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1

Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21633409

Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

2011-01-01

2

Sociodemographic factors contribute to the depressive affect among African Americans with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Depression is common in end-stage renal disease and is associated with poor quality of life and higher mortality; however, little is known about depressive affect in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. To measure this in a risk group burdened with hypertension and kidney disease, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals at enrollment in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Cohort Study. Depressive affect was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory II and quality of life by the Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Beck Depression scores over 14 were deemed consistent with an increased depressive affect and linear regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with these scores. Among 628 subjects, 166 had scores over 14 but only 34 were prescribed antidepressants. The mean Beck Depression score of 11.0 varied with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from 10.7 (eGFR 50–60) to 16.0 (eGFR stage 5); however, there was no significant independent association between these. Unemployment, low income, and lower quality and satisfaction with life scale scores were independently and significantly associated with a higher Beck Depression score. Thus, our study shows that an increased depressive affect is highly prevalent in African Americans with chronic kidney disease, is infrequently treated with antidepressants, and is associated with poorer quality of life. Sociodemographic factors have especially strong associations with this increased depressive affect. Because this study was conducted in an African-American cohort, its findings may not be generalized to other ethnic groups. PMID:20200503

Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

2011-01-01

3

Chronic kidney disease  

MedlinePLUS

Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... kidney disease. If it worsens to end-stage renal disease , and how ... Kidney failure is the last stage of chronic kidney disease. ...

4

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)  

MedlinePLUS

... www.kidneyfund.org > Kidney Disease > Chronic Kidney Disease Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) An estimated 31 million people in the United States are living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). What is CKD? The term “chronic kidney ...

5

Endothelial Cells Obtained from Patients Affected by Chronic Venous Disease Exhibit a Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype  

PubMed Central

Background The inflammatory properties of vein endothelium in relation to chronic venous disease (CVD) have been poorly investigated. Therefore, new insights on the characteristics of large vein endothelium would increase our knowledge of large vessel physiopathology. Methodology/Principal Findings Surgical specimens of veins were obtained from the tertiary venous network (R3) and/or saphenous vein (SF) of patients affected by CVD and from control individuals. Highly purified venous endothelial cell (VEC) cultures obtained from CVD patients were characterized for morphological, phenotypic and functional properties compared to control VEC. An increase of CD31/PECAM-1, CD146 and ICAM-1 surface levels was documented at flow cytometry in pathological VEC with respect to normal controls. Of note, the strongest expression of these pro-inflammatory markers was observed in VEC obtained from patients with more advanced disease. Similarly, spontaneous cell proliferation and resistance to starvation was higher in pathological than in normal VEC, while the migratory response of VEC showed an opposite trend, being significantly lower in VEC obtained from pathological specimens. In addition, in keeping with a higher baseline transcriptional activity of NF-kB, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines osteoprotegerin (OPG) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was higher in pathological VEC cultures with respect to control VEC. Interestingly, there was a systemic correlation to these in vitro data, as demonstrated by higher serum OPG and VEGF levels in CVD patients with respect to normal healthy controls. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, these data indicate that large vein endothelial cells obtained from CVD patients exhibit a pro-inflammatory phenotype, which might significantly contribute to systemic inflammation in CVD patients. PMID:22737245

Tisato, Veronica; Zauli, Giorgio; Voltan, Rebecca; Gianesini, Sergio; di Iasio, Maria Grazia; Volpi, Ilaria; Fiorentini, Guido; Zamboni, Paolo; Secchiero, Paola

2012-01-01

6

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

MedlinePLUS

COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... Smoking is the main cause of COPD. The more a person smokes, the ... develop COPD. But some people smoke for years and never get ...

7

Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?  

PubMed Central

Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

2014-01-01

8

Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

2015-01-01

9

Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurodegenera-tive disorder that affects at least 1% of people by age 70 (13).  

E-print Network

to the development of motor complications including wearing-off (the Diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson diseaseHistory Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurodegenera- tive disorder that affects at least 1% of people by age 70 (1­3). James Parkinson provided the first detailed description

Hayar, Abdallah

10

Environmental and Occupational Exposures: Do They Affect Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Differently in Women and Men?  

Microsoft Academic Search

chronicobstructivepulmonarydiseasemortalityinrelationtotraffic among elderly women compared with men, the other finding no gender difference). Two other environmental studies suggested small gender differences with slightly greater effect of biomass or traffic-related pollution among women. Four of five occupational studiesalsofoundincreasedeffectsofworkplacepollutantexposure on measures of chronic airflow obstruction or bronchitis symptoms in women; again the differences were small. Preliminary findings from analysis of pooled data

Susan M. Kennedy; Reid Chambers; Weiwei Du; Helen Dimich-Ward

2007-01-01

11

Effectiveness of knowledge translation tools addressing multiple high-burden chronic diseases affecting older adults: protocol for a systematic review alongside a realist review  

PubMed Central

Introduction The burden of chronic disease is a global phenomenon, particularly among people aged 65?years and older. More than half of older adults have more than one chronic disease and their care is not optimal. Chronic disease management (CDM) tools have the potential to meet this challenge but they are primarily focused on a single disease, which fails to address the growing number of seniors with multiple chronic conditions. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review alongside a realist review to identify effective CDM tools that integrate one or more high-burden chronic diseases affecting older adults and to better understand for whom, under what circumstances, how and why they produce their outcomes. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AgeLine and the Cochrane Library for experimental, quasi-experimental, observational and qualitative studies in any language investigating CDM tools that facilitate optimal disease management in one or more high-burden chronic diseases affecting adults aged ?65?years. Study selection will involve calibration of reviewers to ensure reliability of screening and duplicate assessment of articles. Data abstraction and risk of bias assessment will also be performed independently. Analysis will include descriptive summaries of study and appraisal characteristics, effectiveness of each CDM tool (meta-analysis if appropriate); and a realist programme theory will be developed and refined to explain the outcome patterns within the included studies. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required for this study. We anticipate that our findings, pertaining to gaps in care across high-burden chronic diseases affecting seniors and highlighting specific areas that may require more research, will be of interest to a wide range of knowledge users and stakeholders. We will publish and present our findings widely, and also plan more active dissemination strategies such as workshops with our key stakeholders. Trial registration number Our protocol is registered with PROSPERO (registration number CRD42014014489). PMID:25649215

Kastner, Monika; Perrier, Laure; Hamid, Jemila; Tricco, Andrea C; Cardoso, Roberta; Ivers, Noah M; Liu, Barbara; Marr, Sharon; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Wong, Geoff; Graves, Lisa; Straus, Sharon E

2015-01-01

12

Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

2014-01-01

13

Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

Goldberg, Barry

1990-01-01

14

Asthma in California Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults (aged 18 years)1  

E-print Network

Asthma in California Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults of age, sex, race, or ethnicity. Although the exact cause of asthma is unknown and it cannot be cured to environmental triggers. The following data provide an overview of the burden of asthma in California (CA

15

Asthma in Washington Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults (aged 18 years)1  

E-print Network

Asthma in Washington Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults of age, sex, race, or ethnicity. Although the exact cause of asthma is unknown and it cannot be cured to environmental triggers. The following data provide an overview of the burden of asthma in Washington (WA

16

Asthma is a widespread public health problem that has continued to increase in Texas and nationwide. In Texas, asthma affects more children than any other chronic disease and  

E-print Network

1 #12;Asthma is a widespread public health problem that has continued to increase in Texas and nationwide. In Texas, asthma affects more children than any other chronic disease and accounts a child from having asthma or cures for asthma, it can be controlled by medical treatment and by avoiding

17

Asthma in Hawaii Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults (aged 18 years)1  

E-print Network

Asthma in Hawaii Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults of age, sex, race, or ethnicity. Although the exact cause of asthma is unknown and it cannot be cured to environmental triggers. The following data provide an overview of the burden of asthma in Hawaii (HI) compared

18

Asthma in New York State Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults (aged 18 years)1  

E-print Network

Asthma in New York State Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million.S.), regardless of age, sex, race, or ethnicity. Although the exact cause of asthma is unknown and it cannot exposure to environmental triggers. The following data provide an overview of the burden of asthma in New

19

Asthma in Wisconsin Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults (aged 18 years)1  

E-print Network

Asthma in Wisconsin Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects an estimated 16.4 million adults of age, sex, race, or ethnicity. Although the exact cause of asthma is unknown and it cannot be cured to environmental triggers. The following data provide an overview of the burden of asthma in Wisconsin (WI

20

Anemia of chronic disease  

MedlinePLUS

Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

21

Chronic Kidney Disease  

MedlinePLUS

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

22

Factors Affecting the Accuracy of Controlled Attenuation Parameter (CAP) in Assessing Hepatic Steatosis in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Background & Aims Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) can measure hepatic steatosis. However, factors affecting its accuracy have not been described yet. This study investigated predictors of discordance between liver biopsy (LB) and CAP. Methods A total of 161 consecutive patients with chronic liver disease who underwent LB and CAP were enrolled prospectively. Histological steatosis was graded as S0 (<5%), S1 (5–33%), S2 (34–66%), and S3 (>66% of hepatocytes). Cutoff CAP values were calculated from our cohort (250, 301, and 325 dB/m for ?S1, ?S2, and S3). Discordance was defined as a discrepancy of at least two steatosis stages between LB and CAP. Results The median age (102 males and 59 females) was 49 years. Repartition of histological steatosis was as follows; S0 26.1% (n?=?42), S1 49.7% (n?=?80), S2 20.5% (n?=?33), and S3 3.7% (n?=?6). In multivariate linear regression analysis, CAP value was independently associated with steatosis grade along with body mass index (BMI) and interquartile range/median of CAP value (IQR/MCAP) (all P<0.05). Discordance was identified in 13 (8.1%) patients. In multivariate analysis, histological S3 (odd ratio [OR], 9.573; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.207–75.931; P?=?0.033) and CAP value (OR, 1.020; 95% CI, 1.006–1.034; P?=?0.006) were significantly associated with discordance, when adjusting for BMI, IQR/MCAP, and necroinflammation, reflected by histological activity or ALT level. Conclusions Patients with high grade steatosis or high CAP values have a higher risk of discordance between LB and CAP. Further studies are needed to improve the accuracy of CAP interpretation, especially in patients with higher CAP values. PMID:24901649

Jung, Kyu Sik; Kim, Beom Kyung; Kim, Seung Up; Chon, Young Eun; Cheon, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Sung Bae; Lee, Sang Hoon; Ahn, Sung Soo; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Park, Young Nyun; Han, Kwang-Hyub

2014-01-01

23

Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion  

MedlinePLUS

... of blindness among adults. 6 Top of page Health Risk Behaviors that Cause Chronic Diseases Health risk behaviors ... of page The Cost of Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Behaviors The majority of US health care and ...

24

[Chronic diseases of the ankle joint].  

PubMed

The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemophilic patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use of MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging or high-resolution coils, the investigation of the ankle joint still offers a wide spectrum of innovation for the next years, which is particularly enforced by the increasing demand for specific diagnosis of chronic diseases in orthopedic medicine. PMID:10065476

Rand, T; Trattnig, S; Breitenseher, M; Kreuzer, S; Wagesreither, S; Imhof, H

1999-01-01

25

Cigarette smoke affects dendritic cell maturation in the small airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to characterize and quantify the numbers and expression levels of cells markers associated with dendritic cell (DC) maturation in small airways in current smokers and non-smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Lung tissues from the following 32 patients were obtained during resection for lung cancer: Eight smokers with COPD, eight non-smokers with COPD, eight current smokers without COPD and eight non-smokers without COPD, serving as a control. The tissue sections were immunostained for cluster of differentiation (CD)83+ and CD1a+ to delineate mature and immature DCs, and chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7+) to detect DC migratory ability. Myeloid DCs were collected from the lung tissues, and subsequently the CD83+ and CCR7+ expression levels in the lung myeloid DCs were detected using flow cytometry. The expression levels of CD83+, CD1a+ and CCR7+ mRNA in total lung RNA were evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Evident chronic bronchitis and emphysema pathological changes were observed in the lung tissues of patients with COPD. The results revealed that the numbers of CD83+ and CCR7+ DCs were reduced but the numbers of CD1a+ DCs were significantly increased in the COPD group as compared with the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Using RT-qPCR, the expression levels of CCR7+ and CD83+ mRNA were found to be reduced in the smokers with COPD as compared with the non-smokers without COPD group (P<0.05, respectively). Excessive local adaptive immune responses are key elements in the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke may stimulate immune responses by impairing the homing of airway DCs to the lymph nodes and reduce the migratory potential of DCs. The present study revealed that COPD is associated with reduced numbers of mature CD83+ DCs and lower CCR7+ expression levels in small airways. PMID:25338516

LIAO, SHI-XIA; DING, TING; RAO, XI-MIN; SUN, DE-SHENG; SUN, PENG-PENG; WANG, YA-JUN; FU, DAN-DAN; LIU, XIAO-LI; OU-YANG, YAO

2015-01-01

26

Cigarette smoke affects dendritic cell maturation in the small airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to characterize and quantify the numbers and expression levels of cells markers associated with dendritic cell (DC) maturation in small airways in current smokers and non-smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Lung tissues from the following 32 patients were obtained during resection for lung cancer: Eight smokers with COPD, eight non-smokers with COPD, eight current smokers without COPD and eight non-smokers without COPD, serving as a control. The tissue sections were immunostained for cluster of differentiation (CD)83+ and CD1a+ to delineate mature and immature DCs, and chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7+) to detect DC migratory ability. Myeloid DCs were collected from the lung tissues, and subsequently the CD83+ and CCR7+ expression levels in the lung myeloid DCs were detected using flow cytometry. The expression levels of CD83+, CD1a+ and CCR7+ mRNA in total lung RNA were evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Evident chronic bronchitis and emphysema pathological changes were observed in the lung tissues of patients with COPD. The results revealed that the numbers of CD83+ and CCR7+ DCs were reduced but the numbers of CD1a+ DCs were significantly increased in the COPD group as compared with the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Using RT-qPCR, the expression levels of CCR7+ and CD83+ mRNA were found to be reduced in the smokers with COPD as compared with the non-smokers without COPD group (P<0.05, respectively). Excessive local adaptive immune responses are key elements in the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke may stimulate immune responses by impairing the homing of airway DCs to the lymph nodes and reduce the migratory potential of DCs. The present study revealed that COPD is associated with reduced numbers of mature CD83+ DCs and lower CCR7+ expression levels in small airways. PMID:25338516

Liao, Shi-Xia; Ding, Ting; Rao, Xi-Min; Sun, De-Sheng; Sun, Peng-Peng; Wang, Ya-Jun; Fu, Dan-Dan; Liu, Xiao-Li; Ou-Yang, Yao

2015-01-01

27

Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death. Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD, but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of

John D Scott; Naomi Garland

2008-01-01

28

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients.

2015-01-01

29

Hyperphosphatemia of chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observational studies have determined hyperphosphatemia to be a cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Mechanistic studies have elucidated that hyperphosphatemia is a direct stimulus to vascular calcification, which is one cause of morbid cardiovascular events contributing to the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease. This review describes the pathobiology of hyperphosphatemia that develops as a consequence of positive phosphate

Keith A Hruska; Suresh Mathew; Richard Lund; Ping Qiu; Raymond Pratt

2008-01-01

30

Hyperphosphatemia of Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Observational studies have determined hyperphosphatemia to be a cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Mechanistic studies have elucidated that hyperphosphatemia is a direct stimulus to vascular calcification, which is one cause of morbid cardiovascular events contributing to the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease. This review describes the pathobiology of hyperphosphatemia that develops as a consequence of positive phosphate balance in chronic kidney disease and the mechanisms by which hyperphosphatemia acts on neointimal vascular cells that are stimulated to mineralize in chronic kidney disease. The characterization of hyperphosphatemia of chronic kidney disease as a distinct syndrome in clinical medicine with unique disordered skeletal remodeling, heterotopic mineralization and cardiovascular morbidity is presented. PMID:18449174

Hruska, Keith A; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard; Qiu, Ping; Pratt, Raymond

2009-01-01

31

Chronic wasting disease.  

PubMed

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a unique transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). The natural history of CWD is incompletely understood, but it differs from scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) by virtue of its occurrence in nondomestic and free-ranging species. CWD has many features in common with scrapie, including early widespread distribution of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) in lymphoid tissues, with later involvement of central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. This distribution likely contributes to apparent efficiency of horizontal transmission and, in this, is similar to scrapie and differs from BSE. Clinical features and lesions of CWD are qualitatively similar to the other animal TSEs. Microscopically, marked spongiform lesions occur in the central nervous system (CNS) after a prolonged incubation period and variable course of clinical disease. During incubation, PrP(d) can be identified in tissues by antibody-based detection systems. Although CWD can be transmitted by intracerebral inoculation to cattle, sheep, and goats, ongoing studies have not demonstrated that domestic livestock are susceptible via oral exposure, the presumed natural route of exposure to TSEs. Surveillance efforts for CWD in captive and free-ranging cervids will continue in concert with similar activities for scrapie and BSE. Eradication of CWD in farmed cervids is the goal of state, federal, and industry programs, but eradication of CWD from free-ranging populations of cervids is unlikely with currently available management techniques. PMID:16145200

Williams, E S

2005-09-01

32

Chronic Kidney Disease Prevention in Singapore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Singapore's Ministry of Health. The NKF Singapore program incorporates primary, secondary and tertiary approaches to the prevention of chronic kidney disease. These include the population-based screening for early chronic kidney disease and chronic diseases that are associated with kidney disease and the implementation of disease management programs that aim to improve the multi-faceted care of patients with chronic diseases that

Sylvia P. B. Ramirez

33

Systemic infections and inflammation affect chronic neurodegeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that systemic infections cause flare-ups of disease in individuals with asthma and rheumatoid arthritis, and that relapses in multiple sclerosis can often be associated with upper respiratory-tract infections. Here we review evidence to support our hypothesis that in chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, with an ongoing innate immune response in the brain, systemic infections

Colm Cunningham; Clive Holmes; V. Hugh Perry

2007-01-01

34

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)  

MedlinePLUS

... How is COPD treated? Learn More What is COPD? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD, refers to ... bronchitis, and in some cases asthma. What causes COPD? In the United States, tobacco smoke is a ...

35

Sleep and Chronic Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... control in persons with Type 2 diabetes. 1 Cardiovascular Disease Persons with sleep apnea have been found to be at increased risk for a number of cardiovascular diseases. Notably, hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease and irregular ...

36

Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metabolic bone disease is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is part of a broad spectrum of disorders of mineral metabolism that occur in this clinical setting and result in both skeletal and extraskeletal consequences. Detailed research in that past 4 decades has uncovered many of the mechanisms that are involved in the initiation and maintenance of

Kevin J. Martin; Esther A. Gonzalez

2007-01-01

37

Genetics of Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current review collates what is already known of the genetics of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and focuses on new trends in genome-wide assessment of the inherited component of susceptibility to this condition. Early efforts to identify kidney disease susceptibility genetic loci using linkage and candidate gene strategies proved disappointing. More recently, genome-wide association studies have yielded highly promising results

Conall M. O’Seaghdha; Caroline S. Fox

2011-01-01

38

Chronic Disease and the Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides an overview of chronic diseases such as asthma, cancer and birth defects (with respect to infant mortality) and their environmental causes. Special topics include disease tracking, biomonitoring, Hispanic Americans and environmental health, public health infrastructure, and bioterrorism. The site also features links to current news and related resources.

Physicians for Social Responsibility

39

Chronic Kidney Diseases  

MedlinePLUS

... pressure at a healthy level. Continue Kinds of Kidney Diseases Like any complicated machine, not all kidneys work ... passed down through a person's genes. How Are Kidney Diseases Diagnosed? Kidney problems are often not noticed at ...

40

The epidemiology of chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The epidemiology of chronic kidney disease. The world's disease profile is changing, and chronic diseases now account for the majority of global morbidity and mortality, rather than infectious diseases. The causes of chronic kidney diseases reflect this change and diabetes, together with hypertension, is now the major cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide, not only within the developed world, but

Robert C. Atkins

2005-01-01

41

[Chronic liver diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease].  

PubMed

The morphological and functional integrity of the liver is vital to human health in general as well as to patients with renal disease. Any chronic liver disease will eventually lead to liver insufficiency. Liver enzymes are routinely measured to assess liver function in patients with or without renal failure. The use of standard reference values of aminotransferases to help detect liver disease is less useful in patients on chronic dialysis therapy. Some investigators have suggested that, to increase the sensitivity of liver function tests among dialysis patients, lower "normal" values of aminotransferases should be adopted. Liver biopsy may be helpful for assessing the activity and severity of liver disease, especially in chronic viral liver diseases. The most widely used scores are Ishak (6-point scale) and METAVIR (4-point scale). The most important chronic liver diseases associated with chronic renal disease are hepatitis B and C. Several types of renal disease have been recognized: mixed cryoglobulinemia, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, membranous nephropathy and polyarteritis nodosa. In any patient first ever diagnosed with any of the mentioned features, serologic and molecular tests for hepatitis B and/or C should be done. There is limited information on the treatment of HBV-associated renal diseases. Nonrandomized studies suggest that antiviral therapy may be beneficial in patients with glomerular disease or vasculitis due to HBV. According to Croatian National Guidelines for Hepatitis B and C, treatment with antiviral drug is recommended for patients with chronic renal disease, especially those on the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Decision on the type and duration of treatment is based on the level of viremia and biochemical and histological activity of liver disease. Several antiviral drugs are currently used for hepatitis B: pegylated interferon alpha-2a and nucleot(z)id analogues. The choice of analogues is based on their genetic barrier and resistance. The probability to develop resistance is much higher in prolonged treatment, more than 1 year. To avoid it, regular check-ups are mandatory. First check-up is recommended after 12 weeks of treatment to detect the possible primary resistance to treatment. Similar approach is used in patients with hepatitis C. Today's standard of care is treatment with a combination of pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin. Serum concentration of both drugs rises in patients with impaired renal function. The dosage should be corrected according to the glomerular filtration rate. Treatment with pegylated interferon alpha is not recommended in patients with glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min and ribavirin less than 50 mL/min. Recent evidence suggest that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with an increased prevalence and incidence of chronic renal disease. Current treatment recommendations for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are limited to weight reduction and treatment of any component of the metabolic syndrome. Liver cirrhosis is the terminal stage of any chronic liver disease. Mortality differs according to the stage of cirrhosis evaluated with Child-Turcotte-Pugh score. The worst prognosis have patients with grade C cirrhosis, which should be borne in mind when evaluating patients with terminal renal disease for treatment with kidney transplantation. PMID:22359907

Hrsti?, Irena; Ostoji?, Rajko

2011-01-01

42

The chronic enteropathogenic disease schistosomiasis.  

PubMed

Schistosomiasis is a chronic enteropathogenic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. The disease afflicts approximately 240 million individuals globally, causing approximately 70 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Chronic infections with morbidity and mortality occur as a result of granuloma formation in the intestine, liver, or in the case of Schistosoma haematobium, the bladder. Various methods are utilized to diagnose and evaluate liver fibrosis due to schistosomiasis. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard, but it is invasive. Diagnostic imaging has proven to be an invaluable method in assessing hepatic morbidity in the hospital setting, but has practical limitations in the field. The potential of non-invasive biological markers, serum antibodies, cytokines, and circulating host microRNAs to diagnose hepatic fibrosis is presently undergoing evaluation. This review provides an update on the recent advances made with respect to gastrointestinal disease associated with chronic schistosomiasis. PMID:25250908

Olveda, David U; Olveda, Remigio M; McManus, Donald P; Cai, Pengfei; Chau, Thao N P; Lam, Alfred K; Li, Yuesheng; Harn, Donald A; Vinluan, Marilyn L; Ross, Allen G P

2014-11-01

43

Klotho and Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Through alternative splicing, Klotho protein exists both as a secreted and a membrane form whose extracellular domain could be shed from the cell surface by secretases and released into the circulation to act as endocrine factor. Unlike membrane Klotho which functions as a coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) to modulate FGF23 signal transduction, soluble Klotho is a multi-function protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and plays important roles in anti-aging, energy metabolism, inhibition of Wnt signaling, anti-oxidation, modulation of ion transport, control of parathyroid hormone and 1,25(OH)2VD3 production, and antagonism of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Emerging evidence from clinical and basic studies reveal that chronic kidney disease is a state of endocrine and renal Klotho deficiency, which may serve as an early biomarker and a pathogenic contributor to chronic progression and complications in chronic kidney disease including vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Supplementation of exogenous Klotho and/or up-regulation of endogenous Klotho production by using rennin angiotensin system inhibitors, HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, vitamin D analogues, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma agonists, or anti-oxidants may confer renoprotection from oxidation and suppression of renal fibrosis, and also on prevention or alleviation of complications in chronic kidney disease. Therefore, Klotho is a highly promising candidate on the horizon as an early biomarker, and as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease. PMID:23652549

Hu, Ming Chang; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

2013-01-01

44

Diet and Chronic Disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

45

Helping to Combat Chronic Wasting Disease  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a disease of the nervous system that results in distinctive brain lesions. CWD affects elk, white-tailed deer, and mule deer, but has not been documented in livestock or humans. The origins of the disease, as well as the modes of transmission, remain unknown. Infected deer and elk appear robust and healthy in the early stages of CWD; clinical signs might not show for years. Mortality typically occurs within months after the appearance of clinical signs. The route of transmission is unknown; likely routes include direct transmission between infected and noninfected animals and infected animals contaminating local environments.

U.S. Geological Survey

2003-01-01

46

Overweight + Inactivity = Increased Risk of Chronic Disease  

E-print Network

Overweight + Inactivity = Increased Risk of Chronic Disease Excessive weight and inactivity are consistently linked with increased incidence of chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high, severity and health care costs of other chronic diseases linked to excessive weight and inactivity. Contact

47

Osteoporosis and chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone disease is heterogenous and highly prevalent among those with chronic kidney disease, stage V (CKD-V) patients. Although we know much regarding the risk factors and outcomes associated with renal osteodystrophy, less is known about osteoporosis in CKD-V. Factors that predict bone loss in the CKD-V population are similar to those in the general population and include female gender, Caucasian

Catherine Stehman-Breen; Stuart M. Sprague; Jorge Cannata-Andia; Maria Coco; Martine Cohen-Solal; David Goltzmann; Marie-Helene Lafage-Proust; Mary Leonard; Susan Ott; Mariano Rodriguez; Paula Stern; Jose Weisinger

2004-01-01

48

Complications of chronic liver disease.  

PubMed

Children with chronic liver disease (CLD) need a head to toe approach and an early suspicion of multi organ involvement. Nutritional assessment and management is the cornerstone of management. Consider immune dysfunction in everyday treatment decisions. Consider early heart-lung-brain involvement in transplant evaluation. PMID:22521556

Tsouka, Alexandra; McLin, Valérie A

2012-06-01

49

Nutrition and chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of malnutrition disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD) appears unchanged over time, whereas patient-care and dialysis techniques continue to progress. Despite some evidence for cost-effective treatments, there are numerous caveats to applying these research findings on a daily care basis. There is a sustained generation of data confirming metabolic improvement when patients control their protein intake, even at

Denis Fouque; Solenne Pelletier; Denise Mafra; Philippe Chauveau

2011-01-01

50

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema  

MedlinePLUS

... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Share Compartir Data ... and other residential care Percent of residents with COPD: 10.8% Source: 2010 NSRCF Data Dictionary: Resident ...

51

HHS and NCI Launch National Campaign to Address Diet-Related Diseases Affecting African-American Men: Major Campaign Urges Men to Eat 9 Servings of Fruits and Vegetables a Day to Reduce Chronic Disease Risk  

Cancer.gov

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tommy G. Thompson and National Cancer Institute (NCI) Director Andrew von Eschenbach today announced a national campaign to reduce the risk of chronic diseases among African-American men.

52

Metabolic bone diseases and chronic liver disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Malabsorption of calcium has clearly been shown by isotopic studies on patients with various forms of chronic liver disease.\\u000a Such malabsorption can be corrected by the administration of vitamin D. Malabsorption is closely correlated with the degree\\u000a of obstruction as shown by the fact that there is depressed mean absorption of isotopic calcium in biliary as opposed to non-biliary\\u000a patients.

M. J. Whelton

1974-01-01

53

Diverticular disease-associated chronic colitis.  

PubMed

A clinical syndrome of chronic colitis unique to the sigmoid colon harboring diverticular was recently reported; its histopathological appearance has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the authors analyzed the clinical and pathological features of 23 patients (age range, 38-87 years; median age, 72 years) with diverticular disease-associated chronic colitis. Nineteen presented with hematochezia; four had abdominal pain. Colonoscopic visualization of the mucosa showed patchy or confluent granularity and friability affecting the sigmoid colon encompassing diverticular ostia. Colonic mucosae proximal and distal to the sigmoid were endoscopically normal. Mucosal biopsy specimens showed features of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that included plasmacellular and eosinophilic expansion of the lamina propria (100%), neutrophilic cryptitis (100%) with crypt abscesses (61%), basal lymphoid aggregates (100%), distorted crypt architecture (87%), basal plasmacytosis (61%), surface epithelial sloughing (61%), focal Paneth cell metaplasia (48%), and granulomatous cryptitis (26%). Concomitant rectal biopsies obtained in five patients demonstrated histologically normal mucosa. Fourteen patients treated with high-fiber diet or antibiotics or both improved clinically, as did nine patients administered sulfasalazine or 5-aminosalicylic acid. Five patients underwent sigmoid colonic resection, three for stricture with obstruction and two for chronic blood loss anemia. Among a control population of 23 age- and gender-matched patients with diverticular disease without luminal surface mucosal abnormality, none required resection during the same follow-up period. By Fisher's exact test, a statistically significant difference in outcome for patients with and without colitis was detected (p = 0.049). In addition, three patients developed ulcerative proctosigmoiditis 6, 9, and 17 months after the onset of diverticular disease-associted colitis. The data indicate that diverticular disease-associated chronic sigmoid colitis expresses morphological features traditionally reserved for idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease. Its clinical and endoscopic profiles permit distinction from Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients with chronic colitis in conjunction with diverticula are at increased risk for sigmoid colonic resection. Diverticular disease-associated chronic colitis may also precede the onset of conventional ulcerative proctosigmoiditis in some cases. PMID:8540614

Makapugay, L M; Dean, P J

1996-01-01

54

Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system affects kidney tissue oxygenation evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Imaging of the kidney using blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) presents a major opportunity to examine differences in tissue oxygenation within the cortex and medulla applicable to human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate BOLD signals before and after treatment with RAS inhibitors in hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Ten patients with stable CKD and 5 healthy volunteers were included. Five CKD patients were subjected to BOLD MRI scan before and after chronic treatment with 300 mg/day aliskiren for at least 6 weeks. Five other CKD patients received BOLD MRI before and 1 hour after acute treatment with 50 mg captopril. A group of healthy volunteers (n=5) was scanned before and 1 hour after acute treatment with 50 mg captopril. The 10 patients had a mean age of 61±17 years; eGFR of 30±11 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) . Office systolic and diastolic blood pressures when on a RAS inhibito, were 130±10 and 86±5 mmHg in CKD patients. Control subjects had normal kidney function and were not on any medication. In untreated condition, systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure elevated, 145±6 and 95±4 mmHg, respectively. After chronic treatment with aliskiren, arterial blood pressure decreased in all patients in this group, 127±3 mmHg and 77±3 mmHg. After acute treatment with captopril arterial blood pressure reduced to 125±4 and 71±8 mmHg. Tissue intensity signal (T2*) was increased in medulla after chronic treatment from 29±6 to 34±6 and after acute treatment with captopril from 34±9 to 38±11 in CKD patients. In addition, T2* ratio between cortex and medulla decreased in CKD patients after chronic treatment and acute treatment. This ratio remained stable in healthy volunteers before and after treatment with captopril 1.62±0.1 and 1.65±0.1, respectively. This study shows for the first time that RAS inhibitors change BOLD signal in CKD patients. Importantly, in healthy volunteers, a RAS inhibitor had no such effect. Further investigation is required. PMID:24708383

Siddiqi, Laima; Hoogduin, Hans; Visser, Freddy; Leiner, Tim; Mali, Willem P; Blankestijn, Peter J

2014-03-01

55

Caloric restriction and chronic inflammatory diseases.  

PubMed

A reduction in calorie intake [caloric restriction (CR)] appears to consistently decrease the biological rate of aging in a variety of organisms as well as protect against age-associated diseases including chronic inflammatory disorders such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Although the mechanisms behind this observation are not fully understood, identification of the main metabolic pathways affected by CR has generated interest in finding molecular targets that could be modulated by CR mimetics. This review describes the general concepts of CR and CR mimetics as well as discusses evidence related to their effects on inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders. Additionally, emerging evidence related to the effects of CR on periodontal disease in non-human primates is presented. While the implementation of this type of dietary intervention appears to be challenging in our modern society where obesity is a major public health problem, CR mimetics could offer a promising alternative to control and perhaps prevent several chronic inflammatory disorders including periodontal disease. PMID:21749581

González, O A; Tobia, C; Ebersole, J L; Novak, M J

2012-01-01

56

Neuropsychological Functioning in Chronic Lyme Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lyme disease is currently the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The disease is multisystemic, and chronic disease, in particular, may be associated with neuropsychological deficits. However, to date, only a few empirical studies exist, which examine the neuropsychological sequelae associated with chronic Lyme disease. A review of the literature shows that the deficits observed in adults with

Holly James Westervelt; Robert J. McCaffrey

2002-01-01

57

Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

58

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary function and cardiovascular disease   

E-print Network

Cardiovascular disease is common in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) independently predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Pathological changes in ...

McAllister, David Anthony

2011-07-05

59

Bone disease in pediatric chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Children with long-standing chronic kidney disease (CKD) display clinical symptoms of bone disease, including bony deformities and fractures, which contribute to long-standing disability. Abnormalities in skeletal mineralization occur in a substantial proportion of this population and may contribute to chronic morbidity. Underscoring the potential contribution of parameters other than bone turnover to bone disease in CKD, a new definition for renal osteodystrophy (ROD), emphasizing the assessment of three key histologic descriptors, i.e., bone turnover (T), mineralization (M), and volume (V) (TMV), has been recommended in the assessment of all patients with CKD. Although bone biopsy is the only available method for assessing all three recommended areas of bone histology, this invasive procedure is not routinely used in any clinical setting; thus, a true understanding of the prevalence of abnormal turnover, defective mineralization, and altered bone volume throughout the course of CKD is limited. Recent data, however, have shed light on the progression of renal ROD throughout the course of CKD, including its early stages, as well as on the alterations in cell biology that accompany ROD. PMID:23064662

2013-01-01

60

Genetics Home Reference: Chronic granulomatous disease  

MedlinePLUS

... chronic granulomatous disease? Mutations in the CYBA , CYBB , NCF1 , NCF2 , or NCF4 gene can cause chronic granulomatous ... to the body. Mutations in the CYBA , CYBB , NCF1 , NCF2 , and NCF4 genes result in the production ...

61

Health literacy and knowledge of chronic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We sought to examine the relationship between health literacy and knowledge of disease among patients with a chronic disease. A total of 653 new Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older who had at least one chronic disease (115 asthma, 266 diabetes, 166 congestive heart failure, 214 hypertension), completed both the in-person and telephone survey. Health literacy measured by the

Julie A Gazmararian; Mark V Williams; Jennifer Peel; David W Baker

2003-01-01

62

[Anemia in chronic kidney disease].  

PubMed

Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach. PMID:25354060

Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

2014-01-01

63

Chronic Granulomatous Disease; fundamental stages in our understanding of CGD  

PubMed Central

It has been 50 years since chronic granulomatous disease was first reported as a disease which fatally affected the ability of children to survive infections. Various milestone discoveries from the insufficient ability of patients' leucocytes to destroy microbial particles to the underlying genetic predispositions through which the disease is inherited have had important consequences. Longterm antibiotic prophylaxis has helped to fight infections associated with chronic granulomatous disease while the steady progress in bone marrow transplantation and the prospect of gene therapy are hailed as long awaited permanent treatment options. This review unearths the important findings by scientists that have led to our current understanding of the disease. PMID:16989665

Assari, Tracy

2006-01-01

64

Epidemiology of Comorbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.  

E-print Network

??abstract__Abstract__ Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is defined by the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) as a common preventable and treatable disease,… (more)

L. Lahousse (Lies)

2014-01-01

65

Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in the Medicare population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in the Medicare population.BackgroundThe extent of diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Medicare population is relatively unknown. Also unknown is the effect of these diseases on patient survival before end-stage renal disease (ESRD).MethodsPrevalent cohorts of Medicare enrollees from 1996 to 2000 were assessed for diabetes and CKD, presence of

Allan J. Collins; Shuling Li; David T. Gilbertson; Jiannong Liu; Shu-Cheng Chen; Charles A. Herzog

2003-01-01

66

Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23802624

Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

2013-01-01

67

Principles of management of chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Childhood onset chronic kidney disease can be indolent with slow gradual changes in symptoms and complications or fulminant, leading to the need for dialysis and transplantation within a short time frame. Improved identification of chronic kidney problems allows for early intervention, which can slow progression. Medical interventions for end-stage renal disease have improved, allowing children to take advantage of lifesaving

Rajesh Jayaraman; Judith Van der Voort

2010-01-01

68

Managing Anemia of Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anemia begins early in the course of declining kidney function and is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease. Both anemia and chronic kidney disease are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Anemia is associated with significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality, including increased risks of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. Although the detrimental effects of anemia are more common in

Susan A. Krikorian

2009-01-01

69

Impact of Chronic Hypercortisolemia on Affective Processing  

PubMed Central

Cushing syndrome (CS) is the classic condition of cortisol dysregulation, and cortisol dysregulation is the prototypic finding in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). We hypothesized that subjects with active CS would show dysfunction in frontal and limbic structures relevant to affective networks, and also manifest poorer facial affect identification accuracy, a finding reported in MDD.Twenty-one patients with confirmed CS (20 ACTH-dependent and 1 ACTH-independent) were compared to 21 healthy controlsubjects. Identification of affective facial expressions (Facial Emotion Perception Test) was conducted in a 3 Tesla GE fMRI scanner using BOLD fMRI signal. The impact of disease (illness duration, current hormone elevation and degree of disruption of circadian rhythm), performance, and comorbid conditions secondary to hypercortisolemia were evaluated.CS patients made more errors in categorizing facial expressions and had less activation in left anterior superior temporal gyrus, a region important in emotion processing. CS patients showed higher activation in frontal, medial, and subcortical regions relative to controls. Two regions of elevated activation in CS, left middle frontal and lateral posterior/pulvinar areas, were positively correlated with accuracy in emotion identification in the CS group, reflecting compensatory recruitment. In addition, within the CSgroup, greater activation in left dorsal anterior cingulatewas related to greater severity of hormone dysregulation. In conclusion, cortisol dysregulation in CS patients is associated with problems in accuracy of affective discrimination and altered activation of brain structures relevant to emotion perception, processing and regulation, similar to the performance decrements and brain regions shown to be dysfunctional in MDD. PMID:21787793

Langenecker, Scott A.; Weisenbach, Sara L.; Giordani, Bruno; Briceno, Emily M.; GuidottiBreting, Leslie M.; Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Leon, Hadia M.; Noll, Douglas C.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Schteingart, David E.; Starkman, Monica N.

2011-01-01

70

Pathophysiology of chronic venous disease.  

PubMed

Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a debilitating condition with a prevalence between 60-70%. The disease pathophysiology is complex and involves genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, with individuals developing visible telengiectasias, reticular veins, and varicose veins. Patient with significant lower extremity symptoms have pain, dermal irritation, swelling, skin changes, and are at risk of developing debilitating venous ulceration. The signature of CVD is an increase in venous pressure referred to as venous hypertension. The various symptoms presenting in CVD and the clinical signs that are observed indicate that there is inflammation, secondary to venous hypertension, and it leads to a number of inflammatory pathways that become activated. The endothelium and glycocalyx via specialized receptors are critical at sensing changes in shear stress, and expression of adhesion molecules allows the activation of leukocytes leading to endothelial attachment, diapedisis, and transmigration into the venous wall/valves resulting in venous wall injury and inflammatory cells in the interstitial tissues. There is a complex of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteases and proteinases, produced by activated leukocytes, that are expressed and unbalanced resulting in an environment of persistent inflammation with the clinical changes that are commonly seen, consisting of varicose veins to more advanced presentations of skin changes and venous ulceration. The structural integrity of protein and the extracellular matrix is altered, enhancing the progressive events of CVD. Work focusing on metabolic changes, miRNA regulation, inflammatory modulation and the glycocalyx will further our knowledge in the pathophysiology of CVD, and provide answers critical to treatment and prevention. PMID:24755829

Raffetto, J D; Mannello, F

2014-06-01

71

Patient Experiences of Depression and Anxiety with Chronic Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease, but remain undertreated despite significant negative consequences on patient health. A number of clinical groups have developed recommendations for depression screening practices in the chronic disease population. Objectives The objective of this analysis was to review empirical qualitative research on the experiences of patients with chronic disease (e.g., COPD, diabetes, heart disease, stroke) and comorbid depression or anxiety, and to highlight the implications of the screening and management of anxiety and/or depression on chronic disease outcomes. Review Methods We performed literature searches for studies published from January 2002 to May 2012. We applied a qualitative mega-filter to nine condition-specific search filters. Titles and abstracts were reviewed by two reviewers and, for the studies that met the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across relevant published primary research studies. Qualitative meta-synthesis produced a synthesis of evidence that both retained the original meaning of the authors and offered a new, integrative interpretation of the phenomenon through a process of comparing and contrasting findings across studies. Results The findings of 20 primary qualitative studies were synthesized. Patients tended to experience their chronic conditions and anxiety or depression as either independent or inter-related (i.e., the chronic disease lead to depression/anxiety, the depression/anxiety lead to the chronic disease, or the two conditions exacerbated each other). Potential barriers to screening for depression or anxiety were also identified. Limitations A wider array of issues might have been captured if the analysis had focused on broader psychological responses to the chronic disease experience. However, given the objective to highlight implications for screening for anxiety or depression, the more narrow focus seemed most relevant. Conclusions Chronic disease and anxiety or depression can be independent or inter-related. Patients may be reluctant to acknowledge depression or anxiety as a separate condition, or may not recognize that the conditions are separate because of overlapping physical symptoms. More qualitative research is needed to specifically address screening for depression or anxiety. Plain Language Summary Depression is a common complication of chronic disease. It may worsen the disease, and it may also affect the self-management of the disease. Screening for depression earlier, and then treating it, may reduce distress and improve symptoms of the chronic disease, leading to better quality of life. PMID:24228079

DeJean, D; Giacomini, M; Vanstone, M; Brundisini, F

2013-01-01

72

Decrease in Irisin in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic kidney disease have abnormal energy expenditure and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying altered energy expenditure in uremia are unknown and remain to be elucidated. Irisin is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? coactivator 1-?–dependent myokine, and it increases energy expenditure in the absence of changes in food intake or activity. We hypothesize that chronic kidney disease patients have altered irisin levels. We measured resting irisin levels in 38 patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease and in 19 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Plasma irisin levels were significantly decreased in chronic kidney disease patients (58.59%; 95% CI 47.9%–69.2%, p<0.0001). The decrease in irisin levels was inversely correlated with the levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Further association analysis revealed that irisin level is independently associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Our results suggest that chronic kidney disease patients have lower than normal irisin levels at rest. Furthermore, irisin may play a major role in affecting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and abnormal energy expenditure in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:23667695

Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chao-Yung; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Hung, Kuo-Chun

2013-01-01

73

The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease caused by the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental influences. There is increasing evidence that genes link to disease pathogenesis and heterogeneity by causing variation in protease anti-protease systems, defence against oxidative stress and inflammation. The main methods of genomic research for complex disease traits are described, together with the genes implicated in COPD thus far, their roles in disease causation and the future for this area of investigation. PMID:17054776

Wood, Alice M; Stockley, Robert A

2006-01-01

74

Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized and the developing countries. During 1997, COPD has been estimated to be the number four cause of death after cardiovascular diseases, tumors and cerebrovascular diseases in the United States. In 2020 COPD will probably become the third leading cause of death all

G. Viegi; A. Scognamiglio; S. Baldacci; F. Pistelli; L. Carrozzi

2001-01-01

75

Cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality remains alarmingly high in all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). CVD often begins before end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and patients with reduced kidney function are more likely to die of CVD than to develop ESRD. Three pathological forms of CVD should be considered in patients with CKD: alterations in cardiac

Mark J. Sarnak

2003-01-01

76

Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction  

PubMed Central

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

2014-01-01

77

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs  

MedlinePLUS

COPD - control drugs ... Control medicines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are drugs you take to control or prevent symptoms of COPD. You must use them every day for them to work well. These ...

78

The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

E-print Network

Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that COPD aggregates in families, suggesting a genetic predisposition to airflow obstruction. Many candidate...

2001-01-11

79

Hemorrhagic Varicella in Chronic Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Hemorrhagic varicella is a serious complication of a relatively benign disorder and usually occurs in immunocompromised persons and those on immunosuppressive therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of hemorrhagic varicella associated with chronic liver disease in Indian literature. Our encounter with this case highlights that rare hemorrhagic varicella can also present in cases of chronic liver disease. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with acyclovir leads to complete recovery. PMID:24741231

Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Sharma, Deepti; Agrawal, Ravi Prakash

2014-01-01

80

Cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease. National Kidney Foundation guidelines define chronic kidney disease (CKD) as persistent kidney damage (confirmed by renal biopsy or markers of kidney damage) and\\/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL\\/min\\/1.73m2 for greater than three months.Patients with CKD experience higher mortality and adverse cardiovascular (CV) event rates, which remains significant after adjustment for conventional coronary risk

Nagesh S. Anavekar; Marc A. Pfeffer

2004-01-01

81

Chronic Kidney Disease Stages Are Appropriate at All Ages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with multiple detrimental consequences to the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. The effects of CKD are even more significant when they begin in childhood as they affect growth and (neuro-) development as well. The division into stages of CKD serves as a guideline for the physician to better anticipate and treat early and later manifestations

Beatrice Goilav; Frederick J. Kaskel

2011-01-01

82

Bilateral pneumectomy (volume reduction) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We undertook surgical bilateral lung volume reduction in 20 patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to relieve thoracic distention and improve respiratory mechanics. The operation, done through median sternotomy, involves excision of 20% to 30% of the volume of each lung. The most affected portions are excised with the use of a linear stapling device fitted with strips of

J. D. Cooper; E. P. Trulock; A. N. Triantafillou; G. A. Patterson; M. S. Pohl; P. A. Deloney; R. S. Sundaresan; C. L. Roper

1995-01-01

83

Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

Kuypers, Dirk R J

2009-03-01

84

Neuromotor control in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Neuromotor control of skeletal muscles, including respiratory muscles, is ultimately dependent on the structure and function of the motor units (motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate) comprising the muscle. In most muscles, considerable diversity of contractile and fatigue properties exists across motor units, allowing a range of motor behaviors. In diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), there may be disproportional primary (disease related) or secondary effects (related to treatment or other concomitant factors) on the size and contractility of specific muscle fiber types that would influence the relative contribution of different motor units. For example, with COPD there is a disproportionate atrophy of type IIx and/or IIb fibers that comprise more fatigable motor units. Thus fatigue resistance may appear to improve, while overall motor performance (e.g., 6-min walk test) and endurance (e.g., reduced aerobic exercise capacity) are diminished. There are many coexisting factors that might also influence motor performance. For example, in COPD patients, there may be concomitant hypoxia and/or hypercapnia, physical inactivity and unloading of muscles, and corticosteroid treatment, all of which may disproportionately affect specific muscle fiber types, thereby influencing neuromotor control. Future studies should address how plasticity in motor units can be harnessed to mitigate the functional impact of COPD-induced changes. PMID:23329816

Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

2013-05-01

85

Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient. PMID:24829799

Reddy Maddika, Srikanth; Vyas, Anix; Iyer, Viswanathan; Cheriyath, Pramil

2014-01-01

86

Thyroid disorders and chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient. PMID:24829799

Mohamedali, Mohamed; Reddy Maddika, Srikanth; Vyas, Anix; Iyer, Viswanathan; Cheriyath, Pramil

2014-01-01

87

COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)  

MedlinePLUS

... the air sacs. This process is called gas exchange. The airways and air sacs are elastic (stretchy). ... ones. If this happens, the amount of gas exchange in the lungs is reduced. In chronic bronchitis, ...

88

Application of biomedical informatics to chronic pediatric diseases: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chronic diseases affect millions of children worldwide leading to substantial disease burden to the children and their families as well as escalating health care costs. The increasing trend in the prevalence of complex pediatric chronic diseases requires innovative and optimal delivery of care. Biomedical informatics applications play an important role in improving health outcomes while being cost-effective. However, their

Fatemeh Moeinedin; Rahim Moineddin; Alejandro R Jadad; Jemila S Hamid; Teresa To; Joseph Beyene

2009-01-01

89

Screening and Management of Depression for Adults With Chronic Diseases  

PubMed Central

Background Depression is the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading contributor to the global burden of disease. In Canada, the 1-year prevalence of major depressive disorder was approximately 6% in Canadians 18 and older. A large prospective Canadian study reported an increased risk of developing depression in people with chronic diseases compared with those without such diseases. Objectives To systematically review the literature regarding the effectiveness of screening for depression and/or anxiety in adults with chronic diseases in the community setting. To conduct a non-systematic, post-hoc analysis to evaluate whether a screen-and-treat strategy for depression is associated with an improvement in chronic disease outcomes. Data Sources A literature search was performed on January 29, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, OVID PsycINFO, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2002 until January 29, 2012. Review Methods No citations were identified for the first objective. For the second, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials that compared depression management for adults with chronic disease with usual care/placebo were included. Where possible, the results of randomized controlled trials were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Eight primary randomized controlled trials and 1 systematic review were included in the post-hoc analysis (objective 2)—1 in people with diabetes, 2 in people with heart failure, and 5 in people with coronary artery disease. Across all studies, there was no evidence that managing depression improved chronic disease outcomes. The quality of evidence (GRADE) ranged from low to moderate. Some of the study results (specifically in coronary artery disease populations) were suggestive of benefit, but the differences were not significant. Limitations The included studies varied in duration of treatment and follow-up, as well as in included forms of depression. In most of the trials, the authors noted a significant placebo response rate that could be attributed to spontaneous resolution of depression or mild disease. In some studies, placebo groups may have had access to care as a result of screening, since it would be unethical to withhold all care. Conclusions There was no evidence to suggest that a screen-and-treat strategy for depression among adults with chronic diseases resulted in improved chronic disease outcomes. Plain Language Summary People with chronic diseases are more likely to have depression than people without chronic diseases. This is a problem because depression may make the chronic disease worse or affect how a person manages it. Discovering depression earlier may make it easier for people to cope with their condition, leading to better health and quality of life. We reviewed studies that looked at screening and treating for depression in people with chronic diseases. In people with diabetes, treatment of depression did not affect clinical measures of diabetes management. In people with heart failure and coronary artery disease, treatment of depression did not improve heart failure management or reduce rates of heart attacks or death. At present, there is no evidence that screening and treating for depression improves the symptoms of chronic diseases or lead to use of fewer health care services. PMID:24133570

2013-01-01

90

Tobacco and the pediatric chronic kidney disease population.  

PubMed

Tobacco use and exposure are preventable causes of morbidity and mortality. Whereas the impact of this public health issue is well described in adults with kidney disease, its role in the pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) population is largely unknown. This review discusses the prevalence of tobacco use and exposure in children with CKD, updates the reader on how tobacco affects the kidney, and presents intervention strategies relevant to this patient population. PMID:24890336

Omoloja, Abiodun; Tyc, Vida L

2015-02-01

91

Glycemic index in chronic disease: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: The intent of this review is to critically analyze the scientific evidence on the role of the glycemic index in chronic Western disease and to discuss the utility of the glycemic index in the prevention and management of these disease states.Background: The glycemic index ranks foods based on their postprandial blood glucose response. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, as well

LS Augustin; S Franceschi; DJA Jenkins; CWC Kendall; C La Vecchia

2002-01-01

92

Comorbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comorbidities such as cardiac disease, diabetes mellitus, hyper- tension, osteoporosis, and psychological disorders are commonly reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but with great variability in reported prevalence. Tobacco smokingis a risk factorfor many of these comorbidities as well as for COPD,makingit difficultto draw conclusions aboutthe relationship between COPD and these comorbidities. However, recent large epi- demiologic

Wissam M. Chatila; Byron M. Thomashow; Omar A. Minai; Gerard J. Criner; Barry J. Make

2008-01-01

93

Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates  

PubMed Central

Chronic wasting disease is a prion disease of cervids. Assessment of its zoonotic potential is critical. To evaluate primate susceptibility, we tested monkeys from 2 genera. We found that 100% of intracerebrally inoculated and 92% of orally inoculated squirrel monkeys were susceptible, but cynomolgus macaques were not, suggesting possible low risk for humans. PMID:24751215

Meade-White, Kimberly D.; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James; Race, Richard; Chesebro, Bruce

2014-01-01

94

Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. The classification of CKD by KDOQI and KDIGO and the routine eGFR reporting have resulted in increased identification of CKD. It is important to be able to identify those at high risk of CKD progression and its associated cardiovascular disease (CVD). Proteinuria is the most sensitive marker of CKD progression

Robert G Fassett; Sree K Venuthurupalli; Glenda C Gobe; Jeff S Coombes; Matthew A Cooper; Wendy E Hoy

2011-01-01

95

Chronic sequelae of foodborne disease.  

PubMed Central

In the past decade the complexity of foodborne pathogens, as well as their adaptability and ability to cause acute illness, and in some cases chronic (secondary) complications, have been newly appreciated. This overview examines long-term consequences of foodborne infections and intoxications to emphasize the need for more research and education. PMID:9366595

Lindsay, J. A.

1997-01-01

96

Fatigue and multidimensional disease severity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Background and aims Fatigue is associated with longitudinal ratings of health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although the degree of airflow obstruction is often used to grade disease severity in patients with COPD, multidimensional grading systems have recently been developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between perceived and actual fatigue level and multidimensional disease severity in patients with COPD. Materials and methods Twenty-two patients with COPD (aged 52-74 years) took part in the study. Multidimensional disease severity was measured using the SAFE and BODE indices. Perceived fatigue was assessed using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS). Peripheral muscle endurance was evaluated using the number of sit-ups, squats, and modified push-ups that each patient could do. Results Thirteen patients (59%) had severe fatigue, and their St George's Respiratory Questionnaire scores were significantly higher (p < 0.05). The SAFE index score was significantly correlated with the number of sit-ups, number of squats, FSS score and FIS score (p < 0.05). The BODE index was significantly associated with the numbers of sit-ups, squats and modified push-ups, and with the FSS and FIS scores (p < 0.05). Conclusions Peripheral muscle endurance and fatigue perception in patients with COPD was related to multidimensional disease severity measured with both the SAFE and BODE indices. Improvements in perceived and actual fatigue levels may positively affect multidimensional disease severity and health status in COPD patients. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of fatigue perception and exercise training on patients with different stages of multidimensional COPD severity. PMID:22958301

2010-01-01

97

Chronic kidney disease and premature ageing.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) shares many phenotypic similarities with other chronic diseases, including heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV infection and rheumatoid arthritis. The most apparent similarity is premature ageing, involving accelerated vascular disease and muscle wasting. We propose that in addition to a sedentary lifestyle and psychosocial and socioeconomic determinants, four major disease-induced mechanisms underlie premature ageing in CKD: an increase in allostatic load, activation of the 'stress resistance response', activation of age-promoting mechanisms and impairment of anti-ageing pathways. The most effective current interventions to modulate premature ageing-treatment of the underlying disease, optimal nutrition, correction of the internal environment and exercise training-reduce systemic inflammation and oxidative stress and induce muscle anabolism. Deeper mechanistic insight into the phenomena of premature ageing as well as early diagnosis of CKD might improve the application and efficacy of these interventions and provide novel leads to combat muscle wasting and vascular impairment in chronic diseases. PMID:25287433

Kooman, Jeroen P; Kotanko, Peter; Schols, Annemie M W J; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

2014-12-01

98

Total body irradiation correlates with chronic graft versus host disease and affects prognosis of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving an HLA identical allogeneic bone marrow transplant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate whether different procedure variables involved in the delivery of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) impact on prognosis of patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT).Methods and Materials: Ninety-three consecutive patients with ALL receiving a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical allogeneic BMT between 1 August 1983 and 30 September 1995 were conditioned

Renzo Corvò; Gabriella Paoli; Salvina Barra; Almalina Bacigalupo; Maria Teresa Van Lint; Paola Franzone; Francesco Frassoni; Daniele Scarpati; Andrea Bacigalupo; Vito Vitale

1999-01-01

99

Cardiometabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular\\u000a (CV) disease, and CV-related premature death. More than 8 million people in the United States have CKD; therefore, preventive\\u000a strategies should be directed at identifying risk factors for this condition. There is growing evidence implicating the cardiometabolic\\u000a syndrome, a clustering of CV

Guido Lastra; Camila Manrique; Samy I. McFarlane; James R. Sowers

2006-01-01

100

Modern treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary,disease (COPD) is a major cause of ill health and medical expenditure,worldwide. Despite recent increases in the knowledge about the nature of the disease process and recognition of cytokine-mediated pathways of inflammation, current management is focussed on patient outcomes that relate to physiological measures,of dysfunction. The new,Global initiative in Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) management guidelines are evidence-based

P. M. A. Calverley

2001-01-01

101

Epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary,disease (COPD) is a leading cause of world-wide mortality and disability. On average y5–15% of adults in industrialized countries have COPD defined by spirometry. In 1990, COPD was considered to be at the twelfth position world-wide as a cause of combined,mortality and disability but is expected,to become,the fifth cause by the year 2020. COPD has a chronic

J. M. Antó; P. Vermeire; J. Vestbo; J. Sunyer

2001-01-01

102

Systemic effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary,disease (COPD) is characterised by an inappropriate\\/excessive inflammatory response of the lungs to respiratory pollutants, mainly tobacco smoking. Recently, besides the typical pulmonary pathology of COPD (i.e. chronic bronchitis and emphysema), several effects occurring outside the lungs have been described, the so- called systemic effects of COPD. These effects are clinically relevant because they modify,and can help

A. G. N. Agusti; A. Noguera; J. Sauleda; E. Sala; J. Pons; X. Busquets

2003-01-01

103

Christos Chatziantoniou at Inserm UMR 1155 Wins GSK's Discovery Fast Track Challenge to Investigate Chronic Kidney Disease  

E-print Network

Chronic Kidney Disease Paris, France - 1 December, 2014 - Christos Chatziantoniou, Director of Research medicines for Chronic Kidney Disease. Dr. Chatziantoniou, researcher in Inserm, is one of 14 winning of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), a pathology affecting millions of people over the world. CKD is defined

104

Chronic inflammatory muscle diseases and risk of coronary artery disease.  

PubMed

Despite recent advancements in the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), it remains the commonest cause of death in the world. Although traditional risk factors partially account for the development of CAD, other novel risk factors have recently been implicated. Specifically, chronic inflammation has been postulated to play a role in the development and propagation of this disease. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence to determine if patients with chronic inflammatory muscle diseases have higher rates of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23341225

Gundogdu, Betul M; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

2013-03-01

105

Systemic Diseases and Chronic Rhinosinusitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many systemic diseases can cause nasal symptoms, either as an initial presentation or a manifestation later in the disease process. When patients present with nasal symptoms resembling infection—such as purulent nasal discharge, crusting, and congestion—acute rhinosinusitis is likely to be diagnosed. However, when these symptoms persist despite appropriate medical therapy, other etiologies should be considered. In some cases, underlying inflammation

Christine Reger; Christina F. Herrera; Megan Abbott; Alexander G. Chiu

106

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the risk of cardiovascular diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous large epidemiological studies reporting on the association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\u000a cardiovascular diseases mainly focussed on prevalent diseases rather than on the incidence of newly diagnosed cardiovascular\\u000a outcomes. We used the UK-based General Practice Research Database (GPRD) to assess the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular\\u000a diseases in COPD patients aged 40–79 between 1995 and 2005, and

Cornelia Schneider; Ulrich Bothner; Susan S. Jick; Christoph R. Meier

2010-01-01

107

Occupational causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

The relation between Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema (CBE), and exposure to coal dust is well established. This paper reviews the evidence relating to other occupational causes of COPD, including industries associated with exposure to fumes, chemical substances, and dusts. A review of key literature has been carried out with a focus on the magnitude of risks and levels of exposure causing disabling health effects. The literature suggests that elevated risks of developing COPD are clearly associated with several occupations, with risk estimates being high in some, even after taking into account the effect of confounders, such as smoking. Of particular concern are agricultural workers who can be exposed to a variety of gases and organic dusts, among whom CBE is clearly elevated, particularly for pig farmers and exposure to endotoxins, with an increased annual decline in lung function. Similarly, cotton textile workers are exposed to a mixture of substances affecting development of atopy, byssinosis, and CBE, and across-shift and long-term decline in lung function. Atopy also has an important role in the development of COPD in flour mill workers and bakers, with those sensitized to bakery allergens having a greater lung function decline than non-sensitized individuals. Welding processes involve a range of potential chemical, physical and radiation hazards. The average reduction in FEV1 associated with welding fumes is similar to that associated with smoking. Challenges in assessing the evidence include variation in diagnostic methods; concurrent exposure to cigarette smoke (direct or second-hand) and multiple work-place irritants; healthy worker selection/survivor effects; poor exposure definition. Raising awareness of occupational causes of COPD among employers, employees, and health service professionals is important. PMID:18078004

Rushton, Lesley

2007-01-01

108

Milk--the promoter of chronic Western diseases.  

PubMed

Common chronic diseases of Western societies, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, cancer, hypertension, obesity, dementia, and allergic diseases are significantly influenced by dietary habits. Cow's milk and dairy products are nutritional staples in most Western societies. Milk and dairy product consumption is recommended by most nutritional societies because of their beneficial effects for calcium uptake and bone mineralization and as a source of valuable protein. However, the adverse long-term effects of milk and milk protein consumption on human health have been neglected. A hypothesis is presented, showing for the first time that milk protein consumption is an essential adverse environmental factor promoting most chronic diseases of Western societies. Milk protein consumption induces postprandial hyperinsulinaemia and shifts the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis to permanently increased IGF-1 serum levels. Insulin/IGF-1 signalling is involved in the regulation of fetal growth, T-cell maturation in the thymus, linear growth, pathogenesis of acne, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, obesity, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, thus affecting most chronic diseases of Western societies. Of special concern is the possibility that milk intake during pregnancy adversely affects the early fetal programming of the IGF-1 axis which will influence health risks later in life. An accumulated body of evidence for the adverse effects of cow's milk consumption from fetal life to childhood, adolescence, adulthood and senescence will be provided which strengthens the presented hypothesis. PMID:19232475

Melnik, Bodo C

2009-06-01

109

Pathological mimics of chronic inflammatory bowel disease.  

PubMed Central

When all of the macroscopic and microscopic features of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are present, the correct diagnosis is usually made without difficulty. When some of the changes are absent, the accuracy of diagnosis is reduced. This review has outlined those diseases which feature some of these pathological changes and may masquerade as idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Some of the pathological mimics are iatrogenic while other common diseases, such as bacterial infection, ischaemia, and diverticulosis may produce confusing histological appearances. The picture is complicated by the fact that many of these pathological imitators may themselves cause or predispose to chronic inflammatory bowel disease, or may complicate chronic inflammatory bowel disease. For example, drugs and infectious agents are recognisable causes of relapse in ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease may cause diverticulitis in patients with diverticulosis; and lymphoma may complicate ulcerative colitis. It behooves all practising histopathologists to recognise these mimics of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease to ensure appropriate management for patients with inflammatory pathology of the intestines. Images PMID:1918397

Shepherd, N A

1991-01-01

110

Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal failure. Patients with chronic kidney disease have significant CVD, and carry a high cardiovascular burden by the time they commence renal replacement therapy (RRT). The severity of CVD that has been observed in dialysis patients lead to a growing body of research examining the pathogenesis

Majd I. Jaradat; Bruce A. Molitoris

2002-01-01

111

Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease do not progress to end stage renal failure, but do have a significantly higher incidence of all cardiovascular co-morbidities. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors only partially account for this increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. In patients with kidney disease the basic biology underlying cardiovascular disease may be similar to that in patients without kidney disease, but it would seem many more risk factors are involved as a consequence of renal dysfunction. Although emphasis is placed on delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease, it must be appreciated that for many patients it is vital to address their cardiovascular risk factors at an early stage to prevent premature cardiovascular death. This review examines available epidemiological evidence, discusses common cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic kidney disease, and suggests possible treatment strategies. Potential areas for important research are also described. PMID:19756163

Wright, Julian; Hutchison, Alastair

2009-01-01

112

[Treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].  

PubMed

The same drugs are used to treat hemorrhagic rectocolitis (HRC) and Crohn's disease (CD), although the aims are very different. Aminosalicylates are highly beneficial in HRC but virtually ineffective in CD, a disease in which immunosuppressants are more useful. Aminosalicylates exert their antiinflammatory effect directly on the lesions. Various oral and rectal preparations have been developed in order to deliver the active molecule to the intestinal target segment. These drugs are now known to act by stimulating the nuclear receptor PPAR-gamma, and this knowledge should help with the development of new agents. Chronic aminosalicylate treatment appears to diminish the risk of malignant transformation. Systemic steroids are still the mainstay of treatment for exacerbations of HRC and CD, yielding remissions in 60 to 90% of cases. In contrast, systemic steroids should not be used for maintenance therapy. Budesonide is a preparation that selectively releases steroids in the ileocolonic region, thereby reducing systemic adverse effects. Immunosuppressants such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine, and also methotrexate in some cases, are used for maintenance therapy of steroid-dependent and highly recurrent forms. These drugs stabilize the disease in about half the patients who receive them. Treatment typically lasts several years and necessitates regular monitoring, especially of hematological status. Cyclosporine is used intravenously in severe HRC. Infliximab (RemicadeR), a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting TNF is effective in acute forms and as maintenance therapy for CD. It was also recently shown to be effective in HRC. Infliximab is indicated in steroid-resistant forms and contraindicated in patients with latent systemic infections (tuberculosis, hepatitis B) and heart failure. Artificial nutrition is now only used in children with acute forms, in order to avoid the need for steroids. Probiotics might have a place in maintenance treatment of HRC. Surgical treatment of HRC consists of colectomy or, more radically, ileoprotectomy followed by ileoanal anastomosis with resection: however, the likely benefits and potential complications (especially nocturnal diarrhea) must be carefully weighed up. Surgical treatment of CD consists of resecting the worst-affected segments. As available medical and surgical treatments can only control these diseases, without curing them, patient management must be planned on a long-term basis. Control of exacerbations is judged on the basis of clinical parameters and biological markers of inflammation, rather than on lesion healing. The choice of maintenance therapy depends on the nature of the disease (HRC or CD) and its progressive nature. Surgery is reserved for patients with complicated and drug-resistant forms. PMID:18402168

Lémann, Marc

2007-06-01

113

Factors affecting the prevalence of chronic diseases in Palestinian people: an analysis of data from the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics.  

PubMed

This study determined whether there are significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer among Palestinians with respect to different demographic variables using secondary data from the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics. Living in the Gaza Strip was a protective factor, with this group being 21% less likely to have diabetes, 35% less likely to have hypertension, and 48% less likely to have CVD than those living in the West Bank. No significant difference was found for cancer. Being a refugee was a significant risk factor for diabetes and CVD while being married/engaged or divorced/ separated/widowed was a risk factor for diabetes and hypertension. Gender was a risk factor for hypertension with females being 60% more likely to have hypertension than males. Living in a rural setting was protective against hypertension. As expected, age was a risk factor for diabetes, hypertension and CVD; the magnitude of this increased risk was alarming, 36 to 434 times greater in those aged 40-65 years compared with those aged 0-19 years. PMID:23882954

Abukhdeir, H F; Caplan, L S; Reese, L; Alema-Mensah, E

2013-04-01

114

Factors affecting the prevalence of chronic diseases in Palestinian people: an analysis of data from the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics  

PubMed Central

This study determined whether there are significant differences in the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer among Palestinians with respect to different demographic variables using secondary data from the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics. Living in the Gaza Strip was a protective factor, with this group being 21% less likely to have diabetes, 35% less likely to have hypertension, and 48% less likely to have CVD than those living in the West Bank. No significant difference was found for cancer. Being a refugee was a significant risk factor for diabetes and CVD while being married/engaged or divorced/separated/widowed was a risk factor for diabetes and hypertension. Gender was a risk factor for hypertension with females being 60% more likely to have hypertension than males. Living in a rural setting was protective against hypertension. As expected, age was a risk factor for diabetes, hypertension and CVD; the magnitude of this increased risk was alarming, 36 to 434 times greater in those aged 40–65 years compared with those aged 0–19 years. PMID:23882954

Abukhdeir, H.F.; Caplan, L.S.; Reese, L.; Alema-Mensah, E.

2014-01-01

115

An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), especially coronary artery disease (CAD), remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients. PMID:24734178

Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

2014-01-01

116

Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease.  

PubMed

Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis, but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection. The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known, but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases. Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease. Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required. PMID:25544877

Iruzubieta, Paula; Terán, Álvaro; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

2014-12-27

117

Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease  

PubMed Central

Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis, but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection. The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known, but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases. Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease. Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required. PMID:25544877

Iruzubieta, Paula; Terán, Álvaro; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

2014-01-01

118

Social inequality in chronic disease outcomes.  

PubMed

Socioeconomic differences in morbidity and mortality, particularly across educational groups, are widening. Differential exposures to behavioural risk factors have been shown to play an important mediating role on the social inequality in chronic diseases such as heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. However, much less attention has been given to the potential role of interaction, where the same level of exposure to a behavioural risk factor has different effect across socioeconomic groups, creating subgroups that are more vulnerable than others. In this thesis, Paper 1 describes the unique cohort consortium which was established by pooling and harmonising prospective data from existing cohort studies in Denmark. This consortium generated a large study population with long follow-up sufficient to study power demanding questions of mechanisms underlying social inequalities in chronic disease outcomes. In Paper 2 on incidence of coronary heart disease, smoking and body mass index partially mediated the observed educational differences. This result suggested that some of the social inequality in coronary heart disease may be enhanced by differential exposure to behavioural risk factors (i.e. smoking and obesity). In Paper 3 on incidence of stroke, an observed interaction between education and smoking indicated that participants, particularly men, with low level of education may be more vulnerable to the effect of smoking than those with high level of education in terms of ischemic stroke. Finally, Paper 4 revealed that behavioural risk factors, primarily smoking, explained a considerable part of the educational differences in cause-specific mortality. Further, this paper added important knowledge about the considerable part of the mediated effect, which could be due to interaction between education and smoking. In conclusion, the research in this thesis is a practical implementation of contemporary statistical methodology, the additive hazards models, in which the potential role of behavioural risk factors can be regarded not only as mediation but also as interaction with the effect of socioeconomic position on chronic disease outcomes. The results support that two central mechanisms, differential exposure and differential vulnerability to behavioural risk factors, particularly smoking; have contributed substantially to the social inequality in chronic disease outcomes in Denmark. These mechanism are not mutually exclusive and should be regarded simultaneously. However, the findings could be non-causal associations due to, for instance, psychosocial or environmental factors. Nevertheless, research on social inequality in chronic disease outcomes should regard not only that the smoking prevalence is higher in lower socioeconomic groups (differential exposure), but also that health consequences of being a smoker seem to be worse in these subgroups (differential vulnerability). PMID:25370965

Nordahl, Helene

2014-11-01

119

X-linked Inheritance in Females with Chronic Granulomatous Disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic granulomatous disease in males is familial and its transmission is is usually clearly x-linked. The mode of inheritance in females with the syndrome is unknown and the carrier state difficult to identify. Defective polymorphonuclear leukocyte bactericidal activity in this disease is associated with an absence of the respiratory burst generated in stimulated phagocytes and may be detected by the chemiluminescence assay. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from three of four females with chronic granulomatous disease had extremely low chemiluminescence production, their asymptomatic mothers had intermediate values, and their fathers were normal. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils of two affected males in these kinships generated no chemiluminescence, whereas two of seven female relatives had intermediate values, and all nonaffected males had normal values. In the three families in which leukocytes were studied by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, two populations of neutrophils were demonstrated for the female patients and/or their mothers. The wide phenotypic variability for clinical disease, evidence of two leukocyte populations in the patients or their mothers, and low but detectable leukocyte chemiluminescence in the affected females is consistent with the Lyon hypothesis of x-chromosome inactivation in these families. The findings suggest an x-linked inheritance in these females with chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:7400319

Mills, Elaine L.; Rholl, Kenneth S.; Quie, Paul G.

1980-01-01

120

Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction with their clinical experience to optimally manage patients with anemia. PMID:17245602

Koshy, Susan M.

2007-01-01

121

Preventive Care in Chronic Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To identify preventive care measures that are appropriate for and specific to patients with chronic liver disease and to provide recommendations and information that can be shared with patients. MEASUREMENTS A review of the literature was undertaken using medlinefrom 1970 to present. Priority was given to randomized controlled studies, but case reports, case-control studies, and reviews were included. MAIN RESULTS Evidence for the avoidance of alcohol and other toxic substances, immunizations, and dietary modifications for chronic liver disease is summarized. In addition, measures that are effective in the mitigation of the complications of cirrhosis are reviewed. CONCLUSIONS Preventive care can play an important role in patients with chronic liver diseases. Based on the existing data, the preventive strategies of alcohol avoidance, hepatitis vaccination, avoidance of NSAIDs nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, iron supplementation when appropriate, and a low-fat diet are prudent in patients with chronic liver disease. Once cirrhosis develops, screening for hepatocellular cancer with ?-fetoprotein testing and ultrasound, and screening for varices by endoscopy are justified. PMID:10571719

Riley, Thomas R; Smith, Jill P

1999-01-01

122

Chronic granulomatous disease, a heterogeneous syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a clinical syndrome, the unifying characteristics of which are a severe predisposition to bacterial and fungal infections, an impaired ability of phagocytic leukocytes to kill certain microorganisms and the failure of these cells to produce microbicidal oxygen metabolites. In CGD the causal biochemical defect and the mechanism of genetic transmission vary from family to family.

W. H. Hitzig; R. A. Seger

1983-01-01

123

Cigarette smoking and chronic kidney diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observational studies have suggested that different chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) have differing relationships to smoking, but no randomized controlled trial has been conducted to examine this topic. In this article, we review available evidence concerning the relationship between smoking and each type of CKD in the general population as well as in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), primary

Yasuyuki Nagasawa; Ryohei Yamamoto; Hiromi Rakugi; Yoshitaka Isaka

2012-01-01

124

INTRODUCTION Chronic kidney disease impairs glomerular filtration  

E-print Network

INTRODUCTION Chronic kidney disease impairs glomerular filtration rate (GFR) which is detected as elevated serum levels of kidney biomarkers such as creatinine and cystatin C. Prior studies have related poor kidney function to cognitive decline and generalized brain atrophy. However, so far, there have

Thompson, Paul

125

Geroscience: linking aging to chronic disease.  

PubMed

Mammalian aging can be delayed with genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic approaches. Given that the elderly population is dramatically increasing and that aging is the greatest risk factor for a majority of chronic diseases driving both morbidity and mortality, it is critical to expand geroscience research directed at extending human healthspan. PMID:25417146

Kennedy, Brian K; Berger, Shelley L; Brunet, Anne; Campisi, Judith; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Epel, Elissa S; Franceschi, Claudio; Lithgow, Gordon J; Morimoto, Richard I; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Rando, Thomas A; Richardson, Arlan; Schadt, Eric E; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Sierra, Felipe

2014-11-01

126

Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases  

PubMed Central

Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-? (tumor necrosis factor-?), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-?-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

2014-01-01

127

MicroRNAs: New Insights into Chronic Childhood Diseases  

PubMed Central

Chronic diseases are the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and have shown increasing incidence rates among children in the last decades. Chronic illnesses in the pediatric population, even if well managed, affect social, psychological, and physical development and often limit education and active participation and increase the risk for health complications. The significant pediatric morbidity and mortality rates caused by chronic illnesses call for serious efforts toward better understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders. Recent studies have shown the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in various aspects of major pediatric chronic non-neoplastic diseases. This review focuses on the role of miRNAs in four major pediatric chronic diseases including bronchial asthma, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and cystic fibrosis. We intend to emphasize the importance of miRNA-based research in combating these major disorders, as we believe this approach will result in novel therapies to aid securing normal development and to prevent disabilities in the pediatric population. PMID:23878802

Omran, Ahmed; Elimam, Dalia; Yin, Fei

2013-01-01

128

Does chronic disease self-management have a role in preventing chronic disease in rural Australia?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic disease accounts for nearly 43% of the total disease burden in Australia and is growing. The situation is much worse for Indigenous Australians. To make any impact on decreasing this burden, efforts need to be focused on the risk factors which cause these diseases: 30% of Australians aged 25 years and over have high blood pressure, 50% have high

Kate Warren; Spencer Gulf; Debra Misan; Gary Misan

129

Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems. PMID:21403882

Tesauro, Manfredi; Canale, Maria Paola; Rodia, Giuseppe; Di Daniele, Nicola; Lauro, Davide; Scuteri, Angelo; Cardillo, Carmine

2011-01-01

130

Affective cycling in thyroid disease  

SciTech Connect

Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

Tapp, A.

1988-05-01

131

[Pathomechanisms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide, and its morbidity and mortality are still increasing. Thus, it is expected that, globally, COPD will be the third most common cause of death by 2020. Moreover, COPD leads to enormous health-economic costs (i. e., outpatient and inpatient treatment, inability to work). Nevertheless, the prevalence of COPD is underestimated also in Germany. This is partly because often, the disease is symptomatic only in its advanced stages and as a result it is not diagnosed until late. In addition, the therapeutic effects on the long-term course and the progression of the disease are limited. Therefore, a much deeper understanding of the manifold and complex pathomechanisms of this pathomorphologically varied disease is needed before new therapeutic strategies can be developed. The aim of this review is to discuss current concepts of the pathophysiology of COPD and their scientific bases. The authors will concentrate mainly on a differentiated description of the pathomechanisms which cause chronic obstructive bronchiolitis and obstructive pulmonary emphysema. PMID:17171318

Glaab, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Jörres, Rudolf A; Krug, Norbert; Welte, Tobias

2006-12-15

132

Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

The mechanisms involved in the genesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are poorly defined. This area is complicated and difficult to model because COPD consists of four separate anatomic lesions (emphysema, small airway remodeling, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic bronchitis) and a functional lesion, acute exacerbation; moreover, the disease in humans develops over decades. This review discusses the various animal models that have been used to attempt to recreate human COPD and the advantages and disadvantages of each. None of the models reproduces the exact changes seen in humans, but cigarette smoke-induced disease appears to come the closest, and genetically modified animals also, in some instances, shed light on processes that appear to play a role. PMID:18456796

Wright, Joanne L.; Cosio, Manuel; Churg, Andrew

2008-01-01

133

Food Insecurity and Chronic Disease123  

PubMed Central

Household food insecurity has been previously hypothesized to promote dependence on inexpensive, highly palatable foods that are energy dense. Such dependence, and the cyclical nature of having enough food in the beginning of the month followed by food scarcity at the end of the month, could lead to weight gain over a short period of time. Such dependence on energy-dense foods and weight gain may play a direct role in the development of chronic conditions. Other compounding factors that result from exposure to household food insecurity have been well described, including pathways by which stress promotes visceral fat accumulation and chronic disease. This symposium review paper summarizes the literature on the link between food insecurity and the following: 1) diet, 2) weight gain, and 3) chronic disease, especially among women. This paper also proposes a framework for considering how the lived experience of household food insecurity may potentiate the development of chronic disease by activating the stress response among individuals at critical developmental periods in a food-impoverished environment. PMID:23493536

Laraia, Barbara A.

2013-01-01

134

FastStats: Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis  

MedlinePLUS

... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Share Compartir Data are for ... Hospital inpatient care Number of discharges with chronic liver disease and cirrhosis as the first-listed diagnosis: ...

135

Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

2012-01-01

136

Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey  

PubMed Central

Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90?mm?Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

2013-01-01

137

Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease: Where Does Europe Go?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review discusses various screening approaches for chronic kidney disease that are used in Europe. The criterion for defining chronic kidney disease in the various programs differs but is frequently limited to estimated glomerular filtration rate, thus offering only data on chronic kidney disease stages 3 and higher; however, screening should not be limited to measuring only estimated glomerular filtration

Paul E. de Jong; Marije van der Velde; Ron T. Gansevoort; Carmine Zoccali

138

Chronic wasting disease in Canada: Part 1  

PubMed Central

Abstract The purpose of part 1 is to provide an overview of published literature (1980–2002) on chronic wasting disease (CWD) to inform Canadian readers about the disease and to explain Canadian regulatory approaches to the surveillance and control of CWD. Much of the scientific information is drawn from American publications obtained from internet searches in PubMed and Medline databases. The following keywords were used: chronic wasting disease, prion, diagnosis, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, CWD and deer, CWD and elk, and CWD and environment. The article also presents information from Canadian publications and unpublished observations, Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) documents, and both government and nongovernment internet Web sites. The article highlights some different features of CWD in Canada, as compared with the situation in the United States, and mentions public health implications of the disease. It also describes the basis for development of Canada’s surveillance and control program. Part 2 will detail the activities and results of the surveillance and control program during 2000 to 2002 and discuss factors that will influence the feasibility of eradicating CWD. Chronic wasting disease appears to have been introduced into Canada through the importation of infected farmed elk from the United States in the late 1980s and early 1990s, at a time when little was known about the disease. Since then, eradication efforts in Canada have led to the control of the spread of CWD in the farmed elk industry. Still, management of this disease, especially in free-ranging cervids, is a challenge. PMID:15206588

2004-01-01

139

[Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].  

PubMed

Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

2014-09-01

140

Optimizing Chronic Disease Management Mega-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background As Ontario’s population ages, chronic diseases are becoming increasingly common. There is growing interest in services and care models designed to optimize the management of chronic disease. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and expected budget impact of interventions in chronic disease cohorts evaluated as part of the Optimizing Chronic Disease Management mega-analysis. Data Sources Sector-specific costs, disease incidence, and mortality were calculated for each condition using administrative databases from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Intervention outcomes were based on literature identified in the evidence-based analyses. Quality-of-life and disease prevalence data were obtained from the literature. Methods Analyses were restricted to interventions that showed significant benefit for resource use or mortality from the evidence-based analyses. An Ontario cohort of patients with each chronic disease was constructed and followed over 5 years (2006–2011). A phase-based approach was used to estimate costs across all sectors of the health care system. Utility values identified in the literature and effect estimates for resource use and mortality obtained from the evidence-based analyses were applied to calculate incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Given uncertainty about how many patients would benefit from each intervention, a system-wide budget impact was not determined. Instead, the difference in lifetime cost between an individual-administered intervention and no intervention was presented. Results Of 70 potential cost-effectiveness analyses, 8 met our inclusion criteria. All were found to result in QALY gains and cost savings compared with usual care. The models were robust to the majority of sensitivity analyses undertaken, but due to structural limitations and time constraints, few sensitivity analyses were conducted. Incremental cost savings per patient who received intervention ranged between $15 per diabetic patient with specialized nursing to $10,665 per patient wth congestive heart failure receiving in-home care. Limitations Evidence used to inform estimates of effect was often limited to a single trial with limited generalizability across populations, interventions, and health care systems. Because of the low clinical fidelity of health administrative data sets, intermediate clinical outcomes could not be included. Cohort costs included an average of all health care costs and were not restricted to costs associated with the disease. Intervention costs were based on resource use specified in clinical trials. Conclusions Applying estimates of effect from the evidence-based analyses to real-world resource use resulted in cost savings for all interventions. On the basis of quality-of-life data identified in the literature, all interventions were found to result in a greater QALY gain than usual care would. Implementation of all interventions could offer significant cost reductions. However, this analysis was subject to important limitations. Plain Language Summary Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in Ontario. They account for a third of direct health care costs across the province. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of health care interventions that might improve the management of chronic diseases. The evaluated interventions led to lower costs and better quality of life than usual care. Offering these options could reduce costs per patient. However, the studies used in this analysis were of medium to very low quality, and the methods had many limitations. PMID:24228076

PATH-THETA Collaboration

2013-01-01

141

Terminology in chronic obstructive lung diseases.  

PubMed Central

Until the 1960's there was great confusion, both within and between countries, on the meaning of diagnostic terms such as emphysema, asthma, and chronic brochitis. Proposals made by a group of British doctors in 1959 gradually received widespread acceptance but in recent years some new problems have developed. These include difficulties in the definition of airflow obstruction, recognition that what used to be regarded as a single disease, chronic bronchitis, comprises at least two distinct pathological processes, and uncertainty about the degree of variability which distinguishes asthmatic from more persistent forms of airflow obstruction. These are all problems which could be solved by continuance of appropriate research and of riqorous attention to the principles which determine accurate and acceptable definitions of disease. PMID:744819

Fletcher, C H

1978-01-01

142

Endocrinological disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: In this overview, the available literature on endocrinological disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is reviewed, with stress on growth hormone\\/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), thyroid hormone and the anabolic steroids. In COPD, little is known about circulating growth hormone or IGF-I concentrations. Some authors find a decrease in growth hormone or IGF-I, others an increase. An increase

E. C. Creutzberg; R. Casaburi

2003-01-01

143

Unreferred chronic kidney disease: a longitudinal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem. A better understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of the different stages of CKD and the associated adverse outcomes is needed to establish and implement appropriate management strategies. Methods: A serum creatinine (SCr) level of 2.03 mg\\/dL or greater (?180 ?mol\\/L) in men and 1.53 mg\\/dL or greater (?135 ?mol\\/L) in

Robert John; Michelle Webb; Alan Young; Paul E Stevens

2004-01-01

144

The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that COPD aggregates in families, suggesting a genetic predisposition to airflow obstruction. Many candidate genes have been assessed, but the data are often conflicting. We review the genetic factors that predispose smokers to COPD and highlight the future role of genomic scans in identifying novel susceptibility genes. PMID:11686861

Lomas, David A; Silverman, Edwin K

2001-01-01

145

Chronic kidney disease: fluid in chronic kidney disease-how much is too much?  

PubMed

A new study provides cogent evidence that fluid overload—measured using bioimpedance spectroscopy—promotes progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A prospective randomized trial is warranted to assess the effect of interventions to reduce fluid overload on disease progression in patients with CKD. PMID:24042464

Hebert, Lee A; Parikh, Samir

2013-11-01

146

[Clinical phenotypes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous disease, that is defined by the degree of obstruction rendered by the forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEVj). This is a good parameter to define the severity of the disease but does not account for its heterogeneity and does not provide a good comprehension of its different clinical behaviors and responses to treatment. Therefore, the classification of these patients in different clinical phenotypes has been attempted, trying to search for common clinical behaviors and responses to treatment. These phenoptypes must be validated in longitudinal studies. Some of the phenotypes detected are COPD with chronic respiratory failure and responsive to home oxygen therapy, COPD with upper lobe emphysema and responsive to volume reduction surgery, COPD with frequent exacerbation behavior, COPD resembling bronchitis and responsive to Roflumilast and possibly, COPD with systemic involvement. Historically, the phenotypes pink puffer, blue bloater, chronic bronchitis were defined. In the next years, we will know if the definitions of these phenotypes will aid in the management of patients with COPD. PMID:23282708

Silva, Rafael O

2012-07-01

147

Chronic Coronary Artery Disease: Diagnosis and Management  

PubMed Central

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the single most common cause of death in the developed world, responsible for about 1 in every 5 deaths. The morbidity, mortality, and socioeconomic importance of this disease make timely accurate diagnosis and cost-effective management of CAD of the utmost importance. This comprehensive review of the literature highlights key elements in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and management strategies of patients with chronic CAD. Relevant articles were identified by searching the PubMed database for the following terms: chronic coronary artery disease or stable angina. Novel imaging modalities, pharmacological treatment, and invasive (percutaneous and surgical) interventions have revolutionized the current treatment of patients with chronic CAD. Medical treatment remains the cornerstone of management, but revascularization continues to play an important role. In the current economic climate and with health care reform very much on the horizon, the issue of appropriate use of revascularization is important, and the indications for revascularization, in addition to the relative benefits and risks of a percutaneous vs a surgical approach, are discussed. PMID:19955250

Cassar, Andrew; Holmes, David R.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Gersh, Bernard J.

2009-01-01

148

Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) – Differences and Similarities  

PubMed Central

Bronchial asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are obstructive pulmonary diseases that affected millions of people all over the world. Asthma is a serious global health problem with an estimated 300 million affected individuals. COPD is one of the major causes of chronic morbidity and mortality and one of the major public health problems worldwide. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the world and further increases in its prevalence and mortality can be predicted. Although asthma and COPD have many similarities, they also have many differences. They are two different diseases with differences in etiology, symptoms, type of airway inflammation, inflammatory cells, mediators, consequences of inflammation, response to therapy, course. Some similarities in airway inflammation in severe asthma and COPD and good response to combined therapy in both of these diseases suggest that they have some similar patophysiologic characteristics. The aim of this article is to show similarities and differences between these two diseases. Today asthma and COPD are not fully curable, not identified enough and not treated enough and the therapy is still developing. But in future better understanding of pathology, adequate identifying and treatment, may be and new drugs, will provide a much better quality of life, reduced morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:23678316

Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Dragisic, Dejan; Ustamujic, Aida

2012-01-01

149

Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management  

SciTech Connect

Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

Rossman, M.D. [Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-10-01

150

Chronic Granulomatous Disease as a Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by recurrent infections and granuloma formation. In addition, we have observed a number of diverse autoimmune conditions in our CGD population, suggesting that patients with CGD are at an elevated risk for development of autoimmune (AI) disorders. In this report, we describe antiphospholipid syndrome (aPL), recurrent pericardial effusion, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), IgA nephropathy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune pulmonary disease in the setting of CGD. The presence and type of autoimmune disease has important treatment implications for patients with CGD. PMID:18823651

De Ravin, Suk See; Naumann, Nora; Cowen, Edward W.; Friend, Julia; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; Balow, James E.; Barron, Karyl S.; Turner, Maria L.; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Harry L.

2009-01-01

151

Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory airway disease whose incidence and mortality increases every year. It is associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lung to toxic particles or gases (usually cigarette smoke). A central role in the pathophysiology has been shown to play a chronic inflammation of the airways that is expressed primarily by hypersecretion of mucus, stenosis of the smaller airways and the establishment of pulmonary emphysema. There is an increasing trend for assessing the inflammatory pattern of inflammatory airway diseases through mediators measured by noninvasive techniques. Markers in biological fluids and exhaled air have been the subject of intense evaluation over the past few years, with some of them reaching their introduction into clinical practice, while others remain as research tools. Of particular interest for the scientific community is the discovery of clinically exploitable biomarkers associated with specific phenotypes of the disease. Studying the effects of therapeutic interventions in these biomarkers may lead to targeted therapy based on phenotype and this is perhaps the future of therapeutics in COPD. PMID:24672691

Angelis, Nikolaos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Arikas, Stamatis; Tsiouda, Theodora; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Michael; Kessisis, George; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

2014-01-01

152

Chronic Sorrow in Caregiving Spouses of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article focuses on the concept of chronic sorrow in a sample of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregiving spouses. A study was designed to determine the long-term grief or chronic sorrow that develops in caregiving spouses and to increase knowledge of the nature of chronic sorrow. Utilizing the Burke Nursing Consortium for Research on Chronic Sorrow questionnaire

Mira Mayer

2001-01-01

153

Progress and promise in the management of chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

1 for the management of chronic kidney disease provide clear guidance for the co- operative care of patients with chronic kidney disease by all health care providers throughout the spectrum of disease. There are specific stages and recommendations for interven- tions to slow disease progression, prevent complications, and reduce morbidity and mortality. This is a major para- digm shift on

Garabed Eknoyan

2008-01-01

154

Chronic kidney disease: considerations for nutrition interventions.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent and has major health consequences for patients. Caring for patients with CKD requires knowledge of the food supply, renal pathophysiology, and nutrition-related medications used to work synergistically with diet to control the signs and symptoms of the disease. The nutrition care process and International Dietetic and Nutrition Terminology allow for systematic, holistic, quality care of patients with this complex, progressive disease. Nutrition interventions must be designed with the individual patients needs in mind while prioritizing factors with the largest negative impact on health outcomes and mortality risk. New areas of nutrition treatment are emerging that involve a greater focus on micronutrient needs, the microbiome, and vegetarian-style diets. These interventions may improve outcomes by decreasing inflammation, improving energy and protein delivery, and lowering phosphorus, electrolytes, and fluid retention. PMID:24637245

Steiber, Alison L

2014-05-01

155

Aortic valve calcification in chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Several clinical studies reported an increased prevalence and accelerated progression of aortic valve calcification among patients with end-stage renal disease when compared with subjects with normal kidney function. Recently, mechanisms of calcific valve degeneration have been further elucidated and many of the pathways involved could be amplified in patients with decreased renal function. In particular, calcium-phosphate balance, MGP metabolism, OPG/RANK/RANKL triad, fetuin-A mineral complexes and FGF-23/Klotho axis have been shown to be impaired among patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and could play a role during vascular/valve calcification. The scope of the present review is to summarize the clinical data and the pathophysiological mechanisms potentially involved in the link between renal function decline and the progression of aortic valve disease. PMID:24097800

Rattazzi, Marcello; Bertacco, Elisa; Del Vecchio, Antonio; Puato, Massimo; Faggin, Elisabetta; Pauletto, Paolo

2013-12-01

156

The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program  

PubMed Central

The Indiana Chronic Disease Management Program (ICDMP) is intended to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of care for Medicaid members with congestive heart failure (chronic heart failure), diabetes, asthma, and other conditions. The ICDMP is being assembled by Indiana Medicaid primarily from state and local resources and has seven components: (1) identification of eligible participants to create regional registries, (2) risk stratification of eligible participants, (3) nurse care management for high-risk participants, (4) telephonic intervention for all participants, (5) an Internet-based information system, (6) quality improvement collaboratives for primary care practices, and (7) program evaluation. The evaluation involves a randomized controlled trial in two inner-city group practices, as well as a statewide observational design. This article describes the ICDMP, highlights challenges, and discusses approaches to its evaluation. PMID:16529571

Rosenman, Marc B; Holmes, Ann M; Ackermann, Ronald T; Murray, Michael D; Doebbeling, Caroline Carney; Katz, Barry; Li, Jingjin; Zillich, Alan; Prescott, Victoria M; Downs, Stephen M; Inui, Thomas S

2006-01-01

157

The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Context: It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. Conclusions: The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25093157

Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T.

2014-01-01

158

Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

2014-01-01

159

Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population. PMID:24212088

McCabe, Kristin M.; Adams, Michael A.; Holden, Rachel M.

2013-01-01

160

Phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

The current clinical classification of smoking-related lung disease fails to take into account the heterogeneity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). With an increased understanding of pathophysiologic variation, COPD now clearly represents a spectrum of overlapping diseases with important extrapulmonary consequences. A "phenotype" describes the outward physical manifestations of a particular disease, and compromises anything that is part of the observable structure, function or behavior of an individual. Such phenotypic distinctions in COPD include: frequent exacerbator, pulmonary cachectic, rapid decliner, airways hyperresponsiveness, impaired exercise tolerance, and emphysema versus airways disease. These variable manifestations, each with unique prognostic, clinical and physiologic ramifications, represent distinct phenotypes within COPD. While all of these phenotypes have smoking as a common risk factor, the other risk factors that determine these phenotypes remain poorly understood. An individual smoker has variable expression of each phenotype and there is mounting evidence that COPD phenotypes have different clinical outcomes. These phenotypes can be broadly classified into one of three groups: clinical, physiologic and radiographic. This review presents the evidence for the spectrum of COPD phenotypes with a focused discussion on the pathophysiologic, epidemiologic and clinical significance of each subtype. PMID:18027163

Friedlander, Adam L; Lynch, David; Dyar, Liesel A; Bowler, Russell P

2007-12-01

161

Antioxidant enzymatic systems in human erythrocytes from subjects with chronic cerebrovascular disease.  

PubMed

In the present study we have assayed antioxidant enzymatic systems in erythrocytes from subjects with chronic cerebrovascular disease to correlate their involvement in red cell deformability. A significant decrease of glutathione peroxidase, reductase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities has been found in human red blood cells from patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease when compared to the control group. The decrease in antioxidant enzymatic systems found in these patients was accompanied by reduced cellular resistance to hydrogen peroxide. An altered balance between the partially reduced forms of oxygen metabolism and the antioxidant enzymatic systems could play a crucial role in the haemorheological alteration frequently occurring in subjects affected by chronic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:2367278

Vanella, A; Scalia, R; Terminella, C; Gambera, G; Castorina, C; Sorrenti, V; Campisi, A; Bianchi, A

1990-01-01

162

Oral transmission of chronic wasting disease in captive Shira's moose.  

PubMed

Three captive Shira's moose (Alces alces shirasi) were orally inoculated with a single dose (5 g) of whole-brain homogenate prepared from chronic wasting disease (CWD)-affected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). All moose died of causes thought to be other than CWD. Histologic examination of one female moose dying 465 days postinoculation revealed spongiform change in the neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Immunohistochemistry staining for the proteinase-resistant isoform of the prion protein was observed in multiple lymphoid and nervous tissues. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays provided additional confirmation of CWD. These results represent the first report of experimental CWD in moose. PMID:17092895

Kreeger, Terry J; Montgomery, D L; Jewell, Jean E; Schultz, Will; Williams, Elizabeth S

2006-07-01

163

Management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common condition. There are an estimated 3 million cases in the UK. Of these, 2 million have not got a formal diagnosis. Community nurses meet patients with COPD frequently, although COPD may not be the primary reason for the encounter, or the COPD may be present but undiagnosed. The number of patients with COPD is believed to be increasing and, with increased awareness of the condition and an emphasis on improving diagnosis, the number of cases is expected to rise. Community nurses are well placed to raise concerns that a patient in their care may have undiagnosed COPD; if the condition is subsequently diagnosed and appropriate treatment is given, outcomes will improve for that individual. Community nurses can also support patients and their families to manage the condition through all stages of the disease trajectory, from diagnosis to the end-of-life phase. PMID:25651279

Grindrod, Karen

2015-02-01

164

Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research  

PubMed Central

Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

Merchant, Michael L.

2010-01-01

165

Chronic Kidney Disease Management: Comparison between Renal Transplant Recipients and Nontransplant Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aim: Renal transplant recipients (RTR) and patients with native chronic kidney disease (CKD) have similar complications. It is not known how the management of CKD in RTR differs from that of patients with native CKD. This study compares the management of complications related to CKD between RTR and patients with native CKD. Methods: Cross-sectional study of all RTR with stage

Ayub Akbari; Naser Hussain; Jolanta Karpinski; Greg A. Knoll

2007-01-01

166

RAAS-mediated Redox effects in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) is central to the pathogenesis of hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney disease. Emerging evidence support various pathways through which a local renal RAAS can affect kidney function, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. A prominent mechanism appears to be loss of redox homeostasis and formation of excessive free radicals. Free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary in normal physiologic processes including development of nephrons, erythropoeisis and tubular sodium transport. However, loss of redox homeostasis contributes to pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic pathways in the kidney that in turn lead to reduced vascular compliance, podocyte pathology and proteinuria. Both blockade of the RAAS and oxidative stress produces salutary effects on hypertension and glomerular filtration barrier injury. Thus, the focus of current research is on understanding the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease in the context of an elevated RAAS and unbalanced redox mechanisms. PMID:19218092

Nistala, Ravi; Wei, Yongzhong; Sowers, James R; Whaley-Connell, Adam

2009-01-01

167

Blood vitamin levels in dogs with chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may affect excretion and metabolism of vitamins but data for dogs are limited. In this study, blood vitamin levels were investigated in 19 dogs with chronic renal failure. High performance liquid chromatography was used to quantify retinol, retinyl esters, tocopherol, thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, ascorbic acid and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentrations, whereas cobalamin, folate, biotin and pantothenic acid were measured by microbiological methods. Levels of retinol, retinyl palmitate, ascorbic acid, and vitamins B1, B2 and B6 were increased compared to healthy dogs. Dogs with CKD showed decreased concentrations of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol and folate. Alpha-tocopherol, biotin, pantothenate and cobalamin levels were not significantly different between controls and dogs with CKD. Whether lower vitamin D and folate concentrations in dogs with CKD justify supplementation has to be evaluated in future studies. PMID:21767966

Galler, A; Tran, J L; Krammer-Lukas, S; Höller, U; Thalhammer, J G; Zentek, J; Willmann, M

2012-05-01

168

Management of osteoporosis in patients with chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Osteoporosis and chronic kidney disease are common in old age and often occur together. Both diseases lead to increased bone fragility and fractures but with different pathophysiological backgrounds. This article reviews the challenges in diagnosis, evaluation and management of osteoporosis in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:24521803

Gupta, Abhaya

2014-02-01

169

Antiproteinuric effect of oral paricalcitol in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antiproteinuric effect of oral paricalcitol in chronic kidney disease.BackgroundProteinuria is a marker of cardiovascular and renal disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and reduction in proteinuria has been associated with improved cardiovascular and renal outcomes. While active vitamin D and its analogs have been shown to have renal protective effects in animals, these hormones have not been shown

RAJIV AGARWAL; MURALIDHAR ACHARYA; JIN TIAN; Richard L. Hippensteel; Joel Z. Melnick; PING QIU; LAURA WILLIAMS; DANIEL BATLLE

2005-01-01

170

Vitamin D levels and patient outcome in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to cardiovascular disease and early mortality in patients on hemodialysis; however, it is not known if the same association exists at earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. To determine this we enrolled 168 consecutive new referrals to a chronic kidney disease clinic over a 2 year period and followed them for up to 6

Pietro Ravani; Fabio Malberti; Giovanni Tripepi; Paola Pecchini; Sebastiano Cutrupi; Patrizia Pizzini; Francesca Mallamaci; Carmine Zoccali

2009-01-01

171

Application of Direct Renin Inhibition to Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Chronic kidney disease has serious implications with a high risk for progressive loss of renal function, increased cardiovascular\\u000a events as well as a substantial financial burden. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is activated in chronic\\u000a kidney disease, especially in diabetes and hypertension, which are the leading causes of chronic kidney disease. Angiotensin\\u000a converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs)

Christian W. Mende

2010-01-01

172

Vaccination against hepatitis b in patients with chronic liver disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of chronic liver disease is increasing, while at the same time, many at-risk populations are witnessing a resurgence\\u000a of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Thus, more patients are likely to have multiple causes of liver disease, as risk factors\\u000a often overlap. Such patients may develop either acute viral hepatitis superimposed on pre-existing chronic liver disease or\\u000a chronic infection

Gary Reiss; Emmet B. Keeffe

2006-01-01

173

Evaluation of chronic kidney disease in chronic heart failure: From biomarkers to arterial renal resistances  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease and its worsening are recurring conditions in chronic heart failure (CHF) which are independently associated with poor patient outcome. The heart and kidney share many pathophysiological mechanisms which can determine dysfunction in each organ. Cardiorenal syndrome is the condition in which these two organs negatively affect each other, therefore an accurate evaluation of renal function in the clinical setting of CHF is essential. This review aims to revise the parameters currently used to evaluate renal dysfunction in CHF with particular reference to the usefulness and the limitations of biomarkers in evaluating glomerular dysfunction and tubular damage. Moreover, it is reported the possible utility of renal arterial resistance index (a parameter associated with abnormalities in renal vascular bed) for a better assesment of kidney disfunction. PMID:25610846

Iacoviello, Massimo; Leone, Marta; Antoncecchi, Valeria; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

2015-01-01

174

[Hormonal shifts in chronic hepatic diseases].  

PubMed

The authors offer quantitative evaluation of system cooperation of endocrine functions in healthy individuals, and apply a system approach to diagnostics of chronic liver diseases. The study included analysis of rectilinear and curvilinear correlations between endocrine system parameters in healthy individuals, and shifts in the levels of multilateral associations between the concentrations of various hormones in patients with different degree of the pathologic process in the liver. The study revealed system disintegration which occurs in the organism in cases of liver involvement and found that all liver diseases are associated with pronounced shifts in the condition of the hormonal system. The authors recommend distinguishing certain bands of the functional condition of the organism, which would allow determination of health status, risk groups, presence and prognosis of an illness. Analysis of hormonal status revealed elevation of excessiveness coefficient in liver diseases. The study established parameters that do not only allow quantitative evaluation of system disintegration of the endocrine system functioning, but differentiation of these diseases as well. The results suggest that cooperation of hormonal functions and their intermodal stability underlie the functional condition of both the endocrine system and the entire organism. Integral indices, unlike qualitative characteristics of individual functions, possess high diagnostic and prognostic relevance. PMID:16734336

Dronova, T A; Zav'ialov, A V

2006-01-01

175

Development and Application of Chronic Disease Risk Prediction Models  

PubMed Central

Currently, non-communicable chronic diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and a large proportion of chronic diseases are preventable through risk factor management. However, the prevention efficacy at the individual level is not yet satisfactory. Chronic disease prediction models have been developed to assist physicians and individuals in clinical decision-making. A chronic disease prediction model assesses multiple risk factors together and estimates an absolute disease risk for the individual. Accurate prediction of an individual's future risk for a certain disease enables the comparison of benefits and risks of treatment, the costs of alternative prevention strategies, and selection of the most efficient strategy for the individual. A large number of chronic disease prediction models, especially targeting cardiovascular diseases and cancers, have been suggested, and some of them have been adopted in the clinical practice guidelines and recommendations of many countries. Although few chronic disease prediction tools have been suggested in the Korean population, their clinical utility is not as high as expected. This article reviews methodologies that are commonly used for developing and evaluating a chronic disease prediction model and discusses the current status of chronic disease prediction in Korea. PMID:24954311

Oh, Sun Min; Stefani, Katherine M.

2014-01-01

176

Management of anemia in chronic kidney disease patients: baseline findings from Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Anemia is a factor that affects the outcome of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, there are only a few reports\\u000a on the management of anemia in Japanese patients with CKD who are not on dialysis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We investigated the prevalence, related factors and management of anemia in CKD stage 3–5 patients in Japan based on the baseline\\u000a data obtained

Tadao AkizawaHirofumi; Hirofumi Makino; Seiichi Matsuo; Tsuyoshi Watanabe; Enyu Imai; Kosaku Nitta; Yasuo Ohashi; Akira Hishida

2011-01-01

177

Epidemiology and treatment effects in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.  

E-print Network

??abstractChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major health epidemic, which has important consequences for patients and community, and still receives insufficient attention from the… (more)

A.S.M. Afonso (Ana)

2011-01-01

178

Histologic spectrum of cryptogenic chronic liver disease and comparison with chronic autoimmune and chronic type C hepatitis.  

PubMed

Most histologic studies of cryptogenic chronic liver disease were done before the discovery of hepatitis C, and therefore encompass the histologic spectrum of this disease. The authors report the histopathologic findings of 18 liver biopsies of presumed cryptogenic chronic liver disease patients and compared them to chronic autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis C virus biopsies. Severe bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis was present in 55%. Eighty percent of biopsies had minimal necroinflammatory activity including those with cirrhosis; 20% had moderate activity. Histologic distinction from chronic hepatitis C was difficult in the minimally active cryptogenic chronic liver disease biopsies because 20% of biopsies had portal lymphoid follicles and 33% had macrovesicular steatosis. Chronic autoimmune hepatitis had more parenchymal necroinflammatory activity and plasma cells than did either cryptogenic chronic liver disease or chronic hepatitis C biopsies. These findings suggest that one form of cryptogenic chronic liver disease is a persistent, low grade hepatitis that can progress to cirrhosis despite an innocuous histopathologic appearance. Pathologists should be aware that cryptogenic chronic liver disease biopsies may have minimal histologic abnormalities. These biopsies should not be reported as normal. Such cases require long-term clinical follow-up. PMID:7572818

Goldstein, N S; Kodali, V P; Gordon, S C

1995-11-01

179

Invited commentary: defining incident chronic kidney disease in epidemiologic study settings.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease affects an estimated 31 million Americans and potentially poses a significant global health and socioeconomic crisis. Chronic kidney disease can be treated if patients are identified early enough in the evolution of their kidney disease. However, in order for this to occur, suitable definitions of what is meant by "chronic kidney disease" need to be identified. In clinical practice, prevalent chronic kidney disease is diagnosed in a patient on the basis of the presence of persistent albuminuria and/or reduced glomerular filtration rate. However, it is unclear how to best define an incident of chronic kidney disease when the definition relies on the need for a patient to be seen multiple times over an extended period of time. In this issue of the Journal, Bash et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2009;170(4):414-424) have compared 4 different definitions of incident chronic kidney disease and their agreement, incident rates, and association with known risk factors. This study explores an extremely important topic for longitudinal epidemiology studies of chronic kidney disease. PMID:19535544

Tonna, Stephen J

2009-08-15

180

Biodiversity Loss Affects Global Disease Ecology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Changes in the type and prevalence of human diseases have occurred during shifts in human social organization, for example, from hunting and gathering to agriculture and with urbanization during the Industrial Revolution. The recent emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases appears to be driven by globalization and ecological disruption. We propose that habitat destruction and biodiversity loss associated with biotic homogenization can increase the incidence and distribution of infectious diseases affecting humans. The clearest connection between biotic homogenization and infectious disease is the spread of nonindigenous vectors and pathogens. The loss of predators and hosts that dilute pathogen transmission can also increase the incidence of vectorborne illnesses. Other mechanisms include enhanced abiotic conditions for pathogens and vectors and higher host-pathogen encounter rates. Improved understanding of these causal mechanisms can inform decisionmaking on biodiversity conservation as an effective way to protect human health.

Montira Pongsiri (US Environmental Protection Agency;Office of the Science Adviser); Joe Roman (University of Vermont;Gund Institute for Ecological Economics)

2009-12-01

181

Exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases by infectious agents: Fact or fiction?  

PubMed Central

Chronic inflammatory diseases caused by obesity represent critical public health concerns worldwide. In these diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis, adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that releases large quantities of inflammatory mediators into circulation. Besides classically recognized effectors on the development of obesity and resultant conditions, infection has attracted attention as an enhancer of chronic inflammatory diseases. Infectious diseases have long been associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis. However, the infectious hypothesis for chronic inflammatory diseases has been challenged by inconclusive clinical trials. Nevertheless, the large body of evidence accumulated over decades on the association of infectious diseases with obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease should not be disregarded. Instead, re-formulation of hypotheses of the mechanisms by which microbes affect obesity-associated diseases may be required with an emphasis on the early events in the progression of such diseases and the multifactorial nature of pathogen-host interactions. This review focuses on pathogens that directly promote obesity and on pathogens that cause chronic infections and thereby enhance metabolic diseases in obese patients. A new perspective on the interaction between infections and obesity-related diseases may improve management of chronic inflammatory diseases that rank high among global threats to human health. PMID:21537425

Wang, Cheng-Ming; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

2010-01-01

182

Beryllium Sensitization Progresses to Chronic Beryllium Disease A Longitudinal Study of Disease Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

The blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test is used in medical surveillance to identify both beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease. Approximately 50% of individuals with beryllium sensitization have chronic beryllium disease at the time of their initial clinical evaluation; however, the rate of progression from beryllium sensitization to chronic beryllium disease is unknown. We monitored a cohort of beryllium-sensitized patients

Lee S. Newman; Margaret M. Mroz; Ronald Balkissoon; Lisa A. Maier

2004-01-01

183

Health care provider perception of chronic kidney disease: knowledge and behavior among African American patients  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is prevalent in the population, but also disproportionately affects African Americans. Disparities in care of chronic kidney disease and transplant for African Americans have also been reported. The purpose of this study is to determine the knowledge and reactions of chronic kidney disease patients regarding their disease, as perceived by nephrologists and clinic nurses in South Carolina. Methods Using a qualitative approach, key informant interviews were conducted with nephrologists, and three focus groups were held with nurses who specialize in chronic kidney disease. The results were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using Qualrus software and the Grounded Theory Method. Results Dominant themes in the interviews and focus groups include: reaction to chronic kidney disease, differences in race, patient thoughts on dialysis, patient knowledge of types of treatment available, information availability, compliance to treatment, information source, and thoughts on kidney transplantation. The study found that the majority of clinicians agreed that there is typically a wide range of reactions in patients with chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The majority of chronic kidney disease patients remain in denial of their diagnosis and do not want to agree to the necessary treatment to improve their condition. In addition, the clinicians reported that the incidence of chronic kidney disease is highest in the African American population and this population of patients typically gets their information on the disease from peers, others they have known that have had renal failure. We find clinicians report that patients typically do not remain compliant to recommended treatment regimens due to lack of knowledge and feelings of denial and fear, and frequently use religiosity as a coping mechanism. Silent progression and complexity of chronic kidney disease frequently result in many patients lacking essential knowledge and developing poor coping mechanisms to seek appropriate follow-up care and prevent progression and optimize outcome. Health care providers are aware of the barriers but may lack the tools and resources to overcome them. PMID:25012542

2014-01-01

184

Phylloquinone and vitamin D status: associations with incident chronic kidney disease in the Framingham Offspring Cohort  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and CKD and vascular disease are etiologically linked. Evidence suggests deficiencies of vitamins D and K may adversely affect the cardiovascular system, but data from longitudinal studies are lacking. W...

185

Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD) leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and ?6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid receptor. Insight into the multiple factors altered in CKD may provide useful information on disease pathogenesis, clinical assessment and treatment rationale such as potential pharmacological, nutritional and exercise therapies. PMID:22537670

2012-01-01

186

Chronic Kidney Disease in Kidney Stone Formers  

PubMed Central

Summary Recent population studies have found symptomatic kidney stone formers to be at increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although kidney stones are not commonly identified as the primary cause of ESRD, they still may be important contributing factors. Paradoxically, CKD can be protective against forming kidney stones because of the substantial reduction in urine calcium excretion. Among stone formers, those with rare hereditary diseases (cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria, Dent disease, and 2,8 dihydroxyadenine stones), recurrent urinary tract infections, struvite stones, hypertension, and diabetes seem to be at highest risk for CKD. The primary mechanism for CKD from kidney stones is usually attributed to an obstructive uropathy or pyelonephritis, but crystal plugs at the ducts of Bellini and parenchymal injury from shockwave lithotripsy may also contribute. The historical shift to less invasive surgical management of kidney stones has likely had a beneficial impact on the risk for CKD. Among potential kidney donors, past symptomatic kidney stones but not radiographic stones found on computed tomography scans were associated with albuminuria. Kidney stones detected by ultrasound screening have also been associated with CKD in the general population. Further studies that better classify CKD, better characterize stone formers, more thoroughly address potential confounding by comorbidities, and have active instead of passive follow-up to avoid detection bias are needed. PMID:21784825

Krambeck, Amy E.; Lieske, John C.

2011-01-01

187

Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

2014-01-01

188

Addressing health disparities in chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012.However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database.The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran's I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25587608

Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I -Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

2014-12-01

189

Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Obesity is fast becoming a bane for the present civilization, as a result of sedentary lifestyle, atherogenic diet, and a susceptible thrifty genotype. The concept of metabolic syndrome, which is a constellation of metabolic disturbances, has crystallized over the last 80 years with the aim of identifying those at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These patients have visceral obesity and insulin resistance characterized by hypertyriglyceridemia. Recently, it has been realized that they are also at an increased risk of chronic renal disease. Release of adipocytokines leads to endothelial dysfunction. There is also activation of systemic and local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress, and impaired fibrinolysis. This leads to glomerular hyperfiltration, proteinuria, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and ultimately end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Treatment consists of lifestyle modifications along with optimal control of blood pressure, blood sugar and lipids. Metformin and thiazolidenidiones reduce insulin resistance; while angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers reduce proteinuria and have a renoprotective effect. Exciting new medical therapies on the horizon include rimonabant a cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, soy proteins, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity has also been shown to be effective in treating metabolic syndrome. PMID:20368911

Bhowmik, D; Tiwari, S C

2008-01-01

190

Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency. PMID:22701173

González-Parra, Emilio; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto

2012-01-01

191

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems. PMID:23101436

2012-01-01

192

Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Quantitative Clinicopathological Relationships  

PubMed Central

10 children with chronic granulomatous disease are described. Though the clinical features were typical, a wide range of clinical severity was noted. A significant correlation between the severity of the syndrome and the qualitative nitro-blue tetrazolium results was found. Facial rashes (4) and polyarthritis (1) were noted in female presumed heterozygotes, the incidence of which was also related to the nitro-blue tetrazolium test results. A father and a paternal great uncle died of leukaemia. The possible aetiological relation between these and the partial leucocyte abnormality is discussed. Three children were treated with busulphan, in order to induce neutropenia, to expose the ingested organisms to humoral bactericidal mechanisms, and to antibiotics. There was evidence suggestive of benefit in one of them. PMID:4191616

Thompson, Eileen N.; Soothill, J. F.

1970-01-01

193

Venous thromboembolism in chronic liver disease.  

PubMed

The liver plays a central role in the maintenance of a normal hemostatic balance by synthesizing several factors belonging to the pathways of coagulation, anticoagulation, and fibrinolysis. It is thereby unsurprising that patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) or cirrhosis may experience a kaleidoscope of hemostatic disorders. A bleeding tendency represents the most frequent and clinically severe hemostatic complication of CLD or cirrhosis. Perhaps less anticipated, growing evidence now suggests that a procoagulant state may be also associated with CLD, so that patients with CLD or cirrhosis, irrespective of its etiology, rather than be "naturally anticoagulated" might also experience a large spectrum of spontaneous or unprovoked venous thrombotic complications. The clinical significance of an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in CLD is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomized studies of potential treatments for this complication is needed. PMID:21305802

Lippi, Giuseppe; Targher, Giovanni; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Franchini, Massimo

2011-02-01

194

Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

2013-01-01

195

Alignment between Chronic Disease Policy and Practice: Case Study at a Primary Care Facility  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic disease is by far the leading cause of death worldwide and of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries, including South Africa, where chronic diseases disproportionately affect the poor living in urban settings. The Provincial Government of the Western Cape (PGWC) has prioritized the management of chronic diseases and has developed a policy and framework (Adult Chronic Disease Management Policy 2009) to guide and improve the prevention and management of chronic diseases at a primary care level. The aim of this study is to assess the alignment of current primary care practices with the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy. Methods One comprehensive primary care facility in a Cape Town health district was used as a case study. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews (n?=?10), focus groups (n?=?8) and document review. Participants in this study included clinical staff involved in chronic disease management at the facility and at a provincial level. Data previously collected using the Integrated Audit Tool for Chronic Disease Management (part of the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy) formed the basis of the guide questions used in focus groups and interviews. Results The results of this research indicate a significant gap between policy and its implementation to improve and support chronic disease management at this primary care facility. A major factor seems to be poor policy knowledge by clinicians, which contributes to an individual rather than a team approach in the management of chronic disease patients. Poor interaction between facility- and community-based services also emerged. A number of factors were identified that seemed to contribute to poor policy implementation, the majority of which were staff related and ultimately resulted in a decrease in the quality of patient care. Conclusions Chronic disease policy implementation needs to be improved in order to support chronic disease management at this facility. It is possible that similar findings and factors are present at other primary care facilities in Cape Town. At a philosophical level, this research highlights the tension between primary health care principles and a diseased-based approach in a primary care setting. PMID:25141191

Draper, Claire A.; Draper, Catherine E.; Bresick, Graham F.

2014-01-01

196

Prevalence of Aspergillosis in chronic lung diseases.  

PubMed

Eighty eight patients of chronic lung diseases (CLD) attending TB and Chest department of J.N. Medical college Hospital were studied to find out the prevalence of Aspergillus in Broncho-alveolar Lavage (BAL) and anti- aspergillus antibodies in their sera. Direct microscopy and fungal culture of BAL was done. Antibodies were studied by immunodiffusion (ID) and Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Dot blot assay for anti-aspergillus antibodies was also performed in sera of patients which were either positive by ID or by ELISA. Aspergillus was isolated in culture from 13(14.7%) cases of CLD, while, 30.6% cases showed anti-aspergillus antibodies by serological methods. Aspergillus fumigatus was the predominant species isolated. 17(19.3%) cases of CLD showed antibody against Aspergillus by ID, 22(25%) by ELISA, while 19 of 27 seropositive cases also showed positive results by Dot Blot assay. In cases of bronchogenic carcinoma and pulmonary tuberculosis, anti-aspergillus antibodies were detected equally by ID and ELISA in 21.42% and 21.05% cases respectively. In bronchial asthma, the antibodies could be detected in 60% cases by ELISA, while, in only 10% cases by ID. ELISA was found more sensitive than ID for detection of anti-aspergillus antibodies. The sensitivity of Dot Blot lies some what between ID and ELISA. It is concluded that prevalence of Aspergillosis is quite high in chronic lung diseases, culture and serological test should be performed in conjunction and more than one type of serological tests should be performed to establish the diagnosis. PMID:17664833

Shahid, M; Malik, A; Bhargava, R

2001-01-01

197

Endothelin system & its antagonism in chronic kidney disease   

E-print Network

Since its discovery in 1988 the powerful vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as well as the cardiovascular disease with which it is ...

Dhaun, Neeraj

2012-06-30

198

Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes

Charles A Herzog; Richard W Asinger; Alan K Berger; David M Charytan; Javier Díez; Robert G Hart; Kai-Uwe Eckardt; Bertram L Kasiske; Peter A McCullough; Rod S Passman; Stephanie S DeLoach; Patrick H Pun; Eberhard Ritz

2011-01-01

199

Homecare-based Motor Rehabilitation in Musculoskeletal Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a frequent complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Extensive musculoskeletal and skin involvement may induce severe functional impairment, disability and quality of life deterioration. Physical rehabilitation is recommended as ancillary therapy in these forms, but experiences are sparse. A 39-year-old man affected by musculoskeletal and skin chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) was treated with a homecare-based motor rehabilitation program during palliation for disease progression. Significant functional improvement was obtained. Motor rehabilitation should be strongly considered for patients with musculoskeletal cGVHD, both in the palliative and in the curative phase of disease. PMID:21976859

Tendas, A; Boschetto, C; Baraldi, L; Caiazza, E; Cupelli, L; Lentini, R; Trawinska, M; Palombi, M; Ales, M; Morino, L; Giovannini, M; Scaramucci, L; Cartoni, C; Dentamaro, T; Arcese, W; de Fabritiis, P; Niscola, P; Mandelli, F

2011-01-01

200

Homecare-based Motor Rehabilitation in Musculoskeletal Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease.  

PubMed

Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a frequent complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Extensive musculoskeletal and skin involvement may induce severe functional impairment, disability and quality of life deterioration. Physical rehabilitation is recommended as ancillary therapy in these forms, but experiences are sparse. A 39-year-old man affected by musculoskeletal and skin chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) was treated with a homecare-based motor rehabilitation program during palliation for disease progression. Significant functional improvement was obtained. Motor rehabilitation should be strongly considered for patients with musculoskeletal cGVHD, both in the palliative and in the curative phase of disease. PMID:21976859

Tendas, A; Boschetto, C; Baraldi, L; Caiazza, E; Cupelli, L; Lentini, R; Trawinska, M; Palombi, M; Ales, M; Morino, L; Giovannini, M; Scaramucci, L; Cartoni, C; Dentamaro, T; Arcese, W; de Fabritiis, P; Niscola, P; Mandelli, F

2011-05-01

201

Collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinases in chronic obstructive lung disease and cancer.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD. PMID:25664615

Woode, Denzel; Shiomi, Takayuki; D'Armiento, Jeanine

2015-01-01

202

CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO OZONE CAUSES RESTRICTIVE LUNG DISEASE  

EPA Science Inventory

A chronic study to determine the progression and or/reversibility of ozone-induced lung disease was conducted. ale rats were exposed to a diurnal pattern of ozone (O3) for 1 wk, 3 wk, 3 mo, 12 mo, or 18 mo. he occurrence of chronic lung disease was determined by structural and fu...

203

Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ? There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ? Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ? Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ? Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca

2013-04-15

204

Introduction: systemic effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the definition of the European Respiratory Society, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disorder characterised by reduced maximum expiratory flow and slow forced emptying of the lungs (1). The clinical syndrome of COPD, manifested clinically by dyspnoea, cough and impaired exercise tolerance, encompasses different disease conditions, varying from chronic obstructive bron- chitis with obstruction of small airways,

E. F. M. Wouters

2003-01-01

205

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AS DISEASE ACCELERATORS DURING CHRONIC HEPATITIS C  

E-print Network

s 1 ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AS DISEASE ACCELERATORS DURING CHRONIC HEPATITIS C Short title : HCV suggested that cigarette smoke may enhance activity grade in patients with chronic hepatitis C, thereby carcinoma (1). The disease severity is however highly variable among patients and over time, some

Boyer, Edmond

206

Arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease: causes and consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, and heart failure and arrhythmias are the biggest causes of cardiovascular death in this population. Increased arterial stiffness is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease and is associated with adverse alterations in cardiac structure and function that may predispose to an increased risk of cardiovascular death. These changes are already apparent

Colin D Chue; Jonathan N Townend; Richard P Steeds; Charles J Ferro

2010-01-01

207

Correction of Anemia with Epoetin Alfa in Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Anemia, a common complication of chronic kidney disease, usually develops as a consequence of erythropoietin deficiency. Recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) is indicated for the correction of anemia associated with this condition. However, the optimal level of hemoglobin correction is not defined. Methods In this open-label trial, we studied 1432 patients with chronic kidney disease, 715 of whom were

Ajay K. Singh; Lynda Szczech; Kezhen L. Tang; Huiman Barnhart; Shelly Sapp; Marsha Wolfson; Donal Reddan

2006-01-01

208

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division  

E-print Network

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division SLAC-I-730-0A09M-001-R003 24 September 2013 #12;Publication Data This document was developed by the Beryllium program and published by ESHQ Publishing. Document Title: Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

Wechsler, Risa H.

209

Sympathetic hyperactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sympathetic hyperactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often characterized by the presence of sympathetic hyperactivity. This contributes to the pathogenesis of renal hypertension. It is also associated with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality independently of its effect on blood pressure (BP). These data suggest that reducing sympathetic hyperactivity might be beneficial. In the present

N. Neumann

2007-01-01

210

Early-life risk factors for chronic nonrespiratory diseases.  

PubMed

We have witnessed a change in disease patterns contributing to the global burden of disease, with a shift from early childhood deaths due to the classic infectious communicable diseases to years lived with disability from chronic noncommunicable diseases. In both developing and developed countries, the years lived with disability attributable to chronic disease have increased: cardiovascular diseases by 17.7%; chronic respiratory disease by 8.5%; neurological conditions by 12.2%; diabetes by 30.0%; and mental and behavioural disorders by 5.0% over the past 20 years. Recognition of the contribution made by adverse environmental exposures in early life to noncommunicable diseases in later life is increasing. These early-life exposures appear to contribute to both chronic respiratory and chronic nonrespiratory diseases. In this State of the Art article, we aim to examine early-life environmental exposures that have an epidemiological association with chronic nonrespiratory diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and neurocognitive and behavioural problems. We will highlight the potential overlap in environmental risks with respiratory diseases, and point out knowledge gaps and research opportunities. PMID:25395038

Chacko, Archana; Carpenter, David O; Callaway, Leonie; Sly, Peter D

2015-01-01

211

Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS): current literature review  

PubMed Central

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic diseases, very common in general population. These obstructive airway illnesses are manifested with chronic inflammation affecting the whole respiratory tract. Obstruction is usually intermittent and reversible in asthma, but is progressive and irreversible in COPD. Asthma and COPD may overlap and converge, especially in older people [overlap syndrome—asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS)]. Although ACOS accounts approximately 15-25% of the obstructive airway diseases, is not well recognised because of the structure of clinical trials. COPD studies exclude asthma patients and asthma studies exclude COPD patients, respectively. It is crucial to define asthma, COPD and overlap syndrome (ACOS), as notable clinical entities, which they share common pathologic and functional features, but they are characterized from differences in lung function, acute exacerbations, quality of life, hospital impact and mortality. PMID:24672688

Papaiwannou, Antonis; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Arikas, Stamatis; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsiouda, Theodora; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Siminelakis, Stavros; Kolettas, Alexander; Kessis, George; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

2014-01-01

212

Molecular diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) suffer from recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections of the skin, the airways, the lymph nodes, liver, brain and bones. Frequently found pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus species, Klebsiella species, Burkholderia cepacia and Salmonella species. CGD is a rare (?1:250 000 births) disease caused by mutations in any one of the five components of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in phagocytes. This enzyme generates superoxide and is essential for intracellular killing of pathogens by phagocytes. Molecular diagnosis of CGD involves measuring NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes, measuring protein expression of NADPH oxidase components and mutation analysis of genes encoding these components. Residual oxidase activity is important to know for estimation of the clinical course and the chance of survival of the patient. Mutation analysis is mandatory for genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. This review summarizes the different assays available for the diagnosis of CGD, the precautions to be taken for correct measurements, the flow diagram to be followed, the assays for confirmation of the diagnosis and the determinations for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24016250

Roos, D; Boer, M

2014-01-01

213

Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.  

PubMed

The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

2013-02-01

214

Aclidinium: in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Aclidinium, an inhaled, long-acting antimuscarinic agent, has been developed as a twice-daily maintenance treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Treatment with the approved dosage of aclidinium (400??g twice daily) statistically significantly improved bronchodilation, disease-specific health status, dyspnoea, night-time COPD symptoms and use of rescue medication compared with placebo in pivotal studies of 12 (ACCORD COPD I) or 24 (ATTAIN) weeks duration in patients with moderate to severe COPD. The improvements in bronchodilation, health status and dyspnoea were clinically meaningful compared with placebo after 24 weeks of treatment in ATTAIN; generally similar results were seen after 12 weeks of treatment in both trials. Aclidinium also statistically significantly reduced the incidence of COPD exacerbations compared with placebo in these studies (albeit neither trial was designed to assess exacerbation frequency). Inhaled aclidinium has a low systemic bioavailability; the approved dosage was generally well tolerated in clinical trials of up to 52 weeks duration. Aclidinium had an adverse event profile that was similar to that of placebo and characterized by low incidences of major adverse cardiovascular events and potential anticholinergic adverse events. PMID:23046206

Frampton, James E

2012-10-22

215

Vitamin D and chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been recognized as a significant global health problem because of the increased risk of total and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is common in patients with CKD, and serum levels of vitamin D appear to have an inverse correlation with kidney function. Growing evidence has indicated that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to deteriorating renal function, as well as increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. Recent studies have suggested that treatment with active vitamin D or its analogues can ameliorate renal injury by reducing fibrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation in animal models; this treatment also decreases proteinuria and mortality in patients with CKD. These renoprotective effects of vitamin D treatment are far beyond its classical role in the maintenance of bone and mineral metabolism, in addition to its pleiotropic effects on extra-mineral metabolism. In this review, we discuss the altered metabolism of vitamin D in kidney disease, and the potential renoprotective mechanisms of vitamin D in experimental and clinical studies. In addition, issues regarding the effects of vitamin D treatment on clinical outcomes are discussed. PMID:25045287

Kim, Chang Seong

2014-01-01

216

Burden of chronic kidney disease: North Africa.  

PubMed

North Africa (NAF) is composed of six countries located in the African Sahara, namely the Western Sahara, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Common features between these countries include similar climate, ecology, population genetics, and the socioeconomic environment. This commonality reflects on the chronic kidney disease (CKD) profile in these countries. While there are some estimates on the epidemiology of end-stage kidney disease, that of earlier stages is unknown. Several national screening programs are currently addressing this issue, such as the EGIPT-CKD project in Egypt and the MAREMAR study in Morocco. Preliminary results from the former suggest a prevalence of proteinuria in 10.6% of the relatives of patients on regular dialysis treatment. Despite the lack of reliable registries, it was possible to gather information on the etiology of CKD by direct contact with leading nephrologists in those countries. It turns out that glomerulonephritis (GN) accounts for 9-20%, diabetes 11-18%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis 10-35%, chronic interstitial nephritis 7-17%, and polycystic disease 2-3%. Compared to two decades earlier, diabetes has become more common at the expense of GN, proliferative GN, and amyloidosis regressed in favor of IgA and membranous nephropathies in Tunisian adults. Conventional schistosomal nephropathies are regressing in favor of hepatitis C viral (HCV) nephropathy in Egyptians. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis is increasing at the expense of proliferative GNs in the region at large. Access to regular dialysis has been optimized during the past decade, with favorable outcomes despite the high incidence of HCV infection, tuberculosis, and protein-calorie malnutrition. Kidney transplantation is available in all NAF countries except the Western Sahara. About 650 transplants are performed annually from live donors, the majority in Egypt, where data from the largest center in Mansoura display a 10-year graft survival of 62%. Many transplants are performed from living unrelated donors, particularly in Egypt, which creates an ethical debate. Legislation for deceased-donor transplantation has been passed successively over the past two decades in Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt, which is expected to reflect quantitatively and qualitatively on the transplantation activity in the near future. PMID:25018981

Barsoum, Rashad S

2013-05-01

217

Moraxella catarrhalis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

PubMed Central

Rationale: Moraxella catarrhalis is frequently present in the sputum of adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Little is known about the role of M. catarrhalis in this common disease. Objective: To elucidate the burden of disease, the dynamics of carriage, and immune responses to M. catarrhalis in COPD. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 104 adults with COPD in an outpatient clinic at the Buffalo Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Measurements: Clinical information, sputum cultures, molecular typing of isolates, and immunoassays to measure antibodies to M. catarrhalis. Main Results: Over 81 months, 104 patients made 3,009 clinic visits, 560 during exacerbations. Molecular typing identified 120 episodes of acquisition and clearance of M. catarrhalis in 50 patients; 57 (47.5%) of the acquisitions were associated with clinical exacerbations. No instances of simultaneous acquisition of a new strain of another pathogen were observed. The duration of carriage of M. catarrhalis was shorter with exacerbations compared with asymptomatic colonization (median, 31.0 vs. 40.4 days; p = 0.01). Reacquisition of the same strain was rare. The intensity of the serum IgG response was greater after exacerbations than asymptomatic colonization (p = 0.009). Asymptomatic colonization was associated with a greater frequency of a sputum IgA response than exacerbation (p = 0.009). Conclusions: M. catarrhalis likely causes approximately 10% of exacerbations of COPD, accounting for approximately 2 to 4 million episodes annually. The organism is cleared efficiently after a short duration of carriage. Patients develop strain-specific protection after clearance of M. catarrhalis from the respiratory tract. PMID:15805178

Murphy, Timothy F.; Brauer, Aimee L.; Grant, Brydon J. B.; Sethi, Sanjay

2005-01-01

218

Hemoglobin Decline in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Baseline Results from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Prospective Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and objectives: The level of glomerular filtration rate at which hemoglobin declines in chronic kidney disease is poorly described in the pediatric population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This cross-sectional study of North American children with chronic kidney disease examined the association of glomerular filtration rate, determined by the plasma disappearance of iohexol, and hemoglobin concentration. Results: Of the

Jeffrey J. Fadrowski; Christopher B. Pierce; Stephen R. Cole; Marva Moxey-Mims; Bradley A. Warady; Susan L. Furth

219

Effectiveness of innovations in nurse led chronic disease management for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: systematic review of evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine the effectiveness of innovations in management of chronic disease involving nurses for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Data sources 24 electronic databases searched for English or Dutch language studies published between January 1980 and January 2005. Review methods Included studies described inpatient, outpatient, and community based interventions for

Stephanie J. C. Taylor; Bridget Candy; Rosamund M. Bryar; Jean Ramsay; Hubertus J. M. Vrijhoef; Glenda Esmond; Jadwiga A. Wedzicha; Chris J. Griffiths

2005-01-01

220

Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Cardiovascular Links  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive lung disease resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, noxious gases, particulate matter, and air pollutants. COPD is exacerbated by acute inflammatory insults such as lung infections (viral and bacterial) and air pollutants which further accelerate the steady decline in lung function. The chronic inflammatory process in the lung contributes to the extrapulmonary manifestations of COPD which are predominantly cardiovascular in nature. Here we review the significant burden of cardiovascular disease in COPD and discuss the clinical and pathological links between acute exacerbations of COPD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24724085

Laratta, Cheryl R.; van Eeden, Stephan

2014-01-01

221

Objective Evidence of Severe Disease: Opioid Use in Chronic Pain  

PubMed Central

Treating chronic pain presents numerous challenges. First, assessing patients with chronic pain is complicated by the lack of objective measures of pain itself. Chronic pain guidelines already developed by national organizations rely on careful history taking rather than objective measures. Second, opioids are an accepted element of chronic pain management, but their use is tempered by risks of overdose, dependency, and the potential for diversion. This essay proposes a new standard for the use of long-term opioids for chronic pain: the presence or absence of objective evidence of severe disease. This standard, which supports responsible prescribing of opioids, is one that clinicians can understand and apply when considering prescribing long-term opioids for chronic pain. Until we have measures of pain itself, we should insist upon objective evidence of severe disease before prescribing opioids for chronic pain. PMID:22778125

Zweifler, John A.

2012-01-01

222

UPDATE ON FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 23 IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide. Presence of CKD predisposes individuals to high risks of end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular disease and premature death. Disordered phosphate homeostasis with elevated circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an early and pervasive complication of CKD. CKD is likely the most common cause of chronically elevated FGF23 levels, and the clinical condition in which levels are most markedly elevated. Although increases in FGF23 levels help maintain serum phosphate in the normal range in CKD, prospective studies in populations of pre-dialysis CKD, incident and prevalent end-stage renal disease, and kidney transplant recipients demonstrate that elevated FGF23 levels are independently associated with progression of CKD and development of cardiovascular events and mortality. It was originally thought that these observations were driven by elevated FGF23 acting as a highly sensitive biomarker of toxicity due to phosphate. However, FGF23 itself has now been shown to mediate “off-target,” direct, end-organ toxicity in the heart, which suggests that elevated FGF23 may be a novel mechanism of adverse outcomes in CKD. This report reviews recent advances in FGF23 biology relevant to CKD, the classical effects of FGF23 on mineral homeostasis, and the studies that established FGF23 excess as a biomarker and novel mechanism of cardiovascular disease. The report concludes with a critical review of the effects of different therapeutic strategies targeting FGF23 reduction and how these might be leveraged in a future randomized trial aimed at improving outcomes in CKD. PMID:22622492

Wolf, Myles

2012-01-01

223

Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by progressive airflow obstruction and a neutrophilic inflammation. Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) may be a marker of disease activity in a variety of lung diseases. We measured exhaled NO in patients with documented COPD and investi- gated whether the concentration of exhaled NO is related to the severity of disease as defined by

WASIM MAZIAK; STELIOS LOUKIDES; SARAH CULPITT; PAUL SULLIVAN; SERGEI A. KHARITONOV; PETER J. BARNES

1998-01-01

224

The spectrum of cardiovascular disease in children with predialysis chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in adults and children on chronic dialysis and in adults after kidney transplantation. Cardiovascular disease burden and cardiovascular mortality are high in adults with chronic kidney disease. The early development of cardiovascular disease risk factors, some of which are modifiable, largely explain this phenomenon. Limited data are available on the prevalence of

Blanche M Chavers; Charles A Herzog

2004-01-01

225

Lipid lowering in liver and chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Lipid lowering, particularly with HMG CoA reductase inhibitors ("statins"), reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. Patients with chronic liver and kidney disease present challenges to the use of lipid medications. In the case of most liver disorders, the concern has been one of safety. There is evidence that most lipid-lowering medications can be used safely in many situations, although large outcomes trials are not available. In contrast, in chronic kidney disease, dosing of lipid medications may require substantial modification depending on creatinine clearance. There are significant alterations in lipid metabolism in chronic kidney disease with concomitant increases in cardiovascular risk. Some data are available on cardiovascular outcomes with dyslipidemia treatment in renal patients. This review will examine lipid physiology and cardiovascular risk in specific liver and kidney diseases and review the evidence for lipid lowering and the use of statin and non-statin therapies in chronic liver and kidney disease. PMID:24840263

Herrick, Cynthia; Litvin, Marina; Goldberg, Anne Carol

2014-06-01

226

Prospective study of cured meats consumption and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in men  

E-print Network

Prospective study of cured meats consumption and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the risk of newly diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Between 1986 and 1998, we Models ; Prospective Studies ; Pulmonary Disease ; Chronic Obstructive ; epidemiology ; Questionnaires

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Prospective study of dietary patterns and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among US men  

E-print Network

Prospective study of dietary patterns and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among US men foods are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms or lung function ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Prospective Studies ; Pulmonary Disease ; Chronic Obstructive ; epidemiology

Boyer, Edmond

228

[Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and biofilm].  

PubMed

The lower respiratory tract of patients affected by COPD is constantly colonized by pathogenic microrganisms such as H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae. Role of bacterial colonization of big and small airways in patients affected by COPD is still unclear but it is likely to play a role in directly or indirectly maintaining the vicious circle of infection/inflammation. Colonizer pathogens are capable to stimulate mucus production, to alter the ciliary function by inducing dyskinesia and stasis; in addition, they represent a strong stimulus for neutrophils to come in the airways, which release elastase that, in turn, inhibit the mucus-ciliary function. The same pathogens are responsible for epithelial damage and chronic inflammation, by releasing neutrophilic elastase, leading to the damage progression and obstruction. Recent studies have also shown that infection sustained by H. influenzae is not limited to bronchial mucosa, i.e. surface epithelial cells, but that the pathogen is capable to penetrate cells, so spreading the infection in sub-epithelial cellular layers. In addition, the ability to produce biofilm is another possible defence mechanism which allows them to grow and colonise. Such a mechanism could in part explain the lack of response to antimicrobials and contribute to stimulation of parenchymal inflammatory response, the cause of pathological-anatomic damage which occurs in COPD. The impossibility to eradicate chronic infection and bacterial exacerbations of COPD are likely the elements that promt and worsen obstruction, so determining the disease's progression. PMID:19696555

Legnani, Delfino

2009-07-01

229

Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease  

SciTech Connect

Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens.

Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

1986-03-05

230

76 FR 22360 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Chronic Wasting Disease...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...cervid herds known to be affected with chronic wasting disease, contact Dr. Patrice N. Klein, Senior Staff Veterinarian, Ruminant Health Programs, NCAHP, VS, APHIS, 4700 Road Unit 43, Riverdale, MD 20737; (301) 734- 0738. For copies of more...

2011-04-21

231

Health care utilization among patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care utilization among patients with chronic kidney disease.BackgroundHigher hospitalization rates among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients impose a substantial burden on the U.S. health care system. Early identification of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and determination of factors associated with increased morbidity may lead to appropriate interventions to attenuate the complications of CKD and possibly reduce future resource

Samina S Khan; Waqar H Kazmi; Rekha Abichandani; Hocine Tighiouart; Brian J G Pereira; Annamaria T Kausz

2002-01-01

232

Venous disease and chronic oedema: treatment and patient concordance.  

PubMed

Compression therapy is the mainstay in the management of chronic venous disease, venous leg ulceration (VLU) and chronic oedema. The management of VLU alone is thought to cost a staggering £400 million per year and accounts for 13% of all district nursing visits. The predicted increase in elderly, obese and chronically ill patients will pose a further strain on already stretched resources. The impact of chronic venous and lymphovenous disease is also costly in terms of physical and psychological terms for patients. Adopting a preventive approach would reduce the financial, workload and symptomatic aspects of this condition. PMID:24820810

Todd, Marie

233

Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90?mmHg in the general population and 130/80?mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

2013-01-01

234

Epidemiology of pediatric chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

In contrast to the adult population, in whom a variety of registries have confirmed the incidence, prevalence, and diagnoses associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), the epidemiological information on pediatric CKD is currently imprecise and flawed by methodological differences between the various data sources. Obstructive uropathy and congenital aplasia/hypoplasia/dysplasia are responsible for almost one half of all cases of CKD in children, underscoring the fact that a substantial percentage of the pediatric CKD population develops renal insufficiency very early in life. However, there are distinct geographic differences in the reported causes of CKD, in part because of environmental, racial, genetic, and cultural (consanguinity) differences. Furthermore, despite apparently comparable incidence rates, high mortality in countries that lack health care resources results in a low prevalence of CKD in those locations. In countries where renal replacement therapy is readily available, the most favored treatment modality is renal transplantation in all pediatric age groups. Additional efforts to define the epidemiology of pediatric CKD worldwide in a more uniform manner are necessary if a better understanding of the full extent of the problem, areas for study, and the potential impact of intervention is desired. PMID:16198273

Chadha, Vimal; Warady, Bradley A

2005-10-01

235

[Chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases. Pathophysiology and therapy].  

PubMed

The pathogenesis and therapy of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by an obvious discrepancy. There is extensive agreement that the pathogenesis is substantially based on a disruption of the barrier of the intestinal mucous membrane against luminal bacteria. This has been demonstrated in recent years by evidence from various disciplines, in particular from genetics, microbiology, morphology and innate immunology. However, there is also the evidence-based therapy which, as in the past, is aimed against the effectors of the adaptive immune system. In this case the therapy with biologicals is more aggressive and takes the risk of a series of undesired side-effects. This dichotomy of pathological knowledge and therapeutic innovation is not only medically unsatisfactory but also makes it difficult to present a consistent picture of these symptoms. Despite this an attempt will be made to bridge these inconsistencies and to demonstrate possible future developments which will lead to a final causal therapy. An extended version of this article appears in our newly published book "Colitis ulcerosa und Morbus Crohn". PMID:19777197

Herrlinger, K; Wittig, B; Stange, E F

2009-10-01

236

Using online health communication to manage chronic sorrow: mothers of children with rare diseases speak.  

PubMed

Families affected by rare disease experience psychosocial reactions similar to families with prevalent chronic diseases. The ability to respond and manage the condition depends on psychosocial factors. This phenomenological study of 16 mothers of children with Alagille syndrome explored their lived experience in using online health communications to manage their chronic sorrow. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews analyzed using techniques described by van Manen. Analysis yielded four essential themes: connectedness, online triggers, empowerment, and seasons of online use contributed to online communication essential to a rare disease community. Findings suggest mothers need emotional support and help accessing appropriate online resources. PMID:25316198

Glenn, Adriana D

2015-01-01

237

Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cause morbidity, hospital admissions, and mortality, and strongly influence health-related quality of life. Some patients are prone to frequent exacerbations, which are associated with considerable physiologic deterioration and increased airway inflammation. About half of COPD exacerbations are caused or triggered primarily by bacterial and viral infections (colds, especially from rhinovirus), but air pollution can contribute to the beginning of an exacerbation. Type 1 exacerbations involve increased dyspnea, sputum volume, and sputum purulence; Type 2 exacerbations involve any two of the latter symptoms, and Type 3 exacerbations involve one of those symptoms combined with cough, wheeze, or symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection. Exacerbations are more common than previously believed (2.5-3 exacerbations per year); many exacerbations are treated in the community and not associated with hospital admission. We found that about half of exacerbations were unreported by the patients, despite considerable encouragement to do so, and, instead, were only diagnosed from patients' diary cards. COPD patients are accustomed to frequent symptom changes, and this may explain their tendency to underreport exacerbations. COPD patients tend to be anxious and depressed about the disease and some might not seek treatment. At the beginning of an exacerbation physiologic changes such as decreases in peak flow and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV(1)) are usually small and therefore are not useful in predicting exacerbations, but larger decreases in peak flow are associated with dyspnea and the presence of symptomatic upper-respiratory viral infection. More pronounced physiologic changes during exacerbation are related to longer exacerbation recovery time. Dyspnea, common colds, sore throat, and cough increase significantly during prodrome, indicating that respiratory viruses are important exacerbation triggers. However, the prodrome is relatively short and not useful in predicting onset. As colds are associated with longer and more severe exacerbations, a COPD patient who develops a cold should be considered for early therapy. Physiologic recovery after an exacerbation is often incomplete, which decreases health-related quality of life and resistance to future exacerbations, so it is important to identify COPD patients who suffer frequent exacerbations and to convince them to take precautions to minimize the risk of colds and other exacerbation triggers. Exacerbation frequency may vary with the severity of the COPD. Exacerbation frequency may or may not increase with the severity of the COPD. As the COPD progresses, exacerbations tend to have more symptoms and take longer to recover from. Twenty-five to fifty percent of COPD patients suffer lower airway bacteria colonization, which is related to the severity of COPD and cigarette smoking and which begins a cycle of epithelial cell damage, impaired mucociliary clearance, mucus hypersecretion, increased submucosal vascular leakage, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Elevated sputum interleukin-8 levels are associated with higher bacterial load and faster FEV(1) decline; the bacteria increase airway inflammation in the stable patient, which may accelerate disease progression. A 2-week course of oral corticosteroids is as beneficial as an 8-week course, with fewer adverse effects, and might extend the time until the next exacerbation. Antibiotics have some efficacy in treating exacerbations. Exacerbation frequency increases with progressive airflow obstruction; so patients with chronic respiratory failure are particularly susceptible to exacerbation. PMID:14651761

Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Donaldson, Gavin C

2003-12-01

238

2014 National Chronic Kidney Disease Fact Sheet  

MedlinePLUS

... diseases are getting better treatments. Top of Page Cardiovascular disease Having kidney disease increases your chances of also having cardiovascular disease, heart attacks, and strokes. Keeping your blood pressure, ...

239

Chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical manifestation and therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in long-term survivors of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The immunopathogenesis of chronic GVHD is, in part, TH-2 mediated, resulting in a syndrome of immunodeficiency and an autoimmune disorder. The most important risk factor for chronic GVHD is prior history of acute GVHD and strategies that prevent acute GVHD

V Ratanatharathorn; L Ayash; HM Lazarus; J Fu; JP Uberti

2001-01-01

240

Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains guidelines for developing policies and procedures related to chronic infectious diseases, as recommended by the Illinois Task Force on School Management of Infectious Disease. It is designed to help school personnel understand how infectious diseases can be transmitted, and to assist school districts in the development and…

Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

241

Anemia as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and moreover, plays a role in the morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, infection, and cancer. Anemia develops during the early stages of CKD and is common in patients with ESRD. Anemia is an important cause of left ventricular hypertrophy and congestive heart failure.

K Iseki; K Kohagura

2007-01-01

242

Chronic Diseases in the Pediatric Age Group. Matrix No. 7.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper briefly outlines current problems associated with chronic diseases in children and youth and provides indications for the types of future research and analysis needed to facilitate the development of solutions. In general, these problems are associated with the following: malignancies, hereditary anemias, cystic fibrosis, other chronic

Katz, Michael

243

Obesity, oxidative stress, and fibrosis in chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Obesity in combination with diabetes and hypertension likely is contributing to the increasing incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the 21st century worldwide and requires novel insights and strategies for treatment. There is an increasing recognition that the kidney has an important role in the complex inter-organ communication that occurs with the development of inflammation and fibrosis with obesity. Inhibition of the adiponectin-AMPK pathway has now become established as a critical pathway regulating both inflammation and pro-fibrotic pathways for both obesity-related kidney disease and diabetic kidney disease. AMPK regulates NF?B activation and is a potent regulator of NADPH oxidases. Nox4 in particular has emerged as a key contribtor to the early inflammation of diabetic kidney disease. AMPK also regulates several transcription factors that contribute to stimulation of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-?) system. Another key aspect of AMPK regulation is its control of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mitochondrial biogenesis. Inhibition of PGC-1?, the transcriptional co-activator of mitochondrial biogenesis is being recognized as a key pathway that is inhibited in diabetic kidney disease and may be linked to inhibition of mitochondrial function. Translation of this concept is emerging via the field of urine metabolomics, as several metabolites linked to mitochondria are consistently downregulated in human diabetic kidney disease. Further studies to explore the role of AMPK and related energy-sensing pathways will likely lead to a more comprehensive understanding of why the kidney is affected early on and in a progressive manner with obesity and diabetes. PMID:25401040

Sharma, Kumar

2014-01-01

244

Technology-supported apprenticeship in the management of chronic disease  

E-print Network

Chronic disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but the current standard of care is woefully ineffective. It is paternalistic, episodic, and perversely incentivized based on volume, resulting ...

Moore, John Oliver

2013-01-01

245

Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.  

PubMed

Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective. PMID:20057258

Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

2009-01-01

246

Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in a general Japanese population: The Hisayama Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in a general Japanese population: The Hisayama Study.BackgroundChronic kidney disease has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in high-risk populations. However, this relationship is inconclusive in community-based populations.MethodsTo clarify this issue, we followed 2634 community-dwelling individuals without cardiovascular disease, aged 40 years or older, for 12 years and examined

TOSHIHARU NINOMIYA; YUTAKA KIYOHARA; MICHIAKI KUBO; YUMIHIRO TANIZAKI; YASUFUMI DOI; KEN OKUBO; YOSHIYUKI WAKUGAWA; JUN HATA; YOSHINORI OISHI; KENTARO SHIKATA; KOJI YONEMOTO; HIDEKI HIRAKATA; MITSUO IIDA

2005-01-01

247

Biomarkers of inflammation and progression of chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomarkers of inflammation and progression of chronic kidney disease.BackgroundChronic kidney disease is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Statins have anti-inflammatory properties and may attenuate loss of kidney function. Although inflammation may mediate progressive renal injury, the relation between statin use, markers of inflammation, and the rate of kidney function loss has not been elucidated. We examined the association

MARCELLO TONELLI; FRANK SACKS; MARC PFEFFER; GIAN S JHANGRI; GARY CURHAN

2005-01-01

248

Pathogenesis of vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathogenesis of vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease.BackgroundHyperphosphatemia and hypercalcemia are independent risk factors for higher incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease. In addition to increased calcium-phosphate product, hyperphosphatemia accelerates the progression of secondary hyperparathyroidism with the concomitant bone loss, possibly linked to vascular calcium-phosphate precipitation.ResultsThe control of serum phosphate levels reduces vascular calcification not only

MARIO COZZOLINO; DIEGO BRANCACCIO; MAURIZIO GALLIENI; EDUARDO SLATOPOLSKY; Mario Cozzolino M. D

2005-01-01

249

Physical activity, genes, and lifetime predisposition to chronic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This mini-review summarizes the main associations between physical activity and chronic diseases and discusses the basic concepts\\u000a related to the role of genetic factors in studies evaluating the effects of physical activity\\/exercise therapy on chronic\\u000a disease prevention\\/treatment during the life course. Many observational cohort studies have shown that high physical activity\\u000a during young adulthood or middle age is associated with

Urho M. Kujala

2011-01-01

250

Advanced MRI Methods for Assessment of Chronic Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

MRI plays an increasingly important role for assessment of patients with chronic liver disease. MRI has numerous advantages, including lack of ionizing radiation and the possibility of performing multiparametric imaging. With recent advances in technology, advanced MRI methods such as diffusion-, perfusion-weighted MRI, MR elastography, chemical shift based fat-water separation and MR spectroscopy can now be applied to liver imaging. We will review the respective roles of these techniques for assessment of chronic liver disease. PMID:19542391

Taouli, Bachir; Ehman, Richard L.; Reeder, Scott B.

2010-01-01

251

Time Course and Recovery of Exacerbations in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with symptomatic and physiological deterio- ration, little is known of the time course and duration of these changes. We have studied symptoms and lung function changes as- sociated with COPD exacerbations to determine factors affecting recovery from exacerbation. A cohort of 101 patients with moder- ate to severe COPD (mean

TERENCE A. R. SEEMUNGAL; GAVIN C. DONALDSON; ANGSHU BHOWMIK; DONALD J. JEFFRIES; JADWIGA A. WEDZICHA

2000-01-01

252

Effect of Exacerbation on Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exacerbations occur commonly in patients with moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but factors affecting their severity and frequency or effects on quality of life are un- known. We measured daily peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and daily respiratory symptoms for 1 yr in 70 COPD patients (52 male, 18 female, mean age ( 6 SD) 67.5 6

TERENCE A. R. SEEMUNGAL; GAVIN C. DONALDSON; ELIZABETH A. PAUL; JANINE C. BESTALL; DONALD J. JEFFRIES; JADWIGA A. WEDZICHA

1998-01-01

253

CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C. [and others

1994-09-01

254

High burden and unmet patient needs in chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex debilitating condition affecting more than 70 million people worldwide. With the increased prevalence in risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in an aging population, CKD prevalence is also expected to increase. Increased awareness and understanding of the overall CKD burden by health care teams (patients, clinicians, and payers) is warranted so that overall care and treatment management may improve. This review of the burden of CKD summarizes available evidence of the clinical, humanistic, and economic burden of CKD and the current unmet need for new treatments and serves as a resource on the overall burden. Across countries, CKD prevalence varies considerably and is dependent upon patient characteristics. The prevalence of risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and congestive heart failure is noticeably higher in patients with lower estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) and results in highly complex CKD patient populations. As CKD severity worsens, there is a subsequent decline in patient health-related quality of life and an increased use of health care resources as well as burgeoning costs. With current treatment, nearly half of patients progress to unfavorable renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Although curative treatment that will arrest kidney deterioration is desired, innovative agents under investigation for CKD to slow kidney deterioration, such as atrasentan, bardoxolone methyl, and spherical carbon adsorbent, may offer patients healthier and more productive lives. PMID:23293534

Braun, LeeAnn; Sood, Vipan; Hogue, Susan; Lieberman, Bonnie; Copley-Merriman, Catherine

2012-01-01

255

Epigenetics and muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, preventable, and treatable disease and a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In COPD, comorbidities, acute exacerbations, and systemic manifestations negatively influence disease severity and progression regardless of the respiratory condition. Skeletal muscle dysfunction, which is one of the commonest systemic manifestations in patients with COPD, has a tremendous impact on their exercise capacity and quality of life. Several pathophysiological and molecular underlying mechanisms including epigenetics (the process whereby gene expression is regulated by heritable mechanisms that do not affect DNA sequence) have been shown to participate in the etiology of COPD muscle dysfunction. The epigenetic modifications identified so far in cells include DNA methylation, histone acetylation and methylation, and noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs. Herein, we first review the role of epigenetic mechanisms in muscle development and adaptation to environmental factors in several models. Moreover, the epigenetic events reported so far to be potentially involved in muscle dysfunction and mass loss of patients with COPD are also discussed. Furthermore, the different expression profile of several muscle-enriched microRNAs in the diaphragm and vastus lateralis muscles of patients with COPD are also reviewed from results recently obtained in our group. The role of protein hyperacetylation in enhanced muscle protein catabolism of limb muscles is also discussed. Future research should focus on the full elucidation of the triggers of epigenetic mechanisms and their specific downstream biological pathways in COPD muscle dysfunction and wasting. PMID:24794953

Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

2015-01-01

256

MRI-based Three dimensional shape analysis of thigh muscles: people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease versus healthy older adults.  

E-print Network

Pulmonary Disease versus healthy older adults. Bahareh HajGhanbari, Ghassan Hamarneh, Neda Changizi, Aaron in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, the distribution of the atrophy among individual, the systemic effects of the disease affect them differently and non- uniformly. The purpose of this study

Hamarneh, Ghassan

257

Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in Italy: possible therapeutical approaches.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects a significant percentage of the Italian population, particularly among the elderly. It is estimated that more than 300 patients per million population (pmp) are diagnosed as having CKD each year, and about 0.8% of Italians are thought to have serum creatinine levels >=1.5 mg/dL. The number of patients being admitted to renal replacement therapies (RRT) has been growing up rapidly in the last decades, leading to 134 patients pmp starting RRT throughout 2000 and to 804 patients pmp on chronic RRT in the same year. As such therapies are very expensive, CKD must be therefore considered as a striking problem also by a socio-economical point of view. As a consequence, any medical intervention being able to halt or at least to slow down the progression of CKD and/or to prevent the development of related complications or comorbidities is of paramount importance. Several therapeutical interventions, including hypertension and proteinuria control, protein restriction, anemia, calcium-phosphate disorders and dyslipidemia correction and smoking cessation, showed to be actually effective in at least partially achieving these objectives. Other emerging therapeutical approaches, although well promising, need further evidence to be definitively included in the management of CKD patients. Particular efforts should be made in order to refer these patients to the nephrologist as early as possible, as it has been widely demonstrated that an early and regular nephrological care leads to decreased morbidity and mortality and also to decreased social costs. PMID:12649529

Locatelli, Francesco; Pozzoni, Pietro; Del Vecchio, Lucia

2003-01-01

258

Building an Evidence Base for the Co-Occurrence of Chronic Disease and Psychiatric Distress and Impairment  

PubMed Central

Introduction Mental disorders and chronic diseases have been reported to independently affect half of the US population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the comorbid nature of these conditions. Methods We analyzed data from 39,954 participants from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey who reported both psychological distress and impairment, on the basis of the Kessler 6 and the Sheehan Disability Scale, and 1 or more of 4 chronic diseases (type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, heart disease). Weighted and nonweighted multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the association between psychological distress and impairment and chronic disease, after adjusting for sex, age, race, current smoking, binge drinking in the previous year, moderate physical activity, and body mass index. Results After controlling for covariates in the model, we found a significant dose–response relationship between reported chronic diseases and psychiatric distress and impairment that ranged from 1.50 for 1 reported chronic disease to 4.68 for 4 reported chronic diseases. Conclusion The growing chronic disease burden should be understood clinically in the context of mental health conditions. Further research is needed to identify ways to integrate mental health and chronic disease prevention in primary care. PMID:25340360

Smith, Tyler C.

2014-01-01

259

Current issues in chronic graft-versus-host disease.  

PubMed

Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Increased transplantation of older patients and the more frequent use of unrelated donors has led to increased numbers of patients with this painful complication. Recent advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of chronic GVHD and in establishing precise criteria for diagnosis and classification of disease manifestations. These advances will hopefully pave the way for improving both the prophylaxis and treatment of chronic GVHD. PMID:24914139

Socié, Gérard; Ritz, Jerome

2014-07-17

260

Chronic diseases in the European Union: the prevalence and health cost implications of chronic pain.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to assess recent data on the prevalence of chronic pain as part of chronic diseases; the prevalence of chronic pain as a chronic condition in its own right; the costs attributed to chronic pain; and the European Union (EU) policies to addressing chronic pain. Recent literature was reviewed for data on the prevalence and cost implications of chronic pain in the EU. Following on from an earlier systematic review, 8 databases were searched for prevalence and 10 for cost information from 2009 to 2011 and relevant EU organizations were contacted. Ten cost and 29 prevalence studies were included from the 142 full papers screened. The general adult population reported an average chronic pain prevalence of 27%, which was similar to those for common chronic conditions. Fibromyalgia had the highest unemployment rate (6%; Rivera et al., Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2009;27[Suppl 56]:S39-S45) claims for incapacity benefit (up to 29.9%; Sicras-Mainar et al., Arthritis Res Ther. 2009;11:R54), and greatest number of days of absence from work (Rivera et al., Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2009;27[Suppl 56]:S39-S45). Chronic pain is common and the total population cost is high. Despite its high impact, chronic pain as a condition seems to have had little specific policy response. However, there does appear to be sufficient evidence to at least make addressing chronic pain a high priority alongside other chronic diseases as well as to conduct more research, particularly regarding cost. PMID:23216170

Leadley, R M; Armstrong, N; Lee, Y C; Allen, A; Kleijnen, J

2012-12-01

261

Magnesium in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease, which is partly explained by the fact that 40–70% of patients receiving dialysis have significant coronary artery disease. Recent clinical studies have shown that lower serum magnesium (Mg) levels are associated with vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

Mehmet Kanbay; David Goldsmith; Mehtap Erkmen Uyar; Faruk Turgut; Adrian Covic

2010-01-01

262

Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with chronic kidney disease have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease, which increases in a dose-dependent fashion with worsening kidney function. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including advanced age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia, have an important role in the progression of cardiovascular disease in patients who have a reduced glomerular filtration rate, especially in those with mild-to-moderate kidney disease.

Sarina van der Zee; Usman Baber; Sammy Elmariah; Jonathan Winston; Valentin Fuster

2009-01-01

263

Personality Traits and Chronic Disease: Implications for Adult Personality Development  

PubMed Central

Objective. Personality traits have been associated with chronic disease. Less is known about the longitudinal relation between personality and disease and whether chronic disease is associated with changes in personality. Method. Participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (N = 2,008) completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and a standard medical interview at regularly scheduled visits; the Charlson Comorbidity Index, a weighted sum of 19 serious diseases, was derived from this interview. Using data from 6,685 visits, we tested whether personality increased risk of disease and whether disease was associated with personality change. Results. Measured concurrently, neuroticism and conscientiousness were associated with greater disease burden. The impulsiveness facet of neuroticism was the strongest predictor of developing disease across the follow-up period: For every standard deviation increase in impulsiveness, there was a 26% increased risk of developing disease and a 36% increased risk of getting more ill. Personality traits changed only modestly with disease: As participants developed chronic illnesses, they became more conservative (decreased openness). Discussion. This research indicates that personality traits confer risk for disease, in part, through health-risk behaviors. These traits, however, were relatively resistant to the effect of serious disease. PMID:23685925

2013-01-01

264

Chronic liver inflammation: clinical implications beyond alcoholic liver disease.  

PubMed

Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to alcoholic liver disease, including hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and chronic inflammation can simultaneously cause systemic medical illness. Recent evidence suggests that alcoholic liver disease is a predictor for liver-related diseases, cardiovascular disease, immunologic disease, and bone disease. Chronic inflammation in alcoholic liver disease is mediated by a direct inflammatory cascade from the alcohol detoxification process and an indirect inflammatory cascade in response to gut microflora-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease and its related systemic illness is characterized by oxidative stress, activation of the immune cascade, and gut-liver interactions. Integrative therapeutic strategies for alcoholic liver disease include abstaining from alcohol consumption; general anti-inflammatories such as glucocorticoid, pentoxifylline, and tumour necrosis factor-? antagonist; antioxidants such as N- acetylcysteine; gut microflora and LPS modulators such as rifaximin and/or probiotics. This review focuses on the impact of chronic liver inflammation on systemic health problems and several potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24605015

Park, Byoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Jae; Lee, Hye-Ree

2014-03-01

265

Chronic liver inflammation: Clinical implications beyond alcoholic liver disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic alcohol exposure can lead to alcoholic liver disease, including hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and chronic inflammation can simultaneously cause systemic medical illness. Recent evidence suggests that alcoholic liver disease is a predictor for liver-related diseases, cardiovascular disease, immunologic disease, and bone disease. Chronic inflammation in alcoholic liver disease is mediated by a direct inflammatory cascade from the alcohol detoxification process and an indirect inflammatory cascade in response to gut microflora-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease and its related systemic illness is characterized by oxidative stress, activation of the immune cascade, and gut-liver interactions. Integrative therapeutic strategies for alcoholic liver disease include abstaining from alcohol consumption; general anti-inflammatories such as glucocorticoid, pentoxifylline, and tumour necrosis factor-? antagonist; antioxidants such as N- acetylcysteine; gut microflora and LPS modulators such as rifaximin and/or probiotics. This review focuses on the impact of chronic liver inflammation on systemic health problems and several potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24605015

Park, Byoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Jae; Lee, Hye-Ree

2014-01-01

266

Genetic polymorphisms of the RAS-cytokine pathway and chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is irreversible. It is associated with renal failure progression and atherosclerotic\\u000a cardiovascular (CV) abnormalities. Nearly 60% of children with CKD are affected since birth with congenital or inherited kidney\\u000a disorders. Preliminary evidence primarily from adult CKD studies indicates common genetic risk factors for CKD and atherosclerotic\\u000a CV disease. Although multiple physiologic pathways share common

Craig Wong; Peter Kanetsky; Dominic Raj

2008-01-01

267

Action plans with limited patient education only for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease characterised by exacerbations, usually infective in origin, which affect symptoms and quality of life. Action plans may help individuals recognise a deterioration in their symptoms and initiate changes to treatment early, thereby reducing the impact of the exacerbation.\\u000aObjectives: To assess the efficacy of action plans in the management of

Julia A E Walters; Allison C Turnock; E Hayden Walters; Richard Wood-Baker

2010-01-01

268

Susceptibility of Domestic Cats to Chronic Wasting Disease  

PubMed Central

Domestic and nondomestic cats have been shown to be susceptible to feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), almost certainly caused by consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-contaminated meat. Because domestic and free-ranging nondomestic felids scavenge cervid carcasses, including those in areas affected by chronic wasting disease (CWD), we evaluated the susceptibility of the domestic cat (Felis catus) to CWD infection experimentally. Cohorts of 5 cats each were inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) or orally (p.o.) with CWD-infected deer brain. At 40 and 42 months postinoculation, two i.c.-inoculated cats developed signs consistent with prion disease, including a stilted gait, weight loss, anorexia, polydipsia, patterned motor behaviors, head and tail tremors, and ataxia, and the cats progressed to terminal disease within 5 months. Brains from these two cats were pooled and inoculated into cohorts of cats by the i.c., p.o., and intraperitoneal and subcutaneous (i.p./s.c.) routes. Upon subpassage, feline CWD was transmitted to all i.c.-inoculated cats with a decreased incubation period of 23 to 27 months. Feline-adapted CWD (FelCWD) was demonstrated in the brains of all of the affected cats by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in clinically ill cats, which included multifocal T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal hyperintensities, ventricular size increases, prominent sulci, and white matter tract cavitation. Currently, 3 of 4 i.p./s.c.- and 2 of 4 p.o. secondary passage-inoculated cats have developed abnormal behavior patterns consistent with the early stage of feline CWD. These results demonstrate that CWD can be transmitted and adapted to the domestic cat, thus raising the issue of potential cervid-to-feline transmission in nature. PMID:23236066

Nalls, Amy V.; Seelig, Davis M.; Kraft, Susan L.; Carnes, Kevin; Anderson, Kelly R.; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hoover, Edward A.

2013-01-01

269

How should environmental stress affect the population dynamics of disease?  

E-print Network

@lifesci.ucsb.edu Abstract We modelled how stress affects the population dynamics of infectious disease. We were specifically-specific diseases generally declined with stress while the impact of non-specific (or open) diseases increased and disease in natural populations. Keywords Disease, dynamics, host, infectious, model, pollution, population

Holt, Robert D.

270

Modeling seasonal behavior changes and disease transmission with application to chronic wasting disease.  

PubMed

Behavior and habitat of wildlife animals change seasonally according to environmental conditions. Mathematical models need to represent this seasonality to be able to make realistic predictions about the future of a population and the effectiveness of human interventions. Managing and modeling disease in wild animal populations requires particular care in that disease transmission dynamics is a critical consideration in the etiology of both human and animal diseases, with different transmission paradigms requiring different disease risk management strategies. Since transmission of infectious diseases among wildlife depends strongly on social behavior, mechanisms of disease transmission could also change seasonally. A specific consideration in this regard confronted by modellers is whether the contact rate between individuals is density-dependent or frequency-dependent. We argue that seasonal behavior changes could lead to a seasonal shift between density and frequency dependence. This hypothesis is explored in the case of chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal disease that affects deer, elk and moose in many areas of North America. Specifically, we introduce a strategic CWD risk model based on direct disease transmission that accounts for the seasonal change in the transmission dynamics and habitats occupied, guided by information derived from cervid ecology. The model is composed of summer and winter susceptible-infected (SI) equations, with frequency-dependent and density-dependent transmission dynamics, respectively. The model includes impulsive birth events with density-dependent birth rate. We determine the basic reproduction number as a weighted average of two seasonal reproduction numbers. We parameterize the model from data derived from the scientific literature on CWD and deer ecology, and conduct global and local sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number. We explore the effectiveness of different culling strategies for the management of CWD: although summer culling seems to be an effective disease eradication strategy, the total culling rate is limited by the requirement to preserve the herd. PMID:24035840

Oraby, Tamer; Vasilyeva, Olga; Krewski, Daniel; Lutscher, Frithjof

2014-01-01

271

Inflammatory Factors and Exercise in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic kidney disease frequently present with chronic elevations in markers of inflammation, a condition that appears to be exacerbated by disease progression and onset of haemodialysis. Systemic inflammation is interlinked with malnutrition and muscle protein wasting and is implicated in a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease: the most common cause of mortality in this population. Research in the general population and other chronic disease cohorts suggests that an increase in habitual activity levels over a prolonged period may help redress basal increases in systemic inflammation. Furthermore, those populations with the highest baseline levels of systemic inflammation appear to have the greatest improvements from training. On the whole, the activity levels of the chronic kidney disease population reflect a sedentary lifestyle, indicating the potential for increasing physical activity and observing health benefits. This review explores the current literature investigating exercise and inflammatory factors in the chronic kidney disease population and then attempts to explain the contradictory findings and suggests where future research is required. PMID:23737775

Hull, Katherine L.; Smith, Alice C.; Burton, James O.; Bishop, Nicolette C.

2013-01-01

272

Role of psychiatric comorbidity in chronic Lyme disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To evaluate the prevalence and role of psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors in patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD). Methods. We assessed 159 patients drawn from a cohort of 240 patients evaluated at an academic Lyme disease referral center. Patients were screened for common axis I psychiatric disorders (e.g., depressive and anxiety disorders); structured clinical interviews confirmed diagnoses.

Afton L. Hassett; Diane C. Radvanski; Steven Buyske; Shantal V. Savage; Michael Gara; Javier I. Escobar; Leonard H. Sigal

2008-01-01

273

Pathophysiology of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis have 2- to 5-fold more coronary artery calcification than age-matched individuals with angiographically proven coronary artery disease. In addition to increased traditional risk factors, CKD patients also have a number,of nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors that may,play a prominent role in the

Linda Demer; Sharon M. Moe; Neal X. Chen

2010-01-01

274

Vitamin D Insufficiency and Deficiency in Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Kidney disease has been identified as a risk factor for vitamin D deficiency in hospitalized patients, and low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been suggested to be a risk factor for hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, little is known about the magnitude of vitamin D deficiency in patients with CKD living in the United States.

Esther A. González; Ashutosh Sachdeva; Dana A. Oliver; Kevin J. Martin

2004-01-01

275

Sleep and Sleep Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death in the US. Numerous studies have demonstrated that sleep disturbances are common in COPD patients, with more prominent complaints in patients with more severe disease and with increasing age. Sleep disturbances may occur due to the effects of breathing abnormalities on sleep and sleep disruption. However, other

Nancy Collop

2010-01-01

276

Uremia-related cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the dialysis population and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic renal failure. The conventional Framingham cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (ie, hypertension, smoking, age, hyper- cholesterolemia, and a family history of CV disease) have typically been the focus of risk stratification and subse- quent primary and\\/or secondary

Caroline E. Stigant

277

Significant Improvement from Chronic Beryllium Disease Following Corticosteroid Pulse Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a rare disease characterized by diffuse interstitial pulmonary granulomatosis. We report a case of CBD which exhibited marked improvement both subjectively and objectively following pulse therapy. The patient was a 36-year-old man whose chief complaint was dyspnea and a dry cough. Since July 1990, the patient had been working in the development of an automatic

Kaoru NAGAOKA; Tsutomu YOSHIDA; Hiroki SAKAKIBARA; Hideki KURITA; Hiroshige TANIWAKI; Yuichiro ONO

2006-01-01

278

Bronchodilator reversibility testing in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A limited or absent bronchodilator response is used to classify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and can determine the treatment offered. The reliability of the recommended response criteria and their relationship to disease progression has not been established.Methods: 660 patients meeting European Respiratory Society (ERS) diagnostic criteria for irreversible COPD were studied. Spirometric parameters were measured on three occasions

P M A Calverley; P S Burge; S Spencer; J A Anderson; P W Jones

2003-01-01

279

Health status measurement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health status measurement is a common feature of studies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This review assesses recent evidence for the validity of these measurements and their role as measures of the overall impact of the disease on the patient's daily life and wellbeing. It reviews the mostly widely used COPD specific questionnaires and examines the contribution that they

P W Jones

2001-01-01

280

Body weight and the prevalence of chronic diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation between body mass index and prevalence of 17 chronic diseases or groups of diseases was analysed using data from the 1983 Italian National Health Survey, based on a sample of 72,284 individuals aged 15 or over randomly selected within strata of geographical area, size of place of residence and of household in order to be representative of the

E Negri; R Pagano; A Decarli; C La Vecchia

1988-01-01

281

Angiotensin1 Converting Enzyme Polymorphisms in Chronic Beryllium Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test the hypothesis that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genotype is associated with chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and disease severity, we studied 50 cases of CBD and compared their ACE genotype to that of two different control groups, consisting of: ( 1 ) 50 participants from a beryl- lium machining facility; and ( 2 ) 50 participants from a

LISA A. MAIER; MARY V. RAYNOLDS; DAVID A. YOUNG; ELIZABETH A. BARKER; LEE S. NEWMAN

1999-01-01

282

Epigenetic modifications of chronic hypoxia-mediated neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder affecting the elderly people. AD is characterized by progressive and gradual decline in cognitive function and memory loss. While familial early-onset AD is usually associated with gene mutations, the etiology of sporadic late-onset form of AD is largely unknown. It has been reported that environmental factors and epigenetic alterations significantly contribute to the process of AD. Our previous studies have documented that chronic hypoxia is one of the environmental factors that may trigger the AD development and aggravate the disease progression. In this review, we will summarize the pathological effects of chronic hypoxia on the onset and development of AD and put forward the possible molecule mechanisms underlying the chronic hypoxia mediated AD pathogenesis. Finally, we propose that epigenetic regulations may represent new opportunity for the therapeutic intervention of this disease. PMID:24650677

2014-01-01

283

Underlying chronic granulomatous disease in a patient with bronchocentric granulomatosis  

PubMed Central

We present a case of bronchocentric granulomatosis in a woman with no history of asthma who was colonised with Aspergillusfumigatus. A family history of chronic granulomatous disease prompted further testing that demonstrated severely depressed neutrophil oxidant production and gp91phox deficiency compatible with the X linked carrier state of chronic granulomatous disease. Only one report of the association of these two rare diseases has previously appeared in the literature. We postulate that an ineffective immune response led to the prolonged colonisation of Afumigatus resulting in a hypersensitivity reaction that was manifest clinically as bronchocentric granulomatosis. PMID:14645984

Moltyaner, Y; Geerts, W; Chamberlain, D; Heyworth, P; Noack, D; Rae, J; Doyle, J; Downey, G

2003-01-01

284

Evaluating bone quality in patients with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Bone of normal quality and quantity can successfully endure physiologically imposed mechanical loads. Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) adversely affects bone quality through alterations in bone turnover and mineralization, whereas bone quantity is affected through changes in bone volume. Changes in bone quality can be associated with altered bone material, structure, or microdamage, which can result in an elevated rate of fracture in patients with CKD–MBD. Fractures cannot always be explained by reduced bone quantity and, therefore, bone quality should be assessed with a variety of techniques from the macro-organ level to the nanoscale level. In this Review, we demonstrate the importance of evaluating bone from multiple perspectives and hierarchical levels to understand CKD–MBD-related abnormalities in bone quality. Understanding the relationships between variations in material, structure, microdamage, and mechanical properties of bone in patients with CKD–MBD should aid in the development of new modalities to prevent, or treat, these abnormalities. PMID:24100399

Malluche, Hartmut H.; Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David

2013-01-01

285

Hydrocarbon exposure and chronic renal disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study objective was to investigate further the potential role of long-term exposure to hydrocarbons (HCs) in the development of idiopathic chronic glomerulopathy (ICG) using a more refined measurement of HC exposure. A total of 321 pairs of cases and controls, matched by age, gender, and geographical area, were assembled. A detailed questionnaire was blindly administered to cases and controls

Nabih R. Asal; Harold L. Cleveland; Christian Kaufman; Wato Nsa; Deborah I. Nelson; Robert Y. Nelson; Elisa T. Lee; Beverly Kingsley

1996-01-01

286

Global health: chronic diseases and other emergent issues in global health.  

PubMed

Infectious diseases have had a decisive and rapid impact on shaping and changing health policy. Noncommunicable diseases, while not garnering as much interest or importance over the past 20 years, have been affecting public health around the world in a steady and critical way, becoming the leading cause of death in developed and developing countries. This article discusses emergent issues in global health related to noncommunicable diseases and conditions, with focus on defining the unique epidemiologic features and relevant programmatic, health systems, and policy responses concerning noncommunicable chronic diseases, mental health, accidents and injuries, urbanization, climate change, and disaster preparedness. PMID:21896363

Koehlmoos, Tracey Pérez; Anwar, Shahela; Cravioto, Alejandro

2011-09-01

287

Clinical application of expectorant therapy in chronic inflammatory airway diseases (Review)  

PubMed Central

Airway mucus hypersecretion is a significant clinical and pathological feature of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Its clinical presentations include recurrent coughing and phlegm. Airway mucus is closely associated with the occurrence, development and prognosis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases and critically affects the lung function, quality of life, hospitalization rate and mortality of patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Therefore, expectorant therapies targeting the potential mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion have been the focus of numerous studies. Conventional expectorants are mainly mucoactive medicines, including nausea-stimulating expectorants, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and proteases and nucleases. In addition, certain traditional Chinese herbal medicines and non-mucoactive agents, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists and macrolide antibiotics, have also shown expectorant effects. Several novel medicines for expectorant therapy have emerged, including cholesterol-lowering statins, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, stanozolol, surfactants, flavonoids, tachykinin receptor antagonists, protease inhibitors, cytokine antagonists and purinergic agonists. With the increasing number of multidisciplinary studies, the effectiveness of expectorant therapy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases has been confirmed. Therefore, the development of novel expectorants and the standardization of expectorant therapy are the direction and focus of future studies, thus benefiting patients who have a chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:24660026

ZHANG, TING; ZHOU, XIANGDONG

2014-01-01

288

Chronic diseases influence major life changing decisions: a new domain in quality of life research  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this review is to identify knowledge about the influence of chronic disease on major life changing decisions (MLCDs). This review was carried out in three stages: identification of key search terms; selection of databases and searching parameters; and evaluation of references. Only two articles matched the main search term ‘major life changing decisions’. No article reviewed or measured the influence of chronic disease on major life changing decisions. However, 76 articles and various sections of seven books were identified that provided insight into this area and these are reviewed in detail. This literature review has brought together previously scattered information on chronic disease impact on important patient life decisions. These include decisions related to having children, marriage and divorce, job and career choice, social life, holidays, travelling and education. Lifestyle decisions viewed by patients as major decisions are also documented. The influence of cancer on life decisions is discussed, as are affected life decisions of other family members. Very little information is available about the long-term impact of chronic disease on patients' lives and methodology to assess long-term impact is incomplete. This review points to a novel dimension to health-related outcome research, the impact of chronic disease on major life changing decisions, and its possible implication for patients' future health. PMID:21659399

Bhatti, ZU; Salek, MS; Finlay, AY

2011-01-01

289

Aging and chronic disease as independent causative factors for death and a programmed onset for chronic disease.  

PubMed

To explore the relationship between occurrence of chronic diseases and the aging process, the role of age in death from disease was assessed by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, to quantify differences in the age compositions between death and survival groups using data for various diseases and from regions of different socioeconomic status in China. Results showed that the contribution of age to different diseases was varied. Increase in life expectancy was associated with relatively old age at the time of death for five of seven diseases. For cancer and diseases of the circulatory system, increase in life expectancy was associated with relatively younger age at the time of death. These findings indicate that chronic diseases may occur independently of aging and may have a programmed onset pattern. PMID:25465502

Hui, Liu

2015-01-01

290

Genetic susceptibility for chronic bronchitis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

BackgroundChronic bronchitis (CB) is one of the classic phenotypes of COPD. The aims of our study were to investigate genetic variants associated with COPD subjects with CB relative to smokers with normal spirometry, and to assess for genetic differences between subjects with CB and without CB within the COPD population.MethodsWe analyzed data from current and former smokers from three cohorts: the COPDGene Study; GenKOLS (Bergen, Norway); and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). CB was defined as having a cough productive of phlegm on most days for at least 3 consecutive months per year for at least 2 consecutive years. CB COPD cases were defined as having both CB and at least moderate COPD based on spirometry. Our primary analysis used smokers with normal spirometry as controls; secondary analysis was performed using COPD subjects without CB as controls. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis.ResultsFor CB COPD relative to smoking controls, we identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 11p15.5 (rs34391416, OR¿=¿1.93, P¿=¿4.99¿×¿10-8) as well as significant associations of known COPD SNPs within FAM13A. In addition, a GWAS of CB relative to those without CB within COPD subjects showed suggestive evidence for association on 1q23.3 (rs114931935, OR¿=¿1.88, P¿=¿4.99¿×¿10-7).ConclusionsWe found genome-wide significant associations with CB COPD on 4q22.1 (FAM13A) and 11p15.5 (EFCAB4A, CHID1 and AP2A2), and a locus associated with CB within COPD subjects on 1q23.3 (RPL31P11 and ATF6). This study provides further evidence that genetic variants may contribute to phenotypic heterogeneity of COPD.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT00608764, NCT00292552. PMID:25241909

Lee, Jin; Cho, Michael H; Hersh, Craig P; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Crapo, James D; Bakke, Per S; Gulsvik, Amund; Comellas, Alejandro P; Wendt, Christine H; Lomas, David A; Kim, Victor; Silverman, Edwin K

2014-09-21

291

Learning from berberine: Treating chronic diseases through multiple targets.  

PubMed

Although advances have been made, chemotherapy for chronic, multifactorial diseases such as cancers, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes is far from satisfactory. Agents with different mechanisms of action are required. The botanic compound berberine (BBR) has been used as an over-the-counter antibacterial for diarrhea in China for many decades. Recent clinical studies have shown that BBR may be therapeutic in various types of chronic diseases. This review addresses BBR's molecular mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy and safety in patients with type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, heart diseases, cancers and inflammation. One of the advantages of BBR is its multiple-target effects in each of these diseases. The therapeutic efficacy of BBR may reflect a synergistic regulation of these targets, resulting in a comprehensive effect against these various chronic disorders. The safety of BBR may be due to its harmonious distribution into those targets. Although the single-target concept is still the principle for drug discovery and research, this review emphasizes the concept of a multiple target strategy, which may be an important approach toward the successful treatment of multifactorial chronic diseases. PMID:24174332

Yao, Jing; Kong, Weijia; Jiang, Jiandong

2013-10-30

292

Metabolic acidosis and the progression of chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease. Accumulating evidence identifies acidosis not only as a consequence of, but as a contributor to, kidney disease progression. Several mechanistic pathways have been identified in this regard. The dietary acid load, even in the absence of overt acidosis, may have deleterious effects. Several small trials now suggest that the treatment of acidosis with oral alkali can slow the progression of kidney disease. PMID:24708763

2014-01-01

293

Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey  

PubMed Central

Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD) and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed by this illness. PMID:24749006

Johnson, Lorraine; Wilcox, Spencer; Mankoff, Jennifer

2014-01-01

294

Impacts of hot and cold spells differ for acute and chronic ischaemic heart diseases  

PubMed Central

Background Many studies have reported associations between temperature extremes and cardiovascular mortality but little has been understood about differences in the effects on acute and chronic diseases. The present study examines hot and cold spell effects on ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality in the Czech Republic during 1994–2009, with emphasis upon differences in the effects on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and chronic IHD. Methods We use analogous definitions for hot and cold spells based on quantiles of daily average temperature anomalies, thus allowing for comparison of results for summer hot spells and winter cold spells. Daily mortality data were standardised to account for the long-term trend and the seasonal and weekly cycles. Periods when the data were affected by epidemics of influenza and other acute respiratory infections were removed from the analysis. Results Both hot and cold spells were associated with excess IHD mortality. For hot spells, chronic IHD was responsible for most IHD excess deaths in both male and female populations, and the impacts were much more pronounced in the 65+ years age group. The excess mortality from AMI was much lower compared to chronic IHD mortality during hot spells. For cold spells, by contrast, the relative excess IHD mortality was most pronounced in the younger age group (0–64 years), and we found different pattern for chronic IHD and AMI, with larger effects on AMI. Conclusions The findings show that while excess deaths due to IHD during hot spells are mainly of persons with chronic diseases whose health had already been compromised, cardiovascular changes induced by cold stress may result in deaths from acute coronary events rather than chronic IHD, and this effect is important also in the younger population. This suggests that the most vulnerable population groups as well as the most affected cardiovascular diseases differ between hot and cold spells, which needs to be taken into account when designing and implementing preventive actions. PMID:24886566

2014-01-01

295

[Features of neurologic semiotics at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is actual pathology, when it forms the mixed hypoxemia. In the conditions of a chronic hypoxemia structures of organism with high level of metabolic processes, namely brain tissues, suffer. Character of defeat of the central nervous system at that pathology is insufficiently studied. In this article we studied and analysed the presence of such changes as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment and features of neurologic semiotics at COPD in 50 patients. PMID:21957596

Litvinenko, I V; Baranov, V L; Kolcheva, Iu A

2011-01-01

296

Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease: Getting to the heart of the matter  

Microsoft Academic Search

The high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with kidney disease is well described. This Canadian, multicenter, observational cohort study reports the prevalence and risk factors of CVD associated with kidney disease, in a cohort of patients with established chronic kidney disease (CKD), who are followed-up by nephrologists. This analysis sought to answer 2 questions: (1) in patients with

Adeera Levin; Ognjenka Djurdjev; Brendan Barrett; Ellen Burgess; Euan Carlisle; Jean Ethier; Kailash Jindal; David Mendelssohn; Sheldon Tobe; Joel Singer; Christopher Thompson

2001-01-01

297

Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

Goderis, Geert

2014-01-01

298

In Search of a Germ Theory Equivalent for Chronic Disease  

PubMed Central

The fight against infectious disease advanced dramatically with the consolidation of the germ theory in the 19th century. This focus on a predominant cause of infections (ie, microbial pathogens) ultimately led to medical and public health advances (eg, immunization, pasteurization, antibiotics). However, the resulting declines in infections in the 20th century were matched by a rise in chronic, noncommunicable diseases, for which there is no single underlying etiology. The discovery of a form of low-grade systemic and chronic inflammation (“metaflammation”), linked to inducers (broadly termed “anthropogens”) associated with modern man-made environments and lifestyles, suggests an underlying basis for chronic disease that could provide a 21st-century equivalent of the germ theory. PMID:22575080

2012-01-01

299

Sickle cell disease: a neglected chronic disease of increasing global health importance  

PubMed Central

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a single gene disorder causing a debilitating systemic syndrome characterised by chronic anaemia, acute painful episodes, organ infarction and chronic organ damage and by a significant reduction in life expectancy. The origin of SCD lies in the malarial regions of the tropics where carriers are protected against death from malaria and hence enjoy an evolutionary advantage. More recently, population migration has meant that SCD now has a worldwide distribution and that a substantial number of children are born with the condition in higher-income areas, including large parts of Europe and North and South America. Newborn screening, systematic clinical follow-up and prevention of sepsis and organ damage have led to an increased life expectancy among people with SCD in many such countries; however, in resource-limited settings where the majority continue to be born, most affected children continue to die in early childhood, usually undiagnosed, due to the lack of effective programmes for its early detection and treatment. As new therapies emerge, potentially leading to disease amelioration or cure, it is of paramount importance that the significant burden of SCD in resource-poor countries is properly recognised. PMID:25239949

Chakravorty, Subarna; Williams, Thomas N

2015-01-01

300

Sickle cell disease: a neglected chronic disease of increasing global health importance.  

PubMed

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a single gene disorder causing a debilitating systemic syndrome characterised by chronic anaemia, acute painful episodes, organ infarction and chronic organ damage and by a significant reduction in life expectancy. The origin of SCD lies in the malarial regions of the tropics where carriers are protected against death from malaria and hence enjoy an evolutionary advantage. More recently, population migration has meant that SCD now has a worldwide distribution and that a substantial number of children are born with the condition in higher-income areas, including large parts of Europe and North and South America. Newborn screening, systematic clinical follow-up and prevention of sepsis and organ damage have led to an increased life expectancy among people with SCD in many such countries; however, in resource-limited settings where the majority continue to be born, most affected children continue to die in early childhood, usually undiagnosed, due to the lack of effective programmes for its early detection and treatment. As new therapies emerge, potentially leading to disease amelioration or cure, it is of paramount importance that the significant burden of SCD in resource-poor countries is properly recognised. PMID:25239949

Chakravorty, Subarna; Williams, Thomas N

2015-01-01

301

Spectrum of anemia associated with chronic liver disease  

PubMed Central

Anemia of diverse etiology is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. The causes of anemia include acute or chronic gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and hypersplenism secondary to portal hypertension. Severe hepatocellular disease predisposes to hemorrhage because of impaired blood coagulation caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factors synthesized by hepatocytes, and/or thrombocytopenia. Aplastic anemia, which is characterized by pancytopenia and hypocellular bone marrow, may follow the development of hepatitis. Its presentation includes progressive anemia and hemorrhagic manifestations. Hematological complications of combination therapy for chronic viral hepatitis include clinically significant anemia, secondary to treatment with ribavirin and/or interferon. Ribavirin-induced hemolysis can be reversed by reducing the dose of the drug or discontinuing it altogether. Interferons may contribute to anemia by inducing bone marrow suppression. Alcohol ingestion is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease and may contribute to associated anemia. In patients with chronic liver disease, anemia may be exacerbated by deficiency of folic acid and/or vitamin B12 that can occur secondary to inadequate dietary intake or malabsorption. PMID:19787828

Gonzalez-Casas, Rosario; Jones, E Anthony; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo

2009-01-01

302

N-acetylcysteine prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress elicited in macrophages by serum albumin drawn from chronic kidney disease rats and selectively affects lipid transporters, ABCA-1 and ABCG-1.  

PubMed

In chronic kidney disease (CKD) nontraditional risk factors, such as oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGE) contribute to cardiovascular disease. Particularly, disturbances in reverse cholesterol transport favor the development of atherosclerosis. We analyzed the influence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in CKD rats on plasma concentration of lipid peroxides (TBARS) and AGE and on the impact of serum albumin in the development of macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and cholesterol efflux, namely apo A-I and HDL2-mediated cholesterol removal and ABCA-1 and ABCG-1 protein level. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in 2-month old male Wistar rats. Controls (Sham) were false operated. Animals were treated or not with NAC (600 mg/L of water). After 60 days serum albumin was isolated by FPLC and purified by alcoholic extraction. J774 macrophages were incubated with serum albumin (1 mg/mL; 18 h) from all groups, and the expression of ERS markers (protein disulfide isomerase - PDI, Grp78 and Grp94), ABCA-1 and ABCG-1 determined by immunoblot. HDL2 or apo A-I were used for cholesterol efflux assays. Protein and lipid composition of total HDL from Sham and CKD was determined and these particles tested on their abilities to accept cell cholesterol. Comparisons were done by one-way ANOVA and Newman Keuls post test. After 60 days of CKD, body weight was 10% lower in CKD compared to Sham (p < 0.01). This was prevented by NAC. Urea, creatinine, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) (mg/dL), proteinuria (mg/24 h) (Sham, n = 31; Sham + NAC, n = 20; CKD, n = 74; CKD + NAC, n = 32), total AGE and pentosidine (n = 8; fluorescence arbitrary unit) and TBARS (n = 7; nmoL/mL) were higher in CKD (122 ± 8; 0.9 ± 0.07; 151 ± 6; 83 ± 4; 46 ± 2.5; 32,620 ± 673; 16,700 ± 1,370; 6.6 ± 0.5, respectively) and in CKD + NAC (91.4 ± 5; 0.6 ± 0.02; 126 ± 7.5; 73 ± 6; 51 ± 3.5; 24,720 ± 1,114; 10,080 ± 748; 4.5 ± 0.5, respectively) in comparison to Sham (41 ± 0.9; 0.4 ± 0.03; 76 ± 2.7; 51.5 ± 3; 14 ± 0.9; 21,750 ± 960; 5,314 ± 129; 2.0 ± 0.2, respectively; p < 0.001) and Sham + NAC (40 ± 0.9; 0.3 ± 0.02; 76 ± 2.6; 68 ± 4; 18.4 ± 1.5; 20,040 ± 700; 5,050 ± 267; 1.8 ± 0.2, respectively; p < 0.001). TC, urea, creatinine, total AGE, pentosidine and TBARS were respectively, 17%, 25%, 33%, 24%, 40% and 28% (p < 0.01) lower in CKD + NAC, than in CKD. Glycemia was higher in Sham + NAC (107 ± 4.6) and CKD + NAC (107 ± 2.6) than in Sham (96 ± 1.8; p < 0.05) and CKD (98 ± 1.6; p < 0.01), respectively. In macrophages (n = 6), CKD albumin increased PDI (3 and 6 times, p < 0.01) and Grp94 (66% and 80%, p < 0.01) in comparison to Sham and CKD + NAC-albumin treated cells, respectively. ABCA-1 expression was lower (87% and 70%, p < 0.001) in macrophage treated with Sham + NAC and CKD albumin respectively in comparison to Sham albumin; ABCG-1 was higher (4 and 7 times, p < 0.001) in macrophages treated with Sham + NAC and CKD + NAC albumin, respectively in comparison to Sham and CKD albumin. Apo A-I mediated cholesterol efflux was lower (59% and 70%, p < 0.0001) in macrophage treated with Sham + NAC and CKD albumin respectively in comparison to Sham albumin, however, the HDL2 mediated cholesterol efflux was higher (54% and 25%, p < 0.0001) in macrophage treated with Sham + NAC albumin, in comparison to Sham and CKD + NAC albumin, respectively. CKD-HDL was enriched in total protein and lipids compared to Sham-HDL but preserved its capacity to remove cholesterol from macrophages. NAC reduces plasma lipid peroxidation and AGE and abrogates ERS induced by CKD-albumin. Despite diminishing ABCA-1, NAC increases ABCG-1 that counteracts the reduction in apo A-I-mediated cholesterol efflux. NAC may contribute to attenuate the deleterious effects of CKD-albumin on lipid accumulation in macrophages helping to prevent atherogenesis in CKD. PMID:25305669

Machado, Juliana T; Iborra, Rodrigo T; Fusco, Fernanda B; Castilho, Gabriela; Pinto, Raphael S; Machado-Lima, Adriana; Nakandakare, Edna R; Seguro, Antonio C; Shimizu, Maria H; Catanozi, Sergio; Passarelli, Marisa

2014-11-01

303

Specialty Care Use in US Patients with Chronic Diseases  

PubMed Central

Despite efforts to eliminate health disparities, racial, ethnic, and geographic groups continue lag behind their counterparts in health outcomes in the United States. The purpose of this study is to determine variation in specialty care utilization by chronic disease status. Data were extracted from the Commonwealth Fund 2006 Health Care Quality Survey (n = 2475). A stratified minority sample design was employed to ensure a representative sample. Logistic regression was used in analyses to predict specialty care utilization in the sample. Poor perceived health, minority status, and lack of insurance was associated with reduced specialty care use and chronic disease diagnosis. PMID:20617013

Bellinger, Jessica D; Hassan, Rahnuma M; Rivers, Patrick A; Cheng, Qiang; Williams, Edith; Glover, Saundra H

2010-01-01

304

Identity and psychological ownership in chronic illness and disease state  

PubMed Central

Psychological ownership is rarely considered in health discourse related to chronic illness or disease state. Construction of identity is an important consideration within this framework. This autoethnographic study explores psychological ownership and identity related to prostate cancer and chronic illness. Conclusions about the nature of psychological ownership and identity were gathered from the relevant literature and personal experience. Themes include the patient–healthcare professional relationship and that psychological ownership is personal and grounded in an individual's sense of identity, control and perceived capacity to control illness or disease. Personal reflection through autoethnography guides discussion of psychological ownership and identity. PMID:20738388

Karnilowicz, W

2011-01-01

305

Chronic inflammation affects the photic response of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.  

PubMed

Environmental light entrains activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the mammalian circadian pacemaker. Using Fos as marker of neuronal activation, we investigated whether chronic systemic endotoxin administration can alter SCN responsiveness to light after different time intervals. Mice were treated i.p. with lipopolysaccharide for 60 days, and exposed to photic stimulation 7 or 30 days later. Light-induced Fos immunosignal in the SCN was highly significantly decreased versus controls at 7 days, and returned to control levels at 30 days. The data show that SCN function is altered by chronic inflammation and that this effect is reversible over time. PMID:17936367

Palomba, Maria; Bentivoglio, Marina

2008-01-01

306

Boswellic acids in chronic inflammatory diseases.  

PubMed

Oleogum resins from BOSWELLIA species are used in traditional medicine in India and African countries for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Animal experiments showed anti-inflammatory activity of the extract. The mechanism of this action is due to some boswellic acids. It is different from that of NSAID and is related to components of the immune system. The most evident action is the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase. However, other factors such as cytokines (interleukins and TNF-alpha) and the complement system are also candidates. Moreover, leukocyte elastase and oxygen radicals are targets. Clinical studies, so far with pilot character, suggest efficacy in some autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and bronchial asthma. Side effects are not severe when compared to modern drugs used for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:17024588

Ammon, H P T

2006-10-01

307

Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... addition, the body cannot respond normally to erythropoietin (EPO), a hormone made by the kidneys that stimulates ... interfere with the production and normal activity of EPO. Infectious diseases that cause AI/ACD include • tuberculosis, ...

308

Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Kidney Disease:

Andrew S. Levey; KAI-UWE ECKARDT; YUSUKE TSUKAMOTO; ADEERA LEVIN; JOSEF CORESH; JEROME ROSSERT; DICK DE ZEEUW; Thomas H. Hostetter; NORBERT LAMEIRE; GARABED EKNOYAN

2005-01-01

309

Blocking Interleukin-1? in Acute and Chronic Autoinflammatory Diseases  

PubMed Central

An expanding spectrum of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases are considered “autoinflammatory” diseases. This review considers autoinflammatory diseases as being distinct from “autoimmune” diseases. Autoimmune diseases are associated with dysfunctional T-cells and treated with “biologicals” including anti-TNF?, CTLA-Ig, anti-IL-12/23, anti-CD20, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-6 receptor. In contrast, autoinflammatory diseases are uniquely due to a dysfunctional monocyte caspase-1 activity and secretion of IL-1?; indeed, blocking IL-1? results in a rapid and sustained reduction in the severity of most autoinflammatory diseases. Flares of gout, Type-2 diabetes, heart failure and smoldering multiple myeloma are examples of seemingly unrelated diseases, which are uniquely responsive to IL-1? neutralization. PMID:21158974

Dinarello, Charles A.

2010-01-01

310

The empirical foundations of telemedicine interventions for chronic disease management.  

PubMed

The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

Bashshur, Rashid L; Shannon, Gary W; Smith, Brian R; Alverson, Dale C; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M; Coye, Molly J; Doarn, Charles R; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Kvedar, Joseph C; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S; Sanders, Jay H; Watson, Andrew R; Weinstein, Ronald S; Yellowlees, Peter

2014-09-01

311

Successful Treatment with Posaconazole of a Patient with Chronic Chagas Disease and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus  

PubMed Central

American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease (CD) is a neglected disease that affects Latin American people worldwide. Two old antiparasitic drugs, benznidazole and nifurtimox, are currently used for specific CD treatment with limited efficacy in chronic infections and frequent side effects. New drugs are needed for patients with chronic CD as well as for immunosuppressed patients, for whom the risk of reactivation is life-threatening. We describe a case of chronic CD and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that required immunosuppression to control the autoimmune process. It was found that benznidazole induced a reduction, but not an elimination, of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi levels, whereas subsequent treatment with posaconazole led to a successful resolution of the infection, despite the maintenance of immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:20348503

Pinazo, María-Jesús; Espinosa, Gerard; Gállego, Montserrat; López-Chejade, Paulo Luis; Urbina, Julio A.; Gascón, Joaquim

2010-01-01

312

Effects of an external resistance on maximum flow in chronic obstructive lung disease: implications for recognition of coincident upper airway obstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine how the presence of generalised airflow limitation due to chronic obstructive lung disease affects the recognition of simulated upper airway obstruction, a study was carried out in 12 patients (mean (SD) age 57 (7) years) with chronic obstructive lung disease (FEV1% predicted 53 (22), range 21-70) and 12 matched control subjects. Patients and control subjects performed maximal inspiratory

D R Robertson; C R Swinburn; T N Stone; G J Gibson

1989-01-01

313

Pain and Opioid Use in Chronic Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Pain is common in patients with liver disease, difficult to treat, and poorly understood. Aims The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with pain and prescription opioid use in a large cohort of patients with confirmed chronic liver. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients with chronic liver disease visiting a tertiary-care hepatology clinic. Pain was determined by self-report and rated numerically from 0–10. Symptoms of mood and sleep disorders and emotional distress were based on a symptom checklist. Etiology and stage of liver disease and use of prescribed opioids were abstracted from the electronic medical record. Logistic regression was used to establish factors associated with pain and prescription opioid use. Results Among 1286 patients with chronic liver disease, 34% had pain and 25% used opioids. The strongest predictor of pain in multivariate modeling was emotional distress (OR=3.66, CI=2.40,5.64), followed by non-white race (OR=1.87, CI=1.24,2.79), mood symptoms (OR=1.47, CI=1.04,2.07), sleep disturbance/fatigue (OR=1.70, CI=1.24,2.32), and advanced liver disease (Child class B: OR=1.73, CI=1.15,2.60; Child class C: OR=2.78 CI=1.49,5.24) compared to no cirrhosis. Emotional distress, mood-related symptoms, and advanced liver disease were also significant predictors of prescription opioid use, as were age, nicotine use, and etiology of liver disease. Conclusions This large cohort study demonstrates the high prevalence of pain and opioid use in chronic liver disease. While disease variables contribute to pain, psychological symptoms were most strongly associated with pain and opioid use, providing rationale and target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23512406

Rogal, Shari S.; Winger, Daniel; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Szigethy, Eva

2013-01-01

314

Impaired Leukocytes Autophagy in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients  

PubMed Central

Background Proteins and cytoplasmic organelles undergo degradation and recycling via autophagy; its role in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is still unclear. We hypothesize that impaired kidney function causes autophagy activation failure. Methods We included 60 patients with stage 5 CKD and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as controls. Patients with conditions that could affect autophagy were excluded. Leukocytes were isolated and analyzed from peripheral blood samples collected after overnight fasting and 2 h after breakfast. Results Overnight fasting induced conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 I to II (?LC3) and increased mRNA levels of the autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) and Beclin-1 in healthy subjects, which were nearly absent in CKD patients (p = 0.0001). Moreover, no significant difference in autophagy activation was observed between CKD patients with or without hemodialysis. Correlation studies showed that ?LC3 was negatively associated with the left atrium size. Changes in Atg5 transcript levels were negatively associated with the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, and changes in Beclin-1 transcript levels were negatively associated with the mitral inflow E- and A-wave sizes. Conclusion These data suggest that CKD patients have impaired autophagy activation, which cannot be reversed with hemodialysis and is closely related to their cardiac abnormalities. PMID:24474954

Chen, Wei-Ting; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wen, Ming-Shien; Hsu, Po-Yaur; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Wang, Horng-Dar; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Shie, Shian-Sen; Wang, Chao-Yung

2013-01-01

315

Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD. PMID:25210423

Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

2014-01-01

316

Helicobacter Pylori Infections in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective: We aimed to investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using the C-14 urea-breath test (C14UBT) and to determine whether there is an association between H. pylori infection and the severity of COPD. This is the first report in the literature of the use of C14UBT to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori in patients with COPD. Materials and Methods: Fifty subjects with COPD (38 males and 12 females, aged 61±10 years) and 20 control subjects (10 males and 10 females, aged 55±11 years) were evaluated. C14UBT was used to determine H. pylori infection. Results: The prevalences of H. pylori infection in subjects with COPD and in controls were 72% and 65%, respectively (p=0.56). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) values were significantly higher in the H. pylori-infected subjects with COPD than in the uninfected subjects (p=0.008 and p=0.006, respectively). Conclusion: The presence of H. pylori infection in COPD patients affects pulmonary functions, but the effects of H. pylori infection on the respiratory system and COPD are not clear.

Tabaru, Ali; Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin; Meral, Mehmet; Sahin, Ali

2012-01-01

317

Chronic restraint or variable stresses differently affect the behavior, corticosterone secretion and body weight in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organisms are constantly subjected to stressful stimuli that affect numerous physiological processes and activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, increasing the release of glucocorticoids. Exposure to chronic stress is known to alter basic mechanisms of the stress response. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effect of two different stress paradigms (chronic restraint or variable stress) on behavioral

Marcelo T. Marin; Fabio C. Cruz; Cleopatra S. Planeta

2007-01-01

318

Chronic pancreatitis: A surgical disease? Role of the Frey procedure  

PubMed Central

Although medical treatment and endoscopic interventions are primarily offered to patients with chronic pancreatitis, approximately 40% to 75% will ultimately require surgery during the course of their disease. Although pancreaticoduodenectomy has been considered the standard surgical procedure because of its favorable results on pain control, its high postoperative complication and pancreatic exocrine or/and endocrine dysfunction rates have led to a growing enthusiasm for duodenal preserving pancreatic head resection. The aim of this review is to better understand the rationale underlying of the Frey procedure in chronic pancreatitis and to analyze its outcome. Because of its hybrid nature, combining both resection and drainage, the Frey procedure has been conceptualized based on the pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis. The short and long-term outcome, especially pain relief and quality of life, are better after the Frey procedure than after any other surgical procedure performed for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25068010

Roch, Alexandra; Teyssedou, Jérome; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques; Pessaux, Patrick

2014-01-01

319

Therapeutic vaccination to treat chronic infectious diseases  

PubMed Central

A famous milestone in the vaccine field has been the first successful vaccination against smallpox, in 1798, by Edward Jenner. Using the vaccinia cowpox virus, Jenner was able to protect vaccinees from variola or smallpox. The Modified Virus Ankara (MVA) poxvirus strain has been one of the vaccines subsequently developed to prevent smallpox infection and was selected by the US government in their Biodefense strategy. Progress in molecular biology and immunology associated with MVA infection has led to the development of MVA as vaccine platform, both in the field of preventive and therapeutic vaccines. This later class of therapeutics has witnessed growing interest that has translated into an increasing number of vaccine candidates reaching the clinics. Among those, MVA-based therapeutic vaccines have addressed four major chronic infections including viral hepatitis, AIDS, human papillomavirus-linked pathologies and tuberculosis. Clinical trials encompass phase 1 and 2 and have started to show significant results and promises. PMID:22894957

Boukhebza, Houda; Bellon, Nadine; Limacher, Jean Marc; Inchauspé, Geneviève

2012-01-01

320

Chronic disease and recent addiction treatment utilization among alcohol and drug dependent adults  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic medical diseases require regular and longitudinal care and self-management for effective treatment. When chronic diseases include substance use disorders, care and treatment of both the medical and addiction disorders may affect access to care and the ability to focus on both conditions. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the association between the presence of chronic medical disease and recent addiction treatment utilization among adults with substance dependence. Methods Cross-sectional secondary data analysis of self-reported baseline data from alcohol and/or drug-dependent adults enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of a disease management program for substance dependence in primary care. The main independent variable was chronic medical disease status, categorized using the Katz Comorbidity Score as none, single condition of lower severity, or higher severity (multiple conditions or single higher severity condition), based on comorbidity scores determined from self-report. Asthma was also examined in secondary analyses. The primary outcome was any self-reported addiction treatment utilization (excluding detoxification) in the 3 months prior to study entry, including receipt of any addiction-focused counseling or addiction medication from any healthcare provider. Logistic regression models were adjusted for sociodemographics, type of substance dependence, recruitment site, current smoking, and recent anxiety severity. Results Of 563 subjects, 184 (33%) reported any chronic disease (20% low severity; 13% higher severity) and 111 (20%) reported asthma; 157 (28%) reported any addiction treatment utilization in the past 3 months. In multivariate regression analyses, no significant effect was detected for chronic disease on addiction treatment utilization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.88 lower severity vs. none, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 1.28; AOR 1.29 higher severity vs. none, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.88) nor for asthma. Conclusions In this cohort of alcohol and drug dependent persons, there was no significant effect of chronic medical disease on recent addiction treatment utilization. Chronic disease may not hinder or facilitate connection to addiction treatment. PMID:22008255

2011-01-01

321

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both very common and their incidence  

E-print Network

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both very common and their incidence in asthma but is progressive and largely irreversible in COPD. In both diseases, there is chronic and COPD are different forms of a common disease (chronic obstructive lung disease), and this came

Cai, Long

322

Nontraditional risk factors predict coronary calcification in chronic kidney disease in a population-based cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased burden of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease cannot be explained by traditional risk factors alone. Here, we evaluated the impact of non-traditional factors on the association of chronic kidney disease with coronary artery calcification using logistic regression among 2672 Dallas Heart Study patients of whom 220 had chronic kidney disease. The prevalence of coronary calcification significantly increased

U Baber; J A de Lemos; A Khera; D K McGuire; T Omland; R D Toto; S S Hedayati

2008-01-01

323

Elderly people at home disabled by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: we compared uptake of hospital and community-based support in elderly people disabled by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), normal controls (NCs) and patients with Parkinsons disease, stroke, amputation, or arthritis (disabled controls; DCs). Methods: there were 65 subjects (35 men) aged 70-93 years (mean 78) with COPD, 55 NCs (23 men; age range 71-90 years (mean 78)) and 53

ABEBAW M. YOHANNES; JAMAL ROOMI; MARTIN J. CONNOLLY

1998-01-01

324

Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer  

E-print Network

Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed wasting disease in white-tailed deer. Ecosphere 4(1):10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES12-00141.1 Abstract- year-old) white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in south-central Wisconsin, USA. We evaluated how

325

Relationship between coronary artery disease and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to determine whether there is a relationship between coronary artery disease and pulmonary hypertension and whether pulmonary hypertension is an additional risk factor for the presence and extent of coronary artery disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary hypertension, and undergone diagnostic coronary angiography for evaluation of suspected coronary artery disease constituted the study group. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease and compared for age, gender, accompanying chronic disease, and pulmonary function tests. A total of 95 patients were recruited in the study. Comparison of the groups revealed that two groups were significantly different on gender (p=0.029), presence of hypertension (p=0.027), and biomass (p=0.040). Correlation analysis of variables revealed that male gender (rs=0.224, p=0.029), hypertension (rs=0.227, p=0.07) were positively correlated with the presence of coronary artery disease. FEV1/FVC ratio (rs=-0.253, p=0.013) and sPAP (rs=-0.215, p=0.037) were negatively correlated with the presence of coronary artery disease. High prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was found. However, no correlation between the presence and severity of coronary artery disease and pulmonary hypertension was detected. PMID:25664116

Asker, Muntecep; Asker, Selvi; Kucuk, Ugur; Kucuk, Hilal Olgun; Ozbay, Bulent

2014-01-01

326

Chronic Kidney Disease, Mortality, and Treatment Strategies among Patients with Clinically Significant Coronary Artery Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of mortal- ity among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study describes associations between CKD, cardiac revascularization strategies, and mortality among patients with CKD and cardio- vascular disease. All patients undergoing cardiac catheterization at Duke University Medical Center (1995 to 2000) with documented stenosis 75% of at least one coronary artery and available

DONAL N. REDDAN; LYNDA ANNE SZCZECH; ROBERT H. TUTTLE; LINDA K. SHAW; ROBERT H. JONES; STEVE J. SCHWAB; MARK STAFFORD SMITH; ROBERT M. CALIFF; DANIEL B. MARK; WILLIAM F. OWEN JR

2003-01-01

327

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Risk Factors, and Outcome Trials: Comparisons with Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major health problem and now ranks fifth in terms of the global burden of disease. Although COPD is a disease that is characterized by pro- gressive respiratory symptoms and functional decline, exacerba- tions pose the greatest risk for morbidity and early mortality, have a dramatic effect on quality of life, and are the

Scott D. Ramsey; F. D. Richard Hobbs

2006-01-01

328

Chronic non-communicable diseases and the economy.  

PubMed

There is no question that chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) pose the single, greatest sustained threat to the stability of health systems worldwide. While undoubtedly the main dimension of the CNCDs challenge is in respect of the health and well-being of the population, it is becoming increasingly obvious that CNCDs are also posing a serious challenge to economies. Health system costs are increasing faster than national income in almost all nations and the main cause is the growing incidence of CNCDs and the diverse spill-over effects. The concern is that if this continues, there will come a time when the economic system will simply no longer be capable of coping with the burden of the CNCDs. In these circumstances the economist has two major concerns. The first is to understand and explain how CNCDs affect the functioning of the economic system. It is argued that while the analysis will necessarily begin on the qualitative level, for policy purposes it must also be taken to the quantitative level. The second major concern of the economist is to understand and explain how the working of the economy influences the incidence of CNCDs in particular countries. The author suggests that at a time when the prevention and management of CNCDs are high on the agenda of many nations, it is important to know whether the measures being taken to improve human development and economic well-being are themselves contributing to an increasing incidence of CNCDs particularly in small, vulnerable, open economies. In this regard, this paper briefly explains how CNCDs affect the economic system and presents some of the estimates of quantitative impact on the economy. PMID:22097669

Theodore, K

2011-07-01

329

Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF <2%) with SCr effects between 0.085 and 0.129 standard deviations. These rare variants have a larger effect on SCr than previously reported common variants, explaining 0.5% of the variability of SCr in Icelanders in addition to the 1% already accounted for. We tested the five variants associating with SCr for association with CKD in an Icelandic sample of 15 594 cases and 291 428 controls. Three of the variants also associated with CKD. These variants may either affect kidney function or creatinine synthesis and excretion. Of note were four mutations in SLC6A19 that associate with reduced SCr, three of which have been shown to cause Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

2014-12-20

330

Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Lessons from a Rare Disorder  

PubMed Central

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency with x-linked or autosomal recessive inheritance involving defects in genes encoding phox proteins which are the subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This results in failure to produce superoxide anion and downstream antimicrobial oxidant metabolites and to activate antimicrobial proteases. Affected patients are susceptible to severe, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation characterized by granulomatous enteritis resembling Crohn's disease and genitourinary obstruction. Early diagnosis of CGD and rapid treatment of infections are critical. Prophylaxis with antibacterial and mould-active antifungal agents and the administration of interferon-? has significantly improved the natural history of CGD. Currently, the only cure is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) although there remains controversy as to which patients with CGD should get a transplant. Allele-based HLA typing of alternative donors, improved supportive care measures and use of reduced toxicity conditioning have resulted in EFS of at least 80% even with an unrelated donor and even better when the patient has no active infections/inflammation. Gene correction of CGD would eliminate the risks of GVHD and the immunoablative chemotherapy required for allogeneic HCT. Based on gene therapy trials in patients with SCID-X1, ADA-SCID and the early experience with CGD, it is clear that at least some degree of myeloablation will be necessary for CGD as there is no inherent selective growth advantage for gene-corrected cells. Current efforts for gene therapy focus on use of lentivector constructs which are thought to be safer from the standpoint of insertional mutagenesis and more efficient in transducing hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:21195301

Segal, B H; Veys, P; Malech, H; Cowan, M J

2010-01-01

331

Anxiety and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Prevalence, Impact, and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as well as the impact of comorbid anxiety on quality of life in patients with COPD. Published studies on three types of treatments for anxiety are then reviewed: psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and pulmonary rehabilitation programs. Materials and Methods: A PubMed search was conducted of

GRETCHEN A. BRENES

2003-01-01

332

Prognostic Value of Nutritional Status in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between low body mass index (BMI) and poor prognosis in patients with chronic ob- structive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common clinical observation. We prospectively examined whether BMI is an independent predictor of mortality in subjects with COPD from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. In total, 1,218 men and 914 women, aged 21 to 89 yr, with airway

CHARLOTTE LANDBO; EVA PRESCOTT; PETER LANGE; JØRGEN VESTBO; THOMAS P. ALMDAL

1999-01-01

333

The costs of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exacerbations are the key drivers in the costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective was to examine the costs of COPD exacerbations in relation to differing degrees of severity of exacerbations and of COPD. We identified 202 subjects with COPD, defined according to the BTS and ERS criteria. Exacerbations were divided into mild (self-managed), mild\\/moderate (telephone contact with

FREDRIK ANDERSSON; SIXTEN BORG; SVEN-ARNE JANSSON; ANN-CHRISTIN JONSSON; ÅSA ERICSSON; CHRISTIN PRÜTZ; EVA RÖNMARK; BO LUNDBÄCK

2002-01-01

334

Circulating Leptin in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unexplained weight loss is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since leptin, an obesity gene product, is known to play important roles in the control of body weight and energy expenditure, we investigated serum leptin levels, along with circulating tumor necrosis factor- a (TNF- a ) and soluble TNF receptor (sTNF-R55 and -R75) levels, in 31 patients

NORIAKI TAKABATAKE; HIDENORI NAKAMURA; SHUICHI ABE; TOSHIHIKO HINO; HIROSHI SAITO; HIDEKI YUKI; SHUICHI KATO; HITONOBU TOMOIKE

1999-01-01

335

Creatine supplementation during pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Skeletal muscle wasting and dysfunction are strong independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Creatine nutritional supplementation produces increased muscle mass and exercise performance in health. A controlled study was performed to look for similar effects in 38 patients with COPD.Methods: Thirty eight patients with COPD (mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 second

J P Fuld; L P Kilduff; J A Neder; Y Pitsiladis; M E J Lean; S A Ward; M M Cotton

2005-01-01

336

Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Okinawa, Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a hospital-based screening program in Okinawa, Japan. The significance of metabolic syndrome as a determinant of CKD was examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 6980 participants, aged 30–79 years, participated in a screening program in Tomishiro Chuo Hospital. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of

H Tanaka; Y Shiohira; Y Uezu; A Higa; K Iseki

2006-01-01

337

The importance of early detection of chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the absence of precise epidemiological data, we know there are a great many patients in the conservative phase of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The incidence and prevalence of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is increasing worldwide. As well as being a large and growing clinical problem, CKD is of an economic and organizational concern, since RRT consumes a considerable proportion

Francesco Locatelli; Lucia Del Vecchio; Pietro Pozzoni

338

Chronic Kidney Disease after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because survival of recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has improved, long-term complications become more important. We studied the incidence and risk factors of chronic kidney disease in these patients and evaluated associated posttransplant complications and mortality. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 266 adults who received myeloablative allogeneic HSCT and who survived for >6 months in

Sabina Kersting; Ronald J. Hené; Hein A. Koomans; Leo F. Verdonck

2007-01-01

339

Heart failure in the patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heart failure is highly prevalent in the population with chronic kidney disease. Upon starting dialysis, 37% of patients will have had a previous episode of heart failure, doubling the risk of death. Both systolic and\\/or diastolic function may be impaired. 15% of patients starting dialysis therapy have systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. The prevalence of diastolic dysfunction at dialysis

Lisowska A

2004-01-01

340

Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) represents a group of inherited disorders of phagocytic system, manifesting recurrent infections at different sites. The present study was accomplished in order to determine the gastrointestinal manifestations of CGD patients. Fifty-seven patients (38 males and 19 females) with CGD, who had been referred to three immunodeficiency referral centers in Iran, were studied during a 24-year period

Masoud Movahedi; Asghar Aghamohammadi; Nima Rezaei; Abolhasan Farhoudi; Mostafa Moin; Mohammad Gharagozlou; Davoud Mansouri; Saba Arshi; Lida Atarod; Bahram MirSaeid Ghazi; Nikrad Shahnavaz; Ali Babaei Jandaghi; Kamran Abolmaali; Maryam Mahmoudi; Nasrin Bazargan; Akefeh Ahmadi Afshar; Mohammad Nabavi

341

The radiology of chronic lung disease in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic lung disease (CLD) in children represents a heterogeneous group of many distinct clinicopathological entities. The prevalence of CLD has increased in the past decade because of the more advanced and intensive respiratory support provided for compromised children and additionally the overall improved survival of preterm babies. The disorders which constitute CLD generally have a slow tempo of progression over

U G Rossi; C M Owens

2005-01-01

342

Impaired Vascular Reactivity in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics. Methods: Arterial vascular properties were quantified by the reflective index using digital photoplethysmography in 260 patients with CKD. Patients were grouped according to estimated glomerular

Fabian Tetzner; Alexandra Scholze; Antje Wittstock; Walter Zidek; Martin Tepel

2008-01-01

343

Actinomyces in Chronic Granulomatous Disease: An Emerging and Unanticipated Pathogen  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disease of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase system that causes defective production of toxic oxygen metabolites, impaired bacterial and fungal killing, and recurrent life-threatening infections, mostly by catalase-producing organisms. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, chronic infections with Actinomyces species in 10 patients with CGD. Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous condition that commonly manifests as cervicofacial, pulmonary, or abdominal disease, caused by slowly progressive infection with oral and gastrointestinal commensal Actinomyces species. Treatment of actinomycosis is usually simple in immunocompetent individuals, requiring long-term, high-dose intravenous penicillin, but is more complicated in those with CGD because of delayed diagnosis and an increased risk of chronic invasive or debilitating disease. Methods Actinomyces was identified by culture, staining, 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction, and/ or a complement fixation test in 10 patients with CGD. Results All 10 patients presented with a history of fever and elevated inflammatory signs without evident focus. Diagnosis was delayed and clinical course severe and protracted despite high-dose intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or surgery. These results suggest an unrecognized and unanticipated susceptibility to weakly pathogenic Actinomyces species in patients with CGD because these are catalase-negative organisms previously thought to be nonpathogenic in CGD. Conclusions Actinomycosis should be vigorously sought and promptly treated in patients with CGD presenting with uncommon and prolonged clinical signs of infection. Actinomycosis is a catalase-negative infection important to consider in CGD. PMID:19874205

Reichenbach, Janine; Lopatin, Uri; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Beovic, Bojana; Siler, Ulrich; Zbinden, Reinhard; Seger, Reinhard A.; Galmiche, Louise; Brousse, Nicole; Kayal, Samer; Güngör, Tayfun; Blanche, Stéphane; Holland, Steven M.

2014-01-01

344

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Lung Cancer: New Molecular Insights  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are major causes of death worldwide. In most cases this reflects cigarette smoke exposure which is able to induce an inflammatory response in the airways of smokers. Indeed, COPD is characterized by lower airway inflammation, and importantly, the presence of COPD is by far the greatest risk factor for lung cancer

Ian M. Adcock; Gaetano Caramori; Peter J. Barnes

2011-01-01

345

Participatory Research for Chronic Disease Prevention in Inuit Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To develop a community-based chronic disease prevention program for Inuit in Nunavut, Canada. Methods: Stakeholders contributed to intervention development through formative research [in-depth interviews (n = 45), dietary recalls (n = 42)], community workshops, group feedback and implementation training. Results: Key cultural themes…

Gittelsohn, Joel; Roache, Cindy; Kratzmann, Meredith; Reid, Rhonda; Ogina, Julia; Sharma, Sangita

2010-01-01

346

Susceptibility to Hyperglycemia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are susceptible to hyperglycemia. Aim: To study the prevalence of pre-diabetes in CKD patients and determine the contribution of insulin resistance (IR) versus ?-cell dysfunction in patients with CKD. Methods: 45 consecutive nondiabetic CKD patients and 40 healthy subjects were included. Patients were divided into a normoglycemic (NG) and a pre-diabetic (PDM) group.

Walid Shehab-Eldin; Ali Zaki; Sanaa Gazareen; Ahmed Shoker

2009-01-01

347

Impaired baroreflex sensitivity predicts mortality in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes and mortality in non-CKD populations, but has not previously been shown to predict all cause mortality in CKD. 134 patients were recruited to an observational study. CV structure, function and inflammatory status were quantified. Survival was assessed at 4

S. G. John; M. K. Sigrist; C. W. McIntyre

2008-01-01

348

Vascular calcification and cardiovascular function in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Vascular calcification and arterial stiff- ening are independent predictors of all causes and cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Few data are currently available comparing vascular calcification and its attendant functional cardiovascular consequences between CKD stage 4 patients and both peritoneal dialysis (PD) and haemodialysis (HD) (CKD stage 5) patients. Method. We studied 134 subjects (60 HD, 28

Mhairi Sigrist; Peter Bungay; Maarter W. Taal; Christopher W. McIntyre

2005-01-01

349

Arterial hypertension in chronic kidney disease: An ABPM study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABPM is an accurate tool for estimating the relationship between true BP load and cardiovascular organ damage. Although cardiovascular morbidity is elevated in renal patients, few studies have used ABPM for BP assessment in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) before dialysis.Thus, we investigated 244 pts (164 men, aging 17-78 yrs) with CKD. Each patient had blood pressure (BP) assessed

Ernesto Paoletti; Diego Bellino; Paolo Cassottana; Giuseppe Cannella

2005-01-01

350

Heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An ignored combination?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: To quantify the prevalence of heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and vice versa. Further, to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic implications of the co-existence of both syndromes. Methods and results: We performed a Medline search from 1966 to March 2005. The reported prevalence of LVSD among COPD patients varied considerably,

Frans H. Rutten; Maarten-Jan M. Cramer; Jan-Willem J. Lammers; Diederick E. Grobbee; Arno W. Hoes

2006-01-01

351

Overt and occult rheumatic diseases: the child with chronic fever  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of the genes involved in hereditary periodic fever syndromes has led to the recognition of a new pathophysiological category, the autoinflammatory disorders. The main non-hereditary autoinflammatory disease in childhood is systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), others being the chronic infantile neurological cutaneous arthropathy (CINCA) syndrome and the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome. Familial Mediterranean fever

Joost Frenkel; Wietse Kuis

2002-01-01

352

Managing hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension are intrinsically linked. Although 59% of the US population will be diagnosed with CKD during their lifetimes, mortality is usually due to a cardiovascular event. Sodium restriction and a combination of a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone medication and a calcium channel blocker are the most effective methods of managing hypertension in patients with CKD. PMID:25148442

Zuber, Kim; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Davis, Jane

2014-09-01

353

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE OF CAPTIVE MULE DEER: A SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past 12 years (1967-79) a syndrome we identify as chronic wasting disease has been observed in 53 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) and one black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) held in captivity in several wildlife facilities in Colorado and more recently in Wyoming. Clinical signs were seen in adultdeerand includedbehavioral alterations, progressive weight loss and death in 2

E. S. WILLIAMS; S. YOUNG

354

Itraconazole to Prevent Fungal Infections in Chronic Granulomatous Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare disorder in which the phagocytes fail to pro- duce hydrogen peroxide. The patients are predisposed to bacterial and fungal infec- tions. Prophylactic antibiotics and interferon gamma have reduced bacterial infec- tions, but there is also the danger of life-threatening fungal infections. We assessed the efficacy of itraconazole as prophylaxis against serious fungal infections

John I. Gallin; David W. Alling; Harry L. Malech; Robert Wesley; Deloris Koziol; Beatriz Marciano; Eli M. Eisenstein; Maria L. Turner; Ellen S. DeCarlo; Judith M. Starling; Steven M. Holland

2003-01-01

355

Chronic systemic pesticide exposure reproduces features of Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown, but epidemiological studies suggest an association with pesticides and other environmental toxins, and biochemical studies implicate a systemic defect in mitochondrial complex I. We report that chronic, systemic inhibition of complex I by the lipophilic pesticide, rotenone, causes highly selective nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration that is associated behaviorally with hypokinesia and rigidity. Nigral

Ranjita Betarbet; Todd B. Sherer; Gillian MacKenzie; Monica Garcia-Osuna; Alexander V. Panov; J. Timothy Greenamyre

2000-01-01

356

Chronic hepatitis in childhood: the spectrum of the disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a multicentre study of chronic hepatitis in childhood diagnosed by biopsy, the spectrum of the disease has been evaluated in 196 consecutive patients, including 157 from Northern Italy and 39 from Southern Italy. Only 31% of patients in the former group and 27% in the latter were symptomatic when first seen: the majority of cases being seen after familial

F Bortolotti; R Calzia; A Vegnente; P Cadrobbi; M Rugge; M Armigliato; M G Marazzi; R Iorio; C Crivellaro; R Piscopo

1988-01-01

357

Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmo- nary disease. Team member roles complement

Anne Marie Kuzma; Yvonne Meli; Catherine Meldrum; Patricia Jellen; Marianne Butler-Lebair; Debra Koczen-Doyle; Peter Rising; Kim Stavrolakes; Frances Brogan

2008-01-01

358

SEVERITY GRADING OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: THE CONFOUNDING EFFECT OF PHENOTYPE AND THORACIC GAS COMPRESSION.  

PubMed

Current guidelines recommend severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease be graded using forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). But this measurements is biased by thoracic gas compression depending on lung volume and airflow resistance. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the effect of thoracic gas compression on FEV1 is greater in emphysema than chronic bronchitis due to larger lung volumes and this influences severity classification and prognosis. FEV1 was simultaneously measured by spirometry and body plethysmography (FEV1-pl) in 47 subjects with dominant emphysema and 51 with dominant chronic bronchitis. Subjects with dominant emphysema had larger lung volumes, lower diffusion capacity and lower FEV1 than those with dominant chronic bronchitis. However, FEV1-pl, patient-centered variables (dyspnea, quality of life, exercise tolerance, exacerbation frequency), arterial blood gases, and respiratory impedance were not significantly different between groups. Using FEV1-pl instead of FEV1 shifted severity distribution towards less severe classes in dominant emphysema more than chronic bronchitis. The Body mass, Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise (BODE) index was significantly higher in dominant emphysema than chronic bronchitis but this difference significantly decreased when FEV1-pl was substituted for FEV1. In conclusion, the FEV1 is biased by thoracic gas compression more in subjects with dominant emphysema than in those with chronic bronchitis. This variably and significantly affects the severity grading systems currently recommended. PMID:25414244

Pellegrino, Riccardo Giovanni; Crimi, Emanuele; Gobbi, Alessandro; Torchio, Roberto; Antonelli, Andrea; Gulotta, Carlo; Baroffio, Michele Pierangelo; Sferrazza Papa, Giuseppe Francesco; Dellaca, Raffaele L; Brusasco, Vito

2014-11-20

359

Information Resources Diseases Affecting Homeostasis and Cardiology  

E-print Network

Medicine Clinical Knowledge Base, which contains articles on 7,000 diseases and disorders. The evidence-based to determine if a textbook, journal, reserve item, or other resource material is available in the library. Many our subscription journals are available both in print and electronic format. 2. UCHC Database Page

Kim, Duck O.

360

[Acute paraparesis in chronic hepatic disease].  

PubMed

An acuta caude equina syndrome following portacaval shunt in a 64-year-old patient suffering from liver cirrhosis is reported. Diagnosis of a hepatic radiculopathy was confirmed by clinical and electrophysiological findings. A nearly complete remission of the neurological symptoms was achieved by treatment of the primary liver disease. Since there are only a few descriptions of severe hepatic polyneuro- and radiculopathies, the differential diagnosis of hepatic myelopathy is discussed. PMID:1851969

Jeske, J; Schädlich, H J; Sandmann, J; Karbe, H; Haupt, W F; Karenberg, A

1991-02-01

361

Treating Alcoholism As a Chronic Disease  

PubMed Central

For many patients, alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders are chronic, recurring conditions involving multiple cycles of treatment, abstinence, and relapse. To disrupt this cycle, treatment can include continuing care to reduce the risk of relapse. The most commonly used treatment approach is initial intensive inpatient or outpatient care based on 12-step principles, followed by continuing care involving self-help groups, 12-step group counseling, or individual therapy. Although these programs can be effective, many patients drop out of initial treatment or do not complete continuing care. Thus, researchers and clinicians have begun to develop alternative approaches to enhance treatment retention in both initial and continuing care. One focus of these efforts has been the design of extended treatment models. These approaches increasingly blur the distinction between initial and continuing care and aim to prolong treatment participation by providing a continuum of care. Other researchers have focused on developing alternative treatment strategies (e.g., telephone-based interventions) that go beyond traditional settings and adaptive treatment algorithms that may improve outcomes for clients who do not respond well to traditional approaches. PMID:23580020

McKay, James R.; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

2011-01-01

362

Benefit packages for chronic disease outpatients in the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme in 32 Chinese counties  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Chronic disease has become a major problem affecting the health of the Chinese population. In response to this situation, the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) has begun to provide health cover for outpatients with chronic disease expenses, made possible by the increased risk pool of previous years. We compare the differences between Benefit Packages for Chronic Diseases Outpatients (BPCDO) in order to produce a reference for policy makers. Methods: Information on the various BPCDO was located by searching the official NRCMS website in Chinese, using certain criteria to select the ideal BPCDO. Population coverage, service coverage and cost of coverage were chosen to form the analytical framework for this paper. The diseases were classified according to the World Health Organisation's (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results: To avoid “moral hazard”, complex processes have been created. This has resulted in chronic disease patients finding it very difficult to become beneficiaries. Forty-one types of chronic diseases were listed in 32 different BPCDO. We found that different counties have different co-payment rates, deductible lines, ceilings, coverage of drugs and tests, appointed hospitals and reimbursement frequencies. Conclusion: High mortality diseases and diseases with a heavier cost burden should be the priority on the list of reimbursement. The BPCDO scheme should be introduced urgently at the national level. It should include twenty-one types of disease and eight essential factors. PMID:24358897

Gericke, Christian A

2013-01-01

363

Inflammation in chronic kidney disease: role in the progression of renal and cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inflammation is the response of the vasculature or tissues to various stimuli. An acute and chronic pro-inflammatory state\\u000a exists in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), contributing substantially to morbidity and mortality. There are many\\u000a mediators of inflammation in adults with CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), including hypoalbuminemia\\/malnutrition,\\u000a atherosclerosis, advanced oxidation protein products, the peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor, leptin, the

Douglas M. Silverstein

2009-01-01

364

How we treat chronic graft-versus-host disease.  

PubMed

Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a common and potentially life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD requiring systemic treatment is ?30% to 40% by National Institutes of Health criteria. The risk of chronic GVHD is higher and the duration of treatment is longer after HCT with mobilized blood cells than with marrow cells. Clinical manifestations can impair activities of daily living and often linger for years. Hematology and oncology specialists who refer patients to centers for HCT are often subsequently involved in the management of chronic GVHD when patients return to their care after HCT. Treatment of these patients can be optimized under shared care arrangements that enable referring physicians to manage long-term administration of immunosuppressive medications and supportive care with guidance from transplant center experts. Keys to successful collaborative management include early recognition in making the diagnosis of chronic GVHD, comprehensive evaluation at the onset and periodically during the course of the disease, prompt institution of systemic and topical treatment, appropriate monitoring of the response, calibration of treatment intensity over time in order to avoid overtreatment or undertreatment, and the use of supportive care to prevent complications and disability. PMID:25398933

Flowers, Mary E D; Martin, Paul J

2015-01-22

365

Renal Function Trajectory Is More Important than Chronic Kidney Disease Stage for Managing Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient’s eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the

Steven J. Rosansky

2012-01-01

366

Chronic Ankle Instability Does Not Affect Lower Extremity Functional Performance  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine if functional performance is impaired in individuals with self-reported chronic ankle instability. Design and Setting: We used a between-groups design to assess 3 functional variables. All data were collected at a Division III college and a military academy. Before testing, all subjects performed a 5-minute warm-up, followed by a series of stretches for the lower extremity muscles. Subjects then performed cocontraction, shuttle run, and agility hop tests in a counterbalanced fashion. Three trials for each functional test were completed and averaged for analysis. Subjects: Twenty men with a history of at least 1 significant ankle sprain and episodes of at least 1 repeated ankle injury or feelings of instability or “giving way” were compared with 20 men with no prior history of ankle injury. Subjects were matched by age, height, weight, and activity level. Measurements: Time to completion was measured in seconds for the cocontraction and the shuttle run tests. The agility hop test was measured on an error point scale. Results: Using 3 separate, independent, 2-tailed t tests, we found no significant difference between groups for the cocontraction (P = .452), shuttle run (P = .680), or agility hop (P = .902) tests. Conclusions: Chronic ankle instability is a subjectively reported phenomenon defined as the tendency to “give way” during normal activity. Although athletes commonly complain of subjective symptoms associated with chronic ankle instability, our findings suggest that these symptoms do not negatively influence actual functional performance. Future researchers should evaluate other, more demanding functional-performance tests to further substantiate these findings. PMID:12937575

Demeritt, Kerry M.; Shultz, Sandra J.; Docherty, Carrie L.; Gansneder, Bruce M.; Perrin, David H.

2002-01-01

367

The Relationship between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Chronic Periodontitis  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims The most common cause of chronic periodontitis is poor oral hygiene. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) enhances the proximal migration of gastric contents and may cause poor oral hygiene. We hypothesized that GERD may increase thse risk of chronic periodontitis and investigated this potential relationship. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in outpatients between January 1, 2010, and April 30, 2012. GERD was defined as being present based on at least two of the following criteria: etiologic agent(s), identifiable signs and symptoms, and consistent anatomic alterations. A total of 280 patients with chronic periodontitis and 280 controls were analyzed. Information regarding patient demographics and other potential confounding factors for chronic periodontitis were collected through individual medical records. Results GERD was revealed to be independently associated with an increased incidence of chronic periodontitis (odds ratio [OR], 2.883; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.775 to 4.682). The other three variables of dental caries (OR, 1.531; 95% CI, 1.042 to 2.249), tobacco use (OR, 2.335; 95% CI, 1.461 to 3.730), and history of medication (calcium channel blocker, cyclosporine, or phenytoin) (OR, 2.114; 95% CI, 1.160 to 3.854) were also determined to be independent risk factors. Conclusions The present study supported our hypothesis that GERD can be a risk factor for chronic periodontitis. PMID:24516699

Song, Jun Young; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Tae Yun

2014-01-01

368

WILDLIFE DISEASES SURVEILLANCE TO DETECT CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN  

E-print Network

of 2002 and 2003 to determine the distribution of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Deer wasting disease, disease surveillance, Odocoileus virginianus, white- tailed deer, Wisconsin. INTRODUCTION), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and elk (Cervus elaphus) associated with the presence

Mladenoff, David

369

Polycystic kidney disease and chronic renal failure in tuberous sclerosis.  

PubMed

Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disease which leads to formation of benign tumours in the brain and other organs of the body. It is a multisystem disease with various clinical manifestations. Renal angiomyolipomas are the most common renal manifestations whereas renal cell carcinoma is the least. Renal cysts are found in around 20% of the patients but polycystic kidney disease is present in less than 2% cases and is relatively rare manifestation of the disease. We present a case of tuberous sclerosis in a 60-year-old man who presented to the medicine outpatient department for routine evaluation of his hypertension. He was diagnosed as tuberous sclerosis. His ultrasound and CT scan of abdomen revealed polycystic kidney disease. His kidney function test and urine analysis were suggestive of chronic kidney disease. PMID:24092520

Dhakal, Mona; Dhakal, O P; Bhandari, Dhurba

2013-01-01

370

Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, targeting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was negatively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer from deer in the area of disease origin (core-area). Genetic differentiation was greatest, and CWD prevalence lowest, in areas separated from the core-area by the Wisconsin River, indicating that this river reduced deer gene flow and probably disease spread. Features of the landscape that influence host dispersal and spatial patterns of disease can be identified based on host spatial genetic structure. Landscape genetics may be used to predict high-risk populations based on their genetic connection to infected populations and to target disease surveillance, control and preventative activities. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

Blanchong, J.A.; Samuel, M.D.; Scribner, K.T.; Weckworth, B.V.; Langenberg, J.A.; Filcek, K.B.

2008-01-01

371

Chronic HIV Disease and Activation of the Coagulation System  

PubMed Central

With current effective antiretroviral treatment, the spectrum of morbidity and mortality during chronic HIV disease has shifted away from AIDS defining clinical events. Persistent abnormalities in coagulation appear to contribute to excess risk for a broad spectrum of non-AIDS defining complications, including, but not limited to, venous and arterial thrombotic disease. Mechanisms specific to HIV disease, antiretroviral therapy, and lifestyle or behavioral factors contribute to a pro-coagulant state, in part, through increased tissue factor activity coupled with a paradoxical decline in the anti-coagulant response. Alterations in coagulation biology in the context of HIV disease appear to be largely a consequence of persistent systemic immune activation, micro- and macro-vascular disease, and, potentially, impaired hepatic synthesis of coagulation factors. The clinical consequences of HIV-related changes in coagulation biology, the degree to which they are unique to HIV disease, and whether they can be mitigated through adjunct treatments, remains a focus of current research. PMID:24034985

Baker, Jason V.

2014-01-01

372

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Respiratory Review of 2014  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a diverse array of pulmonary and nonpulmonary manifestations, but our understanding of COPD pathogenesis and the factors that influence its heterogeneity in disease presentation is poor. Despite this heterogeneity, treatment algorithms are primarily driven by a single measurement, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) as a percentage of its predicted value (FEV1%). In 2011, a major shift in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) treatment recommendations was proposed that stratifies patients with COPD on the basis of symptoms and exacerbation history. This article reviews the work reported in 2013 that enlightens our understanding of COPD with respect to COPD classification systems, phenotype, biomarker, exacerbation, and management for patients with COPD. PMID:25368660

2014-01-01

373

Prions in skeletal muscles of deer with chronic wasting disease.  

PubMed

The emergence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk in an increasingly wide geographic area, as well as the interspecies transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans in the form of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, have raised concerns about the zoonotic potential of CWD. Because meat consumption is the most likely means of exposure, it is important to determine whether skeletal muscle of diseased cervids contains prion infectivity. Here bioassays in transgenic mice expressing cervid prion protein revealed the presence of infectious prions in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected deer, demonstrating that humans consuming or handling meat from CWD-infected deer are at risk to prion exposure. PMID:16439622

Angers, Rachel C; Browning, Shawn R; Seward, Tanya S; Sigurdson, Christina J; Miller, Michael W; Hoover, Edward A; Telling, Glenn C

2006-02-24

374

Recurrent eosinophilic cystitis in a child with chronic granulomatous disease.  

PubMed

Eosinophilic cystitis is an uncommon disease in children, and its association with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has been previously reported in only five patients. In all those patients the disease showed either a self-limited benign course or a rapid response to corticosteroid treatment. The authors describe a child with X-linked CGD who developed eosinophilic cystitis with a recurrent course and difficult therapeutic management. The authors also discuss the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in CGD and review the literature for current therapies for these complications. PMID:15125617

Barese, Cecilia N; Podestá, Miguel; Litvak, Edith; Villa, Mariana; Rivas, Eva María

2004-03-01

375

[Infections in chronic obstructive pulmonery disease].  

PubMed

Infection plays an important role in COPD, particularly during exacerbations. The principal pathogens involved in exacerbations are viruses (influenza and parainfluenza virus, picornavirus, and respiratory syncytial virus). Bacteria (mainly Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Branhamella catarrhalis) are isolated from sputum in approximately 50% of exacerbations and 25% of patients with stable state. Recent data favor of a proinflammatory role of these bacteria in the natural history of the disease. The role of atypical pathogens like Chlamydia pneumoniae may be underestimated. Trials of antibiotic treatment have shown a slight but significant benefit, particularly in patients with recent-onset purulent sputum. The benefit is more significant in patients with stable severe obstructive disease. Guidelines have been published in industrialized countries on the use of antibiotics in this indication. The role of infections in the pathogenesis of obstructive lesions is controversial. Some authors have forwarded a "vicious circle" hypothesis, in which impairment of mucociliary clearance by tobacco smoke contributes to bronchial colonization by bacteria, and this further impairs mucociliary clearance and promotes airway epithelial injury. COPD is a major risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:15368925

Leophonte, Paul

2004-01-01

376

[Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].  

PubMed

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø <9 cm), unstructured, amorphous, with acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD. PMID:23229668

Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

2012-01-01

377

Chronic inflammatory diseases and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS).  

PubMed

The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a highly fatal pro-inflammatory oxidative respiratory disease. Relatively recently, the modulating effects of chronic inflammatory processes on ARDS susceptibility have been recognized in a number of clinical studies. Herein, we briefly review some of the chronic conditions that have been reported to increase (cigarette smoking and alcohol abuse) or decrease (diabetes and obesity) susceptibility to ARDS. We also propose some potential pathways that may hold clues regarding the pathogenesis and/or therapy for ARDS. PMID:23978096

Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Repine, John E

2014-01-01

378

Menkes disease in affected females: The clinical disease spectrum.  

PubMed

Menkes disease (MD; OMIM 309400) is an X-linked, neurodegenerative disorder resulting from deficient activity of copper-dependent enzymes and caused by alterations in the APT7A gene. In its classic form, it manifests in boys with hypotonia, seizures, skin and joint laxity, hair twisting (pili torti), cerebrovascular tortuosity, and bladder diverticulae. Menkes disease phenotypes have been reported in females with X; autosome translocations- disrupting ATP7A gene function- or ATP7A gene alterations. Those females manifest variable clinical findings, some of which, such as pili torti, seizure presence and/or age of onset, cerebrovascular tortuosity, degree of intellectual disability, and bladder divericulae are largely under-reported and under-studied. Here, we report on three females with Menkes disease and variant phenotypes, sharing characteristic features, one with classic Menkes disease and two with Menkes disease variants. We conclude that Menkes disease in females manifests with a variable spectrum of clinical findings but a few are uniformly present such as neurodevelopmental disability, hypotonia, and connective tissue findings. Others, such as seizures, cerebral atrophy, and cerebrovascular tortuosity may be present but are under-reported and under- studied. We propose that the diagnosis of Menkes disease or variants in females with suspicious clinical findings is an important one to consider as early treatment with parenteral copper may be considered. The effect of this treatment on the disease course in females with MD is unknown and remains to be seen. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25428120

Smpokou, Patroula; Samanta, Monisha; Berry, Gerard T; Hecht, Leah; Engle, Elizabeth C; Lichter-Konecki, Uta

2015-02-01

379

Bisphenol A in Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Phenols are uremic toxins of intestinal origin formed by bacteria during protein metabolism. Of these molecules, p-cresol is the most studied and has been associated with renal function impairment and vascular damage. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a molecule with structural similarity with phenols found in plastic food and beverage containers as well as in some dialyzers. BPA is considered an environmental toxicant based on animal and cell culture studies. Japanese authorities recently banned BPA use in baby bottles based on observational association studies in newborns. BPA is excreted in urine and uremic patients present higher serum levels, but there is insufficient evidence to set cut-off levels or to link BPA to any harmful effect in CKD. However, the renal elimination and potential exposure during dialysis warrant the monitoring of BPA exposure and the design of observational studies in which the potential health risks of BPA for end-stage renal disease patients are evaluated. PMID:23997953

González-Parra, Emilio; Herrero, Jose Antonio; Elewa, Usama; Arduán, Alberto Ortiz; Egido, Jesus

2013-01-01

380

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence for an Autoimmune Component  

PubMed Central

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an irreversible limitation on pulmonary airflow associated with chronic inflammation and mucous hypersecretion (chronic bronchitis) and/or the pathological destruction of alveolar airspaces leading to emphysema. COPD, predominantly as a result of tobacco smoke exposure, represents the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide and its prevalence is increasing. Despite this, much of the basic mechanisms which contribute to disease progression remain to be elucidated and current therapeutic approaches are, for the most part, based upon alleviating patient symptoms (bronchodilators) as opposed to treating the underlying pathological mechanisms triggered in response to cigarette smoke exposure. The classic disease paradigm suggests that an imbalance of pulmonary matrix proteases versus anti-proteases underlies the tissue destruction and inflammation associated with COPD. However, there is a growing appreciation of the complex and multifaceted nature of the pathological mechanisms associated with disease progression. Recently, there has been mounting evidence indicating that COPD patients exhibit many of the characteristics of a classical autoimmune response. We will discuss current evidence in support of this paradigm and outline how future therapeutic approaches may be tailored to address this. PMID:19403056

Stefanska, Anna M; Walsh, Patrick T

2009-01-01

381

Emergence of chronic non-communicable diseases in China.  

PubMed

China has experienced an epidemiological transition shifting from the infectious to the chronic diseases in much shorter time than many other countries. The pace and spread of behavioural changes, including changing diets, decreased physical activity, high rates of male smoking, and other high risk behaviours, has accelerated to an unprecedented degree. As a result, the burden of chronic diseases, preventable morbidity and mortality, and associated health-care costs could now increase substantially. China already has 177 million adults with hypertension; furthermore, 303 million adults smoke, which is a third of the world's total number of smokers, and 530 million people in China are passively exposed to second-hand smoke. The prevalence of overweight people and obesity is increasing in Chinese adults and children, because of dietary changes and reduced physical activity. Emergence of chronic diseases presents special challenges for China's ongoing reform of health care, given the large numbers who require curative treatment and the narrow window of opportunity for timely prevention of disease. PMID:18930526

Yang, Gonghuan; Kong, Lingzhi; Zhao, Wenhua; Wan, Xia; Zhai, Yi; Chen, Lincoln C; Koplan, Jeffrey P

2008-11-01

382

Advances in geroscience: impact on healthspan and chronic disease.  

PubMed

Population aging is unprecedented, without parallel in human history, and the 21st century will witness even more rapid aging than did the century just past. Improvements in public health and medicine are having a profound effect on population demographics worldwide. By 2017, there will be more people over the age of 65 than under age 5, and by 2050, two billion of the estimated nine billion people on Earth will be older than 60 (http://unfpa.org/ageingreport/). Although we can reasonably expect to live longer today than past generations did, the age-related disease burden we will have to confront has not changed. With the proportion of older people among the global population being now higher than at any time in history and still expanding, maintaining health into old age (or healthspan) has become a new and urgent frontier for modern medicine. Geroscience is a cross-disciplinary field focused on understanding the relationships between the processes of aging and age-related chronic diseases. On October 30-31, 2013, the trans-National Institutes of Health GeroScience Interest Group hosted a Summit to promote collaborations between the aging and chronic disease research communities with the goal of developing innovative strategies to improve healthspan and reduce the burden of chronic disease. PMID:24833579

Burch, John B; Augustine, Alison Deckhut; Frieden, Leslie A; Hadley, Evan; Howcroft, T Kevin; Johnson, Ron; Khalsa, Partap S; Kohanski, Ronald A; Li, Xiao Ling; Macchiarini, Francesca; Niederehe, George; Oh, Young S; Pawlyk, Aaron C; Rodriguez, Henry; Rowland, Julia H; Shen, Grace L; Sierra, Felipe; Wise, Bradley C

2014-06-01

383

The End of AIDS: HIV Infection as a Chronic Disease  

PubMed Central

Antiretroviral therapy has been a spectacular success. People are now asking if the end of AIDS is possible. For those who are motivated to take therapy and who have access to lifelong treatment, AIDS-related illnesses are no longer the primary threat, but a new set of HIV-associated complications have emerged, resulting in a novel chronic disease that for many will span several decades of life. Treatment does not fully restore immune health; as a consequence, a number of inflammation-associated and/or immunodeficiency complications such as cardiovascular disease and cancer are increasing in importance. Cumulative toxicities from exposure to antiretroviral drugs for decades cause clinically-relevant metabolic disturbances and end-organ damage. There are growing concerns that the multi-morbidity associated with HIV disease may impact healthy aging and could overwhelm some health care systems, particularly those in resource-limited regions that have yet to fully develop a chronic care model. Given the problems inherent in treating and caring for a chronic disease that might persist for several decades, a global effort to identify a cure is now underway. PMID:24152939

Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Havlir, Diane V.

2014-01-01

384

Surveillance for the prevention of chronic diseases through information association  

PubMed Central

Background Research on Genomic medicine has suggested that the exposure of patients to early life risk factors may induce the development of chronic diseases in adulthood, as the presence of premature risk factors can influence gene expression. The large number of scientific papers published in this research area makes it difficult for the healthcare professional to keep up with individual results and to establish association between them. Therefore, in our work we aim at building a computational system that will offer an innovative approach that alerts health professionals about human development problems such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Methods We built a computational system called Chronic Illness Surveillance System (CISS), which retrieves scientific studies that establish associations (conceptual relationships) between chronic diseases (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and obesity) and the risk factors described on clinical records. To evaluate our approach, we submitted ten queries to CISS as well as to three other search engines (Google™, Google Scholar™ and Pubmed®;) — the queries were composed of terms and expressions from a list of risk factors provided by specialists. Results CISS retrieved a higher number of closely related (+) and somewhat related (+/-) documents, and a smaller number of unrelated (-) and almost unrelated (-/+) documents, in comparison with the three other systems. The results from the Friedman’s test carried out with the post-hoc Holm procedure (95% confidence) for our system (control) versus the results for the three other engines indicate that our system had the best performance in three of the categories (+), (-) and (+/-). This is an important result, since these are the most relevant categories for our users. Conclusion Our system should be able to assist researchers and health professionals in finding out relationships between potential risk factors and chronic diseases in scientific papers. PMID:24479447

2014-01-01

385

Association of anemia and erythropoiesis stimulating agents with inflammatory biomarkers in chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inflammatory cytokines are important predictors of cardiovascular mortality especially in patients with chronic kidney disease. Here we explored the relationship of anemia and epoetin treatment to inflammatory cytokine levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. One hundred non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease over 18 years of age were evenly split into anemic and non-anemic cohorts. Of the 50 anemic

Sai Ram Keithi-Reddy; Francesco Addabbo; Tejas V Patel; Bharati V Mittal; Michael S Goligorsky; Ajay K Singh

2008-01-01

386

A disease marker for aspirin-induced chronic urticaria.  

PubMed

There are currently no diagnostic methods in vitro for aspirin-induced chronic urticaria (AICU) except for the provocation test in vivo. To identify disease markers for AICU, we investigated the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the promoter loci of high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc?RI?) and CD203c expression level in Chinese patients with AICU. We studied two genotypic and allelic frequencies of rs2427827 (-344C/T) and rs2251746 (-66T/C) gene polymorphisms of Fc?RI? in 20 patients with AICU, 52 subjects with airway hypersensitivity without aspirin intolerance, and 50 controls in a Chinese population. The results showed that the frequencies of two SNPs (-344C>T, -66C>T) were similar to the normal controls. The allele frequency of -344CC was significantly higher in the patients with AICU compared to those with airway sensitivity (p=0.019). We also studied both histamine release and CD203c expression on KU812 cells to assess aspirin-induced basophil activation. We found that the activity of basophil activation of AICU was significantly higher in the patients with AICU compared to those with airway hypersensitivity without aspirin intolerance. The mean fluorescence intensity of the CD203c expression were 122.5±5.2 vs. 103.3±3.3 respectively, (p<0.05), and the percentages of histamine release were 31.3%±7.4% vs. -24.0%±17.5%, (p<0.05) respectively. Although the mean fluorescence intensity of CD203c expression and the percentage of histamine release were significantly up-regulated by aspirin, they were not affected by anti-IgE antibodies. These results suggest that a single SNP of Fc?RI? (-344C>T) is less likely to develop AICU and the basophil activation activity in the sera by measuring CD203c expression can be applicable to confirm the diagnosis of AICU. PMID:25029546

Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Lee, Jeen-Wei; Liao, En-Chih; Tsai, Jaw-Ji

2014-01-01

387

A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.  

PubMed

Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. PMID:25165181

Casteleijn, Niek F; Visser, Folkert W; Drenth, Joost P H; Gevers, Tom J G; Groen, Gerbrand J; Hogan, Marie C; Gansevoort, Ron T

2014-09-01

388

[Diagnostic differences in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].  

PubMed

Although both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized as obstructive lung disease, their pathophysiologies are quite different. Characteristics of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, airway narrowing with reversibility, and responsiveness of airways. Cough, wheezing, and dyspnea and variability in these symptoms are also characteristic features of asthma. Because there are no definite diagnostic criteria, multidisciplinary consideration is necessary when diagnosing asthma. On the other hand, COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation which is usually progressive. It is associated with noxious particles or gasses, typically cigarette smoking, and subsequent chronic inflammation of the airway and lungs. Nonreversible airflow limitation is a characteristic feature, and exertional dyspnea, chronic cough, and sputum are typical symptoms. Diagnostic criteria are relatively simple: post bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 70%, and no other reason for airflow limitation. Recently, overlap syndrome, with features of both asthma and COPD, is drawing attention. When treating elderly patients with asthma who have persistent airway limitation or patients with COPD who show variability in symptoms and reversibility of lung function, the possibility of overlap syndrome should be considered. The prevalence of overlap syndrome seems to be high in general practice, so the introduction of practical criteria for the diagnosis and a proper guide for therapies is expected. PMID:25051660

Nishiyama, Osamu; Tohda, Yuji

2014-05-01

389

Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.  

PubMed

Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example. PMID:23224289

Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

2012-01-01

390

Glycopyrronium bromide for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Glycopyrronium bromide is a new long-acting muscarinic antagonist to be used once-daily, which is approved as a bronchodilator for the symptomatic maintenance treatment of adult patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the Glycopyrronium bromide in chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease airWays trials, treatment with inhaled glycopyrronium bromide at 50 ?g once daily achieved a significantly better lung function than placebo, as measured by the trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The lung function improvement was maintained for up to 52 weeks. Other improved indexes were dyspnea scores, health status, exacerbation rates and time of exercise endurance. Studies comparing the efficacy of glycopyrronium versus tiotropium bromide found substantial equivalence of the two drugs. Glycopyrronium was generally well tolerated. These data add inhaled glycopyrronium bromide to the treatment of patients with moderate to severe COPD as an effective once-daily LAMA. PMID:25547422

Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Ridolo, Erminia; Riario-Sforza, Edoardo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

2015-02-01

391

Shining light on vitamin D trials in chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Vitamin D compounds may have extraskeletal functions. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) offers an opportunity to investigate these actions, as vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in this population and actions of vitamin D such as those on the heart and glucose metabolism are highly relevant. However, recent randomized controlled trials have tempered enthusiasm. We appraise a trial by de Boer et al. that addresses effects of paricalcitol on glucose metabolism in CKD, and offer perspectives on future trials. PMID:23364588

Nigwekar, Sagar U.; Thadhani, Ravi I.

2014-01-01

392

Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease in Extremely Immature Baboons  

Microsoft Academic Search

A borderline viability model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)\\/chronic lung disease of infancy (CLD) with pathophysiologic parameters consistent with those in extremely immature humans with BPD\\/CLD is described. After prenatal steroid treatment of pregnant dams, 12 premature baboons were delivered by cesarean-section at 125 d (term gestation, 185 d), treated with exogenous surfac- tant, and maintained on appropriate oxygen and positive

JACQUELINE J. COALSON; VICKI T. WINTER; THERESA SILER-KHODR; BRADLEY A. YODER

1999-01-01

393

Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study  

PubMed Central

Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

2009-01-01

394

Chronic Kidney Disease and Mortality Risk: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current guidelines identify people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) as being at high risk for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Because as many as 19 million Americans may have CKD, a comprehensive summary of this risk would be potentially useful for planning public health policy. A systematic review of the association between non-dialysis-dependent CKD and the risk for all-cause and cardiovascular

Marcello Tonelli; Natasha Wiebe; Bruce Culleton; Chris Rabbat; Mei Fok; Finlay McAlister

2006-01-01

395

Chronic kidney disease in children: the global perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contrast to the increasing availability of information pertaining to the care of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD)\\u000a from large-scale observational and interventional studies, epidemiological information on the incidence and prevalence of\\u000a pediatric CKD is currently limited, imprecise, and flawed by methodological differences between the various data sources.\\u000a There are distinct geographic differences in the reported causes of CKD

Bradley A. Warady; Vimal Chadha

2007-01-01

396

Hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome: associations with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of serum uric acid (SUA) and metabolic syndrome on chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain controversial. This study\\u000a grouped subjects according to a combination of their uric acid and metabolic syndrome status and investigated the association\\u000a between these groups and CKD to clarify the relationships of SUA and metabolic syndrome to CKD. This survey analyzed data\\u000a from 81,799 adults

Lai-Chu See; Chang-Fu Kuo; Fang-Hsiu Chuang; Yu-Ming Shen; Yu-Shien Ko; Yu-Ming Chen; Kuang-Hui Yu

2011-01-01

397

The role of psycho-social experience in chronic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of psycho-social factors in contributing to chronic illness, in particular Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and cancer. Research conducted over the last 50 years indicates a modest role for psycho-social factors as risk factors for these conditions. The research suggests that in combination with other modest risk factors, psycho-social factors play an equally important role. Grossarth-Maticek

James McAlister Alexander

2006-01-01

398

Investigating mechanisms of chronic kidney disease in mouse models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal models of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are important experimental tools that are used to investigate novel mechanistic\\u000a pathways and to validate potential new therapeutic interventions prior to pre-clinical testing in humans. Over the past several\\u000a years, mouse CKD models have been extensively used for these purposes. Despite significant limitations, the model of unilateral\\u000a ureteral obstruction (UUO) has essentially become

Allison A. Eddy; Jesús M. López-Guisa; Daryl M. Okamura; Ikuyo Yamaguchi

399

Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient.  

PubMed

Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

Nair, C G; Jacob, P; Menon, R; Babu, M J C

2014-11-01

400

Assessing minimal residual disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

New treatment approaches have substantially improved response rates in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Accurate assessment of\\u000a effective combination chemoimmunotherapy requires more sensitive measures of response, and a variety of techniques to measure\\u000a minimal residual disease (MRD) have been developed. Because many studies demonstrate that MRD eradication is associated with\\u000a prolonged treatment-free survival, detection of MRD is becoming a standard component of

Andy C. Rawstron; Peter Hillmen

2008-01-01

401

An introduction to biomarkers: applications to chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diagnosis and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) will be characterized in the future by an increasing use of biomarkers—quantitative\\u000a indicators of biologic or pathologic processes that vary continuously with progression of the process. “Classical” biomarkers\\u000a of CKD progression include quantitative proteinuria, the percentage of sclerotic glomeruli or fractional interstitial fibrosis.\\u000a New candidate biomarkers (e.g., urinary proteomic patterns) are being

Kevin V. Lemley

2007-01-01

402

How to Best Define Patients with Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The objective of this study was to identify which formula may best identify moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) cut-off of 60 ml\\/min\\/1.73 m2). Methods: We compared the performances of 14 serum creatinine (Scr) and 11 cystatin C (Cys C) estimated GFR equations using inulin clearance (Clin) as the reference test in a stable CKD population

Mahmoud Emara; Ahmed Zahran; Hassan Abd El Hady; Ahmed Shoker

2008-01-01

403

Fibrosis as a Major Mechanism of Chronic Liver Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Hepatic fibrosis and even cirrhosis have emerged as treatable and reversible consequences of chronic liver disease. With dramatic\\u000a advances in understanding the cellular and molecular basis of fibrosis, there is increasing enthusiasm for new treatments\\u000a that attack hepatic fibrosis directly. Basic research has focused on the hepatic stellate cell, which undergoes activation\\u000a into a proliferative and fibrogenic myofibroblast-like cell during

Lars P. Bechmann; Scott L. Friedman

404

Role of Novel Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease: Renalase  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Renalase, a novel, secreted flavin-adenine-dinucleotidedependent amine oxidase regulates cardiac function and blood pressure.\\u000a The enzyme is rapidly activated in plasma by either modest increases in blood pressure or catecholamines. Protein expression\\u000a in kidney and heart and its activation in plasma are markedly reduced in chronic kidney disease. The renalase knockout mouse\\u000a is mildly hypertensive and more likely to develop severe

Gary V. Desir

405

[Echocardiographic grading of cor pulmonale in chronic lung diseases].  

PubMed

The extent of right heart strain determines the prognosis of chronic lung disease. The value of a simple semiquantitative echocardiographic grading system for cor pulmonale was assessed in 69 patients (24 females, 45 males, age 61 +/- 12 years, ranging from 28-82 years) suffering from chronic lung disease. The patients were classified by echocardiography into four groups, Grade 0 consisting of those without evidence of right heart strain and three groups showing increasing severity of change (Grade I: right ventricular hypertrophy; Grade II: I + right ventricular dilation; Grade III: II + Dilation of the inferior vena cava). Echocardiographic investigation, at least from the subcostal view, and grading was possible in all patients. A correlation was found between the echocardiographic grading and the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP)-normal echo study 15.7 +/- 4.8; grade I 21.1 +/- 5.6; grade II 28.8 +/- 10.2; grade III 39.4 +/- 9.4 mmHg. In addition, patients with stress-induced pulmonary hypertension (PHT) were detected by Doppler echocardiography. 6 of 11 patients with latent PHT already showed evidence of cor pulmonale (4 Grade I and 2 Grade II). In 42 patients (61%) the systolic PAP was estimated by measuring the velocity of the tricuspid insufficiency jet with Doppler, and these data correlated closely with the invasive data (p < 0.001; r = 0.81). Doppler echocardiography for evaluation of cor pulmonale is feasible even in patients with chronic lung disease and limited acoustic windows. Semiquantitative grading correlates well with invasive data. Here, this technique is useful as a baseline study as well as for the follow-up of patients with chronic lung disease. PMID:7732691

Weihs, W; Picha, R; Schuchlenz, H; Harb, S; Anelli-Monti, B; Harnoncourt, K

1995-01-01

406

Chronic disease self-management education programs: challenges ahead  

Microsoft Academic Search

effective were those that developed self-efficacy in relation to specific behaviours, such as diet and exercise for diabetes, rather than those that were more general. The combination of self-management support with delivery system design changes (such as multidisciplinary team care and follow-up) was effective in improving patient health outcomes for a number of chronic diseases. This highlights an important and

Sarah M Dennis; Nicholas A Zwar; Iqbal Hasan; Mark F Harris

2007-01-01

407

Managing hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the United States and is a common diagnosis in outpatient and inpatient settings. COPD exacerbations account for more than 800,000 hospital admissions annually and are most commonly caused by viral or bacterial infections. This article reviews management of patients with COPD exacerbations, including recommended diagnostic evaluations and treatments. PMID:25383581

Williams, Jennifer; Stafford, Erin; Williams, Kari; Hartsell, Zachary

2014-12-01

408

Thrombocytopenia and hemostatic disorders in chronic graft versus host disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a major and frequent late complication in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Although thrombocytopenia in cGVHD patients is among the most consistent and strongest predictors of poor survival across many cGVHD studies, such correlation is still neither clearly explained nor well understood. Low platelet counts in the setting of cGVHD are associated with

D Pulanic; J N Lozier; S Z Pavletic

2009-01-01

409

Characteristics of Uninsured Americans with Chronic Kidney Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND  In the United States, public health insurance is available for nearly all persons with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Little\\u000a is known about the extent of health insurance coverage for persons with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE  To describe patterns of health insurance coverage for adults with non-dialysis dependent CKD and to examine risk factors for\\u000a progression of CKD to

Yoshio N. Hall; Rudolph A. Rodriguez; Edward J. Boyko; Glenn M. Chertow; Ann M. O’Hare

2009-01-01

410

Synopsis on the linkage of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease with chronic diseases.  

PubMed

Neurodegeneration is the progressive loss of neuronal structure and function, which ultimately leads to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. Even after the recent significant advances in neurobiology, the above-mentioned disorders continue to haunt the global population. Several studies have suggested the role of specific environmental and genetic risk factors associated with these disorders. However, the exact mechanism associated with the progression of these disorders still needs to be elucidated. In the recent years, sophisticated research has revealed interesting association of prominent neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and PD with chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Several common molecular mechanisms such as generation of free radicals, oxidative DNA damage, aberrations in mitochondrial DNA, and dysregulation of apoptosis have been highlighted as possible points of connection. The present review summarizes the possible mechanism of coexistence of AD and PD with other chronic diseases. PMID:25399848

Jabir, Nasimudeen R; Firoz, Chelapram K; Baeesa, Saleh S; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Akhtar, Suhail; Kamal, Warda; Kamal, Mohammad A; Tabrez, Shams

2015-01-01

411

Parabiosis for the study of age-related chronic disease  

PubMed Central

Summary Modern medicine wields the power to treat large numbers of diseases and injuries most of us would have died from just a hundred years ago. In view of this tremendous achievement, it can seem as if progress has slowed, and we have been unable to impact the most devastating diseases of our time. Chronic diseases of age such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, or Alzheimer’s disease turn out to be of a complexity that may require transformative ideas and paradigms to understand and treat them. Parabiosis, which mimics aspects of the naturally occurring shared blood supply in conjoined twins in humans and certain animals, may just have the power to be such a transformative experimental paradigm. Forgotten and now shunned in many countries, it has contributed to major breakthroughs in tumor biology, endocrinology, and transplantation research in the past century, and a set of new studies in the US and Britain report stunning advances in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration using parabiosis between young and old mice. We review here briefly the history of parabiosis and discuss its utility to study physiological and pathophysiological processes. We argue that parabiosis is a technique that should enjoy wider acceptance and application, and that policies should be revisited especially if one is to study complex age-related, chronic disorders. PMID:24496774

Eggel, Alexander; Wyss-Coray, Tony

2014-01-01

412

Toll-like receptors as targets in chronic liver diseases  

PubMed Central

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to detect the presence of pathogens. In addition to their role in innate immunity, TLRs also play a major role in the regulation of inflammation, even under sterile conditions such as injury and wound healing. This involvement has been suggested to be depend, at least in part, on the ability of TLRs to recognize several endogenous TLR ligands termed damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). The liver not only represents a major target of bacterial PAMPs in many disease states but also upregulates several DAMPs following injury. Accordingly, TLR-mediated signals have been implicated in a number of chronic liver diseases. Here, we will summarize recent findings on the role TLRs and TLR ligands in the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, and highlight the potential role of TLR agonists, antagonists and probiotics for the treatment of chronic liver disease. PMID:19359436

Mencin, Ali; Kluwe, Johannes; Schwabe, Robert F.

2009-01-01

413

Fibrocytes in chronic lung disease--facts and controversies.  

PubMed

Fibrocytes are bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell precursors, defined primarily by their ability to co-express markers of both haematopoietic (e.g. CD45 or CXCR4) and stromal (e.g. collagen) lineages. Fibrocytes in culture also have ultrastructural cell surface features that distinguish them from other leukocytes. Extensive efforts have helped to characterise fibrocytes phenotypically and functionally, but it is still unclear exactly how these cells contribute to tissue repair and/or pathologic fibrosis. Nevertheless, the varied levels of fibrocytes in blood have raised considerable interest as a biomarker of disease activity, such as chronic lung diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and pulmonary hypertension. These cells also may become a novel therapeutic target for these difficult to treat disorders. This review will briefly summarize the current knowledge about fibrocytes in human lung disease and in animal disease models and highlight areas of consensus as well as issues that remain controversial to date. PMID:21951688

Maharaj, Shyam S; Baroke, Eva; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin R J

2012-08-01

414

Links between Chronic Kidney Disease and Cardiovascular Disease: A Bidirectional Relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A strong relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and accelerated cardiovascular disease, defined as the cardiorenal\\u000a syndrome, is well documented, whether the initial event is in the kidney or in the heart. In the kidney context, mechanisms\\u000a that link CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD) involve both conventional and CKD (uremia)-related CVD risk factors. Several\\u000a pathophysiologic processes responsible for the accelerated

Adel E. Berbari

415

Anemia and bone disease of chronic kidney disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.  

PubMed

Anemia and metabolic bone disease accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD), and worsen as CKD progresses. It is likely that both processes contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality seen in CKD. This paper briefly reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of anemia and bone disease in CKD, and summarizes recent consensus guidelines for treatment. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-12.asp, free with no login]. PMID:25463623

Shemin, Douglas

2014-01-01

416

Management of hepatitis C in patients with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) subjects under hemodialysis and in kidney transplantation (KT) recipients, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The vast majority of HCV chronic infections in the hemodialysis setting are currently attributable to nosocomial transmission. Acute and chronic hepatitis C exhibits distinct clinical and laboratorial features, which can impact on management and treatment decisions. In hemodialysis subjects, acute infections are usually asymptomatic and anicteric; since spontaneous viral clearance is very uncommon in this context, acute infections should be treated as soon as possible. In KT recipients, the occurrence of acute hepatitis C can have a more severe course, with a rapid progression of liver fibrosis. In these patients, it is recommended to use pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) in combination with ribavirin, with doses adjusted according to estimated glomerular filtration rate. There is no evidence suggesting that chronic hepatitis C exhibits a more aggressive course in CKD subjects under conservative management. In these subjects, indication of treatment with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin relies on the CKD stage, rate of progression of renal dysfunction and the possibility of a preemptive transplant. HCV infection has been associated with both liver disease-related deaths and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients. Among those individuals, low HCV viral loads and the phenomenon of intermittent HCV viremia are often observed, and sequential HCV RNA monitoring is needed. Despite the poor tolerability and suboptimal efficacy of antiviral therapy in CKD patients, many patients can achieve sustained virological response, which improve patient and graft outcomes. Hepatitis C eradication before KT theoretically improves survival and reduces the occurrence of chronic graft nephropathy, de novo glomerulonephritis and post-transplant diabetes mellitus. PMID:25593456

Carvalho-Filho, Roberto J; Feldner, Ana Cristina CA; Silva, Antonio Eduardo B; Ferraz, Maria Lucia G

2015-01-01

417

The association between benign prostatic hyperplasia and chronic kidney disease in community-dwelling men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between benign prostatic hyperplasia and chronic kidney disease in community-dwelling men.BackgroundBenign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic kidney disease are important public health problems in older men. Previous referral-based studies disagree on whether BPH is associated with chronic kidney disease. The objective of this study was to determine the community-based association between clinical measures of BPH and chronic kidney

Andrew D. Rule; Debra J. Jacobson; Rosebud O. Roberts; Cynthia J. Girman; Michaela E. McGree; Michael M. Lieber; Steven J. Jacobsen

2005-01-01

418

Expansions of T-cell Subsets Expressing Particular T-cell Receptor Variable Regions in Chronic Beryllium Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by the presence of noncaseat- ing granulomas and mononuclear cell inflammation, occurring in 1 to 5% of people exposed to beryllium in the workplace. In the lungs of affected patients, CD4 1 T cells accumulate. Using anti-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibodies, we investigated the TCR beta and alpha variable (V b

Andrew P. Fontenot; Brian L. Kotzin; Lee S. Newman

1998-01-01

419

Evaluation of the Heart to Heart Project: Lessons from a Community-Based Chronic Disease Prevention Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Heart to Heart, a 5-year, community-based chronic disease prevention project, included walkathons, lectures, media messages, restaurant food labeling, and cooking seminars. Surveys and assessments of participants and nonparticipants indicated that the project had a slightly favorable effect on cholesterol and smoking but did not affect other…

Goodman, Robert M.; And Others

1995-01-01

420

Biologic markers of chronic graft vs. host disease  

PubMed Central

Biologic markers of chronic graft vs. host disease (GVHD) may provide insight into the pathogenesis of the syndrome, identify molecular targets for novel interventions, and facilitate advances in clinical management. Despite extensive work performed to date largely focused on prediction and diagnosis of the syndrome, little synthesis of findings and validation of promising candidate markers in independent populations has been performed. Studies suggest that risk for subsequent chronic GVHD development may be associated with donor-recipient genetic polymorphism, deficiency in regulatory immune cell populations (NK, Treg, DC2), and variation in inflammatory and immunoregulatory mediators post-HCT (increased TNF?, IL-10 and BAFF, and decreased TGF? and IL-15). Established chronic GVHD is associated with alteration in immune cell populations (increased CD3+ T cells, Th17, CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory cells, monocytes, CD86 expression, BAFF/B cell ratio, and deficiency of Treg, NK cells, and naïve CD8+ T cells). Inflammatory and immunomodulatory factors (TNF?, IL-6, IL-1?, IL-8, sIL-2R, and IL-1Ra, BAFF, anti-dsDNA, sIL-2R?, and sCD13) are also perturbed. Little is known about biologic markers of chronic GVHD phenotype and severity, response to therapy, and prognosis. PMID:23872737

Pidala, Joseph; Sarwal, Minnie; Roedder, Silke; Lee, Stephanie J.

2014-01-01

421

Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease  

SciTech Connect

During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

1993-01-30

422

Telomere and telomerase in chronic liver disease and hepatocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

The pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis is not completely elucidated. Although in the majority of patients, the risk factors may be identified in B and C viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, drugs or fatty liver disease, there is a small percentage of patients with no apparent risk factors. In addition, the evolution of chronic liver disease is highly heterogeneous from one patient to another. Among patient with identical risk factors, some rapidly progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) whereas others have a benign course. Therefore, a genetic predisposition may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and HCC. Evidence supporting the role of genetic factors as a risk for cirrhosis has been accumulating during the past years. In addition to the results from epidemiological studies, polymorphisms studies and data on twins, the concept of telomere shortening as a genetic risk factor for chronic liver disease and HCC has been proposed. Here we review the literature on telomerase mutations, telomere shortening and liver disease including hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24876749

Carulli, Lucia; Anzivino, Claudia

2014-01-01

423

Adenosine Signaling During Acute and Chronic Disease States  

PubMed Central

Adenosine is a signaling nucleoside that is produced following tissue injury, particularly injury involving ischemia and hypoxia. The production of extracellular adenosine and its subsequent signaling through adenosine receptors plays an important role in orchestrating injury responses in multiple organs. There are four adenosine receptors that are widely distributed on immune, epithelial, endothelial, neuronal and stromal cells throughout the body. Interestingly, these receptors are subject to altered regulation following injury. Studies in mouse models and human cells and tissues have identified that the production of adenosine and its subsequent signaling through its receptors plays largely beneficial roles in acute disease states, with the exception of brain injury. In contrast, if elevated adenosine levels are sustained beyond the acute injury phase, adenosine responses can become detrimental by activating pathways that promote tissue injury and fibrosis. Understanding when during the course of disease adenosine signaling is beneficial as opposed to detrimental and defining the mechanisms involved will be critical for the advancement of adenosine based therapies for acute and chronic diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss key observations that define the beneficial and detrimental aspects of adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states with an emphasis on cellular processes such as inflammatory cell regulation, vascular barrier function and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23340998

Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Xia, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

2013-01-01

424

The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD) treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD group had lower resilience than either high-risk or early CKD groups. Factors affecting pre-ESRD resilience were gender, occupational status, diabetes and health-promoting behaviors. Factors affecting resilience of the high-risk group included level of education and health-promoting behaviors while factors affecting resilience in the early CKD group involved whether they are employed and health promoting behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between health promoting behavior and resilience in all study subjects. Multiple regression analysis found that factors which could effectively predict resilience in patients at high-risk for CKD were gender, whether the patient had a job, nutrition, self-actualization, and stress level, accounting for 69.7% of the variance. Therefore, nursing education should focus on health promotion advocacy throughout the life of not only patients but also their families. PMID:23589703

Ma, Li-Ching; Chang, Hong-Jer; Liu, Yueh-Min; Hsieh, Hsiang-Li; Lo, Lan; Lin, Mei-Yu; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

2013-01-01

425

Link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease: implication for clinical practice.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are global epidemics that incur significant morbidity and mortality. These diseases are frequently found in combination, and they can also be found independent of the common causal factors, primarily smoking. Both conditions are systemic disorders with overlapping mechanisms and pathophysiologic processes. CAD has a strong effect on the severity and prognosis of COPD and vice versa, including acute exacerbations. Even the most recent practical clinical recommendations driven by Clinical Practice Guidelines still focus on one disease at a time, and do not provide advice for the management of patients with associated chronic conditions. COPD should be approached in a more comprehensive manner, including the treatment of cardiac comorbidities, particularly CAD. To focus treatment on these comorbidities might modify the natural course of the disease in patients with COPD who may not find relief from treatment of COPD alone. PMID:22142519

Boschetto, Piera; Beghé, Bianca; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Ceconi, Claudio

2012-04-01

426

The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease: a KDIGO Controversies Conference report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to chronic kidney disease in clinical practice, research and public health, but has also generated debate. It was the position

Andrew S Levey; Paul E de Jong; Josef Coresh; Meguid El Nahas; Brad C Astor; Kunihiro Matsushita; Ron T Gansevoort; Bertram L Kasiske; Kai-Uwe Eckardt

2011-01-01

427

Prevention of chronic kidney and vascular disease: Toward global health equity—The Bellagio 2004 Declaration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prevention of chronic kidney and vascular disease: Toward global health equity—The Bellagio 2004 Declaration Chronic kidney disease (CKD) not only reflects target organ injury in systemic vascular disease in the general population and in association with diabetes, hypertension, and smoking, but it is recognized as one of the major risk factors in the pathogenesis and outcome of cardiovascular disease. Recent

John H. Dirks; DICK DE ZEEUW; Sanjay K. Agarwal; Robert C. Atkins; RICARDO CORREA-ROTTER; GIUSEPPE D'AMICO; Peter H. Bennett; MEGUID EL NAHAS; RAUL HERRERA VALDES; DAN KASEJE; Ivor J. Katz; SARALA NAICKER; BERNARDO RODRIGUEZ-ITURBE; ARRIGO SCHIEPPATI; FAISSAL SHAHEEN; CHITR SITTHI-AMORN; KIM SOLEZ; GIANCARLO VIBERTI; GIUSEPPE REMUZZI; Jan J. Weening

2005-01-01

428

Clinical Implication of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone Blockers in Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis  

PubMed Central

The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers have been widely used in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis; however, whether RAAS blockers have beneficial effects for cardiovascular disease in those patients has not been fully defined. This review focuses on the effects of RAAS blockers in chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24611082

Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

2014-01-01

429

Probiotics and prebiotics in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases  

PubMed Central

The prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells of the colon exist in a highly complex, but harmonious relationship. Disturbances in this remarkable symbiosis can result in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Although the etiology of IBD is not entirely understood, it is known that the chronic inflammation of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and chronic pouchitis are a result of an overly aggressive immune response to the commensal intestinal flora in genetically susceptible hosts. Recent studies have enhanced our ability to understand the interaction between the host and its intestinal microflora and the role the microflora plays in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. As we begin to understand the benefits conferred to the intestine by the microflora, the notion of modifying the composition of the bacterial load to improve human health has arisen. A significant body of research now exists investigating the role of probiotics and prebiotics in ameliorating chronic intestinal inflammation. This article will begin with an overview of the role of the commensal microflora in maintaining mucosal immune homeostasis, and how a dysregulated immune response to the intestinal microflora results in IBD. This will be followed by a summary of the use of probiotics and prebiotics in experimental and human IBD. PMID:17009391

Ewaschuk, Julia B; Dieleman, Levinus A

2006-01-01

430

Multiple Associations Between a Broad Spectrum of Autoimmune Diseases, Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Many recent studies suggest the immune system plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Materials and Methods Literature published between 2001 and 2011 was reviewed for risk of cancer development in patients with autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Mode of risk assessment employed did not limit inclusion of studies. Autoimmune conditions developing after diagnosis of a pre-existing cancer were also considered. Results We report a pervasive, largely positive association between 23 autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and subsequent cancer development. We discuss associations for celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis in detail. We also address the less frequently reported development of some autoimmune conditions within the course of some malignancies, such as vitiligo developing in the course of melanoma. Conclusion Evidence demonstrates that chronic inflammation and autoimmunity are associated with the development of malignancy. Additionally, patients with a primary malignancy may develop autoimmune like disease. These relationships imply a need for surveillance of patients on immunomodulatory therapies for potential secondary disease processes. PMID:22493341

FRANKS, ALEXIS L.; SLANSKY, JILL E.

2012-01-01

431

Psychiatric Comorbidity and Other Psychological Factors in Patients with “Chronic Lyme Disease  

PubMed Central

Background There is no evidence of current or previous B. burgdorferi infection in most patients evaluated at University-based Lyme disease referral centers. Instead, psychological factors likely exacerbate the persistent diffuse symptoms or “Chronic Multisymptom Illness” incorrectly ascribed to an ongoing chronic infection with B. burgdorferi. The objective of this study was to assess the medical and psychiatric status of such patients and compare these findings to those from patients without CMI. Methods 240 consecutive patients undergoing medical evaluation at an academic Lyme disease referral center in New Jersey were screened for clinical disorders (e.g. depression and anxiety) with diagnoses confirmed by structured clinical interviews. Personality disorders, catastrophizing, and negative and positive affect were also evaluated and all factors were compared between groups and to functional outcomes. Results 60.4% of our sample had symptoms that could not be explained by current Lyme disease or another medical condition other than CMI. After adjusting for age and gender, clinical disorders were more common in CMI than in the comparison group (p<.001, OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.97 to 6.55), but personality disorders were not significantly more common. CMI patients had higher negative affect, lower positive affect and a greater tendency to catastrophize pain (p<.001) than did the comparison group. Except for personality disorders, all psychological factors were related to worse functioning. Our explanatory model based on these factors was confirmed. Conclusions Psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors are prominent in the presentation and outcome of some patients who inaccurately ascribe long-standing symptoms to “chronic Lyme disease.” PMID:19699380

Hassett, Afton L.; Radvanski, Diane C.; Buyske, Steven; Savage, Shantal V.; Sigal, Leonard H.

2009-01-01

432

ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

2014-07-14

433

Chronic Kidney Disease Is Associated With White Matter Hyperintensity Volume  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose White matter hyperintensities have been associated with increased risk of stroke, cognitive decline, and dementia. Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for vascular disease and has been associated with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of white matter hyperintensities. Few studies have explored the relationship between chronic kidney disease and white matter hyperintensities. Methods The Northern Manhattan Study is a prospective, community-based cohort of which a subset of stroke-free participants underwent MRIs. MRIs were analyzed quantitatively for white matter hyperintensities volume, which was log-transformed to yield a normal distribution (log-white matter hyperintensity volume). Kidney function was modeled using serum creatinine, the Cockcroft-Gault formula for creatinine clearance, and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula for estimated glomerular filtration rate. Creatinine clearance and estimated glomerular filtration rate were trichotomized to 15 to 60 mL/min, 60 to 90 mL/min, and >90 mL/min (reference). Linear regression was used to measure the association between kidney function and log-white matter hyperintensity volume adjusting for age, gender, race–ethnicity, education, cardiac disease, diabetes, homocysteine, and hypertension. Results Baseline data were available on 615 subjects (mean age 70 years, 60% women, 18% whites, 21% blacks, 62% Hispanics). In multivariate analysis, creatinine clearance 15 to 60 mL/min was associated with increased log-white matter hyperintensity volume (? 0.322; 95% CI, 0.095 to 0.550) as was estimated glomerular filtration rate 15 to 60 mL/min (? 0.322; 95% CI, 0.080 to 0.564). Serum creatinine, per 1-mg/dL increase, was also positively associated with log-white matter hyperintensity volume (? 1.479; 95% CI, 1.067 to 2.050). Conclusions The association between moderate–severe chronic kidney disease and white matter hyperintensity volume highlights the growing importance of kidney disease as a possible determinant of cerebrovascular disease and/or as a marker of microangiopathy. PMID:17962588

Khatri, Minesh; Wright, Clinton B.; Nickolas, Thomas L.; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Paik, Myunghee C.; Kranwinkel, Grace; Sacco, Ralph L.; DeCarli, Charles

2010-01-01

434

Decreased CD57 lymphocyte subset in patients with chronic Lyme disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic Lyme disease (LD) is a debilitating illness caused by tickborne infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Although immunologic abnormalities appear to play a role in this disease, specific immunologic markers of chronic LD have not been identified. Methods: We evaluated 73 patients with chronic LD for lymphocyte subset abnormalities using flow cytometry. Of these, 53 patients had predominant

Raphael B. Stricker; Edward E. Winger

2001-01-01

435

Nephrol Dial Transplant . Author manuscript Epidemiology and prognostic significance of chronic kidney disease in the  

E-print Network

of chronic kidney disease in the elderly--the Three-City prospective cohort study B n dicte Stengelé é 1 distribution of eGFR with both the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study and the Chronic Kidney ; urine ; Female ; Follow-Up Studies ; Glomerular Filtration Rate ; Humans ; Kidney Failure, Chronic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

436

Primary Fallopian Tube Carcinoma Arising in the Setting of Chronic Pelvic Inflammatory Disease  

PubMed Central

Primary fallopian tube cancer (PFTC) is a rare gynaecological malignancy, clinically often mistaken for pelvic inflammatory disease or ovarian cancer. Three primary fallopian tube carcinomas, arising in a background of chronic pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), are presented. The possible association between chronic PID and PFTC is discussed and a hypothesies linking these cancers with chronic inflammation is proposed. PMID:24527040

Zardawi, Ibrahim M.

2014-01-01

437

[Tolerance of +Gz accelerations in chronic compensated cardiac muscle disease].  

PubMed

The functional potentialities of the cardiovascular system were investigated during an exposure of people with compensated chronic diseases of the cardiac muscle to acceleration (+Gz). The test subjects were exposed to acceleration of 3 and 5 g for 30 sec with an interval of 5 min. The parameters of hemodynamics, ECG and visual perception were recorded. The systolic blood volume, cardiac output and specific peripheral resistance were derived from the Bremser-Ranke formula. Seventy one subjects with heart diseases and 23 healthy subjects were examined. The subjects with myocardiodystrophy and myocarditic cardiosclerosis (12+/-16) showed a reduced tolerance to accelerations. During an exposure the subjects with atherosclerotic cardiosclerosis showed a higher pressure in vessels of ear conch than the healthy subjects. The myocardiodystrophic subjects frequently (20%) exhibited an inversion of electrocardiographic T2. The subjects with heart diseases (27-33%) showed extrasystolic disturbances. The results may be used in medical expertise of pilots. PMID:1214489

Suvorov, P M; Bykova, Iu I

1975-01-01

438

Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent respiratory disease and associated with considerable individual and socioeconomic burden. Recent research started examining the role of psychosocial factors for course and management of the disease. Purpose This review provides an overview on recent findings on psychosocial factors and behavioral medicine approaches in COPD. Results Research has identified several important psychosocial factors and effective behavioral medicine interventions in COPD. However, there is considerable need for future research in this field. Conclusions Although beneficial effects of some behavioral medicine interventions have been demonstrated in COPD, future research efforts are necessary to study the effects of distinct components of these interventions, to thoroughly examine promising but yet not sufficiently proven interventions, and to develop new creative interventions. PMID:22351032

Fritzsche, Anja; Trueba, Ana F.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

2013-01-01

439

Identifying patients with chronic kidney disease from general practicecomputer records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important predictor of end-stage\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009renal disease, as well as a marker of increased mortality. The New\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009Opportunities for Early Renal Intervention by Computerised Assessment\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009(NEOERICA) project aimed to assess whether people with undiagnosed\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009CKD who might benefit from early intervention could be identified\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009from GP computer records.The simplified Modification of Diet in Renal\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009Disease

Simon de Lusignan; Tom Chan; Paul Stevens; Donal O'Donoghue; Nigel Hague; Billy Dzregah; Jeremy Van Vlymen; Mel Walker; Sean Hilton

2005-01-01

440

Biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: confusing or useful?  

PubMed Central

The field of biomarker research has almost reached unmanageable proportions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The developments of new technology platforms have generated a huge information data base, both cross sectionally and increasingly, longitudinally. The knowledge emerging provides an enormous potential for understanding the disease pathophysiology, for developing markers specific for long-term outcomes, and for developing new therapeutic strategies. However, the excitement must be tempered with an understanding of the limitations of the data collection techniques, and of the variations in disease state, activity, impact, and progression. Nevertheless, the most crucial aspect in interpreting the current literature is the recognition of the relatively superficial characterization of what is a complex group of pathological processes with a common end point of airflow limitation. The current review explores some of these issues together with those areas where real progress appears to have been made, and provides caution on interpretation. PMID:24532968

Stockley, Robert A

2014-01-01

441

Chronic kidney disease presenting acutely: presentation, clinical features and outcome of patients with irreversible chronic kidney disease who require dialysis immediately  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPatients with irreversible chronic kidney disease who require dialysis immediately are a subset of ultra late referrals for whom the term chronic kidney disease presenting acutely might usefully be applied. Although well known to nephrologists and recognised as a specific group with considerable problems, little has been written about them.ObjectiveTo describe the presentation, clinical features and outcome of irreversible chronic

Maytal Wolfe; Alison Almond; Sue Robertson; Ken Donaldson; Chris Isles

2010-01-01

442

Assessing minimal residual disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.  

PubMed

New treatment approaches have substantially improved response rates in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Accurate assessment of effective combination chemoimmunotherapy requires more sensitive measures of response, and a variety of techniques to measure minimal residual disease (MRD) have been developed. Because many studies demonstrate that MRD eradication is associated with prolonged treatment-free survival, detection of MRD is becoming a standard component of clinical trials. Quantitative approaches using polymerase chain reaction or multiparameter flow cytometry are preferable because they allow comparison of efficacy between different studies. In most clinical settings, the levels of chronic lymphocytic leukemia always increase from the first detection of MRD; the exception is allogeneic transplantation, in which there may be stable MRD levels or delayed MRD eradication. MRD analysis in the peripheral blood also may be used during therapy to predict eventual response and potentially to guide therapy to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:20425446

Rawstron, Andy C; Hillmen, Peter

2008-01-01

443

Hepatic inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease  

PubMed Central

Chronic liver inflammation drives hepatic fibrosis, and current immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral therapies can weaken this driver. Hepatic fibrosis is reversed, stabilized, or prevented in 57%-79% of patients by conventional treatment regimens, mainly by their anti-inflammatory actions. Responses, however, are commonly incomplete and inconsistently achieved. The fibrotic mechanisms associated with liver inflammation have been clarified, and anti-fibrotic agents promise to improve outcomes as adjunctive therapies. Hepatitis C virus and immune-mediated responses can activate hepatic stellate cells by increasing oxidative stress within hepatocytes. Angiotensin can be synthesized by activated hepatic stellate cells and promote the production of reactive oxygen species. Anti-oxidants (N-acetylcysteine, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and vitamin E) and angiotensin inhibitors (losartin) have had anti-fibrotic actions in preliminary human studies, and they may emerge as supplemental therapies. Anti-fibrotic agents presage a new era of supplemental treatment for chronic liver disease. PMID:24627588

Czaja, Albert J

2014-01-01

444

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in non-smokers.  

PubMed

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tobacco smoking is established as a major risk factor, but emerging evidence suggests that other risk factors are important, especially in developing countries. An estimated 25-45% of patients with COPD have never smoked; the burden of non-smoking COPD is therefore much higher than previously believed. About 3 billion people, half the worldwide population, are exposed to smoke from biomass fuel compared with 1.01 billion people who smoke tobacco, which suggests that exposure to biomass smoke migh