Science.gov

Sample records for chronic disease exhibit

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Rats with Chronic Kidney Disease Exhibit Premature Senescence and Loss of Regenerative Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mallau, Monika; Makowska, Anna; van Roeyen, Claudia Renate; Rong, Song; Buecher, Eva Bettina; Boor, Peter; Kovacova, Katarina; Zok, Stephanie; Denecke, Bernd; Stuettgen, Esther; Otten, Simon; Floege, Juergen; Kunter, Uta

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has the potential for organ repair. Nevertheless, some factors might lessen the regenerative potential of MSCs, e.g. donor age or systemic disease. It is thus important to carefully assess the patient's suitability for autologous MSC transplantation. Here we investigated the effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on MSC function. We isolated bone marrow MSCs from remnant kidney rats (RK) with CKD (CKD-RK-MSC) and found signs of premature senescence: spontaneous adipogenesis, reduced proliferation capacity, active senescence-associated-?-galactosidase, accumulation of actin and a modulated secretion profile. The functionality of CKD-RK-MSCs in vivo was tested in rats with acute anti-Thy1.1-nephritis, where healthy MSCs have been shown to be beneficial. Rats received healthy MSCs, CKD-RK-MSC or medium by injection into the left renal artery. Kidneys receiving healthy MSCs exhibited accelerated healing of glomerular lesions, whereas CKD-RK-MSC or medium exerted no benefit. The negative influence of advanced CKD/uremia on MSCs was confirmed in a second model of CKD, adenine nephropathy (AD). MSCs from rats with adenine nephropathy (CKD-AD-MSC) also exhibited cellular modifications and functional deficits in vivo. We conclude that CKD leads to a sustained loss of in vitro and in vivo functionality in MSCs, possibly due to premature cellular senescence. Considering autologous MSC therapy in human renal disease, studies identifying uremia-associated mechanisms that account for altered MSC function are urgently needed. PMID:24667162

  2. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. you may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePLUS

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... Smoking is the main cause of COPD. The more a person smokes, the ... develop COPD. But some people smoke for years and never get ...

  4. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease is anemia that is found in people with ... blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as Crohn disease , systemic ...

  5. Preventing Chronic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is a peer-reviewed electronic journal established by the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to address the interface between applied public health research, practice, and policy. Articles focus on preventing and controlling chronic diseases and conditions, promoting health, and examining the biological, behavioral, physical, and social determinants of health and their impact on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality across the life span.

  6. Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of blindness among adults. 6 Top of Page Health Risk Behaviors that Cause Chronic Diseases Health risk behaviors ... of Page The Cost of Chronic Diseases and Health Risk Behaviors In the United States, chronic diseases and ...

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Related Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Exhibits a Low Prevalence of EGFR and ALK Driver Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Chan Kwon; Kim, Ju Sang; Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Haak; Kim, Seung Joon; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Tae-Jung; Lee, Kyo Young

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two major lung diseases. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, v?Ki?ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements represent driver mutations that are frequently assessed on initial evaluation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The present study focused on the expression of driver mutations in NSCLC patients presenting with COPD and further evaluated the association between NSCLC and COPD. Data from 501 consecutive patients with histologically proven recurrent or metastatic NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively. The patients underwent spirometry and genotyping of EGFR, ALK, and KRAS in tissue samples. Patient characteristics and expression of driver mutations were compared between the COPD and non-COPD groups. Among 350 patients with spirometric results, 106 (30.3%) were diagnosed with COPD, 108 (30.9%) had EGFR mutations, 31 (8.9%) had KRAS mutations, and 34 (9.7%) showed ALK rearrangements. COPD was independently associated with lower prevalences of EGFR mutations (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.254–0.931, p = 0.029) and ALK rearrangements (95% CI, 0.065–0.600, p = 0.004). The proportions of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements decreased as the severity of airflow obstruction increased (p = 0.001). In never smokers, the prevalence of EGFR mutations was significantly lower in the COPD group than in the non-COPD group (12.7% vs. 49.0%, p = 0.002). COPD-related NSCLC patients exhibited low prevalences of EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements compared with the non-COPD group. Further studies are required regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying lung cancer associated with COPD. PMID:26555338

  8. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  9. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... System How the Body Works Main Page Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Bladder, Kidneys & Urinary ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can also change the way your body uses minerals such as calcium and phosphorus that are used ... certain foods to help your body use these minerals better. If you have chronic kidney disease, you ...

  12. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... processes at a metal, alloy and oxide production plant. Occup Environ Med 1997; 54:605-612. Mroz ... for chronic beryllium disease in a beryllium machining plant. J Occup Environ Med 2001; 43:231-237. ...

  13. Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Area Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) Phagocyte (purple) engulfing Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (yellow). Credit: NIAID CGD is a ... types of bacteria and fungi, including the following: Staphylococcus aureus Serratia marcescens Burkholderia cepacia Nocardia species Aspergillus ...

  14. [Chronic disease and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, U

    1992-01-25

    Chronic disease is not a strictly defined term and includes a large number of illnesses ranging from physical to mental impairment. It is estimated that between 10% and 20% of adolescents have a chronic disease. Independence and new relations, acceptance of a new body image and sexuality, career plans and cognitive maturation are core topics in development to adulthood. Chronic disease may interfere with these developmental tasks. Most often there is no specific psychopathology, but the type of impairment, its influence on family life and functioning, age at onset, gender, and other factors will interact with psychosocial maturation. Because of the important role of the family, not only the adolescent patient him/herself, but also parents and siblings need to be included in all major decisions. As hospitalizations may be disruptive they must be planned, taking in account the patient's plans and opinions. Chronic disease may lead to death during the period of adolescence. It is believed that the concept of one's own mortality develops at age 14 to 17 years, a fact that will influence care during the terminal stage of a disease. Whatever the problems and questions raised by the family, the developmental stage of the adolescent has always to be considered when dealing with specific issues of chronic disease. Periodic reassessment of psychosocial development is therefore one of the main tasks of the primary care physician. Counselling will address not only the disease but also the developmental tasks of any teenager. PMID:1734506

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines recommend influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. PMID:23563369

  16. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  17. Chronic wasting disease

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdson, Christina J.; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, chronic wasting disease of cervids, the only wildlife prion disease, was believed to be geographically concentrated to Colorado and Wyoming within the United States. However, increased surveillance has unveiled several additional pockets of CWD-infected deer and elk in 12 additional states and 2 Canadian provinces. Deer and elk with CWD have extensive aggregates of PrPSc not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral lymphoid tissues, skeletal muscle, and other organs, perhaps influencing prion shedding. Indeed, CWD is transmitted efficiently among animals by horizontal routes, although the mechanism of spread is unknown. Genetic polymorphisms in the Prnp gene may affect CWD susceptibility, particularly at codon 225 (S/F) in deer and codon 132 (M/L) in elk. Since CWD infects free-ranging animals and is efficiently spread, disease management will be a challenge. PMID:17223321

  18. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-12-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. PMID:26637695

  19. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Foundation U.S. Food and Drug Administration MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  20. Chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, E S

    2005-09-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a unique transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). The natural history of CWD is incompletely understood, but it differs from scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) by virtue of its occurrence in nondomestic and free-ranging species. CWD has many features in common with scrapie, including early widespread distribution of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) in lymphoid tissues, with later involvement of central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. This distribution likely contributes to apparent efficiency of horizontal transmission and, in this, is similar to scrapie and differs from BSE. Clinical features and lesions of CWD are qualitatively similar to the other animal TSEs. Microscopically, marked spongiform lesions occur in the central nervous system (CNS) after a prolonged incubation period and variable course of clinical disease. During incubation, PrP(d) can be identified in tissues by antibody-based detection systems. Although CWD can be transmitted by intracerebral inoculation to cattle, sheep, and goats, ongoing studies have not demonstrated that domestic livestock are susceptible via oral exposure, the presumed natural route of exposure to TSEs. Surveillance efforts for CWD in captive and free-ranging cervids will continue in concert with similar activities for scrapie and BSE. Eradication of CWD in farmed cervids is the goal of state, federal, and industry programs, but eradication of CWD from free-ranging populations of cervids is unlikely with currently available management techniques. PMID:16145200

  1. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  2. [Chronic granulomatous disease].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cardona, Aristóteles; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2009-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency, a phagocyte defect that appears in 1:200,000 live births and is produced by mutations in the genes that codify for the enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). The inheritance form is X linked (> 60%) or autosomic recesive (30-40%). The NADPH oxidase is responsible for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the activated phagocyte ("respiratory burst"). When present, mutations on the NAPDH oxidase genes do not allow the ROS production, making the neutrophils of these patients incapable to destroy pathogens. These patients are especially susceptible to infections by staphylococcus, fungi and some gram-negative bacteria. The main clinical manifestations include recurrent life-threatening episodes of lymphadenitis, abscess, pneumonias, osteomyelitis, granuloma formation and sepsis. The diagnosis is suggested by a history of recurrent infections, familiar cases, fail to grow and confirmed with an altered test of ROS production and the specific mutation. Allogenic stem cells transplant is the curative treatment. The early diagnosis and the treatment with prophylactic antibiotics and interferon-gamma have modified favorably the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:19999020

  3. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-?, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  5. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... control in persons with Type 2 diabetes. 1 Cardiovascular Disease Persons with sleep apnea have been found to be at increased risk for a number of cardiovascular diseases. Notably, hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease and irregular ...

  6. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... unable to kill some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long-term ( chronic ) and ... during a woman's 10th to 12th week of pregnancy) have made early detection of CGD possible. However, ...

  7. Chronic lung diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a need for innovation

    E-print Network

    Chronic lung diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a need for innovation Chronic lung diseases (CLDs), including chronic obstruc- tive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, lung cancer, neonatal chronic lung disease and pulmonary fibrosis, are the leading diseases worldwide with regard to mor- tality

  8. Chronic Venous Disease and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Matic, P; Jolic, S; Tanaskovic, S; Soldatovic, I; Katsiki, N; Isenovic, E; Radak, Dj

    2015-07-01

    We report the relations between comorbidities and chronic venous disease. In this cross-sectional study, information was gathered from 1679 Serbian patients. The majority (65.0%) of patients were women. Mild forms of chronic venous disease (clinical, etiologic, anatomic and pathophysiologic [CEAP] classification; C0s-C1) were more frequent in women (11.6%), while severe forms (CEAP C4-C6) were more commonly encountered in men (42.1%). The most frequent comorbidity was emphysema/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in both groups (74.3% in males and 70.6% in females). For females, diabetes mellitus (P < .005), arterial hypertension (P < .000), and skeletal/joint diseases (P < .042) were more commonly found in the C4 to C6 category. Both males and females, with severe form of chronic venous disease, may benefit from additional screening for comorbidities. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of association among comorbidities and chronic venous disease. PMID:25005764

  9. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  10. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... Health checks Your Kidneys and You Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  11. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your blood. Your doctor will then use your creatinine test result to figure out your eGFR. An eGFR less than 60 for 3 months or more may be a sign of kidney disease. Urine Test This test tells your doctor if there ...

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... and other residential care Percent of residents with COPD: 10.8% Source: 2010 NSRCF Data Dictionary: Resident ...

  14. [Biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Föll, D

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders of childhood, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a challenge for laboratory diagnostics. Firstly, the classical inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) often inadequately reflect disease activity but on the other hand there are few specific biomarkers that can be helpful in managing these diseases. Acute phase proteins reflect the systemic inflammatory response insufficiently as their increase is only the indirect result of local inflammatory processes. Modern inflammation diagnostics aim to reflect these local processes and to allow precise monitoring of disease activity. Experimental biomarkers, such as S100 proteins can detect subclinical inflammatory activity. In addition, established laboratory parameters exist for JIA [antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP)] and for chronic IBD (fecal calprotectin) that are useful in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26608264

  15. Treatment of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, Jeffrey M; Bauer, Carolyn; Abramowitz, Matthew K; Melamed, Michal L; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2012-02-01

    Treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can slow its progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the therapies remain limited. Blood pressure control using angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) has the greatest weight of evidence. Glycemic control in diabetes seems likely to retard progression. Several metabolic disturbances of CKD may prove to be useful therapeutic targets but have been insufficiently tested. These include acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, and vitamin D deficiency. Drugs aimed at other potentially damaging systems and processes, including endothelin, fibrosis, oxidation, and advanced glycation end products, are at various stages of development. In addition to the paucity of proven effective therapies, the incomplete application of existing treatments, the education of patients about their disease, and the transition to ESRD care remain major practical barriers to better outcomes. PMID:22166846

  16. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary function and cardiovascular disease 

    E-print Network

    McAllister, David Anthony

    2011-07-05

    Cardiovascular disease is common in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) independently predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Pathological changes in ...

  18. Economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Hoang; Lan Huong, Dao; Bao Giang, Kim; Byass, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There remains a lack of information on economic aspects of chronic diseases. This paper, by gathering available and relevant research findings, aims to report and discuss current evidence on economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. Methods Data used in this paper were obtained from various information sources: international and national journal articles and studies, government documents and publications, web-based statistics and fact sheets. Results In Vietnam, chronic diseases were shown to be leading causes of deaths, accounting for 66% of all deaths in 2002. The burdens caused by chronic disease morbidity and risk factors are also substantial. Poorer people in Vietnam are more vulnerable to chronic diseases and their risk factors, other than being overweight. The estimated economic loss caused by chronic diseases for Vietnam in 2005 was about US$20 million (0.033% of annual national GDP). Chronic diseases were also shown to cause economic losses for families and individuals in Vietnam. Both population-wide and high-risk individual interventions against chronic disease were shown to be cost-effective in Vietnam. Conclusion Given the evidence from this study, actions to prevent chronic diseases in Vietnam are clearly urgent. Further research findings are required to give greater insights into economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. PMID:20057939

  19. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Cho, Jae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions. PMID:26194075

  20. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes data on chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and deaths across the U.S. for the time periods 1997-2009 and 1979-2007, respectively. COPD, also known as chronic lung disease, may be partly caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures such as ...

  2. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation. PMID:26376131

  3. Diarrheal Diseases - Acute and Chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... greasy or very bad smelling stools. Causes – Acute Diarrhea Most cases of acute, watery diarrhea are caused ... a common cause of traveler’s diarrhea. Causes – Chronic Diarrhea Chronic diarrhea is classified as fatty or malabsorption, ...

  4. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  5. Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders Among Asian Americans, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  6. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  7. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67 Section 79.67 Judicial... § 79.67 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  8. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial... § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  9. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67 Section 79.67 Judicial... § 79.67 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  10. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial... § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  11. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial... § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  12. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial... § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  13. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67 Section 79.67 Judicial... § 79.67 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  14. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial... § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  15. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67 Section 79.67 Judicial... § 79.67 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  16. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67 Section 79.67 Judicial... § 79.67 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent employment...

  17. Chronic wasting disease of cervids.

    PubMed

    Miller, M W; Williams, E S

    2004-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has recently emerged in North America as an important prion disease of captive and free-ranging cervids (species in the deer family). CWD is the only recognized transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) affecting free-ranging species. Three cervid species, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), are the only known natural hosts of CWD. Endemic CWD is well established in southern Wyoming and northern Colorado, and has been present in this 'core area' for two decades or more. Apparently CWD has also infected farmed cervids in numerous jurisdictions, and has probably been endemic in North America's farmed deer and elk for well over a decade. Several free-ranging foci distant to the Colorado-Wyoming core area have been discovered since 2000, and new or intensified surveillance may well identify even more foci of infection. Whether all of the identified captive and free-ranging foci are connected via a common original exposure source remains undetermined. Some of this recently observed 'spread' may be attributable to improved detection or natural movements of infected deer and elk, but more distant range extensions are more likely caused by movements of infected captive deer and elk in commerce, or by some yet unidentified exposure risk factor. Research on CWD over the last 5 years has resulted in a more complete understanding of its pathogenesis and epidemiology. CWD is infectious, transmitting horizontally from infected to susceptible cervids. Early accumulation of PrP(CWD) in alimentary tract-associated lymphoid tissues during incubation suggests agent shedding in feces or saliva as plausible transmission routes. Residual infectivity in contaminated environments also appears to be important in sustaining epidemics. Improved tests allow CWD to be reliably diagnosed long before clinical signs appear. Implications of CWD are not entirely clear at this time. Natural transmission to humans or traditional domestic livestock seems relatively unlikely, but the possibility still evokes public concerns; impacts on wildlife resources have not been determined. Consequently, where CWD is not known to occur surveillance programs and regulations that prevent or reduce the likelihood that CWD will be introduced into these jurisdictions should be encouraged. Where CWD is known to occur, affected jurisdictions are conducting surveillance to estimate and monitor trends in geographic distribution and prevalence, managing deer and elk populations in attempts to limit spread, and developing and evaluating techniques for further controlling and perhaps eradicating CWD. Programs for addressing the challenges of CWD management will require interagency cooperation, commitment of funds and personnel, and applied research. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is perhaps the most enigmatic of the naturally occurring prion diseases. Although recognized as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) since the late 1970s (Williams and Young 1980, 1982), interest in and concern about CWD has only recently emerged. CWD most closely resembles scrapie in sheep in most respects, but recent media and public reaction to CWD has been more reminiscent of that afforded to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) less than a decade ago. Yet, with the exception of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), CWD is the rarest of the known animal TSEs: fewer than 1,000 cases have been diagnosed worldwide, and all but two of these occurred in North America. CWD is unique among the TSEs in that it affects free-living species (Spraker et al. 1997; Miller et al. 2000). The three natural host species for CWD, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), are all in the family Cervidae and native to North America. Like scrapie, CWD is contagious: epidemics are self-sustaining in both captive and free-ranging cervid populations (Miller et al. 1998, 2000). The geographic extent of endemic CWD in free-ra

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    COPD - control drugs ... Control medicines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are drugs you take to control or prevent symptoms of COPD. You must use them every day for them to work well. These ...

  19. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is COPD? Español COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary (PULL-mun- ... can clog them. Normal Lungs and Lungs With COPD Figure A shows the location of the lungs ...

  20. Exercise for Persons with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis and asthma, is ... to sufficiently empty the lungs. The incidence of COPD is presently increasing in the U.S., with an ...

  1. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  2. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon1, Amy L.; Desai, Tejas

    2013-01-01

    Context: There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay’s Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. Conclusions: It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions. PMID:24475435

  3. Framing international trade and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Ronald; Mohindra, Katia S; Lencucha, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011). Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks. PMID:21726434

  4. Framing international trade and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011). Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks. PMID:21726434

  5. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & ... children tend to grow better. Continue Helping Your Child Needs of kids with chronic kidney disease often ...

  6. Staphylococcus aureus and Chronic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Derycke, Lara; Pérez-Novo, Claudina; Van Crombruggen, Koen; Corriveau, Marie-Noëlle; Bachert, Claus

    2010-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is correlated with the development of persistent severe inflammatory disease of the upper airway including chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. This inflammation of the upper airways is characterized by a T-helper 2-driven disease: interleukin-5 is significantly increased and local production of immunoglobulin E is observed. S. aureus and its enterotoxins are deregulating the tissue inflammation at different levels: structural cells and the innate and adaptive immune system. Knowing the triggers of the pathomechanisms involved will greatly help us to find new therapeutic approaches to resolve this chronic inflammatory process. PMID:23282714

  7. New Viruses Identified in Fig Trees Exhibiting Fig Mosaic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fig mosaic disease has been known for decades, but the causal agent has been elusive. Here we present data on the incidence of at least four new viruses isolated from fig trees exhibiting mosaic symptoms. One of the viruses is closely related to the recently identified European mountain ash ringspo...

  8. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with kidney disease or kidney failure still enjoy sex? It's important to remember that people with kidney ... healthcare professional. What if I lose interest in sex? Your interest in sex may change when you ...

  9. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  10. WILDLIFE DISEASES SURVEILLANCE TO DETECT CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN

    E-print Network

    -mail: mdsamuel@wisc.edu) ABSTRACT: Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disease affecting North American, a number of states and provinces have initiated surveillance programs to detect CWD in native cervid of samples required for an effective CWD surveillance program. We provide an improved statistical method

  11. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Iruzubieta, Paula; Terán, Álvaro; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis, but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection. The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known, but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases. Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease. Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required. PMID:25544877

  13. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  14. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  15. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  16. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  17. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  18. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  19. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  20. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  1. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  2. 28 CFR 79.67 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.67... renal disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by...

  3. Chronic disease management: an outpatient approach.

    PubMed

    Paladichuk, A

    1997-12-01

    The current climate of managed care has sparked efforts to reduce costs in patient care. In many cases, this has resulted in more efficient methods of patient management: chronic disease management in an outpatient setting appears to be one such success story. For critical care nurses interested in working beyond the boundaries of a traditional ICU, chronic disease management clinics represent an alternative environment in which they may apply their skills. Nancy Brass-Mynderse, RN, MSN, CCRN, a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) with 18 years of experience in critical care, was instrumental in development of the Scripps Health Chronic Disease Clinic at Green Hospital of Scripps Clinic, San Diego, Calif. Brass-Mynderse currently supervises the operation of the clinic, along with Omana Kaliangara, RN, MSN, CFNP, a nurse practitioner. Brass-Mynderse received her bachelor's degree from the University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz, and her master's degree from San Diego State University. She recently obtained her family nurse practitioner certificate from California State University, Dominguez Hills, Calif. Kaliangara received her bachelor's degree from San Jose State University, San Jose, Calif, and her nurse practitioner certificate from the University of California, San Francisco, Calif. After working in family medicine and a diabetic clinic, Kaliangara developed an interest in the management of chronic diseases. In an interview with CRITICAL CARE NURSE in September, Brass-Mynderse and Kaliangara took time to discuss the development and operation of the clinic, and to recount some of their success stories. PMID:9418402

  4. INTRODUCTION Chronic kidney disease impairs glomerular filtration

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    INTRODUCTION Chronic kidney disease impairs glomerular filtration rate (GFR) which is detected as elevated serum levels of kidney biomarkers such as creatinine and cystatin C. Prior studies have related poor kidney function to cognitive decline and generalized brain atrophy. However, so far, there have

  5. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-? (tumor necrosis factor-?), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-?-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  6. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Negewo, Netsanet A; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-11-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have been associated with COPD include cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, metabolic disorder, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression, skeletal muscle dysfunction, cachexia, gastrointestinal diseases, and other respiratory conditions. Not only are comorbidities common but they also considerably influence disease prognosis and patients? health status, and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, perusal of literature indicates that little has been done so far to effectively assess, manage, and treat comorbidities in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to comprehensively narrate the comorbid conditions that often coexist with COPD, along with their reported prevalence and their significant impacts in the disease management of COPD. A perspective on integrated disease management approaches for COPD is also discussed. PMID:26521102

  7. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  8. Helping to Combat Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2003-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a disease of the nervous system that results in distinctive brain lesions. CWD affects elk, white-tailed deer, and mule deer, but has not been documented in livestock or humans. The origins of the disease, as well as the modes of transmission, remain unknown. Infected deer and elk appear robust and healthy in the early stages of CWD; clinical signs might not show for years. Mortality typically occurs within months after the appearance of clinical signs. The route of transmission is unknown; likely routes include direct transmission between infected and noninfected animals and infected animals contaminating local environments.

  9. Chronic Heartburn Drugs Tied to Higher Risk of Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Chronic Heartburn Drugs Tied to Higher Risk of Kidney Disease But studies weren't designed to prove ... to be linked with increased risk of chronic kidney disease, two new studies suggest. Prilosec, Nexium and ...

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder Page Content On this page: ... Remember Clinical Trials What is chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD)? CKD-MBD occurs ...

  11. Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

  12. Aggregation and environmental transmission in Chronic Wasting Disease.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Olga; Oraby, Tamer; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2015-02-01

    Disease transmission depends on the interplay between the infectious agent and the behavior of the host. Some diseases, such as Chronic Wasting Disease, can be transmitted directly between hosts as well as indirectly via the environment. The social behavior of hosts affects both of these pathways, and a successful intervention requires knowledge of the relative influence of the different etiological and behavioral aspects of the disease. We develop a strategic differential equation model for Chronic Wasting Disease and include direct and indirect transmission as well as host aggregation into our model. We calculate the basic reproduction number and perform a sensitivity analysis based on Latin hypercube sampling from published parameter values. We find conditions for the existence of an endemic equilibrium, and show that, under a certain mild assumption on parameters, the model does not exhibit a backward bifurcation or bistability. Hence, the basic reproduction number constitutes the disease elimination threshold. We find that the prevalence of the disease decreases with host aggregation and increases with the lifespan of the infectious agent in the environment. PMID:25811337

  13. Chronic Endocrinopathies in Traumatic Brain Injury Disease.

    PubMed

    Masel, Brent E; Urban, Randy

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review was to explain the role played by pituitary hormonal deficiencies in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) disease process. Chronic dysfunction of the pituitary axis is observed in approximately 35% of individuals who sustain a moderate-to-severe TBI. The most common deficiency is that of growth hormone, followed by gonadotropin, cortisol, and thyroid. The medical, psychological, and psychiatric consequences of untreated hypopituitarism are extensive and can be devastating. Many of the consequences of a chronic symptomatic TBI have, in the past, been solely attributed to the brain injury per se. Analysis of the signs and symptoms of pituitary axis dysfunction suggests that many of these consequences can be attributed to post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTH). PTH may well play a significant role in the progressive signs and symptoms that follow a chronic TBI. PMID:25325517

  14. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90?mm?Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  15. Chronic wasting disease in Canada: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of part 1 is to provide an overview of published literature (1980–2002) on chronic wasting disease (CWD) to inform Canadian readers about the disease and to explain Canadian regulatory approaches to the surveillance and control of CWD. Much of the scientific information is drawn from American publications obtained from internet searches in PubMed and Medline databases. The following keywords were used: chronic wasting disease, prion, diagnosis, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, CWD and deer, CWD and elk, and CWD and environment. The article also presents information from Canadian publications and unpublished observations, Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) documents, and both government and nongovernment internet Web sites. The article highlights some different features of CWD in Canada, as compared with the situation in the United States, and mentions public health implications of the disease. It also describes the basis for development of Canada’s surveillance and control program. Part 2 will detail the activities and results of the surveillance and control program during 2000 to 2002 and discuss factors that will influence the feasibility of eradicating CWD. Chronic wasting disease appears to have been introduced into Canada through the importation of infected farmed elk from the United States in the late 1980s and early 1990s, at a time when little was known about the disease. Since then, eradication efforts in Canada have led to the control of the spread of CWD in the farmed elk industry. Still, management of this disease, especially in free-ranging cervids, is a challenge. PMID:15206588

  16. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

  17. Optimizing Chronic Disease Management Mega-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PATH-THETA Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Background As Ontario’s population ages, chronic diseases are becoming increasingly common. There is growing interest in services and care models designed to optimize the management of chronic disease. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and expected budget impact of interventions in chronic disease cohorts evaluated as part of the Optimizing Chronic Disease Management mega-analysis. Data Sources Sector-specific costs, disease incidence, and mortality were calculated for each condition using administrative databases from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Intervention outcomes were based on literature identified in the evidence-based analyses. Quality-of-life and disease prevalence data were obtained from the literature. Methods Analyses were restricted to interventions that showed significant benefit for resource use or mortality from the evidence-based analyses. An Ontario cohort of patients with each chronic disease was constructed and followed over 5 years (2006–2011). A phase-based approach was used to estimate costs across all sectors of the health care system. Utility values identified in the literature and effect estimates for resource use and mortality obtained from the evidence-based analyses were applied to calculate incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Given uncertainty about how many patients would benefit from each intervention, a system-wide budget impact was not determined. Instead, the difference in lifetime cost between an individual-administered intervention and no intervention was presented. Results Of 70 potential cost-effectiveness analyses, 8 met our inclusion criteria. All were found to result in QALY gains and cost savings compared with usual care. The models were robust to the majority of sensitivity analyses undertaken, but due to structural limitations and time constraints, few sensitivity analyses were conducted. Incremental cost savings per patient who received intervention ranged between $15 per diabetic patient with specialized nursing to $10,665 per patient wth congestive heart failure receiving in-home care. Limitations Evidence used to inform estimates of effect was often limited to a single trial with limited generalizability across populations, interventions, and health care systems. Because of the low clinical fidelity of health administrative data sets, intermediate clinical outcomes could not be included. Cohort costs included an average of all health care costs and were not restricted to costs associated with the disease. Intervention costs were based on resource use specified in clinical trials. Conclusions Applying estimates of effect from the evidence-based analyses to real-world resource use resulted in cost savings for all interventions. On the basis of quality-of-life data identified in the literature, all interventions were found to result in a greater QALY gain than usual care would. Implementation of all interventions could offer significant cost reductions. However, this analysis was subject to important limitations. Plain Language Summary Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in Ontario. They account for a third of direct health care costs across the province. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of health care interventions that might improve the management of chronic diseases. The evaluated interventions led to lower costs and better quality of life than usual care. Offering these options could reduce costs per patient. However, the studies used in this analysis were of medium to very low quality, and the methods had many limitations. PMID:24228076

  18. A population-based analysis of health behaviours, chronic diseases and associated costs.

    PubMed

    Ohinmaa, Arto; Schopflocher, Donald; Jacobs, Philip; Demeter, Sandor; Chuck, Anderson; Golmohammadi, Kamran; Klarenbach, Scott W

    2006-01-01

    Health behaviours influence the future incidence of certain common chronic diseases and thus have an impact on health status and utilization of health care services and costs. We analyzed person-level data of the Albertan adult population from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.1 (2000) to determine health care costs associated with specific health behaviours (smoking, sub-optimal diet, physical inactivity) and chronic disease states (heart disease, diabetes, COPD). We found that 74.7 percent of the population exhibited one or more risk behaviours, while 10.5 percent had one or more of the chronic diseases of interest. Greater health care utilization and costs were noted in groups exhibiting risk behaviour and chronic disease states. Approximately 31 percent of health care costs in Alberta were attributable to people having one or more of the three chronic diseases. Our findings of higher health care costs incurred by those exhibiting unhealthy behaviour prior to development of disease, as well as by those with multiple co-existent diseases, are important indicators to guide future prevention and treatment strategies of chronic illness. PMID:16672136

  19. Dermatologic therapy of chronic genital disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Libby

    2004-01-01

    The adaptation of dermatology for the genital area requires several modifications of standard therapy. This unique area produces issues of both psychological sensitivity and unique environmental factors of constant moisture, warmth, and friction. These issues become far more important when symptoms are chronic. Recognition of normal variants, the multifactorial nature of many genital symptoms, and the avoidance of creating secondary iatrogenic disease are all important. PMID:14756885

  20. Psychological aspects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Agle, D P; Baum, G L

    1977-07-01

    This paper describes a number of psychological variables useful in the care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Attention to these factors does not replace destroyed lung tissue. Yet such efforts can lead to meaningful improvement in performance for many patients. The prolongation of life is not the only goal of comprehensive care. Equally important to the patient and his family are efforts to function as well and as comfortably as possible throughout the remainder of his life. PMID:559893

  1. Thoracic perspective revisited in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Kumar, Sachin; Arora, Ankur

    2015-08-01

    A variety of chest manifestations are seen in patients with chronic liver diseases, namely hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension, intrathoracic portosystemic collaterals, hepatic hydrothorax, infections, drug-induced changes, manifestations of hepatocellular carcinoma, gynecomastia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, autoimmune changes, aspiration pneumonitis and changes due to ?1-antitrypsin deficiency. Gastroenterologists and radiologists should be aware of these entities; knowledge of the imaging findings specific to each condition is of prime importance for managing such patients. PMID:25969457

  2. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. PMID:26093993

  3. Chronic beryllium disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, M D

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4+ T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. PMID:8933039

  4. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  5. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  6. Acne as a chronic systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C

    2014-01-01

    Acne is the most common skin disorder. In the majority of cases, acne is a disease that changes its skin distribution and severity over time; moreover, it can be a physically (scar development) and psychologically damaging condition that lasts for years. According to its clinical characteristics, it can be defined as a chronic disease according to the World Health Organization criteria. Acne is also a cardinal component of many systemic diseases or syndromes, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia, seborrhea-acne-hirsutism-androgenetic alopecia syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, hyperandrogenism-insulin resistance-acanthosis nigricans syndrome, Apert syndrome, synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis-pyoderma gangrenosum-acne syndrome. Recent studies on the Ache hunter gatherers of Paraguay detected the lack of acne in association with markedly lower rates of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular diseases, a finding that indicates either a nutritional or a genetic background of this impressive concomitance. PMID:24767186

  7. Secondary Care Clinic for Chronic Disease: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Juneau, Lucille; Legault-Mercier, Samuel; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of chronic disease management activities and the associated financial burden have prompted the development of organizational models, based on the integration of care and services, which rely on primary care services. However, since the institutions providing these services are continually undergoing reorganization, the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec wanted to innovate by adapting the Chronic Care Model to create a clinic for the integrated follow-up of chronic disease that relies on hospital-based specialty care. Objective The aim of the study is to follow the project in order to contribute to knowledge about the way in which professional and management practices are organized to ensure better care coordination and the successful integration of the various follow-ups implemented. Methods The research strategy adopted is based on the longitudinal comparative case study with embedded units of analysis. The case study uses a mixed research method. Results We are currently in the analysis phase of the project. The results will be available in 2015. Conclusions The project’s originality lies in its consideration of the macro, meso, and micro contexts structuring the creation of the clinic in order to ensure the integration process is successful and to allow a theoretical generalization of the reorganization of practices to be developed. PMID:25689840

  8. Hypertension Treatment for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Arjun D.; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common and frequently complicated with hypertension. As a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease in this high risk population, treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease is of paramount importance. We review the epidemiology and pathogenesis of hypertension in chronic kidney disease and then update the latest study results for treatment including salt restriction, invasive endovascular procedures, and pharmacologic therapy. Recent trials draw into question the efficacy of renal artery stenting or renal denervation for hypertension in chronic kidney disease, as well as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade as first line therapy of hypertension in end stage renal disease. Positive trial results reemphasize salt restriction and challenge the prevailing prejudice against the use of thiazide-like diuretics in advanced chronic kidney disease. Lastly, clinical practice guidelines are trending away from recommending tight blood pressure control in chronic kidney disease. PMID:25544866

  9. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Jha, V

    2015-05-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  10. Mechanisms of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are important events that contribute to worsening health status, disease progression, and mortality. They are mainly triggered by respiratory viruses (especially rhinovirus, the cause of the common cold), but airway bacteria are also involved in their pathogenesis. Exacerbations are associated with both airway and systemic inflammation and, this is mainly neutrophilic in origin. Some patients are especially prone to develop exacerbations, and these have been identified as a high-risk group with increased airway inflammation and greater disease progression. Management of acute exacerbations involves therapy with oral corticosteroids and/or antibiotics, and new therapies are needed. A number of interventions may prevent exacerbations, including vaccination, long-acting bronchodilators, antiinflammatory agents, and long-term antibiotic therapy. Understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of COPD exacerbations is important to develop novel therapies. PMID:26595732

  11. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  12. Physical activity, nutrition, and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, S N; Horton, E; Leon, A S; Lee, I M; Drinkwater, B L; Dishman, R K; Mackey, M; Kienholz, M L

    1996-03-01

    Epidemiologic, animal, clinical, and metabolic studies demonstrate the independent roles of physical activity and nutrition in the prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases. Fewer data are available to describe the synergistic effects of exercise and diet, and questions remain as to whether and how these two lifestyle factors work together to promote health and prevent disease. This paper briefly reviews many of the known effects of physical activity and nutrition on the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and osteoporosis as well as how exercise and diet may work together. A discussion of how to increase physical activity levels and how to improve dietary intake also is included. Finally, current exercise and dietary recommendations are summarized, as are directions for future research. PMID:8776222

  13. Chronic kidney disease: considerations for nutrition interventions.

    PubMed

    Steiber, Alison L

    2014-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent and has major health consequences for patients. Caring for patients with CKD requires knowledge of the food supply, renal pathophysiology, and nutrition-related medications used to work synergistically with diet to control the signs and symptoms of the disease. The nutrition care process and International Dietetic and Nutrition Terminology allow for systematic, holistic, quality care of patients with this complex, progressive disease. Nutrition interventions must be designed with the individual patients needs in mind while prioritizing factors with the largest negative impact on health outcomes and mortality risk. New areas of nutrition treatment are emerging that involve a greater focus on micronutrient needs, the microbiome, and vegetarian-style diets. These interventions may improve outcomes by decreasing inflammation, improving energy and protein delivery, and lowering phosphorus, electrolytes, and fluid retention. PMID:24637245

  14. [Chronic fatigue syndrome in patients with vibration disease].

    PubMed

    Kir'iakov, V A; Saarkoppel', L M; Krylova, I V; Sukhova, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents study results that demonstrate chronic fatigue syndrome in patients with vibration disease. Clinical manifestations of chronic fatigue syndrome are characterized by changes in the emotional-volitional and cognitive areas. Application of nootropic drug cortexin increases the efficiency of rehabilitation in patients with vibration disease with chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:23785815

  15. Lymphangiosarcoma in chronic hereditary oedema (Milroy's disease).

    PubMed

    Broström, L A; Nilsonne, U; Kronberg, M; Söderberg, G

    1989-01-01

    Lymphangiosarcoma arising in chronic lymphoedema is extremely rare. In a reference population of about four million people, during a thirty year period (1957-1987), only four patients were treated for such a tumour. The neoplasm is almost exclusively seen in elderly patients after mastectomy but in two of our patients, reported in this paper, it arose in chronic hereditary oedema (Milroy's disease). In both these patients there was a considerable treatment delay because of wrong diagnosis. The tumour extent was difficult to assess macroscopically and ablative surgery had to be a disarticulation of the involved extremity. Macular or papular purple lesions in a lymphoedematous extremity should be a manifestation of this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:2624407

  16. Costs of Chronic Diseases at the State Level: The Chronic Disease Cost Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise B.; Khavjou, Olga A.; Li, Rui; Maylahn, Christopher M.; Tangka, Florence K.; Nurmagambetov, Tursynbek A.; Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Nwaise, Isaac; Chapman, Daniel P.; Orenstein, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have estimated national chronic disease costs, but state-level estimates are limited. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the Chronic Disease Cost Calculator (CDCC), which estimates state-level costs for arthritis, asthma, cancer, congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, other heart diseases, depression, and diabetes. Methods Using publicly available and restricted secondary data from multiple national data sets from 2004 through 2008, disease-attributable annual per-person medical and absenteeism costs were estimated. Total state medical and absenteeism costs were derived by multiplying per person costs from regressions by the number of people in the state treated for each disease. Medical costs were estimated for all payers and separately for Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurers. Projected medical costs for all payers (2010 through 2020) were calculated using medical costs and projected state population counts. Results Median state-specific medical costs ranged from $410 million (asthma) to $1.8 billion (diabetes); median absenteeism costs ranged from $5 million (congestive heart failure) to $217 million (arthritis). Conclusion CDCC provides methodologically rigorous chronic disease cost estimates. These estimates highlight possible areas of cost savings achievable through targeted prevention efforts or research into new interventions and treatments. PMID:26334712

  17. Association between Celiac Disease and Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ashish; Reddy, Chandrasekhar; Duseja, Ajay; Chawla, Yogesh; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease affects the proximal small intestine and is caused by a local immune response to dietary gluten. Celiac disease usually presents with chronic diarrhea; however, presentations with elevated hepatic transaminase levels in blood or with iron-deficiency anemia have been described. Celiac disease has been reported to be associated with autoimmune liver diseases. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can also initiate autoimmune disease process. Therefore, HCV infection and celiac disease may occur together. Here, we describe 4 cases of celiac disease associated with chronic hepatitis C. This small case series indicates that chronic HCV infection and celiac disease are not causally associated. PMID:25755310

  18. The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T.

    2014-01-01

    Context: It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Results: Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. Conclusions: The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25093157

  19. Chronic Wasting Disease Positive Tissue Bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Scott D.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the USGS National Wildlife Health Center entered into an agreement with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the Department of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Wyoming to produce a collection of positive tissues from cervids intentionally infected with chronic wasting disease. This agreement was facilitated through the University of Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit. Also, the investigators on this project sampled the animals incrementally over 2 years to show changes over time, and examined tissues from the animals by immunohistochemistry. CWD positive tissues are catalogued by species, sample site and time of infection. These data and more will soon be published.

  20. Health Technologies for the Improvement of Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). Objective The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. Data Sources The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Review Methods Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Results Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. Conclusions The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient outcomes; reduce resource utilization intensity; be cost-effective; and be a viable contributing factor to chronic disease management in the community. Plain Language Summary People with chronic diseases rely on the health care system to help manage their illness. Hospital use can be costly, so community-based alternatives are often preferred. Research published in the Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series between 2006 and 2011 was reviewed to identify health technologies that have been effective or cost-effective in helping to manage chronic disease in the community. All technologies identified led to better patient outcomes and less use of health services. Most were also cost-effective. Two technologies that can cure chronic disease and 1 that can prevent chronic disease were found. Eight technologies that can help manage chronic disease were also found. Health technologies should be considered an important part of chronic disease management in the community. PMID:24228075

  1. [Skin diseases associated with chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Podányi, B; Lengyel, G; Hársing, J; Becker, K; Horváth, A

    1998-11-01

    The authors are discussing hepatic and extrahepatic pathologic processes caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and they focus their interest to the skin disorders appearing in the presence of chronic, active HCV infections. The trigger of the immunologic processes leading to dermatologic manifestations are the activated T cells (CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes), cytokins, and also the expansion of certain B cells. Pathologic immunologic phenomena may initiate various dermatologic manifestations. Immunoglobulins, immuncomplexes generated by the disease itself are manifested as various forms of cutan vasculitis. In the present series of patients (pts), HCV related skin disorders known from the literature were diagnosed in eleven cases and they were representing 7 different disease entities. These were palpable purpura (3 pts), urticaria, prurigo and alopecia areata (2-2 pts), lichen ruber planus, pruritus and vitiligo (1-1 patient respectively). The case reports of 2 pts, one with palpable purpura (vasculitis purpurica), one with prurigo and vitiligo are presented in details. PMID:9842236

  2. Chronic Disease Medication Administration Rates in a Public School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Lawrence; Fredrickson, Doren D.; Burbach, Cindy; Molgaard, Craig A.; Ngong, Lolem

    2004-01-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest school nurses and staff treat increasing numbers of public school students with chronic diseases. However, professionals know little about actual disease burden in schools. This study measured prevalence of chronic disease medication administration rates in a large, urban midwestern school district. Data from daily…

  3. Genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Seifart, Carola; Plagens, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease with multifactorial background, based on the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. Environmental factors are clearly related to the development of the disease. However, family and twin studies suggested genetics factors to be one of the important determinants for the development of COPD. Different approaches have been used to identify genes of interest. Genomewide linkage analysis found areas of interest on different chromosomes, with some genes located in this regions being identified and replicated as susceptibility genes. Numerous of candidate genes that could be linked to disease pathogenesis have been implicated in COPD genetics. However, the candidate gene approach is often limited by inconsistent results in other study populations. Recently, a combination of different methods is used giving more evidence for some candidate genes, including TGFß-1, Surfactant, SERPINE2 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase. In the future ongoing exact phenotype definition, combination of several approaches, genome-wide association studies and animal model genetics will lead to new insights into the genetics of COPD, with epigenetic factors needs to be further investigated and considered in concert with genetic findings. PMID:18268927

  4. Energetic adaptation to chronic disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Toth, M J; Poehlman, E T

    2000-03-01

    Several chronic diseases occur with increased prevalence in the elderly. Body weight loss is a common feature of many chronic diseases. Weight loss increases the risk for morbidity and mortality and contributes to decreased functional independence and poor quality of life. Thus, an understanding of the effect of chronic disease on energy balance has important implications for nutritional supplementation and clinical outcome. This brief review will consider recent studies that have examined the effect of several chronic diseases (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and congestive heart failure) on daily energy expenditure in elderly individuals. Additionally, we put forth a model to explain the energetic adaptation to chronic disease in the elderly that is based on measurements of daily energy expenditure and its components. Studies suggest that chronic disease decreases daily energy expenditure in elderly individuals due to a marked reduction in physical activity energy expenditure. Moreover, these changes in daily energy expenditure often occur in the presence of increased resting energy expenditure. Thus, the net effect of chronic disease is to decrease daily energy expenditure. These results do not favor the hypothesis that increased energy expenditure contributes to disease-related weight loss. Instead, reduced energy intake appears to be a more likely mediator of the negative energy imbalance and weight loss that frequently accompany chronic disease in the elderly. PMID:10812919

  5. Optimizing bone health in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Solenne; Chapurlat, Roland

    2010-04-01

    Phosphocalcic metabolism disorders often complicate chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsen as kidney function declines, with a consequence on bone structural integrity. The risk of fracture exceeds that of the normal population in both patients with pre-dialysis CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The increasing incidence of CKD, the high mortality rate induced by hip fracture, the decreased quality of life and economic burden of fragility fracture make the renal bone disorders a major problem of public health around the world. Optimizing bone health in CKD patients should be a priority. Bone biopsy is invasive. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, commonly used to screen individuals at risk of fragility fracture in the general population, is not adequate to assess advanced CKD because it does not discriminate fracture status in this population. New non-invasive three-dimensional high-resolution imaging techniques, distinguishing trabecular and cortical bone, appear to be promising in the assessment of bone strength and might improve bone fracture prediction in this population. Therapeutic intervention in the chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) should begin early in the course of CKD to maintain serum concentration of biological parameters involved in mineral metabolism in the normal recommended ranges, prevent the development of parathyroid hyperplasia, prevent extra-skeletal calcifications and preserve skeletal health. In this paper, we review studies of mineral and bone disorders in patients with CKD and ESRD, the utility of current techniques to assess bone health and the preventive and therapeutic strategies for managing CKD-MBD. PMID:20092971

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, M Arfan; Brusselle, Guy G

    2015-11-01

    Along with the aging population, the public health burden of cerebrovascular disease is increasing. Cerebral small vessel disease and accumulation of brain pathology associate with cognitive decline and can lead to clinical outcomes, such as stroke and dementia. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common respiratory disease among elderly. The quality of life and prognosis of patients with COPD is greatly determined by the presence of comorbidities including stroke and cognitive impairment. Despite the clinical relevance of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and (vascular) cognitive impairment in patients with COPD, literature is scarce and underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim of the present review is therefore to summarize current scientific knowledge, to provide a better understanding of the interplay between COPD and the aging brain and to define remaining knowledge gaps. This narrative review article 1) overviews the epidemiology of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and cognitive impairment in patients with COPD; 2) discusses potential underlying mechanisms including aging, smoking, systemic inflammation, vasculopathy, hypoxia and genetic susceptibility; and 3) highlights areas requiring further research. PMID:26342840

  7. Pay for Performance in Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Yamini; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2015-11-01

    With the advent of the Affordable Care Act, pay-for-performance programs have become widespread in the United States and are here to stay. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services started its pay-for-performance program, the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative, in 2007, and made it a permanent system, the Physician Quality Reporting System, in 2011. Although it started off as a pay-for-performance initiative, in which physicians and other health care professionals were rewarded for satisfactorily reporting on selected quality measures, it now has evolved into a penalty-based program. The Physician Quality Reporting System includes measures that target hepatitis C virus infection. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of these measures and the submission process to avoid penalties or other difficulties with reimbursement. This review describes the current measures in chronic liver disease, rates of submission, as well as the submission process and associated challenges. PMID:26164221

  8. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  9. [Psychological consequences of chronic hair diseases].

    PubMed

    Poot, F

    2004-09-01

    The author is looking to the psychological consequences of chronic hair diseases through a review of the recent literature. In general those consequences are depending on the coping skills and on the personality traits. The effect of hair loss on the quality of life is similar to that of a severe psoriasis. The most important effect is a loss of self-confidence. This is enhanced by an insecure or ambivalent attachment pattern. The coping skills will therefore be different and less flexibles. Two psychiatric syndromes are first mentioned: the body dysmorphic syndrome (very slight or imaginary defect in appearance) and trichotillomania. Androgenetic alopecia leads to an important suffering in women mostly. Alopecia induced by cancer chemotherapy has been reported to cause changes in self-concept and body image. This does not return to the previous state after regrowth of hair for a majority of patients. A cosmeto-oncologic care strategy is developed in our department to improve the quality of life of the patients during this difficult coping period. Alopecia areata has an important psychiatric comorbidity: mostly anxiety and depression. Old stressful life events are frequently reported at the onset of the disease revealing a chronic stress. Those patients have difficulties to express their feelings (what is called alexithymia). With a systemic vision this is interpreted as an unconscious task of avoiding family conflicts. This conflicts are raising the anxiety of family splitting coming from early loss or death in the previous generations. A cautious family therapy helps to change those unconscious myths. PMID:15516058

  10. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)????? Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  11. Endothelin system & its antagonism in chronic kidney disease 

    E-print Network

    Dhaun, Neeraj

    2012-06-30

    Since its discovery in 1988 the powerful vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) as well as the cardiovascular disease with which it is ...

  12. Severe Combat Injuries Linked to Risk of Chronic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... risk of high blood pressure rose 6 percent; coronary artery disease and diabetes jumped 13 percent; and chronic kidney ... severely injured veterans, rates of high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and diabetes were significantly higher than overall in ...

  13. Prevalence of Chronic Diseases in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeseburg, B.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Groothoff, J. W.; Reijneveld, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Valid community-based data on the prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescents (12-18 years) with intellectual disability (ID-adolescents) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates and the nature of chronic diseases in a population of ID-adolescents and to compare them with the rates among adolescents in the general…

  14. Can Incentives Improve Medicaid Patient Engagement and Prevent Chronic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Perry, Rebecca; Farrell, Kathleen; Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Under the Medicaid Incentives for the Prevention of Chronic Diseases model, 10 states are testing whether incentives can encourage Medicaid beneficiaries to lose weight, stop smoking, work to prevent diabetes, or control risk factors for other chronic diseases. This commentary describes these incentive programs and how they will be evaluated. PMID:26510225

  15. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ? There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ? Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ? Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ? Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

  16. Metabolic biomarkers for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Breit, Marc; Weinberger, Klaus M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly recognized burden for patients and health care systems with high (and growing) global incidence and prevalence, significant mortality, and disproportionately high treatment costs. Yet, the available diagnostic tools are either impractical in clinical routine or have serious shortcomings impeding a well-informed disease management although optimized treatment strategies with proven benefits for the patients have become available. Advances in bioanalytical technologies have facilitated studies that identified genomic, proteomic, and metabolic biomarker candidates, and confirmed some of them in independent cohorts. This review summarizes the CKD-related markers discovered so far, and focuses on compounds and pathways, for which there is quantitative data, substantiating evidence from translational research, and a mechanistic understanding of the processes involved. Also, multiparametric marker panels have been suggested that showed promising diagnostic and prognostic performance in initial analyses although the data basis from prospective trials is very limited. Large-scale studies, however, are underway and will provide the information for validating a set of parameters and discarding others. Finally, the path from clinical research to a routine application is discussed, focusing on potential obstacles such as the use of mass spectrometry, and the feasibility of obtaining regulatory approval for targeted metabolomics assays. PMID:26235490

  17. Vitamin D and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Seong

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been recognized as a significant global health problem because of the increased risk of total and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is common in patients with CKD, and serum levels of vitamin D appear to have an inverse correlation with kidney function. Growing evidence has indicated that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to deteriorating renal function, as well as increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. Recent studies have suggested that treatment with active vitamin D or its analogues can ameliorate renal injury by reducing fibrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation in animal models; this treatment also decreases proteinuria and mortality in patients with CKD. These renoprotective effects of vitamin D treatment are far beyond its classical role in the maintenance of bone and mineral metabolism, in addition to its pleiotropic effects on extra-mineral metabolism. In this review, we discuss the altered metabolism of vitamin D in kidney disease, and the potential renoprotective mechanisms of vitamin D in experimental and clinical studies. In addition, issues regarding the effects of vitamin D treatment on clinical outcomes are discussed. PMID:25045287

  18. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and safety of specific osteoporosis therapies (alendronate, risedronate and denosumab) in stage 4 CKD. This review also discusses how to diagnose and manage fragility fractures across the five stages of CKD. PMID:26273531

  19. Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Cardiovascular Links

    PubMed Central

    Laratta, Cheryl R.; van Eeden, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive lung disease resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, noxious gases, particulate matter, and air pollutants. COPD is exacerbated by acute inflammatory insults such as lung infections (viral and bacterial) and air pollutants which further accelerate the steady decline in lung function. The chronic inflammatory process in the lung contributes to the extrapulmonary manifestations of COPD which are predominantly cardiovascular in nature. Here we review the significant burden of cardiovascular disease in COPD and discuss the clinical and pathological links between acute exacerbations of COPD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24724085

  20. Indicators for chronic disease surveillance - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Holt, James B; Huston, Sara L; Heidari, Khosrow; Schwartz, Randy; Gollmar, Charles W; Tran, Annie; Bryan, Leah; Liu, Yong; Croft, Janet B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases are an important public health problem, which can result in morbidity, mortality, disability, and decreased quality of life. Chronic diseases represented seven of the top 10 causes of death in the United States in 2010 (Murphy SL, Xu J, Kochanek KD. Deaths: final data for 2010. Natl Vital Stat Rep 2013;6. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/nvsr61_04.pdf Adobe PDF file). Chronic diseases and risk factors vary by geographic area such as state and county, where essential public health interventions are implemented. The chronic disease indicators (CDIs) were established in the late 1990s through collaboration among CDC, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and the Association of State and Territorial Chronic Disease Program Directors (now the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors) to enable public health professionals and policymakers to retrieve data for chronic diseases and risk factors that have a substantial impact on public health. This report describes the latest revisions to the CDIs, which were developed on the basis of a comprehensive review during 2011-2013. The number of indicators is increasing from 97 to 124, with major additions in systems and environmental indicators and additional emphasis on high-impact diseases and conditions as well as emerging topics. PMID:25578080

  1. 77 FR 43092 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Chronic Disease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ...Collection; Comment Request; Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Program...requirements relating to the Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Program...Adults with Disabilities through Chronic Disease Self-Management...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent...

  7. Chronic digestive disease in an urban black population.

    PubMed

    Segal, I

    1986-09-13

    There is a marked contrast in incidence of chronic digestive diseases between black populations of sub-Saharan Africa and Western populations. Environmental factors inherent in modern Western civilization have been incriminated as largely responsible for the differences observed. The significance of these factors in chronic digestive disease in Soweto is emphasized since they provide clues to aetiology. In this context research avenues with regard to specific diseases are suggested. PMID:3529455

  8. Evidence for prescribing exercise as therapy in chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Saltin, B

    2006-02-01

    Considerable knowledge has accumulated in recent decades concerning the significance of physical activity in the treatment of a number of diseases, including diseases that do not primarily manifest as disorders of the locomotive apparatus. In this review we present the evidence for prescribing exercise therapy in the treatment of metabolic syndrome-related disorders (insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity), heart and pulmonary diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, intermittent claudication), muscle, bone and joint diseases (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome) and cancer, depression, asthma and type 1 diabetes. For each disease, we review the effect of exercise therapy on disease pathogenesis, on symptoms specific to the diagnosis, on physical fitness or strength and on quality of life. The possible mechanisms of action are briefly examined and the principles for prescribing exercise therapy are discussed, focusing on the type and amount of exercise and possible contraindications. PMID:16451303

  9. The Jeremiah Metzger Lecture: Inflammation, Immune Modulators, and Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for many different diseases. It is clear that inflammation is associated with degenerative brain diseases, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Throughout the past 100 years, changes in the causes of death in the US have been dramatic. The most recent data indicate that cardiovascular disease and cancer are now responsible for 63% of mortality in the US population. Although progression of these diseases is related to diet, lifestyle, and genetic factors, a common but often unrecognized link is the presence of underlying chronic inflammation. As of 2014, 83.6 million people were living with some form of cardiovascular disease, 29.1 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes, 14 million people carried the diagnosis of cancer, and 5.2 million people were living with Alzheimer disease. These diseases are a huge burden on our health care system and all have been associated with chronic inflammation. PMID:26330682

  10. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, John M.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Hispanics are individuals whose ancestry can be traced to Spain and/or areas previously under Spanish control (e.g., Mexico, Puerto Rico). They are a rapidly growing subset of the population of the United States and are quite diverse in their racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, tobacco use, and access to health care. Current evidence suggests that the prevalence and morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) vary widely among Hispanic-American nations, with similar but limited findings among Hispanic subgroups in the United States. Potential reasons for such variation include differences in racial ancestry and genetic susceptibility, exposure to tobacco smoke and/or biomass smoke, access to health care, and disease management. Future studies of COPD in Hispanics should include large samples of subgroups that are well defined with regard to self-reported ethnicity, country of origin, area of residence, tobacco use, and socioeconomic status. Areas that need to be carefully examined include validation of COPD diagnoses for epidemiologic studies (e.g., by radiologic assessment), COPD in high-risk groups (e.g., Puerto Ricans), impact of biomass smoke (in rural areas) and air pollution (in urban areas) on COPD morbidity, effects of migration and acculturation on COPD prevalence and morbidity among Hispanic subgroups in the United States, development of reference values for spirometry, smoking cessation, and overcoming barriers to management. Public health measures, such as effective smoking prevention and cessation programs, reduction of air pollution and exposure to biomass smoke, and improved access to health care, would help reduce the burden of COPD among Hispanics in the United States and Latin America. PMID:18029789

  11. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90?mmHg in the general population and 130/80?mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  12. Contextual Poverty, Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) outcomes. One of the strongest factors that impacts nutrition is socioeconomic status as evidenced by the large body of epidemiologic data showing that income and education are directly associated with diet quality. Apart from individual-level markers of socioeconomic status such as income and education, contextual factors such as availability of and transportation to food outlets that provide healthy food options and the density of fast food restaurants within particular regions markedly impact the ability of individuals to comply with nutrition recommendations. This is particularly true for nutrition guidelines most specific to individuals with CKD such as the consumption of protein, saturated fat, sodium and phosphorus, all of which have been shown to impact CKD health and are influenced by the availability of healthy food options within individual neighborhood food environments. Because of the strong association of contextual poverty with the diet quality, any serious attempt to improve the diet of CKD patients must include a discussion of the environmental barriers that each individual faces in trying to access healthy foods and health care providers should take account of these barriers when tailoring specific recommendations. PMID:25573510

  13. Role of altered intestinal microbiota in systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease

    E-print Network

    Mafra, D; Lobo, JC; Barros, AF; Koppe, L; Vaziri, ND; Fouque, D

    2014-01-01

    microbiome is briefly described. Background Chronic kidney disease (disease (CKD). Alterations in the composition of the microbiomemicrobiome & metabolic changes during pregnancy Recent work suggests that altered gut micro- biota can be associated with metabolic diseases;

  14. Major affective disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chaiwong, Warawut; Phetsuk, Nittaya; Pisalthanapuna, Sangnual; Chetsadaphan, Nonglak; Inchai, Juthamas

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) have significant impacts on quality of life including psychomotor domain. Purpose To evaluate three major affective disorders in subjects with COPD compared with other CRDs and nonill population. Materials and methods The Thai version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used as a diagnostic instrument for three major affective disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder) by face-to-face interview in assessing patients with CRDs [COPD, asthma, rhinasthma, all asthma (asthma and rhinasthma), and chronic rhinitis], and nonill subjects. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relation between major affective disorders and CRDs adjusting for age, sex, and disease severity. Results Major affective disorders were more prevalent in CRDs than nonill groups (adjusted OR =2.6 [95% CI, 1.8?3.9], P<0.001). COPD patients had significantly more generalized anxiety and panic disorder (adjusted OR =4.0 [95% CI, 1.4?11.9], P=0.011, and 4.4 [95% CI, 1.1?18.1], P=0.038, respectively) but not major depressive disorder (adjusted OR =2.7 [95% CI, 0.8?9.0, P=0.105]) than nonill group. Comparing with all asthma, COPD patients had lower occurrence of major depressive and panic disorders (adjusted OR =0.1 [95% CI, 0.0?0.4], P=0.002, and 0.1 [95% CI, 0.0?0.9], P=0.043, respectively). There was no difference in major mood disorders in COPD, rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis patients. Major affective disorders were not increased by disease severity in COPD. Conclusion Major affective disorders were significantly higher in CRDs than nonill population. Generalized anxiety and panic disorders were significantly high in COPD patients. Moreover, major depressive and panic disorders in COPD were significantly lower than all asthma. The prevalence of major affective disorders may not be related to severity of COPD. PMID:26300637

  15. cGMP levels in chronic cadmium disease and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kagamimori, S.; Williams, W. R.; Watanabe, M.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cadmium on guanyl cyclase activity, urine levels of the nucleotide cGMP were measured in patients with bone and renal lesions resulting from chronic cadmium exposure, in patients with osteoarthritis and in a normal age-matched control population. The effects of cadmium, zinc and mercury salts on blood mononuclear cell cGMP production were also studied in vitro. The two patient groups exhibited clear differences in cGMP excretion. Lower urine cGMP (59%, P less than 0.01) and creatinine values (43%, P less than 0.01) were found in cadmium-exposed patients and higher cGMP values (56%, P less than 0.05) in patients with osteoarthritis, compared to the control group. Creatinine adjusted cGMP values were also lower in cadmium-exposed patients (28%, P less than 0.05) and higher in patients with osteoarthritis (130%, P less than 0.01). In vitro, a 10 h exposure of mononuclear cells to cadmium or mercury salts depressed guanyl cyclase activity in most experiments. At 10(-4) M, mercury was consistently more inhibitory in all cultures (95%, P less than 0.01). As cadmium has a potential for inhibiting guanyl cyclase activity in human tissue, the low urine cGMP values found in patients with cadmium disease may be attributable to chronic cadmium exposure. High guanyl cyclase activity in patients with osteoarthritis may be associated with inflammation. PMID:2874827

  16. Patient Experiences of Depression and Anxiety with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeJean, D; Giacomini, M; Vanstone, M; Brundisini, F

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease, but remain undertreated despite significant negative consequences on patient health. A number of clinical groups have developed recommendations for depression screening practices in the chronic disease population. Objectives The objective of this analysis was to review empirical qualitative research on the experiences of patients with chronic disease (e.g., COPD, diabetes, heart disease, stroke) and comorbid depression or anxiety, and to highlight the implications of the screening and management of anxiety and/or depression on chronic disease outcomes. Review Methods We performed literature searches for studies published from January 2002 to May 2012. We applied a qualitative mega-filter to nine condition-specific search filters. Titles and abstracts were reviewed by two reviewers and, for the studies that met the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across relevant published primary research studies. Qualitative meta-synthesis produced a synthesis of evidence that both retained the original meaning of the authors and offered a new, integrative interpretation of the phenomenon through a process of comparing and contrasting findings across studies. Results The findings of 20 primary qualitative studies were synthesized. Patients tended to experience their chronic conditions and anxiety or depression as either independent or inter-related (i.e., the chronic disease lead to depression/anxiety, the depression/anxiety lead to the chronic disease, or the two conditions exacerbated each other). Potential barriers to screening for depression or anxiety were also identified. Limitations A wider array of issues might have been captured if the analysis had focused on broader psychological responses to the chronic disease experience. However, given the objective to highlight implications for screening for anxiety or depression, the more narrow focus seemed most relevant. Conclusions Chronic disease and anxiety or depression can be independent or inter-related. Patients may be reluctant to acknowledge depression or anxiety as a separate condition, or may not recognize that the conditions are separate because of overlapping physical symptoms. More qualitative research is needed to specifically address screening for depression or anxiety. Plain Language Summary Depression is a common complication of chronic disease. It may worsen the disease, and it may also affect the self-management of the disease. Screening for depression earlier, and then treating it, may reduce distress and improve symptoms of the chronic disease, leading to better quality of life. PMID:24228079

  17. Periodontal Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh K.; Nolph, Karl D.; Ringdahl, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder and being so it has been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and malnutrition. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Annual Data Report, 2010]. A recent scientific statement released by the American Heart Association [Lockhart et al.: Circulation 2012;125:2520-2544] claims that, even though evidence exists to believe that periodontal interventions result in a reduction in systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, there is little evidence that those interventions prevent atherosclerotic vascular disease or modify the outcomes. In this review, we discuss the periodontal findings and their association with an increased prevalence of inflammatory markers and cardiovascular mortality in ESRD patients and CKD. PMID:23802000

  18. Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of captive and free ranging white tailed deer, mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk and moose in the some parts of the United States and Canada. The presence of the disease has sharply curtailed movement of captive...

  19. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document contains guidelines for developing policies and procedures related to chronic infectious diseases, as recommended by the Illinois Task Force on School Management of Infectious Disease. It is designed to help school personnel understand how infectious diseases can be transmitted, and to assist school districts in the development and…

  20. Chronic Diseases in the Pediatric Age Group. Matrix No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Michael

    This paper briefly outlines current problems associated with chronic diseases in children and youth and provides indications for the types of future research and analysis needed to facilitate the development of solutions. In general, these problems are associated with the following: malignancies, hereditary anemias, cystic fibrosis, other chronic

  1. OCCUPATIONAL SILICA EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Vupputuri, Suma; Parks, Christine G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Hogan, Susan L.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Occupational exposure to silica may be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most studies have been conducted in occupational cohorts with high levels of exposure but small numbers of cases. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of occupational silica exposure and CKD. Methods Cases were hospital patients with newly diagnosed CKD and community controls were selected using random digit dialing and frequency matched by age, gender, race and proximity to the hospital. Silica exposure estimates were assigned by industrial hygiene review of lifetime job history data and weighted for certainty and intensity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for CKD conditioned on demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (range, 30-83 years), 56% were male and 54% were white. Any silica exposure (compared to none) was associated with a 40% increased risk of CKD (OR=1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 1.89) in a multivariable adjusted model. The mean cumulative duration of silica exposure was significantly higher in exposed cases than in exposed controls (33.4 vs. 24.8 years, respectively). Overall, compared to non-exposed participants, the ORs (95% CI) for those below and above the median duration of silica exposure were 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.86) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.71), respectively. Conclusions We found a positive relationship between occupational silica exposure and CKD. A dose-response trend of increasing CKD risk with increasing duration of silica exposure was observed and was particularly strong among non-whites. PMID:22032652

  2. Technology-supported apprenticeship in the management of chronic disease

    E-print Network

    Moore, John Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Chronic disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but the current standard of care is woefully ineffective. It is paternalistic, episodic, and perversely incentivized based on volume, resulting ...

  3. Meditation Interventions for Chronic Disease Populations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Roxane Raffin; Larson, Janet L

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly growing body of research regarding the use of meditation interventions in chronic disease presents an opportunity to compare outcomes based on intervention content. For this review, meditation interventions were described as those interventions delivered to persons with chronic disease where sitting meditation was the main or only content of the intervention with or without the addition of mindful movement. This systematic review identified 45 individual research studies that examined meditations effect on levels of anxiety, depression, and chronic disease symptoms in persons with chronic disease. Individual studies were assessed based on interventional content, the consistency with which interventions were applied, and the research quality. This study identified seven categories of meditation interventions based on the meditation skills and mindful movement practices that were included in the intervention. Overall, half of the interventions had clearly defined and specific meditation interventions (25/45) and half of the studies were conducted using randomized control trials (24/45). PMID:25731777

  4. Oral disease profiles in chronic graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Bassim, C W; Fassil, H; Mays, J W; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Naik, H; Datiles, M; Stratton, P; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2015-04-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ? 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ? 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer's tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P < 0.001); salivary dysfunction (11% prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral cGVHD as 3 separate manifestations will improve clinical diagnosis, observational research data collection, and the definitions of outcome measures in clinical trials. PMID:25740857

  5. Advanced MRI Methods for Assessment of Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taouli, Bachir; Ehman, Richard L.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2010-01-01

    MRI plays an increasingly important role for assessment of patients with chronic liver disease. MRI has numerous advantages, including lack of ionizing radiation and the possibility of performing multiparametric imaging. With recent advances in technology, advanced MRI methods such as diffusion-, perfusion-weighted MRI, MR elastography, chemical shift based fat-water separation and MR spectroscopy can now be applied to liver imaging. We will review the respective roles of these techniques for assessment of chronic liver disease. PMID:19542391

  6. Beryllium copper alloy (2%) causes chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, R C; Newman, L S

    1999-04-01

    We describe two newly confirmed cases of chronic beryllium disease who presented to our clinic from a facility that only used 2% beryllium copper alloy. These cases illustrate that the 2% beryllium copper alloy continues to cause chronic beryllium disease and that appropriate preventive measures must be taken to control exposures and educate industries and their workers about the hazards of beryllium alloys. PMID:10224597

  7. Exercise and training in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cox, N J; van Herwaarden, C L; Folgering, H; Binkhorst, R A

    1988-09-01

    Exercise protocols and training are used more and more in diagnostic procedures and as a tool in improving physical, social and psychological functioning in chronic obstructive lung disease patients. Before starting a training programme in chronic obstructive lung disease patients, one should exclude ventilatory-limited patients from the group. A maximal ergometer test with arterial blood samples or pulse oximetry must be performed. In mild forms of chronic obstructive lung disease with no ventilatory insufficiency demonstrable with exercise testing, the patient can be trained with no restrictions. Endurance training is permitted. It should be noted that it is possible to train the muscular and cardiovascular system up to a new, possible ventilatory maximum. In severe chronic obstructive lung disease endurance training is accompanied by hypoxia, with an associated risk of rhythm disturbances and right heart failure. Training with supplemental oxygen can reduce this risk, but should be done only under close medical supervision. In very severe chronic obstructive lung disease, when endurance training is only marginally possible even with supplemental oxygen, suppleness, coordination and relaxation exercises should be emphasised in rehabilitation programmes. Postural exercises and breathing control exercises can also give great subjective improvements in this often very disabled group of patients. Furthermore they can reduce fear and panic when dyspnoea occurs. Training of the respiratory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease must be regarded as an experimental therapy. The clinical importance remains uncertain. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction should not limit exercises or training, provided it is treated correctly. PMID:3055147

  8. Chronic Venous Disease (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the surface of the legs to the deep leg veins, from which calf muscles pump blood ... is located in the superficial veins or the deep veins. (See "Diagnostic evaluation of chronic venous insufficiency" .) ...

  9. Orthopaedic manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Beredjiklian, P K; Drummond, D S; Dormans, J P; Davidson, R S; Brock, G T; August, C

    1998-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-recognized complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Musculoskeletal manifestations include joint contractures, polymyositis, polyserositis, and fasciitis. We present 14 patients with orthopaedic complications of chronic GVHD. Long-term conservative management of joint contractures with physical therapy and orthotics was generally successful in restoring patients' premorbid functional status. Surgical release of joint contractures yielded poor results and rendered the affected joints unresponsive to further conservative treatment. Surgical intervention in the treatment of joint contractures resulting from chronic GVHD does not appear qualitatively to improve functional status in patients affected with this disease process. PMID:9746402

  10. Significant improvement from chronic beryllium disease following corticosteroid pulse therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kaoru; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Sakakibara, Hiroki; Kurita, Hideki; Taniwaki, Hiroshige; Ono, Yuichiro

    2006-04-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a rare disease characterized by diffuse interstitial pulmonary granulomatosis. We report a case of CBD which exhibited marked improvement both subjectively and objectively following pulse therapy. The patient was a 36-year-old man whose chief complaint was dyspnea and a dry cough. Since July 1990, the patient had been working in the development of an automatic or mechanical technique for producing beryllium-copper alloy. It appeared likely that the patient may have been exposed to metal beryllium fumes generated from an opening located just above the furnace. The Be concentration exceeded 25 microg/m3 transiently in the breathing zone in this workplace. A chest X-ray film taken in October 1994 showed fine granular shadows throughout the entire lung fields. Around August 1998, the patient's dyspnea became aggravated. An X-ray taken at that time showed linear and reticular shadows, in addition to the diffuse fine granular shadow. In October 1998, after 3 days of methylprednisolone pulse therapy, oral prednisolone 30 mg was initiated. With this treatment, the patient's pulmonary function tests and blood gases improved. Once the patient's condition had improved sufficiently, the dosage of prednisolone was decreased by 2.5 mg every two weeks. The patient continues to be monitored. PMID:16716007

  11. Developmental determinants in non-communicable chronic diseases and ageing.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Berkouk, K; Gergen, P; Antunes, J Pinto; Augé, P; Camuzat, T; Bringer, J; Mercier, J; Best, N; Bourret, R; Akdis, M; Arshad, S H; Bedbrook, A; Berr, C; Bush, A; Cavalli, G; Charles, M A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Gillman, M; Gold, D R; Goldberg, M; Holloway, J W; Iozzo, P; Jacquemin, S; Jeandel, C; Kauffmann, F; Keil, T; Koppelman, G H; Krauss-Etschmann, S; Kuh, D; Lehmann, S; Carlsen, K C Lodrup; Maier, D; Méchali, M; Melén, E; Moatti, J P; Momas, I; Nérin, P; Postma, D S; Ritchie, K; Robine, J M; Samolinski, B; Siroux, V; Slagboom, P E; Smit, H A; Sunyer, J; Valenta, R; Van de Perre, P; Verdier, J M; Vrijheid, M; Wickman, M; Yiallouros, P; Zins, M

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal and peri-natal events play a fundamental role in health, development of diseases and ageing (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)). Research on the determinants of active and healthy ageing is a priority to: (i) inform strategies for reducing societal and individual costs of an ageing population and (ii) develop effective novel prevention strategies. It is important to compare the trajectories of respiratory diseases with those of other chronic diseases. PMID:25616486

  12. Immune Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Tariq A; Panzica, Louis; Kalathil, Suresh Gopi; Thanavala, Yasmin

    2015-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic disease. Chronic inflammation is the hallmark of COPD, involving the interplay of a wide variety of cells in the lung microenvironment. Cigarette smoke (CS) induces chronic lung inflammation and is considered a key etiological factor in the development and pathogenesis of COPD. Structural and inflammatory cells in the lung respond to CS exposure by releasing proinflammatory mediators that recruit additional inflammatory immune cells, which collectively contribute to the establishment of a chronic inflammatory microenvironment. Chronic inflammation contributes to lung damage, compromises innate and adaptive immune responses, and facilitates the recurrent episodes of respiratory infection that punctuate and further contribute to the pathological manifestations of the stable disease. A number of studies support the conclusion that immune dysfunction leads to exacerbations and disease severity in COPD. Our group has clearly demonstrated that CS exacerbates lung inflammation and compromises immunity to respiratory pathogens in a mouse model of COPD. We have also investigated the phenotype of immune cells in patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects and found extensive immune dysfunction due to the presence and functional activity of T regulatory cells, CD4(+)PD-1(+) exhausted effector T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Manipulation of these immunosuppressive networks in COPD could provide a rational strategy to restore functional immune responses, reduce exacerbations, and improve lung function. In this review, we discuss the role of immune dysfunction in COPD that may contribute to recurrent respiratory infections and disease severity. PMID:26595735

  13. Personality Traits and Chronic Disease: Implications for Adult Personality Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Personality traits have been associated with chronic disease. Less is known about the longitudinal relation between personality and disease and whether chronic disease is associated with changes in personality. Method. Participants from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (N = 2,008) completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory and a standard medical interview at regularly scheduled visits; the Charlson Comorbidity Index, a weighted sum of 19 serious diseases, was derived from this interview. Using data from 6,685 visits, we tested whether personality increased risk of disease and whether disease was associated with personality change. Results. Measured concurrently, neuroticism and conscientiousness were associated with greater disease burden. The impulsiveness facet of neuroticism was the strongest predictor of developing disease across the follow-up period: For every standard deviation increase in impulsiveness, there was a 26% increased risk of developing disease and a 36% increased risk of getting more ill. Personality traits changed only modestly with disease: As participants developed chronic illnesses, they became more conservative (decreased openness). Discussion. This research indicates that personality traits confer risk for disease, in part, through health-risk behaviors. These traits, however, were relatively resistant to the effect of serious disease. PMID:23685925

  14. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  15. Screening and Management of Depression for Adults With Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading contributor to the global burden of disease. In Canada, the 1-year prevalence of major depressive disorder was approximately 6% in Canadians 18 and older. A large prospective Canadian study reported an increased risk of developing depression in people with chronic diseases compared with those without such diseases. Objectives To systematically review the literature regarding the effectiveness of screening for depression and/or anxiety in adults with chronic diseases in the community setting. To conduct a non-systematic, post-hoc analysis to evaluate whether a screen-and-treat strategy for depression is associated with an improvement in chronic disease outcomes. Data Sources A literature search was performed on January 29, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, OVID PsycINFO, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2002 until January 29, 2012. Review Methods No citations were identified for the first objective. For the second, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials that compared depression management for adults with chronic disease with usual care/placebo were included. Where possible, the results of randomized controlled trials were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Eight primary randomized controlled trials and 1 systematic review were included in the post-hoc analysis (objective 2)—1 in people with diabetes, 2 in people with heart failure, and 5 in people with coronary artery disease. Across all studies, there was no evidence that managing depression improved chronic disease outcomes. The quality of evidence (GRADE) ranged from low to moderate. Some of the study results (specifically in coronary artery disease populations) were suggestive of benefit, but the differences were not significant. Limitations The included studies varied in duration of treatment and follow-up, as well as in included forms of depression. In most of the trials, the authors noted a significant placebo response rate that could be attributed to spontaneous resolution of depression or mild disease. In some studies, placebo groups may have had access to care as a result of screening, since it would be unethical to withhold all care. Conclusions There was no evidence to suggest that a screen-and-treat strategy for depression among adults with chronic diseases resulted in improved chronic disease outcomes. Plain Language Summary People with chronic diseases are more likely to have depression than people without chronic diseases. This is a problem because depression may make the chronic disease worse or affect how a person manages it. Discovering depression earlier may make it easier for people to cope with their condition, leading to better health and quality of life. We reviewed studies that looked at screening and treating for depression in people with chronic diseases. In people with diabetes, treatment of depression did not affect clinical measures of diabetes management. In people with heart failure and coronary artery disease, treatment of depression did not improve heart failure management or reduce rates of heart attacks or death. At present, there is no evidence that screening and treating for depression improves the symptoms of chronic diseases or lead to use of fewer health care services. PMID:24133570

  16. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life. PMID:23798298

  17. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life. PMID:23798298

  18. Anti-inflammatory treatments for chronic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Laveti, Durgaprasad; Kumar, Manoj; Hemalatha, R; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Naidu, V G M; Talla, Venu; Verma, Vinod; Kaur, Navrinder; Nagpal, Ravinder

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation is viewed as one of the major causes for the development of different diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, and CNS related diseases such as depression and parkinson's disease; and this fervent phenomenon provides space for understanding different inflammatory markers. Increasing evidences have elucidated the outcome of inflammatory pathways dysregulation resulting in many symptoms of chronic diseases. The detection of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-?B), STAT and their gene products such as COX-2, cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors has laid molecular foundation for the important role of inflammation in chronic diseases in which the NF-?B is reported as a major mediator which makes a possible way for the development of new therapeutic approaches using synthetic and natural compounds that might eventually decrease the prevalence of these diseases. Even if many inflammatory markers like TNF-?, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and C-reactive protein (CRP) are reported to be the major key factors with proved role in several inflammatory diseases, IL-1 and TNF-? are the important cytokines that can induce the expression of NF-?B which is the potential target in these inflammatory diseases. This review aims to explore and summarize that how some drugs and natural compounds show their modulatory activity in inflammatory pathways and chronic inflammatory markers in these inflammatory diseases. PMID:23876224

  19. Inflammatory Factors and Exercise in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Katherine L.; Smith, Alice C.; Burton, James O.; Bishop, Nicolette C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease frequently present with chronic elevations in markers of inflammation, a condition that appears to be exacerbated by disease progression and onset of haemodialysis. Systemic inflammation is interlinked with malnutrition and muscle protein wasting and is implicated in a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease: the most common cause of mortality in this population. Research in the general population and other chronic disease cohorts suggests that an increase in habitual activity levels over a prolonged period may help redress basal increases in systemic inflammation. Furthermore, those populations with the highest baseline levels of systemic inflammation appear to have the greatest improvements from training. On the whole, the activity levels of the chronic kidney disease population reflect a sedentary lifestyle, indicating the potential for increasing physical activity and observing health benefits. This review explores the current literature investigating exercise and inflammatory factors in the chronic kidney disease population and then attempts to explain the contradictory findings and suggests where future research is required. PMID:23737775

  20. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Parnham, Susie F. C.; Gleadle, Jonathan M.; De Pasquale, Carmine G.; Selvanayagam, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease (CKD) population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in CKD lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with CKD.

  1. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) (63 FR 66940). After considering the comments received, DOE published its final rule establishing CBDPP on December 8, 1999 (64 FR 68854). At that time, DOE sought to... Part 850 RIN 1992-AA39 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Health,...

  2. Chronic lyme disease: psychogenic fantasy or somatic infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mervine, Phyllis

    2003-01-01

    Sigal and Hassett published an article about Lyme disease in the EHP Supplements (Sigal and Hassett 2002), suggesting that chronic Lyme disease is "psychogenic." I do not think that Sigal and Hassett, non-psychiatrists, are qualified to speak about psychiatric matters. I, however, actually have had the disease, which they characterize as "medically unexplained," for over 25 years and have 15 years of experience as a patient advocate and educator. I beg to differ. PMID:12573917

  3. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goderis, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  4. Distress Screening in Chronic Disease: Essential for Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Lorie; Lester, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Distress is a psychological state that is often observed in patients with chronic disease. Many cancers are considered chronic in nature, with patients experiencing long, disease-free states and intervals of metastatic disease. Distress can negatively affect the biopsychosocial balance in cancer survivors and impede their progress along the cancer trajectory. Distress can also affect medical and psychological outcomes and hinder advancement into long-term survivorship. Distress may contribute to disease progression, although despite research findings, health-care providers seldom screen for indications of persistent or unresolved distress. This article discusses research findings related to the prevalence of distress in multiple chronic diseases. Validated instruments used to screen for distress in cancer survivors, such as the Distress Thermometer and symptom checklist from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, are reviewed. With the availability of brief and concise instruments to screen for distress, providers have the ability to provide holistic and comprehensive care for cancer survivors. The overall financial impact of cancer-related distress is understudied, although similar psychological studies indicate that prevention or elimination of distress is beneficial. Cancer is a lifelong, chronic disease; patients have ongoing needs and varied sources of distress. As the number of cancer survivors exponentially increases, their psychosocial needs will likewise expand. PMID:25032045

  5. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses. PMID:25201221

  6. A chronic disease score from automated pharmacy data.

    PubMed

    Von Korff, M; Wagner, E H; Saunders, K

    1992-02-01

    Using population-based automated pharmacy data, patterns of use of selected prescription medications during a 1 year time period identified by a consensus judgement process were used to construct a measure of chronic disease status (Chronic Disease Score). This score was evaluated in terms of its stability over time and its association with other health status measures. In a pilot test sample of high utilizers of ambulatory health care well known to their physicians (n = 219), Chronic Disease Score (CDS) was correlated with physician ratings of physical disease severity (r = 0.57). In a second random sample of patients (n = 722), its correlation with physician-rated disease severity was 0.46. In a total population analysis (n = 122,911), it was found to predict hospitalization and mortality in the following year after controlling for age, gender and health care visits. In a population sample (n = 790), CDS showed high year to year stability (r = 0.74). Based on health survey data, CDS showed a moderate association with self rated health status and self reported disability. Unlike self-rated health status and health care utilization, CDS was not associated with depression or anxiety. We conclude that scoring automated pharmacy data can provide a stable measure of chronic disease status that, after controlling for health care utilization, is associated with physician-rated disease severity, patient-rated health status, and predicts subsequent mortality and hospitalization rates. Specific methods of scoring automated pharmacy data to measure global chronic disease status may require adaptation to local prescribing practices. Scoring might be improved by empirical estimation of weighting factors to optimize prediction of mortality and other health status measures. PMID:1573438

  7. Oral protein calorie supplementation for children with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Damian K; Smith, Joanne; Saljuqi, Tawab; Watling, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor growth and nutritional status are common in children with chronic diseases. Oral protein calorie supplements are used to improve nutritional status in these children. These expensive products may be associated with some adverse effects, e.g. the development of inappropriate eating behaviour patterns. This is a new update of a Cochrane review last updated in 2009. Objectives To examine evidence that in children with chronic disease, oral protein calorie supplements alter daily nutrient intake, nutritional indices, survival and quality of life and are associated with adverse effects, e.g. diarrhoea, vomiting, reduced appetite, glucose intolerance, bloating and eating behaviour problems. Search methods Trials of oral protein calorie supplements in children with chronic diseases were identified through comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Companies marketing these products were also contacted. Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 24 February 2015. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing oral protein calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with existing conventional therapy (including advice on improving nutritional intake from food or no specific intervention) in children with chronic disease. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed the outcomes: indices of nutrition and growth; anthropometric measures of body composition; calorie and nutrient intake (total from oral protein calorie supplements and food); eating behaviour; compliance; quality of life; specific adverse effects; disease severity scores; and mortality; we also assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. Main results Four studies (187 children) met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were carried out in children with cystic fibrosis and one study included children with paediatric malignant disease. Overall there was a low risk of bias for blinding and incomplete outcome data.Two studies had a high risk of bias for allocation concealment. Few statistical differences were found in the outcomes we assessed between treatment and control groups, except change in total energy intake at six and 12 months, mean difference 304.86 kcal per day (95% confidence interval 5.62 to 604.10) and mean difference 265.70 kcal per day (95% confidence interval 42.94 to 485.46), respectively. However, these were based on the analysis of just 58 children in only one study. Only two chronic diseases were included in these analyses, cystic fibrosis and paediatric malignant disease. No other studies were identified which assessed the effectiveness of oral protein calorie supplements in children with other chronic diseases. Authors' conclusions Oral protein calorie supplements are widely used to improve the nutritional status of children with a number of chronic diseases. We identified a small number of studies assessing these products in children with cystic fibrosis and paediatric malignant disease, but were unable to draw any conclusions based on the limited data extracted. We recommend a series of large, randomised controlled trials be undertaken investigating the use of these products in children with different chronic diseases. Until further data are available, we suggest these products are used with caution. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY The use of oral protein calorie supplements in children with chronic disease Background A lack of growth and poor nutrition are common in children with chronic diseases like cystic fibrosis and paediatric cancer. This may be due to reduced appetite, poor absorption and the need for extra calories due to the disease. Oral protein calorie supplements, either as milk or juices, may improve nutritional status and help children gain weight. Side effects of taking these supplements include the risk that the protein and calories in the supplement end up replacing those from normal food and have a negative effect on eating behaviour and physical side effects (e.g

  8. [Diabetes management issues for patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Oulahiane, Asmaa; Anaddam, Sara; Ouleghzal, Hassan; Elhaddad, Nadia; Moussaoui, Souad; Yaagoubi, Noussaima; Boufares, Fatima; Belmejdoub, Ghizlaine

    2012-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease is in continuous increase and can be found in up to 23% of patients with diabetes. Glycemic control is difficult to assess and medication therapy for diabetes may require dose adjustments part of the alteration of drug's pharmacokinetics and the insulin resistance which is predicting cardiovascular events. The recommended hemoglobin A1c goal is also lower than 7.0% without hypoglycemia. In this article, we review the therapeutic management of diabetic patients in chronic renal failure stage which is difficult and the ways to control blood glucose. Multidisciplinary approach, which is including management of comorbid diseases, is necessary to provide the optimal care of these patients. PMID:22015216

  9. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. PMID:26300515

  10. Vitamin D Bioavailability and Catabolism in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denburg, Michelle R.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; de Boer, Ian H.; Hewison, Martin; Shults, Justine; Zemel, Babette S.; Stokes, David; Foerster, Debbie; Laskin, Benjamin; Ramirez, Anthony; Leonard, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and catabolism have not been examined in childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods Serum vitamin D [25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, 24,25(OH)2D], DBP, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) concentrations were measured in 148 participants with CKD stages 2–5D secondary to congenital anomalies of the kidney/urinary tract (CAKUT), glomerulonephritis (GN), or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Free and bioavailable 25(OH)D were calculated using total 25(OH)D, albumin and DBP. Results All vitamin D metabolites were lower with more advanced CKD (p<0.001) and glomerular diagnoses (p?0.002). Among non-dialysis participants, DBP was lower in FSGS vs. other diagnoses (FSGS-dialysis interaction p=0.02). Winter season, older age, FSGS and GN, and higher FGF23 were independently associated with lower free and bioavailable 25(OH)D. Black race was associated with lower total 25(OH)D and DBP, but not free or bioavailable 25(OH)D. 24,25(OH)2D was the vitamin D metabolite most strongly associated with iPTH. Lower 25(OH)D, black race, greater CKD severity, and higher iPTH were independently associated with lower 24,25(OH)2D, while higher FGF23 and GN were associated with greater 24,25(OH)2D. Conclusions Children with CKD exhibit altered catabolism and concentrations of DBP and free and bioavailable 25(OH)D, and there is an important impact of their underlying disease. PMID:23728936

  11. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Renal. Home » Kidney Info » 1 in 9 Adults Risk Factors for CKD x What are you doing to ... to prevent or delay kidney failure. Kidney Disease Risk Factors You Can Change Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is ...

  12. Underrecognized comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Mi?kowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Bia?as, Adam J; Zalewska-Janowska, Anna; Górski, Pawe?; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2015-01-01

    COPD is associated with different comorbid diseases, and their frequency increases with age. Comorbidities severely impact costs of health care, intensity of symptoms, quality of life and, most importantly, may contribute to life span shortening. Some comorbidities are well acknowledged and established in doctors’ awareness. However, both everyday practice and literature searches provide evidence of other, less recognized diseases, which are frequently associated with COPD. We call them underrecognized comorbidities, and the reason why this is so may be related to their relatively low clinical significance, inefficient literature data, or data ambiguity. In this review, we describe rhinosinusitis, skin abnormalities, eye diseases, different endocrinological disorders, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Possible links to COPD pathogenesis have been discussed, if the data were available. PMID:26203239

  13. Carbon Nanotubes and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barna, Barbara P.; Judson, Marc A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    Use of nanomaterials in manufactured consumer products is a rapidly expanding industry and potential toxicities are just beginning to be explored. Combustion-generated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) or nanoparticles are ubiquitous in non-manufacturing environments and detectable in vapors from diesel fuel, methane, propane, and natural gas. In experimental animal models, carbon nanotubes have been shown to induce granulomas or other inflammatory changes. Evidence suggesting potential involvement of carbon nanomaterials in human granulomatous disease, has been gathered from analyses of dusts generated in the World Trade Center disaster combined with epidemiological data showing a subsequent increase in granulomatous disease of first responders. In this review we will discuss evidence for similarities in the pathophysiology of carbon nanotube-induced pulmonary disease in experimental animals with that of the human granulomatous disease, sarcoidosis. PMID:25525507

  14. Bone Marrow Therapies for Chronic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Keating, Armand; Gale, Robert Peter

    2015-11-01

    Chronic heart failure is a leading cause of death. The demand for new therapies and the potential regenerative capacity of bone marrow-derived cells has led to numerous clinical trials. We critically discuss current knowledge of the biology and clinical application of bone marrow cells. It appears unlikely that bone marrow cells can develop into functional cardiomyocyte after infusion but may have favorable paracrine effects. Most, but not all, clinical trials report a modest short- but not long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells. Effect size appears to correlate with stringency of study-design: the most stringent trials report the smallest effect-sizes. We conclude there may be short- but not substantial long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells into persons with chronic heart failure and any benefit observed is unlikely to result from trans-differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. Stem Cells 2015;33:3212-3227. PMID:26086629

  15. [Fundamentals of chronic inflammatory lung diseases (asthma, COPD, fibrosis)].

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Since three decades the prevalence of chronic inflammatory lung diseases (asthma, COPD, fibrosis) are worldwide increasing. In Switzerland about 5 % of the population develops asthma, while in other countries it affects up to 20 % (Maori: New Zealand). Today, asthma is the most frequent cause from absence from school and work, and significantly reduces life quality of the patients and their families. COPD, or the smoker's lung, is the 4th most frequent cause of death worldwide and in the Western society affects mainly cigarette smokers and ex-smokers, while in developing countries it is a diseases linked to open fire cocking with most patients being middle aged women. In both diseases only the symptoms can be controlled by muscle relaxing and anti-inflammatory drugs, but there is no cure available. The third chronic inflammatory lung disease is fibrosis which is increasing with the aging population. As indicated by the terminology "chronic inflammatory lung disease" it is widely assumed that the major cause of these diseases is chronic inflammation occurring in different segments of the lung. This hypothesis is now challenged as increasing evidence from clinical and experimental studies that suggest a much different pathogenesis. There is evidence that the inflammation may come second and tissue structural changes are already pre-set during embryogenesis and may become the major driver for the development of chronic inflammatory lung diseases later in life. The mechanism of this pre-disposition is largely unknown and the difficult to perform investigations have only started in recent years. This review aims to provide an overview of key studies published in the past 2 years on clinical and experimental research. PMID:24794334

  16. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  17. The Empirical Foundations of Telemedicine Interventions for Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Alverson, Dale C.; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G.; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M.; Coye, Molly J.; Doarn, Charles R.; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Kvedar, Joseph C.; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C.; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S.; Sanders, Jay H.; Watson, Andrew R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

  18. Semen quality in men with chronic kidney disease and its correlation with chronic kidney disease stages.

    PubMed

    Lehtihet, M; Hylander, B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) has any impact on semen quality parameters in men with CKD stage 1-5. Results were collected from 66 men with different CKD stages (age 18-50 years). Age and BMI (body mass index) were recorded for each male. Higher CKD stage had a significant negative linear trend on semen volume (P < 0.05), progressive motility (P < 0.01), nonprogressive motility (P < 0.001), sperm concentration (P < 0.01), total sperm number (P < 0.01), cytoplasmic droplets (P < 0.01), teratozoospermia index (P < 0.05) and accessory gland markers, ?-glucosidase activity (P < 0.05), zinc (P < 0.01) and fructose (P < 0.01). BMI per se had no significant effect on semen volume, sperm number, sperm concentration, morphology, ?-glucosidase activity, fructose concentration or zinc level. A significant negative correlation between BMI and sexual-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) (P < 0.01) was observed but not with other sex hormones. Age per se was related to a significant decrease of sperm concentration (P < 0.05), normal forms (P < 0.01) and testosterone level (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that CKD stage per se is a factor determining the number of spermatozoa available in the epididymis for ejaculation, in part independent of age-related decrease of testosterone level and BMI. PMID:25487067

  19. Association of coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease in Lebanese population

    PubMed Central

    Milane, Aline; Khazen, Georges; Zeineddine, Nabil; Amro, Mazen; Masri, Leila; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Youhanna, Sonia; Salloum, Angelique K; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Othman, Raed; Kabbani, Samer; Sbeite, Hana; Chami, Youssef; Chammas, Elie; el Bayeh, Hamid; Gauguier, Dominique; Abchee, Antoine B; Zalloua, Pierre; Barbari, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background: More evidence is emerging on the strong association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease. We assessed the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) and renal dysfunction level (RDL) in a group of Lebanese patients. Methods: A total of 1268 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were sequentially enrolled in a multicenter cross sectional study. Angiograms were reviewed and CAD severity scores (CADSS) were determined. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated and clinical and laboratory data were obtained. CKD was defined as eGFR < 60 ml/min. Logistic regression model was performed using multivariate analysis including all traditional risk factors associated with both diseases. ANOVA and the Tukeytestswere used to compare subgroups of patients and to assess the impact of each disease on the severity of the other. Results: Among the 82% patients who exhibited variable degrees of CAD, 20.6% had an eGFR < 60 ml/min. Logistic regression analysis revealed a bidirectional independent association between CAD and CKD with an OR = 2.01 (P < 0.01) and an OR = 1.99 (P < 0.01) for CAD and CKD frequencies, respectively. We observed a steady increase in the CADSS mean as eGFR declined and a progressive reduction in renal function with the worsening of CAD (P < 0.05). This correlation remained highly significant despite considerable inter-patient variability and was at its highest at the most advanced stages of both diseases. Conclusions: Our results show a strong, independent and graded bidirectional relationship between CAD severity and RDL. We propose to add CAD to the list of risk factors for the development and progression of CKD. PMID:26629090

  20. Pain and Opioid Use in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogal, Shari S.; Winger, Daniel; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Szigethy, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain is common in patients with liver disease, difficult to treat, and poorly understood. Aims The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with pain and prescription opioid use in a large cohort of patients with confirmed chronic liver. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients with chronic liver disease visiting a tertiary-care hepatology clinic. Pain was determined by self-report and rated numerically from 0–10. Symptoms of mood and sleep disorders and emotional distress were based on a symptom checklist. Etiology and stage of liver disease and use of prescribed opioids were abstracted from the electronic medical record. Logistic regression was used to establish factors associated with pain and prescription opioid use. Results Among 1286 patients with chronic liver disease, 34% had pain and 25% used opioids. The strongest predictor of pain in multivariate modeling was emotional distress (OR=3.66, CI=2.40,5.64), followed by non-white race (OR=1.87, CI=1.24,2.79), mood symptoms (OR=1.47, CI=1.04,2.07), sleep disturbance/fatigue (OR=1.70, CI=1.24,2.32), and advanced liver disease (Child class B: OR=1.73, CI=1.15,2.60; Child class C: OR=2.78 CI=1.49,5.24) compared to no cirrhosis. Emotional distress, mood-related symptoms, and advanced liver disease were also significant predictors of prescription opioid use, as were age, nicotine use, and etiology of liver disease. Conclusions This large cohort study demonstrates the high prevalence of pain and opioid use in chronic liver disease. While disease variables contribute to pain, psychological symptoms were most strongly associated with pain and opioid use, providing rationale and target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23512406

  1. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shivendra D.; Aroor, Annayya R.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26610587

  2. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26610587

  3. CD137 in chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyang; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2014-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with a high frequency. Preclinical animal chronic GVHD models outlined in this chapter allow for the delineation of events that occur during chronic GVHD development. The DBA/2 ? (C56BL/6 × DBA/2)F1 (BDF1) model is characterized by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like phenotype. The B10.D2 ? Balb/c model presents many features of autoimmune scleroderma. The former model is useful in defining how alloreactive donor CD4(+) T cells break B-cell tolerance, whereas the latter model is suitable for dissecting the pathogenesis of organ fibrosis. Our laboratory has demonstrated that injection of a single dose of strong CD137 agonists can prevent or cure chronic GVHD in these two models. In general, these models are particularly suited to screening the immunomodulatory therapeutics. PMID:24788176

  4. Chronic pancreatitis: A surgical disease? Role of the Frey procedure

    PubMed Central

    Roch, Alexandra; Teyssedou, Jérome; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques; Pessaux, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although medical treatment and endoscopic interventions are primarily offered to patients with chronic pancreatitis, approximately 40% to 75% will ultimately require surgery during the course of their disease. Although pancreaticoduodenectomy has been considered the standard surgical procedure because of its favorable results on pain control, its high postoperative complication and pancreatic exocrine or/and endocrine dysfunction rates have led to a growing enthusiasm for duodenal preserving pancreatic head resection. The aim of this review is to better understand the rationale underlying of the Frey procedure in chronic pancreatitis and to analyze its outcome. Because of its hybrid nature, combining both resection and drainage, the Frey procedure has been conceptualized based on the pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis. The short and long-term outcome, especially pain relief and quality of life, are better after the Frey procedure than after any other surgical procedure performed for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25068010

  5. Updated Mechanisms of Sickle Cell Disease-Associated Chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Brianna; Meiler, Steffen E.; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy, causes sickling of red blood cells, resulting in vessel blockage, stroke, anemia, inflammation, and extreme pain. A vast majority of SCD patients experience pain on a chronic basis, and many turn to opioids to provide limited relief. The side effects that come with chronic opioid use push for research into understanding the specific mechanisms of SCD-associated chronic pain. Current advances in SCD-associated pain have focused on alterations in the pain pathway including nociceptor sensitization and endogenous pain inducers. This article reviews the underlying pathophysiology of SCD, potential pain mechanisms, current treatments and their mechanism of action, and future directions of SCD-associated pain management. The information provided could help propel research in SCD-associated chronic pain and uncover novel treatment options for clinicians. PMID:26301256

  6. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  7. Spontaneous globe luxation associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Ashok; Srikanth, K; Pandurangan, R

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous globe luxation is a rarely reported condition which can lead to complications like optic neuropathy. Common causes are thyroid eye disease, shallow orbit and floppy eyelid syndrome. We report a case of spontaneous globe luxation with the onset and severity associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous globe luxation associated with COPD. PMID:22824607

  8. Comprehensive Care of Patients with Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    James, Jocelyn; Liou, Iris W

    2015-09-01

    Chronic liver disease results from a wide range of conditions, for which individual management is beyond the scope of this article. General education, counseling, and harm reduction practices are important to the primary care of these patients, as are monitoring for cirrhosis and management of its complications. For patients with advanced liver disease, comprehensive care includes considering referral for liver transplantation, educating and empowering patients to prioritize goals of care, and optimizing symptom relief. PMID:26320039

  9. Diagnosis: Chronic kidney disease, now what!

    PubMed

    Ross, Peggy E; Groenhoff, Cheryl; Zin, Patricia

    2004-07-01

    The occupational health nurse can play an important role in supporting employees with CKD and ESRD by recognizing risk factors such as diabetes and hypertension associated with CKD. The occupational health nurse should encourage compliance with treatment regimens that retard or delay progression of kidney disease into the next stage, especially blood pressure and glucose control. When employees are in need of diagnostic testing, the occupational health nurse can describe the testing procedures such as laboratory values, ultrasounds, and biopsies, and explain the five stages of CKD. The occupational health nurse can assist employees in Stage 4 or 5 CKD in deciding on a treatment option modality that best suits their individual lifestyles, after they have seen a nephrologist and kidney patient educator. In addition, the occupational health nurse can guide employees with difficult lifestyle changes and provide support during the adjustment process. The occupational health nurse also can play a key role in facilitating and coordinating those changes with the renal social worker. Together they can explore available resources, such as the NKF, the American Association of Kidney Patients, and kidneydirections.com. See the Sidebar on pages 295 to 296 for other available resources. Kidney disease can be a devastating diagnosis. Support and education are key to a successful lifestyle transition. Employees who have CKD and work with an occupational health nurse who is informed about their disease and its stages of progression can benefit from educational processes that create informed choices to delay or retard the progression of their renal disease. PMID:15971630

  10. Melanomas arising on skin with chronic sun-induced damage exhibit low degree of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pastushenko, Ievgenia; Vicente-Arregui, Sandra; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Gracia-Cazaña, Tamara; Carapeto, Francisco J; Alvarez-Alegret, Ramiro; Dirix, Luc Y; Vermeulen, Peter B; Van Laere, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Differences in gene expression between melanomas arising on skin intermittently and chronically sun-exposed areas were described. Additionally, several studies have shown differences in clinical characteristics and prognosis, suggesting distinct biological pathways in the development of these tumors. We performed a retrospective investigation aimed on evaluation of the differences in angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis between melanomas arising on skin with and without signs of chronic sun-induced damage. For that purpose, we evaluated relative blood and lymphatic vessel areas, blood and lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation fractions, separately for peritumoral and intratumoral areas. We have shown that melanomas arising on sun-exposed skin exhibit lower angiogenic and lymphangiogenic potentials and better prognosis than those arising on skin without signs of chronic sun-induced damage. PMID:25747811

  11. Students with Chronic Diseases: Nature of School Physician Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Howard; Brennan, Jesse J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: To educate children with chronic diseases in the least restrictive environment, schools must prevent, recognize, and react appropriately to symptom exacerbations. Schools are often pushed to their limits of knowledge, resources, and comfort level. This study determined the health conditions of students for whom districts seek school…

  12. Evaluation and treatment of gout as a chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Herrero-Beites, Ana Maria

    2012-11-01

    Gout is a disease caused by deposition of monosodium urate crystals in tissues. One of the limitations for successful treatment of gout is to consider it as an intermittent disease rather than a chronic inflammatory disease which, if improperly treated, leads to chronic clinical manifestations. In addition, gout is linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Urate-lowering therapy comprises both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions, but most patients will need urate-lowering drugs to achieve target therapeutic serum urate levels. Reaching target serum urate levels is associated with improvement in clinical outcomes, including a reduction of acute inflammation episodes, resolution of tophi, and improvement in health-related quality of life perception.A number of urate-lowering drugs are available but a number of patients fail to achieve or maintain therapeutic serum urate levels and go on to develop refractory chronic gout. For such patients, efforts have been made to develop new treatments (e.g., febuxostat or pegloticase).This review intends to increase the awareness of gout as a chronic deposition disease, and show that efforts should be made to properly control serum urate levels in order to achieve complete disappearance of urate crystal deposition. PMID:23104464

  13. DOES CHRONIC OZONE EXPOSURE LEAD TO LUNG DISEASE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential role of ozone in the induction of chronic lung diseases remains unclear. sing an ambient profile adopted from aerometric data from the Southwest Air Basin, rats were exposed to O3 for up to 18 months before assessments of pulmonary structure, function and biochemist...

  14. Actinomyces in Chronic Granulomatous Disease: An Emerging and Unanticipated Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Janine; Lopatin, Uri; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Beovic, Bojana; Siler, Ulrich; Zbinden, Reinhard; Seger, Reinhard A.; Galmiche, Louise; Brousse, Nicole; Kayal, Samer; Güngör, Tayfun; Blanche, Stéphane; Holland, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disease of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase system that causes defective production of toxic oxygen metabolites, impaired bacterial and fungal killing, and recurrent life-threatening infections, mostly by catalase-producing organisms. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, chronic infections with Actinomyces species in 10 patients with CGD. Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous condition that commonly manifests as cervicofacial, pulmonary, or abdominal disease, caused by slowly progressive infection with oral and gastrointestinal commensal Actinomyces species. Treatment of actinomycosis is usually simple in immunocompetent individuals, requiring long-term, high-dose intravenous penicillin, but is more complicated in those with CGD because of delayed diagnosis and an increased risk of chronic invasive or debilitating disease. Methods Actinomyces was identified by culture, staining, 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction, and/ or a complement fixation test in 10 patients with CGD. Results All 10 patients presented with a history of fever and elevated inflammatory signs without evident focus. Diagnosis was delayed and clinical course severe and protracted despite high-dose intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or surgery. These results suggest an unrecognized and unanticipated susceptibility to weakly pathogenic Actinomyces species in patients with CGD because these are catalase-negative organisms previously thought to be nonpathogenic in CGD. Conclusions Actinomycosis should be vigorously sought and promptly treated in patients with CGD presenting with uncommon and prolonged clinical signs of infection. Actinomycosis is a catalase-negative infection important to consider in CGD. PMID:19874205

  15. Participatory Research for Chronic Disease Prevention in Inuit Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Roache, Cindy; Kratzmann, Meredith; Reid, Rhonda; Ogina, Julia; Sharma, Sangita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop a community-based chronic disease prevention program for Inuit in Nunavut, Canada. Methods: Stakeholders contributed to intervention development through formative research [in-depth interviews (n = 45), dietary recalls (n = 42)], community workshops, group feedback and implementation training. Results: Key cultural themes…

  16. [Treatment of chronic itch in systemic disease : Current standards].

    PubMed

    Mettang, T; Ständer, S; Kremer, A E

    2015-12-01

    Chronic itch (CI) is a frequent and sometimes tormenting symptom in many skin and systemic diseases. In systemic diseases, it mostly appears on primarily unaffected skin. As a sequelae of intense scratching, secondary skin lesions such as excoriations, scars, and prurigo nodularis may occur. Due to the lack of valid pathogenetic concepts and good clinical trials, the therapy of CI remains mostly symptomatic. In Europe almost all drugs used to treat CI are not approved for this indication. CI is frequent in patients with chronic kidney diseases in advanced stages. Gabapentin and pregabalin, anticonvulsants, and centrally acting calcium channel blockers have been shown to exert a profound effect in CI. Furthermore, UVB phototherapy has been proven to attenuate pruritus in uremic patients. Randomized controlled studies have recently shown that nalfurafine, a ?-opioid receptor agonist, is able to ameliorate itch in patients with uremic itch. In patients suffering from cholestatic itch, the anion exchange resin colestyramine and rifampicin are effective antipruritic drugs. Furthermore, µ-opioid receptor antagonists and sertraline may be used to alleviate CI in hepatic diseases. In refractory cases, naso-biliary drainage or albumin dialysis are effective invasive procedures. For the treatment of chronic itch in hematological diseases no controlled trials have been performed so far. The mainstay in these cases is to treat the underlying disease. PMID:26585238

  17. Antioxidant Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Gan, Ren-You; Li, Sha; Zhou, Yue; Li, An-Na; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Overproduction of oxidants (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species) in the human body is responsible for the pathogenesis of some diseases. The scavenging of these oxidants is thought to be an effective measure to depress the level of oxidative stress of organisms. It has been reported that intake of vegetables and fruits is inversely associated with the risk of many chronic diseases, and antioxidant phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits are considered to be responsible for these health benefits. Antioxidant phytochemicals can be found in many foods and medicinal plants, and play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases caused by oxidative stress. They often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities, as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits, such as anticancer, anti-aging, and protective action for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes recent progress on the health benefits of antioxidant phytochemicals, and discusses their potential mechanisms in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. PMID:26633317

  18. Mice lacking integrin ?3 expression exhibit altered response to chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Varney, Seth; Polston, Keith F.; Jessen, Tammy; Carneiro, Ana M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate multiple roles for integrin ?v?3 in adult neurons, including response to pharmacological agents such as cocaine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In this study, we examined the role of the integrin ?3 gene (Itgb3) in the response to environmental stimuli by subjecting Itgb3+/+ and Itgb3-/- mice to unpredictable chronic mild stressors. We found that genetic abrogation of integrin ?3 expression elicits an exaggerated vulnerability to chronic unpredictable stress in the open field test. In this test, chronic stress elicited significant decreases in stereotypic behavior and horizontal locomotor activity, including increases in anxiety behaviors. Mild chronic stress led to reductions in dopamine turnover in midbrains of Itgb3+/+, but not Itgb3-/- mice, suggesting a disruption of stress-dependent regulation of DA homeostasis. Chronic stress elicited altered synaptic expression of syntaxin and synaptophysin in midbrains of Itgb3-/- mice, when compared to Itgb3+/+. Semi-quantitative Western blot studies revealed that the synaptic expression, but not total tissue expression, of multiple signaling proteins is correlated with integrin ?v levels in the midbrain. Moreover, loss of integrin ?3 expression modifies this correlation network. Together, these findings demonstrate that Itgb3-/- mice display a pattern of changes indicating disrupted regulation of midbrain synaptic systems involved in conferring resilience to mild stressors. PMID:26634222

  19. Treating Alcoholism As a Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    McKay, James R.; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    For many patients, alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders are chronic, recurring conditions involving multiple cycles of treatment, abstinence, and relapse. To disrupt this cycle, treatment can include continuing care to reduce the risk of relapse. The most commonly used treatment approach is initial intensive inpatient or outpatient care based on 12-step principles, followed by continuing care involving self-help groups, 12-step group counseling, or individual therapy. Although these programs can be effective, many patients drop out of initial treatment or do not complete continuing care. Thus, researchers and clinicians have begun to develop alternative approaches to enhance treatment retention in both initial and continuing care. One focus of these efforts has been the design of extended treatment models. These approaches increasingly blur the distinction between initial and continuing care and aim to prolong treatment participation by providing a continuum of care. Other researchers have focused on developing alternative treatment strategies (e.g., telephone-based interventions) that go beyond traditional settings and adaptive treatment algorithms that may improve outcomes for clients who do not respond well to traditional approaches. PMID:23580020

  20. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). Methods and Materials The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Results Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. Discussion The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. Conclusions The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC. PMID:23813566

  1. Selenium and chronic diseases: a nutritional genomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Méplan, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Mechanistic data have revealed a key role for selenium (Se) and selenoproteins in biological pathways known to be altered in multifactorial diseases, such as cellular maintenance, response to oxidative stress and correct protein folding. Although epidemiological studies indicate that low Se intake is linked to increased risk for various chronic diseases, supplementation trials have given confusing outcomes, suggesting that additional genetic factors could affect the relationship between Se and health. Genetic data support this hypothesis, as risk for several chronic diseases, in particular cancer, was linked to a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) altering Se metabolism, selenoprotein synthesis or activity. Interactions between SNPs in selenoprotein genes, SNPs in related molecular pathways and biomarkers of Se status were found to further modulate the genetic risk carried by the SNPs. Taken together, nutritional genomics approaches uncovered the potential implication of some selenoproteins as well as the influence of complex interactions between genetic variants and Se status in the aetiology of several chronic diseases. This review discusses the results from these genetic associations in the context of selenoprotein functions and epidemiological investigations and emphasises the need to assess in future studies the combined contribution of Se status, environmental stress, and multiple or individual SNPs to disease risk. PMID:25988760

  2. Selenium and Chronic Diseases: A Nutritional Genomics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Méplan, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic data have revealed a key role for selenium (Se) and selenoproteins in biological pathways known to be altered in multifactorial diseases, such as cellular maintenance, response to oxidative stress and correct protein folding. Although epidemiological studies indicate that low Se intake is linked to increased risk for various chronic diseases, supplementation trials have given confusing outcomes, suggesting that additional genetic factors could affect the relationship between Se and health. Genetic data support this hypothesis, as risk for several chronic diseases, in particular cancer, was linked to a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) altering Se metabolism, selenoprotein synthesis or activity. Interactions between SNPs in selenoprotein genes, SNPs in related molecular pathways and biomarkers of Se status were found to further modulate the genetic risk carried by the SNPs. Taken together, nutritional genomics approaches uncovered the potential implication of some selenoproteins as well as the influence of complex interactions between genetic variants and Se status in the aetiology of several chronic diseases. This review discusses the results from these genetic associations in the context of selenoprotein functions and epidemiological investigations and emphasises the need to assess in future studies the combined contribution of Se status, environmental stress, and multiple or individual SNPs to disease risk. PMID:25988760

  3. Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Blanchong, Julie A; Samuel, Michael D; Scribner, Kim T; Weckworth, Byron V; Langenberg, Julia A; Filcek, Kristine B

    2008-02-23

    Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, targeting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was negatively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer from deer in the area of disease origin (core-area). Genetic differentiation was greatest, and CWD prevalence lowest, in areas separated from the core-area by the Wisconsin River, indicating that this river reduced deer gene flow and probably disease spread. Features of the landscape that influence host dispersal and spatial patterns of disease can be identified based on host spatial genetic structure. Landscape genetics may be used to predict high-risk populations based on their genetic connection to infected populations and to target disease surveillance, control and preventative activities. PMID:18077240

  4. Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Scribner, K.T.; Weckworth, B.V.; Langenberg, J.A.; Filcek, K.B.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, targeting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was negatively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer from deer in the area of disease origin (core-area). Genetic differentiation was greatest, and CWD prevalence lowest, in areas separated from the core-area by the Wisconsin River, indicating that this river reduced deer gene flow and probably disease spread. Features of the landscape that influence host dispersal and spatial patterns of disease can be identified based on host spatial genetic structure. Landscape genetics may be used to predict high-risk populations based on their genetic connection to infected populations and to target disease surveillance, control and preventative activities. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

  5. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  6. Analysis of urinary microRNAs in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Cristina; Clayton, Aled; Phillips, Aled O; Fraser, Donald J; Bowen, Timothy

    2012-08-01

    Kidney biopsy is the gold-standard diagnostic test for intrinsic renal disease, but requires hospital admission and carries a 3% risk of major complications. Current non-invasive prognostic indicators such as urine protein quantification have limited predictive value. Better diagnostic and prognostic tests for chronic kidney disease patients are a major focus for industry and academia, with efforts to date directed largely at urinary proteomic approaches. microRNAs constitute a recently identified class of endogenous short non-coding single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Quantification of urinary microRNAs offers an alternative approach to the identification of chronic kidney disease biomarkers. PMID:22817751

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Respiratory Review of 2014

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a diverse array of pulmonary and nonpulmonary manifestations, but our understanding of COPD pathogenesis and the factors that influence its heterogeneity in disease presentation is poor. Despite this heterogeneity, treatment algorithms are primarily driven by a single measurement, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) as a percentage of its predicted value (FEV1%). In 2011, a major shift in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) treatment recommendations was proposed that stratifies patients with COPD on the basis of symptoms and exacerbation history. This article reviews the work reported in 2013 that enlightens our understanding of COPD with respect to COPD classification systems, phenotype, biomarker, exacerbation, and management for patients with COPD. PMID:25368660

  8. Lung disease with chronic obstruction in opium smokers in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, J. L.; Tock, E. P. C.; Boey, H. K.

    1971-01-01

    Fifty-four opium smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease were studied for two-and-a-half years. Forty-eight patients had a cough for at least two years before the onset of inappropriate exertional dyspnoea. Fine, bubbling adventitious sounds suggesting small airway disease were heard on auscultation over the middle and lower lobes in 38 patients. The prevalence of inflammatory lung disease and chronic respiratory failure in this series is suggested as the main cause for the frequent finding of right ventricular hypertrophy and congestive heart failure. Physiological studies revealed moderate to severe airways obstruction with gross over-inflation and, in 32 patients, an additional restrictive defect probably due to peribronchiolar fibrosis. Radiological evidence of chronic bronchitis and bronchiolitis was observed in 45 patients, `pure' chronic bronchiolitis in six patients, and `widespread' emphysema in 25 patients respectively. Necropsy examinations in nine patients, however, showed destructive emphysema of variable severity in all. Chronic bronchiolitis often associated with striking bronchiolectasis was present in six cases. More severe bronchiolar rather than bronchial inflammation was noted. The heavy opium smokers had characteristic nodular shadows on chest radiography, sometimes associated with a striking reticular pattern not seen in `pure' cigarette smokers. This was due to gross pigmented dust (presumably carbon) deposition in relation to blood vessels, lymphatics, and bronchioles, and also within the alveoli. It is speculated that the initial lesion is an acquired bronchiolitis. Opium smoking induces an irritative bronchopathy favouring repeated attacks of acute bronchiolitis and eventually resulting in obliterative bronchiolitis, peribronchiolar fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and destructive emphysema. Images PMID:5134057

  9. 78 FR 17214 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Chronic Disease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ...Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Program Standardized Data...Older Adults and Adults with Disabilities through Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME)...

  10. A High Salt and Potassium Diet May Accelerate Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Salt and Potassium Diet May Accelerate Chronic Kidney Disease Study participants had far more sodium than ... high in sodium and potassium can make chronic kidney disease (CKD) worse, a new study claims. "These ...

  11. Behavioural alterations are independent of sickness behaviour in chronic experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre de Souza; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-12-01

    The existence of the nervous form of Chagas disease is a matter of discussion since Carlos Chagas described neurological disorders, learning and behavioural alterations in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals. In most patients, the clinical manifestations of the acute phase, including neurological abnormalities, resolve spontaneously without apparent consequence in the chronic phase of infection. However, chronic Chagas disease patients have behavioural changes such as psychomotor alterations, attention and memory deficits, and depression. In the present study, we tested whether or not behavioural alterations are reproducible in experimental models. We show that C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi (150 days post-infection) exhibit behavioural changes as (i) depression in the tail suspension and forced swim tests, (ii) anxiety analysed by elevated plus maze and open field test sand and (iii) motor coordination in the rotarod test. These alterations are neither associated with neuromuscular disorders assessed by the grip strength test nor with sickness behaviour analysed by temperature variation sand weight loss. Therefore, chronically T. cruzi-infected mice replicate behavioural alterations (depression and anxiety) detected in Chagas disease patients opening an opportunity to study the interconnection and the physiopathology of these two biological processes in an infectious scenario. PMID:26676323

  12. Role of kidney biomarkers of chronic kidney disease: An update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj

    2014-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive pathological condition marked by deteriorating renal function over time. Diagnostic of kidney disease depend on serum creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate which is detectable when kidney function become half. The detection of kidney damage in an early stage needs robust biomarkers. Biomarkers allow monitoring the disease progression at initial stages of disease. On the onset of impairment in cellular organization there is perturbation in signaling molecules which are either up-regulated or down-regulated and act as an indicator or biomarker of diseased stage. This review compiled the cell signaling of different kidney biomarkers associated with the onset of chronic kidney diseases. Delay in diagnosis of CKD will cause deterioration of nephron function which leads to End stage renal disease and at that point patients require dialysis or kidney transplant. Detailed information on the complex network in signaling pathway leading to a coordinated pattern of gene expression and regulation in CKD will undoubtedly provide important clues to develop novel prognostic and therapeutic strategies for CKD. PMID:25183938

  13. Role of kidney biomarkers of chronic kidney disease: An update

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zeba; Pandey, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive pathological condition marked by deteriorating renal function over time. Diagnostic of kidney disease depend on serum creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate which is detectable when kidney function become half. The detection of kidney damage in an early stage needs robust biomarkers. Biomarkers allow monitoring the disease progression at initial stages of disease. On the onset of impairment in cellular organization there is perturbation in signaling molecules which are either up-regulated or down-regulated and act as an indicator or biomarker of diseased stage. This review compiled the cell signaling of different kidney biomarkers associated with the onset of chronic kidney diseases. Delay in diagnosis of CKD will cause deterioration of nephron function which leads to End stage renal disease and at that point patients require dialysis or kidney transplant. Detailed information on the complex network in signaling pathway leading to a coordinated pattern of gene expression and regulation in CKD will undoubtedly provide important clues to develop novel prognostic and therapeutic strategies for CKD. PMID:25183938

  14. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  15. The Qingdao Twin Registry: a focus on chronic disease research.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zengchang; Ning, Feng; Unger, Jennifer; Johnson, C Anderson; Wang, Shaojie; Guo, Qian; Cao, Weihua; Lee, Liming

    2006-12-01

    With the changing patterns of morbidity and mortality in China, noncommunicable chronic diseases have become the major threats to the health of the Chinese population. The causes of chronic diseases include genetic factors and behavioral risk factors such as the use of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs, unhealthy dietary behaviors, and lack of physical activity. Twin studies offer a unique opportunity to disentangle the genetic and environmental risk and protective factors for chronic disease. The Qingdao Twin Registry (QTR) was initiated in 1998 as part of the National Chinese Twin Registry. Over 11,000 pairs of twins and multiples of all ages have been recruited into the registry. Several studies of physical and mental health are underway. Many of the adult twins have completed health and behavioral risk factor surveys, and the adolescent twins are participating in a study of gene-environment interactions in tobacco and alcohol use. Studies of the heritability of personality factors have been conducted. In 2002, Qingdao established the Qingdao Twin Health Promotion Association, a nonprofit organization that supports health services for twins and their parents, organizes special events and health-related activities for twins, and raises funds to conduct twin health examinations. The QTR will be a useful resource for future studies of population genetics in human health and disease. PMID:17254404

  16. Chronic exposure to ozone causes restrictive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Costa, D.L.; Hatch, G.E.; Miller, F.J.; Graham, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    A chronic study to determine the progression and/or reversibility of ozone-induced lung disease was conducted. Male rats were exposed to a diurnal pattern of ozone (O{sub 3}) for 1 week, 3 weeks, 3 months, 12 months, or 18 months. The occurrence of chronic lung disease was determined by structural and functional endpoints. Structurally, a biphasic response was observed with an initial acute inflammatory response after 1 week of exposure, a reduced acute response after 3 weeks of exposure, and an epithelial and interstitial response observed after 3 months which persisted or increased in intensity up to 18 months of exposure. Functional studies showed a persistence of decreased total lung capacity and residual volumes at 3, 12, and 18 months of exposure, a response indicative of restrictive lung disease. Biochemical changes in antioxidant metabolism were also observed after 12 and 18 months of exposure. Most significant changes were resolved after the clean-air recovery period. The study has shown that chronic exposure to O{sub 3} causes restrictive lung disease as characterized by the development of focal interstitial fibrosis.

  17. [Anti-diabetics and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Carlo; Iazzetta, Nicolangelo; Camocardi, Andrea; Pacilio, Mario; Iodice, Carmela; Minutolo, Roberto; De Nicola, Luca; Conte, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most important non-communicable disease after hypertension. Prevalence of type 2 DM has progressively increased over the last decades. In Italy, 11.8% of the general adult population can be identified as diabetic. The major complication of DM is diabetic nephropathy (DM-CKD), which develops in approximately one-third of diabetics. Achieving optimal glycemic control is the first therapeutic goal in the management of DM-CKD. In recent years, new antidiabetic drugs have been marketed (GLP1 analogues, DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors) to ameliorate glycemia in patients nave or treated by means of traditional agents, such as sulfonylureas, metformin, glinides, insulin. However, use of these drugs in DM-CKD should be evaluated carefully, mainly because of the higher risk of hypoglycemia that requires dosing adjustments. Metformin still represents an adequate choice if proper dose adjustments are made on the basis of renal function. Sulfonylureas with limited renal clearance, i.e., gliquidone, glipizide and gliclazide are an alternative to metformin and more effective than repaglinide on glycemic control. Other antidiabetic agents with potential nephroprotective effects, namely DPP-4 inhibitors, incretin analogues and SGLT-2 inhibitors, may allow nephroprotective effects independent of glycemic control. Insulin remains the cornerstone of therapy when oral therapy is no longer effective. PMID:26480253

  18. Socioeconomic disparities in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Susanne B; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Norris, Keith C

    2015-01-01

    CKD is a national public health problem that afflicts persons of all segments of society. Although racial/ethnic disparities in advanced CKD including dialysis-dependent populations have been well established, the finding of differences in CKD incidence, prevalence, and progression across different socioeconomic groups and racial and ethnic strata has only recently started to receive significant attention. Socioeconomics may exert both interdependent and independent effects on CKD and its complications and may confound racial and ethnic disparities. Socioeconomic constellations influence not only access to quality care for CKD risk factors and CKD treatment but may mediate many of the cultural and environmental determinants of health that are becoming more widely recognized as affecting complex medical disorders. In this article, we have reviewed the available literature pertaining to the role of socioeconomic status and economic factors in both non-dialysis-dependent CKD and ESRD. Advancing our understanding of the role of socioeconomic factors in patients with or at risk for CKD can lead to improved strategies for disease prevention and management. PMID:25573507

  19. Antioxidants in food and chronic degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Candlish, J K; Das, N P

    1996-09-01

    Both preventive and chain breaking antioxidants have a role in the limitation of free radical damage. Some of these may be regarded as "classical", like vitamins E and C but others are more recently discovered, such as the flavonoids, widespread in plant tissues, and the muscle constituents anserine and carnosine. The major conditions in which the role of antioxidants is under intense investigation include coronary artery disease, cancer and diabetes. There are theoretical underpinnings for the efficacy of antioxidants in each of these, with the protection of low density lipoprotein (in respect of the first) being exceptionally persuasive. Much attention is now being focussed on the flavonoids, which are surprisingly pleiotropic in their effects. For one of them, quercetin, over a dozen seemingly independent biological effects can be listed, including the inhibition of low density lipoprotein oxidation. Flavonoids also inhibit peroxidation in foodstuffs, as opposed to tissues. There is much controversy over antioxidant supplementation policies, some authorities recommending a massive programme of supplementation for all ages and classes, others stressing the value of the traditional mixed diet. This matter is unlikely to be resolved soon, but in the meantime sensible supplementation policies should be continued for those most vulnerable, that is, babies and the aged. PMID:8886321

  20. Surveillance for the prevention of chronic diseases through information association

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on Genomic medicine has suggested that the exposure of patients to early life risk factors may induce the development of chronic diseases in adulthood, as the presence of premature risk factors can influence gene expression. The large number of scientific papers published in this research area makes it difficult for the healthcare professional to keep up with individual results and to establish association between them. Therefore, in our work we aim at building a computational system that will offer an innovative approach that alerts health professionals about human development problems such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Methods We built a computational system called Chronic Illness Surveillance System (CISS), which retrieves scientific studies that establish associations (conceptual relationships) between chronic diseases (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and obesity) and the risk factors described on clinical records. To evaluate our approach, we submitted ten queries to CISS as well as to three other search engines (Google™, Google Scholar™ and Pubmed®;) — the queries were composed of terms and expressions from a list of risk factors provided by specialists. Results CISS retrieved a higher number of closely related (+) and somewhat related (+/-) documents, and a smaller number of unrelated (-) and almost unrelated (-/+) documents, in comparison with the three other systems. The results from the Friedman’s test carried out with the post-hoc Holm procedure (95% confidence) for our system (control) versus the results for the three other engines indicate that our system had the best performance in three of the categories (+), (-) and (+/-). This is an important result, since these are the most relevant categories for our users. Conclusion Our system should be able to assist researchers and health professionals in finding out relationships between potential risk factors and chronic diseases in scientific papers. PMID:24479447

  1. Technology-enabled Chronic Disease Management in Under-resourced Environments

    E-print Network

    Knightly, Edward W.

    Technology-enabled Chronic Disease Management in Under-resourced Environments Clifford C. Dacso, MD-- With the large international effort directed against malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and water---borne illnesses of chronic disease. Keywords-technology; biosensing; chronic disease; congestive heart failure; mobile phones

  2. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 850 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Informed Consent Form A Appendix A to Part 850 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Pt. 850, App. A Appendix A to Part 850—Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program...

  7. Nutrition transition and chronic diseases in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, O E; Atinmo, T

    2015-11-01

    Nutrition transition goes with industrialisation that fosters human development which is usually desirable, especially in developing nations. However, the health consequences of this development include high rates of preventable non-communicable diseases which are usually undermined in the quest for industrialisation. The goal of the present paper is to provide evidence-based information that will promote healthy lifestyle including healthy consumption pattern among urban dwellers. Relevant local and international literature was accessed and reviewed to harvest evidence-based information through the use of validated review guide in addition to observation from the field experience. Industrialisation promotes creation of more job opportunities and this facilitates proliferation of fast-food eateries in the cities. However, it was also observed that many of the available workplaces in urban areas are not health-promoting because employees have poor access to preventive health information and sensitisation to healthy lifestyle has been poorly considered. Ironically, weight gain among urban workers which may be linked with increased intake of high-energy foods and low participation in physical activities as a result of accessibility to many energy saving devices have been highlighted as some of the pull-pull factors that attract many people to the cities. Using the concept of health promoting workplace, the workforce in urban areas can be trained as agent of change in health-promoting lifestyle. Consumption of healthy indigenous foods through aggressive promotion of its health potentials should be seriously advocated through the use of existing structure of urban fast-food vendors who constitute a strong stakeholder in nutrition transition. PMID:26242780

  8. Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    , landscape features, and soil clay content on transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in young (,2 frequency-dependent, density-dependent, and intermediate transmission models predicted CWD incidence rates and deer density, and distribution of disease among groups are important factors driving CWD infection

  9. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by ?-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either damage of the cerebrovascular system including silent strokes or causes dysregulation of beta-amyloid clearance at the blood-brain barrier resulting in increased brain beta-amyloid. A cascade of subsequent downstream events may lead to disturbed metabolic changes, and neuroinflammation and tau pathology. The role of NGF on the cell death of cholinergic neurons is discussed. Additional risk factors (e.g. acidosis, metals) contribute to plaque development. PMID:21112383

  10. Pediatric Severe Chronic Upper Airway Disease (P-SCUAD).

    PubMed

    Prokopakis, Emmanuel P; Kalogjera, Livije; Karatzanis, Alexander D

    2015-12-01

    The term SCUAD (severe chronic upper airway disease) has been previously introduced to describe cases with upper airway disorders and symptoms not adequately controlled despite correct diagnosis and management. It has been so far applied mainly in adults and no specific focus has been given on the pediatric population. When the term SCUAD is considered for children specifically, a series of issues may arise. These issues involve accurate definition, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, and socioeconomic implications. These issues seem to clearly differentiate adult from pediatric SCUAD. We attempt to shed light on these issues in an effort to provide directions for future guideline development and research. In this context, P-SCUAD (pediatric severe chronic upper airway disease) is hereby introduced. PMID:26462667

  11. Sirtuin 1 and Aging Theory for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Conti, V.; Corbi, G.; Manzo, V.; Pelaia, G.; Filippelli, A.; Vatrella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory syndrome that represents an increasing health problem, especially in the elderly population. Drug therapies are symptomatic and inadequate to contrast disease progression and mortality. Thus, there is an urgent need to clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this condition in order to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Processes including oxidant/antioxidant, protease/antiprotease, and proliferative/antiproliferative balance and control of inflammatory response become dysfunctional during aging as well as in COPD. Recently it was suggested that Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an antiaging molecule involved in the response to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, is implicated in both development and progression of COPD. The present review focuses on the involvement of SIRT1 in the regulation of redox state, inflammation, and premature senescence, all crucial characteristics of COPD phenotypes. Recent evidence corroborating the statement of the “aging theory for COPD” was also discussed. PMID:26236580

  12. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An African perspective.

    PubMed

    Allwood, B; Calligaro, G

    2015-09-01

    The importance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a global health problem cannot be overstated. According to the latest World Health Organization statistics (2005), 210 million people suffer from COPD worldwide, and 5% of all deaths globally are estimated to be caused by this disease. This corresponds to >3 million deaths annually, of which 90% are thought to occur in low- and middle-income countries.While cigarette smoking remains the major risk factor, and much of the increase in COPD is associated with projected increases in tobacco use, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that in the majority of patients in developing countries the aetiology of COPD is multifactorial.This article summarises the epidemiology of and risk factors for COPD in Africa, including influences other than cigarette smoking that are important contributors to chronic irreversible airflow limitation in our setting. PMID:26636169

  13. Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

  14. Gut microbiota and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifactorial phenotype that in chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse patient outcomes. Recently, alterations in gut microbiota composition and intestinal barrier have been associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD patients. Vanholder and Glorieux recently critically reviewed [Clin Kidney J (2015) 8 (2): 168-179] the current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in the production of uraemic toxins and the therapeutic implications. Where do we stand now? The basic mechanisms of the gut-kidney crosstalk must still be clarified. In addition, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic strategies to modulate the gut microbiota in order to decrease uraemic toxin production and inflammation in chronic kidney disease should be evaluated. Finally, an impact of such strategies on hard outcomes should be demonstrated before incorporation into routine clinical practice. PMID:26034597

  15. Glycopyrronium bromide for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Riario-Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Ridolo, Erminia; Riario-Sforza, Edoardo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2015-02-01

    Glycopyrronium bromide is a new long-acting muscarinic antagonist to be used once-daily, which is approved as a bronchodilator for the symptomatic maintenance treatment of adult patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the Glycopyrronium bromide in chronic Obstructive pulmonary disease airWays trials, treatment with inhaled glycopyrronium bromide at 50 ?g once daily achieved a significantly better lung function than placebo, as measured by the trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The lung function improvement was maintained for up to 52 weeks. Other improved indexes were dyspnea scores, health status, exacerbation rates and time of exercise endurance. Studies comparing the efficacy of glycopyrronium versus tiotropium bromide found substantial equivalence of the two drugs. Glycopyrronium was generally well tolerated. These data add inhaled glycopyrronium bromide to the treatment of patients with moderate to severe COPD as an effective once-daily LAMA. PMID:25547422

  16. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  17. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  18. The Case for Chronic Disease Management for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Saitz, Richard; Larson, Mary Jo; LaBelle, Colleen; Richardson, Jessica; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic disease (care) management (CDM) is a patient-centered model of care that involves longitudinal care delivery; integrated, and coordinated primary medical and specialty care; patient and clinician education; explicit evidence-based care plans; and expert care availability. The model, incorporating mental health and specialty addiction care, holds promise for improving care for patients with substance dependence who often receive no care or fragmented ineffective care. We describe a CDM model for substance dependence and discuss a conceptual framework, the extensive current evidence for component elements, and a promising strategy to reorganize primary and specialty health care to facilitate access for people with substance dependence. The CDM model goes beyond integrated case management by a professional, colocation of services, and integrated medical and addiction care—elements that individually can improve outcomes. Supporting evidence is presented that: 1) substance dependence is a chronic disease requiring longitudinal care, although most patients with addictions receive no treatment (eg, detoxification only) or short-term interventions, and 2) for other chronic diseases requiring longitudinal care (eg, diabetes, congestive heart failure), CDM has been proven effective. PMID:19809579

  19. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  20. Avian Influenza Virus Infection Risk in Humans with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yaogang; Qin, Yannan; Yu, Hanjie; Yu, Jingmin; Wu, Haoxiang; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Peixin; Wang, Xiurong; Jia, Zhansheng; Guo, Yonghong; Zhang, Hua; Shan, Junjie; Wang, Yuxia; Xie, Hailong; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Saliva proteins may protect older people from influenza, however, it is often noted that hospitalizations and deaths after an influenza infection mainly occur in the elderly population living with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cancer. Our objective was to investigate the expression level of the terminal ?2-3- and ?2-6-linked sialic acids in human saliva from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), liver disease and gastric cancer (GC) patients and assess the binding activity of these linked sialic acids against influenza A viruses (IAV). We observed that the expression level of the terminal ?2-3-linked sialic acids of elderly individuals with T2DM and liver disease were down-regulated significantly, and the terminal ?2-6 linked sialic acids were up-regulated slightly or had no significant alteration. However, in the saliva of patients with GC, neither sialic acid was significantly altered. These findings may reveal that elderly individuals with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and liver disease, might be more susceptible to the avian influenza virus due to the decreased expression of terminal ?2-3-linked sialic acids in their saliva. PMID:25754427

  1. BEYOND GENETICS: EPIGENETIC CODE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Rama S.; Herman, James G.; McCaffrey, Timothy; Raj, Dominic SC

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a heritable change in the pattern of gene expression that is mediated by a mechanism specifically not due to alterations in the primary nucleotide sequence. Well known epigenetic mechanisms encompass DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling (histone modifications) and RNA interference. Functionally, epigenetics provides an extra layer of transcriptional control and plays a crucial role in normal physiological development, as well as in pathological conditions. Aberrant DNA methylation is implicated in immune dysfunction, inflammation and insulin resistance. Epigenetic changes may be responsible for “metabolic memory” and development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. MicroRNAs are critical in the maintenance of glomerular homeostasis and hence RNA interference may be important in the progression of renal disease. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic modifications orchestrate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and eventually fibrosis of the renal tissue. Oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperhomocysteinemia and uremic toxins could induce epimutations in chronic kidney disease. Epigenetic alterations are associated with inflammation and cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. Reversible nature of the epigenetic changes gives an unique opportunity to halt or even reverse the disease process through targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:20881938

  2. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) – Differences and Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Dragisic, Dejan; Ustamujic, Aida

    2012-01-01

    Bronchial asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are obstructive pulmonary diseases that affected millions of people all over the world. Asthma is a serious global health problem with an estimated 300 million affected individuals. COPD is one of the major causes of chronic morbidity and mortality and one of the major public health problems worldwide. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the world and further increases in its prevalence and mortality can be predicted. Although asthma and COPD have many similarities, they also have many differences. They are two different diseases with differences in etiology, symptoms, type of airway inflammation, inflammatory cells, mediators, consequences of inflammation, response to therapy, course. Some similarities in airway inflammation in severe asthma and COPD and good response to combined therapy in both of these diseases suggest that they have some similar patophysiologic characteristics. The aim of this article is to show similarities and differences between these two diseases. Today asthma and COPD are not fully curable, not identified enough and not treated enough and the therapy is still developing. But in future better understanding of pathology, adequate identifying and treatment, may be and new drugs, will provide a much better quality of life, reduced morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:23678316

  3. Does this patient really have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Sandra; How, Choon How; Tee, Augustine

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a condition commonly encountered by primary care practitioners. The disease should be detected in its early stages to prevent disease progression and to reduce the burden of symptoms. Early treatment also results in improved mortality and reduced morbidity. COPD should be differentiated from other similar conditions such as asthma, as the basis of treatment differs in these conditions, and misdiagnosis can lead to poorer patient outcomes. Non-pharmacological treatment such as smoking cessation and vaccinations are important in the management of COPD, while pharmacotherapy such as bronchodilators and antimuscarinics are the mainstay of therapy in COPD. Referral to a specialist is recommended when there is progression of the disease or uncertainty regarding the diagnosis. PMID:25917469

  4. Intensive Blood-Pressure Control in Hypertensive Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Lawrence J.; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Agodoa, Lawrence Y.; Astor, Brad C.; Bakris, George L.; Cleveland, William H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Faulkner, Marquetta L.; Gabbai, Francis B.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Hebert, Lee A.; Jamerson, Kenneth A.; Kopple, Joel D.; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Lea, Janice P.; Lewis, Julia B.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Massry, Shaul G.; Miller, Edgar R.; Norris, Keith; Phillips, Robert A.; Pogue, Velvie A.; Randall, Otelio S.; Rostand, Stephen G.; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J.; Toto, Robert D.; Wang, Xuelei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In observational studies, the relationship between blood pressure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is direct and progressive. The burden of hypertension-related chronic kidney disease and ESRD is especially high among black patients. Yet few trials have tested whether intensive blood-pressure control retards the progression of chronic kidney disease among black patients. METHODS We randomly assigned 1094 black patients with hypertensive chronic kidney disease to receive either intensive or standard blood-pressure control. After completing the trial phase, patients were invited to enroll in a cohort phase in which the blood-pressure target was less than 130/80 mm Hg. The primary clinical outcome in the cohort phase was the progression of chronic kidney disease, which was defined as a doubling of the serum creatinine level, a diagnosis of ESRD, or death. Follow-up ranged from 8.8 to 12.2 years. RESULTS During the trial phase, the mean blood pressure was 130/78 mm Hg in the intensive-control group and 141/86 mm Hg in the standard-control group. During the cohort phase, corresponding mean blood pressures were 131/78 mm Hg and 134/78 mm Hg. In both phases, there was no significant between-group difference in the risk of the primary outcome (hazard ratio in the intensive-control group, 0.91; P = 0.27). However, the effects differed according to the baseline level of proteinuria (P = 0.02 for interaction), with a potential benefit in patients with a protein-to-creatinine ratio of more than 0.22 (hazard ratio, 0.73; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In overall analyses, intensive blood-pressure control had no effect on kidney disease progression. However, there may be differential effects of intensive blood-pressure control in patients with and those without baseline proteinuria. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and others.) PMID:20818902

  5. Chronic Liver Diseases in Children: Clinical Profile and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Kher, Archana S.; Ghildiyal, Radha G.; Tambse, Manjusha P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim The main aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of disorders of the liver and hepatobiliary system in paediatric patients and to correlate the histopathology findings of liver biopsy in chronic liver disease. Another aim being to assess the prognosis and to know the outcome and the effects of treatment in chronic liver diseases in paediatric age group. Materials and Methods It was a prospective study, included the clinical profile of Chronic Liver Diseases (CLD) in children and the histopathological correlation. A total of 55 children were thoroughly investigated by doing relevant investigations and liver biopsy. Results A male predominance (60%) was noted with maximum incidence in the age group of 6-12 years. The incidence of CLD was 1.1% of total admissions. The most common presenting complaint was jaundice and abdominal distension. Hepatic encephalopathy was noted in 29% patients. Hepatomegaly was seen in 63% patients and spleenomegaly was seen in 60% patients. The incidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy was 42% (23cases) in CLD patients. The most common diagnosis on histopathology was Wilson’s disease (22%), followed by hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis. The predominant spectrum of CLD was metabolic liver disease and also the predominant cause of death. Conclusion As the incidence of CLD is quite low, a very high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. Some uncommon causes of CLD in children were seen in our study like neutral lipid storage disease, ?1-Antitrypsin deficiency disease, lupus hepatitis, Alagille syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. A patient of CLD with jaundice and hepatomegaly should be treated aggressively as those are the poor prognostic indicators of the disease. Hepatic encephalopathy and cirrhosis are also associated with poor outcome in patients with CLD. Liver biopsy histopathology by an expert and its correlation with laboratory investigations plays an important role in the diagnosis of CLD. The major cause of deaths in patients with CLD is due to end stage liver disease and fulminant hepatic failure and the only way to prevent and treat these patients is by liver transplantation. PMID:26393179

  6. Retinopathy and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker-Ostroff, Candace; Mohler, Emile; Lo, Joan C; Townsend, Raymond R; Gadegbeku, Crystal Ann; Lash, James Phillip; Fink, Jeffrey Craig; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W; Xie, Dawei

    2015-11-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience other diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether retinopathy predicts future CVD events in a subgroup of the participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. In this ancillary investigation, 2,605 participants of the CRIC study were invited to participate, and nonmydriatic fundus photographs were obtained in 1,936 subjects. Using standard protocols, presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive, or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed at a central photograph reading center by trained graders masked to study participant's information. Patients with a self-reported history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. Incident CVD events were adjudicated using medical records. Kidney function measurements, traditional and nontraditional risk factors, for CVD were obtained. Presence and severity of retinopathy were associated with increased risk of development of any CVD in this population of CKD patients, and these associations persisted after adjustment for traditional risk factors for CVD. We also found a direct relation between increased venular diameter and risk of development of CVD; however, the relation was not statistically significant after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In conclusion, the presence of retinopathy was associated with future CVD events, suggesting that retinovascular pathology may be indicative of macrovascular disease even after adjustment for renal dysfunction and traditional CVD risk factors. Assessment of retinal morphology may be valuable in assessing risk of CVD in patients with CKD, both clinically and in research settings. PMID:26409637

  7. Chronic cutaneous graft-versus-host disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, H. M.; Sale, G. E.; Lerner, K. G.; Barker, E. A.; Weiden, P. L.; Sullivan, K.; Gallucci, B.; Thomas, E. D.; Storb, R.

    1978-01-01

    This clinicopathologic study of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic marrow transplantation emphasizes the most prominent feature of the syndrome, the cutaneous aspects, and describes the ophthalmic-oral sicca syndrome with sialoadenitis and the neurologic findings. Chronic cutaneous GVHD affected 19 of 92 recipients surviving 150 days or more. In 6 patients chronic GVHD presented as a continuation of acute GVHD; in 8 it occurred after the resolution of acute GVHD; and in 5 it arose without preceding acute GVHD, ie, de novo late onset. Two cutaneous types were distinguished. The generalized type affected 16 patients and ran a progressive course resulting in late complications of poikiloderma, diffuse dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled generalized morphea and lupus erythermatosus hypertrophicus et profundus. The local type affected 3 patients with a more variable picture of poikiloderma, dermal sclerosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled lupus of erythematosus profundus and scleroderma. Guidelines for defining and subclassifying chronic cutaneous GVHD are proposed. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:26221

  8. INTEGRATING CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENT’S SPIRITUALITY IN THEIR CARE: HEALTH BENEFITS AND RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Fradelos, Evangelos C.; Tzavella, Foteini; Koukia, Evmorfia; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.; Alikari, Victoria; Stathoulis, John; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios; Zyga, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patients who suffer from chronic renal disease face problems in many aspects of their life; problems such as physical and social as well as mental such as stress, anxiety, depression. In addition, they exhibit an amount of spiritual needs, which relate and influence the psychological adaptation to the illness. Aim: The aim of this article is to examine evidence from the international literature regarding the possible relation of spirituality and health outcomes, mostly in the complex codex of a chronic and life treathing disease such as CKD. Results: Spirituality is a very debatable issue and the term has no single and widely agreed definition. The key components of spirituality were ‘meaning’, ‘hope’, ‘relatedness/connectedness’, and ‘beliefs/beliefs systems’. Spirituality has been characterized as the quest for meaning in life, mainly through experiences and expressions of mind, in a unique and dynamic process different for each individual. For many individuals spirituality and religion are important aspects of their existence, constituting a source support contribute to wellbeing and coping with life’s daily difficulties. Conclusion: Considering, assessing and addressing chronic kidney disease patient’s spirituality and spiritual needs is necessary and it can have a positive outcome in health related quality of life, mental health and life expectancy. PMID:26622206

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  10. Targeting CVD risk in chronic connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Anshuman P; Hall, Frances C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatological conditions are associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) most excess mortality is cardiovascular. Increased CVD risk is also associated with psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic sclerosis. Several studies report that CVD mortality increases early in disease in RA, with increased risk of MI within one year and increased risk of hospital admission for CVD within seven years of diagnosis. A linear association has been demonstrated between subclinical carotid atherosclerosis and raised inflammatory markers. SLE is associated with 2-10 times the risk of a CVD event compared with the general population. CVD is now a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE. Antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, as well as thromboses. Atherogenesis in the context of autoimmune disease results from a complex interplay between traditional risk factors, disease-specific factors and drug-related adverse effects. Chronic inflammation itself modifies the lipid profile. PMID:22720456

  11. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain...

  12. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain...

  13. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain...

  14. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain...

  15. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents...for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to certain...

  16. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  17. Chronic wasting disease of cervids: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Haley, Nicholas J; Hoover, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    A naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of mule deer was first reported in Colorado and Wyoming in 1967 and has since spread to other members of the cervid family in 22 states, 2 Canadian provinces, and the Republic of Korea. Chronic wasting disease (CWD), caused by exposure to an abnormally folded isoform of the cellular prion protein, is characterized by progressive neurological disease in susceptible natural and experimental hosts and is ultimately fatal. CWD is thought to be transmitted horizontally in excreta and through contaminated environments, features common to scrapie of sheep, though rare among TSEs. Evolving detection methods have revealed multiple strains of CWD and with continued development may lead to an effective antemortem test. Managing the spread of CWD, through the development of a vaccine or environmental cleanup strategies, is an active area of interest. As such, CWD represents a unique challenge in the study of prion diseases. PMID:25387112

  18. Erectile dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Varouktsi, Anna; Lazaridis, Antonios; Boutari, Chrysoula; Doumas, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is encountered in millions of people worldwide, with continuously rising incidence during the past decades, affecting their quality of life despite the increase of life expectancy in these patients. Disturbance of sexual function is common among men with CKD, as both conditions share common pathophysiological causes, such as vascular or hormonal abnormalities and are both affected by similar coexisting comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The estimated prevalence of erectile dysfunction reaches 70% in end stage renal disease patients. Nevertheless, sexual dysfunction remains under-recognized and under-treated in a high proportion of these patients, a fact which should raise awareness among clinicians. A multifactorial approach in management and treatment is undoubtedly required in order to improve patients’ quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26167462

  19. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  20. Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Anja; Trueba, Ana F.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent respiratory disease and associated with considerable individual and socioeconomic burden. Recent research started examining the role of psychosocial factors for course and management of the disease. Purpose This review provides an overview on recent findings on psychosocial factors and behavioral medicine approaches in COPD. Results Research has identified several important psychosocial factors and effective behavioral medicine interventions in COPD. However, there is considerable need for future research in this field. Conclusions Although beneficial effects of some behavioral medicine interventions have been demonstrated in COPD, future research efforts are necessary to study the effects of distinct components of these interventions, to thoroughly examine promising but yet not sufficiently proven interventions, and to develop new creative interventions. PMID:22351032

  1. National Study of Chronic Disease Self-Management: Age Comparison of Outcome Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ory, Marcia G.; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Jiang, Luohua; Lorig, Kate; Whitelaw, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The adult population is increasingly experiencing one or more chronic illnesses and living with such conditions longer. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) helps participants cope with chronic disease-related symptomatology and improve their health-related quality of life. Nevertheless, the long-term effectiveness of…

  2. Hepatic inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic liver inflammation drives hepatic fibrosis, and current immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral therapies can weaken this driver. Hepatic fibrosis is reversed, stabilized, or prevented in 57%-79% of patients by conventional treatment regimens, mainly by their anti-inflammatory actions. Responses, however, are commonly incomplete and inconsistently achieved. The fibrotic mechanisms associated with liver inflammation have been clarified, and anti-fibrotic agents promise to improve outcomes as adjunctive therapies. Hepatitis C virus and immune-mediated responses can activate hepatic stellate cells by increasing oxidative stress within hepatocytes. Angiotensin can be synthesized by activated hepatic stellate cells and promote the production of reactive oxygen species. Anti-oxidants (N-acetylcysteine, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and vitamin E) and angiotensin inhibitors (losartin) have had anti-fibrotic actions in preliminary human studies, and they may emerge as supplemental therapies. Anti-fibrotic agents presage a new era of supplemental treatment for chronic liver disease. PMID:24627588

  3. Engineering for reliability in at-home chronic disease management

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Logan; Eschler, Jordan; Lozano, Paula; McClure, Jennifer B.; Vizer, Lisa M.; Ralston, James D.; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chronic conditions face challenges with maintaining lifelong adherence to self-management activities. Although reminders can help support the cognitive demands of managing daily and future health tasks, we understand little of how they fit into people’s daily lives. Utilizing a maximum variation sampling method, we interviewed and compared the experiences of 20 older adults with diabetes and 19 mothers of children with asthma to understand reminder use for at-home chronic disease management. Based on our participants’ experiences, we contend that many self-management failures should be viewed as systems failures, rather than individual failures and non-compliance. Furthermore, we identify key principles from reliability engineering that both explain current behavior and suggest strategies to improve patient reminder systems. PMID:25954384

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sundeep S; Barnes, Peter J

    2009-08-29

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tobacco smoking is established as a major risk factor, but emerging evidence suggests that other risk factors are important, especially in developing countries. An estimated 25-45% of patients with COPD have never smoked; the burden of non-smoking COPD is therefore much higher than previously believed. About 3 billion people, half the worldwide population, are exposed to smoke from biomass fuel compared with 1.01 billion people who smoke tobacco, which suggests that exposure to biomass smoke might be the biggest risk factor for COPD globally. We review the evidence for the association of COPD with biomass fuel, occupational exposure to dusts and gases, history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic asthma, respiratory-tract infections during childhood, outdoor air pollution, and poor socioeconomic status. PMID:19716966

  5. Hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcaemia in chronic kidney disease: primary or tertiary?

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, Mitchell R.; Muñoz Mendoza, Jair; Pasche, Lezlee J.; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Ayco, Alexander L.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to highlight the challenges in the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods. In this report, we describe a middle-aged Filipino gentleman with underlying CKD who presented with intractable nausea, vomiting, severe and medically refractory hypercalcaemia and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations in excess of 2400 pg/mL. The underlying pathophysiology as well as the aetiologies and current relevant literature are discussed. We also suggest an appropriate diagnostic approach to identify and promptly treat patients with CKD, HPT and hypercalcaemia. Results. Evaluation confirmed the presence of a large parathyroid adenoma; HPT and hypercalcaemia resolved rapidly following resection. Conclusion. This case report is remarkable for its severe hypercalcaemia requiring haemodialysis, large adenoma size, acute-on-chronic kidney injury and markedly elevated PTH concentration in association with primary HPT in CKD. PMID:25949433

  6. Collaborative Help in Chronic Disease Management: Supporting Individualized Problems

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; Ackerman, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Coping with chronic illness disease is a long and lonely journey, because the burden of managing the illness on a daily basis is placed upon the patients themselves. In this paper, we present our findings for how diabetes patient support groups help one another find individualized strategies for managing diabetes. Through field observations of face-to-face diabetes support groups, content analysis of an online diabetes community, and interviews, we found several help interactions that are critical in helping patients in finding individualized solutions. Those are: (1) patients operationalize their experiences to easily contextualize and share executable strategies; (2) operationalization has to be done within the larger context of sharing illness trajectories; and (3) the support groups develop common understanding towards diabetes management. We further discuss how our findings translate into design implications for supporting chronic illness patients in online community settings. PMID:25360442

  7. [Foetal programming of nutrition-related chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Delisle, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation, which reflects in large part maternal malnutrition in poorer communities, contributes to chronic disease risk through foetal programming, according to the early origins hypothesis of Barker. Foetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, permanent changes in metabolism or structures result from adverse intrauterine conditions. Observational studies first showed an association between lower birth weights and higher rates of coronary disease in the 80s, in England and Scandinavia. The link between low birth weights, or other indicators of small birth size, and cardiovascular disease was later confirmed in many epidemiological studies, including in the USA and in India. Similarly, a reverse relationship of birth weight and systolic blood pressure was shown in men and women, in developed as well as developing countries, and in all age groups, although it was less consistent in adolescents. Insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes have also been found to be independently related to small size at birth in several studies around the world. Insulin resistance associated with small size at birth was frequently shown to be present at a young age. The association of small birth size with chronic disease tends to increase with catch-up growth and obesity, and usually persists after adjusting for confounding factors such as age, family history, and socio-economic status. Several, but not all, twin studies lend support to the hypothesis. There is a tendency for lighter members of twin pairs to have a higher blood pressure, and more diabetes. Observations in people exposed to the Dutch famine while in utero also tend to corroborate the hypothesis. Those who were exposed early in their intrauterine life did not have lower birth weights, but they were prone to becoming obese later on. In contrast, those exposed towards the end of gestation had lower birth weights, and showed a higher rate of impaired glucose tolerance, while having a lower risk of obesity. Dietary manipulations in animal models provide further support and mechanistic explanations, in particular protein deficiency in pregnant rats, which elevates blood pressure, impairs glucose tolerance, and increases the likelihood of obesity in the progeny. Although there are still controversial areas, there is at present sufficient scientific evidence for foetal programming to be regarded as an additional risk factor for chronic disease, in interaction with genetic and lifestyle risk factors. The fact that intrauterine growth retardation may predispose to nutrition-related chronic disease has serious implications for developing countries, particularly those undergoing rapid nutritional transition, as it may further increase the rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes when diets and lifestyles are in themselves "atherogenic". The challenge is for programmes to simultaneously combat apparently opposite nutrition problems, malnutrition and "over-nutrition". Improving the nutrition of women is even more imperative when considering that it may contribute to preventing chronic diseases in the next generation, in addition to enhancing health and survival of mothers and children. PMID:11943639

  8. Arsenic and Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Laura; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Fadrowski, Jeffrey; Agnew, Jackie; Weaver, Virginia M.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, high arsenic exposure has been associated with adverse kidney disease outcomes. We performed a systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence of the association between arsenic and various kidney disease outcomes. The search period was January 1966 through January 2014. Twenty-five papers (comprising 24 studies) meeting the search criteria were identified and included in this review. In most studies, arsenic exposure was assessed by measurement of urine concentrations or with an ecological indicator. There was a generally positive association between arsenic and albuminuria and proteinuria outcomes. There was mixed evidence of an association between arsenic exposure and chronic kidney disease (CKD), ?-2 microglobulin (?2MG), and N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) outcomes. There was evidence of a positive association between arsenic exposure and kidney disease mortality. Assessment of a small number of studies with three or more categories showed a clear dose-response association between arsenic and prevalent albuminuria and proteinuria, but not with CKD outcomes. Eight studies lacked adjustment for possible confounders, and two had small study populations. The evaluation of the causality of the association between arsenic exposure and kidney disease outcomes is limited by the small number of studies, lack of study quality, and limited prospective evidence. Because of the high prevalence of arsenic exposure worldwide, there is a need for additional well-designed epidemiologic and mechanistic studies of arsenic and kidney disease outcomes. PMID:25221743

  9. Chronic kidney disease alters vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, M. Alexandra; Fang, Jianhua; Li, Shan; Ferrer, Lucas; Birkenbach, Mark P.; Lee, Iris J.; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Choi, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access dysfunction associated with arteriovenous grafts and fistulas contributes to the morbidity and mortality of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients receiving hemodialysis. We hypothesized that the uremic conditions associated with CKD promote a pathophysiological vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype that contributes to neointimal hyperplasia. We analyzed the effect of culturing human VSMC with uremic serum. Expression of VSMC contractile marker genes was reduced 50-80% in cells exposed to uremic serum and the decreased expression was accompanied by changes in histone marks. There was an increase in proliferation in cells exposed to uremic conditions, with no change in the levels of apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that uremic serum inhibited PDGF-induced migration of VSMC. Histomorphometric analysis revealed venous neointimal hyperplasia in veins from chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients prior to any surgical manipulation as compared to veins from patients with no kidney disease. We conclude that uremia associated with CKD alters VSMC phenotype in vitro and contributes to neointimal hyperplasia formation in vivo contributing to the pathogenesis of vascular access dysfunction in CKD patients. PMID:25553479

  10. The global burden of chronic respiratory disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Burney, P; Jarvis, D; Perez-Padilla, R

    2015-01-01

    With an aging global population, chronic respiratory diseases are becoming a more prominent cause of death and disability. Age-standardised death rates from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highest in low-income regions of the world, particularly South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, although airflow obstruction is relatively uncommon in these areas. Airflow obstruction is, by contrast, more common in regions with a high prevalence of cigarette smoking. COPD mortality is much more closely related to the prevalence of a low forced vital capacity which is, in turn, associated with poverty. Mortality from asthma is less common than mortality from COPD, but it is also relatively more common in poorer areas, particularly Oceania, South and South-East Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Again this contrasts with the asthma prevalence among adults, which is highest in high-income regions. In high-income areas, mortality due to asthma, which is predominantly an adult problem, has fallen substantially in recent decades with the spread of new guidelines for treatment that emphasise the use of inhaled steroids to control the disease. Although mortality rates have been falling, the prevalence of atopy has been increasing between generations in Western Europe. Changes in the prevalence of wheeze among adults has been more varied and may have been influenced by the reduction in smoking and the increase in the use of inhaled steroids. PMID:25519785

  11. Mediastinectomy for management of chronic pyogranulomatous pleural disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    Trinterud, T; Nelissen, P; Caine, A R; White, R A S

    2014-06-14

    The medical records of 12 dogs with chronic pyogranulomatous pleural disease unresponsive to medical management were reviewed retrospectively. Resection of the mediastinal pleura (mediastinectomy) was performed through a median sternotomy to remove all diseased and surgically accessible mediastinal pleural tissue. Dogs were re-examined two weeks postoperatively, and long-term outcome was evaluated by contacting owners by phone. Twelve dogs underwent mediastinectomy; additional surgeries included subtotal pericardiectomy (8), lung lobectomy (4) and partial diaphragmatic resection (2). Histology of resected tissue consistently revealed neutrophilic, pyogranulomatous cellulitis/serositis. Foreign material was evident in the mediastinal tissue of five dogs and microorganisms were recovered from three dogs. Two dogs developed pneumothorax immediately postoperatively; one dog developed haemothorax one month postoperatively and was euthanased. Median follow-up time was eight months (range: 6-43?months); eleven dogs were alive and considered to be symptom-free by their owners. Mediastinectomy resulted in complete resolution of symptoms in most dogs (92 per cent) and was associated with a low incidence of major complications. The results of this study indicated that mediastinectomy results in favourable outcome for dogs with chronic pleural pyogranulomatous pleural disease unresponsive to medical management. PMID:24686857

  12. Factors promoting acute and chronic diseases caused by yersiniae.

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, R R

    1991-01-01

    The experimental system constructed with the medically significant yersiniae provides a powerful basic model for comparative study of factors required for expression of acute versus chronic disease. The system exploits the close genetic similarity between Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of bubonic plague, and enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. Y. pestis possesses three plasmids, of which one, shared by the enteropathogenic species, mediates a number of virulence factors that directly or indirectly promote survival within macrophages and immunosuppression. The two remaining plasmids are unique and encode functions that promote acute disease by enhancing bacterial dissemination in tissues and resistance to phagocytosis by neutrophils and monocytes. These properties are replaced in the enteropathogenic yersiniae by host cell invasins and an adhesin which promote chronic disease; the latter are cryptic in Y. pestis. Additional distinctions include specific mutational losses in Y. pestis which result in loss of fitness in natural environments plus gain of properties that facilitate transmission and infection via fleabite. Images PMID:1889045

  13. A profile and approach to chronic disease in Abu Dhabi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a country, the United Arab Emirates has developed very rapidly from a developing country with a largely nomadic population, to a modern and wealthy country with a Western lifestyle. This economic progress has brought undoubted social benefits and opportunities for UAE citizens, including a high and increasing life expectancy. However, rapid modernization and urbanization have contributed to a significant problem with chronic diseases, particularly obesity-related cardiovascular risk. In response the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi has significantly strengthened its data systems to better assess the baseline and measure the impact of targeted interventions. The unique population-level Weqaya Programme for UAE Nationals living in Abu Dhabi has recruited more than 94% of adults into a screening programme for the rapid identification of those at risk and the deployment of targeted interventions to control that risk. This article describes the burden of non-communicable disease in Abu Dhabi, and the efforts made by the Health Authority of Abu Dhabi to tackle this burden including the development of a whole population cardiovascular screening programme changes to health policy, particularly in terms of lifestyle and behaviour change, and empowerment of the community to enable individuals to make healthier choices. In addition, recommendations have been made for global responsibility for tackling chronic disease. PMID:22738714

  14. Herbal medicine use among patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tulunay, Munevver; Aypak, Cenk; Yikilkan, Hulya; Gorpelioglu, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used all over the world, and herbal medicines are the most preferred ways of CAM. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of herbal medicine use among patients with chronic diseases. Methodology: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from April 2014 to December 2014 among patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and hyperlipidemia (HL) in Family Medicine Department of D??kap? Y?ld?r?m Beyaz?t Training and Research Hospital, in Ankara. A questionnaire about herbal drug use was applied by face to face interview to the participants. Results: A total of 217 patients were included in this study. The mean age of the participants was 56.6 ± 9.7 years (55 male and 162 female). The rate of herbal medicine use was 29%. Herbal medicine use among female gender was significantly higher (P = 0.040). Conventional medication use was found to be lower among herbal medicine consumers. There was no relationship between herbal medicine use and type of chronic disease, living area, and occupation or education level. Most frequently used herbs were lemon (39.6%) and garlic (11.1%) for HT, cinnamon (12.7%) for DM, and walnut (6.3%) for HL. Conclusions: In this study, herbal medicine use was found to be higher among patients who had been diagnosed with chronic diseases. Therefore, physicians should be aware of herbal medicine usage of their patients and inform them about the effectivity and side effects of herbal medicines. PMID:26401410

  15. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    PubMed

    Rowell, Temperance R; Tarran, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig usage has increased, attracting both former tobacco smokers and never smokers. E-Cig liquids (e-liquids) contain nicotine in a glycerol/propylene glycol vehicle with flavorings, which are vaporized and inhaled. To date, neither E-Cig devices, nor e-liquids, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has proposed a deeming rule, which aims to initiate legislation to regulate E-Cigs, but the timeline to take effect is uncertain. Proponents of E-Cigs say that they are safe and should not be regulated. Opposition is varied, with some opponents proposing that E-Cig usage will introduce a new generation to nicotine addiction, reversing the decline seen with tobacco smoking, or that E-Cigs generally may not be safe and will trigger diseases like tobacco. In this review, we shall discuss what is known about the effects of E-Cigs on the mammalian lung and isolated lung cells in vitro. We hope that collating this data will help illustrate gaps in the knowledge of this burgeoning field, directing researchers toward answering whether or not E-Cigs are capable of causing disease. PMID:26408554

  16. Chronic liver disease in the human immunodeficiency virus patient.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chathur; Dharel, Narayan; Sterling, Richard K

    2015-02-01

    There are an estimated 40 million HIV infected individuals worldwide, with chronic liver disease being the 2nd leading cause of mortality in this population. Elevated liver functions are commonly noted in HIV patients and the etiologies are varied. Viral hepatitis B and C, fatty liver and drug induced liver injury are more common. Treatment options for viral hepatitis C are rapidly evolving and are promising, but treatments are limited for the other conditions and is primarily supportive. Opportunistic infections of the liver are now uncommon. Irrespective of etiology, management requires referral to specialized centers and with due diligence mortality can be reduced. PMID:25454294

  17. Chronic diseases in globally challenging locations: assessment, impacts, and control.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fu

    2004-02-01

    A decision regarding work assignment in challenging environments often is made on an individual basis. The physician must consider (1) objective medical information (eg, CVD risk profile, results of exercise stress testing; see Fig. 6); (2) psychologic assessment, including potential career impacts of the expatriate assignment; and (3) availability of specialty medical facilities and expertise in the host country. Although these individual decisions are important, health professionals should not lose sight of the opportunity to approach chronic diseases on a broader basis by adopting a public health approach for the work site and the surrounding community. PMID:15043367

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Hammad; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and results in an economic and social burden that is both substantial and increasing. The natural history of COPD is punctuated by exacerbations which have major short- and long-term implications on the patient and healthcare system. Evidence-based guidelines stipulate that early detection and prompt treatment of exacerbations are essential to ensure optimal outcomes and to reduce the burden of COPD. Several factors can identify populations at risk of exacerbations. Implementing prevention measures in patients at risk is a major goal in the management of COPD. PMID:25177479

  19. NADPH oxidase deficiency in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, D C; Lehrer, R I

    1975-01-01

    We measured the cyanide-insensitive pyridine nucleotide oxidase activity of fractionated resting and phagocytic neutrophils from 11 normal donors, 1 patient with hereditary deficiency of myeloperoxidase, and 7 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). When measured under optimal conditions (at pH 5.5 and in the presence of 0.5 mM Mn++), NADPH oxidase activity increased fourfold with phagocytosis and was six-fold higher than with NADH. Phagocytic neutrophils from patients with CGD were markedly deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Images PMID:235560

  20. Postnatal Infections and Immunology Affecting Chronic Lung Disease of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Pryhuber, Gloria S

    2015-12-01

    Premature infants suffer significant respiratory morbidity during infancy with long-term negative consequences on health, quality of life, and health care costs. Enhanced susceptibility to a variety of infections and inflammation play a large role in early and prolonged lung disease following premature birth, although the mechanisms of susceptibility and immune dysregulation are active areas of research. This article reviews aspects of host-pathogen interactions and immune responses that are altered by preterm birth and that impact chronic respiratory morbidity in these children. PMID:26593074

  1. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma, suggesting that efforts to eradicate fungi from the airways and environments of these patients should be considered. PMID:24928648

  2. Effects of theophylline-ethylendiamine on chronic pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Panuccio, P; Viroli, L; Chelucci, G; Cresci, F

    1984-01-01

    The use of theophylline in the treatment of chronic lung disease is wide spread thanks to the positive effects on the bronchial tree, on ventilation and on diaphragmatic contractile activity, which are well documented. On the other hand, the cardiovascular effects of this drug have not been studied much, particularly the effects on the hemodynamics of the pulmonary circulation. The latest studies were carried out by Parker (1966 and 1967) and by Jezek (1970) with heart catheterization and by Matthay (1978) with isotopic angiocardiography, but the problem has not been fully explored from the standpoint of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Therefore we are studying the effects of intravenous infusions of aminophylline in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, trying to examine the effects of this drug on three different groups of patients: the 1st without pulmonary arterial hypertension; the 2nd with latent pulmonary arterial hypertension; the 3rd with evident pulmonary arterial hypertension. We consider pulmonary arterial hypertension as pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 20 mmHg at rest and pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 35 mmHg at the end of 8 min of exercise in the supine position, with 40 W load cycle ergometer. The experimental protocol includes the clinical and functional identification of subjects with chronic obstructive long disease, the performance of right heart catheterization and the cannulation of a peripheral artery, measuring all pressure levels, cardiac output, hemogasanalytic data and theophylline levels in steady state (20-30 min. after the end of invasive manoeuvres) at the 10th, 20th and 30th min after the end of an infusion of 10 mg/kg of aminophylline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6534771

  3. Chronic wasting disease in bank voles: characterisation of the shortest incubation time model for prion diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to assess the susceptibility of bank voles to chronic wasting disease (CWD), we inoculated voles carrying isoleucine or methionine at codon 109 (Bv109I and Bv109M, respectively) with CWD isolates from elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer. Efficient transmission rate (100%) was observed with...

  4. Burden of Sickness Absence Due to Chronic Disease in the Dutch Workforce from 2007 to 2011.

    PubMed

    de Vroome, Ernest M M; Uegaki, Kimi; van der Ploeg, Catharina P B; Treutlein, Daniela B; Steenbeek, Romy; de Weerd, Marjolein; van den Bossche, Seth N J

    2015-12-01

    Introduction Chronic diseases are associated with productivity loss costs due to sickness absence. It is not always clear, however, which chronic diseases in particular are involved with how many sickness days and associated costs. Objective To determine the prevalence, additional days of sickness absence, and associated costs of chronic diseases among the Dutch working population from 2007 to 2011. Methods Prevalence of chronic diseases and additional days of sickness absence were derived from the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey (NWCS) from 2007 to 2011. The cost of each sickness absence day was based on linked personal income data. We used multiple regression analysis to derive the unconfounded additional days of sickness absence due to each chronic disease. Results Annually, approximately 37 % of the Dutch working population reported some type of chronic physical or psychological disease. No clinically relevant changes in prevalence of specific chronic diseases were observed in the studied period, nor in the number of additional sickness absence days or associated costs. The national financial burden due to sickness absence associated with chronic musculoskeletal disorders amounted to €1.3 billion annually. Conclusions Chronic diseases result in substantial productivity loss due to sickness absence. Given the ageing population, the proposed increase in the state pension age and an increase in sedentary lifestyle and obesity, the prevalence of chronic diseases may be expected to rise. Coordinated efforts to maintain and improve the health of the working population are necessary to minimize socioeconomic consequences. PMID:25804926

  5. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Egan, Brent M

    2014-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing in incidence and lead to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The relationship between these two entities is complex. Individual components of the MetS are known risk factors for incident kidney disease, but it is not clear how the clustering of these components is linked to the development and progression of kidney disease. Cross-sectional studies show an association of the MetS and prevalent CKD; however, one cannot draw conclusions as to which came first – the MetS or the kidney disease. Observational studies suggest a relationship between MetS and incident CKD, but they also demonstrate the development of MetS in patients with established CKD. These observations suggest a bidirectional relationship. A better understanding of the relationship between components of the MetS and whether and how these components contribute to progression of CKD and incident cardiovascular disease could inform more effective prevention strategies. PMID:25258547

  6. Neurologic Manifestations of Chronic Liver Disease and Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The normal functioning of brain is intimately as well as intricately interrelated with normal functioning of the liver. Liver plays a critical role of not only providing vital nutrients to the brain but also of detoxifying the splanchnic blood. Compromised liver function leads to insufficient detoxification thus allowing neurotoxins (such as ammonia, manganese, and other chemicals) to enter the cerebral circulation. In addition, portosystemic shunts, which are common accompaniments of advanced liver disease, facilitate free passage of neurotoxins into the cerebral circulation. The problem is compounded further by additional variables such as gastrointestinal tract bleeding, malnutrition, and concurrent renal failure, which are often associated with liver cirrhosis. Neurologic damage in chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis seems to be multifactorial primarily attributable to the following: brain accumulation of ammonia, manganese, and lactate; altered permeability of the blood-brain barrier; recruitment of monocytes after microglial activation; and neuroinflammation, that is, direct effects of circulating systemic proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, IL-1?, and IL-6. Radiologist should be aware of the conundrum of neurologic complications that can be encountered in liver disease, which include hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocerebral degeneration, hepatic myelopathy, cirrhosis-related parkinsonism, cerebral infections, hemorrhage, and osmotic demyelination. In addition, neurologic complications can be exclusive to certain disorders, for example, Wilson disease, alcoholism (Wernicke encephalopathy, alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, etc). Radiologist should be aware of their varied clinical presentation and radiological appearances as the diagnosis is not always straightforward. PMID:25908229

  7. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Denzel; Shiomi, Takayuki; D’Armiento, Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD. PMID:25664615

  8. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  9. Chronic Lyme disease: it's not all in our heads.

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Those of us with chronic Lyme disease are not at all confused, as suggested by Sigal and Hassett (2002). We know from years of experience that we have real, specific symptoms that are usually painful and disabling and include severe headaches, crippling arthritis, and heart palpitations, which lead to serious heart disease. Many of us know that our symptoms are kept in check while we are on antibiotics, but they painfully reappear when the antibiotics are withdrawn. Just because the medical community cannot detect a specific causative bacterium and managed health care companies want to maximize profits doesn't mean that those of us afflicted with this terrible condition are delusional and not truly benefiting from antibiotic treatment. We are not all crazy; we are sick and we should not be required to prove it to get medical care. PMID:12573918

  10. Chronic Wasting Disease and Potential Transmission to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Ryan A.; Williams, Elizabeth S.; Miller, Michael W.; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Schonberger, Lawrence B.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is endemic in a tri-corner area of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, and new foci of CWD have been detected in other parts of the United States. Although detection in some areas may be related to increased surveillance, introduction of CWD due to translocation or natural migration of animals may account for some new foci of infection. Increasing spread of CWD has raised concerns about the potential for increasing human exposure to the CWD agent. The foodborne transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans indicates that the species barrier may not completely protect humans from animal prion diseases. Conversion of human prion protein by CWD-associated prions has been demonstrated in an in vitro cell-free experiment, but limited investigations have not identified strong evidence for CWD transmission to humans. More epidemiologic and laboratory studies are needed to monitor the possibility of such transmissions. PMID:15207045

  11. Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Traphagen, Nicole; Tian, Zhi; Allen-Gipson, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) is the world’s most commonly used drug, and has been widely recognized as a risk factor for developing lung disorders. Chronic EtOH exposure affects all of the organ systems in the body and increases the risk of developing pulmonary diseases such as acute lung injury and pneumonia, while exacerbating the symptoms and resulting in increased mortality in many other lung disorders. EtOH and its metabolites inhibit the immune response of alveolar macrophages (AMs), increase airway leakage, produce damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupt the balance of antioxidants/oxidants within the lungs. In this article, we review the role of EtOH exposure in the pathogenesis and progression of pulmonary disease. PMID:26492278

  12. Autonomic denervation and the origins of chronic Western diseases.

    PubMed

    Quinn, M J

    2010-05-01

    Many chronic Western diseases result from lifestyles that include refined diets, poor bowel habits, limited physical exercise and suboptimal patterns of childbirth. Western diets result in reduced stool weights, increased bowel transit times and persistent physical efforts during defaecation. Prolonged physical efforts during defaecation and childbirth cause latent, or direct, injuries to branches of the cardiac (thorax), coeliac (abdomen) and hypogastric (pelvis) plexi. Injuries to autonomic nerves result in impaired visceral function including visceral dysmotility, tissue hypoplasia and hyperplasia, increased susceptibility to infection, and, aberrant reinnervation with sensitisation of the central nervous system (CNS). These unrecognised injuries are vulnerable to the long list of causes of autonomic Dysfunction, e.g. stress, alcohol, drugs, infection, trauma, cancer, etc. Specific injuries at different anatomical locations in midline autonomic pathways give rise to a wide range of Western diseases from infancy to old age, through diverse and cumulative mechanisms. PMID:20022182

  13. Drug therapies to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Frank; Holian, John; Murray, Patrick T

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, impacted not alone by progression to end-stage kidney disease, but also by the high associated incidence of cardiovascular events and related mortality. Despite our current understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD and the treatments available, the reported incidence of CKD continues to rise worldwide, and is often referred to as the silent public healthcare epidemic. The significant cost to patient wellbeing and to the economy of managing the later stages of CKD have prompted efforts to develop interventions to delay the development and progression of this syndrome. In this article, we review established and novel agents that may aid in delaying the progression of CKD and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26621944

  14. [Chronic inflammatory bowel disease--pathogenic concepts and therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Madsen, J R

    2000-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to be a consequence of inappropriate upregulation of immune reactions evoked by the colonic microflora. Abnormalities observed in IBD may be explained, at least in part, by an unfavourable balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Conventional drug treatment of IBD may soon be replaced by more selective inhibitors that act centrally in the inflammatory process. Immunoneutralisation with chimeric anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) antibodies reduces treatment refractory IBD, including fistular Chrons' disease, but recombinant human TNF alpha-receptor fusion proteins may be equally effective with potentially fewer side effects. This view also applies to chimeric antibodies directed against cytokines or adhesion molecules. Potentially more promising are antisense oligonucleotides and matrix-metalloproteinase inhibitors. Whether sustained remission can be achieved probably depends on successful unravelling of the aetiology of IBD. PMID:10745672

  15. The interplay between chronic kidney disease, sudden cardiac death, and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease patients face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, and the risk of sudden cardiac death increases as kidney function declines. Risk factors for sudden cardiac death are poorly understood and understudied among chronic kidney disease patients. In the general population, coronary heart disease-associated risk factors are the most important determinants of sudden cardiac death risk, but among chronic kidney disease patients, there is evidence that these factors play a much smaller role. Complex relationships between chronic kidney disease-specific risk factors, structural heart disease, and arrhythmic triggers contribute to the high risk of sudden cardiac death and ventricular arrhythmias, and modulate the effectiveness of available therapies. This review examines recent data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and mechanisms of sudden cardiac death among patients with chronic kidney disease and examines current evidence regarding the use of pharmacologic and device-based therapies for management of sudden cardiac death risk. PMID:25443573

  16. The Prevalence of Disease Clusters in Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Diseases – A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sinnige, Judith; Braspenning, Jozé; Schellevis, François; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Westert, Gert; Korevaar, Joke

    2013-01-01

    Background Since most clinical guidelines address single diseases, treatment of patients with multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of multiple (chronic) diseases within one person, can become complicated. Information on highly prevalent combinations of diseases can set the agenda for guideline development on multimorbidity. With this systematic review we aim to describe the prevalence of disease combinations (i.e. disease clusters) in older patients with multimorbidity, as assessed in available studies. In addition, we intend to acquire information that can be supportive in the process of multimorbidity guideline development. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library for all types of studies published between January 2000 and September 2012. We included empirical studies focused on multimorbidity or comorbidity that reported prevalence rates of combinations of two or more diseases. Results Our search yielded 3070 potentially eligible articles, of which 19 articles, representing 23 observational studies, turned out to meet all our quality and inclusion criteria after full text review. These studies provided prevalence rates of 165 combinations of two diseases (i.e. disease pairs). Twenty disease pairs, concerning 12 different diseases, were described in at least 3 studies. Depression was found to be the disease that was most commonly clustered, and was paired with 8 different diseases, in the available studies. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were found to be the second most clustered diseases, both with 6 different diseases. Prevalence rates for each disease combination varied considerably per study, but were highest for the pairs that included hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions Twenty disease pairs were assessed most frequently in patients with multimorbidity. These disease combinations could serve as a first priority setting towards the development of multimorbidity guidelines, starting with the diseases with the highest observed prevalence rates and those with potential interacting treatment plans. PMID:24244534

  17. Modeling Routes of Chronic Wasting Disease Transmission: Environmental Prion Persistence Promotes

    E-print Network

    Lazzaro, Brian

    Population Decline and Extinction. PLoS ONE 6(5): e19896. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0019896 Editor: AndrewModeling Routes of Chronic Wasting Disease Transmission: Environmental Prion Persistence Promotes, United States of America Abstract Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal disease of deer, elk

  18. Hsp27 overexpression in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease: chronic neurodegeneration

    E-print Network

    Morimoto, Richard

    Hsp27 overexpression in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease: chronic neurodegeneration Received November 10, 2006; Revised and Accepted March 2, 2007 Huntington's disease (HD) is caused, it illustrates the diverse effect of Hsp27 on acute versus chronic models of disease. INTRODUCTION Huntington

  19. Chronic wasting disease in free-ranging Wisconsin white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joly, D.O.; Ribic, C.A.; Langenberg, J.A.; Beheler, K.; Batha, C.A.; Dhuey, B.J.; Rolley, R.E.; Bartelt, G.; VanDeelen, T.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Three White-tailed Deer shot within 5 km during the 2001 hunting season in Wisconsin tested positive for chronic wasting disease, a prion disease of cervids. Subsequent sampling within 18 km showed a 3% prevalence (n=476). This discovery represents an important range extension for chronic wasting disease into the eastern United States.

  20. Johns Hopkins University Annual Public Health in Asia Symposium Presents: Chronic Diseases and Conditions

    E-print Network

    Johns Hopkins University Annual Public Health in Asia Symposium Presents: Chronic Diseases The Chronic Diseases and Conditions in Asia Symposium aims to provide a platform for both undergraduate- communicable disease (NCD) is a non-infectious and non-transmissible medical condition. Claiming the lives

  1. Enteral nutrition in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient.

    PubMed

    DeBellis, Heather F; Fetterman, James W

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, chronic disease, in which malnutrition can have an undesirable effect. Therefore, the patient's nutritional status is critical for optimizing outcomes in COPD. The initial nutrition assessment is focused on identifying calorically compromised COPD patients in order to provide them with appropriate nutrition. Nutritional intervention consists of oral supplementation and enteral nutrition to prevent weight loss and muscle mass depletion. Evaluation of nutritional status should include past medical history (medications, lung function, and exercise tolerance) and dietary history (patient's dietary habits, food choices, meal patterns, food allergy information, and malabsorption issues), in addition to physiological stress, visceral proteins, weight, fat-free mass, and body mass index. The current medical literature conflicts regarding the appropriate type of formulation to select for nutritional intervention, especially regarding the amount of calories from fat to provide COPD patients. This review article focuses on the enteral product formulations currently available, and how they are most appropriately utilized in patients with COPD. PMID:23065388

  2. [Special surgical complications in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Kroesen, A J

    2015-04-01

    After colorectal and anorectal interventions for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, specific complications can occur.In Crohn's disease these complications mainly occur after proctocolectomy. Pelvic sepsis can be prevented by omentoplasty with fixation inside the pelvis. A persisting sepsis of the sacral cavity can be treated primarily by dissection of the anal sphincter which ensures better drainage. In cases of chronic sacral sepsis, transposition of the gracilis muscle is a further effective option. Early recurrence of a transsphincteric anal fistula should be treated by reinsertion of a silicon seton drainage.Complications after restorative proctocolectomy are frequent and manifold (35%). The main acute complications are anastomotic leakage and pelvic sepsis. Therapy consists of transperineal drainage of the abscess with simultaneous transanal drainage. Late complications due to technical and septic reasons are still a relevant problem even 36 years after introduction of this operative technique. A consistent approach with detailed diagnostic and surgical therapy results in a 75% rescue rate of ileoanal pouches. PMID:25693779

  3. Role of Oxidative RNA Damage in Chronic-Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Normal cellular metabolism and exposure to ionizing and ultraviolet radiations and exogenous agents produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their reactivity, they can interact with many critical biomolecules and induce cell damage. The reaction of ROS with free nucleobases, nucleosides, nucleotides, or oligonucleotides can generate numerous distinct modifications in nucleic acids. Oxidative damage to DNA has been widely investigated and is strongly implicated in the development of many chronic-degenerative diseases. In contrast, RNA damage is a poorly examined field in biomedical research. In this review, I discuss the importance of RNA as a target of oxidative damage and the role of oxidative damage to RNA in the pathogenesis of some chronic-degenerative diseases, such as neurological disorders, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Furthermore, I review recent evidence suggesting that RNA may be the target for toxic agents and indicating RNA degradation as a powerful tool to treat any pathology in which there is an aberrant expression of mRNA and/or its gene products. PMID:26078805

  4. Herbal Products: Benefits, Limits, and Applications in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Anna; Scalera, Antonella; Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Miranda, Agnese; Zulli, Claudio; Gaeta, Laura; Tuccillo, Concetta; Federico, Alessandro; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2012-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine soughts and encompasses a wide range of approaches; its use begun in ancient China at the time of Xia dynasty and in India during the Vedic period, but thanks to its long-lasting curative effect, easy availability, natural way of healing, and poor side-effects it is gaining importance throughout the world in clinical practice. We conducted a review describing the effects and the limits of using herbal products in chronic liver disease, focusing our attention on those most known, such as quercetin or curcumin. We tried to describe their pharmacokinetics, biological properties, and their beneficial effects (as antioxidant role) in metabolic, alcoholic, and viral hepatitis (considering that oxidative stress is the common pathway of chronic liver diseases of different etiology). The main limit of applicability of CAM comes from the lacking of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials giving a real proof of efficacy of those products, so that anecdotal success and personal experience are frequently the driving force for acceptance of CAM in the population. PMID:22991573

  5. Intramyocardial small-vessel disease in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Factor, S M

    1976-11-01

    A morphologic study of the small (50 to 200 micron) intramyocardial coronary arteries was performed. The cases chosen for study were selected from a relatively young group of patients without clinical evidence of alcoholic cardiomyopathy or pathologic evidence of large coronary artery disease, in order to evaluate alterations in the small vessels which could possibly be attributed to the chronic alcoholic state. Five basic vascular abnormalities were described. The most common alteration found in all nine cases was vascular wall edema (48 per cent), followed by perivascular fibrosis (42 per cent), vascular sclerosis (36 per cent), subendothelial humps (13 per cent), and vascular wall inflammation (11 per cent). The significance and pathogenesis of these changes were discussed. Primary endothelial cell damage was proposed as a common pathogenic mechanism for all five types of vascular abnormality. It was suggested that following endothelial damage, fluid and macromolecules penetrate into the vessel wall or into the perivascular space where, by incompletely understood processes, they induce vascular wall myocytes to produce collagen, elastin, and basement membrane-like substances. Evidence supporting this mechanism was derived from the common observation of vascular wall edema, from the occasional presence of erythrocytes and leukocytes within the vessel wall, and from experimental data in the literature. Several possible etiologic agents were implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial and vessel wall injury. These included alcohol itself, acetaldehyde, biogenic amines, and magnesium deficiency. It is probable, however, that there are multiple etiologic factors which affect the small cardiac vessels of the chronic alcoholic. Finally, the proposal was advanced that the nonspecific pathology of the myocardium in chronic alcoholism may be a result of ischemia secondary to disease of the small intramyocardial coronary ateries. PMID:983932

  6. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Never-Smoking Dairy Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Stoleski, Saso; Minov, Jordan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Mijakoski, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Work-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a considerable part of the disease burden globally. Objective : To assess the COPD prevalence and characteristics in never-smoking dairy farmers. Materials and Methodology : We have conducted a cross-sectional study with 75 male dairy farmers aged 26 to 59 years, and compared them with equivalent number of male office workers similar by age, and duration of employment. Data on chronic respiratory symptoms, job history and daily activities were obtained by questionnaire. Lung functional testing of the examined subjects included baseline spirometry, and bronchodilator reversibility measurement. Results : Dairy farmers showed higher prevalence of overall respiratory symptoms, but significant difference was noticed for cough, phlegm, and dyspnea. Dairy farmers had more prevalent work-related respiratory symptoms, being significant for overall symptoms, cough, and phlegm. The mean baseline values of spirometric parameters were lower in dairy farmers, but significance was reported for FEV1/FVC%, MEF50, MEF75, and MEF25-75. Dairy farmers had significantly higher COPD prevalence than office controls (10.7% vs 2.7%, P = 0,049). Dairy farmers and office controls showed significant association between COPD and age over 45 years. Dairy farmers had a significant association between COPD and employment duration of over 20 years (P = 0.023), but also between COPD and work-related chronic respiratory symptoms (P = 0.041). Conclusion : The study findings favor the cause-effect association between job exposure to respiratory hazards, and development of persistent airway obstruction among dairy farmers. PMID:25893027

  7. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  8. [Extra-oral signs to look for in patients exhibiting oral warning signs of genetic diseases].

    PubMed

    Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Lusson, Charlène; Hyon, Isabelle; Dajean-Trutaud, Sylvie; Le Caignec, Cédric; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed at defining guidelines for dental surgeons to manage patients with warning signs of rare genetic diseases. Anomalies of tooth development may occur as an isolated condition or in association with other symptoms in syndromes. In many cases, dental anomalies may be the first manifestations of a genetic disease. The dentist can contribute to the diagnosis, and hence to an early treatment of this syndrome. When one or more dental anomalies are found, practitioners should refer patients to a genetic clinic or a specialized reference center to diagnose genetic diseases. Therefore, we provide, for the first time, a table of extra-oral signs that dental surgeons can look for in patients exhibiting heritable dental developmental anomalies. PMID:25528675

  9. Formulation of budesonide mouthwash for the treatment of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Van Schandevyl, Guy; Bauters, Tiene

    2016-02-01

    Oral involvement is (very) common in chronic graft-versus-host disease and can cause discomfort and impairment of oral function. Budesonide, a highly potent corticosteroid with low systemic activity, can be used as a topical treatment for oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. We describe the development of a formulation of budesonide and sodium bicarbonate for use as mouthwash in patients with oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25411262

  10. Association of Flavin Monooxygenase Gene E158K Polymorphism with Chronic Heart Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Bushueva, O Yu; Bulgakova, I V; Ivanov, V P; Polonikov, A V

    2015-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the risk of chronic heart disease and FMO3 gene polymorphism E158K analyzed by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The homozygous 158KK genotype of FMO3 gene is associated with high risk of chronic heart disease in women, but not in men. FMO3 gene polymorphism E158K is a significant predictor of predisposition to chronic heart disease in women. PMID:26519273

  11. Medicines for Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults with Kidney Disease and Diabetes ....

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure" /> Consumer Summary – Oct. 11, 2012 Medicines for Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: A Review ... and blood vessel diseases. About Your Options What medicines may help? There are four types of medicine ...

  12. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  13. Are Episodic and Chronic Migraine One Disease or Two?

    PubMed

    Burshtein, Reuben; Burshtein, Aaron; Burshtein, Joshua; Rosen, Noah

    2015-12-01

    Migraine is a debilitating headache disorder that has a significant impact on the world population, in both economic and sociologic capacities. Migraine has two main categories: (1) chronic migraine (CM), defined as the patient having 15 or more headache days per month, with at least five attacks fulfilling measures for EM with aura or EM without aura, and (2) episodic migraine (EM), defined as less than 15 headache days per month. With this definition, CM can only exist in the presence of EM, and it questions whether the two are separate diseases. Migraine has a significant impact on the population, as each year, about 2.5 % of patients with EM develop new-onset CM (Manack et al., Curr Pain Headache Rep 15:70-78, 2011) (Loder et al. Headache 55:214-228, 2015), with certain risk factors being evident only with CM. In addition, there are comorbid diseases that are only associated with CM, suggesting two separate diseases rather than one. Differentiation in response to treatments, both preventive and abortive, demonstrates both a similarity and a difference in EM versus CM. Also, comparing the two processes based upon functional imaging has been a recent development, beginning to show a physiological difference in regional cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and regional volumes in patients with EM and CM. Evidence regarding whether EM and CM demonstrate one disease with a significant level of complication or if two independent processes is inconclusive, and additional research must be performed to further characterize their relationship. PMID:26474783

  14. Systems medicine and integrated care to combat chronic noncommunicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Anto, Josep M; Sterk, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Chung, Kian Fan; Roca, Josep; Agusti, Alvar; Brightling, Chris; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Cesario, Alfredo; Abdelhak, Sonia; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Avignon, Antoine; Ballabio, Andrea; Baraldi, Eugenio; Baranov, Alexander; Bieber, Thomas; Bockaert, Joël; Brahmachari, Samir; Brambilla, Christian; Bringer, Jacques; Dauzat, Michel; Ernberg, Ingemar; Fabbri, Leonardo; Froguel, Philippe; Galas, David; Gojobori, Takashi; Hunter, Peter; Jorgensen, Christian; Kauffmann, Francine; Kourilsky, Philippe; Kowalski, Marek L; Lancet, Doron; Pen, Claude Le; Mallet, Jacques; Mayosi, Bongani; Mercier, Jacques; Metspalu, Andres; Nadeau, Joseph H; Ninot, Grégory; Noble, Denis; Oztürk, Mehmet; Palkonen, Susanna; Préfaut, Christian; Rabe, Klaus; Renard, Eric; Roberts, Richard G; Samolinski, Boleslav; Schünemann, Holger J; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Soares, Marcelo Bento; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Tegner, Jesper; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Wellstead, Peter; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Wouters, Emiel; Balling, Rudi; Brookes, Anthony J; Charron, Dominique; Pison, Christophe; Chen, Zhu; Hood, Leroy; Auffray, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We propose an innovative, integrated, cost-effective health system to combat major non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, chronic respiratory, metabolic, rheumatologic and neurologic disorders and cancers, which together are the predominant health problem of the 21st century. This proposed holistic strategy involves comprehensive patient-centered integrated care and multi-scale, multi-modal and multi-level systems approaches to tackle NCDs as a common group of diseases. Rather than studying each disease individually, it will take into account their intertwined gene-environment, socio-economic interactions and co-morbidities that lead to individual-specific complex phenotypes. It will implement a road map for predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine based on a robust and extensive knowledge management infrastructure that contains individual patient information. It will be supported by strategic partnerships involving all stakeholders, including general practitioners associated with patient-centered care. This systems medicine strategy, which will take a holistic approach to disease, is designed to allow the results to be used globally, taking into account the needs and specificities of local economies and health systems. PMID:21745417

  15. Management of chronic kidney disease and dialysis in homeless persons

    PubMed Central

    Podymow, Tiina; Turnbull, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis are complicated illnesses to manage in homeless persons, who often suffer medical comorbidities, psychiatric disease, cognitive impairment and addictions; descriptions of this population and management strategies are lacking. A retrospective review of dialysis patients who were homeless or unstably housed was undertaken at an urban academic Canadian center from 2001 to 2011. Electronic hospital records were analyzed for demographic, housing, medical, and psychiatric history, dialysis history, adherence to treatment, and outcomes. Two detailed cases of homeless patients with chronic kidney disease are presented. Eleven homeless dialysis patients with a mean age of 52.7±12.3 years, mostly men and mostly from minority groups were dialyzed for 41.1±29.2 months. Most resided permanently in shelters, eventually obtained fistula access, and were adherent to dialysis schedules. Patients were often nonadherent to pre-dialysis management, resulting in emergency starts. Many barriers to care for homeless persons with end-stage kidney disease and on dialysis are identified, and management strategies are highlighted. Adherence is optimized with shelter-based health care and intensive team-oriented case management. PMID:25018988

  16. Systems medicine and integrated care to combat chronic noncommunicable diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We propose an innovative, integrated, cost-effective health system to combat major non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, chronic respiratory, metabolic, rheumatologic and neurologic disorders and cancers, which together are the predominant health problem of the 21st century. This proposed holistic strategy involves comprehensive patient-centered integrated care and multi-scale, multi-modal and multi-level systems approaches to tackle NCDs as a common group of diseases. Rather than studying each disease individually, it will take into account their intertwined gene-environment, socio-economic interactions and co-morbidities that lead to individual-specific complex phenotypes. It will implement a road map for predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine based on a robust and extensive knowledge management infrastructure that contains individual patient information. It will be supported by strategic partnerships involving all stakeholders, including general practitioners associated with patient-centered care. This systems medicine strategy, which will take a holistic approach to disease, is designed to allow the results to be used globally, taking into account the needs and specificities of local economies and health systems. PMID:21745417

  17. Complexity of chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: implications for risk assessment, and disease progression and control

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2009-01-01

    Although assessment of asthma control is important to guide treatment, it is difficult since the temporal pattern and risk of exacerbations are often unpredictable. In this Review, we summarise the classic methods to assess control with unidimensional and multidimensional approaches. Next, we show how ideas from the science of complexity can explain the seemingly unpredictable nature of bronchial asthma and emphysema, with implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We show that fluctuation analysis, a method used in statistical physics, can be used to gain insight into asthma as a dynamic disease of the respiratory system, viewed as a set of interacting subsystems (eg, inflammatory, immunological, and mechanical). The basis of the fluctuation analysis methods is the quantification of the long-term temporal history of lung function parameters. We summarise how this analysis can be used to assess the risk of future asthma episodes, with implications for asthma severity and control both in children and adults. PMID:18805337

  18. Health care 2020: reengineering health care delivery to combat chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-04-01

    Chronic disease has become the great epidemic of our times, responsible for 75% of total health care costs and the majority of deaths in the US. Our current delivery model is poorly constructed to manage chronic disease, as evidenced by low adherence to quality indicators and poor control of treatable conditions. New technologies have emerged that can engage patients and offer additional modalities in the treatment of chronic disease. Modifying our delivery model to include team-based care in concert with patient-centered technologies offers great promise in managing the chronic disease epidemic. PMID:25460529

  19. Chronic Diseases, Lack of Medications, and Depression Among Syrian Refugees in Jordan, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Tawalbeh, Loai Issa; Khoury, Laurice Sami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studying mental and physical health problems in refugees facilitates providing suitable health care, thus improving their quality of life. We studied depression tendency in Syrian refugees in Jordan in the light of chronic diseases and medication availability. Also, depression prevalence and depression comorbidity with chronic diseases were identified. Methods In this multicenter cross-sectional survey, data from Syrian refugees attending Caritas centers in 6 Jordanian cities from November 2013 through June 2014 were analyzed. Participants’ demographics, depression, previously diagnosed chronic diseases, and newly diagnosed chronic diseases and the availability of medications were studied. Logistic regression was used to examine predictors for depression. Results Of 765 refugees who participated, about one-third demonstrated significant depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. Descriptive analyses showed that depression was comorbid in 35% of participants with previously diagnosed chronic diseases and in 40% of participants with newly diagnosed chronic diseases. Newly diagnosed chronic diseases and lack of medications significantly contributed to depression, but the regression model as a whole explained less than 5% of the variance. Conclusion Because the regression model showed low effect size, we concluded that newly diagnosed chronic diseases and medication shortages could not predict depression in Syrian refugees residing in Jordan. Therefore, further studies of additional factors are recommended. Prompt measures have to be taken to prevent the spread of chronic diseases and improve mental health in this fragile population. PMID:25633485

  20. Population Causes and Consequences of Leading Chronic Diseases: A Comparative Analysis of Prevailing Explanations

    PubMed Central

    Stuckler, David

    2008-01-01

    Context The mortality numbers and rates of chronic disease are rising faster in developing than in developed countries. This article compares prevailing explanations of population chronic disease trends with theoretical and empirical models of population chronic disease epidemiology and assesses some economic consequences of the growth of chronic diseases in developing countries based on the experiences of developed countries. Methods Four decades of male mortality rates of cardiovascular and chronic noncommunicable diseases were regressed on changes in and levels of country income per capita, market integration, foreign direct investment, urbanization rates, and population aging in fifty-six countries for which comparative data were available. Neoclassical economic growth models were used to estimate the effect of the mortality rates of chronic noncommunicable diseases on economic growth in high-income OECD countries. Findings Processes of economic growth, market integration, foreign direct investment, and urbanization were significant determinants of long-term changes in mortality rates of heart disease and chronic noncommunicable disease, and the observed relationships with these social and economic factors were roughly three times stronger than the relationships with the population's aging. In low-income countries, higher levels of country income per capita, population urbanization, foreign direct investment, and market integration were associated with greater mortality rates of heart disease and chronic noncommunicable disease, less increased or sometimes reduced rates in middle-income countries, and decreased rates in high-income countries. Each 10 percent increase in the working-age mortality rates of chronic noncommunicable disease decreased economic growth rates by close to a half percent. Conclusions Macrosocial and macroeconomic forces are major determinants of population rises in chronic disease mortality, and some prevailing demographic explanations, such as population aging, are incomplete on methodological, empirical, and policy grounds. Rising chronic disease mortality rates will significantly reduce economic growth in developing countries and further widen the health and economic gap between the developed and developing world. PMID:18522614

  1. Genomic imbalances in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Fasel, David A.; Levy, Brynn; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Wuttke, Matthias; Abraham, Alison G.; Kaskel, Frederick; Köttgen, Anna; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Wong, Craig S.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. There is frequent uncertainty in the identification of specific etiologies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recent studies indicate that chromosomal microarrays can identify rare genomic imbalances that can clarify the etiology of neurodevelopmental and cardiac disorders in children; however, the contribution of unsuspected genomic imbalance to the incidence of pediatric CKD is unknown. METHODS. We performed chromosomal microarrays to detect genomic imbalances in children enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study, a longitudinal prospective multiethnic observational study of North American children with mild to moderate CKD. Patients with clinically detectable syndromic disease were excluded from evaluation. We compared 419 unrelated children enrolled in CKiD to multiethnic cohorts of 21,575 children and adults that had undergone microarray genotyping for studies unrelated to CKD. RESULTS. We identified diagnostic copy number disorders in 31 children with CKD (7.4% of the cohort). We detected 10 known pathogenic genomic disorders, including the 17q12 deletion HNF1 homeobox B (HNF1B) and triple X syndromes in 19 of 419 unrelated CKiD cases as compared with 98 of 21,575 control individuals (OR 10.8, P = 6.1 × 10–20). In an additional 12 CKiD cases, we identified 12 likely pathogenic genomic imbalances that would be considered reportable in a clinical setting. These genomic imbalances were evenly distributed among patients diagnosed with congenital and noncongenital forms of CKD. In the vast majority of these cases, the genomic lesion was unsuspected based on the clinical assessment and either reclassified the disease or provided information that might have triggered additional clinical care, such as evaluation for metabolic or neuropsychiatric disease. CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of children with CKD have an unsuspected genomic imbalance, suggesting genomic disorders as a risk factor for common forms of pediatric nephropathy. Detection of pathogenic imbalances has practical implications for personalized diagnosis and health monitoring in this population. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00327860. FUNDING. This work was supported by the NIH, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. PMID:25893603

  2. Aggregated proteins in schizophrenia and other chronic mental diseases

    PubMed Central

    Korth, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Chronic mental diseases (CMD) like the schizophrenias are progressive diseases of heterogenous but poorly understood biological origin. An imbalance in proteostasis is a hallmark of dysfunctional neurons, leading to impaired clearance and abnormal deposition of protein aggregates. Thus, it can be hypothesized that unbalanced proteostasis in such neurons may also lead to protein aggregates in schizophrenia. These protein aggregates, however, would be more subtle then in the classical neurodegenerative diseases and as such have not yet been detected. The DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1) gene is considered among the most promising candidate genes for CMD having been identified as linked to CMD in a Scottish pedigree and having since been found to associate to various phenotypes of CMD. We have recently demonstrated increased insoluble DISC1 protein in the cingular cortex in approximately 20% of cases of CMD within the widely used Stanley Medical Research Institute Consortium Collection. Surprisingly, in vitro, DISC1 aggregates were cell-invasive, i.e., purified aggresomes or recombinant DISC1 fragments where internalized at an efficiency comparable to that of ?-synuclein. Intracellular DISC1 aggresomes acquired gain-of-function properties in recruiting otherwise soluble proteins such as the candidate schizophrenia protein dysbindin. Disease-associated DISC1 polymorphism S704C led to a higher oligomerization tendency of DISC1. These findings justify classification of DISC1-dependent brain disorders as protein conformational disorders which we have tentatively termed DISC1opathies. The notion of disturbed proteostasis and protein aggregation as a mechanism of mental diseases is thus emerging. The yet unidentified form of neuronal impairment in CMD is more subtle than in the classical neurodegenerative diseases without leading to massive cell death and as such present a different kind of neuronal dysfunctionality, eventually confined to highly selective CNS subpopulations. PMID:22421208

  3. Chronic Inflammatory Disease and Osteopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cicchitti, Luca; Martelli, Marta; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory diseases (CID) are globally highly prevalent and characterized by severe pathological medical conditions. Several trials were conducted aiming at measuring the effects of manipulative therapies on patients affected by CID. The purpose of this review was to explore the extent to which osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) can be benefi-cial in medical conditions also classified as CID. Methods This review included any type of experimental study which enrolled sub-jects with CID comparing OMT with any type of control procedure. The search was conducted on eight databases in January 2014 using a pragmatic literature search approach. Two independent re-viewers conducted study selection and data extraction for each study. The risk of bias was evaluated according to the Cochrane methods. Heterogeneity was assessed and meta-analysis performed where possible. Results 10 studies met the inclusion criteria for this review enrolling 386 subjects. The search identified six RCTs, one laboratory study, one cross-over pilot studies, one observation-al study and one case control pilot study. Results suggest a potential effect of osteopathic medicine on patients with medical pathologies associated with CID (in particular Chronic Obstructive Pul-monary Disease (COPD), Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Asthma and Peripheral Arterial Disease) com-pared to no treatment or sham therapy although data remain elusive. Moreover one study showed possible effects on arthritis rat model. Meta-analysis was performed for COPD studies only show-ing no effect of any type of OMT applied versus control. No major side effects were reported by those receiving OMT. Conclusion The present systematic review showed inconsistent data on the effect of OMT in the treatment of medical conditions potentially associated with CID, however the OMT appears to be a safe approach. Further more robust trials are needed to determine the direction and magnitude of the effect of OMT and to generalize favorable results. PMID:25781621

  4. National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By November 2013, a total of 125 clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in Korea. However, despite the high burden of diseases and the clinical importance of CPGs, most chronic diseases do not have available CPGs. Merely 83 CPGs are related to chronic diseases, and only 40 guidelines had been developed in the last 5 yr. Considering the rate of the production of new evidence in medicine and the worsening burden from chronic diseases, the need for developing CPGs for more chronic diseases is becoming increasingly pressing. Since 2011, the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been jointly developing CPGs for chronic diseases. However, priorities have to be set and resources need to be allocated within the constraint of a limited funding. This study identifies the chronic diseases that should be prioritized for the development of CPGs in Korea. Through an objective assessment by using the analytic hierarchy process and a subjective assessment with a survey of expert opinion, high priorities were placed on ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, osteoarthritis, neck pain, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis of the liver. PMID:26713047

  5. Association Between Chronic Kidney Disease Progression and Cardiovascular Disease: Results from the CRIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahboob; Xie, Dawei; Feldman, Harold I; Go, Alan S.; He, Jiang; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James; Miller, Edgar; Ojo, Akinlolo; Qiang, Pan; Seliger, Stephen; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims There is limited information on the risk of progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among individuals with CVD (cardiovascular disease). We studied the association between prevalent CVD and risk of progression of CKD among persons enrolled in a long-term observational study. Methods A prospective cohort study of 3939 women and men with CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study between June 2003 and June 2008. Prevalent cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction/revascularization, heart failure, stroke and peripheral vascular disease) was determined by self-report at baseline. The primary outcome was a composite of either end-stage renal disease or a 50% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from baseline. Results One-third (1316 of 3939, 33.4%) of the study participants reported a history of any cardiovascular disease, and 9.6% (n=382) a history of heart failure at baseline. After a median follow up of 6.63 years, 1028 patients experienced the primary outcome. The composite of any CVD at baseline was not independently associated with the primary outcome (Hazard Ratio 1.04 95% CI (0.91, 1.19)). However, a history of heart failure was independently associated with a 29% higher risk of the primary outcome (Hazard Ratio 1.29 95% CI (1.06, 1.57)). The relationship between heart failure and risk of CKD progression was consistent in subgroups defined by age, race, gender, baseline eGFR and diabetes. Neither the composite measure of any CVD or heart failure was associated with rate of decline in eGFR. Conclusions Self-reported heart failure was an independent risk factor for the development of the endpoint of ESRD or 50% decline in GFR in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:25401485

  6. The dormant blood microbiome in chronic, inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, Marnie; Bester, Janette; Kell, Douglas B.; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-01-01

    Blood in healthy organisms is seen as a ‘sterile’ environment: it lacks proliferating microbes. Dormant or not-immediately-culturable forms are not absent, however, as intracellular dormancy is well established. We highlight here that a great many pathogens can survive in blood and inside erythrocytes. ‘Non-culturability’, reflected by discrepancies between plate counts and total counts, is commonplace in environmental microbiology. It is overcome by improved culturing methods, and we asked how common this would be in blood. A number of recent, sequence-based and ultramicroscopic studies have uncovered an authentic blood microbiome in a number of non-communicable diseases. The chief origin of these microbes is the gut microbiome (especially when it shifts composition to a pathogenic state, known as ‘dysbiosis’). Another source is microbes translocated from the oral cavity. ‘Dysbiosis’ is also used to describe translocation of cells into blood or other tissues. To avoid ambiguity, we here use the term ‘atopobiosis’ for microbes that appear in places other than their normal location. Atopobiosis may contribute to the dynamics of a variety of inflammatory diseases. Overall, it seems that many more chronic, non-communicable, inflammatory diseases may have a microbial component than are presently considered, and may be treatable using bactericidal antibiotics or vaccines. PMID:25940667

  7. Vitamin D and immune function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Chih; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Lu, Chien-Lin; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2015-10-23

    The common causes of death in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are cardiovascular events and infectious disease. These patients are also predisposed to the development of vitamin D deficiency, which leads to an increased risk of immune dysfunction. Many extra-renal cells possess the capability to produce local active 1,25(OH)2D in an intracrine or paracrine fashion, even without kidney function. Vitamin D affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In innate immunity, vitamin D promotes production of cathelicidin and ?-defensin 2 and enhances the capacity for autophagy via toll-like receptor activation as well as affects complement concentrations. In adaptive immunity, vitamin D suppresses the maturation of dendritic cells and weakens antigen presentation. Vitamin D also increases T helper (Th) 2 cytokine production and the efficiency of Treg lymphocytes but suppresses the secretion of Th1 and Th17 cytokines. In addition, vitamin D can decrease autoimmune disease activity. Vitamin D has been shown to play an important role in maintaining normal immune function and crosstalk between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Vitamin D deficiency may also contribute to deterioration of immune function and infectious disorders in CKD patients. However, it needs more evidence to support the requirements for vitamin D supplementation. PMID:26291576

  8. Can eHealth Reduce Medical Expenditures of Chronic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Masatsugu; Taher, Sheikh Abu; Kinai, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate empirically the effectiveness of eHealth in Nishi-aizu Town, Fukushima Prefecture, based on a mail survey to the residents and their receipt data of National Health Insurance from November 2006 to February 2007. The residents were divided into two groups, users and non-users, and sent questionnaires to ask their characteristics or usage of the system. Their medical expenditures paid by National Health Insurance for five years from 2002 to 2006 are examined. The effects were analyzed by comparison of medical expenditures between users and non-users. The interests are focused on four chronic diseases namely heart diseases, high blood pressure, diabetes, and strokes. A regression analysis is employed to estimate the effect of eHealth to users who have these diseases and then calculate the monetary effect of eHealth on reduction of medical expenditures. The results are expected to be valid for establishment of evidence-based policy such as reimbursement from medical insurance to eHealth. PMID:25991143

  9. Current issues in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Roche, N; Huchon, G J

    1997-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among smokers. Many guidelines that have recently been issued emphasize that COPD is not inaccessible to therapeutic measures: although few interventions are capable of affecting its natural history (i.e. smoking cessation and, in patients with severe resting hypoxaemia, oxygen therapy), several others have a demonstrated effect on symptoms and, thereby, quality of life. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids, and alpha 1-antitrypsin replacement therapy in emphysema due to alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency are currently being studied. When there is a marked increase in mucus production, chest physiotherapy using controlled expiration and directed cough may be useful. Inhaled bronchodilators are frequently effective on dyspnoea, anticholinergic agents being more suitable for continuous symptoms. Rehabilitation, which includes education and psychosocial care, chest physiotherapy, nutritional care and exercise training, also improves quality of life. When there is persistent severe alveolar hypoventilation despite oxygen therapy, long-term mechanical ventilation may be considered. Surgical options in the treatment of emphysema include resection of giant bullae and lung volume reduction surgery. Lung transplantation should be proposed only in patients with end-stage disease, the difficulty here being to define what 'end-stage' means. Finally, all preventive and some therapeutic interventions are likely to be more effective early in the course of the disease. Thus, efforts should be made to detect airways obstruction early in subjects at risk, such as smokers. PMID:9400684

  10. Biomarkers of progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Annalicia; Dent, Annette G.; O’Hare, Phoebe E.; Goh, Felicia; Bowman, Rayleen V.; Fong, Kwun M.; Yang, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is variable, with some patients having a relatively stable course, while others suffer relentless progression leading to severe breathlessness, frequent acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), respiratory failure and death. Radiological markers such as CT emphysema index, bronchiectasis and coronary artery calcification (CAC) have been linked with increased mortality in COPD patients. Molecular changes in lung tissue reflect alterations in lung pathology that occur with disease progression; however, lung tissue is not routinely accessible. Cell counts (including neutrophils) and mediators in induced sputum have been associated with lung function and risk of exacerbations. Examples of peripheral blood biological markers (biomarkers) include those associated with lung function (reduced CC-16), emphysema severity (increased adiponectin, reduced sRAGE), exacerbations and mortality [increased CRP, fibrinogen, leukocyte count, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?)] including increased YKL-40 with mortality. Emerging approaches to discovering markers of gene-environment interaction include exhaled breath analysis [volatile organic compounds (VOCs), exhaled breath condensate], cellular and systemic responses to exposure to air pollution, alterations in the lung microbiome, and biomarkers of lung ageing such as telomere length shortening and reduced levels of sirtuins. Overcoming methodological challenges in sampling and quality control will enable more robust yet easily accessible biomarkers to be developed and qualified, in order to optimise personalised medicine in patients with COPD. PMID:25478195

  11. FUMEPOC: Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Currently is not feasible using conventional spirometry as a screening method in Primary Care especially among smoking population to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in early stages. Therefore, the FUMEPOC study protocol intends to analyze the validity and reliability of Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer as simpler tool to aid screening and diagnosis of this disease in early stages in primary care surgery. Methods / Design Study design: An observational, descriptive study of diagnostic tests, undertaken in Primary Care and Pneumology Outpatient Care Centre at San Juan Hospital and Elda Hospital. All smokers attending the primary care surgery and consent to participate in the study will undergo a test with Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer. Subsequently, a conventional spirometry will be performed in the hospital and the results will be compared with those of the Vitalograph COPD-6 test. Discussion It is difficult to use the spirometry as screening for early diagnose test in real conditions of primary care clinical practice. The use of a simpler tool, Vitalograph COPD-6 spirometer, can help in the early diagnose and therefore, it could improve the clinical management of the disease. PMID:21627787

  12. [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G

    2014-12-01

    One out of two smokers who smoke throughout their lifetime will die from a disease related to smoking. Tobacco smoking therefore represents a major global public health issue. Smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Projections for 2020 indicate that by then, COPD will have become the third cause of death and the fifth cause of disability worldwide. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing COPD and is an essential treatment for this inflammatory disease. Smoking cessation decreases the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, number of hospitalizations, and decline in FEV1, as well as exacerbation frequency and overall mortality. Among the patients, 38-77% with COPD are smokers. Their daily cigarette consumption and level of nicotine dependence are often high. The combination of high intensity behavioral interventions and medication treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, bupropion) is the most effective strategy for smokers with COPD. In contrast, behavioral interventions without medication are not more effective than simple advice to stop. Two factors seem to predict the success of the attempt to quit in smokers with COPD: a strong motivation to quit and the use of smoking cessation medications. PMID:25496790

  13. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  14. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  15. Early life obesity and chronic kidney disease in later life.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has increased considerably with a parallel rise in the prevalence of obesity. It is now recognized that early life nutrition has life-long effects on the susceptibility of an individual to develop obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and CKD. The kidney can be programmed by a number of intrauterine and neonatal insults. Low birth weight (LBW) is one of the most identifiable markers of a suboptimal prenatal environment, and the important intrarenal factors sensitive to programming events include decreased nephron number and altered control of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). LBW complicated by accelerated catch-up growth is associated with an increased risk of obesity, hypertension and CKD in later life. High birth weight and exposure to maternal diabetes or obesity can enhance the risk for developing CKD in later life. Rapid postnatal growth per se may also contribute to the subsequent development of obesity and CKD regardless of birth weight and prenatal nutrition. Although the mechanisms of renal risks due to early life nutritional programming remain largely unknown, experimental and clinical studies suggest the burdening role of early life obesity in longstanding cardiovascular and renal diseases. PMID:25145270

  16. Risk of sudden cardiac death in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Banerjee, Debasish; Malik, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The review discusses the epidemiology and the possible underlying mechanisms of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and highlights the unmet clinical need for noninvasive risk stratification strategies in these patients. Although renal dysfunction shares common risk factors and often coexists with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, the presence of renal impairment increases the risk of arrhythmic complications to an extent that cannot be explained by the severity of the atherosclerotic process. Renal impairment is an independent risk factor for SCD from the early stages of CKD; the risk increases as renal function declines and reaches very high levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. Autonomic imbalance, uremic cardiomyopathy, and electrolyte disturbances likely play a role in increasing the arrhythmic risk and can be potential targets for treatment. Cardioverter defibrillator treatment could be offered as lifesaving treatment in selected patients, although selection strategies for this treatment mode are presently problematic in dialyzed patients. The review also examines the current experience with risk stratification tools in renal patients and suggests that noninvasive electrophysiological testing during dialysis may be of clinical value as it provides the necessary standardized environment for reproducible measurements for risk stratification purposes. PMID:24256575

  17. Sclerostin, Osteocytes, and Chronic Kidney Disease - Mineral Bone Disorder.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Rosa M A; Schiavi, Susan C

    2015-11-01

    Osteocytes respond to kidney damage by increasing production of secreted factors important to bone and mineral metabolism. These circulating proteins include the antianabolic factor, sclerostin, and the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Elevated sclerostin levels correlate with increased FGF23, localized reduction in Wnt/?-catenin signaling in the skeleton and reduced osteoblast differentiation/activity. Decreased Wnt/?-catenin signaling occurs regardless of the overall changes in bone formation rates, suggesting that a reduction in the anabolic response may be a common feature of renal bone disorders but additional mechanisms may contribute to the diversity of osteodystrophy phenotypes. Recent preclinical studies support this hypothesis, as treatment with antisclerostin antibodies improved bone quality in the context of low but not high turnover renal osteodystrophy. Sclerostin also appears in the circulation suggesting additional roles outside the skeleton in normal and disease states. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), serum levels are elevated several fold relative to healthy individuals. Emerging data suggest that these changes are associated with increased fracture rates but the relationship between sclerostin and cardiovascular disease is unclear. Additional epidemiologic studies that examine stage specific and patient sub-populations are needed to assess whether sclerostin elevations influence comorbidities associated with CKD. PMID:26288182

  18. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens.

  19. [Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and biofilm].

    PubMed

    Legnani, Delfino

    2009-07-01

    The lower respiratory tract of patients affected by COPD is constantly colonized by pathogenic microrganisms such as H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae. Role of bacterial colonization of big and small airways in patients affected by COPD is still unclear but it is likely to play a role in directly or indirectly maintaining the vicious circle of infection/inflammation. Colonizer pathogens are capable to stimulate mucus production, to alter the ciliary function by inducing dyskinesia and stasis; in addition, they represent a strong stimulus for neutrophils to come in the airways, which release elastase that, in turn, inhibit the mucus-ciliary function. The same pathogens are responsible for epithelial damage and chronic inflammation, by releasing neutrophilic elastase, leading to the damage progression and obstruction. Recent studies have also shown that infection sustained by H. influenzae is not limited to bronchial mucosa, i.e. surface epithelial cells, but that the pathogen is capable to penetrate cells, so spreading the infection in sub-epithelial cellular layers. In addition, the ability to produce biofilm is another possible defence mechanism which allows them to grow and colonise. Such a mechanism could in part explain the lack of response to antimicrobials and contribute to stimulation of parenchymal inflammatory response, the cause of pathological-anatomic damage which occurs in COPD. The impossibility to eradicate chronic infection and bacterial exacerbations of COPD are likely the elements that promt and worsen obstruction, so determining the disease's progression. PMID:19696555

  20. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including ?2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article. PMID:26491494

  1. Smart garments in chronic disease management: progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Ajit

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the progress made developments in the area of Smart Garments for chronic disease management over last 10 years. A large number of health monitoring smart garments and wearable sensors have been manufactured to monitor patient's physiological parameters such as electrocardiogram, blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation, while patient is not in hospital. In last few years with the advancement in smartphones and cloud computing it is now possible to send the measure physiological data to any desired location. However there are many challenges in the development of smart garment systems. The two major challenges are development of new lightweight power sources and there is a need for global standardization and a road map for development of smart garments. In this paper we will discuss current state-of-theart smart garments and wearable sensor systems. Also discussed will be the new emerging trends in smart garment research and development.

  2. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including ?2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article. PMID:26491494

  3. Inhaled corticosteroids and pneumonia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Finney, Lydia; Berry, Matthew; Singanayagam, Aran; Elkin, Sarah L; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are widely used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and, in combination with long-acting ?2 agonists, reduce exacerbations and improve lung function and quality of life. However, inhaled corticosteroids have been linked with an increased risk of pneumonia in individuals with COPD, but the magnitude of this risk, the effects of different preparations and doses, and the mechanisms of this effect remain unclear. Therefore, making informed clinical decisions--balancing the beneficial and adverse effects of inhaled corticosteroids in individuals with COPD--is difficult. Understanding of the mechanisms of increased pneumonia risk with inhaled corticosteroids is urgently needed to clarify their role in the management of COPD and to aid the development of new, safer therapies. PMID:25240963

  4. Prophylactic vaccinations in chronic kidney disease: Current status.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, recent data on results concerning prophylactic vaccinations against hepatitis B virus, influenza viruses, and pneumococci are presented. Effects of active immunization in chronic kidney disease depend on category of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The lower GFR category the better results of response to vaccination. Abnormalities in toll-like receptors and down-regulation of B-cell activating factor receptor in transitional B cells were recently included into uremia-associated deficits in immunocompetence. Development of novel, more potent vaccines containing toll-like receptor agonists as adjuvants may help to achieve more effective immunization against hepatitis B virus in immunocompromised patients. Experimental studies announce further vaccine adjuvants. A vaccine against hepatitis C virus is not available yet, but promising results were already obtained in the experimental and preliminary clinical studies. Prophylactic vaccinations against influenza viruses and pneumococci become increasingly popular in dialysis facilities due to their proved benefits. PMID:25911956

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs of Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Brett; Wallington, Sherrie; Jillson, Irene A.; Trandafili, Holta; Shetty, Kirti; Wang, Judy; Loffredo, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and barriers to care among patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Methods Three separate, one-time-only, 60-minutes focus group sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an editing style of analysis. Results In total, 13 focus group participants provided 254 discrete comments. Emerging themes included: negative lifestyles/behaviors, lack of CLD knowledge, negative attitudes/emotions, stigma and negativity, health insurance, inaccessible/high cost medical care, drug/alcohol abuse, and discriminately sharing CLD diagnoses. Conclusions Participants felt lack of CLD knowledge was a key factor in how patients perceived prevention, risks, causes, and treatment. These findings contribute to the important, yet limited, base of knowledge about CLD and provide a benchmark for future, more extensive studies and interventions. PMID:24933143

  6. Emerging effects of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ikee, Ryota; Tsunoda, Masataka; Sasaki, Naomi; Sato, Naritsugu; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    Sevelamer, a non-absorbable anion exchange resin, is used to control hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) by binding to dietary phosphate in the gastrointestinal tract. Lipid-lowering effect is a widely recognized pleiotropic effect of sevelamer. In addition, many studies have reported that sevelamer leads to reduced vascular calcification compared with calcium-containing phosphate binders, which is attributed to the improved lipid profiles and decreased calcium load. In addition, recent studies have suggested novel pleiotropic effects on bone structure, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, fetuin-A, and trace element metabolism in CKD patients. All of these effects have the potential to suppress the development/progression of cardiovascular lesions and reduce mortality. This review summarizes novel findings from recent studies and discusses the potential pleiotropic effects of sevelamer on non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors in CKD patients. PMID:23486088

  7. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian. PMID:24070587

  8. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Simon E; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2014-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to manage the respiratory failure suffered by many patients during this high-risk period. This review article examines the evidence underlying supplemental oxygen therapy during exacerbations of COPD. We first discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of respiratory failure in COPD during exacerbations. The rationale and evidence underlying oxygen therapy, including the risks when administered inappropriately, are then discussed, along with further strategies for ventilatory support. We also review current recommendations for best practice, including methods for improving oxygen provision in the future. PMID:25404854

  9. Chronic kidney disease and bone fracture: a growing concern.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Leonard, Mary B; Shane, Elizabeth

    2008-09-01

    Susceptibility to fracture is increased across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Moreover, fracture in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) results in significant excess mortality. The incidence and prevalence of CKD and ESKD are predicted to increase markedly over the coming decades in conjunction with the aging of the population. Given the high prevalence of both osteoporosis and CKD in older adults, it is of the utmost public health relevance to be able to assess fracture risk in this population. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which provides an areal measurement of bone mineral density (aBMD), is the clinical standard to predict fracture in individuals with postmenopausal or age-related osteoporosis. Unfortunately, DXA does not discriminate fracture status in patients with ESKD. This may be, in part, because excess parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion may accompany declining kidney function. Chronic exposure to high PTH levels preferentially causes cortical bone loss, which may be partially offset by periosteal expansion. DXA can neither reliably detect changes in bone volume nor distinguish between trabecular and cortical bone. In addition, DXA measurements may be low, normal, or high in each of the major forms of renal osteodystrophy (ROD). Moreover, postmenopausal or age-related osteoporosis may also affect patients with CKD and ESKD. Currently, transiliac crest bone biopsy is the gold standard to diagnose ROD and osteoporosis in patients with significant kidney dysfunction. However, bone biopsy is an invasive procedure that requires time-consuming analyses. Therefore, there is great interest in developing non-invasive high-resolution imaging techniques that can improve fracture risk prediction for patients with CKD. In this paper, we review studies of fracture risk in the setting of ESKD and CKD, the pathophysiology of increased fracture risk in patients with kidney dysfunction, the utility of various imaging modalities in predicting fracture across the spectrum of CKD, and studies evaluating the use of bisphosphonates in patients with CKD. PMID:18563052

  10. A review of halotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashleigh, Rachael; Smith, Sheree MS; Roberts, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive disease and is treated with inhaled medication to optimize the patient’s lung health through decreasing their symptoms, especially breathlessness. Halotherapy is the inhalation of micronized dry salt within a chamber that mimics a salt cave environment. Recent media reports suggest that this therapy may help with the symptoms of COPD. Objective To critically evaluate and summarize the evidence for the use of halotherapy as a treatment for COPD. Design A review using systematic approach and narrative synthesis. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed abstracts and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Results Of the 151 articles retrieved from databases and relevant reference lists, only one randomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was unable to be conducted due to the limited number of published studies. Inclusion criteria were subsequently expanded to allow three case-control studies to be included, ensuring that a narrative synthesis could be completed. From the pooled data of the four studies, there were 1,041 participants (661 in the intervention group and 380 in the control group). The assessment of methodological quality raised issues associated with randomization and patient selection. Three themes were identified from the narrative synthesis: respiratory function, quality of life, and medication use. Conclusion Themes generated from the narrative synthesis data reflect outcome measures regularly used for interventional research associated with COPD. From this review, recommendations for inclusion of halotherapy as a therapy for COPD cannot be made at this point and there is a need for high quality studies to determine the effectiveness of this therapy. PMID:24591823

  11. Intestinal parasitic infection among Egyptian children with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Lerine Bahy El-Dine; El-Faramawy, Amel Abdel Magid; El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Ismail, Khadiga Ahmed; Fouad, Sally Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) are often highly susceptible to parasitic infection due to a depressed immune system. The objective of this study was to detect the most commonly intestinal parasites found among Egyptian children with CLD. The present study was conducted on 50 children with CLD of different etiology (25 were having different intestinal symptoms, 25 without intestinal symptoms) and 50 non-CLD children with gastrointestinal complaints served as controls. All cases were subjected to stool examination and investigated by liver function tests. Also, anthropometric measurements were taken for all children including weight and height. It was found that the most commonly intestinal protozoa identified in the patients with CLD in order of frequency were: Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (16 %), Giardia lamblia (14 %), Blastocystis hominis (14 %), Cryptosporidium parvum (10 %), E. histolytica and G. lamblia (2 %), E. histolytica and B. hominis (2 %), G. lamblia and B. hominis (2 %), B. hominis and Entamoeba coli (2 %), Microsporidium (2 %) and no cases were found infected with Strongyloides stercoralis. As compared to the controls, the observed incidence of these organisms in CLD patients was significantly higher (p < 0.045) as regards stool examination by unstained techniques while, there was no significant difference between both groups as regards stool examination by stained techniques (p < 0.478). In addition, this study showed that the weight and height of studied patients were affected by parasitic infection while, there was no significant correlation between parasitic infection and liver function tests. In conclusion, chronic liver diseases affect the immunity of the patients as shown in significant increase in the incidence of intestinal parasites in cases compared to controls. PMID:25698851

  12. Paricalcitol and endothelial function in chronic kidney disease trial.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Carmine; Curatola, Giuseppe; Panuccio, Vincenzo; Tripepi, Rocco; Pizzini, Patrizia; Versace, Marica; Bolignano, Davide; Cutrupi, Sebastiano; Politi, Raffaele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thadhani, Ravi; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    Altered vitamin D metabolism and low levels of the active form of this vitamin, 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D, is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but there is still no randomized controlled trial testing the effect of active forms of vitamin D on vascular function in patients with CKD. Paricalcitol and ENdothelial fuNction in chronic kidneY disease (PENNY) is a double-blinded randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01680198) testing the effect of an active form of vitamin D, paricalcitol (2 ?g/d×12 weeks) on endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation in 88 patients with stage 3 to 4 CKD and parathormone >65 pg/mL (paricalcitol, n=44; placebo, n=44). Paricalcitol treatment reduced parathormone (-75 pg/mL; 95% confidence interval, -90 to -60), whereas parathormone showed a small rise during placebo (21 pg/mL; 95% confidence interval, 5-36). Blood pressure did not change in both study arms. Baseline flow-mediated dilation was identical in patients on paricalcitol (3.6±2.9%) and placebo (3.6±2.9%) groups. After 12 weeks of treatment, flow-mediated dilation rose in the paricalcitol but not in the placebo group, and the between-group difference in flow-mediated dilation changes (the primary end point, 1.8%; 95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.1%) was significant (P=0.016), and the mean proportional change in flow-mediated dilation was 61% higher in paricalcitol-treated patients than in placebo-treated patients. Such an effect was abolished 2 weeks after stopping the treatment. No effect of paricalcitol on endothelium-independent vasodilatation was registered. Paricalcitol improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in patients with stage 3 to 4 CKD. Findings in this study support the hypothesis that vitamin D may exert favorable effects on the cardiovascular system in patients with CKD. PMID:25259743

  13. Exercise in chronic pulmonary disease: aerobic exercise prescription.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C B

    2001-07-01

    Endurance exercise training (EXT) is singly the most important aspect of rehabilitation for patients with chronic pulmonary disease. When effective, this modality of physical reconditioning leads to improved functional exercise capacity and reduced breathlessness. Early implementation is desirable to obtain more meaningful responses (e.g., when FEV1 falls below 50% of the predicted value in patients with chronic obstructive disease). Preparation for effective EXT requires optimization of respiratory system mechanics (e.g., using bronchodilator therapy), prevention of gas exchange failure (i.e., using supplemental oxygen), nutritional guidance, and psychological support (e.g., to overcome stigmata of disability, fear, and inclination to panic). EXT should be applied using a rigorous, scientifically based aerobic exercise prescription (AXRx) that recognizes basic principles of the human response to exercise prescription while considering individual pathophysiological limitations and identifying safety thresholds for exercise participation. The mode of aerobic exercise should use large muscle groups of the legs (e.g., treadmill or cycle ergometer). The recommended duration is an accumulation of 30 min of exercise per session at the target intensity, achieved by continuous or interval training. EXT should be supervised with a recommended frequency of at least three times per week for 6--8 wk. Target exercise intensity can be monitored by oxygen uptake, work rate, heart rate, or perceived exertion. Target intensity can be determined initially on the basis of 40% of a reference value for maximum oxygen uptake and linked to other variables through predictable interrelationships. All aspects of the AXRx must be reviewed with regard to progression during training. Pulmonary rehabilitation must recognize the importance of achieving clinically meaningful responses (e.g., increased 6-min walking distance of 54 m) as well as the need for maintenance exercise program to sustain the benefits. PMID:11462076

  14. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sansores, Raúl H; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Pérez-Bautista, Oliver; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians do not routinely recommend smokers to undergo spirometry unless they are symptomatic. Objective To test the hypothesis that there are a significant number of asymptomatic smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we estimated the prevalence of COPD in a group of asymptomatic smokers. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and sixty-one smokers with a cumulative consumption history of at least 10 pack-years, either smokers with symptoms or smokers without symptoms (WOS) were invited to perform a spirometry and complete a symptom questionnaire. Results Six hundred and thirty-seven (21.5%) smokers had no symptoms, whereas 2,324 (78.5%) had at least one symptom. The prevalence of COPD in subjects WOS was 1.5% when considering the whole group of smokers (45/2,961) and 7% when considering only the group WOS (45/637). From 329 smokers with COPD, 13.7% were WOS. Subjects WOS were younger, had better lung function and lower cumulative consumption of cigarettes, estimated as both cigarettes per day and pack-years. According to severity of airflow limitation, 69% vs 87% of subjects were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I–II in the WOS and smokers with symptoms groups, respectively (P<0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (mL) was the only predictive factor for COPD in asymptomatic smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of COPD in asymptomatic smokers is 1.5%. This number of asymptomatic smokers may be excluded from the benefit of an “early” intervention, not just pharmacological but also from smoking cessation counseling. The higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second may contribute to prevent early diagnosis. PMID:26586941

  15. Variability of Spirometry in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Herpel, Laura B.; Kanner, Richard E.; Lee, Shing M.; Fessler, Henry E.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Connett, John E.; Wise, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Our goal is to determine short-term intraindividual biologic and measurement variability in spirometry of patients with a wide range of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity, using datasets from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the Lung Health Study (LHS). This may be applied to determine criteria that can be used to assess a clinically meaningful change in spirometry. Methods: A total of 5,886 participants from the LHS and 1,215 participants from the NETT performed prebronchodilator spirometry during two baseline sessions. We analyzed varying criteria for absolute and percent change of FEV1 and FVC to determine which criterion was met by 90% of the participants. Results: The mean ± SD FEV1 for the initial session was 2.64 ± 0.60 L (75.1 ± 8.8% predicted) for the LHS and 0.68 ± 0.22 L (23.7 ± 6.5% predicted) for the NETT. The mean ± SD number of days between test sessions was 24.9 ± 17.1 for the LHS and 85.7 ± 21.7 for the NETT. As the degree of obstruction increased, the intersession percent difference of FEV1 increased. However, the absolute difference between tests remained relatively constant despite the severity of obstruction (0.106 ± 0.10 L). Over 90% of participants had an intersession FEV1 difference of less than 225 ml irrespective of the severity of obstruction. Conclusions: Absolute changes in FEV1 rather than percent change should be used to determine whether patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have improved or worsened between test sessions. PMID:16497996

  16. Use of chronic disease management programs for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, David J.T.; Sargious, Peter; Lewanczuk, Richard; McBrien, Kerry; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the types of chronic disease management (CDM) programs offered for patients with diabetes in Alberta's primary care networks (PCNs). Design A survey was administered to PCNs to determine the types of CDM programs offered for patients with diabetes; CDM programs were organized into categories by their resource intensity and effectiveness. Results of the survey were reported using frequencies and percentages. Setting Alberta has recently created PCNs—groups of family physicians who receive additional funds to enable them to support activities that fall outside the typical physician-based fee-for-service model, but which address specified objectives including CDM. It is currently unknown what additional programs are being provided through the PCN supplemental funding. Participants A survey was administered to the individual responsible for CDM in each PCN. This included executive directors, chronic disease managers, and CDM nurses. Main outcome measures We determined the CDM strategies used in each PCN to care for patients with diabetes, whether they were available to all patients, and whether the services were provided exclusively by the PCN or in conjunction with other agencies. Results There was considerable variation across PCNs with respect to the CDM programs offered for people with diabetes. Nearly all PCNs used multidisciplinary teams (which could include nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists) and patient education. Fewer than half of the PCNs permitted personnel other than the primary physician to write or alter prescriptions for medications. Conclusion Alberta's PCNs have successfully established many different types of CDM programs. Multidisciplinary care teams, which are among the most effective CDM strategies, are currently being used by most of Alberta's PCNs. PMID:23418263

  17. Passage of chronic wasting disease prion into transgenic mice expressing Rocky Mountain elk

    E-print Network

    Passage of chronic wasting disease prion into transgenic mice expressing Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus). Subsequently, the disease was diagnosed in black-tailed deer, Rocky Mountain elk (Williams & Young, 1982, 1992

  18. Evaluation of urinary biomarkers for azotaemic chronic kidney disease in cats

    E-print Network

    Williams, Tim L.; Archer, Joy

    2015-01-01

    defined as healthy non-azotaemic (n=40) if they had serum creatinine concentration disease, or as having azotaemic chronic kidney disease (n=12) if they had serum creatinine concentration >153 µmol/L with urine...

  19. Highly Efficient Amplification of Chronic Wasting Disease Agent by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification with

    E-print Network

    neurodegenerative diseases and include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, and chronic@wisc.edu Introduction Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are a class of rare progressive

  20. Obesity as a Risk and Severity Factor in Rheumatic Diseases (Autoimmune Chronic Inflammatory Diseases)

    PubMed Central

    Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue (AT) as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low-grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the AT on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25426122

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Aberrations and Pathophysiological Implications in Hematopoietic Diseases, Chronic Inflammatory Diseases, and Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Ran; Won, Stephanie Jane; Fabian, Claire; Kang, Min-Gu; Szardenings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are important intracellular organelles that produce energy for cellular development, differentiation, and growth. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a 10- to 20-fold higher susceptibility to genetic mutations owing to the lack of introns and histone proteins. The mtDNA repair system is relatively inefficient, rendering it vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during ATP synthesis within the mitochondria, which can then target the mtDNA. Under conditions of chronic inflammation and excess stress, increased ROS production can overwhelm the antioxidant system, resulting in mtDNA damage. This paper reviews recent literature describing the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and mitochondrial genome aberrations in aging hematopoietic stem cells, bone marrow failure syndromes, hematological malignancies, solid organ cancers, chronic inflammatory diseases, and other diseases caused by exposure to environmental hazards. PMID:25553274

  2. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    PubMed

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, p<0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for traditional, but not novel, AVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25791240

  3. Plasma Osteopontin Level in Chronic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Shawky Abdelhamid; Mohamed, Nagwa Abdel Ghaffar; Fawzy, Mary Wadie; Moustafa, Doaa Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein and is frequently associated with various tumors. Objectives We sought to investigate the clinical usefulness of the level of plasma OPN, compared to ?-fetoprotein (AFP), as a biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to evaluate its diagnostic value in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its relationship with clinical and laboratory features of HCC and NAFLD. Patients and Methods The study was performed on 120 subjects classified into 5 groups: Group I included 25 chronic non-cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients; Group II encompassed 25 patients with chronic HCV infection with liver cirrhosis; Group III comprised 25 patients with chronic HCV with liver cirrhosis and HCC; Group IV was comprised of 25 patients with NAFLD; and Group V consisted of 20 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. All the participants were subjected to history taking and clinical and abdominal ultrasonographic examinations as well as the following laboratory investigations: liver function tests, complete blood count, blood sugar, hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis C virus antibodies, HCV-RNA by qualitative polymerase chain reaction (for Groups I, II, and III) and serum AFP and plasma OPN levels. Results There were statistically significant differences in plasma OPN levels between the HCC group (401 ± 72 ng/mL) and the other groups, between the cirrhotic group (258.3 ± 35 ng/mL) and the non-cirrhotic group (HCV group, 168.7 ± 41 ng/mL; fatty liver group, 106.7 ± 35 ng/mL), and between the chronic non-cirrhotic HCV group and the fatty liver group (I and IV) and the controls (35.1 ± 6 ng/mL). In the HCC group, the diagnostic value of OPN was comparable to that of AFP at a cutoff value of 280 ng/mL, achieving sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of 100%, 98%, and 96%, respectively. Regarding the validity of plasma OPN as a predictor of fatty change, our results revealed a diagnostic accuracy of 50% with 70% sensitivity, 45% specificity, 50% positive predictive value, and 75% negative predictive value at a cutoff value of 134 ng/mL. Conclusions Plasma OPN is comparable to AFP as a diagnostic marker and is related to the severity of liver involvement in HCC patients. Plasma OPN is of diagnostic potential value in NAFLD. PMID:26500684

  4. Chronic wasting disease risk analysis workshop: an integrative approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Shana; Dein, Joshua; Salman, Mo; Richards, Bryan; Duarte, Paulo

    2004-01-01

    Risk analysis tools have been successfully used to determine the potential hazard associated with disease introductions and have facilitated management decisions designed to limit the potential for disease introduction. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) poses significant challenges for resource managers due to an incomplete understanding of disease etiology and epidemiology and the complexity of management and political jurisdictions. Tools designed specifically to assess the risk of CWD introduction would be of great value to policy makers in areas where CWD has not been detected. To this end, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) created a steering committee representing states, native communities, federal, academic, and non-government entities. This committee formulated a collaborative process for the development of CWD risk assessment tools applicable to both free-ranging and captive populations. The committee recommended a workshop be held on the topic and suggested the format, content, and potential participants. Identified objectives of the workshop included: 1. Identify and discuss the needs of various government and non-government groups involved with assessing, managing, and/or preventing CWD. 2. Identify current gaps in CWD research specifically in relation to information applicable to the risk analysis process. 3. Construct a general, consensual, framework model (Figure 1) that incorporates all factors identified as potentially associated with the presence or absence of CWD (Table 1). The resulting CWD Risk Analysis Workshop was held May 11i??13, 2004 in Fort Collins, Colorado. The workshop was attended by 28 individuals representing a cross-section of management, research, and nongovernment organizations. Experts with experience in a variety of risk analysis approaches and representatives from public and private user groups presented in the plenary session. The remainder of the workshop consisted of facilitated breakout sessions and all-group discussions. The framework model (Figure 1) reflects the workshop discussions and subsequent review and comments from workshop participants and steering committee members.

  5. Altered Antibody Profiles against Common Infectious Agents in Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Ching, Kathryn H.; Morse, Caryn G.; Alevizos, Ilias; Bayat, Ahmad; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Ali, Mir A.; Kapoor, Amit; Browne, Sarah K.; Holland, Steven M.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Iadarola, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the important diagnostic value of evaluating antibody responses to individual human pathogens, antibody profiles against multiple infectious agents have not been used to explore health and disease mainly for technical reasons.  We hypothesized that the interplay between infection and chronic disease might be revealed by profiling antibodies against multiple agents. Here, the levels of antibodies against a panel of 13 common infectious agents were evaluated with the quantitative Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS) in patients from three disease cohorts including those with pathogenic anti-interferon-? autoantibodies (IFN-? AAB), HIV and Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) to determine if their antibody profiles differed from control subjects.  The IFN-? AAB patients compared to controls demonstrated statistically higher levels of antibodies against VZV (p=0.0003), EBV (p=0.002), CMV (p=0.003), and C. albicans (p=0.03), but lower antibody levels against poliovirus (p=0.04). Comparison of HIV patients with blood donor controls revealed that the patients had higher levels of antibodies against CMV (p=0.0008), HSV-2 (p=0.0008), EBV (p=0.001), and C. albicans (p=0.01), but showed decreased levels of antibodies against coxsackievirus B4 (p=0.0008), poliovirus (p=0.0005),   and HHV-6B (p=0.002). Lastly, SjS patients had higher levels of anti-EBV antibodies (p=0.03), but lower antibody levels against several enteroviruses including a newly identified picornavirus, HCoSV-A (p=0.004), coxsackievirus B4 (p=0.04), and poliovirus (p=0.02). For the IFN-? AAB and HIV cohorts, principal component analysis revealed unique antibody clusters that showed the potential to discriminate patients from controls.  The results suggest that antibody profiles against these and likely other common infectious agents may yield insight into the interplay between exposure to infectious agents, dysbiosis, adaptive immunity and disease activity. PMID:24312567

  6. Plasma levels of microRNA in chronic kidney disease: patterns in acute and chronic exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H; Ledeganck, Kristien J; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Jürgens, Angelika; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Fransen, Erik; Adams, Volker; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Verpooten, Gert A; Vrints, Christiaan J; Couttenye, Marie M; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2015-12-15

    Exercise training is an effective way to improve exercise capacity in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the underlying mechanisms are only partly understood. In healthy subjects (HS), microRNA (miRNA or miR) are dynamically regulated following exercise and have, therefore, been suggested as regulators of cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. However, these effects were not studied in CKD before. The effect of acute exercise (i.e., an acute exercise bout) was assessed in 32 patients with CKD and 12 age- and sex-matched HS (study 1). miRNA expression in response to chronic exercise (i.e., a 3-mo exercise training program) was evaluated in 40 CKD patients (study 2). In a subgroup of study 2, the acute-exercise induced effect was evaluated at baseline and at follow-up. Plasma levels of a preselected panel miRNA, involved in exercise adaptation processes such as angiogenesis (miR-126, miR-210), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), hypoxia/ischemia (miR-21, miR-210), and progenitor cells (miR-150), were quantified by RT-PCR. Additionally, seven miRNA involved in similar biological processes were quantified in the subgroup of study 2. Baseline, studied miRNA were comparable in CKD and HS. Following acute exercise, miR-150 levels increased in both CKD (fold change 2.12 ± 0.39, P = 0.002; and HS: fold change 2.41 ± 0.48 P = 0.018, P for interaction > 0.05). miR-146a acutely decreased in CKD (fold change 0.92 ± 0.13, P = 0.024), whereas it remained unchanged in HS. Levels of miR-21, miR-126, and miR-210 remained unaltered. Chronic exercise did not elicit a significant change in the studied miRNA levels. However, an acute exercise-induced decrease in miR-210 was observed in CKD patients, only after training (fold change 0.76 ± 0.15). The differential expression in circulating miRNA in response to acute and chronic exercise may point toward a physiological role in cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, also in CKD. PMID:26475583

  7. Putting Chronic Disease on the Map: Building GIS Capacity in State and Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Michele; Tootoo, Joshua; Schieb, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Techniques based on geographic information systems (GIS) have been widely adopted and applied in the fields of infectious disease and environmental epidemiology; their use in chronic disease programs is relatively new. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is collaborating with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the University of Michigan to provide health departments with capacity to integrate GIS into daily operations, which support priorities for surveillance and prevention of chronic diseases. So far, 19 state and 7 local health departments participated in this project. On the basis of these participants’ experiences, we describe our training strategy and identify high-impact GIS skills that can be mastered and applied over a short time in support of chronic disease surveillance. We also describe the web-based resources in the Chronic Disease GIS Exchange that were produced on the basis of this training and are available to anyone interested in GIS and chronic disease (www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/maps/GISX). GIS offers diverse sets of tools that promise increased productivity for chronic disease staff of state and local health departments. PMID:23786907

  8. Putting chronic disease on the map: building GIS capacity in state and local health departments.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Casper, Michele; Tootoo, Joshua; Schieb, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Techniques based on geographic information systems (GIS) have been widely adopted and applied in the fields of infectious disease and environmental epidemiology; their use in chronic disease programs is relatively new. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is collaborating with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the University of Michigan to provide health departments with capacity to integrate GIS into daily operations, which support priorities for surveillance and prevention of chronic diseases. So far, 19 state and 7 local health departments participated in this project. On the basis of these participants' experiences, we describe our training strategy and identify high-impact GIS skills that can be mastered and applied over a short time in support of chronic disease surveillance. We also describe the web-based resources in the Chronic Disease GIS Exchange that were produced on the basis of this training and are available to anyone interested in GIS and chronic disease (www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/maps/GISX). GIS offers diverse sets of tools that promise increased productivity for chronic disease staff of state and local health departments. PMID:23786907

  9. 77 FR 42625 - Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...program to control chronic wasting disease (CWD) in farmed or captive cervids in the United...on our preemption policy with respect to CWD. This document also indicates that we will...program to control chronic wasting disease (CWD) in farmed or captive cervids in the...

  10. The South Australia Health Chronic Disease Self-Management Internet Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; Ritter, Philip L.; Plant, Kathryn; Laurent, Diana D.; Kelly, Pauline; Rowe, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an online chronic disease self-management program for South Australia residents. Method: Data were collected online at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. The intervention was an asynchronous 6-week chronic disease self-management program offered online. The authors measured eight health status measures,…

  11. Development of a Model of Erythropoiesis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    E-print Network

    Development of a Model of Erythropoiesis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Karen M. Bliss1 Carolina State University 2 Renal Research Institute, New York January 23, 2010 Abstract Kidneys in the kidneys, but patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) do not produce sufficient levels of EPO

  12. Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability with and without Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeseburg, B.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.; Groothoff, J. W.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Reijneveld, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescents with intellectual disability (ID) (ID-adolescents) and adolescents with chronic diseases are both more likely to have emotional and behavioural problems. The aim of this study was to assess the association between chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and emotional and behavioural problems in a large school-based sample.…

  13. Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability and Co-Occurring Somatic Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeseburg, B.; Groothoff, J. W.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Reijneveld, S. A.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence on the association between somatic chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and the full range of pervasive developmental disorder behavior (PDD behavior) is scarce. The aim of the present study is to assess the association between somatic chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and mild PDD behavior. We obtained data on 1044 ID-adolescents, aged…

  14. Body mass index among patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    De, Sajal

    2012-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is one of the important parameter to assess functional status of patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The aim of present study was to assess the prevalence of underweight among clinically stable COPD patients and relationship of BMI with increasing severity of COPD. COPD was defined as a subject who had post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < lower limit of normal, age more than 40 years and either current or ex smoker. Spirometry data of 7412 subjects were retrospectively analyzed and 1269 COPD patients and 1202 bronchial asthma patients were identified. The severity of airflow obstruction was classified as per GOLD guideline. The BMI of each patient was calculated from weight and height. The BMI of COPD patients were compared with bronchial asthma. The average BMI of COPD patients and bronchial asthma patients were 20.2 +/- 4.3 kg/m2 and 23.2 +/- 5.4 kg/m2 respectively. Overall, 38% COPD patients were underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2) and irrespective of severity of the disease, proportion of underweight COPD patient was significantly more as compared to bronchial asthma patients (P < 0.001). The mean BMI also reduces significantly with progression of COPD severity. PMID:23781655

  15. Soluble ?-Klotho Serum Levels in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Marzia; Muci, Maria Luisa; Mandanici, Giusy; Sales, Silvia; Mazzaferro, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane ?-Klotho (TM-Klotho), expressed in renal tubules, is a cofactor for FGF23-receptor. Circulating soluble-?-Klotho (s-Klotho) results from TM-Klotho shedding and acts on Phosphate (P) and Calcium (Ca) tubular transport. Decreased TM-Klotho, described in experimental chronic kidney disease (CKD), prevents actions of FGF23 and lessens circulating s-Klotho. Thus, levels of s-Klotho could represent a marker of CKD-MBD. To evaluate the clinical significance of s-Klotho in CKD we assayed serum s-Klotho and serum FGF23 in 68 patients (age 58 ± 15; eGFR 45 ± 21?mL/min). s-Klotho was lower than normal (519 ± 183 versus 845 ± 330?pg/mL, P < .0001) in renal patients and its reduction was detectable since CKD stage 2 (P < .01). s-Klotho correlated positively with eGFR and serum calcium (Cas) and negatively with serum phosphate (Ps), PTH and FGF23. FGF23 was higher than normal (73 ± 51 versus 36 ± 11, P < .0002) with significantly increased levels since CKD stage 2 (P < .001). Our data indicate a negative effect of renal disease on circulating s-Klotho starting very early in CKD. Assuming that s-Klotho mirrors TM-Klotho synthesis, low circulating s-Klotho seems to reflect the ensuing of tubular resistance to FGF23, which, accordingly, is increased. We endorse s-Klotho as an early marker of CKD-MBD. PMID:25873958

  16. [Sleep disorders in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Böing, Sebastian; Randerath, Winfried J

    2014-05-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) are a frequent finding in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have a negative impact on quality of life and the clinical course of the disease. The causes of SD are multiple and include for example respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. On the other hand sleep goes along with multiple physiological changes in respiration, so that sleep itself interacts with asthma and COPD. This interaction favors respiratory symptoms and may lead to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. A further complication of the respiratory situation and the clinical course can be found in asthma and COPD patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Due to the heterogeneity of SD in asthma and COPD, a detailed patient survey is the most important diagnostical tool. Based on the survey further technical examinations should be considered. Treatment strategies for the reduction of SD in asthma and COPD include an optimized medication and treatment of comorbidities. If indicated oxygen therapy, positive pressure breathing and pulmonary rehabilitation can contribute. PMID:24794341

  17. Endothelin and Endothelin Antagonists in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Donald E.; Barton, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), with diabetes and hypertension accounting for the majority of cases, is on the rise, with up to 160 million individuals worldwide predicted to be affected by 2020. Given that current treatment options, primarily targeted at the renin angiotensin system, only modestly slow down progression to end-stage renal disease, the urgent need for additional effective therapeutics is evident. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), largely through activation of endothelin A receptors, has been strongly implicated in renal cell injury, proteinuria, inflammation and fibrosis leading to CKD. Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been demonstrated to ameliorate or even reverse renal injury and/or fibrosis in experimental models of CKD, while clinical trials indicate a substantial antiproteinuric effect of ERAs in diabetic and non-diabetic CKD patients even on top of maximal renin angiotensin system blockade. This review summarizes the role of ET in CKD pathogenesis and discusses the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting the ET system in CKD, with attention to the risks and benefits of such an approach. PMID:24805108

  18. Coronary artery calcification in chronic kidney disease: An update

    PubMed Central

    Stompór, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Arterial calcification is a well-recognized complication of advanced atherosclerosis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by significantly more pronounced, disseminated and fast-progressing calcification of the vascular system, including the coronary arteries. New computed tomography-based imaging techniques allow for the noninvasive assessment and monitoring of calcification in different vascular sites. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the course of CKD and is tightly associated with mineral and bone disorders, which include but are not limited to secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this review, recent data on the pathogenesis of CAC development and progression are discussed, with a special emphasis on fibroblast growth factor 23 and its co-receptor, klotho. The prevalence, progression and prognostic significance of CAC are reviewed separately for patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis, kidney transplant recipients and patients with earlier stages of CKD. In the last section, therapeutic considerations are discussed, with special attention paid to the importance of treatment that addresses mineral and bone disorders of CKD. PMID:24772252

  19. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure. PMID:26299165

  20. Determination of Trace Elements in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim, Saribal; Can, Akyolcu Mehmet; Birsen, Aydemir

    2007-04-01

    Many trace elements have activatory or inhibitory roles in enzyme activities and changes in hemorehology and relation of them with defense system molecules in diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods: While, 25 male COPD patients (during acute attack) were taken as a Patient Group, another healthy 25 male taken as Control Group. Serum concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-680 Shimadzu). Results: While decreased Fe (100.00 +/- 36.98; 123.26 +/- 37.58 ?g/dL) (M+/-SD) and Zn (96.31+/-31.92 116.12+/-28.17 ?g/dL) (M+/-SD), while increased Cu (117.92+/- 25.02; 101.27+/-8.29 ?g/dL) (M+/-SD) concentrations were determined in patient samples than that of control group values (p<0.05), (p<0.01). Conclusion: According to findings of present study it may be said that: In organism while trace elements perform their activities on biomaterials they also possible carry out competition against others.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--diagnosis and classification of severity.

    PubMed

    Viviers, P J; van Zyl-Smit, R N

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, progressive and preventable non-communicable respiratory disorder. It is often confused with asthma and poorly understood by many lay people. The primary cause of COPD is tobacco smoking, but in the South African (SA) context, biomass fuel exposure/household pollution, tuberculosis, HIV and mining exposure are additional important causes.There is a very high prevalence of COPD in SA and it is the third leading cause of mortality globally.The diagnosis of COPD is based predominantly on symptoms, i.e. progressive shortness of breath and cough in a patient with risk factors–usually smoking. Lung function testing is required to formally make the diagnosis, which places a significant hurdle in correctly identifying COPD in SA, given the limited access to spirometry in many areas. Spirometry is also required to grade the severity of lung function obstruction.Severity assessment, which is used to plan a management strategy (predominantly bronchodilators with inhaled steroids in severe cases), combines symptoms, lung function and exacerbations. Based on these 3 factors, a patient can be categorised into 1 of 4 groups and appropriate management instituted. Additional comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular and mental illness, should also be evaluated.Early identification of COPD, with further avoidance of an aetiological cause such as smoking, is key in preventing disease progression.Appropriate therapy, comprising non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions and based on a comprehensive severity assessment, should result in symptom improvement and reduced risk for exacerbations. PMID:26636168

  2. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert G; Eikelboom, John W; Brimble, K Scott; McMurtry, M Sean; Ingram, Alistair J

    2013-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is prevalent in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation and is an independent risk factor for stroke. Warfarin anticoagulation is efficacious for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients with moderate CKD (stage III, estimated glomerular filtration rate 30-59 mL/min), but recent observational studies have challenged its value for patients with end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. The novel oral anticoagulants (i.e., dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban) all undergo renal metabolism to varying degrees, and hence dosing, efficacy, and safety require special consideration in CKD patients. In randomized trials to date involving 11,169 patients with moderate CKD, the novel oral anticoagulants performed well, with similar efficacy and safety profiles as for non-CKD patients. For atrial fibrillation patients with stage III CKD, the available data are strongest for dabigatran 150 mg twice daily as superior to warfarin for stroke prevention and for apixaban as superior to warfarin regarding reduced major hemorrhage. Renal function should be monitored at least annually in patients receiving a novel oral anticoagulant, and more often in elderly patients and those with underlying CKD or comorbidities who are at special risk for dehydration and deterioration of renal function. Much remains to be learned about the optimal use of the novel oral anticoagulants in CKD patients; additional studies about optimal dosing of the novel oral anticoagulants and frequency of monitoring renal function in CKD patients with atrial fibrillation are needed. Anticoagulation options for hemodialysis patients require testing in randomized trials. PMID:23790601

  3. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide?containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)??1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases. PMID:23525378

  4. Supplemental Oxygen Therapy for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, Igor; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen is necessary for aerobic metabolism. Since the human body cannot produce or store oxygen, a continuous and adequate delivery of oxygen needs to be secured by oxygen uptake from inhaled air via the respiratory system and oxygen delivery to body tissues via the circulation. Severely reduced lung function in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be a limiting factor for adequate oxygen uptake and patients with this disease may require supplemental oxygen therapy. While the methodology of oxygen delivery in home settings represents a continuously evolving field, oxygen therapy itself has been an integral part of the management of severely hypoxemic patients with COPD for more than 50 years despite the lack of full understanding of its effects and the relative paucity of clinical evidence supporting its use. In this article, we review the physiological effects and discuss the clinical benefits of oxygen therapy. We also evaluate the evidence supporting and arguing against its use in the published literature, discuss its risks and benefits, define criteria for prescribing oxygen therapy, and review methods of oxygen delivery in home settings. PMID:26238641

  5. Disease burden of chronic hepatitis B among immigrants in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William WL; Woo, Gloria; Heathcote, E Jenny; Krahn, Murray

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection among immigrants to North America ranges from 2% to 15%, 40% of whom develop advanced liver disease. Screening for hepatitis B surface antigen is not recommended for immigrants. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the disease burden of CHB among immigrants in Canada using Markov cohort models comparing a cohort of immigrants with CHB versus a control cohort of immigrants without CHB. METHODS: Markov cohort models were used to estimate life years, quality-adjusted life years and lifetime direct medical costs (adjusted to 2008 Canadian dollars) for a cohort of immigrants with CHB living in Canada in 2006, and an age-matched control cohort of immigrants without CHB living in Canada in 2006. Parameter values were derived from the published literature. RESULTS: At the baseline estimate, the model suggested that the cohort of immigrants with CHB lost an average of 4.6 life years (corresponding to 1.5 quality-adjusted life years), had an increased average of $24,249 for lifetime direct medical costs, and had a higher lifetime risk for decompensated cirrhosis (12%), hepatocellular carcinoma (16%) and need for liver transplant (5%) when compared with the control cohort. DISCUSSION: Results of the present study showed that the socio-economic burden of CHB among immigrants living in Canada is sub-stantial. Governments and health systems need to develop policies that promote early recognition of CHB and raise public awareness regarding hepatitis B to extend the lives of infected immigrants. PMID:23516678

  6. Heart failure and chronic kidney disease: should we use spironolactone?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sahil; Agrawal, Nikhil; Garg, Jalaj; Mohandas, Rajesh; Gupta, Tanush; Segal, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Half of all deaths in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) arise from cardiovascular causes. Congestive heart failure (CHF) is specifically more frequent with CKD. Cardiovascular therapies with proven benefit are often withheld from patients with renal disease for fear of adverse events. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has been implicated as an important maladaptive neurohormonal pathway in heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers have been shown to suppress it ineffectively. Current guidelines support the use of spironolactone for more comprehensive suppression of the RAAS in heart failure patients. Most supporting trials have however excluded patients with renal dysfunction resulting in a dearth of data to support use of spironolactone in CKD patients with CHF. Several small studies that prospectively interrogated the benefits of augmented RAAS blockade with spironolactone in CKD patients have shown improvement in predictors of cardiovascular mortality. More recently, improved mortality outcomes were demonstrated with the use of spironolactone in hemodialysis patients. Although reduction in glomerular filtration rate and hyperkalemia are potential adverse effects with its use, the available evidence suggests that it is uncommon and serious consequences can be avoided with close monitoring. Studies investigating the optimal spironolactone dosage in such a setting recommend starting with a low dose and careful uptitration. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive insight into the issues associated with the use of spironolactone in the setting of concomitant CHF and CKD. PMID:26086152

  7. Cognitive and Physical Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E; Seliger, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Both cognitive and physical function are commonly impaired in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting in important impacts on quality of life and overall health. This review summarizes the burden of cognitive and physical impairment in CKD, focusing on recent research that highlights a possible unifying microvascular etiology among these shared comorbid conditions Recent findings Multiple small studies have been published recently evaluating cognitive and physical functioning in people with CKD. These studies overall demonstrate a high burden of comorbid conditions in people with CKD, including microvascular disease, that may result in cognitive impairment. Additionally, studies demonstrate that physical function is substantially worse than expected in individuals with CKD, that decreased physical activity is associated with worse outcomes, that frailty is very common and associated with an increased risk of death, and that structured exercise programs have small but tangible short term effects of markers of physical performance. Summary Impaired cognitive function and physical performance are important factors impacting the lives of people with CKD. Further research is necessary to better treat this important comorbid conditions in people with CKD. PMID:24638060

  8. HDL abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-01-01

    Normal HDL activity confers cardiovascular and overall protection by mediating reverse cholesterol transport and through its potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antithrombotic functions. Serum lipid profile, as well as various aspects of HDL metabolism, structure, and function can be profoundly altered in patients with nephrotic range proteinuria or chronic kidney disease (CKD). These abnormalities can, in turn, contribute to the progression of cardiovascular complications and various other comorbidities, such as foam cell formation, atherosclerosis, and/or glomerulosclerosis, in affected patients. The presence and severity of proteinuria and renal insufficiency, as well as dietary and drug regimens, pre-existing genetic disorders of lipid metabolism, and renal replacement therapies (including haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplantation) determine the natural history of lipid disorders in patients with kidney disease. Despite the adverse effects associated with dysregulated reverse cholesterol transport and advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, safe and effective therapeutic interventions are currently lacking. This Review provides an overview of HDL metabolism under normal conditions, and discusses the features, mechanisms, and consequences of HDL abnormalities in patients with nephrotic syndrome or advanced CKD. PMID:26568191

  9. NF-kappaB Signaling in Chronic Inflammatory Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are obstructive airway disorders which differ in their underlying causes and phenotypes but overlap in patterns of pharmacological treatments. In both asthma and COPD, oxidative stress contributes to airway inflammation by inducing inflammatory gene expression. The redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB (NF-?B), is an important participant in a broad spectrum of inflammatory networks that regulate cytokine activity in airway pathology. The anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids (GCs), a mainstay treatment for asthma, involve inhibition of NF-?B induced gene transcription. Ligand bound GC receptors (GRs) bind NF-?B to suppress the transcription of NF-?B responsive genes (i.e., transrepression). However, in severe asthma and COPD, the transrepression of NF-?B by GCs is negated as a consequence of post-translational changes to GR and histones involved in chromatin remodeling. Therapeutics which target NF-?B activation, including inhibitors of I?B kinases (IKKs) are potential treatments for asthma and COPD. Furthermore, reversing GR/histone acetylation shows promise as a strategy to treat steroid refractory airway disease by augmenting NF-?B transrepression. This review examines NF-?B signaling in airway inflammation and its potential as target for treatment of asthma and COPD. PMID:26131974

  10. Coronary artery calcification in chronic kidney disease: An update.

    PubMed

    Stompór, Tomasz

    2014-04-26

    Arterial calcification is a well-recognized complication of advanced atherosclerosis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by significantly more pronounced, disseminated and fast-progressing calcification of the vascular system, including the coronary arteries. New computed tomography-based imaging techniques allow for the noninvasive assessment and monitoring of calcification in different vascular sites. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the course of CKD and is tightly associated with mineral and bone disorders, which include but are not limited to secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this review, recent data on the pathogenesis of CAC development and progression are discussed, with a special emphasis on fibroblast growth factor 23 and its co-receptor, klotho. The prevalence, progression and prognostic significance of CAC are reviewed separately for patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis, kidney transplant recipients and patients with earlier stages of CKD. In the last section, therapeutic considerations are discussed, with special attention paid to the importance of treatment that addresses mineral and bone disorders of CKD. PMID:24772252

  11. Prognostic significance of urinary NGAL in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Munna Lal; Sachan, Rekha; Misra, Ravi; Kamal, Ritul; Shyam, Radhey; Sachan, Pushpalata

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Recently urinary NGAL (uNGAL) has been proven to be a useful (potentially ideal) biomarker for early detection of CKD. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of uNGAL with severity of renal impairment in CKD and to evaluate its prognostic value in these subjects. Methods This was a prospective study carried out over a period of 24 months in subjects with CKD due to primary chronic glomerulonephritis. New cases of CKD stage II, III, IV aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled as per KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines 2012. A total of 90 subjects completed the study up to the end-point. The primary follow-up end-point was 18 months, or decreased glomerular filtration rate of less than 15 mL/min. Secondary follow-up end-point was the number of subjects who expired during this period. Results Multiple regression model of estimated glomerular filtration rate showed significant associations with log uNGAL (?=0.38, P<0.001), Ca×PO4 (?=0.60, P<0.001), hemoglobin (?=0.37, P<0.001), urine protein (?=0.34, P<0.001), serum albumin (?=0.48, P<0.001), and systolic blood pressure (?=0.76, P<0.001). Receiver operator curve for uNGAL considering the progression of CKD showed area under the curve for uNGAL was 0.878 (95% confidence interval: 0.68–0.96). Cut-off value for uNGAL was log 3.5 unit with a sensitivity of 93.08% and specificity of 71.43% for predicting the progression of CKD. Kaplan–Meier survival curve showed that patients with log uNGAL levels <3.51 unit had a survival rate of 71.4% while patients with NGAL level >3.51 unit had a renal survival rate of 14.7%. Conclusion Our study result showed that uNGAL has a positive correlation with disease severity which signifies the prognostic importance of uNGAL in CKD. PMID:26508883

  12. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to..., tropical, prisoner of war related disease, or a disease associated with exposure to certain...

  13. Evolution in Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention Practice in California Public Health Departments, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Samantha; Banthia, Rajni; Flores, George; Prentice, Bob; Boyle, Maria; Samuels, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Local health departments (LHDs) are dedicating resources and attention to preventing obesity and associated chronic diseases, thus expanding their work beyond traditional public health activities such as surveillance. This study investigated practices of local health departments in California to prevent obesity and chronic disease. Methods We conducted a web-based survey in 2010 with leaders in California’s LHDs to obtain diverse perspectives on LHDs’ practices to prevent obesity and chronic disease. The departmental response rate for the 2010 survey was 87% (53 of California’s 61 LHDs). Results Although staff for preventing obesity and chronic disease decreased at 59% of LHDs and stayed the same at 26% of LHDs since 2006, LHDs still contributed the same (12%) or a higher (62%) level of effort in these areas. Factors contributing to internal changes to address obesity and chronic disease prevention included momentum in the field of obesity prevention, opportunities to learn from other health departments, participation in obesity and chronic disease prevention initiatives, and flexible funding streams for chronic disease prevention. LHDs that received foundation funding or had a lead person or organizational unit coordinating or taking the lead on activities related to obesity and chronic disease prevention were more likely than other LHDs to engage in some activities related to obesity prevention. Conclusion California LHDs are increasing the intensity and breadth of obesity and chronic disease prevention. Findings provide a benchmark from which further changes in the activities and funding sources of LHD chronic disease prevention practice may be measured. PMID:25393749

  14. NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Dialyzed Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Simona; Masola, Valentina; Zoratti, Elisa; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Baruzzi, Anna; Messa, Michele; Sallustio, Fabio; Gesualdo, Loreto; Lupo, Antonio; Zaza, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether NLR pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that mediates the activation of caspase-1 (CASP-1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-18 and IL-1?, could be involved in the chronic inflammatory state observed in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment (CKD-HD), we employed several biomolecular techniques including RT-PCR, western blot, FACS analysis, confocal microscopy and microarray. Interestingly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 15 CKD-HD patients showed higher mRNA levels of NLRP3, CASP-1, ASC, IL-1?, IL-18 and P2X7receptor compared to 15 healthy subjects. Western blotting analysis confirmed the above results. In particular, active forms of CASP-1, IL1-? and IL-18 resulted significantly up-regulated in CKD-HD versus controls. Additionally, elevated mitochondrial ROS level, colocalization of NLRP3/ASC/mitochondria in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CKD-HD patients and down-regulation of CASP-1, IL1-? and IL-18 protein levels in immune-cells of CKD-HD patients stimulated with LPS/ATP in presence of mitoTEMPO, inhibitor of mitochondrial ROS production, suggested a possible role of this organelle in the aforementioned CKD-associated inflammasome activation. Then, microarray analysis confirmed, in an independent microarray study cohort, that NLRP3 and CASP-1, along with other inflammasome-related genes, were up-regulated in 17 CKD-HD patients and they were able to clearly discriminate these patients from 5 healthy subjects. All together these data showed, for the first time, that NLRP3 inflammasome was activated in uremic patients undergoing dialysis treatment and they suggested that this unphysiological condition could be possibly induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25798846

  15. Elevated Pulse Pressure is Associated with Hemolysis, Proteinuria and Chronic Kidney Disease in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Enrico M.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Rosano, Caterina; Vanderpool, Rebecca; Simon, Marc; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    A seeming paradox of sickle cell disease is that patients do not suffer from a high prevalence of systemic hypertension in spite of endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and vasculopathy. However, some patients do develop systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure, an increasingly recognized major cardiovascular risk factor in other populations. Hence, we hypothesized that pulse pressure, unlike other blood pressure parameters, is independently associated with markers of hemolytic anemia and cardiovascular risk in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the correlates of pulse pressure in patients (n ?=? 661) enrolled in a multicenter international sickle cell trial. Markers of hemolysis were analyzed as independent variables and as a previously validated hemolytic index that includes multiple variables. We found that pulse pressure, not systolic, diastolic or mean arterial pressure, independently correlated with high reticulocyte count (beta ?=? 2.37, p ?=? 0.02) and high hemolytic index (beta ?=? 1.53, p?=?0.002) in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease in two multiple linear regression models which include the markers of hemolysis as independent variables or the hemolytic index, respectively. Pulse pressure was also independently associated with elevated serum creatinine (beta ?=? 3.21, p ?=? 0.02), and with proteinuria (beta ?=? 2.52, p ?=? 0.04). These results from the largest sickle cell disease cohort to date since the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease show that pulse pressure is independently associated with hemolysis, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease. We propose that high pulse pressure may be a risk factor for clinical complications of vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. Longitudinal and mechanistic studies should be conducted to confirm these hypotheses. PMID:25478953

  16. Alignment between Chronic Disease Policy and Practice: Case Study at a Primary Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Claire A.; Draper, Catherine E.; Bresick, Graham F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic disease is by far the leading cause of death worldwide and of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries, including South Africa, where chronic diseases disproportionately affect the poor living in urban settings. The Provincial Government of the Western Cape (PGWC) has prioritized the management of chronic diseases and has developed a policy and framework (Adult Chronic Disease Management Policy 2009) to guide and improve the prevention and management of chronic diseases at a primary care level. The aim of this study is to assess the alignment of current primary care practices with the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy. Methods One comprehensive primary care facility in a Cape Town health district was used as a case study. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews (n?=?10), focus groups (n?=?8) and document review. Participants in this study included clinical staff involved in chronic disease management at the facility and at a provincial level. Data previously collected using the Integrated Audit Tool for Chronic Disease Management (part of the PGWC Adult Chronic Disease Management policy) formed the basis of the guide questions used in focus groups and interviews. Results The results of this research indicate a significant gap between policy and its implementation to improve and support chronic disease management at this primary care facility. A major factor seems to be poor policy knowledge by clinicians, which contributes to an individual rather than a team approach in the management of chronic disease patients. Poor interaction between facility- and community-based services also emerged. A number of factors were identified that seemed to contribute to poor policy implementation, the majority of which were staff related and ultimately resulted in a decrease in the quality of patient care. Conclusions Chronic disease policy implementation needs to be improved in order to support chronic disease management at this facility. It is possible that similar findings and factors are present at other primary care facilities in Cape Town. At a philosophical level, this research highlights the tension between primary health care principles and a diseased-based approach in a primary care setting. PMID:25141191

  17. Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of deer and elk in North America. All diseases in this family are characterized by long preclinical incubation periods following by a relatively short clinical course. Endpoint disease is characterized by ext...

  18. Molecular genealogy tools for white-tailed deer with chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of deer, elk, and moose. CWD is a fatal neurologic disease with a long preclinical incubation period, during which the disease is probably transmitted to healthy animals through direct exposure or environ...

  19. Health care provider perception of chronic kidney disease: knowledge and behavior among African American patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is prevalent in the population, but also disproportionately affects African Americans. Disparities in care of chronic kidney disease and transplant for African Americans have also been reported. The purpose of this study is to determine the knowledge and reactions of chronic kidney disease patients regarding their disease, as perceived by nephrologists and clinic nurses in South Carolina. Methods Using a qualitative approach, key informant interviews were conducted with nephrologists, and three focus groups were held with nurses who specialize in chronic kidney disease. The results were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using Qualrus software and the Grounded Theory Method. Results Dominant themes in the interviews and focus groups include: reaction to chronic kidney disease, differences in race, patient thoughts on dialysis, patient knowledge of types of treatment available, information availability, compliance to treatment, information source, and thoughts on kidney transplantation. The study found that the majority of clinicians agreed that there is typically a wide range of reactions in patients with chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The majority of chronic kidney disease patients remain in denial of their diagnosis and do not want to agree to the necessary treatment to improve their condition. In addition, the clinicians reported that the incidence of chronic kidney disease is highest in the African American population and this population of patients typically gets their information on the disease from peers, others they have known that have had renal failure. We find clinicians report that patients typically do not remain compliant to recommended treatment regimens due to lack of knowledge and feelings of denial and fear, and frequently use religiosity as a coping mechanism. Silent progression and complexity of chronic kidney disease frequently result in many patients lacking essential knowledge and developing poor coping mechanisms to seek appropriate follow-up care and prevent progression and optimize outcome. Health care providers are aware of the barriers but may lack the tools and resources to overcome them. PMID:25012542

  20. Human Prion Disease and Relative Risk Associated with Chronic Wasting Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pape, W. John; Forster, Jeri E.; Anderson, C. Alan; Bosque, Patrick; Miller, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    The transmission of the prion disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans raises concern about chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disease of deer and elk. In 7 Colorado counties with high CWD prevalence, 75% of state hunting licenses are issued locally, which suggests that residents consume most regionally harvested game. We used Colorado death certificate data from 1979 through 2001 to evaluate rates of death from the human prion disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The relative risk (RR) of CJD for CWD-endemic county residents was not significantly increased (RR 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40–1.63), and the rate of CJD did not increase over time (5-year RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.73–1.16). In Colorado, human prion disease resulting from CWD exposure is rare or nonexistent. However, given uncertainties about the incubation period, exposure, and clinical presentation, the possibility that the CWD agent might cause human disease cannot be eliminated. PMID:17176567

  1. Analyses of critical target cell responses during preclinical phases of evolving chronic radiation-induced myeloproliferative disease-exploitation of a unique canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E.; Frazier, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This document briefly summarizes and highlights ongoing studies on the cellular and molecular processes involved in the induction and progression of myeloid leukemia in dogs chronically exposed to low daily doses of wholebody gamma irradiation. Under such conditions, select groups of dogs exhibit extremely high frequencies of myeloproliferative disease (MPD) (i.e., /congruent/50%) of which myeloid leukemia is most prominent. 2 figs.

  2. Factors affecting medication adherence in Lebanese patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; El-Hajj, Zeinab; Zeid, Mayssam Bou; Yassine, Mohammad; Salameh, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-adherence to prescribed medications represents an obstacle toward achieving treatment goals. This problem is more pronounced in patients with chronic illness. Objective: To identify the extent of adherence in Lebanese outpatients with chronic diseases, and to suggest possible predictors of non-adherence in this population. The secondary objective was to assess if medication adherence affects patients’ quality of life. Methods: A questionnaire was administered face-to-face to a sample of Lebanese adults visiting the external clinics at two Tertiary Care Hospitals in Beirut. The level of adherence was assessed using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale which was first validated. The health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients was measured using the EQ-5D. Linear regression and logistic regression analyses examined possible predictors of adherence. Results: Out of the 148 patients included in this study, 42.6% were classified as adherent. In the univariate analyses, statistically significant predictors of high adherence included good physician-patient relationship (p=0.029) and counseling (p=0.037), a high level of HRQoL (p<0.001), and a high level of perceived health (p<0.001). Predictors of low adherence included a declining memory (p<0.001), anxiety/depression (p=0.002), little drug knowledge (p<0.001), and postponing physician appointments (p<0.001). The multivariate analyses revealed similar results. In the linear regression, the most powerful predictor of non-adherence was the disbelief that the drug is ameliorating the disease (beta=0.279), however, in logistic regression, patient who were willing to skip or double doses in case of amelioration/deterioration were found to be 7.35 times more likely to be non-adherent than those who were not (aOR=0.136, 95% CI: 0.037-0.503). Conclusion: The findings of this study reassure the view that patients should be regarded as active decision makers. Patient education should be regarded as a cornerstone for treatment success. Additional studies as well are needed to test the practicability and effectiveness of interventions suggested to enhance adherence. PMID:26445621

  3. Abstract --Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Abstract -- Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver (NASH) and end-stage liver disease, and is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The diagnosis, grading, and staging of NAFLD currently is based on liver biopsy examination with histologic

  4. Exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases by infectious agents: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Ming; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases caused by obesity represent critical public health concerns worldwide. In these diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis, adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that releases large quantities of inflammatory mediators into circulation. Besides classically recognized effectors on the development of obesity and resultant conditions, infection has attracted attention as an enhancer of chronic inflammatory diseases. Infectious diseases have long been associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis. However, the infectious hypothesis for chronic inflammatory diseases has been challenged by inconclusive clinical trials. Nevertheless, the large body of evidence accumulated over decades on the association of infectious diseases with obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease should not be disregarded. Instead, re-formulation of hypotheses of the mechanisms by which microbes affect obesity-associated diseases may be required with an emphasis on the early events in the progression of such diseases and the multifactorial nature of pathogen-host interactions. This review focuses on pathogens that directly promote obesity and on pathogens that cause chronic infections and thereby enhance metabolic diseases in obese patients. A new perspective on the interaction between infections and obesity-related diseases may improve management of chronic inflammatory diseases that rank high among global threats to human health. PMID:21537425

  5. Using Soft Computer Techniques on Smart Devices for Monitoring Chronic Diseases: the CHRONIOUS case

    E-print Network

    Giacomelli, Piero; Rosso, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an Open, Ubiquitous and Adaptive Chronic Disease Management Platform for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease(COPD) Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and Renal Insufficiency. It consists of several modules: an ontology based literature search engine, a rule based decision support system, remote sensors interacting with lifestyle interfaces (PDA, monitor touchscreen) and a machine learning module. All these modules interact each other to allow the monitoring of two types of chronic diseases and to help clinician in taking decision for cure purpose. This paper illustrates how some machine learning algorithms and a rule based decision support system can be used in smart devices, to monitor chronic patient. We will analyse how a set of machine learning algorithms can be used in smart devices to alert the clinician in case of a patient health condition worsening trend.

  6. Modeling seasonal behavior changes and disease transmission with application to chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Oraby, Tamer; Vasilyeva, Olga; Krewski, Daniel; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2014-01-01

    Behavior and habitat of wildlife animals change seasonally according to environmental conditions. Mathematical models need to represent this seasonality to be able to make realistic predictions about the future of a population and the effectiveness of human interventions. Managing and modeling disease in wild animal populations requires particular care in that disease transmission dynamics is a critical consideration in the etiology of both human and animal diseases, with different transmission paradigms requiring different disease risk management strategies. Since transmission of infectious diseases among wildlife depends strongly on social behavior, mechanisms of disease transmission could also change seasonally. A specific consideration in this regard confronted by modellers is whether the contact rate between individuals is density-dependent or frequency-dependent. We argue that seasonal behavior changes could lead to a seasonal shift between density and frequency dependence. This hypothesis is explored in the case of chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal disease that affects deer, elk and moose in many areas of North America. Specifically, we introduce a strategic CWD risk model based on direct disease transmission that accounts for the seasonal change in the transmission dynamics and habitats occupied, guided by information derived from cervid ecology. The model is composed of summer and winter susceptible-infected (SI) equations, with frequency-dependent and density-dependent transmission dynamics, respectively. The model includes impulsive birth events with density-dependent birth rate. We determine the basic reproduction number as a weighted average of two seasonal reproduction numbers. We parameterize the model from data derived from the scientific literature on CWD and deer ecology, and conduct global and local sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number. We explore the effectiveness of different culling strategies for the management of CWD: although summer culling seems to be an effective disease eradication strategy, the total culling rate is limited by the requirement to preserve the herd. PMID:24035840

  7. Volumetric capnography for the evaluation of chronic airways diseases

    PubMed Central

    Veronez, Liliani; Pereira, Monica Corso; Doria da Silva, Silvia Maria; Barcaui, Luisa Affi; De Capitani, Eduardo Mello; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive lung diseases of different etiologies present with progressive peripheral airway involvement. The peripheral airways, known as the silent lung zone, are not adequately evaluated with conventional function tests. The principle of gas washout has been used to detect pulmonary ventilation inhomogeneity and to estimate the location of the underlying disease process. Volumetric capnography (VC) analyzes the pattern of CO2 elimination as a function of expired volume. Objective To measure normalized phase 3 slopes with VC in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCB) and in bronchitic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in order to compare the slopes obtained for the groups. Methods NCB and severe COPD were enrolled sequentially from an outpatient clinic (Hospital of the State University of Campinas). A control group was established for the NCB group, paired by sex and age. All subjects performed spirometry, VC, and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). Two comparisons were made: NCB group versus its control group, and NCB group versus COPD group. The project was approved by the ethical committee of the institution. Statistical tests used were Wilcoxon or Student’s t-test; P<0.05 was considered to be a statistically significant difference. Results Concerning the NCB group (N=20) versus the control group (N=20), significant differences were found in body mass index and in several functional variables (spirometric, VC, 6MWT) with worse results observed in the NCB group. In the comparison between the COPD group (N=20) versus the NCB group, although patients with COPD had worse spirometric and 6MWT values, the capnographic variables mean phase 2 slope (Slp2), mean phase 3 slope normalized by the mean expiratory volume, or mean phase 3 slope normalized by the end-tidal CO2 concentration were similar. Conclusion These findings may indicate that the gas elimination curves are not sensitive enough to monitor the severity of structural abnormalities. The role of normalized phase 3 slope may be worth exploring as a more sensitive index of small airway disease, even though it may not be equally sensitive in discriminating the severity of the alterations. PMID:25284998

  8. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and Â?normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify changes in potential protein biomarkers in beryllium-treated mice. We will correlate these findings with the ability of the transgenic mice to develop a beryllium-specific adaptive immune response in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. We will also determine whether beryllium-responsive CD4+ T cells in blood and BAL correlate with the onset of granuloma formation. Thus, we will provide the scientific community with biomarkers of sensitization and disease progression for CBD. These biomarkers will serve as critical tools for development of improved industrial hygiene and therapeutic interventions.

  9. The Sputum Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-11-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are thought to be associated with-and perhaps to mediate-accelerated loss of lung function in COPD. Although the application of culture-independent methods for detection of bacteria have shown COPD to be associated with marked differences in the burden, diversity, and composition of the bronchial bacterial microbiome, few studies have examined the changes associated with community-acquired exacerbations of the disease. In a longitudinal cohort study of COPD, the availability of sputum samples from subjects obtained at the onset of an exacerbation and during periods of clinical stability before and after the event enabled us to recently address this gap in knowledge, using culture-independent, 16S rRNA-based analysis methods combined with in silico inference of metagenomic functions. We observed sputum bacterial composition to be generally stable over the preexacerbation period of clinical stability, but to change at the time of exacerbation, with specific enrichment in not only typical COPD-associated bacterial species (e.g., Haemophilus influenzae) but also other phylogenetically related species with pathogenic potential. Concurrently, we observed depleted abundance of other bacteria whose predicted metagenomes suggest functional capacities to produce a variety of antiinflammatory compounds. Most strikingly, we found that resolution of these exacerbation-related changes in sputum microbiota composition differed significantly, depending on the exacerbation treatments prescribed. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in microbiome enrichment for a number of bacterial communities, mostly members of the Proteobacteria phylum, whereas prolonged suppression of microbiota was seen in those treated with antibiotics alone. Taken together, our findings suggest that exacerbations of COPD are associated with heterogeneous changes in the bronchial microbiome, with increases in the abundance of species related to typical COPD pathogens and decreases in microbiota members that contribute to compositional and functional homeostasis. The findings further suggest that exacerbation treatments may have very different impacts on the bronchial microbiome's rate of return toward baseline composition. PMID:26595736

  10. HIV Associated Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akanbi, Maxwell O; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Achenbach, Chad J; Ozoh, Obianuju B; Obaseki, Daniel O; Sule, Halima; Agbaji, Oche O; Ukoli, Christiana O

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among HIV-infected adults in Nigeria. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods HIV-infected adults aged ? 30 years with no acute ailments accessing care at the antiretroviral therapy clinic of Jos University Teaching Hospital were enrolled consecutively. Participants were interviewed to obtain pertinent demographic and clinical information, including exposure to risk factors for COPD. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was carried out. HIV related information was retrieved from the clinic medical records. COPD case-definition was based on the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria using post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC <0.7. COPD prevalence was also calculated using the lower limit of normal for FEV1/FVC criteria (LLN) from the European Respiratory Society normative equation. Factors associated with COPD were determined using logistic regression models Results Study population comprised 356 HIV infected adults with mean age of 44.5 (standard deviation, 7.1) years and 59% were female. The mean time elapsed since HIV diagnosis was 7.0 (SD, 2.6) years and 97.5% of the respondents were on stable ART with virologic suppression present in 67.2%. Prevalence of COPD were 15.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.7-19.2), 12.07% (95% CI 8.67-15.48), 22.19% (95% CI 18.16-26.83) using GOLD, ERS LLN and GLI LLN diagnostic criteria respectively. In multivariate analyses adjusting for gender, exposure to cigarette smoke or biomass, history of pulmonary tuberculosis, use of antiretroviral therapy, current CD4 T-cell count and HIV RNA, only age > 50 years was independently associated with COPD with OR 3.4; 95% CI 1.42-8.17 when compared to ages 30-40 years. Conclusion HIV-associated COPD is common in our population of HIV patients. PMID:26236557

  11. Intervention to Influence Behaviors Linked to Risk of Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Jemmott, John B.; Landis, J. Richard; Pequegnat, Willo; Wingood, Gina M.; Wyatt, Gail Elizabeth; Bellamy, Scarlett L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The high morbidity and mortality in African Americans associated with behavior-linked chronic diseases are well documented. Methods We tested the efficacy of an intervention to increase multiple health-related behaviors in African Americans. In a multisite cluster-randomized controlled trial, groups of African American human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–serodiscordant heterosexual couples in Atlanta (Georgia), Los Angeles (California), New York (New York), and Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) were allocated to an individual-focused health promotion that addressed multiple health-related behaviors or to a couple-focused HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk reduction intervention. Primary outcomes were adherence to fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity guidelines assessed preintervention, immediately postintervention, and 6 and 12 months postintervention. Secondary outcomes included fatty food consumption, prostate and breast cancer screening, and alcohol use. Generalized estimating equations tested the efficacy of the health promotion intervention over the postintervention assessments. Results Health promotion intervention participants were more likely to report consuming 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily (rate ratio [RR], 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 1.62) and adhering to physical activity guidelines (1.39; 1.22 to 1.59) compared with HIV/STD intervention participants. In the health promotion intervention compared with the HIV/STD intervention, participants consumed fatty foods less frequently (mean difference, ?0.18; 95% CI, ?0.30 to ?0.07), more men received prostate cancer screening (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.88), and more women received a mammogram (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.50). Alcohol use did not differ between the intervention groups. Conclusion This trial demonstrates the efficacy of interventions targeting multiple health-related behaviors in African American HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative men and women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00644163 PMID:21518939

  12. Hepcidin Levels in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat; Erduran, Erol; Turkmen, Elif Sag; Aliyazicioglu, Yuksel; Reis, Gokce Pinar; Cobanoglu, Umit; Demir, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: We aimed to analyze serum hepcidin level in children with chronic liver disease (CLD) and its relationship with serum cytokines level, liver function tests, hepatic iron content, and liver fibrosis. Patients and Methods: The study included 34 children with CLD, and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy children. Serum hepcidin, ferritin, iron level, interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-? (TGF-? ), total oxidant status (TOS), and antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in all patients and in the control group. Liver iron content (LIC) was measured from the liver biopsy specimen. Results: Serum ferritin levels were higher in patients with CLD than control group (100.1 ± 98.2 ng/mL vs 50.5 ± 32.2 ng/mL, P = 0.016). No significant difference was found in hepcidin levels. Hepcidin levels in children with CLD was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.75, P = 0.001), pediatric end-stage liver disease (PELD) score (r = 0.56, P = 0.001), TAS (r = 0.42, P = 0.02), but negatively correlated with albumin level (r = ?0.45, P = 0.008). Transferrin saturation and hepcidin:ferritin ratio were significantly low in patients with severe fibrosis compared with patients with mild/without fibrosis (15.5 ± 5.5 vs 34.3 ± 30.1, P = 0.017 and 1 ± 0.5 vs 1.9 ± 1.4, P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: Serum hepcidin levels in children with CLD reflect both liver functions and TAS, and severe fibrosis is associated with low hepcidin:ferritin ratio in children with CLD. PMID:26458857

  13. Sleep Quality and Disease Severity in Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Jeremiah A.; Smith, Timothy L.; Mace, Jess C.; Soler, Zachary M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sleep quality in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) using a validated outcome measure and compare measures of CRS disease severity with sleep dysfunction. Study Design Cross-sectional evaluation of a multi-center cohort Methods Patients with CRS according to the 2007 Adult Sinusitis Guidelines were prospectively enrolled from four academic, tertiary care centers across North America. Each subject completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) instrument, in addition to CRS-specific measures of quality-of-life (QOL), endoscopy, computed tomography (CT), and olfaction. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, and clinical measures of disease severity were compared between patients with “good” (PSQI; ? 5) and “poor” (PSQI; >5) sleep quality. Results Patients (n=268) reported a mean PSQI score of 9.4(range: 0–21). 75.0% of patients reported PSQI scores above the traditional cut-off indicating poor sleep quality. Patients with poor sleep quality were found to have significantly worse QOL scores on both the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (p<0.001) and 22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test (p<0.001). No significant differences in average endoscopy, CT, or olfactory function scores were found between patients with good or poor sleep quality. Tobacco smokers reported worse average PSQI total scores compared to non-smokers(p=0.030). Patients reporting poor sleep were more likely to have a history of depression, even after controlling for gender (p=0.020). Conclusion The majority of patients with CRS have a poor quality of sleep as measured by the PSQI survey. Poor sleep quality is significantly associated with CRS-specific QOL, gender, comorbid depression, and tobacco use but not CT score or endoscopy grade. PMID:23918740

  14. Safety of Chinese Herbal Medicine for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anthony Lin; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2015-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is increasingly used by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, there has been no systematic evaluation of its safety. This review examined the adverse events (AEs) reported in clinical studies of CHM for COPD. Five English databases (PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and CENTRAL) and four Chinese databases (CBM, CNKI, CQVIP, and Wanfang Data) were searched from inception to May 2013. Adverse event data, including nature, severity, author-assigned causality, management, and outcome, were extracted from included studies. Descriptive statistics were used for the rate of adverse events. Of the 152 included studies, AEs were reported in 47 studies. The rate of adverse events was slightly lower in the CHM groups compared with controls (84 events in 5,909 participants, 1.4% versus 102 events in 5,676 participants, 1.8%). The most frequently reported adverse event was nausea (28 cases in the CHM groups and 19 cases in the control groups), which was more common in studies where CHM was combined with pharmacotherapy to treat acute exacerbation of COPD. Other frequent adverse events were abdominal discomfort, dry mouth, and dizziness. Detailed information about the adverse events was scant. Overall, CHM appears to be well tolerated in people with COPD. PMID:25883670

  15. Mechanisms and measurement of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Donald A

    2006-05-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) describe their breathlessness as related to the work and effort associated with breathing. Current evidence suggests that the perception of dyspnea is due to a "mismatch" between the outgoing motor command from the central nervous system and the corresponding afferent information from chemoreceptors and/or mechanoreceptors. To measure the severity of dyspnea the principles of psychophysics (stimulus --> response relationship) can be applied. One approach is to consider activities of daily living as a putative stimulus. Although this method relies on patient recall and description of daily tasks, ability to function, as well as time and effort to complete an activity, select clinical instruments have demonstrated appropriate measurement criteria in randomized clinical trials involving patients with COPD. Another approach is for a patient to report the intensity of dyspnea during exercise, and current practice is to provide ratings each minute "on cue" during the exercise test. A computerized system has been developed whereby the person can report ratings spontaneously and continuously by moving a computer mouse that adjusts a vertical bar adjacent to 0-10 category-ratio scale positioned on a monitor. With this continuous method the patient reports twice the number of dyspnea ratings during exercise compared with discrete ratings each minute. Patient-reported dyspnea based on activities of daily living and exercise testing provides distinct but complimentary information. PMID:16636091

  16. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD. PMID:25210423

  17. Safety of chinese herbal medicine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Meaghan; Shergis, Johannah Linda; Liu, Shaonan; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Guo, Xinfeng; Lu, Chuanjian; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2015-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is increasingly used by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, there has been no systematic evaluation of its safety. This review examined the adverse events (AEs) reported in clinical studies of CHM for COPD. Five English databases (PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and CENTRAL) and four Chinese databases (CBM, CNKI, CQVIP, and Wanfang Data) were searched from inception to May 2013. Adverse event data, including nature, severity, author-assigned causality, management, and outcome, were extracted from included studies. Descriptive statistics were used for the rate of adverse events. Of the 152 included studies, AEs were reported in 47 studies. The rate of adverse events was slightly lower in the CHM groups compared with controls (84 events in 5,909 participants, 1.4% versus 102 events in 5,676 participants, 1.8%). The most frequently reported adverse event was nausea (28 cases in the CHM groups and 19 cases in the control groups), which was more common in studies where CHM was combined with pharmacotherapy to treat acute exacerbation of COPD. Other frequent adverse events were abdominal discomfort, dry mouth, and dizziness. Detailed information about the adverse events was scant. Overall, CHM appears to be well tolerated in people with COPD. PMID:25883670

  18. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctly advise them. Moreover, in a more interconnected and globalized society, in which more and more Muslim patients live in the Western countries, this topic is of high interest also for the general practitioner. For this purpose, we carried out a systematic review, including also articles written in Arabic, Turkish, and Persian languages. Our main findings are that: recipients of kidney allograft can safely fast during Ramadan;evidences for safety in patients with nephrolithiasis and CKD are instead mixed and controversial. On the other hand,most studies have been carried out during Ramadan falling in cold seasons, and there is scarce information about Ramadan fasting in hot seasons. For these reasons, the findings may be not generalizable and therefore cautions should be taken and applied; the physicians should carefully monitor their patients during the fasting period with an adequate follow-up, in order to avoid any injurious effect. PMID:25364369

  19. Effects of chronic kidney disease on blood cells membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Kaderjakova, Z; Lajdova, I; Horvathova, M; Morvova, M; Sikurova, L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is progressive loss of renal function associated among others with increased intracellular calcium concentration. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of CKD on cell membrane properties such as human red blood cell Ca(2+) ATPase activity, lymphocyte plasma membrane P2X(7) receptor expression and function. This could help us in elucidating the origin of increased calcium concentration in blood cells. We found out Ca(2+) ATPase activity is decreased in early stage CKD patients resulting in altered calcium removal from cytoplasm. By means of flow cytometry we assessed that P2X(7) receptor expression on lymphocyte membrane is 1.5 fold increased for CKD patients. Moreover, we detected an increased uptake of ethidium bromide through this receptor in CKD at basal conditions. It means CKD lymphocyte membranes contain more receptors which are more permeable thus allowing increased calcium influx from extracellular milieu. Finally, we can state alterations in blood cell membranes are closely linked to CKD and may be responsible for intracellular calcium accumulation. PMID:22425286

  20. Pathophysiology of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a roundtable.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Banzett, Robert B; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Casaburi, Richard; Davenport, Paul W; Gandevia, Simon C; Gelb, Arthur F; Mahler, Donald A; Webb, Katherine A

    2007-05-01

    Effective management of dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires a clearer understanding of its underlying mechanisms. This roundtable reviews what is currently known about the neurophysiology of dyspnea with the aim of applying this knowledge to the clinical setting. Dyspnea is not a single sensation, having multiple qualitative descriptors. Primary sources of dyspnea include: (1) inputs from multiple somatic proprioceptive and bronchopulmonary afferents, and (2) centrally generated signals related to inspiratory motor command output or effort. Respiratory disruption that causes a mismatch between medullary respiratory motor discharge and peripheral mechanosensor afferent feedback gives rise to a distressing urge to breathe which is independent of muscular effort. Recent brain imaging studies have shown increased limbic system activation in response to various dyspneogenic stimuli and emphasize the affective dimension of this symptom. All of these mechanisms are likely instrumental in exertional dyspnea causation in COPD. Increased central motor drive (and effort) is required to increase ventilation during activity because the inspiratory muscles become acutely overloaded and functionally weakened. Abnormal dynamic ventilatory mechanics and excessive chemostimulation during exercise also result in a widening disparity between escalating central neural drive and restricted thoracic volume displacement. This neuromechanical uncoupling may form the basis for the distressing sensation of unsatisfied inspiration. Interventions that alleviate dyspnea in COPD do so by improving ventilatory mechanics, reducing central neural drive, or both-thereby partially restoring neuromechanical coupling of the respiratory system. Self-management strategies address the affective aspect of dyspnea and are essential to successful treatment. PMID:17494725

  1. Arterial Stiffness, Kidney Function, and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Tomiyama, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness can nowadays be measured easily and noninvasively around the globe. Although well established as an independent predictor of cardiovascular events, less is known about the role of arterial stiffness in the progressive loss of kidney function once chronic kidney disease (CKD) is established. In addition to measures of arterial stiffness, a number of devices now noninvasively record the pulse profile from sites such as the radial artery and, using internal algorithms, are able to estimate central pressure profiles. Although these devices have generated much data on the prediction of cardiovascular events, e.g. measures of arterial stiffness, there is much less known about the predictive utility of these measures in CKD progression. In this review, we cover approaches to arterial stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity and discuss measures of the systolic and diastolic contour of the pulse waveform vis-à-vis their relationship to declines in kidney function over time. We restrict our coverage to studies that have longitudinal data, but we also include a table of studies, which, to our knowledge, have only published cross-sectional data at this time.

  2. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, periorbital and subconjunctival swelling].

    PubMed

    Rivinius, R; Futterer, S; Puderbach, M; Herth, F; Heußel, C P

    2012-11-01

    A 70-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and dilative cardiomyopathy was referred due to acute dyspnea and chest pain. After spontaneous pneumothorax was confirmed by chest radiography, a chest tube was inserted into the right side. Persistent air bubbles escaping through the water seal of the drainage in synchrony with respiration indicated a bronchopleural fistula. A physical examination revealed orbital and subconjunctival emphysemas. Skull and chest computed tomography (CT) scans showed further massive cervical, thoracic and pulmonary subcutaneous emphysemas which are increased subcutaneous amounts of gas which can disperse along the fasciae. Cardinal sign is the sensation of air under the skin known as subcutaneous crepitation (similiar to touching rice crispies). Conditions causing subcutaneous emphysemas are trauma, medical treatment and intracutaneous gas production by bacteria. In this case, large amounts of air leaked out of the pleural space through the incision made for the chest tube into the subcutaneous tissue, mediastinum and retroperitoneum causing subcutaneous emphysemas. From there, ascending air spread along the fascial planes of the mediastinum and cervical area through the inferior orbital fissure to the orbits and eyelids causing orbital and subconjunctival emphysemas. On the basis of the progressive emphysemas and persistent pneumothorax, a second chest tube was inserted. Subsequently, the signs and symptoms disappeared completely. PMID:22777204

  3. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  4. Evaluating bone quality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Bone of normal quality and quantity can successfully endure physiologically imposed mechanical loads. Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) adversely affects bone quality through alterations in bone turnover and mineralization, whereas bone quantity is affected through changes in bone volume. Changes in bone quality can be associated with altered bone material, structure, or microdamage, which can result in an elevated rate of fracture in patients with CKD–MBD. Fractures cannot always be explained by reduced bone quantity and, therefore, bone quality should be assessed with a variety of techniques from the macro-organ level to the nanoscale level. In this Review, we demonstrate the importance of evaluating bone from multiple perspectives and hierarchical levels to understand CKD–MBD-related abnormalities in bone quality. Understanding the relationships between variations in material, structure, microdamage, and mechanical properties of bone in patients with CKD–MBD should aid in the development of new modalities to prevent, or treat, these abnormalities. PMID:24100399

  5. Cohort profile: the chronic kidney disease prognosis consortium.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Astor, Brad C; Jong, Paul E de; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Levey, Andrew S; Levin, Adeera; Wen, Chi-Pang; Woodward, Mark; Coresh, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium (CKD-PC) was established in 2009 to provide comprehensive evidence about the prognostic impact of two key kidney measures that are used to define and stage CKD, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, on mortality and kidney outcomes. CKD-PC currently consists of 46 cohorts with data on these kidney measures and outcomes from >2 million participants spanning across 40 countries/regions all over the world. CKD-PC published four meta-analysis articles in 2010-11, providing key evidence for an international consensus on the definition and staging of CKD and an update for CKD clinical practice guidelines. The consortium continues to work on more detailed analysis (subgroups, different eGFR equations, other exposures and outcomes, and risk prediction). CKD-PC preferably collects individual participant data but also applies a novel distributed analysis model, in which each cohort runs statistical analysis locally and shares only analysed outputs for meta-analyses. This distributed model allows inclusion of cohorts which cannot share individual participant level data. According to agreement with cohorts, CKD-PC will not share data with third parties, but is open to including further eligible cohorts. Each cohort can opt in/out for each topic. CKD-PC has established a productive and effective collaboration, allowing flexible participation and complex meta-analyses for studying CKD. PMID:23243116

  6. Craniopharyngioma: long-term consequences of a chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hermann L

    2015-11-01

    Childhood-onset craniopharyngiomas (CP) are rare embryonal malformations of low-grade histological malignancy. Hypothalamic involvement and/or treatment-related lesions result in impaired physical and social functionality and severe neuroendocrine sequelae. Quality of life in CP with hypothalamic involvement is impaired by severe obesity, physical fatigue, reduced motivation, dyspnea, diarrhea, and non-optimal psychosocial development. 567 CI patients have been recruited between 1998 and 2010 in the German Craniopharyngioma Registry. Only 5 of 567 patients (<1%) presented without confirmed signs of relapse/progression, visual impairment, and endocrine deficiencies during longitudinal follow-up of more than 5 years. Hypothalamic obesity in CP is associated with a severe increase in BMI during the early post-operative period. Patients with CP involving hypothalamic structures show reduced 10-years overall survival, whereas overall and progression-free survival rates are not related to the degree of surgical resection. Accordingly, gross-total resection should be avoided in cases of hypothalamic involvement to prevent further hypothalamic damage. As surgical expertise has been shown to have impact on postoperative morbidity, medical societies should establish criteria of adequate professional expertise for the treatment of CP. Based on these criteria, health authorities should organize the certification of centers of excellence authorized for treatment and care of patients with this chronic disease. PMID:26523617

  7. End-stage renal disease and chronic kidney disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lugon, Jocemir R

    2009-01-01

    The world is facing an epidemic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report discusses the present state of chronic kidney disease care in Brazil. We report frequency of dialysis treatment and prevalence of kidney transplantation throughout Brazil. We estimated the number of CKD patients in the country through a mathematical extrapolation based on data generated by the NHANES. On January 2007, 73,605 patients were on dialysis, which corresponds to 390 patients per million of population (pmp); the majority of these patients (approximately 90%) were funded by the Brazilian Public Health System. If we aggregate patients with a functioning kidney graft, unofficially estimated by ABTO as 27,500 (approximately 150 pmp), the whole adjusted prevalence of end-stage renal disease patients in Brazil by January 2007 is approximately 540 pmp. We estimate that the number of patients with glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 of body surface approximates 15 million people in Brazil, many of whom are not in treatment. PMID:19484865

  8. Christos Chatziantoniou at Inserm UMR 1155 Wins GSK's Discovery Fast Track Challenge to Investigate Chronic Kidney Disease

    E-print Network

    Chronic Kidney Disease Paris, France - 1 December, 2014 - Christos Chatziantoniou, Director of Research medicines for Chronic Kidney Disease. Dr. Chatziantoniou, researcher in Inserm, is one of 14 winning of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), a pathology affecting millions of people over the world. CKD is defined

  9. Chronic immune stimulation as a contributing cause of chronic disease in opiate addiction including multi-system ageing.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2010-12-01

    Evidence of immune stimulation has been noted in opiate dependent patients for many decades. Documented changes have included lymphadenopathy, round cell infiltration of the hepatic portal triads, diffuse peri-bronchitis, hyperglobulinaemia, lymphocytosis, monocytosis, systemic cytokine stimulation, and cytokine and chemokine activation within the neuraxis. A parallel literature describes an elevated list of chronic degenerative disease as common in such patients including neurodegenerative conditions, atherosclerosis, nephrosclerosis, hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis, chronic obstructive and fibrotic lung disease, osteoporosis, chronic periodontitis, various cancers, hair greying, and stem cell suppression. All of these disorders are now known to have an important immunological role in their pathogenic pathways. The multisystem nature of these myriad changes strongly suggest that the ageing process itself is stimulated in these patients. The link between the immunostimulation on the one hand and the elevated and temporally advanced nature of the chronic degenerative diseases on the other appears not to have been made in the literature. Moreover as immunostimulation is also believed to be an important, potent and principal contributor to the ageing process it appears that experimental and studies of this putative link are warranted. Verification of such an hypothesis would also carry management implications for dose and duration of chronic pain and addiction treatment, pharmacotherapeutic selection, and novel treatments such as long term naltrexone implant therapy and heroin trials. PMID:20800362

  10. Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Long-term Oxygen Therapy for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Chronic Respiratory Failure Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telehealth for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using an Ontario Policy Model Experiences of Living and Dying With COPD: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of the Qualitative Empirical Literature For more information on the qualitative review, please contact Mita Giacomini at: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/ceb/faculty_member_giacomini.htm. For more information on the economic analysis, please visit the PATH website: http://www.path-hta.ca/About-Us/Contact-Us.aspx. The Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) collaborative has produced an associated report on patient preference for mechanical ventilation. For more information, please visit the THETA website: http://theta.utoronto.ca/static/contact. Objective The objective of this analysis was to compare hospital-at-home care with inpatient hospital care for patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who present to the emergency department (ED). Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease state characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. This airflow limitati

  11. Vitamin D and chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disease (CKD–MBD)

    PubMed Central

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Tamez, Hector; Thadhani, Ravi I

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a modern day epidemic and has significant morbidity and mortality implications. Mineral and bone disorders are common in CKD and are now collectively referred to as CKD– mineral and bone disorder (MBD). These abnormalities begin to appear even in early stages of CKD and contribute to the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy. Alteration in vitamin D metabolism is one of the key features of CKD–MBD that has major clinical and research implications. This review focuses on biology, epidemiology and management aspects of these alterations in vitamin D metabolism as they relate to skeletal aspects of CKD–MBD in adult humans. PMID:24605215

  12. Preventing Chronic Disease in the Workplace: A Workshop Report and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Landsbergis, Paul; Hammer, Leslie; Amick, Benjamin C.; Linnan, Laura; Yancey, Antronette; Welch, Laura S.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Flannery, Kelly M.; Pratt, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Chronic disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Risk factors and work conditions can be addressed through health promotion aimed at improving individual health behaviors; health protection, including occupational safety and health interventions; and efforts to support the work–family interface. Responding to the need to address chronic disease at worksites, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened a workshop to identify research priorities to advance knowledge and implementation of effective strategies to reduce chronic disease risk. Workshop participants outlined a conceptual framework and corresponding research agenda to address chronic disease prevention by integrating health promotion and health protection in the workplace. PMID:21778485

  13. Minireview: Roles of Fibroblast Growth Factors 19 and 21 in Metabolic Regulation and Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangfang; Yu, Lechu; Lin, Xiufei; Cheng, Peng; He, Luqing; Li, Xiaokun; Lu, Xuemian; Tan, Yi; Yang, Hong; Cai, Lu; Zhang, Chi

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19 and FGF21 are hormones that regulate metabolic processes particularly during feeding or starvation, thus ultimately influencing energy production. FGF19 is secreted by the intestines during feeding and negatively regulates bile acid synthesis and secretion, whereas FGF21 is produced in the liver during fasting and plays a crucial role in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as maintaining energy homeostasis. FGF19 and FGF21 are regarded as late-acting hormones because their functions are only used after insulin and glucagon have completed their actions. Although FGF19 and FGF21 are activated under different conditions, they show extensively functional overlap in terms of improving glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, weight loss, and lipid, and energy metabolism, particularly in pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular and renal diseases. Most patients with these metabolic diseases exhibit reduced serum FGF19 levels, which might contribute to its etiology. In addition, the simultaneous increase in serum FGF21 levels is likely a compensatory response to reduced FGF19 levels, and the 2 proteins concertedly maintain metabolic homeostasis. Here, we review the physiological and pharmacological cross talk between FGF19 and FGF21 in relation to the regulation of endocrine metabolism and various chronic diseases. PMID:26308386

  14. Inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its role in cardiovascular disease and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Paul T

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by lung inflammation that persists after smoking cessation. This inflammation is heterogeneous but the key inflammatory cell types involved are macrophages, neutrophils and T cells. Other lung cells may also produce inflammatory mediators, particularly the epithelial cells. The main inflammatory mediators include tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, reactive oxygen species and proteases. COPD is also associated with systemic inflammation and there is a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (particularly coronary artery disease) and lung cancer in patients with COPD. There is strong associative evidence that the inflammatory cells/mediators in COPD are also relevant to the development of cardiovascular disease and lung cancer. There are a large number of potential inhibitors of inflammation in COPD that may well have beneficial effects for these comorbidities. This is a not well-understood area and there is a requirement for more definitive clinical and mechanistic studies to define the relationship between the inflammatory process of COPD and cardiovascular disease and lung cancer. PMID:26220864

  15. Subclinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prospective hospital-based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Chindhi, Sandip; Thakur, Surinder; Sarkar, Malay; Negi, Prakash C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important non-communicable disease worldwide with a rising global incidence. COPD is associated with multiple co-morbidities. Patients with COPD are at increased risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in COPD. The present case-control study was designed to assess the relationship between sub-clinical atherosclerotic vascular diseases with COPD. Methods: It was a prospective case-control blinded observational study. There were 142 COPD patients and 124 age-and sex-matched controls without COPD and cardiovascular diseases. Frequency of sub-clinical atherosclerosis was assessed by the carotid B-mode duplex ultrasonography assessment of carotid wall intima medial thickness (IMT). Plaque was defined as IMT of more than 1.2 mm. Results: Prevalence of carotid plaqing was significantly higher amongst patients of COPD (38.7%) compared to controls (13.7%, odds ratio 3.9, P < 0.0001). Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed COPD as an independent predictor of carotid plaqing (r = 0.85, P < 0.023). Conclusion: The frequency of carotid plaqing is high in COPD patients. Carotid plaqing may be due to shared risk factors or the presence of low-grade systemic inflammation. Presence of increased CIMT and carotid plaqing in COPD patients identifies early atherosclerotic changes and future cardiovascular risk. Hence screening of CIMT should be a part of cardiovascular assessment in patients with COPD. PMID:25814798

  16. Ubiquitous monitoring system for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Il Hyung; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Hee Chan

    2007-01-01

    The Purpose of this paper is to report a code division multiple access (CDMA) based wireless device that is able to measure pulse oxygen saturation(SpO2) and Electrocardiogram(ECG) during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease patients' daily life at home. Global Positioning System (GPS) and a specific database system are also included in this device to trace patient's location. Unlike the pre-reported devices using wireless network like Bluetooth or Zigbee which has a limited connection area, the developed system enables the literally ubiquitous service in reporting the patient's data to their doctors at any time and any place using the CDMA-based cellular phone network. PMID:18002798

  17. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  18. ABUNDANT PRP-CWD IN TONSIL FROM MULE DEER WITH PRECLINICAL CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal neurologic disease of deer. The unexpected spread of the disease from a limited area in the western US to a number of states and Canadian provinces has prompted a call for extensive surveillance efforts. The current diagnostic test is sensitive and specific...

  19. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  20. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65 % of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50 % reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings. PMID:25801207

  1. Sickle cell disease: a neglected chronic disease of increasing global health importance.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Subarna; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a single gene disorder causing a debilitating systemic syndrome characterised by chronic anaemia, acute painful episodes, organ infarction and chronic organ damage and by a significant reduction in life expectancy. The origin of SCD lies in the malarial regions of the tropics where carriers are protected against death from malaria and hence enjoy an evolutionary advantage. More recently, population migration has meant that SCD now has a worldwide distribution and that a substantial number of children are born with the condition in higher-income areas, including large parts of Europe and North and South America. Newborn screening, systematic clinical follow-up and prevention of sepsis and organ damage have led to an increased life expectancy among people with SCD in many such countries; however, in resource-limited settings where the majority continue to be born, most affected children continue to die in early childhood, usually undiagnosed, due to the lack of effective programmes for its early detection and treatment. As new therapies emerge, potentially leading to disease amelioration or cure, it is of paramount importance that the significant burden of SCD in resource-poor countries is properly recognised. PMID:25239949

  2. Sickle cell disease: a neglected chronic disease of increasing global health importance

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Subarna; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a single gene disorder causing a debilitating systemic syndrome characterised by chronic anaemia, acute painful episodes, organ infarction and chronic organ damage and by a significant reduction in life expectancy. The origin of SCD lies in the malarial regions of the tropics where carriers are protected against death from malaria and hence enjoy an evolutionary advantage. More recently, population migration has meant that SCD now has a worldwide distribution and that a substantial number of children are born with the condition in higher-income areas, including large parts of Europe and North and South America. Newborn screening, systematic clinical follow-up and prevention of sepsis and organ damage have led to an increased life expectancy among people with SCD in many such countries; however, in resource-limited settings where the majority continue to be born, most affected children continue to die in early childhood, usually undiagnosed, due to the lack of effective programmes for its early detection and treatment. As new therapies emerge, potentially leading to disease amelioration or cure, it is of paramount importance that the significant burden of SCD in resource-poor countries is properly recognised. PMID:25239949

  3. [The use of microwave resonance therapy on patients with chronic nonspecific lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Dziublik, A A; Mukhin, A A; Ugarov, B N; Chechel', L V

    1989-03-01

    The authors investigated the efficacy of using electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency and low intensity (bioresonance therapy) in the treatment of patients with some forms of chronic unspecific pulmonary diseases. The object of the investigation were patients with bronchial asthma, chronic nonobstructive and obstructive bronchitis. The treatment efficacy was 80%. PMID:2750121

  4. Attrition in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs and Self-Efficacy at Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community…

  5. HIV/AIDS as a Chronic Disease: Emergence from the Plague Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Christy L.; Chambre, Susan M.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the social, biological, and political forces that changed the public policy conception of HIV/AIDS from an acute epidemic to a chronic illness. Provides an overview of the institutional and social responses to the disease. Discusses and defines characteristics of the chronic illness and plague models. (MJP)

  6. Chronic Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Mountaintop Mining Areas of Central Appalachian States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Laura; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates are higher among residents of mountaintop mining (MTM) areas compared to mining and nonmining areas, and to examine the association between greater levels of MTM surface mining and CVD mortality. Methods: Age-adjusted chronic CVD mortality rates from 1999 to 2006 for…

  7. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  8. Chronic lung disease of prematurity: a short history.

    PubMed

    Philip, Alistair G S

    2009-12-01

    Chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD) is commonly considered to be a consequence of assisted ventilation. However, prior to the description in 1967 of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), following ventilator therapy for respiratory distress syndrome, Wilson-Mikity syndrome (WMS) had been described in very preterm infants on minimal oxygen supplementation. In the 1970s and 1980s, many infants treated with assisted ventilation required prolonged mechanical ventilation after developing radiographic features of coarse infiltrates, severe hyperinflation, and microcystic changes, associated with hypercarbemia and the need for increased inspired oxygen concentrations. Some infants died and showed evidence of pulmonary fibrosis, obstructive bronchiolitis, and dysplastic change. The role of supplemental oxygen, positive pressure ventilation, and the immaturity of the lung have long been considered important in the etiology of CLD/BPD. More recently, the role of inflammation (particularly antenatal exposure to cytokines) and individual susceptibility (genetic predisposition) have assumed greater etiologic importance. The historical setting into which corticosteroid treatment for BPD was introduced is also discussed. After the licensing of exogenous surfactant to treat RDS in the early 1990s and more widespread use of prenatal corticosteroids in the mid-1990s, severe BPD became an unusual event. Gradually, the diagnosis of CLD, still often referred to as BPD, was based on an oxygen requirement at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. However, it is not clear that this 'new BPD' is substantially different from WMS. It is difficult to make prognostications about long-term lung function of these infants based on oxygen 'requirement' at 36 weeks, since supplemental oxygen is frequently used unnecessarily. PMID:19699162

  9. Hemoglobin discriminates stages of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YING; QIN, MINGZHAO; ZHENG, JIE; YAN, HONG; LI, MEI; CUI, YAO; ZHANG, RUIHUA; ZHAO, WEI; GUO, YING

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) increases with age, and anemia is known to affect the outcome of subjects with CKD. However, little is known with regard to the associations between metabolic complications and stages of CKD among elderly patients. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of CKD in elderly Chinese patients, as well as the associations between stages of CKD and clinically important complications of anemia. In total, 2,258 individuals with CKD, divided into younger (n=989) and elderly (n=1,269) groups, were enrolled in the study between June 2009 and December 2011. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed using a 99mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging method (modified Gate's method). The levels of serum creatinine (SCr) and hemoglobin (Hb), and the hematocrit (HCT) were measured simultaneously per manufacturer's instructions. In the elderly group, the levels of SCr and proportional ratios were higher, while the GFR, Hb level, HCT and proportional ratios were lower when compared with the values in the younger group. Statistically significant differences were observed in the Hb concentrations when comparing individuals classified with different stages of CKD in the younger and elderly groups. In the younger group, there was no significant difference in the Hb concentrations between the stage 3a and 3b CKD patients. However, in the elderly group, the Hb concentrations were significantly higher in patients classified with stage 3a CKD when compared with those with stage 3b, whose GFR cutoff point was <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. In conclusion, the results indicated that Hb levels may be used to discriminate stages of CKD in elderly patients; thus, Hb may be used as a biomarker to assess the severity of CKD.

  10. Nitric oxide status in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Y. S.; Kiranmayi, V. S.; Bitla, A. R.; Krishna, G. S.; Rao, P. V. L. N. Srinivasa; Sivakumar, V.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular (CVD) morbidity and mortality, mainly due to atherosclerosis. Decreased production or reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) can result in endothelial dysfunction (ED). Multiple mechanisms are known to cause a state of NO deficiency in patients with CKD. Patients in various stages of CKD grouped as group-1 (CKD stage 1 and 2), group-2 (CKD stage 3 and 4), group-3 (CKD stage 5) and healthy controls were included in the study. Each group of patients and controls comprised 25 subjects. Plasma nitrites, L-arginine, asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) and citrulline were measured in all the subjects. Patients in all stages of CKD had lower NO and higher ADMA levels compared to controls. Further, group-2 and group-3 patients had lower levels of NO and higher levels of ADMA than group-1 patients. L-arginine levels showed no difference between patients and controls. However, group-3 patients had lower L-arginine levels compared to group-1 patients. Citrulline levels were decreased in group-3 patients. NO production was decreased in patients in all stages of CKD. The decrease could be due to decreased availability of the substrate, L-arginine or due to an increased ADMA, a potent inhibitor of endothelial NO synthase. Therapeutic interventions directed towards improvement of NO production in addition to management of other CVD risk factors may prevent development of ED and facilitate proper management of CKD patients who are at increased risk for CVD.

  11. Ibrutinib treatment ameliorates murine chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubovsky, Jason A.; Flynn, Ryan; Du, Jing; Harrington, Bonnie K.; Zhong, Yiming; Kaffenberger, Benjamin; Yang, Carrie; Towns, William H.; Lehman, Amy; Johnson, Amy J.; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Devine, Steven M.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Serody, Jonathan S.; Murphy, William J.; Munn, David H.; Luznik, Leo; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Wong, Henry K.; MacDonald, Kelli K.P.; Maillard, Ivan; Koreth, John; Elias, Laurence; Cutler, Corey; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Ritz, Jerome; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Byrd, John C.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a life-threatening impediment to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and current therapies do not completely prevent and/or treat cGVHD. CD4+ T cells and B cells mediate cGVHD; therefore, targeting these populations may inhibit cGVHD pathogenesis. Ibrutinib is an FDA-approved irreversible inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) and IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) that targets Th2 cells and B cells and produces durable remissions in B cell malignancies with minimal toxicity. Here, we evaluated whether ibrutinib could reverse established cGVHD in 2 complementary murine models, a model interrogating T cell–driven sclerodermatous cGVHD and an alloantibody-driven multiorgan system cGVHD model that induces bronchiolar obliterans (BO). In the T cell–mediated sclerodermatous cGVHD model, ibrutinib treatment delayed progression, improved survival, and ameliorated clinical and pathological manifestations. In the alloantibody-driven cGVHD model, ibrutinib treatment restored pulmonary function and reduced germinal center reactions and tissue immunoglobulin deposition. Animals lacking BTK and ITK did not develop cGVHD, indicating that these molecules are critical to cGVHD development. Furthermore, ibrutinib treatment reduced activation of T and B cells from patients with active cGVHD. Our data demonstrate that B cells and T cells drive cGVHD and suggest that ibrutinib has potential as a therapeutic agent, warranting consideration for cGVHD clinical trials. PMID:25271622

  12. The Lung Tissue Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Marc A.; Dimitriu, Pedro A.; Hayashi, Shizu; Elliott, W. Mark; McDonough, John E.; Gosselink, John V.; Cooper, Joel; Sin, Don D.; Mohn, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Based on surface brushings and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, Hilty and coworkers demonstrated microbiomes in the human lung characteristic of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which have now been confirmed by others. Objectives: To extend these findings to human lung tissue samples. Methods: DNA from lung tissue samples was obtained from nonsmokers (n = 8); smokers without COPD (n = 8); patients with very severe COPD (Global Initiative for COPD [GOLD] 4) (n = 8); and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 8). The latter served as a positive control, with sterile water as a negative control. All bacterial community analyses were based on polymerase chain reaction amplifying 16S rRNA gene fragments. Total bacterial populations were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and bacterial community composition was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and pyrotag sequencing. Measurement and Main Results: Total bacterial populations within lung tissue were small (20–1,252 bacterial cells per 1,000 human cells) but greater in all four sample groups versus the negative control group (P < 0.001). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing distinguished three distinct bacterial community compositions: one common to the nonsmoker and smoker groups, a second to the GOLD 4 group, and the third to the CF-positive control group. Pyrotag sequencing identified greater than 1,400 unique bacterial sequences and showed an increase in the Firmicutes phylum in GOLD 4 patients versus all other groups (P < 0.003) attributable to an increase in the Lactobacillus genus (P < 0.0007). Conclusions: There is a detectable bacterial community within human lung tissue that changes in patients with very severe COPD. PMID:22427533

  13. Vitamin D and UV exposure in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Rolfdieter

    2013-01-01

    With loss of renal function and decreasing glomerula filtration rate the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] as well as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25 (OH)2 D] often decrease simultaneously. In representative groups of German patients on renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplantation) our group retrospectively analyzed the vitamin D status over a period of 12 y (1995?2006). Only 11% of patients had a serum level of 25(OH)D that was > 30 ng/ml, more than 70% had a level of 25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml. In clinical trials we used sun-simulating artificial lamps to produce vitamin D3 in the skin. Partial-body irradiation (15% of body surface) was used during the routine hemodialysis treatment. Whole-body UV exposure was done in a standing position three times a week before the hemodialysis treatment. With both procedures we observed an increase of the serum level of 25(OH)2D3 by approx. 35–50% over a period of 2?3 mo, maintenance of trabecular bone mineral density and a normalization of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Heart rate variability improved during the whole-body radiation intervention period by 20?25%. Patients who continued the whole-body irradiation regularly two or three times before starting the routine hemodialysis session had maintained normal levels of circulating 25(OH)D3 and of 1,25(OH)2D3. Therefore, from our data it can be recommended that intermittent suberythemal UVB exposure with a sun-simulation spectrum is effective to treat and/or protect against vitamin D deficiency in chronic and end-stage kidney disease patients. PMID:24494043

  14. Cinacalcet in Pediatric and Adolescent Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alharthi, Abdulla A.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Abukhatwah, Mohamed W.; Sherief, Laila M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cinacalcet, a calcimimetic drug, has been shown to be efficacious in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients; however, it was not fully studied in pediatric CKD patients. We aimed at assessing the effect of cinacalcet on intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) secretion in children with CKD-4/5 with iPTH consistently ? 300?pg/mL refractory to conventional treatment. This is a prospective cohort analysis of 28 children with uncontrolled hyper-parathyroidism secondary to stage 4 and 5 CKD admitted to a tertiary center during the period from April 2012 to April 2014. Twenty-eight patients with CKD-4/5 were assessed prospectively regarding bone biochemistry, renal ultrasonography, serum iPTH level, and medications. Patients were classified into 3 groups: group 1, 6 patients with CKD-4 on supplemental and supportive therapy; group 2, 6 patients with CKD-5 on hemodialysis and; group 3, 16 patients with CKD-5 on automated peritoneal dialysis. Patients were between the ages of 9 months and 18 years on commencing cinacalcet at doses of 0.5 to 1.5?mg/kg. All patients showed at least a 60% reduction in iPTH (60%–97%). Highly significant reduction in iPTH and serum alkaline phosphatase levels was detected post-cinacalcet. The serum calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), and Ca?×?P product were unaffected. Treatment was well tolerated with no hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, or other adverse effects almost in all patients. Cinacalcet use was proven safe for all pediatric and adolescent patients with CKD-4/5 during the study period, and at the same time most of the patients reached the suggested iPTH target values PMID:25590845

  15. Computed Tomographic Airway Morphology in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Remodeling or Innate Anatomy?

    PubMed

    Diaz, Alejandro A; Estépar, Raul San José; Washko, George R

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomographic measures of central airway morphology have been used in clinical, epidemiologic, and genetic investigation as an inference of the presence and severity of small-airway disease in smokers. Although several association studies have brought us to believe that these computed tomographic measures reflect airway remodeling, a careful review of such data and more recent evidence may reveal underappreciated complexity to these measures and limitations that prompt us to question that belief. This Perspective offers a review of seminal papers and alternative explanations of their data in the light of more recent evidence. The relationships between airway morphology and lung function are observed in subjects who never smoked, implying that native airway structure indeed contributes to lung function; computed tomographic measures of central airways such as wall area, lumen area, and total bronchial area are smaller in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease versus those without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and the airways are smaller as disease severity increases. The observations suggest that (1) native airway morphology likely contributes to the relationships between computed tomographic measures of airways and lung function; and (2) the presence of smaller airways in those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease versus those without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as their decrease with disease severity suggests that smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may simply have smaller airways to begin with, which put them at greater risk for the development of smoking-related disease. PMID:26562761

  16. Reduction of cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Murray

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and morbidity in people with chronic kidney disease, but there are few evidence-based treatments for reducing cardiovascular events in these patients. The failure of novel drug candidates to delay progression to end-stage renal disease and limit or abrogate cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has led to increased interest in a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist-based treatment model to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Aldosterone concentrations and MR signalling are associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular injury and the incidence of sudden death, and MR blockade decreases the risk of cardiovascular events and sudden death in patients with reduced glomerular filtration rate. Since evidence from clinical trials shows that treatment with MR antagonists confers a morbidity and mortality advantage for patients with cardiovascular disorders, similar benefits might also accrue in patients with chronic kidney disease. Large prospective trials are urgently needed to answer this question. In this Review, I argue that despite differences in the pathophysiology and clinical features of cardiovascular disease in patients with and without chronic kidney disease, MR antagonists could provide cardiovascular benefit in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26429402

  17. Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and periodontal diseases. However, a large-scale population-based cohort study was previously absent from the literature. Therefore, we evaluated the risk of periodontal diseases in patients with COPD in a nationwide population. From the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 22,332 patients with COPD who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2010. For each case, two individuals without COPD were randomly selected and frequency matched by age, sex, and diagnosis year. Both groups were followed up till the end of 2011. The overall incidence of periodontal diseases was 1.19-fold greater in the COPD group than in the comparison group (32.2 vs 26.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.24). Compared with non-COPD patients, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD increased with the number of emergency room visits (from 1.14 [95% CI 1.10–1.19] to 5.09 [95% CI 4.53–5.72]) and admissions (from 1.15 [95% CI 1.10–1.20] to 3.17 [95% CI 2.81–3.57]). In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids (1.22, 95% CI 1.11–1.34) and systemic corticosteroids (1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23) were significantly higher than those of patients not treated with corticosteroids. Patient with COPD are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases than the general population. Our results also support that the risk of periodontal diseases is proportional to COPD control. In addition, patients who receive corticosteroid treatment are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases. PMID:26579813

  18. Potential drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roblek, Tina; Trobec, Katja; Mrhar, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polypharmacy is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but little is known about the prevalence and significance of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This study evaluates DDIs in hospitalized patients. Material and methods We retrospectively screened medical charts over a 6-month period for diagnosis of chronic HF and/or COPD. Potential DDIs were evaluated using Lexi-Interact software. Results Seven hundred and seventy-eight patients were included in the study (median age 75 years, 61% men). The median number of drugs on admission and discharge was 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 4–9) and 7 (IQR 5–), respectively (p = 0.10). We recorded 6.5 ±5.7 potential DDIs per patient on admission and 7.2 ±5.6 on discharge (p = 0.2). From admission to discharge, type-C and type-X potential DDIs increased (p < 0.05 for both). Type X interactions were rare (< 1%), with the combination of a ?-blocker and a ?2 agonist being the most common (64%). There were significantly more type-C and type-D potential DDIs in patients with chronic HF as compared to patients with COPD (p < 0.001). Patients with concomitant chronic HF and COPD had more type-C and type-X potential DDIs when compared to those with individual disease (p < 0.005). An aldosterone antagonist and ACE inhibitor/ARB were prescribed to 3% of chronic HF patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 ml/(min × 1.73 m2). Conclusions The DDIs are common in patients with chronic HF and/or COPD, but only a few appear to be of clinical significance. The increase in potential DDIs from admission to discharge may reflect better guideline implementation rather than poor clinical practice. PMID:25395943

  19. CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION (CDP) BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATABASE HEALTH PROMOTION AND PREVENTION (HP) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This database focuses on chronic disease prevention, health promotion, and health education emphasizing the methodology and application of effective programs and risk reduction interventions. The materials cover such topics as community health education, self-care, maternal and i...

  20. 78 FR 79659 - Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ...Program Standards for the chronic wasting disease (CWD) herd certification program. The CWD herd certification program is a voluntary, cooperative...participating States to administer Approved State CWD Herd Certification Programs, and provisions...

  1. 77 FR 3434 - Notice of Request for Reinstatement of an Information Collection; Chronic Wasting Disease Herd...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ...when feasible. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy...loss leading to death. The presence of CWD in cervids causes significant economic and...voluntary Federal- State-private sector CWD Herd Certification Program designed to...

  2. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air p...

  3. Pharmacology Update on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Weatherspoon, Christopher A; Abbott, Brianna

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a brief review and summarizes current therapies for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, major depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. One new pharmaceutical agent is highlighted for each of the topics. PMID:26596663

  4. Participatory diagnosis of a chronic wasting disease in cattle in southern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Catley, A; Okoth, S; Osman, J; Fison, T; Njiru, Z; Mwangi, J; Jones, B A; Leyland, T J

    2001-10-11

    In southern Sudan, livestock keepers identified a chronic wasting disease in adult cattle as one of their most-serious animal-health problems. Participatory-appraisal (PA) methods and conventional veterinary-investigation methods were used to characterise the chronic wasting disease and identify linkages between indigenous knowledge and modern veterinary knowledge. The local characterisation of chronic wasting encompassed trypanosomosis, fasciolosis, parasitic gastroenteritis and schistosomosis (as both single and mixed infections).A standardised PA method called matrix scoring had good reproducibility when investigating local perceptions of disease-signs and disease causes. Comparison of matrix-scoring results showed much overlap with modern veterinary descriptions of cattle diseases and the results of conventional veterinary investigation. Applications of PA methods in remote areas with very limited veterinary infrastructure are discussed. The validation of data derived from PA is discussed by reference to the low sensitivity of 'field-friendly' diagnostic tests for important cattle diseases. PMID:11535278

  5. Impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis by serum from patients with chronic lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaswal, U; Roper, S; Roath, S

    1983-01-01

    The sera of 74 individuals with chronic lymphoproliferative disease were screened for the presence of inhibitory activity against neutrophil chemotaxis. This was present in more than half the patients with IgA myeloma and Hodgkin's disease but was less common in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, lymphocytic lymphoma and non-IgA paraproteinaemia. Heating the sera prior to testing frequently enhanced inhibitory activity particularly in myeloma and lymphoma. PMID:6833512

  6. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Long-term Oxygen Therapy for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Chronic Respiratory Failure Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients with Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telehealth for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using an Ontario Policy Model Experiences of Living and Dying With COPD: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of the Qualitative Empirical Literature For more information on the qualitative review, please contact Mita Giacomini at: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/ceb/faculty_member_giacomini.htm. For more information on the economic analysis, please visit the PATH website: http://www.path-hta.ca/About-Us/Contact-Us.aspx. The Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) collaborative has produced an associated report on patient preference for mechanical ventilation. For more information, please visit the THETA website: http://theta.utoronto.ca/static/contact. Objective The objective of this analysis was to determine the effectiveness of the influenza vaccination and the pneumococcal vaccination in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in reducing the incidence of influenza-related illness or pneumococcal pneumonia. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Influenza Disease Influenza is a global threat. It is believed that the risk of a pandemic of influenza still exists. Three pandemics occurred in the 20th century

  7. Telemetric Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Investigation of Quality of Life for People Working in Shipbuilding Industry

    PubMed Central

    Koulouri, Agoritsa; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Hatzoglou, Chryssi; Roupa, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) has a significant impact on quality of life-related health. Aim: It was the detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by using telemetric methods and the investigation of the quality of life for people working in Shipbuilding Industry compared with a control group. Methods: A group of one hundred men working in the shipbuilding industry aged 51.8 ± 8.2 years old and a control group of one hundred men of the general population aged 51.1 ± 6.4 years were studied. All participants completed the General Health Questionnaire – 28, the Fagerstrom test and a form with demographic characteristics. Pulmonary function test results were electronically sent to a specialist for evaluation. Results: People working in the shipbuilding zone had significantly lower values (p<0.001) in FVC, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC compared with the general population participants. Worse social functionality was exhibited by workers in the shipbuilding zone, people with elementary education, unemployed and by those suffering from comorbidities (p <0.001). Conclusions: Health level and its individual dimensions are both associated with health self-assessment and occupational and economic status. The coexistence of chronic diseases and smoking dependence affects emotion and social functioning of individuals. PMID:25568580

  8. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities. PMID:25655487

  9. Association between Psoriasis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Kong, Lingjun; Li, Fulun; Chen, Chen; Xu, Rong; Wang, Hongshen; Peng, Shiguang; Zhou, Min; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is considered a systemic inflammatory disorder. Previous studies have reported conflicting positive or negative correlations between psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether there is an associated risk between psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We performed a complete 30-year literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register databases on this topic. Four observational studies with a total of 13,418 subjects were identified. The odds ratios of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in subjects with psoriasis/mild-to-moderate psoriasis were analyzed using the random-effects model, while the odds ratios of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in subjects with severe psoriasis and current smoking in subjects with psoriasis were analyzed using the fixed-effect model. We found that psoriasis patients were at a greater risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than the general population (odds ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.36–2.65) and that the association between of psoriasis and with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was stronger among patients with severe psoriasis (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.26–3.67). Psoriasis patients should be advised to cease smoking to reduce their risk of COPD. Moreover, identification of this potential risk may enable earlier implementation of preventive measures for reduction comorbidity and mortality rates. PMID:26700640

  10. Beyond Obesity and Lifestyle: A Review of 21st Century Chronic Disease Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, John

    2014-01-01

    The obesity epidemic and associated chronic diseases are often attributed to modern lifestyles. The term “lifestyle” however, ignores broader social, economic, and environmental determinants while inadvertently “blaming the victim.” Seen more eclectically, lifestyle encompasses distal, medial, and proximal determinants. Hence any analysis of causality should include all these levels. The term “anthropogens,” or “…man-made environments, their by-products and/or lifestyles encouraged by these, some of which may be detrimental to human health” provides a monocausal focus for chronic diseases similar to that which the germ theory afforded infectious diseases. Anthropogens have in common an ability to induce a form of chronic, low-level systemic inflammation (“metaflammation”). A review of anthropogens, based on inducers with a metaflammatory association, is conducted here, together with the evidence for each in connection with a number of chronic diseases. This suggests a broader view of lifestyle and a focus on determinants, rather than obesity and lifestyle per se as the specific causes of modern chronic disease. Under such an analysis, obesity is seen more as “a canary in a mineshaft” signaling problems in the broader environment, suggesting that population obesity management should be focused more upstream if chronic diseases are to be better managed. PMID:24804239

  11. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Puspitasari, Hanni P.; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists’ practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. Methods: We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5) and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15) in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by “grounded-theory”. Results: We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists’ attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists’ inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Conclusion: Pharmacists’ attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists’ contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists’ involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists’ practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care. PMID:26445618

  12. Interventions to enhance work participation of workers with a chronic disease: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, Marloes; Leensen, Monique C J; Hoving, Jan L; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of the available effective interventions that enhance work participation of people with a chronic disease, irrespective of their diagnosis. A search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library, searching for systematic reviews published between 2004 and February 2015. Systematic reviews were eligible for inclusion if they described an intervention aimed at enhancing work participation and included participants of working age (18-65?years) with a chronic disease. Reviews had to include populations having different chronic diseases. The quality of the included reviews was evaluated using the quality instrument AMSTAR. Results of reviews of medium and high quality were described in this review. The search resulted in 9 reviews, 5 of which were of medium quality. No high quality reviews were retrieved. 1 review reported inconclusive evidence for policy-based return to work initiatives. The 4 other reviews described interventions focused on changes at work, such as changes in work organisation, working conditions and work environment. Of these 4 reviews, 3 reported beneficial effects of the intervention on work participation. Interventions examined in populations having different chronic diseases were mainly focused on changes at work. The majority of the included interventions were reported to be effective in enhancing work participation of people with a chronic disease, indicating that interventions directed at work could be considered for a generic approach in order to enhance work participation in various chronic diseases. PMID:26408509

  13. Beyond obesity and lifestyle: a review of 21st century chronic disease determinants.

    PubMed

    Egger, Garry; Dixon, John

    2014-01-01

    The obesity epidemic and associated chronic diseases are often attributed to modern lifestyles. The term "lifestyle" however, ignores broader social, economic, and environmental determinants while inadvertently "blaming the victim." Seen more eclectically, lifestyle encompasses distal, medial, and proximal determinants. Hence any analysis of causality should include all these levels. The term "anthropogens," or "…man-made environments, their by-products and/or lifestyles encouraged by these, some of which may be detrimental to human health" provides a monocausal focus for chronic diseases similar to that which the germ theory afforded infectious diseases. Anthropogens have in common an ability to induce a form of chronic, low-level systemic inflammation ("metaflammation"). A review of anthropogens, based on inducers with a metaflammatory association, is conducted here, together with the evidence for each in connection with a number of chronic diseases. This suggests a broader view of lifestyle and a focus on determinants, rather than obesity and lifestyle per se as the specific causes of modern chronic disease. Under such an analysis, obesity is seen more as "a canary in a mineshaft" signaling problems in the broader environment, suggesting that population obesity management should be focused more upstream if chronic diseases are to be better managed. PMID:24804239

  14. Neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats induces chronic hyperthermia resulting in infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    JEONG, KEUN-YEONG; KIM, HWAN MOOK

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of neonatal animals with capsaicin has previously been associated with long-lasting hyperthermia and severe cutaneous lesions. The present study analyzed the effects of capsaicin-induced hyperthermia on the occurrence of infectious disease and pruritic dermatitis in a rat model. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were obtained 1 week prior to parturition. Pups from each litter were randomly assigned to the following experimental groups: Capsaicin-treated (cap-treated; n=10) or vehicle-treated (n=5). Capsaicin (50 mg/kg) or vehicle were systemically administered to the SD rat pups (age, 48 h), after which body temperature was measured using a biotelemetry system, and the effects of hyperthermia on the ability of the rat pups to resist bacterial infection were analyzed. Furthermore, pruritus-induced scratching behavior and dermatitis were assessed, and changes in interleukin (IL)-4- and IL-13-induced immunoglobulin E expression were measured. Treatment of neonatal rats with capsaicin resulted in chronic hyperthermia, which had negative effects on the host immune defense response. The expression levels of T-helper type 2 cell-associated cytokines were significantly increased (P<0.01) in the cap-treated rats following bacterial infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus agalactiae. Furthermore, cap-treated rats exhibited pruritus-induced scratching behavior and dermatitis. The results of the present study suggested that treatment of neonatal rats with capsaicin induces chronic hyperthermia and decreases the effectiveness of the host defense system. Therefore, a cap-treated neonatal rat model may be considered useful when investigating the association between hyperthermia and infectious disease. PMID:26668650

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... www.clinicaltrials.gov . Notes: For more information National Kidney Disease Education Program 1-866-4 KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639) www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Disease Education Program The National Kidney Disease Education Program ( ...

  16. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... was not exposed to any such agent during that service. See also 38 CFR 3.814(c)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure...

  17. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... was not exposed to any such agent during that service. See also 38 CFR 3.814(c)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure...

  18. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... was not exposed to any such agent during that service. See also 38 CFR 3.814(c)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure...

  19. 38 CFR 3.307 - Presumptive service connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... was not exposed to any such agent during that service. See also 38 CFR 3.814(c)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure to... connection for chronic, tropical or prisoner-of-war related disease, or disease associated with exposure...

  20. Dyslipidemia in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Report of the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Pierce, Christopher B; Mitsnefes, Mark M; Flynn, Joseph T.; Goebel, Jens; Kupferman, Juan C.; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods 391 children aged 1–16 yrs underwent measurement of serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). GFR by plasma disappearance of iohexol and urine protein/creatinine ratio (Up/c) were concomitantly measured. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), GFR, and Up/c. Results The median GFR and age were 43 ml/min/1.73m2 and 12 years. Proteinuria was nephrotic range (Up/c > 2) in 12% and BMI exceeded the 95th percentile in 15%. 32% of the cohort had TG > 130 mg/dL. 21% had HDL-C < 40 mg/dl, and 16% had non-HDL-C > 160 mg/dL. Lower GFR was associated with higher TG, lower HDL-C and higher non-HDL-C. Overall, 45% of the cohort had dyslipidemia, defined as one or more abnormal lipid measure; 45% of those had combined dyslipidemia. Nephrotic range proteinuria was associated with dyslipidemia and combined dyslipidemia to an equal and large degree: odds ratio (OR) of 4.16 (95% CI: 1.96, 8.79). Compared to children with GFR > 50 ml/min/1.73m2, children with GFR < 30 ml/min/1.73m2 had an OR of 2.9 (95% CI: 1.47, 5.70) for any dyslipidemia and an OR of 8.58 (95% CI: 3.70, 19.88) for combined dyslipidemia. Conclusions Among children with moderate CKD, dyslipidemia is common and is associated with lower GFR, nephrotic proteinuria, and non-renal factors including age and obesity. PMID:20736985