42.2 in LI, 31.5 mL/min in cyclosporine). More cyclosporine-treated patients (44%) progressed to GFR <30 mL/min (chronic kidney disease [CKD] stage 4/5) than belatacept-treated patients (27-30%). Acute rejection rates were similar between groups. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurrence was higher in belatacept-treated patients (two in MI, three in LI), most of which occurred during the first 18 months; four additional cases (3 in LI, 1 in cyclosporine) occurred after 3 years. Tuberculosis was reported in two MI, four LI and no cyclosporine patients. In conclusion, at 3 years after transplantation, immunosuppression with belatacept resulted in similar patient survival, graft survival and acute rejection, with better renal function compared with cyclosporine. As previously reported, PTLD and tuberculosis were the principal safety findings associated with belatacept in this study population. PMID:22300431

  11. 21 CFR 524.575 - Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment. 524.575 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.575 Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment. (a) Specifications. Each gram of ointment contains...

  12. Use of Cyclosporine Therapy in Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Raza; Altaf, Areeba; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Mari, Anum; Noorani, Sahir; Saeed, Eraj; Mevawalla, Areesh Amir; Haq, Zaiyn Ul; Faquih, Muhammad Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    A chronic, progressive disorder Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS) accounts for 10-20% of all children with Nephrotic Syndrome. It is a heterogeneous disorder comprised of persistent edema, proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia. Treatment for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is challenging and children who suffer from SRNS require aggressive treatment to achieve remission. Calcineurin inhibitors have been used more in an empirical manner than on the basis of clear rationale. It was in 1984 when cyclosporine was first considered for the treatment of steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome. Cyclosporin is a calcineurin inhibitor that suppresses immune response by downregulating the transcription of various cytokine genes. Till now many studies have been conducted to determine dosages, duration of therapy, side effects and advantages of cyclosporine. Treatment of SRNS remains a difficult challenge in pediatric nephrology. Treatment should be individualized according to the underlying histopathology, and clinical and environmental conditions of the children. There is an urgent need to distinguish as soon as possible those patients who may benefit from prolonged immunosuppressive treatment from those who will not benefit from such treatment and who will just suffer from its major side effects. The emerging evidence that the majority of genetic forms of SRNS should receive symptomatic treatment only, should also be clinically tested and studies baring its significance should be evaluated in the future. PMID:26573045

  13. Possible Antipruritic Mechanism of Cyclosporine A in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyi Chan; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Umehara, Yoshie; Matsuda, Hironori; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kina, Katsunari; Ogawa, Mayuko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2016-06-15

    Cyclosporine A is an immunosuppressive agent that suppresses pruritus and is currently used in the treatment of patients with severe atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the antipruritic mechanism of cyclosporine A using a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclosporine A (5 mg/kg) significantly reduced epidermal nerve density, number of scratching bouts, dermatitis scores, and transepidermal water loss, as well as decreasing the numbers of inflammatory cells in the dermis and decreasing epidermal thickness. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclosporine A dose-dependently inhibited increased itch-related receptor gene expression, such as interleukin-31 receptor A and neurokinin-1 receptor, in the dorsal root ganglion of atopic dermatitis model mice. Thus, the antipruritic efficacy of cyclosporine A may involve reduced epidermal nerve density and expression levels of itch-related receptor genes in the dorsal root ganglion, as well as improvement in acanthosis and reduction in cutaneous inflammatory cell number. PMID:26671728

  14. Cyclosporine dose reduction by ketoconazole administration in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Alexander, J W; Stephens, G W; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Pesce, A J

    1991-02-01

    Cyclosporine metabolism occurs in the liver via hepatic cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzymes. Ketoconazole, an imidazole derivative, has been shown to inhibit the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Thirty-six renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine as part of a triple immunosuppressive drug regimen were started on 200 mg/day of oral ketoconazole. The dose of cyclosporine was reduced by 70% at the start of ketoconazole; this dose reduction was based on our previous experience with concomitant cyclosporine-ketoconazole therapy. Ketoconazole was started in patients who had been on cyclosporine for between 10 days and 74 months. The mean cyclosporine dose was 420 mg/day (5.9 mg/kg/day) before starting ketoconazole and 66 mg/day (0.9 mg/kg/day) one year after the addition of ketoconazole; this represents a cyclosporine dose reduction of 84.7% (P less than 0.0001). The mean trough whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations measured by HPLC, were 130 ng/mL preketoconazole and 149 ng/mL after 1 year of combination therapy. Mean serum creatinine and BUN levels were unchanged before and during ketoconazole administration, and no changes in liver function tests were noted. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were performed before and after at least three weeks of ketoconazole. Hourly whole-blood samples were measured by HPLC (parent cyclosporine only) and TDX (parent + metabolites). Combination therapy resulted in decreases in the maximum blood concentration and the steady-state volume of distribution divided by the fractional absorption, and increases in mean residence time and the parent-to-parent plus metabolite ratio (calculated by dividing the HPLC by the TDX value). The addition of ketoconazole to cyclosporine-treated patients resulted in a significant inhibition of cyclosporine metabolism and decrease in the dosage. There was minimal nephrotoxicity, and only four rejection episodes occurred on combined therapy. The concomitant administration of the two drugs was well

  15. Emerging therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, Jehrod; Hill, Jon; Pullen, Steve

    2016-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common pathology contributing to the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). DN caused by hypertension and unmitigated inflammation in diabetics, renders the kidneys unable to perform normally, and leads to renal fibrosis and organ failure. The increasing global prevalence of DN has been directly attributed to rising incidences of Type II diabetes, and is now the largest non-communicable cause of death worldwide. Despite the high morbidity, successful new treatments for DN are lacking. This review seeks to provide new insight on emerging clinical candidates under investigation for the treatment of DN. PMID:27520943

  16. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Growth of Infected T Cells by the Immunosuppressive Drugs Cyclosporin A and FK 506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpas, Abraham; Lowdell, Mark; Jacobson, S. Kim; Hill, Fergal

    1992-09-01

    The effects of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK 506 were studied on cells chronically infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as well as on uninfected and newly infected cells. When cells chronically infected with HIV-1 or with HIV-2 were cocultivated with uninfected cells in the presence of cyclosporin A or FK 506 there was a delay in the formation of syncytia and of cytopathic effects. This inhibitory effect was not due to decreased membrane expression of CD4. In addition, there was an ≈100-fold reduction in the yield of infectious HIV-1 when the infected cells were grown in the presence of these drugs, a finding consistent with other evidence of decreased HIV expression. Both drugs were found to inhibit the growth of chronically infected cells at concentrations that did not inhibit the growth of the uninfected cells. These results, demonstrating that cyclosporin A and FK 506 interfere with HIV production and selectively inhibit the growth of infected cells, suggest that they may be useful in the treatment of this infection and indicate further cellular targets for antiviral agents.

  17. The effect of oral metoclopramide on the absorption of cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, N K; Schroeder, T J; O'Flaherty, E; Pesce, A J; Myre, S A; First, M R

    1987-02-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of coadministered oral metoclopramide on the absorption of oral cyclosporine in 14 kidney transplant patients with stable renal function. The study was conducted on two consecutive days. Ten patients were studied twice and four patients once, giving 24 studies. The total dosage of metoclopramide was 20 mg. The day on which metoclopramide was administered was chosen randomly. Whole blood cyclosporine levels were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Coadministration of cyclosporine with metoclopramide resulted in a significant increase in mean maximum blood concentration (567 ng/mL nu 388 ng/mL) and mean area under the blood concentration nu time curve (4120 ng X h/mL nu 3370 ng X h/mL), and a significant decrease in mean time to reach maximum concentration: The mean increase in area under the blood concentration versus time curve was 29%. No significant changes were observed in the elimination of cyclosporine when it was coadministered with metoclopramide. These observations suggest that coadministered metoclopramide increased the total absorption of cyclosporine. Metoclopramide has been shown to hasten gastric emptying; since cyclosporine is absorbed predominantly in the small intestine, coadministration of metoclopramide resulted in increased bioavailability of cyclosporine. PMID:3547879

  18. The effect of oral metoclopramide on the absorption of cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, N K; Schroeder, T J; O'Flaherty, E; Pesce, A J; Myre, S A; First, M R

    1987-02-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of coadministered oral metoclopramide on the absorption of oral cyclosporine in 14 kidney transplant patients. The study was conducted on two consecutive days. Ten patients were studied twice, and 4 patients once, giving 24 studies. The total dosage of metoclopramide was 20 mg. The day on which metoclopramide was administered was chosen randomly. Whole-blood cyclosporine levels were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Coadministration of cyclosporine with metoclopramide resulted in a significant increase in mean maximum blood concentration (567 ng/ml versus 388 ng/ml) and mean area under the blood-concentration-versus-time curve (4120 ng X hr/ml versus 3370 ng X hr/ml); and a significant decrease in mean time to reach maximum concentration. The mean increase in area under the blood-concentration-versus-time curve was 29%. No significant changes were observed in the elimination of cyclosporine when it was coadministered with metoclopramide. These observations suggest that coadministered metoclopramide increased the total absorption of cyclosporine. Metoclopramide has been shown to hasten gastric emptying; since cyclosporine is absorbed predominantly in the small intestine, coadministration of metoclopramide resulted in increased bioavailability of cyclosporine. PMID:3544377

  19. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, eNOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25512783

  20. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used. PMID:25762415

  1. Optimized method for measuring cyclosporin A with /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporin

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, R.A.; Mifflin, T.E.; Bastani, B.

    1986-07-01

    We evaluated the use of the new iodinated ligand for the in vitro measurement of cyclosporin A by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Substitution of the iodinated cyclosporin (/sup 125/I-CyA) for the corresponding tritium-labeled analog (/sup 3/H-CyA) considerably simplifies and accelerates the currently available RIA, and improves its precision. Analysis of the respective dose-response curves showed that the 50% B0 value was lower for the /sup 125/I-CyA assay than for the /sup 3/H-CyA assay (37 vs 77 micrograms/L). Use of whole-blood specimens minimized interferences from temperature and hematocrit. We conclude that the use of /sup 125/I-CyA in a commercially available RIA for whole-blood specimens is accessible to most laboratories and provides rapid, reproducible data for management of transplant patients.

  2. An unusual cause of acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy in systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Heather M; Joya, Christie A; Plasse, Richard A; Baker, Thomas P; Flessner, Michael F; Nee, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Oxalate nephropathy is an uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. Far rarer is its association with scleroderma, with only one other published case report in the literature. We report a case of a 75-year-old African-American female with a history of systemic scleroderma manifested by chronic pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) treated with rifaximin, who presented with acute kidney injury with normal blood pressure. A renal biopsy demonstrated extensive acute tubular injury with numerous intratubular birefringent crystals, consistent with oxalate nephropathy. We hypothesize that her recent treatment with rifaximin for SIBO and decreased intestinal transit time in pseudo-obstruction may have significantly increased intestinal oxalate absorption, leading to acute kidney injury. Oxalate nephropathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury in scleroderma with normotension, and subsequent evaluation should be focused on bowel function to include alterations in gut flora due to antibiotic administration. PMID:25500295

  3. Bile cast nephropathy: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaymon; Walayat, Saqib; Kalva, Nikhil; Palmer-Hill, Sidney; Dhillon, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Bile cast nephropathy is a condition of renal dysfunction in the setting of hyperbilirubinemia. There are very few cases of this condition reported in the last decade and a lack of established treatment guidelines. While the exact etiology remains unknown, bile cast nephropathy is presumed to be secondary to multiple concurrent insults to the kidney including direct toxicity from bile acids, obstructive physiology from bile casts, and systemic hypoperfusion from vasodilation. Therapy directed at bilirubin reduction may improve renal function, but will likely need dialysis or plasmapheresis as well. We report our case of bile cast nephropathy and the therapeutic measures undertaken in a middle-aged male with chronic renal insufficiency that developed hyperbilirubinemia and drug-induced liver injury secondary to antibiotic use. He developed acute renal injury in the setting of rising bilirubin. He subsequently had a progressive decline in renal and hepatic function, requiring dialysis and plasmapheresis with some improvement, ultimately requiring transplantation. PMID:27468221

  4. Bile cast nephropathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaymon; Walayat, Saqib; Kalva, Nikhil; Palmer-Hill, Sidney; Dhillon, Sonu

    2016-07-21

    Bile cast nephropathy is a condition of renal dysfunction in the setting of hyperbilirubinemia. There are very few cases of this condition reported in the last decade and a lack of established treatment guidelines. While the exact etiology remains unknown, bile cast nephropathy is presumed to be secondary to multiple concurrent insults to the kidney including direct toxicity from bile acids, obstructive physiology from bile casts, and systemic hypoperfusion from vasodilation. Therapy directed at bilirubin reduction may improve renal function, but will likely need dialysis or plasmapheresis as well. We report our case of bile cast nephropathy and the therapeutic measures undertaken in a middle-aged male with chronic renal insufficiency that developed hyperbilirubinemia and drug-induced liver injury secondary to antibiotic use. He developed acute renal injury in the setting of rising bilirubin. He subsequently had a progressive decline in renal and hepatic function, requiring dialysis and plasmapheresis with some improvement, ultimately requiring transplantation. PMID:27468221

  5. Radioimmunoassay of salivary cyclosporine with use of /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J.E.; Lam, S.F.; McGaw, W.T.

    1988-08-01

    We prepared /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine (/sup 125/I-CS) by modifying the procedure of Mahoney and Orf and characterized it with regards to maximal immunoreactivity (greater than 90%), trichloroacetic acid precipitability (greater than 90%), and stability (90% immunoreactive after five half-lives of /sup 125/I). For a particular preparation of /sup 125/I-CS, we estimated its immunoreaction concentration (50 pmol/L) and the equilibrium constant for its reaction with Sandoz polyclonal antiserum (K = 3.9 X 10(9) L/mol). By substituting /sup 125/I-CS as tracer in the Sandoz radioimmunoassay and by modifying other aspects of the assay, we developed a procedure that is sufficiently sensitive (0.34 micrograms/L) to allow measurement of trough (lowest inter-dose) cyclosporine concentrations in parotid saliva. Of 38 kidney-transplant patients, 35 had measurable concentrations in saliva (mean 8.3, SD 5.2 micrograms/L), and these correlated moderately with paired serum concentrations (r = 0.68, P less than 0.001). We believe that measurement of salivary cyclosporine may offer a simple way of estimating the free fraction of the drug in serum or plasma.

  6. HNF1 AND HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Renata I.; Hinojos, Cruz A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braun, Michael C.; Fornage, Myriam; Doris, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension in SHR is associated with renal redox stress and we hypothesized that nephropathy arises in SHR-A3 from altered capacity to mitigate redox stress compared with nephropathy-resistant SHR lines. We measured renal expression of redox genes in distinct lines of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-A3, SHR-B2, SHR-C) and the normotensive WKY strain. The SHR lines differ in either resisting (SHR-B2, SHR-C) or experiencing hypertensive nephropathy (SHR-A3). Immediately prior to the emergence of hypertensive renal injury expression of redox genes in SHR-A3 was profoundly altered compared with the injury-resistant SHR lines and WKY. This change appeared to arise in anti-oxidant genes where 16 of 28 were expressed at 34.3% of the level in the reference strain (WKY). No such change was observed in the injury-resistant SHR lines. We analyzed occurrence of transcription factor matrices (TFM) in the promoters of the down-regulated antioxidant genes. In these genes, the HNF1 TFM was found to be nearly twice as likely to be present and the overall frequency of HNF1 sites was nearly 5 times higher, compared with HNF1 TFMs in anti-oxidant genes that were not down-regulated. We identified 35 other (non-redox) renal genes regulated by HNF1. These were also significantly down-regulated in SHR-A3, but not in SHR-B2 or SHR-C. Finally, expression of genes that comprise HNF1 (Tcf1, Tcf2 and Dcoh) was also down-regulated in SHR-A3. The present experiments uncover a major change in transcriptional control by HNF1 that affects redox and other genes and precedes emergence of hypertensive renal injury. PMID:18443232

  7. Balkan nephropathy: evolution of our knowledge.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Boletis, John

    2008-09-01

    Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), originally described in the late 1950s as a chronic tubulointerstitial kidney disease, is identified by its unique epidemiological features. The most remarkable characteristic of BEN is the focal topographical nature that characterizes its occurrence at the global, national, and even household level. BEN affects only certain endemic rural foci along tributaries of the Danube River in the Balkan countries of Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania, and Serbia. The spatial distribution has remained astonishingly unchanged with time because the disease affects the same endemic clusters as 50 years ago. The natural course of the disease is characterized by universal development of end-stage renal disease and the frequent development of upper urinary tract tumors, posing a substantial disease burden to the afflicted areas. The greatest challenge in the study of BEN has been the elucidation of its cause. The unique features of the disease, in particular its endemic nature and the long incubation period required for the disease to develop, have led to the proposal that BEN represents a unique environmental disease. The quest for the responsible environmental factor has been long and diverse, and although no definitive answer has been provided to date, converging lines of evidence support the theory that long-term consumption of food contaminated with aristolochic acid underlies the pathogenesis of BEN. The present review describes the evolution of our knowledge of BEN in relation to the development of the main theories for its pathogenesis. PMID:18725017

  8. Use of Cyclosporine in Uterine Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saso, Srdjan; Logan, Karl; Abdallah, Yazan; Louis, Louay S.; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Smith, J. Richard; Del Priore, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Uterine transplantation has been proposed as a possible solution to absolute uterine factor infertility untreatable by any other option. Since the first human attempt in 2000, various teams have tried to clarify which immunosuppressant would be most suitable for protecting the allogeneic uterine graft while posing a minimal risk to the fetus. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant widely used by transplant recipients. It is currently being tested as a potential immunosuppressant to be used during UTn. Its effect on the mother and fetus and its influence upon the graft during pregnancy have been of major concern. We review the role of CsA in UTn and its effect on pregnant transplant recipients and their offspring. PMID:22132302

  9. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  10. Cyclosporine alters opiate withdrawal in rodents.

    PubMed

    Dafny, N; Wagle, V G; Drath, D B

    1985-05-01

    Opiates exert numerous effects on all levels of the central nervous system with tolerance, physical dependence and withdrawal being characteristics of this drug class. The degree of dependence is directly correlated to the intensity of withdrawal. Therefore, success in modifying the withdrawal syndrome may shed light on the dynamics of opiate addiction. The present study demonstrates that cyclosporine, a widely used immunosuppressive drug, considerably modified the behavioral signs of a naloxone-induced abstinence syndrome in morphine-addicted rats. In previous experiments, alpha-interferon has shown similar results. The similarity in actions of these two immunomodulator drugs is discussed and we suggest that opiate addiction may involve the immune system. PMID:4039025

  11. Treatment of myelodysplasia with oral cyclosporin.

    PubMed

    Atoyebi, W; Bywater, L; Rawlings, L; Brunskill, S; Littlewood, T J

    2002-08-01

    Recent studies have shown a good response to immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporin A (CSA) in patients with the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We have treated six transfusion-dependent MDS patients with CSA for a minimum of 3 months. None of these patients showed a significant response, while the drug was withdrawn in 3/6 patients because of intolerable side-effects. Two reasons for the failure of this treatment in our patients can be advanced. Firstly, the hypoplastic variant of MDS predominated in previous studies in contrast to ours. Secondly, the concomitant use of other immunosuppressive agents in previous studies might have enhanced the effect of CSA. We suggest further therapeutic trials of CSA in MDS, selecting patients on the basis of in vitro studies that predict an immunological basis for their disease, to assess its efficacy in prolonging survival. PMID:12181023

  12. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc

  13. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80. PMID:26240796

  14. Intravenous tacrolimus and cyclosporine induced anaphylaxis: what is next?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Tacrolimus and cyclosporine have been used in various formulations, but their hypersensitivity reactions are rare in practice. Castor oil derivatives are nonionic surfactants used in aqueous preparations of hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Castor oil derivatives that can be used as additives to tacrolimus and cyclosporine may play a role in the development of hypersensitivity reactions, especially anaphylaxis. Various immunologic and nonimmunologic mechanisms have been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions induced by castor oil derivatives. Physicians should be aware that not only the drug itself, but also its additives or metabolites could induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of anaphylaxis caused by vitamin K (phytonadine), serotonin antagonist (granisetron), intravenous tacrolimus, and cyclosporine. Interestingly, the patient tolerated oral cyclosporine, which did not contain Cremophor EL or polysorbate 80. PMID:26240796

  15. Childhood AIDS nephropathy: a 10-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Rajpoot, D.; Kaupke, C. J.; Vaziri, N. D.; Rao, T. K.; Pomrantz, A.; Fikrig, S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define the demographic, immunologic, and clinical characteristics of children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS nephropathy, and contrast this with the existing adult data. Data from 62 pediatric patients with AIDS who were treated at SUNY Health Science Center, Brooklyn, New York, between 1983 and 1993 were analyzed. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was acquired during the neonatal period by vertical transmission (n = 60) or blood transfusion (n = 2). All children with AIDS who exhibited clinical nephropathy died (n = 16), with mean survival of 55.3 months. In contrast, 32 of 56 AIDS patients (70%) who did not manifest nephropathy were alive at the end of the study period. Patients with nephropathy were noted to have significantly lower CD4+ lymphocyte counts than those without nephropathy. These observations suggest that the predominant renal lesion in pediatric patients who acquired HIV infection during the perinatal period is focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, although a variety of other histological lesions were present. As in adults, the survival in children is dismal following the onset of clinical renal disease. In contrast to the adult population in whom multiple risk factors can potentially contribute to AIDS-associated nephropathy, occurrence of nephropathy in children with vertical HIV transmission provides convincing evidence for the pathogenetic role of HIV infection. PMID:8803430

  16. Cyclosporin for treatment of life-threatening alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Tilly, H; Azagury, M; Bastit, D; Lallemand, A; Piguet, H

    1990-05-01

    We describe a 16-year-old girl with aplastic anemia who, 1 year after initial diagnosis developed a refractory state to platelet transfusions due to alloimmunization and resulting in severe bleeding. Treatment with cyclosporin, initially prescribed as treatment of the bone marrow failure, resulted in prompt decrease in lymphocytotoxic antibodies, which paralleled a marked improvement in platelet recovery. To our knowledge, such a dramatic effect of cyclosporin on alloimmunization has not been previously reported and merits further attention. PMID:2327409

  17. Anorexia nervosa: from purgative behaviour to nephropathy. a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals who suffer from Anorexia Nervosa refuse to maintain a minimally normal body weight, are intensely afraid of gaining weight and exhibit a significant disturbance in the perception of the shape and size of their body. Postmenarchal females with this disorder are amenorrohic. In the Binge-Eating/Purging subtype individuals regularly engage in binge eating and purging behaviour (i.e self-induced vomiting or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas). Hypokalaemia is often seen in chronic Anorexia Nervosa, especially that of the purging type (ANp), and, as well as electrocardiographic anomalies, this can lead to tubulointerstitial nephritis (hypokalaemic nephropathy) with typical histological characteristics. The physiopathological mechanisms behind this damage are linked to altered stimulation of vasoactive mediators, and to the ammonium-mediated activation of the alternative complement pathway. However, it has not yet been ascertained whether a variant of the pathway specific for ANp [1], exists. Case presentation We describe herein a case of hypokalaemic nephropathy in a patient affected by chronic ANp who presented to our Centre for Eating Disorders. Conclusion Hypokalaemia can provoke cardiovascular alterations as well as muscular and renal complications, and thus potential renal damage needs to be investigated in patients suffering from long-term purgative anorexia. PMID:19144110

  18. The endothelium in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Advani, Andrew; Gilbert, Richard E

    2012-03-01

    The long-term complications of diabetes are characterized by pathologic changes in both the microvasculature and conduit vessels. Although the fenestrated glomerular endothelium classically has been viewed as providing little in the way of an impediment to macromolecular flow, increasing evidence illustrates that this is not the case. Rather, hyperglycemia-mediated endothelial injury may predispose to albuminuria in diabetes both through direct effects and through bidirectional communication with neighboring podocytes. Although neo-angiogenesis of the glomerular capillaries may be a feature of early diabetes, particularly in the experimental setting, loss of capillaries in the glomerulus and in the interstitium are key events that each correlate closely with declining glomerular filtration rate in patients with diabetic nephropathy. The hypoxic milieu that follows the microvascular rarefaction provides a potent stimulus for fibrogenesis, leading to the glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis that characterize advanced diabetic kidney disease. Given the pivotal role the endothelium plays in both the development and the progression of diabetic nephropathy we need effective strategies that prevent its loss or accelerate its regeneration. Such advances likely will lead not only to improved tissue oxygenation and reduced fibrosis, but also to improved long-term renal function. PMID:22617769

  19. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  20. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  1. Effects of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum on Cyclosporine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jenoobi, F. I.; Al-Suwayeh, S. A.; Muzaffar, Iqbal; Al-Kharfy, Khalid M.; Korashy, Hesham M.; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M.; Raish, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in rabbits. Two groups of animals were treated separately with Nigella sativa (200 mg/kg p.o.) or Lepidium sativum (150 mg/kg p.o.) for eight consecutive days. On the 8th day, cyclosporine (30 mg/kg p.o.) was administered to each group one hour after herbal treatment. Blood samples were withdrawn at different time intervals (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, 12, and 24 hrs) from marginal ear vein. Cyclosporine was analyzed using UPLC/MS method. The coadministration of Nigella sativa significantly decreased the Cmax and AUC0−∞ of cyclosporine; the change was observed by 35.5% and 55.9%, respectively (P ≤ 0.05). Lepidium sativum did not produce any significant change in Cmax of cyclosporine, although its absorption was significantly delayed compared with control group. A remarkable change was observed in Tmax and AUC0−t of Lepidium sativum treated group. Our findings suggest that concurrent consumption of Nigella sativa and Lepidium sativum could alter the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine at various levels. PMID:23957013

  2. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  3. IFI27 Is a Useful Genetic Marker for Diagnosis of Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy and Membranous Nephropathy Using Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Muso, Eri; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Shinzawa, Maki; Iwasaki, Yukako; Iwatani, Hirotsugu; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) depends primarily on renal biopsy, which is expensive and requires hospitalization, creating a demand for noninvasive diagnostic method for this disease. We used DNA microarray analysis to search for genes whose expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) could distinguish between patients with CGN and healthy volunteers (HVs). We selected immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) and membranous nephropathy (MN) as typical forms of CGN. The mRNA level of the gene encoding interferon (IFN)-alpha-inducible protein 27, IFI27, which is preferentially expressed in podocytes of glomeruli, was lower in PBMCs of IgAN and MN patients than in those of HVs. This result was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Moreover, qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the IFI27 mRNA level was reduced in PBMCs of patients with other types of chronic glomerulonephritis. IFI27 immunohistochemical staining of biopsied specimens also confirmed reduced expression of IFI27 protein in IgAN and MN patients. Based on these results, we propose that IFI27 could serve as a noninvasive diagnostic marker for CGNs using peripheral blood. PMID:27100186

  4. Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys)

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation, Inc. MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Alternate Language URL Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys) Page Content On this page: Acute Kidney Failure ...

  5. Low-Dose IL-17 Therapy Prevents and Reverses Diabetic Nephropathy, Metabolic Syndrome, and Associated Organ Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Riyaz; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Chen, Feng; Fulton, David; Stepp, David; Gansevoort, Ron T; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, accounting for >45% of new cases of dialysis. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidant stress, pathologic features that are shared by many other chronic inflammatory diseases. The cytokine IL-17A was initially implicated as a mediator of chronic inflammatory diseases, but recent studies dispute these findings and suggest that IL-17A can favorably modulate inflammation. Here, we examined the role of IL-17A in diabetic nephropathy. We observed that IL-17A levels in plasma and urine were reduced in patients with advanced diabetic nephropathy. Type 1 diabetic mice that are genetically deficient in IL-17A developed more severe nephropathy, whereas administration of low-dose IL-17A prevented diabetic nephropathy in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Moreover, IL-17A administration effectively treated, prevented, and reversed established nephropathy in genetic models of diabetes. Protective effects were also observed after administration of IL-17F but not IL-17C or IL-17E. Notably, tubular epithelial cell-specific overexpression of IL-17A was sufficient to suppress diabetic nephropathy. Mechanistically, IL-17A administration suppressed phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a central mediator of fibrosis, upregulated anti-inflammatory microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein in an AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent manner and favorably modulated renal oxidative stress and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Administration of recombinant microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein suppressed diabetes-induced albuminuria and enhanced M2 marker expression. These observations suggest that the beneficial effects of IL-17 are isoform-specific and identify low-dose IL-17A administration as a promising therapeutic approach in diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26334030

  6. Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of cyclosporine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, O.; Schreier, E.; Heitz, F.; Maurer, G.

    1987-05-01

    Tissue distribution, disposition, and metabolism of /sup 3/H-cyclosporine were studied in rats after single and repeated oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and after an iv dose of 3 mg/kg. The oral doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg were dissolved in polyethylene glycol 200/ethanol or in olive oil/Labrafil/ethanol. Absorption from both formulations was slow and incomplete, with peak /sup 3/H blood levels at 3-4 hr. Approximately 30% of the radioactive dose was absorbed, which is consistent with oral bioavailability data for cyclosporine. More than 70% of the radioactivity was excreted in feces and up to 15% in urine. Elimination via the bile accounted for 10 and 60% of the oral and iv doses, respectively. Since unchanged cyclosporine predominated in both blood and tissues at early time points, the half-lives of the distribution phases (t 1/2 alpha) of parent drug and of total radioactivity were similar. In blood, kidney, liver, and lymph nodes, t 1/2 alpha of cyclosporine ranged from 6-10 hr. Elimination of radioactivity from the systemic circulation was multiphasic, with a terminal half-life of 20-30 hr. /sup 3/H-Cyclosporine was extensively distributed throughout the body, with highest concentrations in liver, kidney, endocrine glands, and adipose tissue. The concentrations of both total radioactivity and parent drug were greater in tissues than in blood, which is consistent with the high lipid solubility of cyclosporine and some of its metabolites. Skin and adipose tissue were the main storage sites for unchanged cyclosporine. Elimination half-lives were slower for most tissues than for blood and increased with multiple dosing. The amount of unchanged drug was negligible in urine and bile.

  7. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Neelofar, Km; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  8. Cyclosporin in cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jansen Of Lorkeers, S J; Hart, E; Tang, X L; Chamuleau, M E D; Doevendans, P A; Bolli, R; Chamuleau, S A J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy in promoting cardiac repair in the setting of ischemic heart disease. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that cell therapy improves cardiac function. Whether autologous or allogeneic cells should be used, and the need for immunosuppression in non-autologous settings, is a matter of debate. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used in preclinical trials to reduce cell rejection after non-autologous cell therapy. The direct effect of CsA on the function and survival of stem cells is unclear. Furthermore, the appropriate daily dosage of CsA in animal models has not been established. In this review, we discuss the pros and cons of the use of CsA on an array of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we present a small collection of data put forth by our group supporting the efficacy and safety of a specific daily CsA dosage in a pig model. PMID:24831573

  9. Lack of effect of spiramycin on cyclosporin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Vernillet, L; Bertault-Peres, P; Berland, Y; Barradas, J; Durand, A; Olmer, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The influence of spiramycin coadministration on cyclosporin pharmacokinetics was studied in five renal transplant patients. The plasma concentrations of cyclosporin were measured both by non-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). 2. The kinetics of cyclosporin were followed before treatment, and after 1 day and then 2 weeks of oral treatment with spiramycin (3 X 10(6) iu, twice daily). The main pharmacokinetic parameters (the area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve, the maximum plasma drug concentration and the time to reach it) obtained both by RIA and h.p.l.c. were not modified by spiramycin cotreatment after 1 day, nor after 2 weeks of spiramycin administration. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporin (parent drug and parent drug plus metabolites) are not influenced by the coadministration of spiramycin macrolide at therapeutic dosage. 3. Spiramycin may be preferable to other macrolide antibiotics known to interact with cyclosporin such as erythromycin or josamycin. PMID:2667601

  10. Diabetic Nephropathy for the Primary Care Provider: New Understandings on Early Detection and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Andrew; Krikorian, Armand; Lerma, Edgar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of renal disease in the United States, occurring in 20%-40% of patients with diabetes. This condition is a distinct manifestation of diabetic renal disease seen in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Despite clear screening and management recommendations, diabetic nephropathy remains substantially underdiagnosed. Methods This review presents recent guidelines and recommendations from varied work groups to identify, monitor, and halt the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Our search of the recent literature focused on diagnostic criteria, the latest screening recommendations, novel screening methods, current research, new treatment recommendations, and goals for early intervention. Results Current recommendations for early detection and treatment of diabetic nephropathy include yearly albumin to creatinine ratio checks and more frequent tests if indicated based on glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria; optimizing glucose control with a target hemoglobin A1c goal of <7%; initiating angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) as the first line in disease management with dual therapy of ACE inhibitors and ARBs no longer recommended; managing blood pressure with a goal of <140/90 mmHg as the target for all patients with diabetes; and initiating statin therapy for patients <50 years old and with concomitant chronic kidney disease and diabetes and in all patients with chronic kidney disease >50 years of age regardless of the coexistence of diabetes. Conclusion With early detection, proper screening, and management, the impact of diabetic nephropathy may be better mitigated to lessen its impact on society and healthcare. PMID:25249803

  11. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy does not improve hypertensive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jonathan; Michel, Pierre-Antoine; Dussaule, Jean-Claude; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Ronco, Pierre; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy (SWT) has been shown to improve myocardial dysfunction, hind limb ischemia, erectile function, and to facilitate cell therapy and healing process. These therapeutic effects were mainly due to promoting angiogenesis. Since chronic kidney diseases are characterized by renal fibrosis and capillaries rarefaction, they may benefit from a proangiogenic treatment. The objective of our study was to determine whether SWT could ameliorate renal repair and favor angiogenesis in L-NAME-induced hypertensive nephropathy in rats. SWT was started when proteinuria exceeded 1 g/mmol of creatinine and 1 week after L-NAME removal. SWT consisted of implying 0.09 mJ/mm(2) (400 shots), 3 times per week. After 4 weeks of SWT, blood pressure, renal function and urinary protein excretion did not differ between treated (LN + SWT) and untreated rats (LN). Histological lesions including glomerulosclerosis and arteriolosclerosis scores, tubular dilatation and interstitial fibrosis were similar in both groups. In addition, peritubular capillaries and eNOS, VEGF, VEGF-R, SDF-1 gene expressions did not increase in SWT-treated compared to untreated animals. No procedural complications or adverse effects were observed in control (C + SWT) and hypertensive rats (LN + SWT). These results suggest that extracorporeal kidney shock wave therapy does not induce angiogenesis and does not improve renal function and structure, at least in the model of hypertensive nephropathy although the treatment is well tolerated. PMID:27255359

  12. Tempol effects on diabetic nephropathy in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Akram; Ghasemi, Hassan; Hatami, Mahdi; Dadras, Farahanaz; Heidary Shayesteh, Tavakol; Khoshjou, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of the chronic kidney disease in the world. Oxidative stress on the other hand has a major and well known role in its pathophysiology. Objectives: The aim of the study is to figure out if tempol, a synthetic antioxidant agent, modifies DN and to determine its relevance to changes of serum oxidative biomarkers. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven male rats were equally divided in to 4 groups (7 rats for each group). Group I (control or C), group II (diabetic or D), groups III (Tempol) which were given tempol (100 mg/kg/day) by gavages for 28 days and group IV (D&T) which includes diabetic rats that also received same dose of tempol. After treatment, blood samples were isolated. Enzymatic scavengers including catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, lipid peroxidation (LPO), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total thiol molecules (TTM) were measured. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr) an albumin/Cr ratio were evaluated as well. Statistical differences were assessed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by SPSS followed by Tukey t test. Results: Oxidative stress biomarkers modified and Alb/Cr ratio increased in diabetic group (II), however, they were altered to normal in group IV (D&T) compared with diabetic group (D). Conclusion: Tempol can modify oxidative stress biomarkers and presumably nephropathy in diabetic rats. PMID:27471738

  13. Early Differential Expression of Oncostatin M in Obstructive Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Luan D.; Tawil, Ahmad; Wang, Wansheng; Dawson, Sara; Lan, Hui Y.; Zhang, Ping; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Smith, C. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis plays a major role in progression of renal diseases. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a cytokine that regulates cell survival, differentiation, and proliferation. Renal tissue from patients with chronic obstructive nephropathy was examined for OSM expression. The elevated levels in diseased human kidneys suggested possible correlation between OSM level and kidney tissue fibrosis. Indeed, unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), a model of renal fibrosis, increased OSM and OSM receptor (OSM-R) expression in a time-dependent manner within hours following UUO. In vitro, OSM overexpression in tubular epithelial cells (TECs) resulted in epithelial-myofibroblast transdifferentiation. cDNA microarray technology identified up-regulated expression of immune modulators in obstructed compared with sham-operated kidneys. In vitro, OSM treatment up-regulated CC chemokine ligand CCL7, and CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)-14 mRNA in kidney fibroblasts. In vivo, treatment of UUO mice with neutralizing anti-OSM antibody decreased renal chemokines expression. In conclusion, OSM is up-regulated in kidney tissue early after urinary obstruction. Therefore, OSM might play an important role in initiation of renal fibrogenesis, possibly by inducing myofibroblast transdifferentiation of TECs as well as leukocyte infiltration. This process may, in turn, contribute in part to progression of obstructive nephropathy and makes OSM a promising therapeutic target in renal fibrosis. PMID:20626292

  14. APOL1 nephropathy: from gene to mechanisms of kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kruzel-Davila, Etty; Wasser, Walter G; Aviram, Sharon; Skorecki, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The contribution of African ancestry to the risk of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and chronic kidney disease has been partially explained by the recently described chromosome 22q variants in the gene apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The APOL1 variants appear at a high allele frequency in populations of West African ancestry as a result of apparent adaptive selection of the heterozygous state. Heterozygosity protects from infection with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. This review will describe the role of the approaches in population genetics for the description of APOL1-associated nephropathies and draw inferences as to the biologic mechanisms from genetic epidemiology findings to date. Modifier loci can influence APOL1 risk for the development of kidney disease. 'Second hits', both viral and non-viral, may explain the discrepancy between the remarkably high odds ratios and the low lifetime risks of kidney disease in two allele carriers of APOL1 risk variants. Therapeutic strategies for APOL1-associated nephropathies will require the prevention and treatment of these 'second hits' and the development of drugs to protect the APOL1 downstream renal injury pathways. PMID:25561578

  15. Conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A Improves Glucose Tolerance in HCV-Positive Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, Ammon; Kerscher, Corinna; Tura, Andrea; Herkner, Harald; Payer, Berit Anna; Mandorfer, Mattias; Werzowa, Johannes; Winnicki, Wolfgang; Reiberger, Thomas; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; Säemann, Marcus; Schmidt, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcineurin-inhibitors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increase the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus. Chronic HCV infection promotes insulin resistance rather than beta-cell dysfunction. The objective was to elucidate whether a conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A affects fasting and/or dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or all in HCV-positive renal transplant recipients. Methods In this prospective, single-center study 10 HCV-positive renal transplant recipients underwent 2h-75g-oral glucose tolerance tests before and three months after the conversion of immunosuppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Established oral glucose tolerance test-based parameters of fasting and dynamic insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were calculated. Data are expressed as median (IQR). Results After conversion, both fasting and challenged glucose levels decreased significantly. This was mainly attributable to a significant amelioration of post-prandial dynamic glucose sensitivity as measured by the oral glucose sensitivity-index OGIS [422.17 (370.82–441.92) vs. 468.80 (414.27–488.57) mL/min/m2, p = 0.005), which also resulted in significant improvements of the disposition index (p = 0.017) and adaptation index (p = 0.017) as markers of overall glucose tolerance and beta-cell function. Fasting insulin sensitivity (p = 0.721), insulinogenic index as marker of first-phase insulin secretion [0.064 (0.032–0.106) vs. 0.083 (0.054–0.144) nmol/mmol, p = 0.093) and hepatic insulin extraction (p = 0.646) remained unaltered. No changes of plasma HCV-RNA levels (p = 0.285) or liver stiffness (hepatic fibrosis and necroinflammation, p = 0.463) were observed after the conversion of immunosuppression. Conclusions HCV-positive renal transplant recipients show significantly improved glucose-stimulated insulin sensitivity and overall glucose tolerance after conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Considering the HCV

  16. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  17. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4(-/-) mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2(-)/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  18. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus inhibit urothelial tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Li, Yi; Zheng, Yichun; Miyamoto, Yurina; Netto, George J; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The functional role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), while it has been extensively investigated in the immune system, remains uncertain in bladder cancer development. We here aim to assess the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506), immunosuppressants known to specifically inactivate the NFAT pathway in immune cells, on neoplastic transformation of urothelial cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression levels of NFATc1, a NFAT isoform shown to function as an oncogene in a sarcoma model, were elevated in urothelial neoplasms, compared with non-neoplastic urothelial tissues, and in low-grade and high-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas, compared with papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential. In an immortalized normal urothelial cell line SVHUC, CsA and FK506 reduced NFATc1 expression, NFAT transcriptional activity, and the expression of c-myc, a downstream target of NFATc1 signals. Treatment with CsA or FK506 in the SVHUC cells undergoing neoplastic transformation induced by exposure to a chemical carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene resulted in strong inhibition in colony formation in vitro as well as tumor formation in NOD-SCID mice. CsA and FK506 were additionally found to up-regulate the expression of several molecules that play a protective role in bladder tumorigenesis, including p53, p21, and p27, and down-regulate that of oncogenic genes, such as cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and cyclin E, in SVHUC cells with the carcinogen challenge. Thus, CsA and FK506 likely inhibit urothelial tumorigenesis. These findings offer a potential chemopreventive approach for urothelial tumors using NFAT inhibitors. PMID:25594762

  19. Cyclosporine Amicellar delivery system for dry eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Han; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Wonkyung; Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Sun, Bo Kyung; Hyun, Sang-Min; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to develop stable cyclosporine A (CsA) ophthalmic micelle solutions for dry-eye syndrome and evaluate their physicochemical properties and therapeutic efficacy. Materials and methods CsA-micelle solutions (MS-CsA) were created by a simple method with Cremophor EL, ethanol, and phosphate buffer. We investigated the particle size, pH, and osmolarity. In addition, long-term physical and chemical stability for MS-CsA was observed. To confirm the therapeutic efficacy, tear production in dry eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test (STT). When compared to a commercial product, Restasis, MS-CsA demonstrated improvement in goblet-cell density and conjunctival epithelial morphology, as demonstrated in histological hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results MS-CsA had a smaller particle size (average diameter 14–18 nm) and a narrow size distribution. Physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, osmolarity, and remaining CsA concentration were all within the expected range of 60 days. STT scores significantly improved in MS-CsA treated groups (P<0.05) in comparison to those of the Restasis-treated group. The number of goblet cells for rabbit conjunctivas after the administration of MS-CsA was 94.83±8.38, a significantly higher result than the 65.17±11.51 seen with Restasis. The conjunctival epithelial morphology of dry eye-induced rabbits thinned with loss of goblet cells. However, after 5 days of treatment with drug formulations, rabbit conjunctivas recovered epithelia and showed a relative increase in the number of goblet cells. Conclusion The results of this study indicate the potential use of a novel MS for the ophthalmic delivery of CsA in treating dry eyes. PMID:27382280

  20. Heat Stress Nephropathy From Exercise-Induced Uric Acid Crystalluria: A Perspective on Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Barregard, Lars; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Wesseling, Catharina; Harra, Tamara; Aragón, Aurora; Grases, Felix; Jarquin, Emmanuel R; González, Marvin A; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN), an epidemic in Central America, is a chronic kidney disease of unknown cause. In this article, we argue that MeN may be a uric acid disorder. Individuals at risk for developing the disease are primarily male workers exposed to heat stress and physical exertion that predisposes to recurrent water and volume depletion, often accompanied by urinary concentration and acidification. Uric acid is generated during heat stress, in part consequent to nucleotide release from muscles. We hypothesize that working in the sugarcane fields may result in cyclic uricosuria in which uric acid concentrations exceed solubility, leading to the formation of dihydrate urate crystals and local injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, we present pilot data documenting the common presence of urate crystals in the urine of sugarcane workers from El Salvador. High end-of-workday urinary uric acid concentrations were common in a pilot study, particularly if urine pH was corrected to 7. Hyperuricemia may induce glomerular hypertension, whereas the increased urinary uric acid may directly injure renal tubules. Thus, MeN may result from exercise and heat stress associated with dehydration-induced hyperuricemia and uricosuria. Increased hydration with water and salt, urinary alkalinization, reduction in sugary beverage intake, and inhibitors of uric acid synthesis should be tested for disease prevention. PMID:26455995

  1. [Pregnancy following liver transplantation and during immunosuppression with cyclosporine].

    PubMed

    Günter, H H; Mauz, S; Ringe, B; Niesert, S

    1990-05-11

    Orthotopic liver transplantation had been performed in 1983 in a now 40-year-old woman in the terminal stage of posthepatitis liver cirrhosis with recurrent oesophageal bleedings and precoma from complete liver-cell failure. She became pregnant in 1988 while under immunosuppression with cyclosporin (2.1-2.7 mg/kg body-weight) and prednisolone (5 or 7.5 mg daily in rotation). Pregnancy proceeded without complication and there were no side effects from cyclosporin. After premature membrane rupture in the 39th week of pregnancy uterine inertia developed during oxytocin stimulation of contractions, and caesarean section was performed. The female infant was normally developed without any malformations. Liver, kidney and adrenal functions were normal, as was haemopoiesis. But possible late sequelae of cyclosporin treatment in the child cannot as yet be assessed because of the short follow-up. PMID:2338057

  2. [Cyclosporine-induced gingival hyperplasia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, Carlos; Godoy, Jorge

    2007-03-01

    Gingival enlargement can be an adverse effect of cyclosporine A and nifedipine use. It has a high relapse rate if the drugs are not discontinued. There is a genetic predisposition to the development of this condition and dental biofilm can also play a role. We report a 64 years old male who received a renal allograft and was treated with cyclosporine and nifedipine. He required six surgical interventions for generalized gingival enlargement. After the sixth relapse, the patient was subjected to a periodontal treatment to eliminate the dental biofilm, which decreased the rate of recurrence of gingival enlargement. PMID:17505584

  3. Successful treatment of postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum with cyclosporin.

    PubMed

    Schöfer, H; Baur, S

    2002-03-01

    Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG), also known as postoperative progressive gangrene of Cullen, is a rare and rapidly evolving complication of surgical procedures. Since the first description by Cullen in 1924 (Surg Gynecol Obstet 1924; 38: 579-582) various case reports have been published. Even in typical cases PPG is often misdiagnosed and therefore wrongly treated; the unknown aetiology makes treatment difficult. The therapies used for pyoderma gangrenosum include systemic corticosteroids, azathioprine, dapsone, mercaptopurine, sulphasalazine, sulphapyridine, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, clofazimine, isotretinoin, immunoglobulins and cyclosporin. We report on two patients with PPG following breast surgery who were successfully treated with low-dose cyclosporin (2.5-5 mg/kg per day). PMID:12046819

  4. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  5. Signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kawanami, Daiji; Matoba, Keiichiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, specific treatment for DN has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, it is critically important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying DN to develop cause-related therapeutic strategy. To date, various factors such as hemodynamic changes and metabolic pathways have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of DN. Excessive glucose influx activates cellular signaling pathways, including the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, advanced glycation end-products (AGE), polyol pathway, hexosamine pathway and oxidative stress. These factors interact with one another, thereby facilitating inflammatory processes, leading to the development of glomerulosclerosis under diabetic conditions. In addition to metabolic pathways, Rho-kinase, an effector of small-GTPase binding protein Rho, has been implicated as an important factor in the pathogenesis of DN. A number of studies have demonstrated that Rho-kinase plays key roles in the development of DN by inducing endothelial dysfunction, mesangial excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) production, podocyte abnormality, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In this review article, we describe our current understanding of the signaling pathways in DN. PMID:27094540

  6. Diabetic nephropathy among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subrata; Thameem, Farook; Alves, Tahira; Nolen, Jacqueline; Al-Shahrouri, Hania; Bansal, Shweta; Abboud, Hanna E.; Fanti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is growing rapidly worldwide as a consequence of the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among U.S. ethnic groups, Mexican Americans have a disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of DN and associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In communities bordering Mexico, as many as 90% of Mexican American patients with ESRD also suffer from T2DM compared to only 50% of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Both socio-economic factors and genetic predisposition appear to have a strong influence on this association. In addition, certain pathogenetic and clinical features of T2DM and DN are different in Mexican Americans compared to NHW, raising questions as to whether the diagnostic and treatment strategies that are standard practice in the NHW patient population may not be applicable in Mexican Americans. This article reviews the epidemiology of DN in Mexican Americans, describes the pathophysiology and associated risk factors, and identifies gaps in our knowledge and understanding that needs to be addressed by future investigations. PMID:22445478

  7. The role of ultrasonography in the study of medical nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, F.; Barozzi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Diagnostic techniques in nephrology include clinical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, scintigraphy, diagnostic imaging techniques as well as renal biopsy. In kidney diseases, ultrasonography is used as a first-line imaging technique, and its role in medical nephropathy is to exclude urological pathologies, to differentiate between acute and chronic renal failure, to follow-up on the course of a disease, to guide needle biopsy, etc. Ultrasound images are useful at characterizing the pelvis, assessing renal dimensions and parenchymal echogenicity, sampling color–power Doppler signals and evaluating their characteristics and distribution as well as measuring parenchymal resistive index. Taken together, these data can provide useful clues to the diagnosis and help to reduce the number of possible differential diagnoses. PMID:23396246

  8. Dabigatran-Related Nephropathy in a Patient with Undiagnosed IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Escoli, Rachele; Santos, Paulo; Andrade, Sequeira; Carvalho, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor used as an alternative to warfarin for long term anticoagulation. Warfarin-related nephropathy is an increasingly recognized entity, but recent evidence suggests that dabigatran can cause a WRN-like syndrome. We describe a case of a biopsy-proven anticoagulant nephropathy related to dabigatran in a patient with IgA nephropathy and propose that, despite the base glomerular disease, acute kidney injury was due to tubular obstruction by red blood cells and heme-associated tubular injury, and through a mechanism involving inhibition of anticoagulation cascade and barrier abnormalities caused by molecular mechanisms. PMID:26347498

  9. Dabigatran-Related Nephropathy in a Patient with Undiagnosed IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Escoli, Rachele; Santos, Paulo; Andrade, Sequeira; Carvalho, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor used as an alternative to warfarin for long term anticoagulation. Warfarin-related nephropathy is an increasingly recognized entity, but recent evidence suggests that dabigatran can cause a WRN-like syndrome. We describe a case of a biopsy-proven anticoagulant nephropathy related to dabigatran in a patient with IgA nephropathy and propose that, despite the base glomerular disease, acute kidney injury was due to tubular obstruction by red blood cells and heme-associated tubular injury, and through a mechanism involving inhibition of anticoagulation cascade and barrier abnormalities caused by molecular mechanisms. PMID:26347498

  10. Schnitzler's syndrome with monoclonal IgG kappa gammopathy: good response to cyclosporin.

    PubMed

    Pascual-López, M; Hernández-Núñez, A; Sánchez-Pérez, J; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Díez, A

    2002-05-01

    Schnitzler's syndrome (SS) is a rare entity characterized by the association of chronic urticaria and monoclonal IgM gammopathy. Usually, intermittent fever, arthralgia and elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate also occur. We report a patient with the same symptoms, but with monoclonal IgG instead of IgM paraproteinaemia. Histological examination of the urticarial lesions showed signs of leucocytoclastic vasculitis. After 20 years of therapeutic failure, cyclosporin has achieved a total clearance of urticarial lesions in our patient. Two previous similar cases with clinical features of SS and monoclonal IgG immunoglobulin have been described. We suggest our case also represents a variant of SS with IgG gammopathy. PMID:12195569

  11. Marked decrease of cyclosporin bioavailability caused by coadministration of ginkgo and onion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, C Y; Chao, P D L; Hou, Y C; Tsai, S Y; Wen, K C; Hsiu, S L

    2006-09-01

    Quercetin was reported to modulate CYP isoenzymes and P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a drug efflux transporter. Our previous study reported that quercetin significantly decreased the bioavailability of cyclosporin, a substrate for CYP3A4 and Pgp, in rats and pigs. Ginkgo and onion contain quercetin and its glycosides as St. John's Wort. The coadministration of cyclosporin with ginkgo or onion may be subject to clinically relevant interactions as St. John's Wort. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influences of ginkgo and onion on the absorption and disposition of cyclosporin in rats. Cyclosporin was administered orally and intravenously to rats with and without an oral dose of ginkgo or onion in crossover designs. Blood samples were collected via cardiopuncture and blood cyclosporin concentration was assayed by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Everted gut sac was used to investigate the effects of ginkgo and onion on the function of intestinal Pgp. Oral coadministration of ginkgo and onion significantly decreased the Cmax of cyclosporin by 62% and 60%, and reduced the AUC0-t by 51% and 68%, respectively, whereas no influence was observed when cyclosporin was given intravenously. This indicates that the interactions between cyclosporin and ginkgo or onion occurred mainly at the absorption site. In conclusion, ginkgo and onion markedly decreased the oral bioavailability of cyclosporin. We suggest that concurrent intake of quercetin-rich herbs or foods with cyclosporin are better avoided in order to ensure the efficacy of cyclosporin. PMID:16762474

  12. Effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures on brain development and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Clift, Danielle E.; Thorn, Robert J.; Passarelli, Emily A.; Kapoor, Mrinal; LoPiccolo, Mary K.; Richendrfer, Holly A.; Colwill, Ruth M.; Creton, Robbert

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine, a calcineurin inhibitor, is successfully used as an immunosuppressant in transplant medicine. However, the use of this pharmaceutical during pregnancy is concerning, since calcineurin is thought to play a role in neural development. The risk for human brain development is difficult to evaluate, because of a lack of basic information on the sensitive developmental times and the potentially pleiotropic effects on brain development and behavior. In the present study, we use zebrafish as a model system to examine the effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures. Early embryonic exposures reduced the size of the eyes and brain. Late embryonic exposures did not affect the size of the eyes or brain, but did lead to substantial behavioral defects at the larval stages. The cyclosporine-exposed larvae displayed a reduced avoidance response to visual stimuli, low swim speeds, increased resting, an increase in thigmotaxis, and changes in the average distance between larvae. Similar results were obtained with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, suggesting that most, but not all, effects on brain development and behavior are mediated by calcineurin inhibition. Overall, the results show that cyclosporine can induce either structural or functional brain defects, depending on the exposure window. The observed functional brain defects highlight the importance of quantitative behavioral assays when evaluating the risk of developmental exposures. PMID:25591474

  13. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1235 - Cyclosporine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclosporine test system. 862.1235 Section 862.1235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  18. Effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures on brain development and behavior.

    PubMed

    Clift, Danielle E; Thorn, Robert J; Passarelli, Emily A; Kapoor, Mrinal; LoPiccolo, Mary K; Richendrfer, Holly A; Colwill, Ruth M; Creton, Robbert

    2015-04-01

    Cyclosporine, a calcineurin inhibitor, is successfully used as an immunosuppressant in transplant medicine. However, the use of this pharmaceutical during pregnancy is concerning since calcineurin is thought to play a role in neural development. The risk for human brain development is difficult to evaluate because of a lack of basic information on the sensitive developmental times and the potentially pleiotropic effects on brain development and behavior. In the present study, we use zebrafish as a model system to examine the effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures. Early embryonic exposures reduced the size of the eyes and brain. Late embryonic exposures did not affect the size of the eyes or brain, but did lead to substantial behavioral defects at the larval stages. The cyclosporine-exposed larvae displayed a reduced avoidance response to visual stimuli, low swim speeds, increased resting, an increase in thigmotaxis, and changes in the average distance between larvae. Similar results were obtained with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, suggesting that most, but not all, effects on brain development and behavior are mediated by calcineurin inhibition. Overall, the results show that cyclosporine can induce either structural or functional brain defects, depending on the exposure window. The observed functional brain defects highlight the importance of quantitative behavioral assays when evaluating the risk of developmental exposures. PMID:25591474

  19. Pomelo enhances cyclosporine bioavailability in healthy male Thai volunteers.

    PubMed

    Anlamlert, Wirin; Sermsappasuk, Pakawadee; Yokubol, Dhirayudh; Jones, Sirada

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pomelo pulp on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in healthy male Thai volunteers. The study design was an open-label, randomized, single dose, crossover study with a 2-week washout period. A single oral dose of 2 × 100 mg cyclosporine was administered with 200 mL of water. Each subject received 250 g of pomelo pulp or 250 mL of water 1 hour before drug administration and once again 10 minutes following drug administration. Blood samples were collected over a 24 hour period. The point estimates (90% confidence intervals) of the test/control ratio using logarithmic transformed data for the area under the curve (AUC) for blood concentration from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0- ∞)) and the observed maximum concentration (C(max)) were 128.8% (120.6-137.6) and 136.1% (126.0-146.8), respectively. These 90% confidence intervals were higher than the accepted bioequivalence range defined by the European Medicines Agency guidelines for narrow therapeutic index drugs (90%-111% for AUC and 80%-125% for C(max)). However, the apparent terminal half-life (t(1/2)) was not significantly different. In conclusion, co-administration of cyclosporine and pomelo pulp increased the relative bioavailability of cyclosporine. PMID:25408261

  20. [Value of protecting mitochondrial functions during treatment with cyclosporin A].

    PubMed

    Simon, N; Albengres, E; Barré, J; Jolliet, P; Urien, S; Settaf, A; Tillement, J P

    1997-01-01

    The use of cyclosporin A is often limited by its nephrotoxicity. This dose-dependent toxicity can occur in all kinds of transplantation and is reversed with drug withdrawal. Cyclosporin A induces a vasoconstriction leading to an increase of renal vascular resistance and a reduction of glomerular filtration. Histochemical studies show mitochondrial alterations and an excess of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium leading to a decrease of ATP synthesis. Two strategies can be evoked for limiting cyclosporin-A-induced nephrotoxicity. First, the use of drugs counteracting the vasoconstriction has been proposed. Second, drugs acting by restoration of ATP synthesis could also be of interest. For example, calcium channel blockers may be used for limiting the Ca2+ fluxes into cells. Another way to protect ATP synthesis is to inhibit the cyclosporin-A-induced increase of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentrations; Trimetazidine has shown its efficiency in vitro for protecting mitochondria against these modifications of Ca2+ homeostasis and is under clinical evaluation. PMID:9231511

  1. An underlying role for hepatobiliary dysfunction in cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Aleo, Michael D.

    2008-07-01

    Renal-derived cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLT), such as leukotrienes C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) and D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) are thought to mediate acute and chronic cyclosporine A (CSA) nephrotoxicity. However, whole-body cysLT elimination is regulated primarily by hepatobiliary excretion. Since CSA is known to alter hepatobiliary function, the effects of CSA on whole-body cysLT elimination were investigated in vivo, with respect to hepatobiliary and renal function. Male rats were anesthetized and cannulated (jugular vein, bile duct, and urinary bladder). A tracer dose of tritiated LTC{sub 4} ({sup 3}H-LTC{sub 4}) was administered systemically (i.v.) immediately following vehicle and then 90 min later after vehicle or CSA. In vehicle/vehicle controls, hepatobiliary {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination predominated over renal elimination without altering glomerular filtration rate (GFR), bile flow, and urine production. {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination kinetics were comparable between each 90 min collection period. In vehicle/CSA-treated rats, an acutely nephrotoxic dose of CSA (20 mg/kg, i.v.) reduced urine flow 74 {+-} 9% and caused a transient reduction in GFR, while total bile flow decreased 40 {+-} 13%. Hepatobiliary and renal {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination was also impaired 59 {+-} 5 and 61 {+-} 18%, respectively. In contrast, a non-nephrotoxic dose (2 mg/kg i.v.) increased renal {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination due to impaired hepatobiliary elimination without affecting GFR, bile flow or urine production. Both doses caused {sup 3}H-cysLT retention in hepatic and renal tissue. These findings demonstrate that CSA alters whole-body handling of cysLT by disrupting hepatobiliary cysLT elimination. This disruption leads to increased renal exposure to systemically derived cysLT and renal cysLT tissue retention. Renal exposure to and accumulation of systemically derived cysLT products may be underlying factors in CSA nephrotoxicity.

  2. Study of Aplastic Anaemia with Cyclosporine in Resource Poor Setting

    PubMed Central

    Narendra, Anukonda Moti Venkata Raja; Adiraju, Krishna Prasad; Modugu, Nageshwar Rao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aplastic Anaemia (AA) is a syndrome characterized by peripheral pancytopenia with hypo-cellular marrow. Acquired idiopathic AA is the most common variety, probably of an autoimmune aetiology. Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice but cost is the limiting factor. Antithymocyte Globulin and Cyclosporine-A is an alternative to BMT. Cyclosporine alone has been tried as a single agent in resource poor setting. Aim The study was conducted with the aim to observe the treatment response in aplastic anaemia to Cycloserine-A. Materials and Methods Patients who were diagnosed as AA and opted for Cyclosporine with informed consent were included in the study. All the subjects were started on 5mg/kg of Cyclosporine and were followed up for three months to see the treatment response. This study had the approval from IEC. Results Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. Age of the patients ranged from 10 to 65 years. Maximum number (10/20) of patients was in the 2nd decade. Most of the patients presented with mucosal bleeds and breathlessness on exertion; the predominant sign was pallor. Eleven patients had severe AA, eight had non severe and one had very severe anaemia. Out of 20, three patients were lost to follow-up and one patient discontinued therapy due to renal dysfunction; finally sixteen patients’ data was analysed. Out of 16 patients, 9 responded was and 7 did not respond. Complete response was observed in three patients, partial response in six patients. Seven patients had drug toxicity in the form of acute renal failure and gum hypertrophy. Conclusion Cyclosporine seems to be a reasonable therapeutic option with good response rate and minimal side effects. PMID:27504327

  3. Effect of cyclosporine in a murine model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Banić, Marko; Anić, Branimir; Brkić, Tomislav; Ljubicić, Neven; Plesko, Sanja; Dohoczky, Csaba; Erceg, Damir; Petrovecki, Mladen; Stipancić, Igor; Rotkvić, Ivo

    2002-06-01

    The use of immunosuppressive therapy may be associated with significant toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) in murine model of experimental colitis. Experimental colitis was induced in NMRI mice using an enema of 0.2% solution of dinitrofluorobenzene, combined with skin sensitization. After inducing colitis, experimental groups of animals were treated with CsA (1, 3, 5, 10, 25, 50 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intracolonically (i.c.), and control groups were treated with phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally or intracolonically, respectively. Colonic inflammatory changes were assessed using a histopathologic score of 0-30, and pooled whole blood samples were processed with monoclonal antibodies for cyclosporine concentration. In addition, two groups of animals with experimental colitis were treated intraperitoneally or intracolonically with 3 mg/kg/day of CsA, and the colons were also taken for immunohistochemistry for CD25. CsA diminished the extent of colitis in groups treated with 3, 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg intraperitoneally or intracolonically, and in groups treated with 1 and 50 mg/kg intracolonically (P < 0.05). The effect of intracolonic application of CsA was not related to whole blood cyclosporine concentrations. In addition, the effect of CsA at 3 mg/kg, applied intraperitoneally or intracolonically was, in part, expressed in decreasing the numbers of CD25+ cells within colonic mucosa/submucosa (P < 0.05). In conclusions, the results of this study indicate the possibility of intracolonic application of cyclosporine in order to widen the therapeutic window for effective, but possibly toxic drug, such as cyclosporine. PMID:12064814

  4. Clinical Features and Histology of Apolipoprotein L1-Associated Nephropathy in the FSGS Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Cheryl A.; Zhao, Xiongce; Radeva, Milena K.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Nast, Cynthia C.; Wei, Changli; Reiser, Jochen; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.; Pollak, Martin R.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Gipson, Debbie S.; Trachtman, Howard; Friedman, Aaron L.; Kaskel, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) confer risk for kidney disease. We sought to better define the phenotype of APOL1-associated nephropathy. The FSGS Clinical Trial involved 138 children and young adults who were randomized to cyclosporin or mycophenolate mofetil plus pulse oral dexamethasone with a primary outcome of proteinuria remission. DNA was available from 94 subjects who were genotyped for APOL1 renal risk variants, with two risk alleles comprising the risk genotype. Two APOL1 risk alleles were present in 27 subjects, of whom four subjects did not self-identify as African American, and 23 of 32 (72%) self-identified African Americans. Individuals with the APOL1 risk genotype tended to present at an older age and had significantly lower baseline eGFR, more segmental glomerulosclerosis and total glomerulosclerosis, and more tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis. There were differences in renal histology, particularly more collapsing variants in those with the risk genotype (P=0.02), although this association was confounded by age. APOL1 risk genotype did not affect response to either treatment regimen. Individuals with the risk genotype were more likely to progress to ESRD (P<0.01). In conclusion, APOL1 risk genotypes are common in African-American subjects with primary FSGS and may also be present in individuals who do not self-identify as African American. APOL1 risk status is associated with lower kidney function, more glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, and greater propensity to progress to ESRD. The APOL1 risk genotype did not influence proteinuria responses to cyclosporin or mycophenolate mofetil/dexamethasone. PMID:25573908

  5. Clinical Features and Histology of Apolipoprotein L1-Associated Nephropathy in the FSGS Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Jeffrey B; Winkler, Cheryl A; Zhao, Xiongce; Radeva, Milena K; Gassman, Jennifer J; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nast, Cynthia C; Wei, Changli; Reiser, Jochen; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Pollak, Martin R; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Gipson, Debbie S; Trachtman, Howard; Friedman, Aaron L; Kaskel, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variants in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) confer risk for kidney disease. We sought to better define the phenotype of APOL1-associated nephropathy. The FSGS Clinical Trial involved 138 children and young adults who were randomized to cyclosporin or mycophenolate mofetil plus pulse oral dexamethasone with a primary outcome of proteinuria remission. DNA was available from 94 subjects who were genotyped for APOL1 renal risk variants, with two risk alleles comprising the risk genotype. Two APOL1 risk alleles were present in 27 subjects, of whom four subjects did not self-identify as African American, and 23 of 32 (72%) self-identified African Americans. Individuals with the APOL1 risk genotype tended to present at an older age and had significantly lower baseline eGFR, more segmental glomerulosclerosis and total glomerulosclerosis, and more tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis. There were differences in renal histology, particularly more collapsing variants in those with the risk genotype (P=0.02), although this association was confounded by age. APOL1 risk genotype did not affect response to either treatment regimen. Individuals with the risk genotype were more likely to progress to ESRD (P<0.01). In conclusion, APOL1 risk genotypes are common in African-American subjects with primary FSGS and may also be present in individuals who do not self-identify as African American. APOL1 risk status is associated with lower kidney function, more glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, and greater propensity to progress to ESRD. The APOL1 risk genotype did not influence proteinuria responses to cyclosporin or mycophenolate mofetil/dexamethasone. PMID:25573908

  6. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy in newly diagnosed pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Bala, Asif; Ali, Butool; Khan, Husna; Bracamonte, Erika; Sussman, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy can occur due to primary hyperoxaluria and secondary hyperoxaluria. The primary hyperoxalurias are a group of autosomal recessive disorders of endogenous oxalate overproduction. Secondary hyperoxaluria may occur as a result of excess dietary intake, poisoning with oxalate precursors (ethylene glycol), or enteric hyperoxaluria. The differential diagnosis of enteric hyperoxaluria includes inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, bariatric surgery (with jejunoileal bypass or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), celiac disease, partial colectomy, and chronic pancreatitis. The common etiology in all these processes is fat malabsorption, steatorrhea, saponification of calcium, and absorption of free oxalate. Hyperoxaluria causes increased urinary oxalate excretion, urolithiasis (promoted by hypovolemia, decreased urinary pH caused by metabolic acidosis, and decreased citrate and magnesium concentrations in urine), tubulointerstitial oxalate deposits, and tubulointerstitial nephritis. We report a rare case of acute oxalate nephropathy due to pancreatic atrophy and exocrine insufficiency caused by newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:26614399

  7. Monitoring Diabetic Nephropathy by Circulating Gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Ene, Corina Daniela; Penescu, Mircea; Anghel, Amalia; Neagu, Monica; Budu, Vlad; Nicolae, Ilinca

    2016-01-01

    Gangliosides are multifunctional molecules, abundantly expressed in renal cell membrane but also in sera of patients with renal disease. The aim of this study was to quantify the serum levels of sialic acid-ganglioside in patients diagnosed with diabetes for an eventual biomarker stratification of patients with renal complications. We included 35 diabetic patients without metabolic complications, 35 patients with diabetic nephropathy, 35 non-diabetic individuals. We found that sialic acid ganglioside serum level was significantly increased in patients with diabetic nephropathy compared to the level obtained in patients with uncomplicated diabetes and to non-diabetic controls. A statistically significant positive correlation was obtained between serum levels of sialic acid gangliosides, HbA1c, and serum creatinine in patients with diabetes without complications. Moreover positive correlation was found between sialic acid ganglioside and blood glucose, HbA1c, urea, creatinine, microalbuminuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We can conclude that serum sialic acid-gangliosides are statistically increased in diabetic nephropathy positively correlated with microalbuminuria. PMID:26359623

  8. Diabetic Nephropathy and Its Risk Factors in a Society with a Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic: A Saudi National Diabetes Registry-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ahmad, Najlaa A.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Al-Mutlaq, Hind M.; David, Satish K.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra

    2014-01-01

    Aims The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors. Methodology A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD) for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25–44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population. PMID:24586457

  9. Cyclosporin in subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rojnuckarin, Ponlapat; Nakorn, Thanyaphong Na; Assanasen, Thamathorn; Wannakrairot, Pongsak; Intragumtornchai, Tanin

    2007-03-01

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a rare form of hematologic malignancy characterized by lesions in subcutaneous fat associated with systemic symptoms. The standard treatment of the disease, currently, is not established, but CHOP or CHOP-like regimens are usually given. We report, herein, 4 cases of SPTCL diagnosed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry who were refractory to CHOP and/or ESHAP and/or fludarabine-based regimen, but showed rapid improvement within weeks after oral cyclosporin 4 mg/kg/day. Three sustained complete remission for the durations of 8 - 9 months off-treatments. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement revealed polyclonality in 3 cases and monoclonality in 1 case. Our data suggest the benefit of incorporating cyclosporin into the treatment regimen for SPTCL. PMID:17454599

  10. Management of Cyclosporine and Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Aral, Kübra; Sarica, Yagmur; Sivrikoz, Oya Nermin

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargements modified by medications are becoming more common because of the increased use of inducing drugs, and may create speech, mastication, tooth eruption, periodontal, and aesthetic problems. We hereby present a case of a 54-year-old man with 12-month history of generalized gingival enlargement in the keratinized gingiva was referred to our clinic. The patient had a history of kidney transplant and was under medication of cyclosporine and nifedipine. After medical consultation, cyclosporine was changed to tacrolimus and nifedipine was changed to captopril. Gingivectomy was performed using a diode laser, and scaling and root planning were performed. At five months postoperative, the gingival enlargements relapsed and diode laser-assisted surgery was repeated. The patient was followed-up on second postoperatively at 18 months and no relapse was seen. Diode laser-assisted gingivectomy was found to be useful for coagulation during surgery and decreased postoperative bleeding. Recurrence risk of cyclosporine and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth is high, thus, there is a great need for prolonged care of patients following treatment and prosthetic restoration. PMID:26812935

  11. The Genome of Tolypocladium inflatum: Evolution, Organization, and Expression of the Cyclosporin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bushley, Kathryn E.; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Cumbie, Jason S.; Nonogaki, Mariko; Boyd, Alexander E.; Owensby, C. Alisha; Knaus, Brian J.; Elser, Justin; Miller, Daniel; Di, Yanming; McPhail, Kerry L.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Tolypocladium inflatum, a pathogen of beetle larvae, is best known as the producer of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin. The draft genome of T. inflatum strain NRRL 8044 (ATCC 34921), the isolate from which cyclosporin was first isolated, is presented along with comparative analyses of the biosynthesis of cyclosporin and other secondary metabolites in T. inflatum and related taxa. Phylogenomic analyses reveal previously undetected and complex patterns of homology between the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) that encodes for cyclosporin synthetase (simA) and those of other secondary metabolites with activities against insects (e.g., beauvericin, destruxins, etc.), and demonstrate the roles of module duplication and gene fusion in diversification of NRPSs. The secondary metabolite gene cluster responsible for cyclosporin biosynthesis is described. In addition to genes necessary for cyclosporin biosynthesis, it harbors a gene for a cyclophilin, which is a member of a family of immunophilins known to bind cyclosporin. Comparative analyses support a lineage specific origin of the cyclosporin gene cluster rather than horizontal gene transfer from bacteria or other fungi. RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses in a cyclosporin-inducing medium delineate the boundaries of the cyclosporin cluster and reveal high levels of expression of the gene cluster cyclophilin. In medium containing insect hemolymph, weaker but significant upregulation of several genes within the cyclosporin cluster, including the highly expressed cyclophilin gene, was observed. T. inflatum also represents the first reference draft genome of Ophiocordycipitaceae, a third family of insect pathogenic fungi within the fungal order Hypocreales, and supports parallel and qualitatively distinct radiations of insect pathogens. The T. inflatum genome provides additional insight into the evolution and biosynthesis of cyclosporin and lays a foundation for further investigations of the role

  12. Potential clinical implications of substitution of generic cyclosporine formulations for cyclosporine microemulsion (Neoral) in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Atholl; Belitsky, Philip; Frei, Ulrich; Horvath, John; Hoyer, Peter; Helderman, J Harold; Oellerich, Michael; Pollard, Stephen; Riad, Hany; Rigotti, Paolo; Keown, Paul; Nashan, Björn

    2004-08-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is a critical-dose drug for which a minor change in absorption can have important clinical implications. Generic formulations of CsA are becoming more widely available, but standard criteria for bioequivalence require only that a single study in healthy volunteers demonstrate that mean pharmacokinetic parameters fall within 80-125% of the mean values for Neoral, the reference formulation of CsA. However, CsA absorption is known to differ between healthy volunteers and transplant patients and between different types of transplant patients, such that standard bioequivalence testing may be inadequate to ensure interchangeability of CsA formulations in all patients. The limited available clinical evidence has shown that stable renal transplant patients receiving Neoral have a significant reduction in mean CsA trough level after transfer to the Cicloral formulation. Mean pharmacokinetic values have been reported as equivalent following transfer to Gengraft in one study, but mean CsA trough fell and mean serum creatinine rose significantly in a separate trial. The only clinical outcomes data available are from a retrospective study of de novo renal transplant patients, which reported a significantly higher incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection in patents receiving Gengraf versus Neoral (39% versus 25%, P<0.05). Until robust clinical data demonstrate that different formulations of CsA are interchangeable, it is advisable to prescribe CsA by brand, and any transfer to a different CsA formulation should be undertaken with close supervision and only at the direction of the transplant physician. PMID:15205865

  13. Recent advances in managing and understanding diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sydney C.W.; Chan, Gary C.W.; Lai, Kar Neng

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the commonest cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed economies. Current standard of care for diabetic nephropathy embraces stringent blood pressure control via blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and glycemia control. Recent understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy has led to the development of novel therapeutic options. This review article focuses on available data from landmark studies on the main therapeutic approaches and highlights some novel management strategies. PMID:27303648

  14. Tubular biomarkers to assess progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Gianfranco; Kanwar, Yashpal S

    2011-05-01

    Despite aggressive management, many patients with diabetic nephropathy still develop end-stage renal disease. Accompanying tubulointerstitial damage is important in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Markers of tubular damage, such as NGAL, KIM-1, and LFABP, have been proposed for monitoring the effectiveness of therapy. However, Nielsen et al. report a lack of an independent correlation between these biomarkers and glomerular filtration rate. Therefore, these markers seem to offer no improvement in the management of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21527942

  15. Endothelial dysfunction as a potential contributor in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takahiko; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Croker, Byron P.; Johnson, Richard J.; Grant, Maria B.; Kosugi, Tomoki; Li, Qiuhong

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive the development of diabetic nephropathy remain undetermined. Only 30–40% of patients with diabetes mellitus develop overt nephropathy, which suggests that other contributing factors besides the diabetic state are required for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with human diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy, and advanced diabetic glomerulopathy often exhibits thrombotic microangiopathy, including glomerular capillary microaneurysms and mesangiolysis, which are typical manifestations of endothelial dysfunction in the glomerulus. Likewise, diabetic mice with severe endothelial dysfunction owing to deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide synthase develop progressive nephropathy and retinopathy similar to the advanced lesions observed in humans with diabetes mellitus. Additionally, inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system fail to be renoprotective in some individuals with diabetic nephropathy (due in part to aldosterone breakthrough) and in some mouse models of the disease. In this Review, we discuss the clinical and experimental evidence that supports a role for endothelial nitric oxide deficiency and subsequent endothelial dysfunction in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. If endothelial dysfunction is the key factor required for diabetic nephropathy, then agents that improve endothelial function or raise intraglomerular nitric oxide level could be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21045790

  16. Use of cyclosporine and ketoconazole without nephrotoxicity in two heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, T J; Melvin, D B; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Reising, J M; Wolf, R K; Collins, J A; Pesce, A J; First, M R

    1987-01-01

    A cyclosporine-ketoconazole drug interaction was first described in 1981. It has been suggested that the two drugs should not be used concomitantly because of the danger of severe nephrotoxicity. Two reported cases indicate that cyclosporine and ketoconazole can be safely coadministered, provided that the dosage of cyclosporine is reduced appropriately. Two patients were initially given 8 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine at the time of heart transplantation, and the dosage was tapered to meet appropriate blood levels (250 to 350 ng/ml by whole blood high-performance liquid chromatography). During ketoconazole therapy (400 mg daily for 4 weeks), patient 1 received 80 to 100 mg/day of cyclosporine, which is equal to approximately 1 mg/kg/day, and patient 2 received between 40 and 80 mg/day of cyclosporine, which is equivalent to 0.4 to 0.8 mg/kg/day. Neither patient exhibited a creatinine value above 1.4 mg/dl while on combined therapy, and there were no problems with allograft rejection. Both patients had inappropriately high cyclosporine blood levels even with this marked reduction in dosage (patient 1, 520 to 1310 ng/ml and patient 2, 320 to 600 ng/ml). Thus it appears that cyclosporine and ketoconazole can be administered together safely, provided that there is an appropriate reduction in the dosage of cyclosporine; this results in the maintenance of adequate immunosuppression without development of nephrotoxicity. PMID:3305834

  17. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms. PMID:23149251

  18. [Nephropathy associated with electrolyte disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, K; Nakauchi, M; Hondo, I; Nihei, H

    1995-08-01

    It is well known that renal dysfunction is associated with several types of electrolyte disorders. On the other hand, renal manifestations have been attributed to electrolyte disorders. Hypokalemia is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality encountered in clinical practice. The main cause of hypokalemia is due to abuse of laxatives and diuretics or to anorexia nervosa. Hypercalcemia is another major electrolyte abnormality, associated with numerous renal manifestations. Renal tubules damages and chronic interstitial nephritis are characteristic pathological findings in prolonged electrolyte disorders. The mechanism of renal involvement and characteristic clinical manifestations of the electrolyte disorders are reviewed. PMID:7563640

  19. Corticosteroid therapy in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jicheng; Xu, Damin; Perkovic, Vlado; Ma, Xinxin; Johnson, David W; Woodward, Mark; Levin, Adeera; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-06-01

    The benefits and risks of steroids for the treatment of IgA nephropathy remain uncertain. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized, controlled trials of corticosteroid therapy for IgA nephropathy published between 1966 and March 2011. We identified nine relevant trials that included 536 patients who had urinary protein excretion >1 g/d and normal renal function. Forty-six (8.6%) of these patients developed a kidney failure event, defined as doubling of the serum creatinine/halving of the GFR or ESRD. Overall, steroid therapy was associated with a lower risk for kidney failure (relative risk, 0.32 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.67]; P=0.002) and a reduction in proteinuria (weighted mean difference, -0.46 g/d [95% CI, -0.63 to -0.29 g/d]), with no evidence of heterogeneity in these outcomes. Subgroup analysis suggested that the dose modifies the effect of steroids for renal protection (P for heterogeneity=0.030): Relatively high-dose and short-term therapy (prednisone >30 mg/d or high-dose pulse intravenous methylprednisolone with duration ≤1 year) produced significant renal protection, whereas low-dose, long-term steroid use did not. Steroid therapy was associated with a 55% higher risk for adverse events. The quality of included studies was low, however, limiting the generalizability of the results. In conclusion, steroids appear to provide renal protection in patients with IgA nephropathy but increase the risk for adverse events. Reliably defining the efficacy and safety of steroids in IgA nephropathy requires a high-quality trial with a large sample size. PMID:22539830

  20. Importance of endogenous prostaglandins for the toxicity of cyclosporin A to rat endocrine and exocrine pancreas?

    PubMed Central

    Rünzi, M; Peskar, B M; von Schönfeld, J; Müller, M K

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that cyclosporin A is toxic to the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The aim of this study was to examine whether endogenous eicosanoids play a role in controlling cyclosporin A induced toxicity. Rats were treated for eight days with indomethacin (2 mg/kg, twice daily) in addition to cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg daily). Effects of drug treatments on exocrine (as assessed by amylase and protein secretion into the pancreatic juice) and endocrine (as assessed by the glucose dependent insulin release) pancreatic functions, and pancreatic formation of prostaglandins and thromboxane were evaluated. Treatment with cyclosporin A in the doses used did not inhibit eicosanoid formation by the pancreatic tissue ex vivo. Indomethacin caused significant inhibition of pancreatic formation of prostaglandin E2, 6k prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2. Combined treatment with indomethacin and cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg) augmented cyclosporin A induced pancreatic toxicity with further impairment of insulin release, amylase secretion, and pancreatic juice protein content, but did not result in more pronounced inhibition of pancreatic eicosanoid formation. The increased toxicity of the combined treatment was, however, associated with raised cyclosporin A whole blood concentrations. The data suggest that the potentiation of pancreatic toxicity of cyclosporin A observed during coadministration of indomethacin is not the result of suppression of endogenous pancreatic eicosanoid biosynthesis, but more likely results from altered cyclosporin A pharmacokinetic which may be caused by an interference of indomethacin with the hepatic cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenase involved in cyclosporin A metabolism. The possibility that coadministration of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs aggravates toxic effects in cyclosporin A treated patients should be considered. PMID:1280611

  1. Recent advances in the understanding and management of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kar Neng; Leung, Joseph C.K.; Tang, Sydney C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Since its first description in 1968, IgA nephropathy has remained the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis leading to chronic kidney disease in developed countries. The clinical progression varies, and consequent end-stage renal disease occurs in 30% to 40% of patients 20 to 30 years after the first clinical presentation. Current data implicate overproduction of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 as being pivotal in the induction of renal injury. Effective and specific treatment is still lacking, and new therapeutic approaches will be developed after better understanding the disease pathogenesis.

  2. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with membranous nephropathy in a patient exposed to levamisole-adulterated cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Camillo; Emili, Stefano; Lin, Mercury; Alpers, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic agent widely used as an adulterant of illicit cocaine recently implicated as a cause of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated microscopic polyangiitis in cocaine abusers. An isolated case of membranous nephropathy (MN) associated with levamisole exposure has also been reported. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with both microscopic polyangiitis manifest as a pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and concurrent MN in the setting of chronic cocaine abuse and presumed levamisole exposure, raising the hypothesis that levamisole was the causative agent in the development of this rare dual glomerulopathy. PMID:26985374

  3. Treatment of chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Jurakić Toncić, Ruzica; Lipozencić, Jasna; Marinović, Branka

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria is a disorder characterized by rapid onset of localized swelling of the skin or mucosa, called wheals or urtica. According to frequency and duration, urticaria can be divided into acute and chronic type. Chronic urticaria is any type of urticaria occurring every day or twice per week, lasting longer than 6 weeks. Chronic urticaria is a common disorder and estimated prevalence is 1% of the population. Also, it is not rare in childhood. The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria has not yet been completely understood. Chronic urticaria is a heterogeneous group of disorders, and according to the etiology and cause, several groups of chronic urticaria are distinguished, i.e. autoimmune, pseudoallergic, infection-related, physical urticaria, vasculitis urticaria and idiopathic urticaria. Treatment and management of chronic urticaria can be non-pharmacological and pharmacological, and sometimes it is not possible to control the disease with antihistamines only, which are considered to be the mainstay of treatment. In severe cases of chronic urticaria, especially if autoimmunity has been proven, several authors describe different modules of immunomodulation: cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate-mofetil, omalizumab, plasmapheresis, systemic corticosteroids, and immunoglobulin therapy. This article primarily addresses the treatment of chronic idiopathic and autoimmune urticaria. PMID:20021986

  4. Effect of Posaconazole on Cyclosporine Blood Levels and Dose Adjustment in Allogeneic Blood and Marrow Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ortega, Isabel; Vázquez, Lourdes; Montes, Carmen; Patiño, Beatriz; Arnan, Montserrat; Bermúdez, Arancha; Yáñez, Lucrecia; Caballero, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The posaconazole prescribing information recommends an upfront cyclosporine dose reduction upon initiation of posaconazole prophylaxis. We examined this recommendation in the early phase of allogeneic transplantation, where cyclosporine levels potentially becoming subtherapeutic following upfront dose reduction would be deleterious to transplant outcome. Our data show that while posaconazole leads to an increase in cyclosporine levels, subsequent cyclosporine dose reduction can be safely guided by therapeutic drug monitoring and is not required upfront. Therefore, the current recommendation may be modified. PMID:23027192

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  6. Cyclosporin-erythromycin interaction in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S K; Bakran, A; Johnson, R W; Rowland, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The interaction between cyclosporin (CyA) and erythromycin was studied in renal transplant patients following oral and intravenous administration of CyA. 2. Blood and plasma CyA concentrations and blood concentrations of metabolite 17 were measured by h.p.l.c. 3. Erythromycin produced almost a two-fold increase in bioavailability, from 36% to 60%; with a small (13%) decrease in clearance of CyA. 4. The metabolite 17 data further support the postulate that erythromycin increases the absorption of CyA rather than inhibits its metabolism, as generally believed. PMID:2655690

  7. Decreased cyclosporin A absorption after treatment with GoLytely lavage solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Santa, T; Nishihara, K; Horie, S; Kotaki, H; Sawada, Y; Kawabe, K; Iga, T

    1994-07-01

    Recently we observed a case in which the cyclosporin A absorption decreased after treatment with GoLytely lavage solution in a kidney transplant patient. In this study, we confirmed the decrease of the blood concentration of cyclosporin A after oral administration by GoLytely (Macrogol 3350) based on experiments with rats. The peak blood cyclosporin A concentration, and the area under the blood drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h in the GoLytely-administered group were significantly lower than the control group. In the case of gastrointestinal dysfunction such as diarrhoea, or in treatment with laxatives such as GoLytely lavage solution, whole blood cyclosporin levels must be carefully monitored, and intravenous cyclosporin A may be more suitable for providing adequate immunosuppression. PMID:7996392

  8. Effect of cyclosporin on hair-existing area of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Y; Imaizumi, T; Kondo, S

    1994-07-01

    We investigated the effect of cyclosporin, as well as minoxidil, testosterone, estradiol and corticosteroid on the hair growth on the hairy part of nude mice. Aliquots of solutions of cyclosporin and other agents were applied once per every day topically on the tails and the lower backs of 5 week-old BALB/c nude mice, for as long as 6 weeks. Cyclosporin prolonged the hair-existing phase of the hair cycle, but did not change the term of the hair cycle, i.e., the resting phase was not affected. Minoxidil, testosterone and estradiol did not influence the hair growth cycle. Combination of cyclosporin and other agents demonstrated that there was neither additive nor synergistic effect, but a high dose of corticosteroid inhibit the cyclosporin effect, as well as suppressing completely the reappearance of the growing phase. PMID:7999675

  9. L-arginine prevents bone loss and bone collagen breakdown in cyclosporin A-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Fiore, C E; Pennisi, P; Cutuli, V M; Prato, A; Messina, R; Clementi, G

    2000-11-24

    Cyclosporin A is implicated in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation bone disease. Because of recent evidence that cyclosporin A may cause renal and cardiovascular toxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) activity, and that NO slows bone remodeling and bone loss in animal and human studies, we investigated a possible link between NO production and beneficial effects on bone health in cyclosporin A-treated rats. Thirty-six 10-week-old male rats were assigned to six groups of six animals each, and treated for 4 weeks with: vehicle; cyclosporin A; L-arginine; N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME, a general inhibitor of NO synthase activity); a combination of cyclosporin A+L-arginine; and a combination of cyclosporin A+L-NAME. Whole body and regional (spine and pelvis) bone mineral content of rats were measured under basal conditions and at the end of the treatment period by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. Femur weights and serum concentrations of pyridinoline, a reliable marker of bone resorption, were measured at the end of the study period. Cyclosporin A-, L-NAME-, and cyclosporin A+L-NAME-treated rats had significantly lower bone mineral content and femur weights, and significantly higher pyridinoline levels than did control animals. The administration of L-arginine appeared to prevent bone loss caused by cyclosporin A, suggesting that this amino acid, which can be converted to produce NO, might prove useful in preventing disturbed bone modeling and inhibition of bone growth associated with cyclosporin A therapy. PMID:11090650

  10. Oral Administration of Ginseng Ameliorates Cyclosporine-Induced Pancreatic Injury in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Jin, Long; Piao, Shang Guo; Heo, Seong Beom; Zheng, Yu Fen; Bae, Soo Kyung; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate whether ginseng has a protective effect in an experimental mouse model of cyclosporine-induced pancreatic injury. Methods Mice were treated with cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously) and Korean red ginseng extract (0.2 or 0.4 g/kg/day, oral gavage) for 4 weeks while on a 0.01% salt diet. The effect of ginseng on cyclosporine-induced pancreatic islet dysfunction was investigated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and measurements of serum insulin level, β cell area, macrophage infiltration, and apoptosis. Using an in vitro model, we further examined the effect of ginseng on a cyclosporine-treated insulin-secreting cell line. Oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in serum, tissue sections, and culture media. Results Four weeks of cyclosporine treatment increased blood glucose levels and decreased insulin levels, but cotreatment with ginseng ameliorated the cyclosporine-induced glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Pancreatic β cell area was also greater with ginseng cotreatment compared with cyclosporine monotherapy. The production of proinflammatory molecules, such as induced nitric oxide synthase and cytokines, and the level of apoptotic cell death also decreased in pancreatic β cell with ginseng treatment. Consistent with the in vivo results, the in vitro study showed that the addition of ginseng protected against cyclosporine-induced cytotoxicity, inflammation, and apoptotic cell death. These in vivo and in vitro changes were accompanied by decreases in the levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in pancreatic β cell in tissue section, serum, and culture media during cotreatment of ginseng with cyclosporine. Conclusions The results of our in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that ginseng has a protective effect against cyclosporine-induced pancreatic β cell injury via reducing oxidative stress. PMID:24009697

  11. Maternal Obesity Promotes Diabetic Nephropathy in Rodent Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Tsang, Michael; Teh, Rachel; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T.; Zaky, Amgad A.; Pollock, Carol A.; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is known to increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in offspring. Though diabetes is a key risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the relationship between maternal obesity and CKD has not been clearly defined. In this study, a mouse model of maternal obesity was employed to determine the impact of maternal obesity on development of diabetic nephropathy in offspring. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for six weeks prior to mating, during gestation and lactation. Male offspring were weaned to normal chow diet. At postnatal Week 8, offspring were randomly administered low dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day for five days) to induce diabetes. Assessment of renal damage took place at postnatal Week 32. We found that offspring of obese mothers had increased renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. Importantly, offspring exposed to maternal obesity had increased susceptibility to renal damage when an additional insult, such as STZ-induced diabetes, was imposed. Specifically, renal inflammation and oxidative stress induced by diabetes was augmented by maternal obesity. Our findings suggest that developmental programming induced by maternal obesity has implications for renal health in offspring. Maternal obesity should be considered a risk factor for CKD. PMID:27277011

  12. MicroRNAs in Diabetic Nephropathy: From Biomarkers to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate; Wonnacott, Alexa; Fraser, Donald J; Bowen, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Recent estimates suggest that 1 in 12 of the global population suffers from diabetes mellitus. Approximately 40 % of those affected will go on to develop diabetes-related chronic kidney disease or diabetic nephropathy (DN). DN is a major cause of disability and premature death. Existing tests for prognostic purposes are limited and can be invasive, and interventions to delay progression are challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently described class of molecular regulators found ubiquitously in human tissues and bodily fluids, where they are highly stable. Alterations in miRNA expression profiles have been observed in numerous diseases. Blood and tissue miRNAs are already established cancer biomarkers, and cardiovascular, metabolic and immune disease miRNA biomarkers are under development. Urinary miRNAs represent a potential novel source of non-invasive biomarkers for kidney diseases, including DN. In addition, recent data suggest that miRNAs may have therapeutic applications. Here, we review the utility of miRNAs as biomarkers for the early detection and progression of DN, assess emerging data on miRNAs implicated in DN pathology and discuss how the data from both fields may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:26973290

  13. Hypertension-attributed nephropathy: what's in a name?

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Cohen, Arthur H

    2016-01-01

    Unrelated disease processes commonly occur in non-diabetic individuals with mild-to-moderate hypertension and low level or absent proteinuria who present with chronic kidney disease: primary glomerulosclerosis in those with recent African ancestry, and arteriolar nephrosclerosis with resultant glomerular ischaemia potentially related to hypertension and vascular disease risk factors in other cases. Unfortunately, nephrologists often indiscriminately apply a diagnosis of 'hypertensive nephrosclerosis' to patients in either scenario, which implies that the hypertension is causative of their renal disease. Although nephropathies that are associated with variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) often cause secondarily elevated blood pressure, they belong to the spectrum of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and are not initiated by systemic hypertension. Because genetic testing for APOL1 variants and other glomerulosclerosis-associated gene variants is available and can provide a precise definition of disease pathogenesis, we believe that the term 'hypertensive nephrosclerosis' should now be abandoned and replaced with either gene-based (for example, APOL1-associated) glomerulosclerosis or arteriolar nephrosclerosis. Precision medicine will be key to improving diagnostic accuracy in this field. Discrimination of these disparate disorders has the potential to eradicate primary forms of glomerulosclerosis that are associated with APOL1 renal-risk variants. PMID:26553514

  14. Aristolochic acid nephropathy: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Perazella, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a compound extracted from the Aristolochia species of herbs. It has been used for centuries as a remedy for various illnesses and diseases. However, in the early 1990s in the setting of a weight loss herbal remedy, AA exposure was associated with a syndrome of kidney injury, termed aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). This entity is marked by elevated serum creatinine, significant anemia, and histopathologic changes demonstrating a hypocellular interstitial infiltrate with severe fibrosis. Progression towards end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is rapid, with most patients having chronic kidney disease for less than 2 years. In addition, AAN is associated with a 40-45 % prevalence of urothelial carcinomas. Treatment of AAN is limited to glucocorticoids that have been shown to delay progression in non-randomized trials. As most patients progress to ESRD, need for renal replacement therapy, as either dialysis or kidney transplant, usually ensues. However, given the high malignant potential, care must be taken to minimize future development of upper urinary tract cancers by performing prophylactic bilateral nephroureterectomies and aggressive cancer surveillance. PMID:25446374

  15. Maternal Obesity Promotes Diabetic Nephropathy in Rodent Offspring.

    PubMed

    Glastras, Sarah J; Tsang, Michael; Teh, Rachel; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T; Zaky, Amgad A; Pollock, Carol A; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is known to increase the risk of obesity and diabetes in offspring. Though diabetes is a key risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the relationship between maternal obesity and CKD has not been clearly defined. In this study, a mouse model of maternal obesity was employed to determine the impact of maternal obesity on development of diabetic nephropathy in offspring. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for six weeks prior to mating, during gestation and lactation. Male offspring were weaned to normal chow diet. At postnatal Week 8, offspring were randomly administered low dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day for five days) to induce diabetes. Assessment of renal damage took place at postnatal Week 32. We found that offspring of obese mothers had increased renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. Importantly, offspring exposed to maternal obesity had increased susceptibility to renal damage when an additional insult, such as STZ-induced diabetes, was imposed. Specifically, renal inflammation and oxidative stress induced by diabetes was augmented by maternal obesity. Our findings suggest that developmental programming induced by maternal obesity has implications for renal health in offspring. Maternal obesity should be considered a risk factor for CKD. PMID:27277011

  16. Prognostic factors and biomarkers of congenital obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2016-09-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy (CON) is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Anomalies of the urinary tract are often associated with abnormal nephrogenesis, which is compounded by obstructive injury and by maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight. Currently available fetal and postnatal imaging and analytes of amniotic fluid, urine, or blood lack predictive value. For ureteropelvic junction obstruction, biomarkers are needed for optimal timing of pyeloplasty; for posterior urethral valves, biomarkers of long-term prognosis and CKD are needed. The initial nephron number may be a major determinant of progression of CKD, and most patients with CON who progress to renal failure reach this point in adulthood, presumably compounded by episodes of acute kidney injury. Biomarkers of tubular injury may be of particular value in predicting the need for surgical intervention or in tracking progression of CKD, and must be adjusted for patient age. Discovery of new biomarkers may depend on "unbiased" proteomics, whereby patterns of urinary peptide fragments from patients with CON are analyzed in comparison to controls. Most promising are the analysis of urinary exosomes (restricting biomarkers to relevant tubular cells) and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging techniques allowing precise determination of nephron number and tubular mass. The greatest need is for large prospective multicenter studies with centralized biomarker sample repositories to follow patients with CON from fetal life through adulthood. PMID:26667236

  17. Protein-losing nephropathy in small animals.

    PubMed

    Littman, Meryl P

    2011-01-01

    Genetic and acquired defects of glomerular permselectivity may lead to proteinuria and protein-losing nephropathy (PLN). Morbidity and mortality from complications of PLN may be severe even before progression to azotemia and renal failure. Leakage of plasma proteins into the glomerular filtrate can damage tubular cells and the function of the entire nephron. Detection, localization, and treatment of proteinuria are important to decrease the clinical signs and complications of PLN and the likelihood of progression to renal failure. Thorough diagnostic work-ups help to identify subsets of glomerular disease and their response to specific treatment protocols. PMID:21251510

  18. Chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fabian, J; Katz, I; Gerntholtz, T; Goetsch, S; Naicker, S

    2007-06-01

    The number of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide was estimated to be 39.5 million in 2006, 2.6 million more than in 2004. The manifestations of HIV infection in the kidney are multiple and varied, highlighting the complexity of the disease process. There is a wide spectrum of renal disease that occurs in the course of HIV infection. Biopsy studies reveal varying frequencies of histological patterns. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is most common. A biopsy study at Chris Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa showed that HIVAN was present in 27% and immune complex disease in 21%. Han et al. studied HIV-positive patients in Durban, South Africa and screened for proteinuria, including microalbuminuria. They found persistent proteinuria in 6%; HIVAN in 21/30 (72.4%) and the prevalence of HIVAN in patients with persistent microalbuminuria was 85.7%. Studies in black patients have shown a higher prevalence of both severe glomerular lesions (focal glomerulosclerosis) and nephrotic range proteinuria with renal dysfunction in the presence of normo-hypotension. There have been no prospective randomised controlled studies with any form of therapy for HIVAN to date. Therapy of HIVAN has included corticosteroids, cyclosporine and antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART appears to be a logical choice in the management of HIV-associated renal disease. Regimens containing protease inhibitors have been shown to be associated with significant slowing of the decline in creatinine clearance. Both peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis are appropriate treatment modalities for HIV-infected patients with end stage renal disease. The choice of dialysis modality between haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis is not a factor in predicting survival, if patients are stable on ART. Preliminary short-term data in case reports and small cohorts of liver, kidney, and heart transplant recipients suggest that patient survival rates may be similar to those in HIV

  19. Wt-1 Expression Linked to Nitric Oxide Availability during Neonatal Obstructive Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Luciana; Manucha, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The wt-1 gene encodes a zinc finger DNA-binding protein that acts as a transcriptional activator or repressor depending on the cellular or chromosomal context. The wt-1 regulates the expression of a large number of genes that have a critical role in kidney development. Congenital obstructive nephropathy disrupts normal renal development and causes chronic progressive interstitial fibrosis, which contributes to renal growth arrest, ultimately leading to chronic renal failure. Wt-1 is downregulated during congenital obstructive nephropathy, leading to apoptosis. Of great interest, nitric oxide bioavailability associated with heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) interaction may modulate wt-1 mRNA expression, preventing obstruction-induced cell death during neonatal unilateral ureteral obstruction. Moreover, recent genetic researches have allowed characterization of many of the complex interactions among the individual components cited, but the realization of new biochemical, molecular, and functional experiments as proposed in our and other research labs allows us to establish a deeper level of commitment among proteins involved and the potential pathogenic consequences of their imbalance. PMID:24288526

  20. Anti-microRNA-21 oligonucleotides prevent Alport nephropathy progression by stimulating metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ivan G; MacKenna, Deidre A; Johnson, Bryce G; Kaimal, Vivek; Roach, Allie M; Ren, Shuyu; Nakagawa, Naoki; Xin, Cuiyan; Newitt, Rick; Pandya, Shweta; Xia, Tai-He; Liu, Xueqing; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Grafals, Monica; Shankland, Stuart J; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Portilla, Didier; Liu, Shiguang; Chau, B Nelson; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) contributes to the pathogenesis of fibrogenic diseases in multiple organs, including the kidneys, potentially by silencing metabolic pathways that are critical for cellular ATP generation, ROS production, and inflammatory signaling. Here, we developed highly specific oligonucleotides that distribute to the kidney and inhibit miR-21 function when administered subcutaneously and evaluated the therapeutic potential of these anti-miR-21 oligonucleotides in chronic kidney disease. In a murine model of Alport nephropathy, miR-21 silencing did not produce any adverse effects and resulted in substantially milder kidney disease, with minimal albuminuria and dysfunction, compared with vehicle-treated mice. miR-21 silencing dramatically improved survival of Alport mice and reduced histological end points, including glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, and inflammation. Anti-miR-21 enhanced PPARα/retinoid X receptor (PPARα/RXR) activity and downstream signaling pathways in glomerular, tubular, and interstitial cells. Moreover, miR-21 silencing enhanced mitochondrial function, which reduced mitochondrial ROS production and thus preserved tubular functions. Inhibition of miR-21 was protective against TGF-β-induced fibrogenesis and inflammation in glomerular and interstitial cells, likely as the result of enhanced PPARα/RXR activity and improved mitochondrial function. Together, these results demonstrate that inhibition of miR-21 represents a potential therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney diseases including Alport nephropathy. PMID:25415439

  1. Anti–microRNA-21 oligonucleotides prevent Alport nephropathy progression by stimulating metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G.; MacKenna, Deidre A.; Johnson, Bryce G.; Kaimal, Vivek; Roach, Allie M.; Ren, Shuyu; Nakagawa, Naoki; Xin, Cuiyan; Newitt, Rick; Pandya, Shweta; Xia, Tai-He; Liu, Xueqing; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Grafals, Monica; Shankland, Stuart J.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Portilla, Didier; Liu, Shiguang; Chau, B. Nelson; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) contributes to the pathogenesis of fibrogenic diseases in multiple organs, including the kidneys, potentially by silencing metabolic pathways that are critical for cellular ATP generation, ROS production, and inflammatory signaling. Here, we developed highly specific oligonucleotides that distribute to the kidney and inhibit miR-21 function when administered subcutaneously and evaluated the therapeutic potential of these anti–miR-21 oligonucleotides in chronic kidney disease. In a murine model of Alport nephropathy, miR-21 silencing did not produce any adverse effects and resulted in substantially milder kidney disease, with minimal albuminuria and dysfunction, compared with vehicle-treated mice. miR-21 silencing dramatically improved survival of Alport mice and reduced histological end points, including glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, tubular injury, and inflammation. Anti–miR-21 enhanced PPARα/retinoid X receptor (PPARα/RXR) activity and downstream signaling pathways in glomerular, tubular, and interstitial cells. Moreover, miR-21 silencing enhanced mitochondrial function, which reduced mitochondrial ROS production and thus preserved tubular functions. Inhibition of miR-21 was protective against TGF-β–induced fibrogenesis and inflammation in glomerular and interstitial cells, likely as the result of enhanced PPARα/RXR activity and improved mitochondrial function. Together, these results demonstrate that inhibition of miR-21 represents a potential therapeutic strategy for chronic kidney diseases including Alport nephropathy. PMID:25415439

  2. The Treatment of IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kar Neng; Leung, Joseph C.K.; Tang, Sydney C.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a very common glomerulonephritis worldwide. Nevertheless, treatment options for primary IgAN are still largely based on opinion or weak evidence. There is a lack of large randomized controlled trials (RCT) that provide a definitive immunosuppressive protocol for IgAN. The recent KDIGO Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glomerulonephritis have assigned low levels of evidence for almost all recommendations and suggestions related to this nephropathy. Summary In this article, we review different treatment options and emphasize that the key to therapeutic decision-making is the assessment of an individual's prognosis. The risk of disease progression is closely related to clinical parameters such as proteinuria, hypertension, and impaired glomerular filtration rate. For patients with minor urinary abnormalities, the mainstay of treatment is long-term regular follow-up to detect renal progression and hypertension. Optimized supportive care aiming to maintain proteinuria <1 g/day is preferred in the typical patient presenting with microhematuria, significant but nonnephrotic proteinuria, hypertension, and variable degrees of renal failure. The atypical patient with overt nephritic syndrome or rapidly progressive kidney injury that represents a vasculitic form of IgAN should be treated with immunosuppression. Finally, the variant of overlapping syndrome of IgAN and lipoid nephrosis that runs a good prognosis should be treated as lipoid nephrosis. Key Message The treatment of IgAN should be structured according to the clinical scenario.

  3. Biomarkers in diabetic nephropathy: Present and future

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Gemma; McKay, Gerard; Delles, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the Western world. Microalbuminuria (MA) is the earliest and most commonly used clinical index of DN and is independently associated with cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. Although MA remains an essential tool for risk stratification and monitoring disease progression in DN, a number of factors have called into question its predictive power. Originally thought to be predictive of future overt DN in 80% of patients, we now know that only around 30% of microalbuminuric patients progress to overt nephropathy after 10 years of follow up. In addition, advanced structural alterations in the glomerular basement membrane may already have occurred by the time MA is clinically detectable.Evidence in recent years suggests that a significant proportion of patients with MA can revert to normoalbuminuria and the concept of nonalbuminuric DN is well-documented, reflecting the fact that patients with diabetes can demonstrate a reduction in glomerular filtration rate without progressing from normo-to MA. There is an unmet clinical need to identify biomarkers with potential for earlier diagnosis and risk stratification in DN and recent developments in this field will be the focus of this review article. PMID:25512779

  4. Diabetic nephropathy: What does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Montero, R M; Covic, A; Gnudi, L; Goldsmith, D

    2016-01-01

    The consensus management of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in 2015 involves good control of glycaemia, dyslipidaemia and blood pressure (BP). Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-2 receptor blockers or mineralocorticoid inhibitors are key therapeutic approaches, shown to be beneficial once overt nephropathy is manifest, as either, or both, of albuminuria and loss of glomerular filtration rate. Some significant additional clinical benefits in slowing the progression of DN was reported from the Remission clinic experience, where simultaneous intensive control of BP, tight glycaemic control, weight loss, exercise and smoking cessation were prioritised in the management of DN. This has not proved possible to translate to more conventional clinical settings. This review briefly looks over the history and limitations of current therapy from landmark papers and expert reviews, and following an extensive PubMed search identifies the most promising clinical biomarkers (both established and proposed). Many challenges need to be addressed urgently as in order to obtain novel therapies in the clinic; we also need to examine what we mean by remission, stability and progression of DN in the modern era. PMID:26438328

  5. Management of cyclosporine-induced gingival hyperplasia by use of an argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Triolo, P.; Powell, G. L.

    1994-09-01

    This is a report of a case study with interesting laser applications. A 7 year old female was referred to us for treatment of hyperplastic tissue. At age two the patient had successfully undergone a liver transplant. She had undergone two periodontal surgeries under general anesthetic for the same soft tissue problem. Other possible complications were chronic sinusitis and frequent headaches. She has allergies to penicillin and sulfa. Her daily medications are Predisone and Cyclosporin. We consulted with her transplant team and they had no contraindication for the proposed dental surgery. The doctor placed her on prophylactic erythromycin for the procedure, as a preventive measure. The patient desired not to have any more general anesthetics administered. Clinical examination revealed electric pulp tests were normal for all teeth tested. No visible carious lesions were observed and there was no need for radiographs at this time. Soft tissue revealed red inflamed fibrous tissue consistent with gingival hyperplasia. Probing demonstrated 4 - 6 mm pockets around the anterior teeth.

  6. Successful treatment of acute kidney injury secondary to haeme nephropathy in paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria with alkaline diuresis

    PubMed Central

    Sakthiswary, R.; Das, S.; Fadilah, S.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) also known as 'Marchiafava Micheli syndrome' is a rare condition which can lead to both acute and chronic forms of renal failure through renal tubular haemosiderin deposition. A 45-year-old lady with underlying PNH, presented with complaints of fever, productive cough followed by dark coloured urine. Investigations revealed pancytopenia with a markedly raised creatinine from her baseline (from 65 mmol/L to 385 mmol/L) consistent with acute kidney injury (AKI). Renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of haeme nephropathy. The renal impairment improved rapidly and normalised over a period of 5 days with alkaline diuresis (AD). The patient did not require haemodialysis unlike most other reported cases of AKI secondary to haeme nephropathy in PNH. This is the second reported case of AKI in PNH which was successfully treated with AD alone emphasizing the role of AD as a promising therapeutic strategy in this condition.

  7. Investigation of developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of cyclosporine A, tacrolimus and their combinations with prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Unver Dogan, Nadire; Uysal, Ismihan Ilknur; Fazliogullari, Zeliha; Karabulut, Ahmet Kagan; Acar, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate the toxic and teratogenic effects of cyclosporine A and tacrolimus and their combinations with prednisolone using an in vitro rat embryo culture technique. Cyclosporine A (4-40 μg/ml), tacrolimus (1-20 μg/ml) and combinations of these drugs with prednisolone (20 μg/ml) at different concentrations were tested. Cyclosporine A and its combination with prednisolone were determined to have toxic effects on embryonic growth after 10 μg/ml. When used alone, the lowest dose of tacrolimus had embryotoxic effects on the total morphological score and number of somites. It was determined that cyclosporine A caused hematoma at 4 μg/ml and higher doses, and tacrolimus especially at 20 μg/ml caused an open neural tube beside hematoma. It was observed that cyclosporine A at 40 μg/ml dose initiated apoptotic effects at a very low rate, prednisolone increased this effect, tacrolimus led to excessive apoptosis after 15 μg/ml, and this effect did not change with prednisolone supplement. We are of the opinion that the doses should be determined carefully when cyclosporine A and tacrolimus are required to be administered to pregnant women with prednisolone combination, as prednisolone increases the toxic effects of cyclosporine A, and increases teratogenic effects of tacrolimus. PMID:26993750

  8. Efficacy of topical cyclosporin 0.05% in the treatment of posterior blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Michael; Rao, Sanjay N

    2006-02-01

    We assessed the efficacy of topical cyclosporin 0.05% ophthalmic emulsion versus tobramycin 0.3%/dexamethasone 0.1% in patients with posterior blepharitis. Posterior blepharitis improved significantly from the initial study visit with both cyclosporin treatment and tobramycin/dexamethasone. Cyclosporin provided greater improvements in Schirmer's scores (P < 0.001) and tear break-up time (P = 0.018) than tobramycin/dexamethasone after 12 weeks of treatment. Eyelid health also improved in both groups, but the mean improvement in meibomian gland secretion quality was significantly greater with cyclosporin than with tobramycin/dexamethasone (P = 0.015). Moreover, a higher percentage of patients in the cyclosporin treatment group had improvements in symptoms of blurred vision, burning, and itching and more cyclosporin-treated patients experienced resolution of lid telangiectasia. The findings in this prospective study suggest that posterior blepharitis can be more effectively treated with cyclosporin than with tobramycin/dexamethasone. These findings should be further evaluated in large-scale, controlled, clinical trials. PMID:16503775

  9. Prolonged heart xenograft survival using combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Saad, T.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1986-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine have profound immunosuppressive properties and permit successful heart allotransplantation. Cyclosporine used alone has not permitted consistently successful transplantation between species in all cases. Total lymphoid irradiation has not been applied to xenotransplantation. The efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation alone and in combination with cyclosporine was examined using an animal model of heart xenotransplantation. Heterotopic heart transplants were performed using inbred Syrian hamsters as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. Total lymphoid irradiation was administered preoperatively over 3 weeks for a total dose of 15 gray. Cyclosporine was started on the day of surgery and was given as a daily intramuscular injection of 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day until rejection was complete. Neither total lymphoid irradiation nor cyclosporine alone markedly prolonged graft survival. However, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day, dramatically prolonged graft survival to greater than 100 days in most recipients. There were no treatment-related deaths. In conclusion, combined total lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine permit successful long-term survival of heart xenotransplants in this hamster-to-rat model.

  10. Pharmacokinetic interaction studies of fenugreek with CYP3A substrates cyclosporine and carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I; Alam, Mohd Aftab; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Korashy, Hesham M; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Iqbal, Muzaffar; Ahad, Abdul; Raish, Mohammad

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fenugreek seed powder on disposition of CYP3A substrates, cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Rabbits were treated with fenugreek seed powder (300 mg/kg p.o.) for 8 days and on 8th day the single dose of cyclosporine (30 mg/kg, p.o.) and carbamazepine (40 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered to the corresponding group after 1 h of fenugreek administration. Blood samples were drawn at several time points and analyzed by using UPLC-MS (cyclosporine) and HPLC (carbamazepine). Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by using PK Solver. The present investigation reveals that there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-treated pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC(o-t), AUC(o-∞), C(max), T(max), T(1/2), K(el), MRT(o-∞) , V(z/F), and Cl/F for cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Two tailed "P" values for all these pharmacokinetic parameters were more than 0.05, indicating insignificant impact of fenugreek treatment on the disposition of cyclosporine and carbamazepine. Further, fenugreek may also not have any significant effect on the functionality of P-glycoprotein as cyclosporine is a substrate to P-glycoprotein. The outcomes of present study suggested that fenugreek may not likely to interfere cyclosporine and carbamazepine pharmacokinetics, when co-administered with these drugs. PMID:24022709