Science.gov

Sample records for chronic disease self-help

  1. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carmel M; Peterson, Chris; Robinson, Rowena; Sturmberg, Joachim P

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core themes around chronic illness

  2. [Swiss Bechterew's Disease Association: a patient self-help organization].

    PubMed

    Baumberger, H

    1991-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the third most common form of rheumatism and as such of considerable economic and social significance due to its early outbreak, its course of flare-ups and its remissions, chronic persistence and risk of early invalidity. As there is no basic therapy, the main emphasis of modern treatment lies on the practice of regular and intensive AS-specific physical exercise, complemented by suitable sports. In these circumstances, the active cooperation of the patients themselves is of utmost importance; therefore, it was obvious that the information of AS patients on their disease and their interest to improve their physical and psychological situation would be further encouraged by the foundation of a self-assistance organization for AS patients, thereby lightening the blow fate had dealt them. The Swiss Ankylosing Spondylitis Association (Schweizerische Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew, SVMB, Société de la spondylarthrite ankylosante, SSSA, Società svizzera morbo di Bechterew, SSMB), founded in 1978, has its headquarters in Zurich (Röntgenstrasse 22, CH-8005 Zurich, Tel. 01 272 78 66) and strives for the following: --the organization of local and regional therapy groups for AS gymnastics and sports --information for patients and their families on all aspects concerning AS --preparation of 'contact' meetings between AS patients to exchange experiences and thoughts --information for doctors on the latest developments in the field of AS and about the activities of the AS Society --promotion of research in the field of AS and its related diseases --information to the general population about the physical aspects of AS and the problems confronting AS patients --cooperation with other AS societies within the framework of the Ankylosing Spondylitis International Federation, ASIF. PMID:2063048

  3. Self-help, mutual aid and chronic patients' clubs in Croatia, Yugoslavia: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Kulcar, Z

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the clubs for patients with hypertension which have operated effectively in parts of Croatia and Slovenia (Yugoslavia) for more than 15 years, with many thousands of patients enrolling voluntarily. Based on the principle of self-help, yet involving the regular participation of members of a patient's own primary health team, they increase compliance with long-term treatment regimens and improve the quality of life. Such programmes are capable of reducing the amount of time devoted by a medical practitioner while increasing the effectiveness of treatments. If they are to succeed, it is essential to ensure regular club meetings, social activities and encouragement to each individual member to find a role and to continue attending for as long as possible. A new life style and consequent benefits to health are obtained only through long membership. PMID:2041007

  4. Professional Support of Self-Help Groups: A Support Group Project for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen, Benedicte

    2003-01-01

    Study follows a collaborative support group project between a team of health professionals and a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients' group. While advantageous for professionals to decide upon the aim of a joint intervention in dialogue with participants, simply asking participants what their aims are does not guarantee actual agreement. Case study…

  5. Coping with sickle cell disease: a profile and perspective of a pioneer self-help group.

    PubMed

    Duncan, D E; Scott, R B

    1988-02-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a chronic, debilitating disease that is passed genetically from generation to generation. It is a disease marked by periods of well-being and crisis, and it has a profound effect on all bodily organs, shortening the lifespan of its victims. The disease also has far-reaching effects on family functioning and relationships. Support for affected families and individuals is therefore a vital component of any management regimen.In the 1960s, the idea for the Association for Sickle Cell Anemia Research (ASCAR) was implemented. The group was spearheaded by Dr. Roland B. Scott and Dr. Angella Ferguson, both of whom were members of the Department of Pediatrics at Freedmen's Hospital (now Howard University Hospital).This group was perhaps the first of its kind, and adopted as its goals education and family support as well as fund-raising to aid in the support of research. This article provides an overview of the development of this group, its organization and activities, as well as an appraisal of its accomplishments. It also offers specific suggestions for formulating similar groups. PMID:3241309

  6. Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to be Effective

    PubMed Central

    Trompetter, Hester R.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.; Lamers, Sanne M. A.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.

    2016-01-01

    -based self-help ACT may not be allocated to chronic pain sufferers experiencing low levels of mental resilience resources such as self-acceptance, goals in life, and environmental mastery. Other subgroups are identified that potentially need specific tailoring of (web-based) ACT. Emotional and psychological wellbeing should receive much more attention in subsequent studies on chronic pain and illness. PMID:27014159

  7. Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to be Effective.

    PubMed

    Trompetter, Hester R; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Lamers, Sanne M A; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2016-01-01

    -based self-help ACT may not be allocated to chronic pain sufferers experiencing low levels of mental resilience resources such as self-acceptance, goals in life, and environmental mastery. Other subgroups are identified that potentially need specific tailoring of (web-based) ACT. Emotional and psychological wellbeing should receive much more attention in subsequent studies on chronic pain and illness. PMID:27014159

  8. Self-Help Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    1973-01-01

    The author believes that there is a distinct need for professionals to become competent in providing materials for self-help lay efforts. Colleges and universities must provide for the facilitation of personal growth through self administered procedures by either a clinical approach (in counseling centers) or a didactic one (in classes as, for…

  9. Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), is characterized by chronic disabling fatigue and other symptoms, which are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. Previous trials have suggested that graded exercise therapy (GET) is an effective and safe treatment. GET itself is therapist-intensive with limited availability. Objective While guided self-help based on cognitive behavior therapy appears helpful to patients, Guided graded Exercise Self-help (GES) is yet to be tested. Methods This pragmatic randomized controlled trial is set within 2 specialist CFS/ME services in the South of England. Adults attending secondary care clinics with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)-defined CFS/ME (N=218) will be randomly allocated to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus GES while on a waiting list for therapist-delivered rehabilitation. GES will consist of a structured booklet describing a 6-step graded exercise program, supported by up to 4 face-to-face/telephone/Skype™ consultations with a GES-trained physiotherapist (no more than 90 minutes in total) over 8 weeks. The primary outcomes at 12-weeks after randomization will be physical function (SF-36 physical functioning subscale) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes will include healthcare costs, adverse outcomes, and self-rated global impression change scores. We will follow up all participants until 1 year after randomization. We will also undertake qualitative interviews of a sample of participants who received GES, looking at perceptions and experiences of those who improved and worsened. Results The project was funded in 2011 and enrolment was completed in December 2014, with follow-up completed in March 2016. Data analysis is currently underway and the first results are expected to be submitted soon. Conclusions This study will indicate whether adding GES to SMC will benefit patients who often spend many months

  10. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  11. Assessing the Availability and Quality of Online Self-Help Videos: A Pilot Study with a Focus on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Julia; Rennie, Brandon; Seekins, Tom; O'Donnell, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The Internet and other electronic media may provide one part of a solution for reducing disparities in the availability of medical services. From a patient-centred perspective, an individual with a chronic, degenerative condition may ask what information is available that I can use to manage changes in my functional capacity over time,…

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000091.htm Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease. Having COPD ...

  13. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  14. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  15. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called ... some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder leads to long- ...

  16. Self Help and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Alan

    1976-01-01

    Suggests that the single most important common denominator of the various types of self-help groups examined may be that the role of the person who has already lived through the experience is critical for helping others. (Author/AM)

  17. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm. PMID:25999227

  18. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  20. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Sleep and Sleep Disorders Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep and Chronic Disease How Much Sleep Do ...

  1. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland that often results in reduced thyroid function ( hypothyroidism ). Causes Chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto disease is a ... TSH). This condition is also known as subclinical hypothyroidism. If there is no evidence of thyroid hormone ...

  2. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  3. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hattab, Yousef; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Balaan, Marvin; Lega, Mark; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic smoking-related lung disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. It carries an enormous economic burden on the health care system. This results in a significant social impact on affected patients and their families. In this article, we review COPD in general, critical care management of patients presenting with acute exacerbation of COPD, and methods of prevention. PMID:26919673

  4. Integrating self-help books into psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Linda F; Smith, Thomas P

    2003-02-01

    This article describes a systematic and integral method of incorporating self-help books into psychotherapy as a collaborative function. We address the distinctions between self-help and bibliotherapy, consider bibliotherapy as adjunctive or integrative to psychotherapy, and outline the multiple uses of bibliotherapy for clinical purposes. How to apply self-help books in psychotherapy and ways to select books are illustrated by a case example. Indications and contraindications for bibliotherapy in therapy are outlined. PMID:12552626

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  6. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease that makes it difficult to empty air out of the lungs. This difficulty in ...

  7. Self-Help Books: Some Ethical Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becvar, Raphael J.

    1978-01-01

    Self-help books may be a useful resource to counselors in their work with counselees. They may contribute, however, to the development of psychological problems or prevent people from seeking help when needed. The utopia promised by self-help books may be a pathology in its own right. (Author)

  8. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  10. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  11. Managing menopause: a qualitative analysis of self-help literature for women at midlife.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Antonia C; Griffin, Christine

    2003-04-01

    This article reports on a qualitative social constructionist analysis that aims to examine the ways in which menopause and women's bodies are represented in self-help texts. In particular, we aim to compare texts with a more traditional 'medical' approach and others taking a more 'woman-centred' perspective. Four diverse self-help books on menopause and HRT available in England were analysed to examine the ways in which women, menopause and midlife were portrayed, and to investigate the construction of notions of knowledge, expertise and responsibility. The selected texts were published between 1992 and 1996 and covered a range of perspectives, including medical, alternative and feminist. Results showed that menopause was constructed as a 'deficiency disease' in all four texts, although in three of the texts this 'disease' discourse was counterposed by the simultaneous use of a 'menopause as natural' discourse. Menopause was also constructed as inherently complex and confusing, as were women's bodies. A discourse of 'change' was drawn upon in which menopause was portrayed as only one of the stressful events women must cope with at midlife. Finally, most of the texts drew on a discourse of 'management' rather than one of 'treatment' or 'cure' when discussing how menopause, and women's relationship to menopause should be handled. The medical profession was constructed as the primary source of expertise on menopause and women's bodies, although responsibility for the 'management' of menopause as a chronic condition lay solely with individual women. Although there were a number of differences in representations of menopause in medically oriented self-help texts and those adopting a more woman-centred perspective, our analysis also revealed several areas of similarity and overlap with regard to the construction of menopause and its 'management'. The implications of these findings for the construction of menopause in self-help texts for women are discussed. PMID:12639580

  12. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  13. Chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of chronic kidney disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26030647

  14. Analyzing Self-Help Forums with Ontology-Based Text Mining: An Exploration in Kidney Space.

    PubMed

    Burckhardt, Philipp; Padman, Rema

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as a popular source for health-related information. More than eighty percent of American Internet users have searched for health topics online. Millions of patients use self-help online forums to exchange information and support. In parallel, the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases has become a financial burden for the healthcare system demanding new, cost-effective interventions. To provide such interventions, it is necessary to understand patients' preferences of treatment options and to gain insights into their experiences as patients. We introduce a text-processing algorithm based on semantic ontologies to allow for finer-grained analyses of online forums compared to standard methods. We have applied our method in an analysis of two major Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) forums. Our results suggest that the analysis of forums may provide valuable insights on daily issues patients face, their choice of different treatment options and interactions between patients, their relatives and clinicians. PMID:26958281

  15. Analyzing Self-Help Forums with Ontology-Based Text Mining: An Exploration in Kidney Space

    PubMed Central

    Burckhardt, Philipp; Padman, Rema

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has emerged as a popular source for health-related information. More than eighty percent of American Internet users have searched for health topics online. Millions of patients use self-help online forums to exchange information and support. In parallel, the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases has become a financial burden for the healthcare system demanding new, cost-effective interventions. To provide such interventions, it is necessary to understand patients’ preferences of treatment options and to gain insights into their experiences as patients. We introduce a text-processing algorithm based on semantic ontologies to allow for finer-grained analyses of online forums compared to standard methods. We have applied our method in an analysis of two major Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) forums. Our results suggest that the analysis of forums may provide valuable insights on daily issues patients face, their choice of different treatment options and interactions between patients, their relatives and clinicians. PMID:26958281

  16. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  17. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Amit; Bhattad, Sagar; Singh, Surjit

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is the most common symptomatic phagocytic defect. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding protein subunits of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex. CGD is characterized by a defective intracellular killing of phagocytosed organisms due to a defective oxidative burst in the neutrophils and macrophages. It is inherited in either X-linked recessive or autosomal recessive pattern. Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus species are the most common organisms reported. Infections with Burkholderia, Serratia, and Nocardia warrant a screen for CGD. Suppurative lymphadenitis, cutaneous abscesses, pneumonia and diarrhea constitute the most common problems in children with CGD. A small percentage of children develop autoimmune manifestations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, colitis, autoimmune hepatitis) and warrant immunosuppression. X-linked carriers of CGD are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Nitroblue-tetrazolium dye reduction test and dihydro-rhodamine assay by flow cytometry are the screening tests for this disorder. While most children do well on long term antibiotic and antifungal prophylaxis, those with severe forms warrant hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The role of regular interferon-γ injections is debatable. Evidence for white cell transfusions is sparse, and gene therapy is under trial.This current review highlights various aspects and studies in CGD. X-linked form of CGD has been noted to carry a poorer prognosis compared to autosomal recessive variants. However, recent evidence suggests that outcome in CGD is determined by the amount of residual NADPH oxidase activity irrespective of mode of inheritance. PMID:26865172

  18. Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shreya

    2015-05-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective functioning of NADPH oxidase enzyme in the phagocytes. This leads to recurrent infections by catalase positive organisms and later, granuloma formation in multiple organs. This condition usually presents in the age group of 2-5 y and is uncommon in neonates. In this case report, we describe a rare case of CGD in a 40-day-old male child who initially presented with a history of erythematous pustular rash on left forearm and refusal to feeds. He remained unresponsive to regular antibiotics. CT chest and abdomen revealed multiple ill-defined lesions suggestive of granulomas or developing abscesses. Immunodeficiency workup showed negative Nitroblue Tetrazolium test and positive Dihydrorhodamine test (flow cytometry). A diagnosis of CGD was then made and treated accordingly. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that although it is rare for CGD to present at such an early age, but in a neonate with multiple granulomas or abscesses, it should be considered as a differential and worked up accordingly. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis. PMID:26155526

  19. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by defective functioning of NADPH oxidase enzyme in the phagocytes. This leads to recurrent infections by catalase positive organisms and later, granuloma formation in multiple organs. This condition usually presents in the age group of 2-5 y and is uncommon in neonates. In this case report, we describe a rare case of CGD in a 40-day-old male child who initially presented with a history of erythematous pustular rash on left forearm and refusal to feeds. He remained unresponsive to regular antibiotics. CT chest and abdomen revealed multiple ill-defined lesions suggestive of granulomas or developing abscesses. Immunodeficiency workup showed negative Nitroblue Tetrazolium test and positive Dihydrorhodamine test (flow cytometry). A diagnosis of CGD was then made and treated accordingly. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that although it is rare for CGD to present at such an early age, but in a neonate with multiple granulomas or abscesses, it should be considered as a differential and worked up accordingly. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve the prognosis. PMID:26155526

  20. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  1. Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bortoletto, Pietro; Lyman, Kyle; Camacho, Andres; Fricchione, Marielle; Khanolkar, Aaruni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an uncommon primary immunodeficiency that can be inherited in an X-linked (XL) or an autosomal recessive (AR) manner. We reviewed our large, single-center US experience with CGD. Methods: We reviewed 27 patients at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago from March 1985 to November 2013. Fisher exact test was used to compare differences in categorical variables, and Student t test was used to compare means for continuous variables. Serious infections were defined as those requiring intravenous antibiotics or hospitalization. Results: There were 23 males and 4 females; 19 were XL and 8 were AR. The average age at diagnosis was 3.0 years; 2.1 years for XL and 5.3 years for AR inheritance (P = 0.02). There were 128 serious infections. The most frequent infectious agents were Staphylococcus aureus (n = 13), Serratia (n = 11), Klebsiella (n = 7), Aspergillus (n = 6) and Burkholderia (n = 4). The most common serious infections were pneumonia (n = 38), abscess (n = 32) and lymphadenitis (n = 29). Thirteen patients had granulomatous complications. Five patients were below the 5th percentile for height and 4 were below the 5th percentile for weight. Average length of follow-up after diagnosis was 10.1 years. Twenty-four patients were compliant and maintained on interferon-γ, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and an azole. The serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. Twenty-three patients are alive (1 was lost to follow-up). Conclusions: We present a large, single-center US experience with CGD. Twenty-three of 27 patients are alive after 3276 patient-months of follow-up (1 has been lost to follow-up), and our serious infection rate was 0.62 per patient-year. PMID:26181896

  2. Chronic autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Litta Modignani, R; Barantani, E; Mazzolari, M; Pincetti Nervi, M; Macchi, R

    1991-01-01

    A total of 67 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroid disease were followed, mainly as outpatients, for a period of a few months to over 15 years. The diagnosis was euthyroidism (n = 16, 23.8%), subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 20, 29.8%), primary hypothyroidism (n = 28, 41.7%) or hashitoxicosis (n = 3, 4.47%). Patients with goiters fit Hashimoto's original description of "struma lymphomatosa". The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds and the usual laboratory hormonal tests. Histological examination was carried out at surgery or by fine needle aspiration in 35 patients (52.2%), and a clinical diagnosis was made in 32 (47.7%). Three patients had juvenile Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Most patients were in the fourth, fifth or sixth decade (64.8%), and of these 12 (18%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, which should be suspected when thyrotropin (TSH) is twice the upper normal limit. In these cases thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) testing and evaluation of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and anti-microsomal antigen antibodies (MsAb) are mandatory. Hypothyroidism with few symptoms develops insidiously in young or elderly patients; the most sensitive test is TSH assay in conjunction with tests for TgAb and MsAb. L-thyroxine administration may be harmful in older patients with late diagnosed primary hypothyroidism. Thyroid supplementation is suggested for patients with subclinical hypothyroidism if TSH values are above 10 mU/L; otherwise they should be followed up annually, as should patients with positive thyroid autoantibodies who are still euthyroid. PMID:1804288

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  4. Self-Help Program Components and Linkage to Aftercare Following Inpatient Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Frydrych, Lynne M.; Greene, Benjamin J.; Blondell, Richard D.; Purdy, Christopher H.

    2009-01-01

    Many patients fail to initiate aftercare for addictive disease rehabilitation following detoxification. This study of 136 inpatients compared characteristics of those who initiated aftercare (behavior therapy or self-help programs) during the week following discharge with those who did not. Among this group of patients, 77% (91/119) linked to aftercare. Self-help treatment related components were associated with increased aftercare treatment attendance rates and included: having a copy of the “12 Steps” (81% vs. 46%, P = .002), having read self-help literature (73% vs. 42%, P = .007) and having telephone numbers of self-help program members (50% vs. 18%, P = .008). Those who initiated aftercare treatment were also more likely to have remained abstinent from drugs and alcohol (81% vs. 39%, P <.001). Having self-help treatment-related components were associated with increased rates of aftercare attendance following hospital inpatient detoxification. PMID:19197592

  5. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... an immune response or “allergy” to beryllium metal, ceramic or alloy, termed beryllium sensitization (BeS). Beryllium sensitization ... Mroz MM, Newman LS. Beryllium disease screening in ceramics industry: Blood test performance and exposure-disease relations. ...

  6. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  7. [Implication of the self-help mechanism in the geriatric club (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Martincević-Ljumanović, R

    1981-07-01

    In the paper clinical investigations are given of the implication of the self-help mechanism with the 125 members of the Geriatric club of the Clinical hospital "Dr. Mladen Stojanović" in Zagreb during the year 1979. The results show that in this phase of the development of contemporary society and medicine and prevention geriatrics self-help is the only way of care and responsibility for the health of a great number of the population. Self-help is built-in everyday life and activity of the members of the club. Elder persons take part in the permanent care of their own health through the group mechanism of self-help by helping and caring for themselves on te basis of obtained health informations, knowledge and experience with society and public health services. In time they discover factors of risk which in many cases provoke a number of chronic illness and thereby put health in danger. The perspectives of self-help are in the scientific work of various social structures and in finding out specific methods of individual and group self-help for attacking mass chronic sicknesses of contemporary civilisation. PMID:6116457

  8. Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links​ Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference ​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain ... and Infectious Diseases web site to work incorrectly. Please visit your ...

  9. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  10. Chronic granulomatous disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system cells called phagocytes are unable to kill some types of bacteria and fungi. This disorder ... diagnose the disease and find out whether the mother is a carrier Genetic testing to confirm the ...

  11. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  12. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  13. Microcomputer Applications in Self-Help Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas H.

    1984-01-01

    The trend towards self-help healthcare is a social current which appears to run counter to the increasing technological complexity and sophistication of modern medical care. Yet it is the development of consumer-oriented high-tech medical devices which is facilitating this trend and which will permit the development of an electronics-based self-care system within the next ten years. Data on the present status of computer-assisted self-care was obtained from several sources, including a survey of homecomputer owners. Several useful software applications programs are currently in the marketplace; however, a data-integrating advice and referral program remains to be written. This development is seen as the last major technological impediment to the introduction of a complete microcomputer-based self-care system.

  14. Developing and Offering Student Self-Help Support Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R., Ed.; Bleuer, Jeanne C., Ed.

    This document consists of one module extracted from a six-module larger work. Module 3 consists of seven articles on developing and offering student self-help support groups. Article titles and authors are as follows: (1) "Youth Engaged in Self-Help: A Guide for Starting Youth Self-Help Groups" (Mary K. Parkinson, Nancy Sax); (2) "Introducing and…

  15. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  16. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  17. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Martinez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    COPD is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The morphological basis for airflow obstruction results from a varying combination of obstructive changes in peripheral conducting airways and destructive changes in respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. A reduction of vascularity within the alveolar septa has been reported in emphysema. Typical physiological changes reflect these structural abnormalities. Spirometry documents airflow obstruction when the FEV1/FVC ratio is reduced below the lower limit of normality, although in early disease stages FEV1 and airway conductance are not affected. Current guidelines recommend testing for bronchoreversibility at least once and the postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC be used for COPD diagnosis; the nature of bronchodilator response remains controversial, however. One major functional consequence of altered lung mechanics is lung hyperinflation. FRC may increase as a result of static or dynamic mechanisms, or both. The link between dynamic lung hyperinflation and expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing has been demonstrated. Hyperinflation may increase the load on inspiratory muscles, with resulting length adaptation of diaphragm. Reduction of exercise tolerance is frequently noted, with compelling evidence that breathlessness and altered lung mechanics play a major role. Lung function measurements have been traditionally used as prognostic indices and to monitor disease progression; FEV1 has been most widely used. An increase in FVC is also considered as proof of bronchodilatation. Decades of work has provided insight into the histological, functional, and biological features of COPD. This has provided a clearer understanding of important pathobiological processes and has provided additional therapeutic options. PMID:24692133

  19. [Chronic prostatitis and Bechterew's disease].

    PubMed

    Kohlicek, J; Svec, V

    1977-11-01

    A group of patients between 35 and 65 years old with chronic prostatitis were examined for the presence of Becherew's disease. In this connection the New York and Roman criterions for morbus Bechterew were applied. There were found one ankyosing spondylarthritis, one ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, and 11 times a tentative sacroileitis were stated. Altogether the proved and tentative findings were only 3.68 per cent of all examinations. In our countries the morbus Bechterew is found in 0,21 per cent of the normal population. So the protion of the Bechterew's disease in patients with chronic prostatitis is indeed a little higher than average, but not so frequent as often pretended in recent times. After a second series 58 patients being treated because of Bechterew's disease of different stages and different terms were examined for the possibility of a simultaneously elapsing chronic prostatitis. A chronic prostatitis was found in 38 per cent of these patients which correspondents to the incidence published in literature for the medium-age manhood. Nobody of the test persons had complaints on the part of the urologenital tract. PMID:602457

  20. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.5 MB] More Data Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin (chronic lower respiratory disease includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, and other ...

  1. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  2. [Biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Föll, D

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory disorders of childhood, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a challenge for laboratory diagnostics. Firstly, the classical inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) often inadequately reflect disease activity but on the other hand there are few specific biomarkers that can be helpful in managing these diseases. Acute phase proteins reflect the systemic inflammatory response insufficiently as their increase is only the indirect result of local inflammatory processes. Modern inflammation diagnostics aim to reflect these local processes and to allow precise monitoring of disease activity. Experimental biomarkers, such as S100 proteins can detect subclinical inflammatory activity. In addition, established laboratory parameters exist for JIA [antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP)] and for chronic IBD (fecal calprotectin) that are useful in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26608264

  3. Hypnotic Taper with or without Self-Help Treatment of Insomnia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Genevieve; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both…

  4. [Chronic kidney disease and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities of mineral metabolism develop with decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is called as a CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The standard approach for management of CKD-MBD is to keep serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone in the reference range by dietary intervention and medications. It has been recently pointed out that starting the treatment from early CKD is important for suppressing CKD-MBD. PMID:26923973

  5. Arterial disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Chue, Colin D; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N

    2013-03-01

    End stage renal disease is associated with a very high risk of premature cardiovascular death and morbidity. Early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with an increased frequency of cardiovascular events and is a common but poorly recognised and undertreated risk factor. Cardiovascular disease in CKD can be attributed to two distinct but overlapping pathological processes, namely atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. While the risk of athero-thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction is elevated, arteriosclerosis is the predominant pathophysiological process involving fibrosis and thickening of the medial arterial layer. This results in increased arterial stiffness causing left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis and the exposure of vulnerable vascular beds such as the brain and kidney to high pressure fluctuations causing small vessel disease. These pathophysiological features are manifest by a high risk of lethal arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent work has highlighted the importance of aldosterone and disordered bone mineral metabolism. PMID:23118349

  6. Placental Origins of Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Burton, Graham J; Fowden, Abigail L; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence links an individual's susceptibility to chronic disease in adult life to events during their intrauterine phase of development. Biologically this should not be unexpected, for organ systems are at their most plastic when progenitor cells are proliferating and differentiating. Influences operating at this time can permanently affect their structure and functional capacity, and the activity of enzyme systems and endocrine axes. It is now appreciated that such effects lay the foundations for a diverse array of diseases that become manifest many years later, often in response to secondary environmental stressors. Fetal development is underpinned by the placenta, the organ that forms the interface between the fetus and its mother. All nutrients and oxygen reaching the fetus must pass through this organ. The placenta also has major endocrine functions, orchestrating maternal adaptations to pregnancy and mobilizing resources for fetal use. In addition, it acts as a selective barrier, creating a protective milieu by minimizing exposure of the fetus to maternal hormones, such as glucocorticoids, xenobiotics, pathogens, and parasites. The placenta shows a remarkable capacity to adapt to adverse environmental cues and lessen their impact on the fetus. However, if placental function is impaired, or its capacity to adapt is exceeded, then fetal development may be compromised. Here, we explore the complex relationships between the placental phenotype and developmental programming of chronic disease in the offspring. Ensuring optimal placentation offers a new approach to the prevention of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, which are reaching epidemic proportions. PMID:27604528

  7. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  8. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  9. Self-Help Books Used by Religious Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. Brad; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Members of the Christian Association for Psychological Studies were surveyed to assess self-help book utilization. Self-help books were used with clients by 92% of respondents (N=243) some of the time. Differences in selection criteria and practices between master's and doctoral-level respondents are noted. Frequently used books are listed.…

  10. Self-Help and Community Education. Courier No. 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This journal consists of eight articles dealing with self-help and community education. Included in the volume are the following articles: "An Uphill Struggle--Self-Help in Bangladesh," by S. Harrison and Judy Saul; "How Not to Help a Local Community: A Case from South India," by Nora Sammut and Maria Theresa; "The High Cost of Manipulating…

  11. Self-Help Tips for Vulvar Skin Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Online Patient Tutorial Health Care Provider List Support Services Self-Help Tips Patient Stories Participate in Research Other Resources For Health ... Online Patient Tutorial Health Care Provider List Support Services Self-Help Tips Patient Stories Participate in Research Other Resources Home Self- ...

  12. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  13. Economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Minh, Hoang; Lan Huong, Dao; Bao Giang, Kim; Byass, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There remains a lack of information on economic aspects of chronic diseases. This paper, by gathering available and relevant research findings, aims to report and discuss current evidence on economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. Methods Data used in this paper were obtained from various information sources: international and national journal articles and studies, government documents and publications, web-based statistics and fact sheets. Results In Vietnam, chronic diseases were shown to be leading causes of deaths, accounting for 66% of all deaths in 2002. The burdens caused by chronic disease morbidity and risk factors are also substantial. Poorer people in Vietnam are more vulnerable to chronic diseases and their risk factors, other than being overweight. The estimated economic loss caused by chronic diseases for Vietnam in 2005 was about US$20 million (0.033% of annual national GDP). Chronic diseases were also shown to cause economic losses for families and individuals in Vietnam. Both population-wide and high-risk individual interventions against chronic disease were shown to be cost-effective in Vietnam. Conclusion Given the evidence from this study, actions to prevent chronic diseases in Vietnam are clearly urgent. Further research findings are required to give greater insights into economic aspects of chronic diseases in Vietnam. PMID:20057939

  14. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Cho, Jae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions. PMID:26194075

  15. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  16. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  17. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  18. Chronic non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Unwin, N; Alberti, K G M M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for almost 60% of global mortality, and 80% of deaths from NCD occur in low- and middle-income countries. One quarter of these deaths--almost 9 million in 2005--are in men and women aged <60 years. Taken together, NCD represent globally the single largest cause of mortality in people of working age, and their incidences in younger adults are substantially higher in the poor countries of the world than in the rich. The major causes of NCD-attributable mortality are cardiovascular disease (30% of total global mortality), cancers (13%), chronic respiratory disease (7%) and diabetes (2%). These conditions share a small number of behavioural risk factors, which include a diet high in saturated fat and low in fresh fruit and vegetables, physical inactivity, tobacco smoking, and alcohol excess. In low- and middle-income countries such risk factors tend to be concentrated in urban areas and their prevalences are increasing as a result of rapid urbanization and the increasing globalisation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries. Because NCD have a major impact on men and women of working age and their elderly dependents, they result in lost income, lost opportunities for investment, and overall lower levels of economic development. Reductions in the incidences of many NCD and their complications are, however, already possible. Up to 80% of all cases of cardiovascular disease or type-2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer, for example, are probably preventable based on current knowledge. In addition, highly cost-effective measures exist for the prevention of some of the complications of established cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Achieving these gains will require a broad range of integrated, population-based interventions as well as measures focused on the individuals at high risk. At present, the international-assistance community provides scant resources for the control of NCD in poor countries, partly, at least

  19. Self-Help Housing: The Magic of Ownership for Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Richard F.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the activities of the Southwest Florida Self-Help Housing, Inc., serving three counties in the Florida migrant and seasonal farming area, first funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity out of its Migrant Division funds in 1967. (JM)

  20. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  1. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  2. [Troponins and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Bellasi, Antonio; Cozzolino, Mario; De Pascalis, Antonio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis was recognized since 19th century as clinical entity with bad outcomes; only in 1912 it was reported that acute myocardial infarction had to been distinguished from angina pectoris. First diagnostic test was electrocardiogram, while white blood cells count and erythrocytes sedimentation rate were the only available laboratory tests. Late in the 60s and 70s glutammic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyravate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were added to biomarkers pool to provide a diagnosis of myocardial infarction related to myocardial cells injury. Only in 1987 assays for cardiac troponin were developed to assess structural damage of myocardial cells and in 2010 high sensibility troponins first dosage kits became available. It is well known that the population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than the general population. The use and interpretation of high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays have been particularly challenging in these patients with the majority having elevated levels at baseline. Aim of this review is to evaluate hs-cTn in patients with CKD for the diagnosis of AMI and for the prognostic significance of elevated levels in CKD patients without AMI. PMID:26252257

  3. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Prevalence and Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes data on chronic pulmonary disease (COPD) prevalence and deaths across the U.S. for the time periods 1997-2009 and 1979-2007, respectively. COPD, also known as chronic lung disease, may be partly caused or exacerbated by environmental exposures such as ...

  4. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD. PMID:26598845

  5. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, except during acute exacerbations of chronic lung disease or when multiple co-morbidities are present. Treatment is targeted at correcting hypoxia and improving pulmonary gas exchange and mechanics. There are presently no convincing data to support the use of pulmonary hypertension-specific therapies in patients with right ventricular dysfunction secondary to chronic lung disease. PMID:22548815

  6. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  7. Role of Self-help Group in Substance Addiction Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prangya Paramita Priyadarshini

    2012-11-01

    Background: The Narcotics Anonymous (NA)/Alcoholic Anonymous(AA) is based on the philosophy of self-help, where the former addicts and recovering addicts share experiences, provide emotional support and do active monitoring through mentoring. In mentoring, a former addict with longer duration of drug-free life acts as a guide to the newly recovering addict. Objective: The objective was to study the effect of involvement in self help group upon addictís level of depression, functional social support, and anxiety. Method: The size of the sample was 60. 30 addicts were taken from rehabilitation centre and 30 were taken from self-help groups. ANOVA was used to analyze the result. Result: In all the criteria it was found that there exists a significant impact of Self-help group. Conclusion: Self-help group provide clients with a social network of individuals with similar problems and experiences, since most of these individuals may be isolated from society due to the social stigma attached to their addictions. The transition from being help recipients to being helpers enables recovering addicts to build their self-confidence and feelings of being wanted and desired in society, which facilitates their self-confidence and positive self-esteem.

  8. The self-help component of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D

    1980-10-01

    The target of "health for all by 2000," to be achieved through primary health care, is discussed. The author states that the goal entails reorganization of health care and community participation at the local level. Self-help groups are proposed as an effective and efficient vehicle for participation by the people in their own health care, and the strong points of such groups, including emotional and psychological support, and orientation toward action and progress, are described. Another major feature is that participants become their own health care personnel, achieving some expertise in the management of their particular illness or disability. Clubs for hypertensives, wherein participants learn to monitor and control their blood pressure, are used as an example of the self-help group. The author suggests that self-help could be a basic component of primary health care, and contribute to "health for all." PMID:7444489

  9. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  10. DOUBLE TROUBLE IN RECOVERY: SELF-HELP FOR PEOPLE WITH DUAL DIAGNOSES

    PubMed Central

    VOGEL, HOWARD S.; KNIGHT, EDWARD; LAUDET, ALEXANDRE B.; MAGURA, STEPHEN

    2007-01-01

    Self-help is gaining increased acceptance among treatment professionals as the advent of managed care warrants the use of cost-effective modalities. Traditional “one disease-one recovery” self-help groups cannot serve adequately the needs of the dually diagnosed. This article discusses Double Trouble in Recovery (DTR), a 12-step self-help group designed to meet the special needs of those diagnosed with both a psychiatric disability and a chemical addiction, DTR differs from traditional self-help groups by offering people a safe forum to discuss their psychiatric disabilities, medication, and substance abuse. Preliminary data collected at four DTR sites in NYC indicate that DTR members have a long history of psychiatric disabilities and of substance abuse, and extensive experience with treatment programs in both areas. They are actively working on their recovery, as evidenced by their fairly intensive attendance at DTR. Recent substance use is limited, suggesting that participation in DTR (in conjunction with format treatment when needed) is having a positive effect. Most members require medication to control their psychiatric disabilities, and that alone may make attendance at “conventional” 12-step groups uncomfortable. Ratings of statements comparing DTR to other 12-step meetings suggest that DTR is a setting where members can feel comfortable and safe discussing their dual recovery needs. PMID:17710222

  11. Treating Alcoholism As a Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    McKay, James R.; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    For many patients, alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders are chronic, recurring conditions involving multiple cycles of treatment, abstinence, and relapse. To disrupt this cycle, treatment can include continuing care to reduce the risk of relapse. The most commonly used treatment approach is initial intensive inpatient or outpatient care based on 12-step principles, followed by continuing care involving self-help groups, 12-step group counseling, or individual therapy. Although these programs can be effective, many patients drop out of initial treatment or do not complete continuing care. Thus, researchers and clinicians have begun to develop alternative approaches to enhance treatment retention in both initial and continuing care. One focus of these efforts has been the design of extended treatment models. These approaches increasingly blur the distinction between initial and continuing care and aim to prolong treatment participation by providing a continuum of care. Other researchers have focused on developing alternative treatment strategies (e.g., telephone-based interventions) that go beyond traditional settings and adaptive treatment algorithms that may improve outcomes for clients who do not respond well to traditional approaches. PMID:23580020

  12. Use of self-help manuals to treat problem drinkers.

    PubMed

    Finfgeld, D L

    2000-04-01

    In spite of research findings indicating that alcohol abusers may benefit from self-help manuals, health care providers have been slow to recognize their potential usefulness. As self-care strategies grow more popular and funding for traditional forms of alcohol treatment diminish, health care providers need to look more seriously at these materials. They also need to be aware of new innovations such as self-help materials that can be purchased on diskette. It may not be long before computerized materials sit next to printed manuals on bookstore shelves, and nurses need to know which materials to recommend. PMID:10789110

  13. Cults and zealous self-help movements: a psychiatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Galanter, M

    1990-05-01

    Modern cults and zealous self-help movements exercise an intense group influence and can have a major impact on their members' psychiatric status. On the basis of research findings, the author describes the charismatic group, a generic model for such cohesive, intensely ideological movements. He examines the psychological forces they tap and the way they can both relieve and exacerbate psychopathology. The model is then used to explain the operation of zealous self-help programs that address psychiatric syndromes; these are directed at problems of the medically ill, substance abusers, and relatives of psychiatric patients. PMID:2158240

  14. The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alice M; Stockley, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease caused by the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental influences. There is increasing evidence that genes link to disease pathogenesis and heterogeneity by causing variation in protease anti-protease systems, defence against oxidative stress and inflammation. The main methods of genomic research for complex disease traits are described, together with the genes implicated in COPD thus far, their roles in disease causation and the future for this area of investigation. PMID:17054776

  15. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit when they're all better. Save Your Energy at Home Place items you use often in ... or the skin around your fingernails are blue Alternative Names COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - ...

  17. Vitamin D deficiency and chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Arum, Seth M; Smith, Cecilia M

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is increasingly being recognized as a prevalent problem in the general population. Patients with chronic lung diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive lung disease and interstitial pneumonia appear to be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency for reasons that are not clear. Several studies indicate that vitamin D possesses a range of anti-inflammatory properties and may be involved in processes other than the previously believed functions of calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Various cytokines, cellular elements, oxidative stress and protease/antiprotease levels appear to affect lung fibroproliferation, remodelling and function, which may be influenced by vitamin D levels. Chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease have also been linked to vitamin D on a genetic basis. This immune and genetic influence of vitamin D may influence the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases. A recent observational study notes a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and decreased pulmonary function tests in a large ambulatory population. The present review will examine the current literature regarding vitamin D deficiency, its prevalence in patients with chronic lung disease, vitamin D anti-inflammatory properties and the role of vitamin D in pulmonary function. PMID:19557213

  18. [Lupus in Germany: analysis within the German lupus self-help organization (LULA)].

    PubMed

    Fischer-Betz, R; Wessel, E; Richter, J; Winkler-Rohlfing, B; Willers, R; Schneider, M

    2005-03-01

    During the last few decades, the prognosis for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (LE) has changed from high early mortality to a more chronic longterm course. Although the prevalence of LE has been estimated at 20-50/100,000, data concerning the situation of LE patients in Germany are sparse. Since 2001, a documentation within the German Lupus Self-Help Organisation scheduled for a period of 10 years (LULA) has been recording at the patient level the actual status and the long-term course of a large group of LE patients. A questionnaire adapted from the German rheumatological database is updated once a year and sent to all members.In 2001, 1033 members participated in the documentation. Of these, 92.2% were women (mean age 45.8 years) with a mean disease duration of 9.9 years. 37.6% were employed, and 24.5% were on early retirement. 50.2% rated their overall health status as "not so good" or "poor". Most were receiving treatment with [hydroxy-]chloroquine (35.2%) or azathioprine (21.9%), while 67.9% were receiving corticosteroids. The most frequent comorbidities reported were hypertension (33%), scarring skin disease (24.4%), osteoarthritis (25.2%), osteoporosis (24%), psychiatric disorders/depression (22.9%) and chronic renal disease (22%). Thromboembolic events were reported in 18.5%, myocardial infarction in 2.3% and stroke in 4.8% of cases. Concerning their main contact person for health care, 63.6% specified the rheumatologist. In comparison with other cohort studies and in particular with the German rheumatological database, the data provided exclusively by patients are feasible. Concerning the severity of their disease, their treatment and their global assessment of health status, LULA participants are comparable with other LE patients and can be seen as representative of LE patients in Germany. Further assessment especially of long-term data are needed to obtain additional insights into the burden of the disease and the need for special medical

  19. Chronic beryllium disease: computed tomographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Patel, Jeet; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2010-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is a rare multisystem granulomatous disease predominantly involving the lungs and resulting from an immunologic response to long-term occupational exposure. Computed tomography of the chest reveals important lung parenchymal and mediastinal findings and plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up assessment of patients with chronic beryllium disease. Its significance lies in the exact localization and evaluation of the extent of lesions. We present an overview of the subject and a pictorial review of the spectrum of computed tomographic features of beryllium disease. PMID:21084914

  20. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    PubMed

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:26596632

  1. Psychiatric aspects of chronic disease in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Magen, J

    1990-06-01

    In adolescents with chronic illnesses, the rate of behavioral disorders is 10% to 20% higher than that in their well peers. Rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, and many other chronic illnesses constitute risk factors for behavioral disorders in adolescents. Because they are now living longer, more productive lives, adolescents with chronic illnesses are more often seen by their primary care physicians with behavioral disorders that can interfere with disease control. Risk-taking behaviors, difficulties with parents, noncompliance, depression, and isolation may all be manifestations of behavioral disorders. Parents and siblings may also be at risk for disorder. Particular constellations of family and individual characteristics may be associated with behavior disorder. So that these behaviors may be discovered as early as possible, it is important that the primary care physician conceptualize chronically ill adolescents and their families as "at risk." PMID:2190958

  2. Persuasion in a Self-Help Group: Processes and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurik, Nancy C.

    1987-01-01

    Examined techniques of persuasion used in self-help organization for persons with mental problems. Concludes that successful affiliation with the group is a conversion process and that, although acceptance of the organizational ideology may facilitate an individual member's recovery, it simultaneously reinforces an understanding of mental problems…

  3. Relative Grading Methods: A Self-Help Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL.

    This supplementary text to a lecture course "Methods of Grading" is a self-help text. Some relative grading methods covered are: Centile Rank; Rank Order; Mean, Median and Mode; Range; Deviation; Standard Deviation; Standard Score; and T-Score. Section I of the book written as a "scrambled text," and Section II is a workbook. (DB)

  4. Self-Help Book Prescription Practices of Canadian University Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Ronald E.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 80 Canadian university counselors to determine whether they prescribed self-help books and to compare titles of most prescribed books to those selected by Canadian psychologists. Found that 74.4 percent of 78 counselors answering question responded affirmatively to recommending books with 56 titles being prescribed. Lists 10 books most…

  5. Self-Help Groups--Implications for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Morton A.; McCall, Mary E.

    A recent review of published and unpublished data suggests that the elderly are underrepresented in most self-help groups. Some national groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous do serve the aged but many others such as widow groups do not. A recent national survey of over 3,000 households conducted by Mellinger and Balter examined the use of…

  6. Speaking Out for Yourself: A Self-Help Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Self-Help Guide Page 1 Foreword It contains information, ideas, and strategies that people from all over the country have ... the area to help you decide if the information you have found is accurate. Plan your strategy. Now that you know what you want and ...

  7. Rational-Emotive Therapy and Self-Help Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    Unsupervised do-it-yourself therapy constitutes an exceptionally important issue that calls for more empirical and scientific investigation of the validity of publications in this field. Rational-emotive therapy (RET), one of the most popular forms of self-help treatment, has led to several generalizations. (1) Cognitive and cognitive-behavior…

  8. Behavioral Bibliotherapy: An Evaluation of a Self-Help Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Fred

    The effectiveness of a self help book on assertiveness training was assessed by comparing two bibliotherapy conditions with group therapy and a waiting list control condition. One group of bibliotherapy subjects read a popular paperback with no therapist contact, while the other group additionally participated in informal discussion sessions.…

  9. Chronic sequelae of foodborne disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the past decade the complexity of foodborne pathogens, as well as their adaptability and ability to cause acute illness, and in some cases chronic (secondary) complications, have been newly appreciated. This overview examines long-term consequences of foodborne infections and intoxications to emphasize the need for more research and education. PMID:9366595

  10. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  11. Implementing 'self-help friendliness' in German hospitals: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Trojan, Alf; Nickel, Stefan; Kofahl, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    In Germany, the term 'self-help friendliness' (SHF) describes a strategy to institutionalize co-operation of healthcare institutions with mutual aid or self-help groups of chronically ill patients. After a short explanation of the SHF concept and its development, we will present findings from a longitudinal study on the implementation of SHF in three German hospitals. Specifically, we wanted to know (i) to what degree SHF had been put into practice after the initial development phase in the pilot hospitals, (ii) whether it was possible to maintain the level of implementation of SHF in the course of at least 1 year and (iii) which opinions exist about the inclusion of SHF criteria in quality management systems. With only minor restrictions, the findings provide support for the usefulness, practicability, sustainability and transferability of SHF. Limitations of our empirical study are the small number of hospitals, the above average motivation of their staff, the small response rate in the staff-survey and the inability to get enough data from members of self-help groups. The research instrument for measuring SHF was adequate and fulfils the most important scientific quality criteria in a German context. We conclude that the implementation of SHF leads to more patient-centredness in healthcare institutions and thus improves satisfaction, self-management, coping and health literacy of patients. SHF is considered as an adequate approach for reorienting healthcare institutions in the sense of the Ottawa Charta, and particularly suitable for health promoting hospitals. PMID:25500993

  12. The Story of Self-Help Enterprises [SHE]. A History of Self-Help Housing in the San Joaquin Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Richard

    SHE is a rural California home building corporation founded on the principles of self-help. Lacking sufficient capital to purchase or finance a home by conventional means, a low-income family may elect to "self-construct with SHE". A participant family agrees to invest its labor, up to 1,500 hours, in the supervised construction of its own home…

  13. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  14. Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Meade-White, Kimberly D.; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James; Race, Richard; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease is a prion disease of cervids. Assessment of its zoonotic potential is critical. To evaluate primate susceptibility, we tested monkeys from 2 genera. We found that 100% of intracerebrally inoculated and 92% of orally inoculated squirrel monkeys were susceptible, but cynomolgus macaques were not, suggesting possible low risk for humans. PMID:24751215

  15. Chronic kidney disease - pediatric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Janchevska, Aleksandra; Emini, Nora; Sahpazova, Emilija; Gucev, Zoran; Polenakovic, Momir

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the progression of chronic kidney disease is an important issue for every pediatric nephrologist and pediatrician in order to implement appropriate measures to prevent wasting of renal function and the final consequence - end stage renal disease with the need for the dialysis and transplantation. Therefore it is important to know, treat or ameliorate the standard risk factors such as hypertension, proteinuria, anemia, hyperparathyroidism etc. In this review devoted to the World Kidney Day 2016 we will pay attention to the low birth parameters, obesity, hyperuricemia and smoking which emerged as particularly important risk factors for children and adolescent with chronic kidney disease. PMID:27442412

  16. Framing international trade and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011). Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks. PMID:21726434

  17. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  18. Revisioning the Self: A Phenomenological Investigation into Self-Help Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruneau, Laura; Bubenzer, Donald L.; McGlothlin, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The helpfulness of self-help reading was explored through interviews with 6 female self-help readers. Themes derived through phenomenological data analysis suggested that there is a distinct structure to the self-help reading experience, including self-help reading as a medium for revisioning of self. Implications for counseling practice and…

  19. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  20. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  1. 7 CFR 1924.262 - Handling complaints involving dwellings constructed by the self-help method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... by the self-help method. 1924.262 Section 1924.262 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... constructed by the self-help method. When a borrower whose dwelling was constructed by the self-help method... the guidance of the self-help group. Defects which are determined to be the responsibility of...

  2. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  3. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  4. Quality of Life in Chronic Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Megari, Kalliopi

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains – physical, psychological, and social functioning – that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL. [«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea)] PMID:26973912

  5. Chronic Disease in a General Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kathleen N.; Kamberg, Caren J.; Goldberg, George A.; Brook, Robert H.; Keeler, Emmett B.; Calabro, Thomas A.

    1986-01-01

    Using questionnaire and physical screening examination data for a general population of 4,962 adults aged 18 to 61 years enrolled in the Rand Health Insurance Experiment, we calculated the prevalence of 13 chronic illnesses and assessed disease impact. Low-income men had a significantly higher prevalence of anemia, chronic airway disease and hearing impairment than their high-income counterparts, low-income women a higher prevalence of congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hearing impairment and vision impairment. Of our sample, 30% had one chronic condition and 16% had two or more. Several significant pairs or “clusters” of chronic illnesses were found. With few exceptions (diabetes, hypertension), the use of physician care in the previous year for a specific condition tended to be low. Disease impact (worry, activity restriction) was widespread but mild. Persons with angina, congestive heart failure, mild chronic joint disorders and peptic ulcer disease reported a greater impact than persons with other illnesses. PMID:3788141

  6. Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders Among Asian Americans, chronic liver disease is ... women. At a glance – Cancer Rates for Asian/Pacific Islanders (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100, ...

  7. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  8. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  9. Chronic pain: a non-use disease.

    PubMed

    Pruimboom, L; van Dam, A C

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems in modern medicine is to find remedies for the group of people with chronic pain syndromes. Low back pain is one of the most frequent syndromes and perhaps the most invalidating of all of them. Chronic pain seems to develop through several pathways affecting the spinal cord and the brain: (1) neuro-anatomical reorganisation, (2) neuro-physiological changes, and (3) activation of glia cells (immune reaction in the central nervous system). Although all of these pathways seem to provide a (partial) plausible explanation for chronic pain, treatments influencing these pathways often fail to alleviate chronic pain patients. This could be because of the probability that chronic pain develops by all three mechanisms of disease. A treatment influencing just one of these mechanisms can only be partially successful. Other factors that seem to contribute to the development of chronic pain are psychosocial. Fear, attention and anxiety are part of the chronic pain syndrome being cause or consequence. The three pathways and the psycho-emotional factors constitute a psycho-neuro-immunological substrate for chronic pain syndromes; a substrate which resembles the substrate for phantom pain and functional invalidity after stroke. Both phantom pain and functional invalidity are considered non-use syndromes. The similarity of the substrate of both these two neurological disorders and chronic pain makes it reasonable to consider chronic pain a non-use disease (the hypothesis). To test this hypothesis, we developed a "paradoxal pain therapy". A therapy which combines the constraint induced movement therapy and strategies to dissociate pain from conditioning factors like fear, anxiety and attention. The aim of the therapy is to establish a behaviour perpendicular on the pathological pain-behaviour. Clinically, the treatment seems promising, although we just have preliminary results. Further clinical and laboratory studies are needed to measure eventual changes at

  10. Adult stem cells for chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic, progressive and lethal lung diseases. The incidence of IPF and COPD increases with age, independent of exposure to common environmental risk factors. At present, there is limited understanding of the relationship between ageing and the development of chronic lung diseases. One hypothesis is that chronic injury drives to exhaustion the local and systemic repair responses in the lung. These changes are accentuated during ageing where there is a progressive accumulation of senescent cells. Recently, stem cells have emerged as a critical reparative mechanism for lung injury. In this review, we discuss the repair response of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (B-MSC) after lung injury and how their function is affected by ageing. Our own work has demonstrated a protective role of B-MSC in several animal models of acute and chronic lung injury. We recently demonstrated the association, using animal models, between age and an increase in the susceptibility to develop severe injury and fibrosis. At the same time, we have identified functional differences between B-MSC isolated from young and old animals. Further studies are required to understand the functional impairment of ageing B-MSC, ultimately leading to a rapid stem cell depletion or fatigue, interfering with their ability to play a protective role in lung injury. The elucidation of these events will help in the development of rational and new therapeutic strategies for COPD and IPF. PMID:23648014

  11. Ethical considerations in chronic musculoskeletal disease.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, C Ronald; de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    Chronic diseases compromise the life of the sufferer, encumber their families, and exert intractable burdens on the health-care system. With the aging of the population, such conditions have become the primary determinants of morbidity and mortality and the leading cause of disability in our society. Despite the serious challenges they impose, the ethical discourse engendered by them has lagged behind that of acute care medicine. Of particular relevance are the challenges to individual autonomy, as the dilemmas arising in the chronic care setting have not only medical but personal and societal dimensions, may require the input of multiple participants, and resolve over longer periods of time. As such, the conventional model of autonomy is often inadequate to address problems in the chronic care setting. This paper deals with this dilemma through an examination of a clinical scenario. A framework for the exploration of ethical problems in the chronic care setting is thus presented. PMID:25864103

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Iruzubieta, Paula; Terán, Álvaro; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis, but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection. The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known, but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases. Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease. Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required. PMID:25544877

  13. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Huerta, Arturo; Domingo, Rebeca; Soler, Néstor

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic disease causing increasing healthcare costs worldwide. Another respiratory disease causing high costs and morbidity is community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Because of the constant growth in the population with both diseases (CAP and COPD), analyzing their clinical characteristics is important. Several cellular factors are known to contribute to differences in clinical expression: some lead to COPD exacerbations while others lead to symptoms of pneumonia. The use of new biomarkers (procalcitonin, pro-adrenomedullin and copeptin) help to distinguish among these clinical pictures. To decrease morbidity and mortality, clinical guidelines on antibiotic therapy must be followed and this therapy should be prescribed to patients with CAP and COPD. There are also prevention measures such as the pneumococcal vaccine whose role in the prevention of pneumococcal CAP should be further studied. The present review aims to elucidate some of the above-mentioned issues. PMID:20620690

  14. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  15. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    PubMed

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  16. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs. PMID:27032986

  17. Chronic osteomyelitislike disease with negative bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, P; Ryöppy, S; Jääskeläinen, J; Rapola, J; Repo, H; Kaitila, I

    1988-11-01

    During a seven-year period we observed 14 children who had chronic osteomyelitislike disease. The bacterial cultures from the bone lesions were negative. In eight patients the findings were compatible with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), in four the findings were compatible with chronic sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré, and two had osteomyelitis of the clavicle. In patients with CRMO, lymphocyte subpopulations, the responses to mitogens, and the chemotactic and chemokinetic responses showed no consistent abnormalities. After a mean follow-up of 4.5 years (range, one to ten years), all four patients with osteomyelitis of Garré were symptomatic, and two had complications. Only two of the eight patients with CRMO had active disease. The course had been complicated by growth disturbances in one patient and by thoracic outlet syndrome in another. Wegener's granulomatosis later developed in a patient with CRMO. PMID:3177323

  18. Chronic tracheobronchial disease in the dog.

    PubMed

    Padrid, P; Amis, T C

    1992-09-01

    Tracheobronchial collapse and chronic bronchitis (CB) are the two most common forms of chronic tracheobronchial disease in dogs. These conditions may exist independently of one another, although CB and some degree of tracheobronchial collapse often co-exist in the same patient. Diagnosis of CB can be established on clinical grounds alone, whereas radiographic or bronchoscopic evidence is required to confirm the diagnosis of tracheobronchial collapse. Although glucocorticoid drug therapy remains one of the most effective methods for managing CB, surgical implantation of a prosthetic airway device may be of great benefit for some dogs with a focal area of collapsing trachea. With early diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical management, the prognosis for many dogs with chronic tracheobronchial disease is good for reasonable quality of life. PMID:1523790

  19. Mucin overproduction in chronic inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Foley, Susan C; Hamid, Qutayba

    2006-01-01

    Mucus overproduction and hypersecretion are commonly observed in chronic inflammatory lung disease. Mucins are gel-forming glycoproteins that can be stimulated by a variety of mediators. The present review addresses the mechanisms involved in the upregulation of secreted mucins. Mucin induction by neutrophil elastase, bacteria, cytokines, growth factors, smoke and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator malfunction are also discussed. PMID:16983448

  20. Invasive mucormycosis in chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Abdulnasir M; Al-Shahrani, Dayel A; Al-Idrissi, Eman M; Al-Abdely, Hail M

    2016-05-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that occurs in certain immunocompromised patients. We present 2 cases of invasive mucormycosis due to Rhizopus spp. in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and discuss their clinical presentation, management challenges, and outcomes. PMID:27146621

  1. Case Management of Adolescents with Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina A.

    This training guide presents a model for optimum delivery of the primary duties, tasks, and steps required in the comprehensive case management of adolescents with chronic disease. Using a team approach to coordinated health care, the guide involves the patient and family as key members of the care team along with the physician, nurse, dietitian,…

  2. Invasive mucormycosis in chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Abdulnasir M.; Al-Shahrani, Dayel A.; Al-Idrissi, Eman M.; Al-Abdely, Hail M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that occurs in certain immunocompromised patients. We present 2 cases of invasive mucormycosis due to Rhizopus spp. in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and discuss their clinical presentation, management challenges, and outcomes. PMID:27146621

  3. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  4. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  5. Molecular pathways of chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Bienaimé, Frank; Canaud, Guillaume; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Terzi, Fabiola

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive loss of functional nephrons. This loss means that the remaining nephrons are put under stress and are forced to adapt in order to maintain kidney function. Over the time, the strains imposed by these adaptations result in a vicious circle in which the loss of damaged nephrons results in the damage of the so far healthy nephrons. Hence, the rate of chronic kidney disease progression depends on the ability of the remaining nephrons to cope with stress. This article reviews the molecular pathways involved in the compensation and deterioration process after nephron reduction. In particular, we examine the role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)/serine-threonine protein kinase AKT, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and unfolded protein response pathways, as well as the pleiotropic function of Lipocalin 2. We also discuss the dual role played by some of these pathways in acute and chronic kidney disease. Finally, the relevance of these experimental finding to human chronic kidney disease is discussed. PMID:26972095

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  7. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  8. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  9. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  10. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  11. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  12. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  13. Animal models of chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Meyer, Christoph; Xu, Chengfu; Weng, Honglei; Hellerbrand, Claus; ten Dijke, Peter; Dooley, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases are frequent and potentially life threatening for humans. The underlying etiologies are diverse, ranging from viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and intoxications (including alcohol abuse) to imbalanced diets. Although at early stages of disease the liver regenerates in the absence of the insult, advanced stages cannot be healed and may require organ transplantation. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms is mandatory for the design of new drugs to be used in clinic. Therefore, rodent models are being developed to mimic human liver disease. However, no model to date can completely recapitulate the "corresponding" human disorder. Limiting factors are the time frame required in humans to establish a certain liver disease and the fact that rodents possess a distinct immune system compared with humans and have different metabolic rates affecting liver homeostasis. These features account for the difficulties in developing adequate rodent models for studying disease progression and for testing new pharmaceuticals to be translated into the clinic. Nevertheless, traditional and new promising animal models that mimic certain attributes of chronic liver diseases are established and being used to deepen our understanding in the underlying mechanisms of distinct liver diseases. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of recent advances in animal models recapitulating different features and etiologies of human liver diseases. PMID:23275613

  14. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  15. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  16. Early origins of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Narang, Indra; Bush, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and a significant challenge for adult physicians. However, there is a misconception that COPD is a disease of only adult smokers. There is a growing body of evidence to support the hypothesis that chronic respiratory diseases such as COPD have their origins in early life. In particular, adverse maternal factors will interact with the environment in a susceptible host promoting altered lung growth and development antenatally and in early childhood. Subsequent lung injury and further gene-environment interactions may result in permanent lung injury manifest by airway obstruction predisposing to COPD. This review will discuss the currently available data regarding risk factors in early life and their role in determining the COPD phenotype. PMID:22265926

  17. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have consistently linked alcoholic beverage consumption with the development of several chronic disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The impact of drinking is usually dose-dependent, and light to moderate drinking tends to lower risks of certain diseases, while heavy drinking tends to increase the risks. Besides, other factors such as drinking frequency, genetic susceptibility, smoking, diet, and hormone status can modify the association. The amount of ethanol in alcoholic beverages is the determining factor in most cases, and beverage types could also make an influence. This review summarizes recent studies on alcoholic beverage consumption and several chronic diseases, trying to assess the effects of different drinking patterns, beverage types, interaction with other risk factors, and provide mechanistic explanations. PMID:27231920

  18. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption and Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have consistently linked alcoholic beverage consumption with the development of several chronic disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The impact of drinking is usually dose-dependent, and light to moderate drinking tends to lower risks of certain diseases, while heavy drinking tends to increase the risks. Besides, other factors such as drinking frequency, genetic susceptibility, smoking, diet, and hormone status can modify the association. The amount of ethanol in alcoholic beverages is the determining factor in most cases, and beverage types could also make an influence. This review summarizes recent studies on alcoholic beverage consumption and several chronic diseases, trying to assess the effects of different drinking patterns, beverage types, interaction with other risk factors, and provide mechanistic explanations. PMID:27231920

  19. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Negewo, Netsanet A; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G

    2015-11-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) often experience comorbid conditions. The most common comorbidities that have been associated with COPD include cardiovascular diseases, lung cancer, metabolic disorder, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression, skeletal muscle dysfunction, cachexia, gastrointestinal diseases, and other respiratory conditions. Not only are comorbidities common but they also considerably influence disease prognosis and patients׳ health status, and are associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, perusal of literature indicates that little has been done so far to effectively assess, manage, and treat comorbidities in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to comprehensively narrate the comorbid conditions that often coexist with COPD, along with their reported prevalence and their significant impacts in the disease management of COPD. A perspective on integrated disease management approaches for COPD is also discussed. PMID:26521102

  20. Food Insecurity and Chronic Disease123

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Household food insecurity has been previously hypothesized to promote dependence on inexpensive, highly palatable foods that are energy dense. Such dependence, and the cyclical nature of having enough food in the beginning of the month followed by food scarcity at the end of the month, could lead to weight gain over a short period of time. Such dependence on energy-dense foods and weight gain may play a direct role in the development of chronic conditions. Other compounding factors that result from exposure to household food insecurity have been well described, including pathways by which stress promotes visceral fat accumulation and chronic disease. This symposium review paper summarizes the literature on the link between food insecurity and the following: 1) diet, 2) weight gain, and 3) chronic disease, especially among women. This paper also proposes a framework for considering how the lived experience of household food insecurity may potentiate the development of chronic disease by activating the stress response among individuals at critical developmental periods in a food-impoverished environment. PMID:23493536

  1. Helping to Combat Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2003-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a disease of the nervous system that results in distinctive brain lesions. CWD affects elk, white-tailed deer, and mule deer, but has not been documented in livestock or humans. The origins of the disease, as well as the modes of transmission, remain unknown. Infected deer and elk appear robust and healthy in the early stages of CWD; clinical signs might not show for years. Mortality typically occurs within months after the appearance of clinical signs. The route of transmission is unknown; likely routes include direct transmission between infected and noninfected animals and infected animals contaminating local environments.

  2. Chronic Disease Modeling and Simulation Software

    PubMed Central

    Barhak, Jacob; Isaman, Deanna JM; Ye, Wen; Lee, Donghee

    2010-01-01

    Computers allow describing the progress of a disease using computerized models. These models allow aggregating expert and clinical information to allow researchers and decision makers to forecast disease progression. To make this forecast reliable, good models and therefore good modeling tools are required. This paper will describe a new computer tool designed for chronic disease modeling. The modeling capabilities of this tool were used to model the Michigan model for diabetes. The modeling approach and its advantages such as simplicity, availability, and transparency are discussed. PMID:20558320

  3. Privacy-Preserving Self-Helped Medical Diagnosis Scheme Based on Secure Two-Party Computation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing growth of wireless sensor networks in pervasive medical care, people pay more and more attention to privacy in medical monitoring, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. On one hand, we expect the public health institutions to provide us with better service. On the other hand, we would not like to leak our personal health information to them. In order to balance this contradiction, in this paper we design a privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks so that patients can privately diagnose themselves by inputting a health card into a self-helped medical diagnosis ATM to obtain a diagnostic report just like drawing money from a bank ATM without revealing patients' health information and doctors' diagnostic skill. It makes secure self-helped disease diagnosis feasible and greatly benefits patients as well as relieving the heavy pressure of public health institutions. PMID:25126107

  4. Privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuing growth of wireless sensor networks in pervasive medical care, people pay more and more attention to privacy in medical monitoring, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. On one hand, we expect the public health institutions to provide us with better service. On the other hand, we would not like to leak our personal health information to them. In order to balance this contradiction, in this paper we design a privacy-preserving self-helped medical diagnosis scheme based on secure two-party computation in wireless sensor networks so that patients can privately diagnose themselves by inputting a health card into a self-helped medical diagnosis ATM to obtain a diagnostic report just like drawing money from a bank ATM without revealing patients' health information and doctors' diagnostic skill. It makes secure self-helped disease diagnosis feasible and greatly benefits patients as well as relieving the heavy pressure of public health institutions. PMID:25126107

  5. Haemostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jens; Menke, Julia; Sollinger, Daniel; Schinzel, Helmut; Thürmel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The coagulation system has gained much interest again as new anticoagulatory substances have been introduced into clinical practice. Especially patients with renal failure are likely candidates for such a therapy as they often experience significant comorbidity including cardiovascular diseases that require anticoagulation. Patients with renal failure on new anticoagulants have experienced excessive bleeding which can be related to a changed pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds. However, the coagulation system itself, even without any interference with coagulation modifying drugs, is already profoundly changed during renal failure. Coagulation disorders with either episodes of severe bleeding or thrombosis represent an important cause for the morbidity and mortality of such patients. The underlying reasons for these coagulation disorders involve the changed interaction of different components of the coagulation system such as the coagulation cascade, the platelets and the vessel wall in the metabolic conditions of renal failure. Recent work provides evidence that new factors such as microparticles (MPs) can influence the coagulation system in patients with renal insufficiency through their potent procoagulatory effects. Interestingly, MPs may also contain microRNAs thus inhibiting the function of platelets, resulting in bleeding episodes. This review comprises the findings on the complex pathophysiology of coagulation disorders including new factors such as MPs and microRNAs in patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:24132242

  6. Mediterranean dietary pattern and chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Panico, Salvatore; Mattiello, Amalia; Panico, Camilla; Chiodini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of the relationship between the Mediterranean way of eating and the occurrence of diseases typical of the economically developed countries has been considered the starting point of nutritional epidemiology. From the Seven Countries Study in the 1950s to the recent European EPIC collaboration, the evaluation of the components of diet-affecting chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer has been crucially based on the analysis of foods and nutrients characterizing the Mediterranean dietary habits. This long research history has been marked by a consistency of data over time when either single nutrients/food groups or more complex dietary patterns have been analyzed: The Mediterranean way of eating is a protective tool from cardiovascular diseases and many cancers. Italy has been a natural point of observation, starting from cardiovascular disease in the mid-1950s and continuing with major cancers. In spite of unfavorable lifestyle changes in the Italian population mostly due to globalization of unhealthy habits (richer diet and lower levels of physical activity), those individuals still close to the Mediterranean style are significantly protected. The very recent Italian data derived from the observation of about 50,000 individuals, participating in the Italian cohorts of the EPIC study, confirm these findings and are consistent with results from other European populations and in some cases also from North American populations. Moreover, several dietary trials suggest that such a way of eating improves both the metabolic risk condition for chronic disease and the occurrence of those diseases. In conclusion, a way of eating inspired by a Mediterranean dietary pattern is not only based on evidence but is also a palatable style that has contributed to protection from the epidemic of chronic diseases. PMID:24114475

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    MedlinePlus

    ... online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does it Mean for Me? Page Content ... My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  8. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castellon, Xavier; Bogdanova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and subclinical atherosclerosis as well as early-stage endothelial dysfunction screening using the FMD method (Flow Mediated Dilation). This phenomenon, referred to as accelerated pathological remodeling of arterial wall, could be attributed to traditional risk factors associated with atherosclerosis. Several new non-invasive techniques have been used to study arterial wall’s structural and functional alterations. These techniques (based of Radio Frequency, RF) allow for an assessment of artery age through calculations of intima-media thickness (RF- QIMT), pulse wave rate (RF- QAS) and endothelial dysfunction degree (FMD). The inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors, result of the major consequences of oxidative stress and RAS (Renin Angiotensin System) imbalance associated with the deleterious effect of known risk factors that lead to the alteration of the arterial wall. Inflammation plays a key role in all stages of the formation of vascular lesions maintained and exacerbated by the risk factors. The consequence of chronic inflammation is endothelial dysfunction that sets in and we can define it as an integrated marker of the damage to arterial walls by classic risk factors. The atherosclerosis, which develops among these patients, is the main cause for cardiovascular morbi-mortality and uncontrolled chronic biological inflammation, which quickly favors endothelial dysfunction. These inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26815098

  9. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90 mm Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  10. Mechanisms of Cachexia in Chronic Disease States.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia and cachexia are muscle wasting syndromes associated with aging and with many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF), diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). While mechanisms are complex, these conditions are often accompanied by elevated angiotensin II (Ang II). Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. It was found that Ang II infusion in rodents leads to skeletal muscle wasting. Ang II increases cytokines and circulating hormones, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A and glucocorticoids, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II-induced muscle wasting is caused by alterations in insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling, enhanced muscle protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome system and decreased appetite resulting from the downregulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides, such as Npy and orexin. Ang II also inhibits 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity and disrupts normal energy balance via the activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphatase PP2Cα. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits skeletal muscle stem (satellite) cell proliferation, leading to lowered muscle regenerative capacity. Distinct satellite cell angiotensin receptor subtypes have different effects on different stages of differentiation and are critical for the regulation of muscle regeneration. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in mechanisms underlying cachexia in chronic disease states, and it is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with diseases such as CHF and CKD. PMID:26083652

  11. Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

  12. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

  13. [Self-help on the internet. Chances and risks of communication in electronic networks].

    PubMed

    Podoll, K; Mörth, D; Sass, H; Rudolf, H

    2002-01-01

    The worldwide web is used for self-help purposes by an increasing number of patients with a variety of mental disorders. The benefits and dangers of applying the internet in psychiatry are discussed based on a case report concerning a female with post traumatic stress and multiple personality disorders who visited a chat-room in the internet with two of her 48 supernumerary identities. During one stage of her history, she displayed an excessive use of the internet which must be considered a symptom of mental disorder rather than a distinct disease entity, viz. "internet addiction". PMID:11975070

  14. Optimizing Chronic Disease Management Mega-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PATH-THETA Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Background As Ontario’s population ages, chronic diseases are becoming increasingly common. There is growing interest in services and care models designed to optimize the management of chronic disease. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and expected budget impact of interventions in chronic disease cohorts evaluated as part of the Optimizing Chronic Disease Management mega-analysis. Data Sources Sector-specific costs, disease incidence, and mortality were calculated for each condition using administrative databases from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. Intervention outcomes were based on literature identified in the evidence-based analyses. Quality-of-life and disease prevalence data were obtained from the literature. Methods Analyses were restricted to interventions that showed significant benefit for resource use or mortality from the evidence-based analyses. An Ontario cohort of patients with each chronic disease was constructed and followed over 5 years (2006–2011). A phase-based approach was used to estimate costs across all sectors of the health care system. Utility values identified in the literature and effect estimates for resource use and mortality obtained from the evidence-based analyses were applied to calculate incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Given uncertainty about how many patients would benefit from each intervention, a system-wide budget impact was not determined. Instead, the difference in lifetime cost between an individual-administered intervention and no intervention was presented. Results Of 70 potential cost-effectiveness analyses, 8 met our inclusion criteria. All were found to result in QALY gains and cost savings compared with usual care. The models were robust to the majority of sensitivity analyses undertaken, but due to structural limitations and time constraints, few sensitivity analyses were conducted. Incremental cost savings per patient who received intervention ranged between

  15. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  16. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24054776

  17. Vitamin D in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yahn-Yir

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in both the pediatric and adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. CKD is characterized by dysregulation of vitamin D and mineral metabolism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism and its management puts patients with CKD at increased cardiovascular risk. Emergence of experimental and some clinical data suggesting beneficial effects of vitamin D on proteinuria, blood pressure, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes has pushed it to the center stage of CKD research. Pediatric data on vitamin D dysregulation and its consequences are still in its infancy. Ongoing prospective studies such as Chronic Kidney disease in Children (CKiD) and the Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Children with CKD (4 C) should help to delineate the evolution of disturbances in mineral metabolism and its adverse effects on growth, CKD progression and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22544696

  18. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : new pharmacotherapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Greulich, T; Koczulla, A R; Vogelmeier, C

    2012-11-01

    Data about the clinical presentation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have resulted in a new classification of the disease. The degree of airflow limitation has been amended by symptoms and exacerbation rate. The standard pharmacotherapy of stable COPD is in transition, as fixed combinations of long acting beta agonists and long acting anticholinergics are in the late stages of clinical development. On this background inhaled corticosteroids will need to be re-evaluated. Roflumilast is a recently approved therapeutic option that primarily diminishes exacerbation frequency in patients with chronic bronchitis and severe airflow obstruction (FEV(1) < 50%). In COPD patients with acute exacerbations procalcitonin levels can be used to guide antibiotic therapy. Comparable clinical outcomes can be achieved while using significantly less amounts of antibiotics. PMID:22955248

  19. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  20. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Devine, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a growing healthcare problem that is expected to worsen as the population ages and the worldwide use of tobacco products increases. Smoking cessation is the only effective means of prevention. Employers are in a unique position to help employees stop smoking. During the long asymptomatic phase, lung function nevertheless continues to decline; therefore, many patients seek medical attention only when they are at an advanced stage or when they have experienced an acute exacerbation. To help preserve patients' quality of life and reduce healthcare costs related to this chronic disease, clinicians need to accurately diagnose the condition and appropriately manage patients through the long course of their illness. This article discusses the current approach to patient management. PMID:25126252

  1. Tuberculosis-associated chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jobson Lopes; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) account for approximately 15-20% of TB cases in immunocompetent patients. The genitourinary system is the third most commonly affected site. We report the case of a 20-year-old man admitted with fever, chills, dry cough, right flank pain, and oliguria who developed renal function loss. The pyelogram evidenced silence of the right kidney, and the abdominal and pelvic magnetic resonance showed significant dilation of the right pyelocaliceal system and proximal ureter. Biopsies of renal cortex and retroperitoneal lymph nodes showed caseous granuloma consistent with TB. Treatment was started with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and the patient presented a favorable outcome but with non-dialytic chronic kidney disease. This case illustrates a case of chronic kidney disease secondary to TB in a young, otherwise healthy man. PMID:21633015

  2. Educational session: managing chronic myeloid leukemia as a chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has transformed this disease from being invariably fatal to being the type of leukemia with the best prognosis. Median survival associated with CML is estimated at > 20 years. Nevertheless, blast crisis occurs at an incidence of 1%-2% per year, and once this has occurred, treatment options are limited and survival is short. Due to the overall therapeutic success, the prevalence of CML is gradually increasing. The optimal management of this disease includes access to modern therapies and standardized surveillance methods for all patients, which will certainly create challenges. Furthermore, all available TKIs show mild but frequent side effects that may require symptomatic therapy. Adherence to therapy is the key prerequisite for efficacy of the drugs and for long-term success. Comprehensive information on the nature of the disease and the need for the continuous treatment using the appropriate dosages and timely information on efficacy data are key factors for optimal compliance. Standardized laboratory methods are required to provide optimal surveillance according to current recommendations. CML occurs in all age groups. Despite a median age of 55-60 years, particular challenges are the management of the disease in children, young women with the wish to get pregnant, and older patients. The main challenges in the long-term management of CML patients are discussed in this review. PMID:22160024

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  4. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. PMID:26093993

  5. Oxidants in Acute and Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mannam, Praveen; Srivastava, Anup; Sugunaraj, Jaya Prakash; Lee, Patty J; Sauler, Maor

    2015-01-01

    Oxidants play an important role in homeostatic function, but excessive oxidant generation has an adverse effect on health. The manipulation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) can have a beneficial effect on various lung pathologies. However indiscriminate uses of anti-oxidant strategies have not demonstrated any consistent benefit and may be harmful. Here we propose that nuanced strategies are needed to modulate the oxidant system to obtain a beneficial result in the lung diseases such as Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). We identify novel areas of lung oxidant responses that may yield fruitful therapies in the future. PMID:25705575

  6. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  7. Pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Saey, D; Bernard, S; Gagnon, P; Laviolette, L; Soicher, J; Maltais, F; Esgagne, P; Coats, V; Devost, A-A

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and an important worldwide cause of disability and handicap. Centered around exercise training, pulmonary rehabilitation is a global, multidisciplinary, individualized and comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation is now well recognized as an effective and key intervention in the management of several respiratory diseases particularly in COPD. Modern and effective pulmonary rehabilitation programs are global, multidisciplinary, individualized and use comprehensive approach acting on the patient as a whole and not only on the pulmonary component of the disease. In the last two decades interest for pulmonary rehabilitation is on the rise and a growing literature including several guidelines is now available. This review addresses the recent developments in the broad area of pulmonary rehabilitation as well as new methods to consider in the development of future and better programs. Modern literature for rationale, physiopathological basis, structure, exercise training as well challenges for pulmonary rehabilitation programs are addressed. Among the main challenges of pulmonary rehabilitation, efforts have to be devoted to improve accessibility to early rehabilitation strategies, not only to patients with COPD but to those with other chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:19776711

  8. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  9. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  10. Acne as a chronic systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C

    2014-01-01

    Acne is the most common skin disorder. In the majority of cases, acne is a disease that changes its skin distribution and severity over time; moreover, it can be a physically (scar development) and psychologically damaging condition that lasts for years. According to its clinical characteristics, it can be defined as a chronic disease according to the World Health Organization criteria. Acne is also a cardinal component of many systemic diseases or syndromes, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia, seborrhea-acne-hirsutism-androgenetic alopecia syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, hyperandrogenism-insulin resistance-acanthosis nigricans syndrome, Apert syndrome, synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis-pyoderma gangrenosum-acne syndrome. Recent studies on the Ache hunter gatherers of Paraguay detected the lack of acne in association with markedly lower rates of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular diseases, a finding that indicates either a nutritional or a genetic background of this impressive concomitance. PMID:24767186

  11. Up from Dependency: A New National Public Assistance Strategy. Supplement 3: A Self-Help Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotler, Martin; And Others

    Self-help among low-income people is vitally important. In no area is self-help more important than in overcoming poverty's burdens and energizing the escape from poverty. This document comprises an inventory of self-help and mutual-help programs that feature active involvement of members of the low-income population. The programs in this…

  12. Public Pedagogy, Private Lives: Self-Help Books and Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Self-help literature has become an important domain of adult learning in North America. Self-help books offer readers advice on how to take charge of their lives and achieve goals such as prosperity, love, happiness, wellness, and self-actualization. Despite the popularity of self-help books, there has been little research about them from scholars…

  13. Self-Help Group Leaders as Community Helpers: An Impact Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissen, Greg; Warren, Mary; Nansel, Tonja; Goodman, Samantha

    2002-01-01

    A study examined costs and benefits perceived by 26 self-help group leaders who helped rural Kansas communities in extending the use, awareness, and effectiveness of self-help groups. Findings that satisfaction in helping was the major benefit and time constraints the major cost were used to tailor leadership roles. Self-help group activity…

  14. An Information and Referral Model for Improving Self-Help Group Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollert, Richard

    This paper describes the Self-Help Information Service (SIS), and summarizes data evaluating the program. Associated with a generally focused information and referral service (I&R), SIS was designed to facilitate research on self-help groups. Its specific goals were to develop and maintain a telephone referral service disseminating self-help group…

  15. Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis and Thalidomide in Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Martín-Nalda, Andrea; Roca, Isabel; Fontecha, Cesar Galo; Fernández-Polo, Aurora; Barber, Ignasi; Martinez-Gallo, Mónica; Soler-Palacin, Pere

    2016-08-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency that leads to severe recurrent infection and inflammatory complications that are usually difficult to diagnose and treat. Several hyperinflammation mechanisms, such as decreased neutrophil apoptosis, toll-like receptor activation imbalance, Th17 cell induction, Nrf2 activity deficiency, and inflammasome activation, have been described in CGD patients However, there have been no reports of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis as an inflammatory complication in CGD, and the differential diagnosis of this condition with infectious osteomyelitis is challenging. Thalidomide has been used to treat several inflammatory manifestations in CGD patients with good clinical results. Here, we report the case of a previously asymptomatic 11-year-old boy who consulted for difficulty walking and pain at the back of the right thigh, with increased inflammatory markers. Multifocal bone involvement was seen on bone scintigraphy, and acute-phase reactants were elevated. On the basis of a suspected diagnosis of infectious osteomyelitis, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was started, with no clinical response. Bone biopsy and microbiological tests yielded negative results; at that point, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis was suspected. The patient was unresponsive to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and corticosteroids. Thalidomide was started, and within 6 months, clinical and radiologic resolution of the condition was achieved with no adverse effects. More than 1 year after stopping thalidomide, the patient remained free of symptoms and inflammatory parameters are within normal levels. Thalidomide has a favorable safety profile compared with other alternatives and could be considered a feasible therapeutic option for this type of condition in selected patients. PMID:27436506

  16. Chronic idiopathic urticaria and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, R M; Imbesi, S; Saitta, S; Campennì, A; Cannavò, S; Trimarchi, F; Gangemi, S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common condition characterized by recurrent episodes of mast cell-driven wheal and flare-type skin reactions lasting for more than 6 weeks. In about 75% of cases, the underlying causes remain unknown, and the term chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is used to emphasize that wheals develop independently of identified external stimuli. Although CIU affects about 1.0% of the general population, its etiopathogenesis is not yet well understood. It is now widely accepted that in many cases CIU should be regarded as an autoimmune disorder caused by circulating and functionally active IgG autoantibodies specific for the IgE receptor (FceRI) present on mast cells and basophils or for IgE itself. The well-known association of CIU with other autoimmune processes/diseases represents further indirect evidence of its autoimmune origin. Autoimmune thyroid diseases, especially autoimmune thyroiditis, represent the most frequently investigated diseases in association with CIU. Here we review this topic with particular regard to the association between Graves' disease and CIU. The possible pathogenetic mechanisms and the clinical implications of such an association are discussed. PMID:23609949

  17. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  18. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  19. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions. PMID:27576232

  20. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation. PMID:26560514

  1. Self-help quit smoking interventions: effects of self-help materials, social support instructions, and telephone counseling.

    PubMed

    Orleans, C T; Schoenbach, V J; Wagner, E H; Quade, D; Salmon, M A; Pearson, D C; Fiedler, J; Porter, C Q; Kaplan, B H

    1991-06-01

    Smokers requesting self-help materials for smoking cessation (N = 2,021) were randomized to receive (a) an experimental self-quitting guide emphasizing nicotine fading and other nonaversive behavioral strategies, (b) the same self-quitting guide with a support guide for the quitter's family and friends, (c) self-quitting and support guides along with four brief counselor calls, or (d) a control guide providing motivational and quit tips and referral to locally available guides and programs. Subjects were predominantly moderate to heavy smokers with a history of multiple previous quit attempts and treatments. Control subjects achieved quit rates similar to those of smokers using the experimental quitting guide, with fewer behavioral prequitting strategies and more outside treatments. Social support guides had no effect on perceived support for quitting or on 8- and 16-month quit rates. Telephone counseling increased adherence to the quitting protocol and quit rates. PMID:2071729

  2. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  3. Physical activity, nutrition, and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Blair, S N; Horton, E; Leon, A S; Lee, I M; Drinkwater, B L; Dishman, R K; Mackey, M; Kienholz, M L

    1996-03-01

    Epidemiologic, animal, clinical, and metabolic studies demonstrate the independent roles of physical activity and nutrition in the prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases. Fewer data are available to describe the synergistic effects of exercise and diet, and questions remain as to whether and how these two lifestyle factors work together to promote health and prevent disease. This paper briefly reviews many of the known effects of physical activity and nutrition on the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and osteoporosis as well as how exercise and diet may work together. A discussion of how to increase physical activity levels and how to improve dietary intake also is included. Finally, current exercise and dietary recommendations are summarized, as are directions for future research. PMID:8776222

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions. PMID:24816034

  5. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuder, Rubin M.; Petrache, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The current epidemic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has produced a worldwide health care burden, approaching that imposed by transmittable infectious diseases. COPD is a multidimensional disease, with varied intermediate and clinical phenotypes. This Review discusses the pathogenesis of COPD, with particular focus on emphysema, based on the concept that pulmonary injury involves stages of initiation (by exposure to cigarette smoke, pollutants, and infectious agents), progression, and consolidation. Tissue damage entails complex interactions among oxidative stress, inflammation, extracellular matrix proteolysis, and apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Lung damage by cigarette smoke ultimately leads to self-propagating processes, resulting in macromolecular and structural alterations — features similar to those seen in aging. PMID:22850885

  6. Role of autophagy in chronic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a common pathway of various glomerular diseases, which carries great morbidity and mortality to people. CKD is characterized by progressive kidney fibrosis and remodeling. CKD is also associated with the depletion of glomerular and tubular cells. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. It plays an important role in both normal and disease states, including immunity, inflammation, and adaptation to stress. Evidence has indicated that impaired autophagic activity is involved in the development of CKD. Here, we review the progress in our understanding of the role of autophagy in the development and progression of CKD. Targeting the autophagic signaling pathways may be a therapeutic strategy for CKD. PMID:26885176

  7. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Jha, V

    2015-05-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  8. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'. PMID:27334146

  9. [Pulmonary obstructive chronic disease and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    António, Carla; Gonçalves, Ana Paula; Tavares, Alcina

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease that can be prevented and treated, with a pulmonary component and with significant systemic effects that contribute to the severity of clinical manifestations. COPD causes a number of changes, including those which lead to exercise tolerance limitation and to a progressive deterioration of life quality of the patients. Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) represents a key part of the treatment. The benefits of RR are independent of sex, age and disease severity. At the end of the program, the patient should have acquired a life style as independent and healthy as possible. With this article the authors intend to review the benefits of physical exercise in rehabilitation of patients with COPD and the different types of training used in the respiratory rehabilitation program established for each patient. PMID:20700562

  10. An Informatics-based Chronic Disease Practice

    PubMed Central

    Nordyke, Robert A.; Kulikowski, Casimir A.

    1998-01-01

    The authors present the case study of a 35-year informatics-based single subspecialty practice for the management of patients with chronic thyroid disease. This extensive experience provides a paradigm for the organization of longitudinal medical information by integrating individual patient care with clinical research and education. The kernel of the process is a set of worksheets easily completed by the physician during the patient encounter. It is a structured medical record that has been computerized since 1972, enabling analysis of different groups of patients to answer questions about chronic conditions and the effects of therapeutic interventions. The recording process and resulting studies severe as an important vehicle for medical education about the nuances of clinical practice. The authors suggest ways in which computerized medical records can become an integral part of medical practice, rather than a luxury or novelty. PMID:9452988

  11. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Scarlata, Simone; Pennazza, Giorgio; Santonico, Marco; Pedone, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) dramatically increases with age, and COPD complicated by chronic respiratory failure may be considered a geriatric condition. Unfortunately, most cases remain undiagnosed because of atypical clinical presentation and difficulty with current respiratory function diagnostic standards. Accordingly, the disease is under-recognized and undertreated. This is expected to impact noticeably the health status of unrecognized COPD patients because a timely therapy could mitigate the distinctive and important effects of COPD on the health status. Comorbidity also plays a pivotal role in conditioning both the health status and the therapy of COPD besides having major prognostic implication. Several problems affect the overall quality of the therapy for the elderly with COPD, and current guidelines as well as results from pharmacological trials only to some extent apply to this patient. Finally, physicians of different specialties care for the elderly COPD patient: physician's specialty largely determines the kind of approach. In conclusion, COPD, in itself a complex disease, becomes difficult to identify and to manage in the elderly. Interdisciplinary efforts are desirable to provide the practicing physician with a multidisciplinary guide to the identification and treatment of COPD. PMID:24183233

  12. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  13. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

  14. Genetic Considerations in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Lyndsay A; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is an irreversible process that, in some cases, may lead to end-stage renal disease. The majority of children with CKD have a congenital disorder of the kidney or urological tract arising from birth. There is strong evidence for both a genetic and epigenetic component to progression of CKD. Utilization of gene-mapping strategies, ranging from genome-wide association studies to single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis, serves to identify potential genetic variants that may lend to disease variation. Genome-wide association studies evaluating population-based data have identified different loci associated with CKD progression. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on an individual level suggests that secondary systemic sequelae of CKD are closely related to dysfunction of the cardiovascular-inflammatory axis and may lead to advanced cardiovascular disease through abnormal vascular calcification and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Similarly, genetic variants affecting cytokine control, fibrosis, and parenchymal development may modulate CKD through development and acceleration of renal interstitial fibrosis. Epigenetic studies evaluate modification of the genome through DNA methylation, histone modification, or RNA interference, which may be directly influenced by external or environmental factors directing genomic expression. Lastly, improved understanding of the genetic and epigenetic contribution to CKD progression may allow providers to identify a population at accelerated risk for disease progression and apply novel therapies targeted at the genetic mechanism of disease. PMID:27617141

  15. A customizable model for chronic disease coordination: Lessons learned from the coordinated chronic disease program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managedmore » resources, and 6) relationship building. Furthermore, these elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.« less

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clinical integrative physiology.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Webb, Katherine; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral airway dysfunction, inhomogeneous ventilation distribution, gas trapping, and impaired pulmonary gas exchange are variably present in all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article provides a cogent physiologic explanation for the relentless progression of activity-related dyspnea and exercise intolerance that all too commonly characterizes COPD. The spectrum of physiologic derangements that exist in smokers with mild airway obstruction and a history compatible with COPD is examined. Also explored are the perceptual and physiologic consequences of progressive erosion of the resting inspiratory capacity. Finally, emerging information on the role of cardiocirculatory impairment in contributing to exercise intolerance in patients with varying degrees of airway obstruction is reviewed. PMID:24507837

  17. [Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, C; Koczulla, R; Fehrenbach, H; Bals, R

    2006-09-01

    It is currently believed that the most important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is inflammation of the small airways caused by inhaled particles and gases. In this context, a disturbance of the physiological balance between proteases and antiproteases develops that may cause lung emphysema. Moreover, oxidative stress seems to be important, as it may enhance the inflammatory reaction. The development of emphysema may also involve a loss of alveolar cells by apoptosis. Finally, several studies have indicated that a systemic inflammation is induced by COPD that may be of relevance to the development of systemic components that are observed in COPD patients. PMID:16845536

  18. Chronic Wasting Disease Positive Tissue Bank

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Scott D.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the USGS National Wildlife Health Center entered into an agreement with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the Department of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Wyoming to produce a collection of positive tissues from cervids intentionally infected with chronic wasting disease. This agreement was facilitated through the University of Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit. Also, the investigators on this project sampled the animals incrementally over 2 years to show changes over time, and examined tissues from the animals by immunohistochemistry. CWD positive tissues are catalogued by species, sample site and time of infection. These data and more will soon be published.

  19. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  20. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  1. [Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease and strategies to counteract chronic diseases in Italy].

    PubMed

    Mastrilli, Valeria; D'Elia, Roberto; Galeone, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is placed in the more general context of prevention of major chronic Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases and tumors that are the main problem for public health worldwide. Any health policy strategy aimed to the prevention of NCDs has to provide knowledge of health and socioeconomic status of the population, to reduce the level of exposure to risk factors and to adapt health services to the request for assistance. To this purpose, population monitoring systems have been implemented in the last years. The NCDs share some risk factors that are related, in large part, to unhealthy individual behaviours: smoking, alcohol abuse, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. NCDs prevention has to be understood as the set of all actions, sanitary and not, aiming to prevent or delay the onset of diseases or their complications. Preventive measures should, therefore, involve not only the health sector but also all the actors that can help to prevent that disease. As for the Prevention of CKD, the Ministry of Health has established a working table, which handled the Drafting of the "Position paper for the CKD", approved in the State-Regions Conference on august 8th 2014. The document draws a national strategy to combat this disease through primary prevention, early diagnosis and the establishment of diagnostic - therapeutic pathways (DTP). PMID:27545630

  2. Responding to local needs. Self-help groups.

    PubMed

    Jayaseelan, J

    1993-01-01

    Pink Triangle, the only community-based group in Malaysia which works with men who have sex with men, took initial steps in August 1992 to establish a self-help project for people who are HIV-seropositive. Supporting people who are HIV-positive and fighting for their rights is new in Malaysia. The group has thus far been publicized through its public education events, hospitals, and other nongovernmental organizations. For the first time, information is being published specifically by and for people living with HIV/AIDS. The project also has a phone line to allow people to speak anonymously with someone who shares their experience. Many callers are men who have sex with men in the social context of intense prejudice and discrimination. Afraid to openly acknowledge their sexuality with strangers, the callers have yet to accede to meeting each other face-to-face in a group setting. The author notes in closing that Pink Triangle must be realistic about what can be achieved in Malaysia and allow the group to develop according to people's needs and not on the basis of a model imported from outside of the country. PMID:12288933

  3. Telomeres, NAFLD and Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Benedetta; Valenti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres consist of repeat DNA sequences located at the terminal portion of chromosomes that shorten during mitosis, protecting the tips of chromosomes. During chronic degenerative conditions associated with high cell replication rate, progressive telomere attrition is accentuated, favoring senescence and genomic instability. Several lines of evidence suggest that this process is involved in liver disease progression: (a) telomere shortening and alterations in the expression of proteins protecting the telomere are associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; (b) advanced liver damage is a feature of a spectrum of genetic diseases impairing telomere function, and inactivating germline mutations in the telomerase complex (including human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) and human Telomerase RNA Component (hTERC)) are enriched in cirrhotic patients independently of the etiology; and (c) experimental models suggest that telomerase protects from liver fibrosis progression. Conversely, reactivation of telomerase occurs during hepatocarcinogenesis, allowing the immortalization of the neoplastic clone. The role of telomere attrition may be particularly relevant in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver, an emerging cause of advanced liver disease. Modulation of telomerase or shelterins may be exploited to prevent liver disease progression, and to define specific treatments for different stages of liver disease. PMID:26999107

  4. Telomeres, NAFLD and Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Donati, Benedetta; Valenti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres consist of repeat DNA sequences located at the terminal portion of chromosomes that shorten during mitosis, protecting the tips of chromosomes. During chronic degenerative conditions associated with high cell replication rate, progressive telomere attrition is accentuated, favoring senescence and genomic instability. Several lines of evidence suggest that this process is involved in liver disease progression: (a) telomere shortening and alterations in the expression of proteins protecting the telomere are associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; (b) advanced liver damage is a feature of a spectrum of genetic diseases impairing telomere function, and inactivating germline mutations in the telomerase complex (including human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) and human Telomerase RNA Component (hTERC)) are enriched in cirrhotic patients independently of the etiology; and (c) experimental models suggest that telomerase protects from liver fibrosis progression. Conversely, reactivation of telomerase occurs during hepatocarcinogenesis, allowing the immortalization of the neoplastic clone. The role of telomere attrition may be particularly relevant in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver, an emerging cause of advanced liver disease. Modulation of telomerase or shelterins may be exploited to prevent liver disease progression, and to define specific treatments for different stages of liver disease. PMID:26999107

  5. Tobacco smoking and chronic destructive periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Jan

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor associated with chronic destructive periodontal disease. No other known factor can match the strength of smoking in causing harm to the periodontium. The harmful effects manifest themselves by interfering with vascular and immunologic reactions, as well as by undermining the supportive functions of the periodontal tissues. The typical characteristic of smoking-associated periodontal disease is the destruction of the supporting tissues of the teeth, with the ensuing clinical symptoms of bone loss, attachment loss, pocket formation, and eventually tooth loss. A review of the international literature that has accumulated over the past 20 years offers convincing evidence that smokers exhibit greater bone loss and attachment loss, as well as more pronounced frequencies of periodontal pockets, than non-smokers do. In addition, tooth loss is more extensive in smokers. Smoking, thus, considerably increases the risk for destructive periodontal disease. Depending on the definition of disease and the exposure to smoking, the risk is 5- to 20-fold elevated for a smoker compared to a never-smoker. For a smoker exposed to heavy long-life smoking, the risk of attracting destructive periodontal disease is equivalent to that of attracting lung cancer. The outcome of periodontal treatment is less favorable or even unfavorable in smokers. Although long-term studies are rare, available studies unanimously agree that treatment failures and relapse of disease are predominantly seen in smokers. This contention is valid irrespective of treatment modality, suggesting that smoking will interfere with an expected normal outcome following commonplace periodontal therapies. The majority of available studies agree that the subgingival microflora of smokers and non-smokers are no different given other conditions. As a consequence, the elevated morbidity in smokers does not depend on particular microflora. The mechanisms behind the destructive effects of

  6. Integrative Genomics of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Brian D.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease with both environmental and genetic determinants, the most important of which is cigarette smoking. There is marked heterogeneity in the development of COPD among persons with similar cigarette smoking histories, which is likely partially explained by genetic variation. Genomic approaches such as genomewide association studies and gene expression studies have been used to discover genes and molecular pathways involved in COPD pathogenesis; however, these “first generation” omics studies have limitations. Integrative genomic studies are emerging which can combine genomic datasets to further examine the molecular underpinnings of COPD. Future research in COPD genetics will likely use network-based approaches to integrate multiple genomic data types in order to model the complex molecular interactions involved in COPD pathogenesis. This article reviews the genomic research to date and offers a vision for the future of integrative genomic research in COPD. PMID:25078622

  7. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Joy X.; Török, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases. PMID:26436133

  8. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:26965220

  9. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  10. Intractable colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Yoshiaki; Goto, Akira; Yamashita, Kentaro; Endo, Takao; Ikeda, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kaori; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-11-01

    The case of a 20-year-old Japanese man, diagnosed as having autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), who was being treated with corticosteroids for intractable unclassified colitis, is described. He died from multiple organ failure following disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to disseminated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection. He was diagnosed as an index case of CGD when 2 years old, was inoculated against VZV at the age of 5 years and had had an unremarkable course for 19 years. He was admitted to hospital because of a third episode of recurrent bloody diarrhoea. Clinical remission for each episode was achieved by intravenous corticosteroid therapy. Unclassified colitis associated with CGD was diagnosed based on a colonic biopsy demonstrating characteristic macrophages with lipofuscin deposits. From a treatment viewpoint, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) should be differentiated from secondary IBD occurring in CGD, in which immunosuppressive drugs including corticosteroids, still the mainstay of IBD treatment, should be avoided. PMID:17030921

  11. Isoflavonoids and chronic disease: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Boersma, B; Patel, R; Kirk, M; Darley-Usmar, V M; Kim, H; Xu, J

    2000-01-01

    Soy and its isoflavones are associated with a reduced risk of chronic disease. The mechanisms of action of isoflavones include their roles as weak estrogens, inhibitors of tyrosine kinase-dependent signal transduction processes and as cellular antioxidants. Although estrogen receptor beta binds genistein with an affinity close to that of 17beta-estradiol, it remains to be determined whether it is a mediator of genistein's activity in vivo. Genistein's inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases is not limited to direct effect on these kinases, but may result from alteration in kinase expression. Genistein is not a particularly good scavanger of cellular oxidants; however, it reacts vigorously with the prooxidant hypochlorous acid, produced by neutrophils as part of the inflammatory response. The chlorinated isoflavones may have altered biochemical and biological effects compared to their parent compounds and may provide increased protection against inflammatory disease. PMID:11216488

  12. Psoriasis: experiencing a chronic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Chrissopoulos, A; Cleaver, G

    1996-03-01

    Psoriasis is an incurable chronic skin disease that affects one in fifty people. Psychological factors play a role in the aetiology and experience of psoriasis but there is little pertaining to the psychological experience of psoriasis in research literature. In this study the phenomenological approach is used to describe the everyday experiences of a person with psoriasis. By using Giorgi's (1985) steps of data analysis a description of the lifeworld of the person with psoriasis was compiled. The description presented several essential components of the experience of psoriasis and the results emphasize the effects of the disease on the sufferer's life. Problematic interpersonal relationships, a negative selfconcept, fluctuating moods, loss of control, negativity and loneliness are a part of this experience. It is hoped that knowledge of the world of the psoriasis sufferer will assist the help professions to understanding and empathize with the suffering and limitations that psoriasis brings. PMID:9257576

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD. PMID:27081728

  14. Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy a real disease?

    PubMed

    Randolph, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has received widespread media attention and is treated in the lay press as an established disease, characterized by suicidality and progressive dementia. The extant literature on CTE is reviewed here. There currently are no controlled epidemiological data to suggest that retired athletes are at increased risk for dementia or that they exhibit any type of unique neuropathology. There remain no established clinical or pathological criteria for diagnosing CTE. Despite claims that CTE occurs frequently in retired National Football League (NFL) players, recent studies of NFL retirees report that they have an all-cause mortality rate that is approximately half of the expected rate, and even lower suicide rates. In addition, recent clinical studies of samples of cognitively impaired NFL retirees have failed to identify any unique clinical syndrome. Until further controlled studies are completed, it appears to be premature to consider CTE a verifiable disease. PMID:24412888

  15. Treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a readily diagnosable disorder that responds to treatment. Smoking cessation can reduce symptoms and prevent progression of disease. Bronchodilator therapy is key in improvement of lung function. Three classes of bronchodilators-beta agonists, anticholinergics, and theophylline-are available and can be used individually or in combination. Inhaled glucocorticoids can also improve airflow and can be combined with bronchodilators. Inhaled glucocorticoids, in addition, might reduce exacerbation frequency and severity as might some bronchodilators. Effective use of pharmacotherapy in COPD needs integration with a rehabilitation programme and successful treatment of co-morbidities, including depression and anxiety. Treatment for stable COPD can improve the function and quality of life of many patients, could reduce admissions to hospital, and has been suggested to improve survival. PMID:15337408

  16. [Neurourological signs of chronic cerebral vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Shvarts, P G; Dutov, V V; Kadykov, A S; Shvedkov, V V; Popov, S V; Plotnikov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of urination, along with motor and cognitive disorders, are characteristic of different forms of chronic cerebral vascular diseases (CCVD). Irritation symptoms are more frequent in subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) and multi infarct hypertonic encephalopathy (MIHE). Overactive urine bladder syndrome (OUBS) caused by neurogenic detrusive hyperactivity manifests itself in frequent urination, nocturia and imperative enuresis and thus decreases quality of life and results in disability of patents with CCVD. At the same time, the character of symptoms points indirectly to the localization of lacunar infarction or the extent of severity of leukoareosis. It is the most frequent form of disorders of urination in the first years of disease that significantly aggravates its course and needs timed diagnosis and pharmacological treatment. Competitive antagonists of muscarinic receptors M2, M3 subtypes are the most effective drugs for treatment of OUBS comorbid to CCVD. PMID:23994932

  17. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  18. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:27102136

  19. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    PubMed Central

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  20. Chronic Pulmonary Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehari, Alem; Klings, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), the most common genetic hemolytic anemia worldwide, affects 250,000 births annually. In the United States, SCD affects approximately 100,000 individuals, most of African descent. Hemoglobin S (HbS) results from a glutamate-to-valine mutation of the sixth codon of the β-hemoglobin allele; the homozygous genotype (HbSS) is associated with the most prevalent and severe form of the disease. Other SCD genotypes include HbSC, composed of one HbS allele and one HbC (glutamate-to-lysine mutation) allele; and HbS-β-thalassemia(0) or HbS-β-thalassemia(+), composed of one HbS allele and one β-thalassemia allele with absent or reduced β-chain production, respectively. Despite advances in care, median survival remains in the fifth decade, due in large part to chronic complications of the disease. Chronic pulmonary complications in SCD are major contributors to this early mortality. Although our understanding of these conditions has improved much over the past 10 to 15 years, there remains no specific treatment for pulmonary complications of SCD. It is unclear whether conventional treatment regimens directed at non-SCD populations have equivalent efficacy in patients with SCD. This represents a critical research need. In this review, the authors review the state-of-the-art understanding of the following pulmonary complications of SCD: (1) pulmonary hypertension; (2) venous thromboembolic disease; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) asthma and recurrent wheezing; and (5) pulmonary function abnormalities. This review highlights the advances as well as the knowledge gaps in this field to update clinicians and other health care providers and to garner research interest from the medical community. PMID:26836905

  1. Health Technologies for the Improvement of Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). Objective The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. Data Sources The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Review Methods Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Results Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. Conclusions The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient

  2. [Development, situation and perspective of self-help support in Germany].

    PubMed

    Geene, R; Huber, E; Hundertmark-Mayser, J; Möller-Bock, B; Thiel, W

    2009-01-01

    Self-help groups and self-help associations are an important part of the social security system. In Germany, self-help contact points, senior citizen centers, volunteer agencies, citizen centers and multi-generation houses combine citizen participation with innovative professional services. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee of continuous financial support for these important, locally administered institutions. There are about 280 self-help contact points and more than 400 federal self-help associations that support and promote self-help in Germany. Healthy communities, healthy workplaces and healthy people need a decentralized system of self-help programs operated at local and regional levels, in districts and towns. Thereby, professional support systems that operate self-help programs and promote citizen participation in the self-help programs must be managed in a similar regional format. New forms of cooperation from the regional and local governments, private companies, and citizen engagement already exist. Additionally, regional projects of integrated maintenance systems with the regional health maintenance institutions have been established. Currently, the central challenges of the self-help programs are quality development, inclusion of people with social disadvantages and of people with migrational background. The essential prerequisites for this work are continuous financial support and a politically supported infrastructure, which is in fact an important health investment. PMID:19189150

  3. Pregnancy and chronic progressive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Isaiah D; Johannesson, Marie; Edenborough, Frank P; Sufian, Beth S; Kerem, Eitan

    2007-02-15

    Progressive pulmonary disease may preclude the option of pregnancy for a number of women in their child-bearing years due to the severity of the disease. For a subset of women with chronic lung disease including cystic fibrosis, pregnancy is possible, but can have a devastating effect both on the prospective mother and fetus. The potential hazards of pregnancy in cystic fibrosis or other progressive pulmonary diseases may trigger a moral conflict between physician and patient. The female patient may argue that her autonomy cannot be circumscribed and that the physician is obliged to assist her reproductive efforts. The physician can counter that his/her participation in potentially harmful interventions is not consistent with professional norms requiring adherence to the principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence. Whenever possible, the ethical conflict between physician and patient should be resolved before initiation of pregnancy. We propose that this best be done through structured negotiations between physician and patient with the goal of constructing an ethical framework for reducing the moral tension between the two. Steps in the negotiating process include defining the therapeutic alliance, information exchange, dialog, and deliberation. As part of the information exchange, it is important to discuss alternatives to pregnancy such as adoption and surrogacy, especially when there are strong contraindications to pregnancy. If negotiations reach a satisfactory conclusion for both sides, there should be a well-delineated consensual agreement to commence the pregnancy with the full support of the medical team. PMID:17110647

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines What You Need to Know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ... n n n Notes: For more information National Kidney Disease Education Program 1-866-4 KIDNEY (1-866- ...

  5. Chronic Disease Medication Administration Rates in a Public School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Lawrence; Fredrickson, Doren D.; Burbach, Cindy; Molgaard, Craig A.; Ngong, Lolem

    2004-01-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest school nurses and staff treat increasing numbers of public school students with chronic diseases. However, professionals know little about actual disease burden in schools. This study measured prevalence of chronic disease medication administration rates in a large, urban midwestern school district. Data from daily…

  6. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  7. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-24

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP] <25 mm Hg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP ≥25 mm Hg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mm Hg or mPAP ≥25 mm Hg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0 l/min/m(2)]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on

  8. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular diseases--'cardiopulmonary continuum'].

    PubMed

    Batura-Gabryel, Halina; Grabicki, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by persistent airflow limitation and extrapulmonary comorbidities, which contribute to the overall severity. Some risk factors, with tobacco smoking as the most serious one, lead to a chronic, systemic inflammation that plays the main role in the pathogenesis of COPD and comorbidities, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The course of COPD is diverse; it depends on pathologies in the respiratory system and on other organ dysfunctions. CVDs are the most commonly recognised comorbidities in COPD patients. The severity and natural course of COPD, as well as quality of the patient's life, are influenced by them. CVDs are frequently the reason for hospitalisation and may lead to death. They are also an important prognostic factor. Comorbidities may prolong exacerbation of COPD. On the other hand, COPD is an independent risk factor of CVD. The prevalence of COPD is high in patients suffering from coronary artery disease, and airflow limitation is a major risk factor for chronic heart failure. These complex interactions between heart and lung can be denoted as 'cardiopulmonary continuum'. These dependencies are not recognised in detail. Currently research is being done, which attempts to explain these complicated relations. For many years COPD and CVD were not connected. Today it is known that patients suffering from COPD must be provided comprehensive care. It is necessary to monitor the risk of CVD and their influence on the COPD course. Careful and proper treatment of all diseases is essential. An interdisciplinary team with good cooperation should prepare a plan of COPD treatment with simultaneous therapy of comorbidities. PMID:25339571

  9. Development and Application of Chronic Disease Risk Prediction Models

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun Min; Stefani, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, non-communicable chronic diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and a large proportion of chronic diseases are preventable through risk factor management. However, the prevention efficacy at the individual level is not yet satisfactory. Chronic disease prediction models have been developed to assist physicians and individuals in clinical decision-making. A chronic disease prediction model assesses multiple risk factors together and estimates an absolute disease risk for the individual. Accurate prediction of an individual's future risk for a certain disease enables the comparison of benefits and risks of treatment, the costs of alternative prevention strategies, and selection of the most efficient strategy for the individual. A large number of chronic disease prediction models, especially targeting cardiovascular diseases and cancers, have been suggested, and some of them have been adopted in the clinical practice guidelines and recommendations of many countries. Although few chronic disease prediction tools have been suggested in the Korean population, their clinical utility is not as high as expected. This article reviews methodologies that are commonly used for developing and evaluating a chronic disease prediction model and discusses the current status of chronic disease prediction in Korea. PMID:24954311

  10. [Sweet's syndrome. Its association with chronic inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Calvo Catalá, J; González Pérez, J A; Febrer Bosch, I; Oliver Mas, V; Herrera Ballester, A

    1990-07-01

    Sweet's syndrome, or febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is a disease first described by Sweet R.D. in 1964 as a dermatologic disease. Subsequently, it has been associated to several disease. One of those rarely describe is the association to chronic intestinal inflammatory disease. We reviewed the cases studied in our hospital since 1980 and found two cases associated to chronic intestinal inflammatory disease. We recommend the carrying out of gastrointestinal studies in patients afflicted by Sweet's syndrome to detect its association. PMID:2103250

  11. Guided self-help for binge eating/purging anorexia nervosa before inpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Manfred; Cebulla, Marian; Quadflieg, Nobert; Naab, Silke

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a cognitive-behavioral self-help manual for anorexia nervosa. Patients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (N=102), binge eating/purging type (AN-B/P), were consecutively assigned to one of two conditions: 6-week manualized guided self-help or a wait-list control. All patients thereafter received inpatient treatment in a hospital for behavioral medicine. The primary outcome variable was the number of days in inpatient treatment. Secondary outcome variables were measures of psychopathology. Results showed that duration of inpatient treatment was significantly shorter (by 5.2 days) among participants receiving guided self-help. Body image, slimness ideal, general psychopathology, and some bulimic symptoms improved significantly during self-help. The authors conclude that, to increase effects of therapist-guided self-help in AN-B/P, additional variants of a self-help manual should be tried in different therapeutic settings. PMID:18816009

  12. [Chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic kidney chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is a serious complication which can evolve into severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), or even end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It impacts on the patient's quality of life and that of their family and significantly increases the cost of care. The development and progression of chronic kidney disease is prevented by strictly controlling blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risk factors as well as monitoring the markers of kidney disease. In the case of CKD, treatment may need to be adapted. PMID:26036123

  13. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Related to disease severity?

    PubMed Central

    Echave-Sustaeta, Jose M; Comeche Casanova, Lorena; Cosio, Borja G; Soler-Cataluña, Juan Jose; Garcia-Lujan, Ricardo; Ribera, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Several diseases commonly co-exist with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in elderly patients. This study aimed to investigate whether there is an association between COPD severity and the frequency of comorbidities in stable COPD patients. Patients and methods In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, patients with spirometric diagnosis of COPD attended to by internal medicine departments throughout Spain were consecutively recruited by 225 internal medicine specialists. The severity of airflow obstruction was graded using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) and data on demographics, smoking history, comorbidities, and dyspnea were collected. The Charlson comorbidity score was calculated. Results Eight hundred and sixty-six patients were analyzed: male 93%, mean age 69.8 (standard deviation [SD] 9.7) years and forced vital capacity in 1 second 42.1 (SD 17.7)%. Even, the mean (SD) Charlson score was 2.2 (2.2) for stage I, 2.3 (1.5) for stage II, 2.5 (1.6) for stage III, and 2.7 (1.8) for stage IV (P=0.013 between stage I and IV groups), independent predictors of Charlson score in the multivariate analysis were age, smoking history (pack-years), the hemoglobin level, and dyspnea, but not GOLD stage. Conclusion COPD patients attended to in internal medicine departments show high scores of comorbidity. However, GOLD stage was not an independent predictor of comorbidity. PMID:25429213

  14. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cerebrovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lahousse, Lies; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, M Arfan; Brusselle, Guy G

    2015-11-01

    Along with the aging population, the public health burden of cerebrovascular disease is increasing. Cerebral small vessel disease and accumulation of brain pathology associate with cognitive decline and can lead to clinical outcomes, such as stroke and dementia. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a common respiratory disease among elderly. The quality of life and prognosis of patients with COPD is greatly determined by the presence of comorbidities including stroke and cognitive impairment. Despite the clinical relevance of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and (vascular) cognitive impairment in patients with COPD, literature is scarce and underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim of the present review is therefore to summarize current scientific knowledge, to provide a better understanding of the interplay between COPD and the aging brain and to define remaining knowledge gaps. This narrative review article 1) overviews the epidemiology of cerebral small vessel disease, stroke and cognitive impairment in patients with COPD; 2) discusses potential underlying mechanisms including aging, smoking, systemic inflammation, vasculopathy, hypoxia and genetic susceptibility; and 3) highlights areas requiring further research. PMID:26342840

  16. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2009-03-01

    Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

  17. Methylotroph Infections and Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    PubMed

    Falcone, E Liana; Petts, Jennifer R; Fasano, Mary Beth; Ford, Bradley; Nauseef, William M; Neves, João Farela; Simões, Maria João; Tierce, Millard L; de la Morena, M Teresa; Greenberg, David E; Zerbe, Christa S; Zelazny, Adrian M; Holland, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a defect in production of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, which leads to recurrent infections with a characteristic group of pathogens not previously known to include methylotrophs. Methylotrophs are versatile environmental bacteria that can use single-carbon organic compounds as their sole source of energy; they rarely cause disease in immunocompetent persons. We have identified 12 infections with methylotrophs (5 reported here, 7 previously reported) in patients with CGD. Methylotrophs identified were Granulibacter bethesdensis (9 cases), Acidomonas methanolica (2 cases), and Methylobacterium lusitanum (1 case). Two patients in Europe died; the other 10, from North and Central America, recovered after prolonged courses of antimicrobial drug therapy and, for some, surgery. Methylotrophs are emerging as disease-causing organisms in patients with CGD. For all patients, sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was required for correct diagnosis. Geographic origin of the methylotroph strain may affect clinical management and prognosis. PMID:26886412

  18. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development. PMID:27481751

  19. Methylotroph Infections and Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petts, Jennifer R.; Fasano, Mary Beth; Ford, Bradley; Nauseef, William M.; Neves, João Farela; Simões, Maria João; Tierce, Millard L.; de la Morena, M. Teresa; Greenberg, David E.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Holland, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a defect in production of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, which leads to recurrent infections with a characteristic group of pathogens not previously known to include methylotrophs. Methylotrophs are versatile environmental bacteria that can use single-carbon organic compounds as their sole source of energy; they rarely cause disease in immunocompetent persons. We have identified 12 infections with methylotrophs (5 reported here, 7 previously reported) in patients with CGD. Methylotrophs identified were Granulibacter bethesdensis (9 cases), Acidomonas methanolica (2 cases), and Methylobacterium lusitanum (1 case). Two patients in Europe died; the other 10, from North and Central America, recovered after prolonged courses of antimicrobial drug therapy and, for some, surgery. Methylotrophs are emerging as disease-causing organisms in patients with CGD. For all patients, sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was required for correct diagnosis. Geographic origin of the methylotroph strain may affect clinical management and prognosis. PMID:26886412

  20. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  1. Cryoglobulins in acute and chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Florin-Christensen, A.; Roux, María E. B.; Arana, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Cryoglobulins were detected in the sera of thirteen patients with acute viral hepatitis and of twelve with chronic hepatic diseases (active chronic hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cryptogenic cirrhosis). Their nature and antibody activity was studied. In both groups, most of them consisted of mixed cryoimmunoglobulins (IgM, IgG and/or IgA), but some were single-class immunoglobulins with one or both types of light chains. Unusual components were also found. α1-fetoprotein was present in four cryoprecipitates: in two as the single constituent and in two associated to immunoglobulins; hepatitis-associated antigen co-existed in one of the latter. Some cryoglobulins showed antibody activity against human IgG, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antigens. In one case, the IgM-kappa of the cryoprecipitate had antibody activity against α1-fetoprotein; this antigen was also present in the cryoprecipitate, suggesting immune-complex formation. Autoantibodies were also looked for in the sera of the twenty-five patients; apart from the most common ones, antibodies to α1-fetoprotein were found in two patients. PMID:4143195

  2. The pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; Timens, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The mechanism(s) that allow small airways to thicken in such close proximity to lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction remains a puzzle that needs to be solved. PMID:18954287

  3. Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, Barbara M; Moreira, Carolina A; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients. PMID:26861899

  4. Recent advances in chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, David

    2014-11-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by abnormities in the NADPH Oxidase that is involved in the respiratory burst responsible for initiating the killing of microbes ingested by phagocytic cells. The hallmark of CGD is recurrent infection but the inflammatory complications can prove difficult to treat. New insights into the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory complications have led to new therapies. The treatment of CGD colitis with an anti-tumour necrosis alpha agent has been shown to be successful but associated with significant infectious complications. Haematopoietic stem cell transplants offer the possibility of cure for those with ether a matched or unrelated donor transplant, with results of the latter improving significantly over recent years. Gene Therapy offers the promise of cure without the need for a transplant but better vectors are required. PMID:25264161

  5. Autonomic dysfunction in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Frith, James; Newton, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that quality of life (QOL) is impaired in those with chronic liver disease (CLD). One of the most important contributors to impaired QOL is the symptomatic burden which can range from slight to debilitating. Autonomic dysfunction accounts for a significant proportion of these symptoms, which can be common, non-specific and challenging to treat. Investigating the autonomic nervous system can be straight forward and can assist the clinician to diagnose and treat specific symptoms. Evidence-based treatment options for autonomic symptoms, specifically in CLD, can be lacking and must be extrapolated from other studies and expert opinion. For those with severely impaired quality of life, liver transplantation may offer an improvement; however, more research is needed to confirm this. PMID:24367224

  6. Mechanisms of progression of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in all age groups, including children. Regardless of the underlying cause, CKD is characterized by progressive scarring that ultimately affects all structures of the kidney. The relentless progression of CKD is postulated to result from a self-perpetuating vicious cycle of fibrosis activated after initial injury. We will review possible mechanisms of progressive renal damage, including systemic and glomerular hypertension, various cytokines and growth factors, with special emphasis on the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), podocyte loss, dyslipidemia and proteinuria. We will also discuss possible specific mechanisms of tubulointerstitial fibrosis that are not dependent on glomerulosclerosis, and possible underlying predispositions for CKD, such as genetic factors and low nephron number. PMID:17647026

  7. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  8. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  9. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  10. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited. PMID:27191018

  11. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD. PMID:24256364

  12. Phosphorus: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    Phosphorus Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program What Is Phosphorus? Phosphorus is a mineral that helps keep your bones healthy. It also helps ...

  13. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders were seven times ... At a glance – Cancer Rates for Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Liver & IBD Cancer Incidence Rates per 100, ...

  14. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  15. Alternative dietary indices both strongly predict risk of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuve, Stephanie E; Fung, Teresa T; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B; McCullough, Marjorie L; Wang, Molin; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C

    2012-06-01

    The Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) measures adherence to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, but the association between the HEI-2005 and risk of chronic disease is not known. The Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), which is based on foods and nutrients predictive of chronic disease risk, was associated inversely with chronic disease risk previously. We updated the AHEI, including additional dietary factors involved in the development of chronic disease, and assessed the associations between the AHEI-2010 and the HEI-2005 and risk of major chronic disease prospectively among 71,495 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 41,029 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of chronic disease at baseline. During ≥24 y of follow-up, we documented 26,759 and 15,558 incident chronic diseases (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, or nontrauma death) among women and men, respectively. The RR (95% CI) of chronic disease comparing the highest with the lowest quintile was 0.84 (0.81, 0.87) for the HEI-2005 and 0.81 (0.77, 0.85) for the AHEI-2010. The AHEI-2010 and HEI-2005 were most strongly associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes, and for both outcomes the AHEI-2010 was more strongly associated with risk than the HEI-2005 (P-difference = 0.002 and <0.001, respectively). The 2 indices were similarly associated with risk of stroke and cancer. These findings suggest that closer adherence to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines may lower risk of major chronic disease. However, the AHEI-2010, which included additional dietary information, was more strongly associated with chronic disease risk, particularly CHD and diabetes. PMID:22513989

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Domej, W; Földes-Papp, Z; Flögel, E; Haditsch, B

    2006-04-01

    The respiratory tract as the main entrance for various inhalative substances has great potential to generate reactive species directly or indirectly in excess. Thus, heavy smokers are at high risk for development, impairment and failed response to treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The article is an update regarding the influence of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species on COPD; however, we do not intend to describe ROS and RNS actions on the entire lung tissue. Here, we focus on the airways, because in human most of the described effects of ROS and RNS species are measured on respiratory epithelial cells obtained by bronchoscopy. ROS and RNS species are physiological compounds in cells and risk factors for several respiratory diseases. In general, both kinds of species are thermodynamically stabile, but their reaction behaviors in cellular environments are very different. For example, the life times of the superoxide anion radical range from micro/milliseconds up to minutes and even hours in in-vitro model systems. Oxidative stress by cigarette smoke was investigated in detail by the authors of this article. In addition, original studies by the authors on the amount of fine particulate matter and trace elements in lung biopsies after defined inhalation indicate a distortion of the equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants. We also try to present some modern views with respect to genomic medicine for future therapeutic perspectives, although this is an upcoming sector of COPD therapy. PMID:16724946

  17. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  18. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

  19. Diphenhydramine disposition in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Meredith, C G; Christian, C D; Johnson, R F; Madhavan, S V; Schenker, S

    1984-04-01

    Diphenhydramine (DPHM) disposition was examined in nine patients with chronic alcohol-related liver disease and in eight normal subjects. Sleep of 1 to 2 hr duration was induced in all subjects by a 0.8 mg/kg iv dose without an apparent increase in cerebral sensitivity in the patients with cirrhosis. Protein binding as determined by equilibrium dialysis (3H-DPHM) revealed a 15% decrease in the cirrhotic patients, while recovery of unchanged DPHM in urine (2%) was of the same order in the two groups. Computerized biexponential curve analysis was used to compare the plasma profiles for five of the patients and six of the normal subjects. Monoexponential curve analysis of the terminal beta-phase, including all subjects, was also used to compare the two groups. The means of plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution in cirrhotic patients were respectively less and greater than in normal subjects, but these differences were not significant. The t1/2 for the beta-phase (t1/2 beta), which reflects this reciprocal trend, was increased in the patients (15.2 +/- 1.5 and 9.3 +/- 0.9 hr). This correlated in part with severity of disease, with r = 0.723 between t1/2 beta and the serum bilirubin levels. In conclusion, a single intravenous dose of DPHM provided safe and effective sedation in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:6705445

  20. Molecular diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Roos, D; Boer, M

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) suffer from recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections of the skin, the airways, the lymph nodes, liver, brain and bones. Frequently found pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus species, Klebsiella species, Burkholderia cepacia and Salmonella species. CGD is a rare (∼1:250 000 births) disease caused by mutations in any one of the five components of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in phagocytes. This enzyme generates superoxide and is essential for intracellular killing of pathogens by phagocytes. Molecular diagnosis of CGD involves measuring NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes, measuring protein expression of NADPH oxidase components and mutation analysis of genes encoding these components. Residual oxidase activity is important to know for estimation of the clinical course and the chance of survival of the patient. Mutation analysis is mandatory for genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. This review summarizes the different assays available for the diagnosis of CGD, the precautions to be taken for correct measurements, the flow diagram to be followed, the assays for confirmation of the diagnosis and the determinations for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24016250

  1. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  2. The Chronic Kidney Disease - Colonic Axis.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has long been known to cause significant gastrointestinal and colonic pathology. Recent advances in understanding of the role of colonic bacterial microbiome and its function and composition in health and disease have revealed previously unappreciated effects of CKD-associated colonic pathology on the development of uremic complications. CKD can result in profound changes in the microbiome composition and biosynthetic pattern, and the structure and function of the colon. Increases in bacteria that produce urease, uricase, p-cresol- and indole-forming enzymes and the depletion of bacteria that possess short chain fatty acid forming enzymes have been described in human and animal models. Disruption of the colonic epithelial tight junction in different animal models of CKD has been reported and is largely due to the conversion of luminal urea to ammonia by urease possessing bacteria. Together, these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by allowing the translocation of endotoxin and microbial fragments into the circulation. Additionally, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, P-cresol sulfate. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the colonic microbiome and the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and their role in the pathogenesis the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. PMID:25855516

  3. Molecular diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Roos, D; de Boer, M

    2014-02-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) suffer from recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections of the skin, the airways, the lymph nodes, liver, brain and bones. Frequently found pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus species, Klebsiella species, Burkholderia cepacia and Salmonella species. CGD is a rare (∼1:250 000 births) disease caused by mutations in any one of the five components of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in phagocytes. This enzyme generates superoxide and is essential for intracellular killing of pathogens by phagocytes. Molecular diagnosis of CGD involves measuring NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes, measuring protein expression of NADPH oxidase components and mutation analysis of genes encoding these components. Residual oxidase activity is important to know for estimation of the clinical course and the chance of survival of the patient. Mutation analysis is mandatory for genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. This review summarizes the different assays available for the diagnosis of CGD, the precautions to be taken for correct measurements, the flow diagram to be followed, the assays for confirmation of the diagnosis and the determinations for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24016250

  4. Vegetarian diets, chronic diseases and longevity.

    PubMed

    Ginter, E

    2008-01-01

    Vegetarians form a non-homogenous group consisting of semivegetarians (plant food, dairy products, eggs and fish), lacto-ovo vegetarians (plant food, dairy products, eggs) and vegans (plant food only). According to pure vegetarian ideologists, people consuming vegetarian diet have better health and live longer than nonvegetarians, because persons consuming milk, dairy products, meat, eggs and fish are at health risk. In fact the most healthy people in Europe are inhabitants of Iceland, Switzerland and Scandinavia, consuming great amounts of food of animal origin. Meta-analysis of several prospective studies showed no significant differences in the mortality caused by colorectal, stomach, lung, prostate or breast cancers and stroke between vegetarians and "health-conscious" nonvegetarians. In vegetarians, a decrease of ischemic heart disease mortality was observed probably due to lower total serum cholesterol levels, lower prevalence of obesity and higher consumption of antioxidants. Very probably, an ample consumption of fruits and vegetables and not the exclusion of meat make vegetarians healthful. Now, the largest cohort study of diet and health on more than half million of persons, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, will bring new data on the relationships between diet, lifestyle and environmental factors and the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Vegetarianism is a form of food restriction; and in our overfed society, food restriction is a plus unless it results in a nutritional deficiency (Fig. 1, Tab. 2, Ref. 18). PMID:19166134

  5. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  6. Prevalence of Chronic Diseases in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeseburg, B.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Groothoff, J. W.; Reijneveld, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Valid community-based data on the prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescents (12-18 years) with intellectual disability (ID-adolescents) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence rates and the nature of chronic diseases in a population of ID-adolescents and to compare them with the rates among adolescents in the general…

  7. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a...

  8. Theory in Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Michael; Elise, Eifert

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality related to chronic diseases are a primary concern of health professionals, including Health Educators. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over one half of the adult population in the United States suffer from one or more chronic conditions. Understanding the health risk behaviors that contribute to…

  9. Can Incentives Improve Medicaid Patient Engagement and Prevent Chronic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Perry, Rebecca; Farrell, Kathleen; Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Under the Medicaid Incentives for the Prevention of Chronic Diseases model, 10 states are testing whether incentives can encourage Medicaid beneficiaries to lose weight, stop smoking, work to prevent diabetes, or control risk factors for other chronic diseases. This commentary describes these incentive programs and how they will be evaluated. PMID:26510225

  10. CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO OZONE CAUSES RESTRICTIVE LUNG DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A chronic study to determine the progression and or/reversibility of ozone-induced lung disease was conducted. ale rats were exposed to a diurnal pattern of ozone (O3) for 1 wk, 3 wk, 3 mo, 12 mo, or 18 mo. he occurrence of chronic lung disease was determined by structural and fu...

  11. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  12. 582 Chronic Urticaria Associated with Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Guadalupe Peñaloza-González, Flor; Velasco-Medina, Andrea Aida; Gonzalez-Carsolio, Aida; Burbano-Ceron, Andres-Leonardo; Barreto-Sosa, Adriana; Velázquez-Sámano, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic urticaria has an incidence of 15% in the general population and sometimes is associated with chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, vitiligo and thyroid disorders. Chronic urticarial is characterized by wheals lasting more than 6 weeks, with alterations of the upper layers of the skin only. On histopathology there is a perivascular infiltrate characterized by T CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes and other inflammatory cells. Cytokines produced by lymphocytes, mast cells and other cells increase the expression of vascular adhesion molecules. Other mediators such as histamine increase vascular permeability causing edema, clinically represented by wheals. Treatment of chronic urticaria includes first and second generation antihistamines as first line treatment. Sometimes there is a poor response to there drugs and second line treatments such as immunosupressors are indicated. A search for systemic disorders is helpful to identify associated pathology which makes chronic urticaria reluctant to therapy. Methods We performed a retrospective study considering patients with chronic urticaria attending our clinic during the last 5 years. Three hundred patients with urticaria were considered, with 16% (50 patients) with a chronic disease. Six patients with chronic urticaria were associated with thyroid disease. Results We considered 6 patients with chronic urticaria with altered thyroid function tests; 4 with subclinical hypothyroidism and 2 with subclinical hyperthyroidism. All of them had a poor response to antihistamines. When a thyroid disorder was identified, they received appropriate treatment achieving control of chronic urticaria. Treatment with antihistamines was continued. Conclusions Chronic urticaria is a disease often associated with systemic disorders including thyroid disease. We found an association with thyroid pathology in 2% of patients with chronic urticaria, with remission of cutaneous symptoms after treatment of endocrinologic disorder

  13. Social Workers' Use of Self-Help Groups as a Resource for Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toseland, Ronald W.; Hacker, Lynda

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 247 social workers to investigate their use of community self-help groups as a resource for clients. Results indicated social workers were aware of self-help groups and their benefits, but agencies do not have policies that encourage their use. (JAC)

  14. Cyber-Porn Dependence: Voices of Distress in an Italian Internet Self-Help Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaglion, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes narratives of cyber-porn users and defines major patterns of distress as self-reported by contributors to a self-help group in the Internet. It applies narrative analysis methodology to 2000 messages sent by 302 members of an Italian self-help Internet community for cyber-porn dependents ("noallapornodipendenza"). This paper…

  15. Self-help medical advice was popular in the 1930s, too.

    PubMed

    Clarfield, M

    1997-11-01

    Self-help books proliferate today, but the concept of helping oneself in health matters is certainly not a modern phenomenon, Dr. Mark Clarfield notes. He recently studied a self-help booklet from 1936, What to do until the doctor comes, in which he found not only some sound advice but also some harmless suggestions, useless treatments and dangerous remedies. PMID:9361652

  16. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Self-Help Homeownership...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Self-Help... proposal by name and/or OMB approval Number (2506-0157) and should be sent to: HUD Desk Officer, Office of... to OMB may be obtained from Ms. Pollard. Title of Proposal: Self-Help Homeownership...

  17. 2001-2002 NATIONAL SURVEY OF MENTAL HEALTH MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUPS AND SELF HELP ORGANIZATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the Mutual Support/Self-Help Survey are to provide a national estimate of the number of mutual support groups, self-help organizations, and businesses and services run by and for consumers and/or their family members and to describe their structure, types of activiti...

  18. Solution-Focused Self-Help for Improving University Students' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakrosnis, Rytis; Cepukiene, Viktorija

    2015-01-01

    Along with positive developments in psychology, the self-help movement is becoming widespread, based on the belief that people are capable of growing and achieving positive change with only minimal help. This article addresses the potential of a solution-focused self-help tool to improve university students' well-being by comparing its outcome to…

  19. Self-Help and Health in Europe. New Approaches in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Stephen, Ed.; Kickbusch, Ilona, Ed.

    This book brings together 24 contributions (from 13 European countries) about the role of self-help in the overall pattern of health care, dealing with both the practical and the theoretical: (1) "A Reorientation of Health Care?" (Ilona Kickbusch and Stephen Hatch); (2) "Self-help Groups in Primary Health Care" (David Robinson); (3) "Self-care:…

  20. With or without a Therapist: Self-Help Reading for Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To address a critical gap in health education scholarship by exploring the contexts in which self-help reading takes place, the motivations of self-help readers and the processes through which such readers engage with books on mental health. Design: Structured, in-depth interviews conducted with participants recruited through online…

  1. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  2. Adolescent Substance-Use Frequency following Self-Help Group Attendance and Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangi, Jennifer; Darling, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneity of posttreatment outcomes, the likelihood of relapse is often dependent on several factors, including participation in continuing care services such as self-help groups. However, few studies have examined the use of self-help groups among adolescent outpatients. Therefore, in this study, investigators examined self-help…

  3. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a self-help... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment... SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING...

  4. Substance Abuse Treatment Agencies and Self-Help Groups: Collaborators or Competitors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith; And Others

    While self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous are becoming more integrated into the professional substance abuse treatment network, many professionals are still hesitant to encourage clients to attend self-help groups after treatment. This study examined what factors predict the degree of cooperation between professional agencies and…

  5. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  6. Therapeutic vaccines for chronic diseases: successes and technical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Martin F.; Jennings, Gary T.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic, non-communicable diseases are the major cause of death and disability worldwide and have replaced infectious diseases as the major burden of society in large parts of the world. Despite the complexity of chronic diseases, relatively few predisposing risk factors have been identified by the World Health Organization. Those include smoking, alcohol abuse, obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure as the cause of many of these chronic conditions. Here, we discuss several examples of vaccines that target these risk factors with the aim of preventing the associated diseases and some of the challenges they face. PMID:21893545

  7. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crişan, Alexandru F.; Oancea, Cristian; Timar, Bogdan; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Crişan, Alexandru; Tudorache, Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA) is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD) phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire. Methods We enrolled 39 patients (pts), smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD) and 13 healthy subjects (control group), having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers. Results Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001) decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4) compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4) and controls (24.2±5.8). The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001) and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001) sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095). The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28) and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = −0.57), fibrinogen (r = −0.58), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = −0.55) and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = −0.47). Conclusions According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease. PMID:25033379

  8. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching.

    PubMed

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  9. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  10. [A therapeutic approach towards chronic granulomatous disease].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency (PID) characterized by the inability of phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) due to a defect in the NADPH oxidase complex. Recent studies have revealed that ROIs are involved in inflammatory signaling in phagocytes, illuminating the underlying mechanisms of hyper-inflammation in CGD. CGD patients frequently suffer from CGD-associated bowel inflammation, granuloma, and life-threatening infections. Based on the discovery of the regulatory function of ROIs in the immune response, therapeutic methods for excessive inflammation focusing on inflammatory cytokines are being developed for CGD. Although hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) is a curative therapy for CGD, successful transplants greatly depend on HSC source selection and the degree of matching of potential donors. Gene therapy trials for PID have been performed on over 120 patients with no HLA identical donor for HSCT, and have demonstrated clinical benefits. Genotoxicity in HSC gene therapy trials has expanded our knowledge on the mechanisms of vector-associated clonal expansion of gene-modified cells, which will advance gene therapy development using self-inactivating retrovirus and lentivirus vectors. We will discuss the complications of HSCT for CGD. We will then outline the status of gene therapy approaches in the treatment of CGD. PMID:25748127

  11. Contextual Poverty, Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) outcomes. One of the strongest factors that impacts nutrition is socioeconomic status as evidenced by the large body of epidemiologic data showing that income and education are directly associated with diet quality. Apart from individual-level markers of socioeconomic status such as income and education, contextual factors such as availability of and transportation to food outlets that provide healthy food options and the density of fast food restaurants within particular regions markedly impact the ability of individuals to comply with nutrition recommendations. This is particularly true for nutrition guidelines most specific to individuals with CKD such as the consumption of protein, saturated fat, sodium and phosphorus, all of which have been shown to impact CKD health and are influenced by the availability of healthy food options within individual neighborhood food environments. Because of the strong association of contextual poverty with the diet quality, any serious attempt to improve the diet of CKD patients must include a discussion of the environmental barriers that each individual faces in trying to access healthy foods and health care providers should take account of these barriers when tailoring specific recommendations. PMID:25573510

  12. [Chronic kidney disease: therapy and care].

    PubMed

    Noel, Natacha; Gaha, Khaled; Rieu, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. It is therefore important to slow its progression and to treat its complications. Regardless of the causal nephropathy, arterial hypertension and proteinuria are the major progression factors of CKD. Thus, optimal control of blood pressure, reduction of proteinuria by using rennin angiotension system inhibitors can slow the progression of CKD. This effect can be enhanced by reducing sodium intake. The recent recommendations suggest that blood pressure should not be higher than 130/80 mmHg and proteinuria should not exceed 0,5 g/day. The consequences of advanced stages of the CKD have to be diagnosed and treated early: anemia, abnormal bone metabolism, hyperkalemia, fluid overload, metabolic acidosis... A particular emphasis has to be given to cardiovascular complications and risk factors. Monitoring data are well defined by the actual recommandations. Nephrologist can provide a set of recommended intervention to the primary care physician. The most accepted criterion of initiation of dialysis, in absence of clinic uremic manifestation is a glomerular filtration rate lower than 7 ml/min/1,73m2. Psychological and medical preparation of the patient to dialysis is essential. The possibility of renal transplantation should be evaluated during the following of patient with CKD PMID:22335066

  13. [Treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome caused by complex and interrelated causes. The early markers of this syndrome are often present even before the blood pressure (BP) elevation; therefore, SAH cannot only be classified by the BP elevation threshold, which sometimes is discreet. Its progression is strongly associated with structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities, which lead to end-organ damage (heart, kidney, brain, blood vessels and other organs), and cause premature morbidity and death. In this sense, the BP is only a biomarker of this cardiovascular syndrome, which is why it is more useful to consider individual BP patterns of the ill patient rather than a single BP threshold. The study and treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has made some progresses, especially in patients requiring dialysis. The use of non-invasive technology to register the BP has reconfigured health care of patients in regards to the diagnosis, circadian pattern, clinical surveillance, pharmacological prescription, prognosis, and risk of cardiovascular events (as well as mortality). The opportunity in the diagnosis and treatment means a delay in the onset of complications and, also, of dialysis. The blockade of the renin-aldotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a regular monitoring of the dry weight of the population in dialysis, and non-pharmacological interventions to modify lifestyle are the maneuvers with greater impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients. PMID:27284847

  14. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90 mmHg in the general population and 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  15. Immunological aspects of chronic venous disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grudzińska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a very common health problem concerning up to 1/3 of the society. Although venous hypertension and valvular incompetence have been long known to be crucial for development of the illness, its exact aetiology remains unclear. Recent findings indicate that inflammatory processes may be crucial for development of incompetent valves and vein wall remodelling. One of the most interesting theories describes “leucocyte trapping” as the mechanism responsible for elevated vein wall permeability and oxidative stress in the veins. At the same time, the cytokine profile of the blood in incompetent veins has not been thoroughly examined. Popular anti-inflammatory drugs relieve some symptoms but do not have much proved effects in prevention and treatment. We intend to summarize the existing knowledge of the immunological aspects of CVD in order to emphasize its importance for understanding the aetiology of this illness. We also wish to indicate some aspects that remain to be studied in more detail. PMID:26155174

  16. Leukoaraiosis Is a Chronic Atherosclerotic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Assayag, Einor; Mijajlovic, Milija; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Bova, Irena; Shopin, Ludmila; Bornstein, Natan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose. White matter changes (WMCs), or leukoaraiosis (LA), are associated with increased age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and history of stroke. Although several lines of evidence suggest a role of atherosclerosis in atherothrombotic vascular events, their involvement in LA remains to be determined. Our study examines this association in ischemic stroke patients. Methods. One hundred and seventy consecutive ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients were included. All patients underwent brain computed tomography (CT) with assessment of the extension and severity of WMCs, carotid arteries duplex scan with measurements of intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaques. Results. Seventy-two patients (42.4%) were found to have white matter lesions, of whom 28.8% had advanced LA. Mean IMT was significantly higher in patients with LA and with advanced LA (P = 0.002, P = 0.003, resp.). In addition, LA and LA severity were associated with existence of carotid plaque (P = 0.007, P = 0.004, resp.). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, including all vascular risk factors, LA was found to be associated with age and IMT. Conclusion. This study reinforces the tight association between LA and carotid atherosclerosis in ischemic stroke patients. We conclude that a chronic atherosclerotic disease underlies the pathophysiology of leukoaraiosis and its progression. PMID:22675271

  17. Nutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M

    2000-03-01

    Weight loss is a frequently occurring complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is a determining factor of functional capacity, health status, and mortality. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Both metabolic and mechanical inefficiency contribute to the elevated energy expenditure. A disbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown may cause a disproportionate depletion of fat-free mass in some patients. Nutritional support is indicated for depleted patients with COPD because it provides not only supportive care, but direct intervention through improvement in respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function and in exercise performance. A combination of oral nutritional supplements and exercise or anabolic stimulus appears to be the best treatment approach to obtaining significant functional improvement. Patients responding to this treatment even demonstrated a decreased mortality. Poor response was related to the effects of systemic inflammation on dietary intake and catabolism. The effectiveness of anticatabolic modulation requires further investigation. PMID:10741769

  18. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  19. The cytokine network in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are very common inflammatory diseases of the airways. They both cause airway narrowing and are increasing in incidence throughout the world, imposing enormous burdens on health care. Cytokines play a key role in orchestrating the chronic inflammation and structural changes of the respiratory tract in both asthma and COPD and have become important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies in these diseases. PMID:18982161

  20. Genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Silverman, E K

    2001-01-01

    The marked variability in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in response to cigarette smoking has been known for decades, but severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PI Z) remains the only proven genetic risk factor for COPD. With cigarette smoking, PI Z subjects tend to develop more severe pulmonary impairment at an earlier age than non-smoking PI Z individuals. However, PI Z individuals exhibit wide variability in pulmonary function impairment, even among individuals with similar smoking histories. Therefore, other genes and environmental exposures are also likely involved. The role of heterozygosity for the Z allele as a risk factor for COPD remains controversial, but accumulating evidence suggests that at least some PI MZ individuals are at increased risk of developing airflow obstruction. In individuals without alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial aggregation of COPD has been reported in several studies. To study novel genetic determinants of COPD, our research group enrolled 44 severe, early-onset COPD probands (FEV1 < 40%, age < 53 yrs, non-PI Z) and 266 of their relatives. A marked female predominance was noted among the early-onset COPD probands. In addition, increased risk to current or ex-smoking first-degree relatives of early-onset COPD probands for reduced FEV1, chronic bronchitis and spirometric bronchodilator responsiveness has been demonstrated. These data strongly support the genetic basis for the development of COPD and the potential for gene-by-environment interaction. A variety of studies have examined candidate gene loci with association studies, comparing the distribution of variants in genes hypothesized to be involved in the development of COPD in COPD patients and control subjects. For most genetic loci which have been tested, there have been inconsistent results. Genetic heterogeneity could contribute to difficulty in replicating associations between studies. In addition, case-control association studies

  1. 77 FR 43092 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Chronic Disease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Program Standardized Data Collection... collection requirements relating to the Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Program. DATES: Submit... Disabilities through Chronic Disease Self-Management Education (CDSME) Programs'' cooperative agreement...

  2. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  3. Reporting of ethnicity in research on chronic disease: update

    PubMed Central

    O'Loughlin, J; Dugas, E; Maximova, K; Kishchuk, N

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the inclusion of ethnicity and race as variables in current, leading edge research on chronic disease and its risk factors. Of 100 randomly selected original research articles published in high‐impact journals in 2005, 85% did not report either a definition of ethnicity or its conceptualisation in terms of theoretical reasoning, and 98% did not report an actual measurement item. Ethnicity and race remain non‐standardised and largely underdescribed variables in research on chronic disease. This represents an important loss of opportunity to articulate and test hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying ethnic group differences in chronic disease. PMID:17099093

  4. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The golden decade. Implications for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    López-Giraldo, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous illness, which causes an important socio-economic burden. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in the understanding and knowledge of COPD with a paradigm shift in both the assessment and management of the disease. The article here reviews these changes with a particular focus on the last revision (2013) of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:24820902

  5. The case for disease management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Randolph A; Scott, Susan; Mattern, William D; Mohini, Ravinder; Nissenson, Allen R

    2006-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing epidemic in the United States and worldwide, with nearly two thirds of CKD patients also having diabetes, hypertension, or both. Morbidity and mortality among patients with CKD are high, as are the costs associated with care, which is highly fragmented. Disease management (DM) programs are designed to coordinate the delivery of care to patients, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce costs along the continuum of care. The goals of DM programs in CKD patients are to fill the gaps in current care by focusing on four key areas: (1) slowing the progression of CKD, (2) identifying and managing the complications of CKD, (3) identifying and managing associated comorbid conditions, and (4) smoothing the transition to renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be successful, this approach requires multidisciplinary collaboration among physicians (eg, primary care physicians, endocrinologists, cardiologists, nephrologists, surgeons) and participating caregivers including nurses, dieticians, social workers, and pharmacists. Patient identification, limited reimbursement, late patient referral, and lack of primary care physician and nephrologist knowledge about the importance and details of CKD management are all barriers that must be overcome for such programs to be successfully implemented. Considering the magnitude of the opportunity, DM applied to CKD is a promising approach to the care of this vulnerable population. PMID:16620194

  6. Self-help: What future role in health care for low and middle-income countries?

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, KR; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Razum, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    In the debate on 'Third options' for health care delivery in low- and middle-income countries it is proposed that self-help should play a larger role. Self-help is expected to contribute towards improving population health outcomes and reducing government health care expenditure. We review scope and limitations of self-help groups in Europe and South Asia and assess their potential role in health care within the context of health sector reform. Self-help groups are voluntary unions of peers, formed for mutual assistance in accomplishing a health-related purpose. In Europe, self-help groups developed out of dissatisfaction with a de-personalised health care system. They successfully complement existing social and health services but cannot be instrumentalized to improve health outcomes while reducing health expenditure. In South Asia, with its hierarchical society, instrumental approaches towards self-help prevail in Non-governmental Organizations and government. The utility of this approach is limited as self-help groups are unlikely to be sustainable and effective when steered from outside. Self-help groups are typical for individualistic societies with developed health care systems – they are less suitable for hierarchical societies with unmet demand for regulated health care. We conclude that self-help groups can help to achieve some degree of synergy between health care providers and users but cannot be prescribed to partially replace government health services in low-income countries, thereby reducing health care expenditure and ensuring equity in health care. PMID:15084250

  7. Smoking Cessation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective strategy for slowing down the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reducing mortality in the approximately 50% of patients with diagnosed COPD who continue to smoke. While behavioral interventions (including simple advice) have modest efficacy in improving smoking quit rates, the combination of counseling and pharmacotherapy is more effective than either alone. When combined with even brief counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion SR, and varenicline have all been shown to be effective in promoting smoking cessation and sustained abstinence in smokers with COPD to a degree comparable to that observed in the general smoking population. However, the recidivism rate is high after initial quitting so that at the end of 1 year, approximately 80% or more of patients are still smoking. Thus, new approaches to smoking cessation are needed. One approach is to combine different pharmacotherapies, for example, nicotine patch plus rapidly acting NRT (e.g., gum or nasal spray) and/or bupropion or even varenicline plus either NRT or bupropion, in a stepwise approach over a varying duration depending on the severity of nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal symptoms during the quit attempt, as proposed in the American College of Chest Physicians Tobacco Dependence Took Kit. Electronic (e)-cigarettes, which deliver vaporized nicotine without most of the noxious components in the smoke from burning tobacco cigarettes, also has potential efficacy as a smoking cessation aid, but their efficacy and safety as either substitutes for regular cigarettes or smoking cessation aids require additional study. This task is complicated because e-cigarettes are currently unregulated and hundreds of different brands are currently available. PMID:26238637

  8. OCCUPATIONAL SILICA EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Vupputuri, Suma; Parks, Christine G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Hogan, Susan L.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Occupational exposure to silica may be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most studies have been conducted in occupational cohorts with high levels of exposure but small numbers of cases. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of occupational silica exposure and CKD. Methods Cases were hospital patients with newly diagnosed CKD and community controls were selected using random digit dialing and frequency matched by age, gender, race and proximity to the hospital. Silica exposure estimates were assigned by industrial hygiene review of lifetime job history data and weighted for certainty and intensity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for CKD conditioned on demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (range, 30-83 years), 56% were male and 54% were white. Any silica exposure (compared to none) was associated with a 40% increased risk of CKD (OR=1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 1.89) in a multivariable adjusted model. The mean cumulative duration of silica exposure was significantly higher in exposed cases than in exposed controls (33.4 vs. 24.8 years, respectively). Overall, compared to non-exposed participants, the ORs (95% CI) for those below and above the median duration of silica exposure were 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.86) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.71), respectively. Conclusions We found a positive relationship between occupational silica exposure and CKD. A dose-response trend of increasing CKD risk with increasing duration of silica exposure was observed and was particularly strong among non-whites. PMID:22032652

  9. Immunologic resolution of human chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Mahadeo, Kris M; Masinsin, Bernadette; Kapoor, Neena; Shah, Ami J; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Parkman, Robertson

    2014-10-01

    To determine the role of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) in the pathogenesis of human chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and its clinical resolution, we evaluated long-term recipients of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Seventy-one recipients were evaluated, 30 of whom had a history of chronic GVHD, including 16 with active chronic GVHD and 14 with resolved chronic GVHD. There were no significant clinical differences and no differences in the frequency of Tregs (CD4(+), CD127(-), CD25(+)) between the recipients with active chronic GVHD and those with resolved chronic GVHD. Using the Miyara/Sakaguchi classification scheme to identify functional Tregs, a decreased frequency of functional resting Tregs (rTregs) was identified in recipients with active chronic GVHD (P = .009 compared with normal donors; P = .001 compared with HSCT recipients without history of chronic GVHD; P = .005 compared with recipients with resolved chronic GVHD). The frequency and number of recent thymic emigrants in rTregs were normal in recipients with resolved chronic GVHD, but persistently decreased in recipients with active chronic GVHD. These results support the hypothesis that the reestablishment of normal numbers of functional rTregs is required for the clinical resolution of chronic GVHD. PMID:24979733

  10. AIDS: Implications for Homosexual Self-Help and Support Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro-Alfonso, Jose

    The Colectivo de Concientizacion Gay, a homosexual and lesbian organization in Puerto Rico, developed a brief analysis of what has happened since symptoms associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were first reported by the Centers for Disease Control in 1981; the analysis also included implications for the gay community. Since…

  11. Patient Experiences of Depression and Anxiety with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    DeJean, D; Giacomini, M; Vanstone, M; Brundisini, F

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease, but remain undertreated despite significant negative consequences on patient health. A number of clinical groups have developed recommendations for depression screening practices in the chronic disease population. Objectives The objective of this analysis was to review empirical qualitative research on the experiences of patients with chronic disease (e.g., COPD, diabetes, heart disease, stroke) and comorbid depression or anxiety, and to highlight the implications of the screening and management of anxiety and/or depression on chronic disease outcomes. Review Methods We performed literature searches for studies published from January 2002 to May 2012. We applied a qualitative mega-filter to nine condition-specific search filters. Titles and abstracts were reviewed by two reviewers and, for the studies that met the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across relevant published primary research studies. Qualitative meta-synthesis produced a synthesis of evidence that both retained the original meaning of the authors and offered a new, integrative interpretation of the phenomenon through a process of comparing and contrasting findings across studies. Results The findings of 20 primary qualitative studies were synthesized. Patients tended to experience their chronic conditions and anxiety or depression as either independent or inter-related (i.e., the chronic disease lead to depression/anxiety, the depression/anxiety lead to the chronic disease, or the two conditions exacerbated each other). Potential barriers to screening for depression or anxiety were also identified. Limitations A wider array of issues might have been captured if the analysis had focused on broader psychological responses to the chronic disease experience. However, given the objective to highlight implications for screening for anxiety

  12. Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of captive and free ranging white tailed deer, mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk and moose in the some parts of the United States and Canada. The presence of the disease has sharply curtailed movement of captive...

  13. Management of Chronic Infectious Diseases in School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document contains guidelines for developing policies and procedures related to chronic infectious diseases, as recommended by the Illinois Task Force on School Management of Infectious Disease. It is designed to help school personnel understand how infectious diseases can be transmitted, and to assist school districts in the development and…

  14. Oral disease profiles in chronic graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Bassim, C W; Fassil, H; Mays, J W; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Naik, H; Datiles, M; Stratton, P; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2015-04-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ≤ 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ≤ 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer's tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P < 0.001); salivary dysfunction (11% prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral c

  15. Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158020.html Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds ... affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study ...

  16. Do Genes That Protect Against Dementia Guard Against Chronic Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158442.html Do Genes That Protect Against Dementia Guard Against Chronic Diseases? ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Healthy Aging Seniors' Health Recent ...

  17. Chronic disease management and the development of virtual communities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    The current volume and expected increases in the number of patients with chronic diseases are concerned significant and substantial. Patients with chronic diseases have a great need to personally manage their health-related behaviour, such as food consumption, and its impact on their health indicators, like blood pressure, body weight, blood sugar, cholesterol, to name a few. Current healthcare systems are unable to meet the needs of patients with chronic diseases for management, due to the need for acute care. An analysis of the needs was performed and recommendations for virtual communities were made to help patients with chronic diseases monitor and manage their health. Virtual communities have the potential to meet the need to assist with monitoring activities, education, community membership, and the sale of products and services. However, they also face risks inherent to accepting and storing any form of personal health information, and of remaining in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accessibility Act of 2001. PMID:18048306

  18. Online Cognitive-Restructuring Self-Help: www.SelfHelpSocialAnxiety.com a New Application for Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an online self-help treatment program for Social Anxiety Disorder, focused on cognitive restructuring. It can be difficult getting socially anxious individuals to commit to treatment since therapy is typically a face to face social interaction (the feared stimulus). Recent research suggests…

  19. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    PubMed

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective. PMID:20057258

  20. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

  1. Disability self-help organizations in the developing world: a case study from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M J

    1993-09-01

    Disability self-help organizations have emerged as an important element of response to the advancement of people with disabilities throughout the developing world in recent years. There are now self-help organizations in all regions of the developing world, their memberships are growing, and the scope of their activities is enlarging. This paper draws on field research in Malaysia to present an organization developed by and for people with physical disabilities as a case study of self-help action in the Southeast Asian region. This paper reviews the origins and growth of the organization, describes its current programme of activities, and offers comment about the nature and future of disability self-help in the region and its continued advancement in the developing world generally. A combination of internal factors that relate to organization and programming, and external political and social conditions is indicated as important. PMID:8244611

  2. Reading self-help literature in Russia: governmentality, psychology and subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Salmenniemi, Suvi; Vorona, Mariya

    2014-03-01

    Self-help has become a booming business over the past decades and an increasingly visible part of popular media culture worldwide. The paper analyzes the arrival and effects of this cultural technology in post-Soviet Russia after more than seventy years of socialism. It examines how Russians are engaging with popular psychology self-help as a technology of the self and how they are making it meaningful in their lives. Drawing on a set of one-to-one and focus group interviews conducted with self-help readers, it examines how these individuals negotiate the new ethics and the normative models of personhood put forward by the self-help genre. It argues that popular psychology has offered a new language for making sense of the self and the social world, and highlights how the readers critically engage with the normalizing power of popular psychology by drawing on a number of local historically sedimented discourses. PMID:24433165

  3. Anemia and pregnancy: a link to maternal chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Raja; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Keith, Louis

    2011-11-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. It has serious short- and long-term consequences during pregnancy and beyond. The anemic condition is often worsened by the presence of other chronic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and diabetes. Untreated anemia also leads to increased morbidity and mortality from these chronic conditions as well. It is surprising that despite these chronic conditions (such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV) often being preventable, they still pose a real threat to public health. This article aims to review the current understanding of the pathophysiology, risks, prevention, and treatment of anemia in the light of these chronic conditions. PMID:22099433

  4. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  5. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  6. Fatigue in chronic kidney disease: Definition, assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zalai, Dora; Bohra, Miqdad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue--an overwhelming subjective feeling of mental or physical exhaustion--impacts patients' everyday functioning and quality of life, delays recovery after hemodialysis, and increases mortality. There are a number of factors that may perpetuate clinically significant fatigue among individuals with chronic kidney disease, including sleep disorders, depression, sedentary lifestyle, anemia, and chronic inflammation. Some of these factors (i.e., anemia and inflammation) are in the forefront of clinical attention, whereas the other contributing factors often remain unrecognized. This article provides a pragmatic overview of the definition, assessment, maintaining factors, and management of fatigue in chronic kidney disease. Given that chronic fatigue is a major determinant of patients' quality of life, nurses can bring about a fundamental improvement in patients' well-being if they recognize the most common fatigue-perpetuating factors and facilitate fatigue management interventions. PMID:27215061

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  8. Severity of chronic Chagas disease is associated with cytokine/antioxidant imbalance in chronically infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Guégan, Jean-François; Barnabé, Christian; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Salgado-Rosas, Hilda; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Briones, Bernardo; Romero-Díaz, Mónica; Ramos-Jiménez, Judith; Sánchez-Guillén, María del Carmen

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms in chronic Chagas disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America, is essential for the design of rational therapeutic strategies. In this paper we show that the development of Chagas disease is a consequence of a long-term and complex relationship between parasite persistence and maladapted homeostatic mechanisms in the host which leads to pathologic changes. We performed a retrospective study on 50 patients with chronic Chagas disease and 50 healthy control individuals. The specific immune response was detected by ELISA and IHA tests using autochthonous antigens, inflammatory process with the cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), and antioxidant protection with glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. We developed generalised linear modelling procedures to assess simultaneously which explanatory variables and/or their interactions better explained disease severity in patients. Our results show the existence of a strong relationship between anti-Trypanosoma cruzi levels and chronic Chagas disease (P<0.0001). Taken together, the statistical data indicate both cumulative and complementary effects, where the increase in TNF-alpha (P=0.004) and NO (P=0.005) levels correlated with a reduction in glutathione peroxidase (P=0.0001) and SOD (P=0.01) levels drives the disease pathology in chronically infected patients. Our findings may have important implications for understanding host susceptibility to develop severe chronic infectious disease. In addition we show putative targets for the design of new therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression, considering both specific treatment against the aetiological agent and modulation of the different immunopathological reactions in chronically infected individuals with chronic Chagas disease. PMID:12670514

  9. Trialling of an optimal health programme (OHP) across chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Castle, David J

    2016-01-01

    Population ageing is a worldwide phenomenon, most advanced in developed countries and expected to continue over the next few decades. As people are surviving longer with age-associated disease and disability, there is an imperative to identify innovative solutions for an already overburdened health care system. Such innovations need to be focused on disease management, taking into consideration the strong associations that have been established between psychosocial factors and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with chronic disease. Aside from personal and community costs, chronic diseases produce a significant economic burden due to the culmination of health care costs and lost productivity. This commentary reports on a programme of research, Translating Research, Integrated Public Health Outcomes and Delivery, which will evaluate an optimal health programme that adopts a person-centred approach and engages collaborative therapy to educate, support and improve the psychosocial health of those with chronic disease. The effectiveness of the optimal health programme will be evaluated across three of the most significant contributors to disease burden: diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease and stroke. Cost-effectiveness will also be evaluated. The findings derived from this series of randomised controlled trials will also provide evidence attesting to the potential applicability of the optimal health programme in other chronic conditions. PMID:27612634

  10. Developmental determinants in non-communicable chronic diseases and ageing.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Berkouk, K; Gergen, P; Antunes, J Pinto; Augé, P; Camuzat, T; Bringer, J; Mercier, J; Best, N; Bourret, R; Akdis, M; Arshad, S H; Bedbrook, A; Berr, C; Bush, A; Cavalli, G; Charles, M A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Gillman, M; Gold, D R; Goldberg, M; Holloway, J W; Iozzo, P; Jacquemin, S; Jeandel, C; Kauffmann, F; Keil, T; Koppelman, G H; Krauss-Etschmann, S; Kuh, D; Lehmann, S; Carlsen, K C Lodrup; Maier, D; Méchali, M; Melén, E; Moatti, J P; Momas, I; Nérin, P; Postma, D S; Ritchie, K; Robine, J M; Samolinski, B; Siroux, V; Slagboom, P E; Smit, H A; Sunyer, J; Valenta, R; Van de Perre, P; Verdier, J M; Vrijheid, M; Wickman, M; Yiallouros, P; Zins, M

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal and peri-natal events play a fundamental role in health, development of diseases and ageing (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)). Research on the determinants of active and healthy ageing is a priority to: (i) inform strategies for reducing societal and individual costs of an ageing population and (ii) develop effective novel prevention strategies. It is important to compare the trajectories of respiratory diseases with those of other chronic diseases. PMID:25616486

  11. Screening and Management of Depression for Adults With Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading contributor to the global burden of disease. In Canada, the 1-year prevalence of major depressive disorder was approximately 6% in Canadians 18 and older. A large prospective Canadian study reported an increased risk of developing depression in people with chronic diseases compared with those without such diseases. Objectives To systematically review the literature regarding the effectiveness of screening for depression and/or anxiety in adults with chronic diseases in the community setting. To conduct a non-systematic, post-hoc analysis to evaluate whether a screen-and-treat strategy for depression is associated with an improvement in chronic disease outcomes. Data Sources A literature search was performed on January 29, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, OVID PsycINFO, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 1, 2002 until January 29, 2012. Review Methods No citations were identified for the first objective. For the second, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials that compared depression management for adults with chronic disease with usual care/placebo were included. Where possible, the results of randomized controlled trials were pooled using a random-effects model. Results Eight primary randomized controlled trials and 1 systematic review were included in the post-hoc analysis (objective 2)—1 in people with diabetes, 2 in people with heart failure, and 5 in people with coronary artery disease. Across all studies, there was no evidence that managing depression improved chronic disease outcomes. The quality of evidence (GRADE) ranged from low to moderate. Some of the study results (specifically in coronary artery disease populations) were suggestive of benefit, but

  12. Chronic renal failure and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, V K; Konstantinidis, A; Siamopoulos, K C

    2000-05-01

    In order to define the effects of chronic renal failure (CRF) in the progress of gingival inflammation, we studied 6 patients (4 male, 2 female) with CRF who were on chronic hemodialysis for 4.25 (range 1-15) years. Six healthy individuals, age and sex matched were used as controls. The protocol which we used comprised of two periods (a) a 40-day duration period of preparation and (b) a 28-day duration experimental period. During the (a) period, all subjects went through: (1) therapy of the chronic gingivitis and (2) complete control of dental plaque by oral hygiene. During the experimental period, all subjects were advised to avoid, for at least 21 days, any mechanical or chemical media of oral hygiene and went through photographing, recording of gingival index (GI), recording of plaque index (PII), and the collection and quantification of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). On the 21st day, root planning and polishing were performed and subjects were advised to carry out oral hygiene. On the 28th day, all previous examinations (GI, PII, GCF) were repeated. In both patients and controls, GI, PII and GCF were increased on 7th, 14th and 21st day, without significant differences between the groups and returned to normal (close to zero point) on the 28th day. There are no significant differences between patients with CRF and normal controls in the evolution of experimental gingivitis. Therefore, chronic uremia has no effect on the defense of periodontal tissue against microbial plaque. PMID:10843241

  13. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-05-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1-2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1-2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  14. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1–2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1–2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  15. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  16. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  17. Unmet needs in severe chronic upper airway disease (SCUAD).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W; Casale, Thomas B; Cruz, Alvaro A; Lockey, Richard J; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-09-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and acceptable) pharmacologic treatment based on guidelines. These patients have impaired quality of life, social functioning, sleep, and school/work performance. Severe uncontrolled allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases, or occupational airway diseases are defined as SCUADs. Pediatric SCUADs are still unclear. In developing countries SCUADs exist, but risk factors can differ from those seen in developed countries. Comorbidities are common in patients with SCUADs and might increase their severity. The present document is the position of a group of experts considering that SCUADs should be considered differently from mild chronic upper airway diseases. It reviews the state of the art, highlighting gaps in our knowledge, and proposes several areas for a better understanding, prevention, and management of SCUADs. This document can also serve to optimize the pharmacoeconomic evaluation of SCUADs by means of comparison with mild chronic upper airway diseases. PMID:19660803

  18. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  19. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  20. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  1. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart I of... - Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance... Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart I of Part 1944—Evaluation Report of Self-Help Technical Assistance (TA) Grants Evaluation for Quarter...

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  4. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  5. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  6. 41 CFR 102-75.550 - What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What does âself-help... PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Providing Self-Help Housing Or Housing Assistance § 102-75.550 What does “self-help housing or housing assistance” mean?...

  7. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  8. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  9. The Effects of Alcohol on Other Chronic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christine C; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol consumption is often a comorbid condition in other chronic liver diseases. It has been shown to act in synergy to increase liver injury in viral hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related mortality. Data suggest that modest alcohol consumption may be inversely related to the risk of developing NAFLD and lower rates of progression of NAFLD to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This article reviews data on the relationship between alcohol consumption and other chronic liver diseases. PMID:27373618

  10. Ageism as a Risk Factor for Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Julie Ober

    2016-08-01

    Ageism is one of the most socially condoned and institutionalized forms of prejudice in the United States. Older adults are discriminated against in employment, health care, and other domains. Exposure to unfavorable stereotypes adversely affects the attitudes, cognitions, and behavior of older adults. Recurrent experiences with negative stereotypes combined with discrimination may make ageism a chronic stressor in the lives of older adults. The way stress influences physical health is gaining increasing support. The weathering hypothesis (Geronimus, A. T. (1992) The weathering hypothesis and the health of African-American women and infants: Evidence and speculations. Ethnicity and Disease, 2, 207-221) posits that the cumulative effects of chronic objective and subjective stressors and high-effort coping cause deterioration of the body, premature aging, and associated health problems such as chronic diseases. Researchers have found empirical support for the weathering hypothesis as well as its theorized contribution to racial and ethnic health disparities. Although ageism is not experienced over the entire life course, as racism typically is, repeated exposure to chronic stressors associated with age stereotypes and discrimination may increase the risk of chronic disease, mortality, and other adverse health outcomes. I conclude with implications for practice in the helping professions and recommendations for future research. Ageism warrants greater recognition, social condemnation, and scientific study as a possible social determinant of chronic disease. PMID:25618315

  11. The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Care.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Bober, Robert M; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease represents the epidemic of our time, present in half the adult population and responsible for 86% of United States (US) healthcare costs and 70% of deaths. The major chronic diseases are primarily due to health risk behaviors that are widely communicable across populations. As a nation, the US has performed poorly in managing chronic disease, in large part because of a failed delivery model of care. New opportunities exist as a result of recent advances in home-based wireless devices, apps and wearables, enabling health delivery systems to monitor disease metrics in near real time. These technologies provide a framework for patient engagement and a new model of care delivery utilizing integrated practice units, both of which are needed to navigate the healthcare needs of the 21st century. PMID:26772623

  12. Chronic fluorosis: The disease and its anaesthetic implications

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Madhuri S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fluorosis is a widespread disease-related to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water and food. Prolonged ingestion of fluoride adversely affects the teeth, bones and other organs and alters their anatomy and physiology. Fluoride excess is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease and other major diseases, including hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity. Although anaesthesiologists may be aware of its skeletal and dental manifestations, other systemic manifestations, some of which may impact anaesthetic management are relatively unknown. Keeping this in mind, the topic of chronic fluorosis was hand searched from textbooks, scientific journals and electronically through Google, PubMed and other scientific databases. This article concentrates on the effect of chronic fluorosis on various organ systems, its clinical features, diagnosis and the anaesthetic implications of the disease. PMID:27053777

  13. VNI Cures Acute and Chronic Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, Fernando; Dobish, Mark C.; Nde, Pius N.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Johnson, Candice A.; Waterman, Michael R.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a deadly infection caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Afflicting approximately 8 million people in Latin America, Chagas disease is now becoming a serious global health problem proliferating beyond the traditional geographical borders, mainly because of human and vector migration. Because the disease is endemic in low-resource areas, industrial drug development has been lethargic. The chronic form remains incurable, there are no vaccines, and 2 existing drugs for the acute form are toxic and have low efficacy. Here we report the efficacy of a small molecule, VNI, including evidence of its effectiveness against chronic Chagas disease. VNI is a potent experimental inhibitor of T. cruzi sterol 14α-demethylase. Nontoxic and highly selective, VNI displays promising pharmacokinetics and administered orally to mice at 25 mg/kg for 30 days cures, with 100% cure rate and 100% survival, the acute and chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:23372180

  14. Chronic fluorosis: The disease and its anaesthetic implications.

    PubMed

    Kurdi, Madhuri S

    2016-03-01

    Chronic fluorosis is a widespread disease-related to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water and food. Prolonged ingestion of fluoride adversely affects the teeth, bones and other organs and alters their anatomy and physiology. Fluoride excess is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease and other major diseases, including hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity. Although anaesthesiologists may be aware of its skeletal and dental manifestations, other systemic manifestations, some of which may impact anaesthetic management are relatively unknown. Keeping this in mind, the topic of chronic fluorosis was hand searched from textbooks, scientific journals and electronically through Google, PubMed and other scientific databases. This article concentrates on the effect of chronic fluorosis on various organ systems, its clinical features, diagnosis and the anaesthetic implications of the disease. PMID:27053777

  15. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  16. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  17. Diarrhea in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, Heimo H

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common clinical feature of inflammatory bowel diseases and may be accompanied by abdominal pain, urgency, and fecal incontinence. The pathophysiology of diarrhea in these diseases is complex, but defective absorption of salt and water by the inflamed bowel is the most important mechanism involved. In addition to inflammation secondary to the disease, diarrhea may arise from a variety of other conditions. It is important to differentiate the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the diarrhea in the individual patient to provide the appropriate therapy. This article reviews microscopic colitis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, focusing on diarrhea. PMID:22917170

  18. Periodontal disease as a risk marker in coronary heart disease and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Taylor, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over half a million Americans die each year from coronary heart disease (CHD), 26 million suffer from chronic kidney disease (CKD), and a large proportion have periodontal disease (PD), a chronic infection of the tissues surrounding teeth. Chronic inflammation contributes to CHD and CKD occurrence and progression, and PD contributes to the cumulated chronic systemic inflammatory burden. This review examines recent evidence regarding the role of PD in CHD and CKD. Recent findings Periodontal pathogens cause both local infection and bacteremia, eliciting local and systemic inflammatory responses. PD is associated with the systemic inflammatory reactant CRP, a major risk factor for both CHD and CKD. Non-surgical PD treatment is shown to improve periodontal health, endothelial function and levels of CRP and other inflammatory markers. Evidence for the association of PD with CKD consists of a small body of literature represented mainly by cross-sectional studies. No definitive randomized-controlled trials exist with either CHD or CKD as primary endpoints. Summary Recent evidence links PD with CHD and CKD. Adding oral health self-care and referral for professional periodontal assessment and therapy to the repertoire of medical care recommendations is prudent to improve patients’ oral health and possibly reduce CHD and CKD risk. PMID:20948377

  19. Childhood Social Disadvantage, Cardiometabolic Risk, and Chronic Disease in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Non, Amy L.; Rewak, Marissa; Kawachi, Ichiro; Gilman, Stephen E.; Loucks, Eric B.; Appleton, Allison A.; Román, Jorge C.; Buka, Stephen L.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse social environments in early life are hypothesized to become biologically embedded during the first few years of life, with potentially far-reaching implications for health across the life course. Using prospective data from a subset of a US birth cohort, the Collaborative Perinatal Project, started in 1959–1966 (n = 566), we examined associations of social disadvantage assessed in childhood with cardiometabolic function and chronic disease status more than 40 years later (in 2005–2007). Social disadvantage was measured with an index that combined information on adverse socioeconomic and family stability factors experienced between birth and age 7 years. Cardiometabolic risk (CMR) was assessed by combining information from 8 CMR biomarkers; an index of chronic disease status was derived by assessing 8 chronic diseases. Poisson models were used to investigate associations between social disadvantage and CMR or chronic disease scores while adjusting for childhood covariates and potential pathway variables. A high level of social disadvantage was significantly associated with both higher CMR (incident rate ratio = 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 2.39) and with a higher number of chronic diseases (incident rate ratio = 1.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.92) in minimally adjusted models. Associations with CMR persisted even after accounting for childhood and adult covariates. PMID:24970845

  20. Awareness assessment in Turkish subpopulation with chronic oral mucosal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okumus, Ozlem; Kalkan, Sevda; Keser, Gaye; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of group Turkish patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases by chronic oral mucosal diseases questionnaires (COMDQ). Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases were participated in the study. A detailed medical history of each patient was taken, and all the COMDQ questions, which were translated from English version, were filled out. The data were analyzed with the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences Statistics 22.0. Results: The mean ages of patients were 48.91 ± 13.36 years. Of the total 80 cases of chronic oral mucosal diseases identified 52 (65%) were female and 28 (35%) male. The standardized mean scores for COMDQ were 1.72 ± 1.11 for “pain and functional limitation,” 1.09 ± 0.94 for “medication and treatment,” 2.31 ± 1.06 for “social and emotional,” and 2.27 ± 0.83 for “patient support,” respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the COMDQ has the profitable psychometric peculiarity and comfortable to patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases in Turkey. PMID:26929697

  1. Patient-Specific Airway Wall Remodeling in Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mona; Kuschner, Ware G; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lung disease affects more than a quarter of the adult population; yet, the mechanics of the airways are poorly understood. The pathophysiology of chronic lung disease is commonly characterized by mucosal growth and smooth muscle contraction of the airways, which initiate an inward folding of the mucosal layer and progressive airflow obstruction. Since the degree of obstruction is closely correlated with the number of folds, mucosal folding has been extensively studied in idealized circular cross sections. However, airflow obstruction has never been studied in real airway geometries; the behavior of imperfect, non-cylindrical, continuously branching airways remains unknown. Here we model the effects of chronic lung disease using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth. We perform finite element analysis of patient-specific Y-branch segments created from magnetic resonance images. We demonstrate that the mucosal folding pattern is insensitive to the specific airway geometry, but that it critically depends on the mucosal and submucosal stiffness, thickness, and loading mechanism. Our results suggests that patient-specific airway models with inherent geometric imperfections are more sensitive to obstruction than idealized circular models. Our models help to explain the pathophysiology of airway obstruction in chronic lung disease and hold promise to improve the diagnostics and treatment of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and respiratory failure. PMID:25821112

  2. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue. PMID:27358182

  3. [Therapeutic training and sports in chronic diseases of the lung].

    PubMed

    Podolsky, A; Haber, P

    1993-01-01

    Training is defined as systematic physical activity in order to improve the physical working capacity, which causes measurable morphological and functional changes in organs. Effects and the rules of applying aerobic endurance training in patients with chronic diseases of the lungs are dealt with. Training does not replace the normal medication, but is an additional therapeutic mean in order to regain physical working capacity, lost by chronic immobilization in the natural course of disease. Contraindications are acute diseases and exacerbations, but not a certain degree of the disease. Training does not improve the lung function, but the function of the other organs, the physical working capacity ist based on (circulation, musculature). This helps to use optimally the remaining reserves of lung function. Methods of aerobic endurance training are described, the definition of aims, performance diagnostic and the finding of the exact doses of training according to intensity, duration, frequency and the weekly netto training time. The training in different diseases of the lungs is discussed: In asthma bronchiale the prophylaxis of the exercise induced asthma and permitted and forbidden drugs for asthmatics according to the rules of international olympic committee. In chronic bronchitis with arterial hypoxemia, in restrictive lung diseases and in pulmonary hypertension. At last the way to prescribing training for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases is described as well as the advising of patients wishing to do sport by their own motivation or planning projects, for instance touristic ones, which require physical stress. PMID:8465532

  4. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lorraine; Wilcox, Spencer; Mankoff, Jennifer; Stricker, Raphael B

    2014-01-01

    Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD) and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed by this

  5. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lorraine; Wilcox, Spencer; Mankoff, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD) and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed by this

  6. Chronic lyme disease: psychogenic fantasy or somatic infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mervine, Phyllis

    2003-01-01

    Sigal and Hassett published an article about Lyme disease in the EHP Supplements (Sigal and Hassett 2002), suggesting that chronic Lyme disease is "psychogenic." I do not think that Sigal and Hassett, non-psychiatrists, are qualified to speak about psychiatric matters. I, however, actually have had the disease, which they characterize as "medically unexplained," for over 25 years and have 15 years of experience as a patient advocate and educator. I beg to differ. PMID:12573917

  7. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Neha M; Katial, Rohit K

    2016-08-01

    Patients with severe asthma and concomitant chronic rhinosinusitis often have severe, refractory upper and lower airway inflammation. This inflammation has been proposed to be similar throughout the upper and lower airways leading to the unified airways concept. This article reviews chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps, and the subgroup with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, while focusing on the relationship with asthma. Additionally, diagnosis and treatment with current and newer therapies are discussed. PMID:27401622

  8. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses. PMID:25201221

  9. Interest in different forms of self-help in a general population sample of drinkers.

    PubMed

    Koski-Jänne, A; Cunningham, J

    2001-01-01

    The study investigates: (1) the level of interest in self-help services for drinkers, and (2) the predictors of interest in these services. A representative sample of 1,557 Ontario respondents participated in a telephone survey. Current drinkers (n=1,247) were asked about their interest in getting: (a) a telephone call from a therapist to help them evaluate their drinking, (b) a self-help book, and (c) a computerized summary comparing their drinking to that of other Canadians. Bivariate comparisons of demographic and drinking-related variables were made between those interested and not interested in each of the offered services. Logistic regression analysis was used to find the best predictors of interest. The results revealed that 16% were interested in a telephone call, 26% in a self-help book, and 39% in computerized normative feedback. Negative consequences of drinking and indicators of lower societal resources increased interest in self-help services. Computerized feedback and self-help books serve as cheap and nonintrusive ways to provide incentive for change to early-stage problem drinkers due to the interest they raise in the intended target population. PMID:11196295

  10. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  11. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goderis, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  12. Genetic Factors Are Not the Major Causes of Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The risk of acquiring a chronic disease is influenced by a person's genetics (G) and exposures received during life (the 'exposome', E) plus their interactions (G×E). Yet, investigators use genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to characterize G while relying on self-reported information to classify E. If E and G×E dominate disease risks, this imbalance obscures important causal factors. To estimate proportions of disease risk attributable to G (plus shared exposures), published data from Western European monozygotic (MZ) twins were used to estimate population attributable fractions (PAFs) for 28 chronic diseases. Genetic PAFs ranged from 3.4% for leukemia to 48.6% for asthma with a median value of 18.5%. Cancers had the lowest PAFs (median = 8.26%) while neurological (median = 26.1%) and lung (median = 33.6%) diseases had the highest PAFs. These PAFs were then linked with Western European mortality statistics to estimate deaths attributable to G for heart disease and nine cancer types. Of 1.53 million Western European deaths in 2000, 0.25 million (16.4%) could be attributed to genetics plus shared exposures. Given the modest influences of G-related factors on the risks of chronic diseases in MZ twins, the disparity in coverage of G and E in etiological research is problematic. To discover causes of disease, GWAS should be complemented with exposome-wide association studies (EWAS) that profile chemicals in biospecimens from incident disease cases and matched controls. PMID:27105432

  13. Chronic Chagas disease: from basics to laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Saravia, Silvia Gilka Munoz; Wallukat, Gerd; Ziebig, Reinhard; Schimke, Ingolf

    2013-02-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is ranked as the most serious parasitic disease in Latin America and has huge potential to become a worldwide problem, due to increasing migration, and international tourism, as well as infectant transfer by blood contact and transfusion, intrauterine transfer, and organ transplantation. Nearly 30% of chronically-infected patients become symptomatic, often with a latency of 10-30 years, developing life-threatening complications. Of those, nearly 90% develop Chagas heart disease, while the others manifest gastrointestinal disease and neuronal disorders. Besides interrupting the infection cycle and chemo therapeutic infectant elimination, starting therapy early in symptomatic patients is important for counteracting the disease. This would be essentially supported by optimized patient management, involving risk assessment, early diagnosis and monitoring of the disease and its treatment. From economic and logistic viewpoints, the tools of laboratory medicine should be especially able to guarantee this. After summarizing the basics of chronic Chagas disease, such as the epidemiological data, the pathogenetic mechanisms thought to drive symptomatic Chagas disease and also treatment options, we present tools of laboratory medicine that address patient diagnosis, risk assessment for becoming symptomatic and guidance, focusing on autoantibody estimation for risk assessment and heart marker measurement for patient guidance. In addition, increases in levels of inflammation and oxidative stress markers in chronic Chagas disease are discussed. PMID:23045386

  14. Self-Help for Depression via E-mail: A Randomised Controlled Trial of Effects on Depression and Self-Help Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J.; Jorm, Anthony F.; Mackinnon, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-help or self-management strategies are commonly used to deal with depression, but not all are thought to be helpful. A previous study found that sub-threshold depression symptoms were improved by an e-mail intervention that encouraged the use of evidence-based self-help strategies. Aim To investigate whether these e-mails were effective for adults with a range of depression symptomatology including major depression. Method The study was a parallel-group randomised controlled trial. Adult participants with any level of depressive symptoms were recruited over the internet from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the United States. Participants were randomised to receive a series of e-mails either promoting the use of evidence-based self-help strategies or containing depression information as a control. E-mails were sent automatically twice a week for six weeks. Depression symptoms were assessed with the self-rated Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-9). Results 1736 participants with a wide range of symptom severity were recruited and assigned to active (n = 862) and control (n = 874) groups. However, there was a significant attrition rate, with 66.9% lost to follow-up at post-intervention. Both groups showed large improvements in depression symptoms overall, with no significant difference in improvement at the end of the study (mean difference in improvement 0.35 points, 95% CI: −0.57 to 1.28, d = 0.11, 95% CI: −0.06 to 0.27), although there was a small effect at the study mid-point. Results were similar for the sub-group of participants with major depression. The active group showed small to moderate improvements in self-help behaviour (d = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.56). Conclusions These results suggest that the e-mails were able to increase participants’ use of evidence-based self-help, but that this did not improve depression more than an attention control. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  15. Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Hand, Anne; Sindi, Shireen; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    The self-help industry generates billions of dollars yearly in North America. Despite the popularity of this movement, there has been surprisingly little research assessing the characteristics of self-help books consumers, and whether this consumption is associated with physiological and/or psychological markers of stress. The goal of this pilot study was to perform the first psychoneuroendocrine analysis of consumers of self-help books in comparison to nonconsumers. We tested diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol levels, personality, and depressive symptoms in 32 consumers and nonconsumers of self-help books. In an explorative secondary analysis, we also split consumers of self-help books as a function of their preference for problem-focused versus growth-oriented self-help books. The results showed that while consumers of growth-oriented self-help books presented increased cortisol reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to other groups, consumers of problem-focused self-help books presented higher depressive symptomatology. The results of this pilot study show that consumers with preference for either problem-focused or growth-oriented self-help books present different physiological and psychological markers of stress when compared to nonconsumers of self-help books. This preliminary study underlines the need for additional research on this issue in order to determine the impact the self-help book industry may have on consumers' stress. PMID:26839713

  16. Salivary Cortisol Levels and Depressive Symptomatology in Consumers and Nonconsumers of Self-Help Books: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Hand, Anne; Sindi, Shireen; Juster, Robert-Paul; Lupien, Sonia J.

    2016-01-01

    The self-help industry generates billions of dollars yearly in North America. Despite the popularity of this movement, there has been surprisingly little research assessing the characteristics of self-help books consumers, and whether this consumption is associated with physiological and/or psychological markers of stress. The goal of this pilot study was to perform the first psychoneuroendocrine analysis of consumers of self-help books in comparison to nonconsumers. We tested diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol levels, personality, and depressive symptoms in 32 consumers and nonconsumers of self-help books. In an explorative secondary analysis, we also split consumers of self-help books as a function of their preference for problem-focused versus growth-oriented self-help books. The results showed that while consumers of growth-oriented self-help books presented increased cortisol reactivity to a psychosocial stressor compared to other groups, consumers of problem-focused self-help books presented higher depressive symptomatology. The results of this pilot study show that consumers with preference for either problem-focused or growth-oriented self-help books present different physiological and psychological markers of stress when compared to nonconsumers of self-help books. This preliminary study underlines the need for additional research on this issue in order to determine the impact the self-help book industry may have on consumers' stress. PMID:26839713

  17. [Chronic urticaria from the aspect of autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Lenert, P; Poljacki, M; Mitić, I; Duran, V

    1995-01-01

    At some time in their lives one in a five persons is affected by urticaria and/or angioedema. The cause of urticaria may never be found in up to one quarter of patients with acute urticaria and in up to 90-95% with chronic urticaria. In this study we present results of our compounded approach (clinical follow up, laboratory findings, allergological testing) to patients with chronic urticaria and autoimmune diseases that progressed into chronic urticaria or started before the onset of the chronic urticaria. Our first case was a 56 year old woman with a 10 month history of chronic urticaria, angioedema and chronic gastritis before the diagnoses of insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus and Hypothyreoidismus primarius were established. Allergological testing reveals specific clinical significant immediate reaction to Balsam Peru. After adequate substitutional therapy was advocated and with specific clinical avoidance of offended allergen, remission was obtained. The second case was a 46 year old female suffering from chronic urticaria (with clinical features of urticaria like vasculitis) associated with hypocomplementemia (particularly C4 depressed) with negative antinuclear antibodies but positive circulating immune complexes after a 2 year follow up the patient developed Systemic lupus erythematosus. The third case was a 63 year old woman who developed chronic urticaria 3 years after total thyroidectomy, with pathological finding of Thyroiditis lymphocytaria-Hashimoto; after the allergological testing, positive lymphocyte transformation test revealed allergical sensitization to Vobenol was substituted with Thyvoral, complete remission was obtained. PMID:7565341

  18. Usability factors of mobile health application for chronic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Fatima; Hussain, Azham; Mohd, Haslina

    2016-08-01

    M-health has changed the conventional delivery system of health-care, permitting continuous, pervasive Health-care anywhere, anytime. Chronic disease apps are increasing, as many health workers, patients and clinicians already embracing smartphones in their comprehensive and diverse practices. There are lots of challenges and requirements that need to be addressed for mobile health applications to prevent or eliminate design problems and minimize potential threats for users, the proposed factors for chronic disease mobile applications can be used as a guide for app developers While, the usability testing, and evaluations of chronic disease apps have not yet touched the accuracy level of other web based applications. This study is being conducted to learn about challenges of m-health apps and to identify the factors that affect the usability of such applications.

  19. Adenosine signaling and the regulation of chronic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Schneider, Daniel J.; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease are characterized by inflammation and tissue remodeling processes that compromise pulmonary function. Adenosine is produced in the inflamed and damaged lung where it plays numerous roles in the regulation of inflammation and tissue remodeling. Extracellular adenosine serves as an autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule by engaging cell surface adenosine receptors. Preclinical and cellular studies suggest that adenosine plays an anti-inflammatory role in processes associated with acute lung disease, where activation of the A2AR and A2BR have promising implications for the treatment of these disorders. In contrast, there is growing evidence that adenosine signaling through the A1R, A2BR and A3R may serve pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling functions in chronic lung diseases. This review discusses the current progress of research efforts and clinical trials aimed at understanding the complexities of this signaling pathway as they pertain to the development of treatment strategies for chronic lung diseases. PMID:19426761

  20. Chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism: epidemiology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Keattiyoat; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An estimated 13% of Americans have kidney disease. We sought to describe the association of kidney disease with risk of venous thromboembolism and discuss possible mechanisms explaining this association. Recent findings All severities of kidney disease appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. In the general population the risk associated with mild to moderate kidney disease is 1.3–2-fold increased, and present even for microalbuminuria, although stage 1 chronic kidney disease itself has not been studied. End-stage renal disease is also associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk, compared to the general population. Although data are limited, risk increases after kidney transplant and with nephrotic syndrome as well. Summary Rates of kidney disease are increasing rapidly in the population and kidney disease is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. An improved understanding of mechanisms linking kidney disease with venous thromboembolism will allow further study of best prevention efforts. PMID:19561505

  1. Underrecognized comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Zalewska-Janowska, Anna; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2015-01-01

    COPD is associated with different comorbid diseases, and their frequency increases with age. Comorbidities severely impact costs of health care, intensity of symptoms, quality of life and, most importantly, may contribute to life span shortening. Some comorbidities are well acknowledged and established in doctors’ awareness. However, both everyday practice and literature searches provide evidence of other, less recognized diseases, which are frequently associated with COPD. We call them underrecognized comorbidities, and the reason why this is so may be related to their relatively low clinical significance, inefficient literature data, or data ambiguity. In this review, we describe rhinosinusitis, skin abnormalities, eye diseases, different endocrinological disorders, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Possible links to COPD pathogenesis have been discussed, if the data were available. PMID:26203239

  2. Investigation of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gerontoukou, Evangelia-Ioanna; Michaelidoy, Sofia; Rekleiti, Maria; Saridi, Maria; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    The health of an individual depends on both his/her physical and psychological condition. In recent years it has been observed that chronic patients have frequently an affected psycho-emotional state. The purpose of this study is to investigate anxiety and depression in patients with chronic diseases and the correlation of the results with daily physical activity levels and individual health levels, as well comorbidity. This study included patients with chronic diseases that were treated in a local general hospital or were visiting often outpatient clinics of the same hospital due to their condition. The sample in this particular study included 204 patients; 118 of them were women and 86 men. From the total sample that participated in our research, 118 (57.8%) were females and the majority of the participants were secondary/basic education graduates (67%), married (71%), living in urban areas (53%). Hypertension was the most frequent chronic disease in our sample, followed by hypercholesterolemia and diabetes mellitus. Comparing the occurrence of depression and anxiety symptoms in both questionnaires in relation to the expected frequency in the general population, significant levels of depression and anxiety symptoms were recorded. Taking into consideration the findings of this research, anxiety and depression symptoms can have profound effects regarding the control of chronic diseases, the patients’ quality of life and their general health. PMID:26973961

  3. Why do young people with chronic kidney disease die early?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shankar; Bogle, Richard; Banerjee, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease poses the greatest risk of premature death seen among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Up to 50% of mortality risk in the dialysis population is attributable to cardiovascular disease and the largest relative excess mortality is observed in younger patients. In early CKD, occlusive thrombotic coronary disease is common, but those who survive to reach end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis are more prone to sudden death attributable mostly to sudden arrhythmic events and heart failure related to left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary vascular calcification and electrolyte disturbances. In this review, we discuss the basis of the interaction of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease with various pathological processes such as endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, low grade chronic inflammation, neurohormonal changes and vascular calcification and stiffness which account for the structural and functional cardiac changes that predispose to excess morbidity and mortality in young people with CKD. PMID:25374808

  4. Taking care of business: self-help and sleep medicine in american corporate culture.

    PubMed

    Brown, Megan

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that corporate management in the United States has expanded its scope beyond office walls and encompasses many aspects of workers' daily lives. One new element of corporate training is the micromanagement of sleep; self-help books, newspaper reports, magazine articles, and consulting firms currently advise workers and supervisors on optimizing productivity by cultivating certain sleep habits. Although consultants and self-help books make specific recommendations about sleep, most medical research is inconclusive about sleep's benefits for human performance. Using the ideas of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze as a philosophical backdrop, this article examines the complex and often contradictory links between self-help, medicine, and corporate governance. PMID:15292702

  5. Agreement among readers on what is relevant in self-help psychology books.

    PubMed

    Forest, James J; Del Ben, Kevin; Toews, Stuart B

    2003-12-01

    It was hypothesized that text marking in self-help psychology books would indicate that readers agree on which pages and lines contain relevant information. Previously owned copies of two self-help book titles (n=48, n=38), all with marked text, were collected from second-hand book stores and scored for line and page marking. Chi-squares for goodness-of-fit yielded significant differences between observed and chance agreement in marking behavior. Intraclass and KR-20 correlations were significantly different from zero, suggesting that readers agreed on what information was relevant and irrelevant. Actual users of self-help books may have similar standards because of cultural values, social group relations, or common problem experiences. PMID:14723464

  6. [Self-help program: a new tool to facilitate the access to treatment for problem gamblers].

    PubMed

    Saeremans, M; Noël, X; Verbanck, P

    2015-01-01

    Shame, fear of stigmatization, denial, accessibility to and the cost of treatment program may explain why only a small proportion of problem gamblers sought clinical treatment. In the hope to overcome these barriers, the Gambling Clinic and Other Behavioral Addictions of C.H.U. Brugmann (Brussels) has developed its own self-help program for excessive gamblers. Our goals were to foster readiness to change gambling behaviors and when appropriate to facilitate the transition from self-help program to classical face-to-face clinical intervention. In a sample of 172 problem gamblers who participated, 40% had never sought help (e.g., clinical treatment) and/or never attempted quit gambling. Interestingly, for some, internet-based self-help treatment preceded their determination for seeking a traditional face-to-face therapeutic setting. Those results led us to discuss this program as a valid clinical tool within a broader health care setting in excessive gamblers. PMID:26164965

  7. Oral protein calorie supplementation for children with chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Damian K; Smith, Joanne; Saljuqi, Tawab; Watling, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor growth and nutritional status are common in children with chronic diseases. Oral protein calorie supplements are used to improve nutritional status in these children. These expensive products may be associated with some adverse effects, e.g. the development of inappropriate eating behaviour patterns. This is a new update of a Cochrane review last updated in 2009. Objectives To examine evidence that in children with chronic disease, oral protein calorie supplements alter daily nutrient intake, nutritional indices, survival and quality of life and are associated with adverse effects, e.g. diarrhoea, vomiting, reduced appetite, glucose intolerance, bloating and eating behaviour problems. Search methods Trials of oral protein calorie supplements in children with chronic diseases were identified through comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Companies marketing these products were also contacted. Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 24 February 2015. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing oral protein calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with existing conventional therapy (including advice on improving nutritional intake from food or no specific intervention) in children with chronic disease. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed the outcomes: indices of nutrition and growth; anthropometric measures of body composition; calorie and nutrient intake (total from oral protein calorie supplements and food); eating behaviour; compliance; quality of life; specific adverse effects; disease severity scores; and mortality; we also assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. Main results Four studies (187 children) met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were carried out in children with cystic fibrosis and one study included children with paediatric malignant disease

  8. Chronic diseases in captive geriatric female Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Lee, D Rick; Lammey, Michael L

    2012-04-01

    The current aging population of captive chimpanzees is expected to develop age-related diseases and present new challenges to providing their veterinary care. Spontaneous heart disease and sudden cardiac death are the main causes of death in chimpanzees (especially of male animals), but little is known about the relative frequency of other chronic diseases. Furthermore, female chimpanzees appear to outlive the males and scant literature addresses clinical conditions that affect female chimpanzees. Here we characterize the types and prevalence of chronic disease seen in geriatric (older than 35 y) female chimpanzees in the colony at Alamogordo Primate Facility. Of the 16 female chimpanzees that fit the age category, 87.5% had some form of chronic age-related disease. Cardiovascular-related disease was the most common (81.25%) followed by metabolic syndrome (43.75%) and renal disease (31.25%). These data show the incidence of disease in geriatric female chimpanzees and predict likely medical management challenges associated with maintaining an aging chimpanzee population. PMID:22546920

  9. State Variations of Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Older Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kachan, Diana; Fernandez, Cristina A.; McClure, Laura A.; LeBlanc, William G.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Lee, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and compare 3 key health behaviors associated with chronic disease (ie, risky drinking, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle). We used data from the National Health Interview Survey from 1997 through 2010 to calculate the prevalence of these behaviors among older Americans and rank each state, and we analyzed overall trends in prevalence for each behavior over the 14 years. Older adults residing in Arkansas and Montana had the worst chronic disease risk profile compared with other states. These findings indicate the need for improved or increased targeted interventions in these states. PMID:23256910

  10. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. PMID:26300515

  11. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J G; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, H Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J E; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2010-05-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney disease (P = 5.0 x 10(-5) and P = 3.6 x 10(-4), respectively). Our findings provide insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:20383145

  12. Association of Pseudomonas cepacia with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bottone, E J; Douglas, S D; Rausen, A R; Keusch, G T

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia was recovered from a number of infected sites in three patients with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood. The organisms were identified on the basis of their oxidative utilization of a variety of carbohydrates and their positive beta-galactosidase and oxidase activities. They were resistant to most antimicrobial agents and moderately susceptible to chloramphenicol. Peripheral blood leukocytes isolated from two siblings with chronic granulomatous disease, including one of the patients in this series, failed to kill P. cepacia in vitro. Prolonged prophylactic and antimicrobial therapy may well have played a significant role in the colonization and infection of these patients with P. cepacia. PMID:1176612

  13. Update on Bone Health in Pediatric Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristen M

    2016-06-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic disease are predisposed to impaired bone health. Pediatric illness, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, and cystic fibrosis, have significant risk of low bone mineralization and fracture due to underlying inflammation, malabsorption, lack of physical activity, and delayed puberty. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the primary imaging method to assess bone health in this population. The purpose of this review is to update readers about the assessment and management of bone health in children with common pediatric chronic illnesses and review recent advances in the prevention and treatment of impaired bone health. PMID:27241973

  14. Concordance among readers of self-help books about important ideas.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Betty L; Forest, James J

    2004-04-01

    Amount of agreement among readers about the relevant information in a self-help psychology book was measured to assess whether readers' choices are unique or overlapping. 15 men and 14 women attended two 1-hr. sessions in which they read and marked relevant information in the first 60 pages of a self-help psychology book. Comparison of the amount and pattern of marking across pages and lines on five specific pages showed that there was a statistically significant amount of agreement on which pages contained relevant ideas and which lines contained important concepts. There were no differences between men and women. PMID:15154198

  15. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  16. The empirical foundations of telemedicine interventions for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Bashshur, Rashid L; Shannon, Gary W; Smith, Brian R; Alverson, Dale C; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M; Coye, Molly J; Doarn, Charles R; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Kvedar, Joseph C; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S; Sanders, Jay H; Watson, Andrew R; Weinstein, Ronald S; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

  17. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  18. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    PubMed

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 body surface area) based on a single serum creatinine measurement was 0%-67% men and 0%-57% women. Prevalence was generally higher in male farmworkers aged 20-50 years, and varied by community economic activity and altitude. Cause was unknown in 57.4%-66.7% of patients. The dominant histopathological diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis. Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors. PMID:24878644

  19. The Empirical Foundations of Telemedicine Interventions for Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Gary W.; Smith, Brian R.; Alverson, Dale C.; Antoniotti, Nina; Barsan, William G.; Bashshur, Noura; Brown, Edward M.; Coye, Molly J.; Doarn, Charles R.; Ferguson, Stewart; Grigsby, Jim; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Kvedar, Joseph C.; Linkous, Jonathan; Merrell, Ronald C.; Nesbitt, Thomas; Poropatich, Ronald; Rheuban, Karen S.; Sanders, Jay H.; Watson, Andrew R.; Weinstein, Ronald S.; Yellowlees, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The telemedicine intervention in chronic disease management promises to involve patients in their own care, provides continuous monitoring by their healthcare providers, identifies early symptoms, and responds promptly to exacerbations in their illnesses. This review set out to establish the evidence from the available literature on the impact of telemedicine for the management of three chronic diseases: congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. By design, the review focuses on a limited set of representative chronic diseases because of their current and increasing importance relative to their prevalence, associated morbidity, mortality, and cost. Furthermore, these three diseases are amenable to timely interventions and secondary prevention through telemonitoring. The preponderance of evidence from studies using rigorous research methods points to beneficial results from telemonitoring in its various manifestations, albeit with a few exceptions. Generally, the benefits include reductions in use of service: hospital admissions/re-admissions, length of hospital stay, and emergency department visits typically declined. It is important that there often were reductions in mortality. Few studies reported neutral or mixed findings. PMID:24968105

  20. CHRONIOUS: an open, ubiquitous and adaptive chronic disease management platform for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosso, R; Munaro, G; Salvetti, O; Colantonio, S; Ciancitto, F

    2010-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an highly innovative Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) research Initiative that aspires to implement its vision for ubiquitous health and lifestyle monitoring. The 17 European project partners are strictly working together since February 2008 to realize and open platform to manage and monitor elderly patients with chronic diseases and many difficulties to reach hospital centers for routine controls. The testing activities will be done in Italy and Spain involving COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) patients, these being widespread and highly expensive in terms of social and economic costs. Patients, equipped by wearable technologies and sensors and interacting with lifestyle interfaces, will be assisted by healthcare personnel able to check the health record and critical conditions through the Chronious platform data analysis and decision support system. Additionally, the new ontology based literature search engine will help the clinicians in the standardization of care delivery process. This paper is to present the main project objectives and its principal components from the intelligent system point of view. PMID:21096301

  1. Late appearance of chronic pericardial disease in patients treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Applefeld, M.M.; Cole, J.F.; Pollock, S.H.; Sutton, F.J.; Slawson, R.G.; Singleton, R.T.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1981-03-01

    Radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease was recognized in nine patients 53 to 124 months (mean, 88 months) after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Depending on whether abnormal cardiac hemodynamics occurred before or after a fluid challenge, patients were considered to have either constrictive pericarditis (Group I) or occult constrictive pericarditis (Group II). There were no differences between these groups in various radiotherapy data, the use of chemotherapy, or the interval after treatment when the diagnosis of chronic pericardial disease was made. There were no consistent noninvasive variables to support the diagnosis of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease before cardiac catheterization. Four patients underwent pericardiectomy. Two of the four operated patients had an excellent surgical result; a third patient died 4 months postoperatively of drug-induced granulocytopenia; the fourth patient has persistent visceral constrictive pericarditis 18 months after surgery. Speculation over the causes of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease is made and our recommendations for its treatment given.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis: A surgical disease? Role of the Frey procedure

    PubMed Central

    Roch, Alexandra; Teyssedou, Jérome; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques; Pessaux, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although medical treatment and endoscopic interventions are primarily offered to patients with chronic pancreatitis, approximately 40% to 75% will ultimately require surgery during the course of their disease. Although pancreaticoduodenectomy has been considered the standard surgical procedure because of its favorable results on pain control, its high postoperative complication and pancreatic exocrine or/and endocrine dysfunction rates have led to a growing enthusiasm for duodenal preserving pancreatic head resection. The aim of this review is to better understand the rationale underlying of the Frey procedure in chronic pancreatitis and to analyze its outcome. Because of its hybrid nature, combining both resection and drainage, the Frey procedure has been conceptualized based on the pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis. The short and long-term outcome, especially pain relief and quality of life, are better after the Frey procedure than after any other surgical procedure performed for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25068010

  3. How to advocate for the inclusion of chronic kidney disease in a national noncommunicable chronic disease program.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Marcello; Agarwal, Sanjay; Cass, Alan; Garcia Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivek; Naicker, Sarala; Wang, HaiYan; Yang, Chih-Wei; O'Donoghue, Donal

    2014-06-01

    Many countries are developing or refining national strategies for noncommunicable chronic disease (NCD) prevention and control. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a cause and consequence of other NCDs; CKD acts as a risk multiplier for all four key NCDs as specified by the World Health Organization; CKD is associated with high health-care costs; CKD is readily identifiable; and treatment of CKD is cost-effective and improves outcomes. These observations argue in favor of including CKD in national NCD programs. The purpose of this article is to outline key steps in advocating for the inclusion of CKD in national NCD strategies. PMID:23407433

  4. [Migration flow and imported diseases: chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, Roberto A; Di Girolamo, Chiara; Ciannameo, Anna; Milei, José

    2009-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is transmitted by triatomine bugs in endemic regions of the American continent and less frequently by blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Immigration rates explain why the disease can be found worldwide. Non-endemic countries that receive a significant amount of Latin American immigrants should be familiarized with the disease to allow prevention, diagnosis and early treatment. In Italy, where no serologic screening is routinely performed to detect Trypanosoma cruzi in blood donations, a special consideration must be held. Accordingly, attention to congenital transmissions of the disease should be drawn considering the lack of newborn screening. Though commonly unrecognized, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is the most common type of chronic myocarditis in the world. PMID:19475878

  5. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined. PMID:23756992

  6. Gas exchange in disease: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Iven H; Bye, Peter T P

    2011-04-01

    Ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality is the underlying abnormality determining hypoxemia and hypercapnia in lung diseases. Hypoxemia in asthma is characterized by the presence of low VA/Q units, which persist despite improvement in airway function after an attack. This hypoxemia is generally attenuated by compensatory redistribution of blood flow mediated by hypoxic vasoconstriction and changes in cardiac output, however, mediator release and bronchodilator therapy may cause deterioration. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have more complex patterns of VA/Q inequality, which appear more fixed, and changes in blood flow and ventilation have less benefit in improving gas exchange efficiency. The inability of ventilation to match increasing cardiac output limits exercise capacity as the disease progresses. Deteriorating hypoxemia during exacerbations reflects the falling mixed venous oxygen tension from increased respiratory muscle activity, which is not compensated by any redistribution of VA/Q ratios. Shunt is not a feature of any of these diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have no substantial shunt when managed according to modern treatment regimens. Interstitial lung diseases demonstrate impaired oxygen diffusion across the alveolar-capillary barrier, particularly during exercise, although VA/Q inequality still accounts for most of the gas exchange abnormality. Hypoxemia may limit exercise capacity in these diseases and in CF. Persistent hypercapnic respiratory failure is a feature of advancing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF, closely associated with sleep disordered breathing, which is not a prominent feature of the other diseases. Better understanding of the mechanisms of hypercapnic respiratory failure, and of the detailed mechanisms controlling the distribution of ventilation and blood flow in the lung, are high priorities for future research. PMID:23737199

  7. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases: novel vasoconstrictor pathways.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Simon C; Keane, Michael P; Gaine, Seán; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well recognised complication of chronic hypoxic lung diseases, which are among the most common causes of death and disability worldwide. Development of pulmonary hypertension independently predicts reduced life expectancy. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-term oxygen therapy ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and greatly improves survival, although the correction of alveolar hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension is only partial. Advances in understanding of the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone show that chronic vasoconstriction plays a more important part in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension than previously thought, and that structural vascular changes contribute less. Trials of existing vasodilators show that pulmonary hypertension can be ameliorated and systemic oxygen delivery improved in carefully selected patients, although systemic hypotensive effects limit the doses used. Vasoconstrictor pathways that are selective for the pulmonary circulation can be blocked to reduce hypoxic pulmonary hypertension without causing systemic hypotension, and thus provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26895650

  8. Endometriosis: a high-risk population for major chronic diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Kvaskoff, Marina; Mu, Fan; Terry, Kathryn L.; Harris, Holly R.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Farland, Leslie; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite an estimated prevalence of 10% in women, the etiology of endometriosis remains poorly understood. Over recent decades, endometriosis has been associated with risk of several chronic diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, asthma/atopic diseases and cardiovascular diseases. A deeper understanding of these associations is needed as they may provide new leads into the causes or consequences of endometriosis. This review summarizes the available epidemiological findings on the associations between endometriosis and other chronic diseases and discusses hypotheses for underlying mechanisms, potential sources of bias and methodological complexities. METHODS We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge databases for all studies reporting on the associations between endometriosis and other diseases published in English through to May 2014, using numerous search terms. We additionally examined the reference lists of all identified papers to capture any additional articles that were not identified through computer searches. RESULTS We identified 21 studies on the associations between endometriosis and ovarian cancer, 14 for breast cancer, 8 for endometrial cancer, 4 for cervical cancer, 12 for cutaneous melanoma and 3 for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as 9 on the links between endometriosis and autoimmune diseases, 6 on the links with asthma and atopic diseases, and 4 on the links with cardiovascular diseases. Endometriosis patients were reported to be at higher risk of ovarian and breast cancers, cutaneous melanoma, asthma, and some autoimmune, cardiovascular and atopic diseases, and at decreased risk of cervical cancer. CONCLUSIONS Increasing evidence suggests that endometriosis patients are at higher risk of several chronic diseases. Although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood, the available data to date suggest that endometriosis is not harmless with respects to women's long-term health. If

  9. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2015-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. PMID:25943942

  10. Early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, assessment, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Rennard, Stephen I; Drummond, M Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide. COPD, however, is a heterogeneous collection of diseases with differing causes, pathogenic mechanisms, and physiological effects. Therefore a comprehensive approach to COPD prevention will need to address the complexity of COPD. Advances in the understanding of the natural history of COPD and the development of strategies to assess COPD in its early stages make prevention a reasonable, if ambitious, goal. PMID:25943942

  11. [Telemedicine for heart failure, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, St; Klötzer, J-P

    2016-03-01

    It is generally believed that telemedicine has a tremendous potential to improve health care. This publication reviews the current knowledge available on telemedical concepts for heart failure, diabetes and chronic pulmonary diseases, discusses existing difficulties, and suggests how such concepts could best be used in the near future. PMID:27111954

  12. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  13. DOES CHRONIC OZONE EXPOSURE LEAD TO LUNG DISEASE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential role of ozone in the induction of chronic lung diseases remains unclear. sing an ambient profile adopted from aerometric data from the Southwest Air Basin, rats were exposed to O3 for up to 18 months before assessments of pulmonary structure, function and biochemist...

  14. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  15. Chronic Diseases in the Pediatric Age Group. Matrix No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Michael

    This paper briefly outlines current problems associated with chronic diseases in children and youth and provides indications for the types of future research and analysis needed to facilitate the development of solutions. In general, these problems are associated with the following: malignancies, hereditary anemias, cystic fibrosis, other chronic…

  16. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  17. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  18. Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Maria, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    While governing bodies have mandated that all students have the right to an education, with disabled students treated to the same rights and opportunities as non-disabled students, policymakers do not always agree on what all-inclusive education should look like. "Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases"…

  19. Experimental chronic wasting disease (CWD) in fallow deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the transmissibility of chronic wasting disease (CWD) to fallow deer (Cervus dama) and to provide information about clinical course, lesions and suitability of currently used diagnostic procedures for detection of CWD in this species, 13 fawns were inoculated intracerebrally with CWD br...

  20. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.S. |; Lloyd, J.; Daniloff, E.

    1996-10-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressing into clinical disease. This article discusses the historical, recent, and ongoing studies germane to our understanding of CBD natural history, including the immunologic and inflammatory basis of the disease, the environmental and host risk factors for disease progression, biological markers of disease severity and activity that may help predict outcome, and the implications for broad-based workplace screening to identify patients at the earliest stages of beryllium sensitization and disease. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  1. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L S; Lloyd, J; Daniloff, E

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressing into clinical disease. This article discusses the historical, recent, and ongoing studies germane to our understanding of CBD natural history, including the immunologic and inflammatory basis of the disease, the environmental and host risk factors for disease progression, biological markers of disease severity and activity that may help predict outcome, and the implications for broad-based workplace screening to identify patients at the earliest stages of beryllium sensitization and disease. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D PMID:8933038

  2. [Treatment of chronic itch in systemic disease. Current standards].

    PubMed

    Mettang, T; Ständer, S; Kremer, A E

    2015-12-01

    Chronic itch (CI) is a frequent and sometimes tormenting symptom in many skin and systemic diseases. In systemic diseases, it mostly appears on primarily unaffected skin. As a sequelae of intense scratching, secondary skin lesions such as excoriations, scars, and prurigo nodularis may occur. Due to the lack of valid pathogenetic concepts and good clinical trials, the therapy of CI remains mostly symptomatic. In Europe almost all drugs used to treat CI are not approved for this indication. CI is frequent in patients with chronic kidney diseases in advanced stages. Gabapentin and pregabalin, anticonvulsants, and centrally acting calcium channel blockers have been shown to exert a profound effect in CI. Furthermore, UVB phototherapy has been proven to attenuate pruritus in uremic patients. Randomized controlled studies have recently shown that nalfurafine, a κ-opioid receptor agonist, is able to ameliorate itch in patients with uremic itch. In patients suffering from cholestatic itch, the anion exchange resin colestyramine and rifampicin are effective antipruritic drugs. Furthermore, µ-opioid receptor antagonists and sertraline may be used to alleviate CI in hepatic diseases. In refractory cases, naso-biliary drainage or albumin dialysis are effective invasive procedures. For the treatment of chronic itch in hematological diseases no controlled trials have been performed so far. The mainstay in these cases is to treat the underlying disease. PMID:26585238

  3. Epigenetics and early life origins of chronic noncommunicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Walker, Sheila O; Hong, Xiumei; Bartell, Tami R; Wang, Xiaobin

    2013-02-01

    In light of the increasing threats of chronic noncommunicable diseases in developing countries, the growing recognition of the early life origins of chronic disease, and innovative breakthroughs in biomedical research and technology, it is imperative that we harness cutting-edge data to improve health promotion and maintenance. It is well recognized that chronic diseases are complex traits affected by a wide range of environmental and genetic factors; however, the role of epigenetic factors, particularly with regard to early life origins, remains largely unexplored. Given the unique properties of the epigenome-functionality during critical time windows, such as the intrauterine period, heritability, and reversibility-enhancing our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms may offer new opportunities for the development of novel early prediction and prevention paradigms. This may present an unparalleled opportunity to offer maternal and child health professionals important tools with the translational value to predict, detect, and prevent disease at an early age, long before its clinical occurrence, and as such, break lifelong and transgenerational cycles of disease. In doing so, modern technology can be leveraged to make great contributions to population health, quality of life, and reducing the burdensome economic costs of noncommunicable diseases in developing countries. PMID:23332566

  4. Uncontrolled chronic disease: patient non-compliance or clinical mismanagement?

    PubMed

    Javors, Jonathan R; Bramble, Judith E

    2003-01-01

    A study group of 30 individuals was randomly chosen from 1,379 beneficiaries predicted to be at risk for health care complications at a large, Midwest, industrial company currently experiencing increased health care costs. All 30 individuals had one or more chronic illness, primarily diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or asthma. Through analysis of medical records, a self-reporting health risk assessment survey, and personal contact with both patients and clinicians, each study individual was assessed as to whether his disease(s) was under control, the individual was compliant with his treatment protocol, and whether the supervising clinician was following nationally accepted standards of care. Fewer than 50% of the individuals in the study group had their chronic illness(es) under control. Those individuals whose treatment adhered to national guidelines were significantly more likely to have their disease under control (p < 0.001). For this study, patient compliance was high and unrelated to whether their disease was under control. Behavioral (external) barriers were most often cited as the reason a clinical practitioner did not follow the appropriate national standard of care. Most clinicians were aware of and familiar with the guidelines; a few either did not agree with or misunderstood the guidelines. The results of this study suggest that changing clinical practice behaviors to better ensure compliance to national standards of care may make a substantial difference in chronic disease control. PMID:14570385

  5. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  6. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  7. Specific Psychosocial and Behavioral Outcomes from the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Carrie Jo; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data from 104 participants in the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Self-Help Course showed that patients had significant increases in enabling skills and use of relaxation/exercise and decreases in depression. Amount of time spent in class was correlated with significant changes over time. (SK)

  8. The Acceptability of an Internet-Based Self-Help Treatment for Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, C.; Gallego, M. J.; Garcia-Palacios, A.; Banos, R. M.; Quero, S.; Alcaniz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Several randomised controlled studies have shown the efficacy of Internet-based self-help treatments. These studies have centred their attention on axis I (efficacy) of the Guidelines for Empirically Validated Treatments, although there are a few studies that also take into account axis II (effectiveness). The aim of the present work was to test…

  9. Health Status of Homeless and Marginally Housed Users of Mental Health Self-Help Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Steven P.; Gomory, Tomi; Silverman, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the health status of 310 homeless and marginally housed people to determine the usefulness of mental health self-help agencies (SHAs) in addressing their physical health needs. Findings indicated that frequencies of health problems among respondents were similar to those of other homeless or marginally housed groups and that the study…

  10. Examination of Predictors and Moderators for Self-Help Treatments of Binge-Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masheb, Robin M.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2008-01-01

    Predictors and moderators of outcomes were examined in 75 overweight patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments. Age variables, psychiatric and personality disorder comorbidity, and clinical characteristics were tested as predictors and moderators of treatment outcomes.…

  11. The Effectiveness of a Computerized Self-Help Stress Coping Program with Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James J.

    1987-01-01

    Examined whether computerized self-help stress coping program was effective in reducing stress among 30 adult male juvenile counselors. Compared to controls, subjects who participated in program showed decreases in personal strain and state anxiety and increases in personal resources. Concluded that program could provide relief for situational…

  12. 77 FR 71609 - Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) Grant Monitoring AGENCY: Office of...'' to drawdown SHOP Grant funds through LOCCS/VRS. ] DATES: Comments Due Date: January 2,...

  13. "Transform Your Child's Behaviour Now": Parent Education as Self-Help Culture and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widding, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    Parents in the Western world today are often said to feel unsure and inadequate and as a consequence there are a plethora of self-help products on the market as well as parent education programmes. This article explores the kinds of research questions that are raised by this state of affairs. The discussion is mainly based on existing studies of…

  14. Self-Help Tapes as an Adjunct to Hotline Counseling Services: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Carroll, Brion P.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzes usage of a campus counseling self-help tape program and discusses the potential for such services. Results indicated that, during the first two months of operation, sexuality represented the major concern. Males' and females' requests evidenced similar topic preferences. Tapes appear to provide an effective outreach program. (Author/JAC)

  15. Self-Help Books and Amount of Therapist Contact in Smoking Cessation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Russell E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Evaluated two self-help behavior therapy books for stopping smoking against a minimal treatment program. Results indicated under self-administered conditions, the minimal treatment program was as effective as the behavior therapy books. On the self-report measures, therapist contact was associated with improved treatment outcome for the behavior…

  16. The current status and future direction of self-help treatments for problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Raylu, Namrata; Oei, Tian P S; Loo, Jasmine

    2008-12-01

    The self-help treatment (SHT) studies for other psychological problems significantly outweigh those for problem gambling. Currently, very little is published about the application and efficacy of various forms of SHTs for problem gambling. Thus, this paper reviews the self-help literature (using the PsycINFO database--all years up to April 2008) to stimulate further research in this area for problem gambling. The findings show that SHTs in problem gambling are still in their infancy. Although the problem gambling literature has mainly reported on two forms of SHTs with problem gamblers (i.e. use of self-help manuals and audiotapes), the review discuss utilizing a wide range of SHTs with problem gamblers. These include written materials (e.g. self-help books and treatment manuals), audiotapes, videotapes, computer-based SHTs implemented on palmtop computers, desktop computers, via telephone (Interactive Voice Response systems--IVR) or via the Internet and virtual reality applications. These SHTs would suit those problem gamblers who are not accessing professional treatment due to shame, guilt, fear of stigma, privacy concerns or financial difficulties, as well as those living in rural areas or with less severe gambling problems. The review also suggest future protocols for conducting further research in this area with problem gamblers, highlighting a need for a cohesive theory to guide research. PMID:18760868

  17. Written and computer-based self-help treatments for depression.

    PubMed

    Williams, C; Whitfield, G

    2001-01-01

    Patients and health purchasers are demanding the provision of effective and accessible mental health treatments. Psychotherapeutic approaches are popular with patients, but access to specialist psychotherapy services is often limited. Other ways of offering treatment within the time and resources available to most practitioners need to be considered. One possible solution is the use of structured self-help materials that address common mental disorders such as depression. Self-help treatments are available in a variety of formats such as books, CD-ROMS, audio and videotapes. Evidence exists for their effectiveness; however, a relatively neglected area has been a discussion of the educational aspects of such materials. Self-help materials aim to improve patient knowledge and skills in self-management. They require very clear educational goals and a content and structure that is appropriate for those who use them. Such work will enhance the credibility, take-up, and effectiveness of self-help materials within clinical settings. PMID:11719913

  18. A feminist analysis of self-help bestsellers for improving relationships: a decade review.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, T S; Holm, K E; Starrels, M E

    2001-04-01

    Self-help literature is pervasive and influential in the United States. A critical analysis of self-help books would help therapists to determine their utility for the therapeutic process and assist them in making reading recommendations to clients. In this study, a content analysis was conducted of the top 11 relationship self-help books on the New York Times Bestseller List over a period of 10 years (1988-1998) to determine the degree to which these books support a feminist approach to therapy. This study yielded three major findings. First, the number of feminist books, the number of nonfeminist books, and those falling in the middle across four components of feminist family therapy are about equal. However, the second major finding was that the top-selling books are more likely to be nonfeminist than feminist. The third finding is that most best-selling self-help books appear to have become less compatible with a feminist approach to relationships over time. This analysis encourages therapists to think critically about these best-selling books; it will also allow therapists to consider this methodology as a model for critically analyzing other books that they recommend to clients or use in their own professional development. PMID:11314550

  19. A Feminist Analysis of Self-Help Bestsellers for Improving Relationships: A Decade Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Holm, Kristen E.; Starrels, Marjorie E.

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis was conducted of the top eleven relationship self help books on the New York Times Bestseller List over ten years to determine the degree to which they support a feminist approach to therapy. Results indicated the number of feminist and nonfeminist approach books is about equal and that bestsellers have become less feminist…

  20. An Evaluation of the Stepfamily Self-Help Literature for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Reviews and critiques 11 stepfamily self-help books for children and adolescents. Codes books on dimensions of appropriate audience, author background, issues, advice, and strengths. Rates general interest and quality of writing of books and assigns categories of recommendation. Discusses use of the books as an adjunct to therapy. (Author/NB)

  1. The Uses of Juvenile Fiction and Self-Help Books with Stepfamilies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H.

    1990-01-01

    Advocates use of bibliotherapy as an adjunct to counseling with stepchildren and remarried adults. Information to guide the selection and use of fiction and self-help books for children and adolescents is provided. Also mentioned are other audiences and uses for the adolescent fiction. (Author)

  2. Comparison of Self-Help Books for Coping with Loss: Expectations and Attributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogles, Benjamin M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of 4 self-help books given randomly to 64 participants who had recently experienced divorce or breakup. Books were either behaviorally oriented, based on stage theories, or focused on general life crises. All groups significantly improved in depressive, general psychiatric, and loss-specific symptoms from pretest to posttest…

  3. An Evaluation of the Remarriage and Stepfamily Self-Help Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marilyn; Nickleberry, Lynette

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to critique in-print, post-1990 copyrighted stepfamily self-help books in order to provide guidance to helping professionals who work with these complex families. Of the 63 books reviewed, trained coders were able to strongly recommend 13 books for being well organized, for relying on clinical or empirical sources of…

  4. The Benefits of Parenting Self-Help Groups for Rural Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wituk, Scott; Commer, Amy; Lindstrom, Julie; Meisen, Greg

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 118 rural, mostly female, Latino participants in Parents Helping Parents (PHP)--a Kansas network of parenting self-help groups--found high satisfaction with PHP. PHP provided support and information concerning child rearing and child development, improved family communication, and increased the use of alternative means of discipline.…

  5. Voices of coping in an Italian self-help virtual community of cyberporn dependents.

    PubMed

    Cavaglion, Gabriel

    2008-10-01

    Textual analysis of 2000 messages from 302 participants in an Italian self-help Internet community for cyberporn dependents (noallapornodipendenza) shows that through anonymous sharing, participants form a support community providing emotional involvement and care. Similarities with encounter group strategies for other types of addictions are discussed. PMID:18785822

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a self-help... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  7. Public Pedagogy from the Learner's Perspective: Women Reading Self-Help Relationship Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Brandi M.; McLean, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of public pedagogy has increasingly influenced the study of continuing education, drawing attention to ways in which adults access resources from popular culture and learn without the involvement of educational institutions. Reading relationship self-help books has become a prominent component of popular culture. There…

  8. Predictors of dropout from internet-based self-help cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wing-Fai; Chung, Ka-Fai; Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Ho, Lai-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Dropout from self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) potentially diminishes therapeutic effect and poses clinical concern. We analyzed the characteristics of subjects who did not complete a 6-week internet-based CBT-I program. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to identify potential variables and cutoff for predicting dropout among 207 participants with self-report insomnia 3 or more nights per week for at least 3 months randomly assigned to self-help CBT-I with telephone support (n = 103) and self-help CBT-I (n = 104). Seventy-two participants (34.4%) did not complete all 6 sessions, while 42 of the 72 (56.9%) dropped out prior to the fourth session. Significant predictors of non-completion are total sleep time (TST) ≥ 6.82 h, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score ≥ 9 and Insomnia Severity Index score < 13 at baseline in this ranking order. Only TST ≥ 5.92 h predicts early dropout. Longer TST and less severe insomnia predict dropout in this study of self-help CBT-I, in contrast to shorter TST as a predictor in 2 studies of face-to-face CBT-I, while greater severity of depression predicts dropout in both this study and a study of face-to-face CBT-I. Strategies for minimizing dropout from internet-based CBT-I are discussed. PMID:26226091

  9. Measurement of Attitudes of Rural Women towards Self-Help Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meena, M. S.; Jain, Dilip; Meena, H. R.

    2008-01-01

    Self-help groups (SHGs) have emerged as an effective mechanism of empowerment and development of women as well as being on efficient mode of promoting group action and technology dissemination. Initiatives were undertaken at the Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), Ludhiana to facilitate the formation of women's…

  10. Dealing with the Effects of Trauma: A Self-Help Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Self-Help Guide Page 1 Foreword It contains information, ideas, and strategies that people from all over the country have found to be helpful in relieving and preventing troubling feelings and symptoms. The information in this booklet can be used safely along ...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a self-help... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  12. Factors Predicting Attendance at Self-Help Groups after Substance Abuse Treatment: Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Keith; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Followed 201 treated substance abusers for 6 months and found that Blacks and women were more likely to attend self-help groups and that measures of social stability did not predict attendance. Found that persons who attended groups had more severe problems in several domains. (Author/NB)

  13. An evaluation of the efficacy of supervised cognitive behavioral self-help bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P J; Coker, S; Fleming, C

    1996-03-01

    Eighty two patients with bulimia nervosa were managed by providing them with supervision in the use of a highly structured cognitive behavioral self-help manual. Their progress was assessed in an open clinical trial. The 67 patients who completed the course of self-help experienced considerable benefit; the frequency of bulimic episodes and self-induced vomiting decreasing by 80% and 79%, respectively. Compared to those who benefited, those who had a poor outcome or dropped out of treatment were more than twice as likely to have had anorexia nervosa in the past and were somewhat more likely to have a personality disorder. Three-quarters of those who persisted with the programme of supervised self-help were followed up a year after commencing treatment. Clinical gains were well maintained: almost two thirds were abstinent with respect to both bulimic episodes and self-induced vomiting. It would seem appropriate that, as part of a stepped care approach to the management of bulimia nervosa, supervised cognitive behavioral self-help should routinely be the first line treatment. PMID:8861124

  14. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Guided Self-Help Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Frances L.; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Dickerson, John F.; Perrin, Nancy; DeBar, Lynn; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Adoption of effective treatments for recurrent binge-eating disorders depends on the balance of costs and benefits. Using data from a recent randomized controlled trial, we conducted an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of a cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help intervention (CBT-GSH) to treat recurrent binge eating…

  16. Guided self-help of bulimia nervosa in a specialist setting: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dalle Grave, R

    1997-09-01

    Seventeen patients meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa were treated in a specialist setting according to the "guided self-help" approach as outlined in the self-help handbook "Overcoming Binge Eating" by Fairburn. This self-help manual is essentially a condensed version of the cognitive-behavioural therapy for bulimia nervosa developed by the same author. Every patient took part in 8 bimonthly sessions each lasting 20 minutes. All subjects were evaluated both before and after the treatment through a semi-structured interview. Overall, 10 patients (58.8%) did well; 6 of these 10 patients (35.3%) stopped binge-eating and vomiting altogether. Although the conclusions arising from this pilot study have yet to be confirmed by a controlled study, the preliminary findings seem to suggest that "guided self-help" in a specialist setting could, indeed, be not only sufficient in some cases but may also be the most accessible approach in treating many patients affected by bulimia nervosa. PMID:14655843

  17. Parents' Training: Effects of the Self-Help Skills Programme with Down's Syndrome Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Maria Teresa; Menendez, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating the effectiveness of two types of early intervention programmes for babies with Down's syndrome (DS). Evaluation of self-help early intervention programmes was done with two types of training with the parents: in the first the parents learned the training programme from observing the clinician, and in the…

  18. Padres Maltratadores: Grupos de Autoayuda (Abusive Parents: Self-Help Groups).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intebi, Irene V.; Groisman, Adriana E.

    1991-01-01

    Causes of child abuse by parents are discussed. A therapy program in Buenos Aires (Argentina) for abusive parents is described. The program utilizes self-help groups as part of the therapeutic plan and has found them to be promising. Referral, types of interactions with the groups, and short-, medium-, and long-term objectives are discussed. (BRM)

  19. Self-Help Books for Parents of Adolescents, 1980-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Cecil; Vartanian, Lesa R.; DeFrates-Densch, Nancy; Van Loon, Preston C.; Locke, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes the contents of self-help books for parents of adolescents that were published from 1980 to 1993. Examines the scope of topics presented and the authors' views about parenting practices to determine the extent to which these parenting books reinforce or debunk cultural stereotypes about adolescents. (Contains 36 references.) (GCP)

  20. Music for Elementary Teachers; Self-Help Guide (MUS 370). Adams State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Cloyce

    This self-help guide for the music teacher is one of a series of eight Teacher Education Modules developed by Adams State College Teacher Corps Program. The guide itself consists of 11 modules, the first five of which focus on the mathematical and scientific aspects of music--pitch, tempo, furation, time, and key. These five modules are…

  1. Beyond the therapeutic: A Habermasian view of self-help groups' place in the public sphere

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sarah; Avis, Mark; Munn-Giddings, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Self-help groups in the United Kingdom continue to grow in number and address virtually every conceivable health condition, but they remain the subject of very little theoretical analysis. The literature to date has predominantly focused on their therapeutic effects on individual members. And yet they are widely presumed to fulfil a broader civic role and to encourage democratic citizenship. The article uses Habermas' model of the public sphere as an analytical tool with which to reconsider the literature on self-help groups in order to increase our knowledge of their civic functions. In doing this it also aims to illustrate the continuing relevance of Habermas' work to our understanding of issues in health and social care. We consider, within the context of current health policies and practices, the extent to which self-help groups with a range of different forms and functions operate according to the principles of communicative rationality that Habermas deemed key to democratic legitimacy. We conclude that self-help groups' civic role is more complex than is usually presumed and that various factors including groups' leadership, organisational structure and links with public agencies can affect their efficacy within the public sphere. PMID:23326207

  2. Telepsychology and Self-Help: The Treatment of Fear of Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Cristina; Guillen, Veronica; Banos, Rosa M.; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Gallego, Maria J.; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a self-help, Internet-based telepsychology program for the treatment of public speaking fears. The system is comprised of 3 parts: The "assessment protocol" gives the patient information about his or her problem (i.e., amount of interference it creates in his or her life, severity, degree of fear and avoidance). The system also…

  3. Evaluation of a self-help dietary intervention in a primary care setting.

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, S A; Farmer, E M; Feingold, L; Graves, K L; Sumner, S K; Baker, R M

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Dietary intervention to reduce fat consumption and increase fiber consumption has been recommended by the National Cancer Institute, but there is little evidence concerning the effectiveness of self-help materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate such self-help materials, introduced by a nurse in a primary care setting. METHODS. A randomized controlled trial involving 242 subjects was conducted in two primary care clinics in Chapel Hill, NC, in 1987. Changes in fat and fiber consumption in the intervention and control groups during the 3-month interval between interviews were compared using analysis of covariance. RESULTS. The estimated reduction in fat was 3.8g larger for the intervention group than for the control group, but the confidence interval included zero. For those individuals who had some responsibility for meal preparation there was a larger difference (-6.9g) in favor of the intervention group, although the difference using calorie-adjusted values was -3.8g with a 95% confidence interval (-7.1, -0.4). The differences for fiber change were smaller. CONCLUSIONS. We found significant small but consistent differential changes associated with a minimal self-help intervention, but we cannot rule out the possibility of some response bias. Nonetheless, this study demonstrates that the use of self-help materials for dietary change is feasible, and may be effective. PMID:1311152

  4. From Hospital to Community: A Self-Help Program to Promote the Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Bernard; And Others

    Vocational placement, social needs, and the lack of proper transportation for disabled persons are major problems to be solved if physically handicapped people are to function in community life. Mobilization for Maturity was a 3-year research and demonstration project which utilized a self-help approach to help disabled people to re-enter…

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a self-help... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit D to Subpart I of... - Self-Help Technical Assistance Grant Predevelopment Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 1944.410(d) of 7 CFR part 1944, subpart I, as necessary, to develop a complete program for a self-help... Agreement D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Technical Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. I, Exh. D Exhibit D to Subpart I of Part...

  7. Getting out of Depression: Teens' Self-Help Interventions to Relieve Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Barker, Ellen C.

    2006-01-01

    Most depressed adolescents do not access medical care for symptoms, yet many improve without professional intervention. While several self-help interventions have empirical support, teens' non-directed efforts to reduce symptoms are not documented. We reviewed 14 depressed adolescents' reports of attempts to reduce depressive symptoms. Results…

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health…

  9. Beyond the therapeutic: A Habermasian view of self-help groups' place in the public sphere.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarah; Avis, Mark; Munn-Giddings, Carol

    2013-02-01

    Self-help groups in the United Kingdom continue to grow in number and address virtually every conceivable health condition, but they remain the subject of very little theoretical analysis. The literature to date has predominantly focused on their therapeutic effects on individual members. And yet they are widely presumed to fulfil a broader civic role and to encourage democratic citizenship. The article uses Habermas' model of the public sphere as an analytical tool with which to reconsider the literature on self-help groups in order to increase our knowledge of their civic functions. In doing this it also aims to illustrate the continuing relevance of Habermas' work to our understanding of issues in health and social care. We consider, within the context of current health policies and practices, the extent to which self-help groups with a range of different forms and functions operate according to the principles of communicative rationality that Habermas deemed key to democratic legitimacy. We conclude that self-help groups' civic role is more complex than is usually presumed and that various factors including groups' leadership, organisational structure and links with public agencies can affect their efficacy within the public sphere. PMID:23326207

  10. Using dBase III for Self-Help Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopson, Jean B.; Yeung, Jimmy T.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the design and operation of a system that resulted from a project undertaken by a small specialized library to provide self-help for patrons seeking reference assistance. The areas of information available on the system are described, including standard reference titles, library holdings and services, reserve readings, and placement…

  11. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  12. Ohoyo Training Manual. Leadership: Self Help American Indian-Alaska Native Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verble, Sedelta D.; Walton, M. Frances

    The training manual provides self-help in six areas of leadership development for American Indian and Alaska Native women. Following an introduction describing how to use the manual are six chapters focusing on the theories and development of leadership skills, the vulnerability of Indian women to poverty, nontraditional careers for Indian women,…

  13. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  14. Can mindfulness and acceptance be learnt by self-help?: a systematic review and meta-analysis of mindfulness and acceptance-based self-help interventions.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Kate; Strauss, Clara; Forder, Lewis; Jones, Fergal

    2014-03-01

    There is growing evidence that mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have positive consequences for psychological and physical health. The most well-established of these interventions typically involve relatively large resource commitments, in terms of both the provider and participant. A number of recent studies have begun to explore whether the benefits of such interventions can be generalised to less intensive methods. Methods include pure and guided self-help utilising resources such as books and workbooks, computer programmes and applications and audio-visual materials. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that have evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of low-intensity interventions including mindfulness and acceptance-based components. Fifteen RCTs (7 ACT-based, 4 mindfulness-based and 4 multi-component interventions including elements of mindfulness and/or acceptance) were identified and reviewed. Interventions that included mindfulness and/or acceptance-based components produced significant benefits in comparison to control conditions on measures of mindfulness/acceptance, depression and anxiety with small to medium effect sizes. Engagement with the self-help interventions varied but on average two-thirds of participants completed post-intervention measures. Emerging research into low-intensity mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions is hopeful. Recommendations for research and practice are presented. PMID:24487343

  15. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). Methods and Materials The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Results Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. Discussion The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. Conclusions The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC. PMID:23813566

  16. Impaired opsonization by serum from patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wyke, R J; Rajkovic, I A; Williams, R

    1983-01-01

    Serum opsonization of two organisms, E. coli and yeasts (S. cerivisiae), was examined in 68 patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). Impaired opsonization for yeasts was found in seven (29%) of 24 patients with chronic active hepatitis, six (27%) of 22 with alcoholic cirrhosis and five (23%) of 22 with primary biliary cirrhosis. Opsonization for E. coli was normal in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but impaired in seven (29%) patients with chronic active hepatitis and three (14%) of those with alcoholic cirrhosis. The defect of opsonization in chronic active hepatitis was found mainly in patients with histological evidence of active disease. A deficiency, rather than antagonism or inhibition, of normal opsonization factors was responsible, but could not be related to reduced levels of serum complement factors of either the classical or the alternative pathway present in 45% of the patients with chronic active hepatitis, 71% with alcoholic cirrhosis and 18% of those with primary biliary cirrhosis. Serum from two of 11 patients with impaired opsonization antagonised the function of normal polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and polymorphonuclear leucocytes from six of seven patients had slightly reduced phagocytosis/killing of E. coli opsonized in normal serum. Defects of serum opsonization, complement activity and polymorphonuclear leucocyte function may be causes of the increased susceptibility to bacterial infection in patients with CLD. PMID:6339126

  17. How we treat chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a common and potentially life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD requiring systemic treatment is ∼30% to 40% by National Institutes of Health criteria. The risk of chronic GVHD is higher and the duration of treatment is longer after HCT with mobilized blood cells than with marrow cells. Clinical manifestations can impair activities of daily living and often linger for years. Hematology and oncology specialists who refer patients to centers for HCT are often subsequently involved in the management of chronic GVHD when patients return to their care after HCT. Treatment of these patients can be optimized under shared care arrangements that enable referring physicians to manage long-term administration of immunosuppressive medications and supportive care with guidance from transplant center experts. Keys to successful collaborative management include early recognition in making the diagnosis of chronic GVHD, comprehensive evaluation at the onset and periodically during the course of the disease, prompt institution of systemic and topical treatment, appropriate monitoring of the response, calibration of treatment intensity over time in order to avoid overtreatment or undertreatment, and the use of supportive care to prevent complications and disability. PMID:25398933

  18. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  19. Bisphenol A in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    González-Parra, Emilio; Herrero, Jose Antonio; Elewa, Usama; Arduán, Alberto Ortiz; Egido, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Phenols are uremic toxins of intestinal origin formed by bacteria during protein metabolism. Of these molecules, p-cresol is the most studied and has been associated with renal function impairment and vascular damage. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a molecule with structural similarity with phenols found in plastic food and beverage containers as well as in some dialyzers. BPA is considered an environmental toxicant based on animal and cell culture studies. Japanese authorities recently banned BPA use in baby bottles based on observational association studies in newborns. BPA is excreted in urine and uremic patients present higher serum levels, but there is insufficient evidence to set cut-off levels or to link BPA to any harmful effect in CKD. However, the renal elimination and potential exposure during dialysis warrant the monitoring of BPA exposure and the design of observational studies in which the potential health risks of BPA for end-stage renal disease patients are evaluated. PMID:23997953

  20. Genetic Factors Are Not the Major Causes of Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The risk of acquiring a chronic disease is influenced by a person’s genetics (G) and exposures received during life (the ‘exposome’, E) plus their interactions (G×E). Yet, investigators use genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to characterize G while relying on self-reported information to classify E. If E and G×E dominate disease risks, this imbalance obscures important causal factors. To estimate proportions of disease risk attributable to G (plus shared exposures), published data from Western European monozygotic (MZ) twins were used to estimate population attributable fractions (PAFs) for 28 chronic diseases. Genetic PAFs ranged from 3.4% for leukemia to 48.6% for asthma with a median value of 18.5%. Cancers had the lowest PAFs (median = 8.26%) while neurological (median = 26.1%) and lung (median = 33.6%) diseases had the highest PAFs. These PAFs were then linked with Western European mortality statistics to estimate deaths attributable to G for heart disease and nine cancer types. Of 1.53 million Western European deaths in 2000, 0.25 million (16.4%) could be attributed to genetics plus shared exposures. Given the modest influences of G-related factors on the risks of chronic diseases in MZ twins, the disparity in coverage of G and E in etiological research is problematic. To discover causes of disease, GWAS should be complemented with exposome-wide association studies (EWAS) that profile chemicals in biospecimens from incident disease cases and matched controls. PMID:27105432