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Sample records for chronic gastrointestinal disorders

  1. Gastrointestinal Disorders Associated with Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) and Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD).

    PubMed

    Uzzan, Mathieu; Ko, Huaibin M; Mehandru, Saurabh; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immune deficiency (CVID) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) are two of the well-characterized primary immune deficiencies with distinct pathologic defects. While CVID is predominantly a disorder of the adaptive immune system, in CGD, innate immunity is impaired. In both syndromes, the clinical manifestations include an increased susceptibility to infections and a number of non-infectious, inflammatory conditions including systemic autoimmunity, as well as organ-specific pathology. Among the organ-associated disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations are one of the most intractable. As such, non-infectious inflammatory disorders of the GI tract are clinically challenging as they have protean manifestations, often resembling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or celiac disease, are notoriously difficult to treat, and hence are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, assessing the pathogenesis and defining appropriate therapeutic approaches for GI disease in patients with CVID and CGD is imperative. PMID:26951230

  2. Gastrointestinal Disorders Associated with Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) and Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD)

    PubMed Central

    Uzzan, Mathieu; Ko, Huaibin M.; Mehandru, Saurabh; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) and Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) are two of the well-characterized primary immune defects with distinct pathologic defects. While CVID is predominantly a disorder of the adaptive immune system, in CGD, innate immunity is impaired. In both syndromes, the clinical manifestations include an increased susceptibility to infections and a number of non-infectious, inflammatory conditions including systemic autoimmunity, as well as organ-specific pathology. Among the organ-associated disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations are one of the most intractable. As such, non-infectious inflammatory disorders of the GI tract are clinically challenging as they have protean manifestations, often resembling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or celiac disease, are notoriously difficult to treat, and hence are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, assessing the pathogenesis, and defining appropriate therapeutic approaches for GI disease in patients with CVID and CGD is imperative. PMID:26951230

  3. Prevalence of Chronic Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children with Autism and Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Cynthia A.; Manning-Courtney, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of 137 children (ages 24-96 months) classified as having autism, 24% had a history of at least one chronic gastrointestinal symptom. The most common symptom was diarrhea, which occurred in 17%. There was no association between chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of developmental regression. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  4. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ambartsumyan, Lusine

    2014-01-01

    The most common and challenging gastrointestinal motility disorders in children include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal achalasia, gastroparesis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and constipation. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting children and is diagnosed clinically and treated primarily with acid secretion blockade. Esophageal achalasia, a less common disorder in the pediatric patient population, is characterized by dysphagia and treated with pneumatic balloon dilation and/or esophagomyotomy. Gastroparesis and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction are poorly characterized in children and are associated with significant morbidity. Constipation is among the most common complaints in children and is associated with significant morbidity as well as poor quality of life. Data on epidemiology and outcomes, clinical trials, and evaluation of new diagnostic techniques are needed to better diagnose and treat gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. We present a review of the conditions and challenges related to these common gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. PMID:24799835

  5. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- digestive.niddk.nih.gov

  6. PancreApp: An Innovative Approach to Computational Individualization of Nutritional Therapy in Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stawiski, Konrad; Strzałka, Alicja; Puła, Anna; Bijakowski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Medical nutrition therapy has a pivotal role in the management of chronic gastrointestinal disorders, like chronic pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel diseases (Leśniowski-Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) or irritable bowel syndrome. The aim of this study is to develop, deploy and evaluate an interactive application for Windows and Android operating systems, which could serve as a digital diet diary and as an analysis and a prediction tool both for the patient and the doctor. The software is gathering details about patients' diet and associated fettle in order to estimate fettle change after future meals, specifically for an individual patient. In this paper we have described the process of idea development and application design, feasibility assessment using a phone survey, a preliminary evaluation on 6 healthy individuals and early results of a clinical trial, which is still an ongoing study. Results suggest that applied approximative approach (Shepard's method of 6-dimensional metric interpolation) has a potential to predict the fettle accurately; as shown in leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). PMID:26262064

  7. [Post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders: from the acute episode to chronicity].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Balboa, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) form a major part of gastroenterology practice. Several studies have reported the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) after acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Non-gastrointestinal (GI) infections may increase the risk of developing IBS. There are also data showing that a GI infection may trigger functional dyspepsia (PI-FD). The possible development of PI-IBS or PI-FD depends on factors related to both the infection and the host. Microinflammation has been found in patients with post-infectious FGID. Studies performed in animal models show that infection and acute inflammation permanently change gastrointestinal motility and sensitivity. The role of AGE in the development of FGID is important not only because this entity provides an excellent natural model for pathogenic study but also because it provides an opportunity for preventive action. PMID:21641686

  8. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  9. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  10. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  11. [Zinc and gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Higashimura, Yasuki; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, affects immune responses, skin metabolism, hormone composition, and some sensory function, so that the deficiency presents various symptoms such as immunodeficiency and taste obstacle. Further, the zinc deficiency also considers as a risk of various diseases. Recent reports demonstrated that -20% of the Japanese population was marginally zinc deficiency, and over 25% of the global population is at high risk of zinc deficiency. In gastrointestinal disorders, zinc plays an important role in the healing of mucosal and epithelial damage. In fact, polaprezinc, a chelate compound of zinc and L-carnosine, has been used for the treatment of gastric ulcer and gastritis. We describe here the therapeutic effect of zinc on gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27455800

  12. The interrelationship of thyroid hormones with vitamin A and zinc nutritional status in patients with chronic hepatic and gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Russell, R M; Reed, A; Carney, E A; Hershman, J M

    1981-08-01

    To define the role of vitamin A, retinol binding protein, and zinc deficiency in producing the thyroid hormone abnormalities found in chronic illness, we studied 62 clinically stable patients with hepatic and gastrointestinal disorders. Serum triiodothyronine (T3) and free T3 index (FT3I) were depressed compared to controls (p less than 0.05) in the patients. Retinol binding protein and prealbumin levels correlated with both T3 and FT3I (p less than 0.01), whereas vitamin A levels did not. Vitamin A therapy in patients with documented vitamin A deficiency produced an increase in T3, thyroxine (T4), FT3I, FT4I, and free T3 by dialysis, with a concomitant increase in retinol binding protein and no alteration in prealbumin concentrations. Zinc-deficient patients had significantly depressed T3 and FT3I (p less than 0.001) and increased prolactin levels (p less than 0.01). Zinc supplementation failed to return any of these parameters to normal. Vitamin A therapy in normals produced a transient decrease in T3 and T4 after 1 wk of therapy, but after a further 2 wk, thyroid function returned to normal. Our data suggest a causal relationship between the pathogenesis of deranged vitamin A-retinol binding protein metabolism and the low T3 syndrome either by interfering with T4 entry into tissues or by directly affecting the enzymatic conversion of T4 to T3. PMID:7196691

  13. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  14. [Motility and functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at the 2014 Digestive Diseases Week conference that are of greatest interest to us. New data have been provided on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders, with recent prevalence data for irritable bowel syndrome and fecal incontinence. We know more about the pathophysiological mechanisms of the various functional disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, which has had the largest number of studies. Thus, we have gained new data on microinflammation, genetics, microbiota, psychological aspects, etc. Symptoms such as abdominal distension have gained interest in the scientific community, both in terms of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and those with constipation. From the diagnostic point of view, the search continues for a biomarker for functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially for irritable bowel syndrome. In the therapeutic area, the importance of diet for these patients (FODMAP, fructans, etc.) is once again confirmed, and data is provided that backs the efficacy of already marketed drugs such as linaclotide, which rule out the use of other drugs such as mesalazine for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. This year, new forms of drug administration have been presented, including metoclopramide nasal sprays and granisetron transdermal patches for patients with gastroparesis. Lastly, a curiosity that caught our attention was the use of a vibrating capsule to stimulate gastrointestinal transit in patients with constipation. PMID:25294261

  15. Psychosocial aspects of the functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Drossman, D; Creed, F; Olden, K; Svedlund, J; Toner, B; Whitehead, W

    1999-01-01

    The functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most frequent conditions seen in gastroenterology practice and comprise a major portion of primary care. Psychosocial factors are important in these disorders with regard to: (1) their effects on gut physiology; (2) their modulation of the symptom experience; (3) their influence on illness behavior; (4) their impact on outcome; and (5) the choice of the therapeutic approach. This paper provides a review and consensus of the existing literature by gastroenterologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, physiologists, and health services investigators. Evidence is provided to support the biopsychosocial model as a basis for understanding and treating these disorders, and epidemiological and clinical information on the relations of psychosocial factors to gut physiology, symptom presentation, health behavior, and outcome is offered. Features of motility, personality, abuse history, health concerns, and treatment-seeking differ between patients with FGID and healthy controls, but they are not specific to FGID. They occur in other patients with chronic medical conditions and/or psychiatric disorders. Review of treatment trials indicates clear support for psychotherapeutic treatments, especially in the long term, as well as some evidence for the benefit of antidepressants in FGID, even in the absence of improvements in mood.


Keywords: functional gastrointestinal disorders; psychologic assessment; psychiatric diagnosis; psychosocial factors; health-related quality of life; psychological treatment; psychopharmacological treatment; Rome II PMID:10457041

  16. Chronic gastrointestinal haemorrhage controlled by antifibrinolytic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used chiefly for control of acute haemorrhage. Their applicability to chronic bleeding from inflammatory lesions of the gastrointestinal tract is illustrated by two case histories. PMID:2813242

  17. Functional gastrointestinal disorders: psychological, social, and somatic features

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E; Piesse, C; Palmer, K; Badcock, C; Tennant, C; Kellow, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Psychological, social, and extraintestinal (somatic) disturbances are prominent features of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID); little attention, however, has been given to differences in the nature of these disturbances in the various FGID subgroups. 
Aims—(1) To determine whether psychological, social, and extraintestinal factors are associated with specific FGID, and/or with the overall severity and extent of FGID disturbance (the number of coexistent FGID subgroups present in any individual); and (2) to determine whether chronic social stressors link gastrointestinal, extraintestinal, and emotional symptomatologies in FGID. 
Patients—One hundred and eighty eight outpatients, fulfilling standard criteria for one or more functional gastroduodenal or functional bowel disorders. 
Methods—Utilising detailed and objective interview and questionnaire methods, detailed gastrointestinal, extraintestinal, psychological, and social data were collected. 
Results—Chronic stressors and extraintestinal and emotional symptomatologies were prominent features of functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) alone. These particular features were, however, highly specific for particular FD and/or IBS subgroups. The chronic threat component of social stressors predicted the nature and extent of multisystem (gastrointestinal, extraintestinal, and emotional) symptomatology. 
Conclusions—Notable differences between the various FGID subgroups support the symptom based classification of FGID. Chronic stressor provoked psychological and extraintestinal disturbance is most specific for the FD-IBS group of syndromes. 

 Keywords: functional gastrointestinal disorders; psychosocial; extraintestinal symptoms; chronic stress PMID:9577351

  18. Mast cells in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are constitutively found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The three major physiological functions of GI mast cells comprise of - as far as we know - regulation of GI functions, namely epithelial and endothelial functions, crosstalk with the enteric nervous system, and contribution to the host defense against bacterial, viral and parasitic agents. A number of chronic GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and food allergies, are thought to be associated with mast cell hyperplasia and humoral activity. Clinical conditions characterized by a decrease in mast cell functionality are not known so far. In the present review, we summarize current evidence which show that human mast cells play a central role at the GI barrier, both in health and disease. PMID:26852959

  19. [Functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2012-09-01

    We summarize and discuss the studies presented at the congress of the American Association of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) that, in our opinion, are of greatest interest. Both clinically and physiopathologically, functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are highly complex. A single cause is unlikely to explain symptoms as heterogeneous as those of functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore, it is easier (and more useful) to try to understand functional GI disorders using a bio-psycho-social model. Moreover, data supporting the combined importance of genetic, organic and psychological factors in the onset and persistence of functional GI disorders are increasingly convincing. This year, new data have been provided on pharmacogenetics in gastroparesis, on microinflammation or alterations in the modulation of somatic and visceral sensitivity in functional dyspepsia, and on the impact of psychological factors in IBS. From the therapeutic point of view, further information has been provided on the role of probiotics, the antinociceptive effect of linaclotide (demonstrated in several studies presented this year), and on the high efficacy of hypnotherapy in patients with IBS. Finally, data on the clinical management of patients with constipation due to pelvic floor dyssynergia and on the safety and efficacy of prucalopride in patients with severe constipation were also of interest. PMID:23018003

  20. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26520191

  1. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    Functional gastrointestinal (GI) and motility disorders generate a large volume of consultations in gastroenterology and primary care offices. The present article summarizes the most interesting studies presented in the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association 2008. For all functional GI disorders, studies were presented that evaluated the applicability of diagnostic criteria in clinical practice and new data were presented on physiopathology (for example, mediation by neuromodulators such as serotonin, microinflammation, alterations in intestinal microbiota, and psychological factors). More specifically, the therapeutic results of new prokinetic agents in functional dyspepsia, such as acotiamide, were presented. This agent has been demonstrated to have good efficacy in symptom control, especially in patients with postprandial distress syndrome. In irritable bowel syndrome, data were presented on several drugs that act through diverse mechanisms of action and have been shown to be more effective than placebo in symptom control. These drugs include antiinflammatory agents such as mesalazine, antibiotics such as rifaximin, probiotics with distinct bacterial strains, and prokinetic agents such as lubiprostone. Highly promising results have been obtained in the treatment of constipation with prokinetics such as prucalopride and with novel laxatives such as linaclotide, as well as with techniques that continue to be shown to be effective such as anorectal biofeedback, which is also highly useful in patients with fecal incontinence. Another disorder that is less frequent but highly difficult to treat is gastroparesis. For several years, treatment in the most severe cases has consisted of implantation of a gastric pacemaker. Although the results are far from perfect, new data were presented that allow better patient selection to achieve greater symptom control. The list of new advances, both in knowledge of the physiopathology of these disorders and

  2. Eosinophilic Disorders of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Samiullah; Bhurgri, Hadi; Sohail, Umair

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders represent a spectrum of disorders demonstrating gastrointestinal eosinophilia without any known cause for eosinophilia. Pathogenesis is not clearly established, but immune responses to dietary antigens are implicated. These disorders affect children and adults and are seen in association with allergic disorders. Eosinophilic esophagitis is diagnosed in the setting of mucosal eosinophilia on endoscopic biopsy and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is also diagnosed with endoscopic biopsies. Eosinophilic colitis commonly presents with lower gastrointestinal symptoms and is a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:27545738

  3. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  4. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start at age 5 or 6 and get worse until age 12. They often improve during adulthood.

  5. [Functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2011-10-01

    As in previous years, a huge number of studies were presented at the Congress of the American Gastroenterology Association (Digestive Diseases Week [DDW]), some of which were better than others. The present article attempts to extract and summarize the most interesting findings reported. In general terms, certain technological advances have been consolidated, with full incorporation into clinical practice, such as impedancemetry and high-resolution manometry. New physiopathological data are coming to light that increasingly indicate the inextricable link between organic and psychological factors (the biopsychosocial model) in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Despite the high hopes that the Rome III criteria would improve the diagnosis of FGID and especially that of functional dyspepsia, their practical application has been fairly discouraging. Moreover, at least two studies have demonstrated that these criteria cannot be used to differentiate subtypes of functional dyspepsia and that there is wide overlap with gastroesophageal reflux disease. New data were presented on the role of genetic, microinflammatory and psychological factors in the etiopathogenesis of the two main FGID: functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The results on the safety and efficacy of acotiamide in functional dyspepsia and of linaclotide and prucalopride in idiopathic and IBS-associated constipation were also presented. Several studies, and even meta-analyses, have demonstrated the utility of biofeedback in the treatment of constipation. Even so, the efficacy of this therapy has been questioned due to certain methodological deficiencies in some studies. In DDW 2011, studies confirming the utility of biofeedback, whether hospital- or home-based were presented, in dyssynergy constipation. The present article also mentions certain features of special interest in the diagnosis and treatment of rumination syndrome, thoracic pain of possible esophageal origin and

  6. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis: a case of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Fonnesu, C; Giovinale, M; Verrecchia, E; De Socio, G; Cerquaglia, C; Curigliano, V; Soriano, A; Obici, L; Grieco, A; Lauriola, L; Gasbarrini, G; Manna, R

    2009-03-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease caused by extracellular deposits of insoluble fibrillar proteins in various organs and tissues. There are different forms of amyloidosis distinguished by the type of protein fibrils, by the sites of deposition and by associated conditions. Gastrointestinal involvement is common both in primary and secondary amyloidosis, while isolated gastrointestinal amyloidosis is rare. We describe a case of AL amyloidosis with a gastrointestinal involvement and restrictive cardiomiopathy. A 64 year old woman came to our attention with a history of chronic diarrhoea and weight loss, associated with dysphagia, dry mouth, xerophtalmia, chronic gastritis and depression. Clinical diagnosis has been difficult because of aspecificity of symptoms that mimed other more common diseases, like gastro-paresis, epigastric discomfort, gastric or duodenal ulcers, perforation, malabsorption, intestinal pseudo-obstruction. There is an important risk of misunderstanding and diagnostic delay. Indeed in this patient a diagnosis of irritable colon syndrome was erroneously established two years before admission in our hospital. Therefore gastrointestinal amyloidosis should be considered among differential diagnoses of chronic diarrhoea and weight loss when other more common diseases have been excluded. PMID:19530511

  7. Chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyungil; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Woo, Chang Gok; Hong, Seung-Mo; Chang, Kiju; So, Hoonsub; Kwak, Minseob; Kim, Wan Soo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    As mast cells have been highlighted in the pathogenesis of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, a new term "mastocytic enterocolitis" was suggested by Jakate and colleagues to describe an increase in mucosal mast cells in patients with chronic intractable diarrhea and favorable response to treatment with antihistamines. Although it is not an established disease entity, two cases have been reported in the English medical literature. Here, for the first time in Asia, we report another case of chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis. The patient was a 70-year-old male with chronic intractable diarrhea for 3 months; the cause of the diarrhea remained obscure even after exhaustive evaluation. However, biopsy specimens from the jejunum were found to have increased mast cell infiltration, and the patient was successfully treated with antihistamines. PMID:27433151

  8. Chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyungil; Park, Sang Hyoung; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Woo, Chang Gok; Hong, Seung-Mo; Chang, Kiju; So, Hoonsub; Kwak, Minseob; Kim, Wan Soo; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun

    2016-07-01

    As mast cells have been highlighted in the pathogenesis of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, a new term "mastocytic enterocolitis" was suggested by Jakate and colleagues to describe an increase in mucosal mast cells in patients with chronic intractable diarrhea and favorable response to treatment with antihistamines. Although it is not an established disease entity, two cases have been reported in the English medical literature. Here, for the first time in Asia, we report another case of chronic intractable diarrhea caused by gastrointestinal mastocytosis. The patient was a 70-year-old male with chronic intractable diarrhea for 3 months; the cause of the diarrhea remained obscure even after exhaustive evaluation. However, biopsy specimens from the jejunum were found to have increased mast cell infiltration, and the patient was successfully treated with antihistamines. PMID:27433151

  9. Ghrelin as a target for gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Kriegsman, Michael; Nelson, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The therapeutic potential of ghrelin and synthetic ghrelin receptor (GRLN-R) agonists for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders is based on their ability to stimulate coordinated patterns of propulsive GI motility. This review focuses on the latest findings that support the therapeutic potential of GRLN-R agonists for the treatment of GI motility disorders. The review highlights the preclinical and clinical prokinetic effects of ghrelin and a series of novel ghrelin mimetics to exert prokinetic effects on the GI tract. We build upon a series of excellent reviews to critically discuss the evidence that supports the potential of GRLN-R agonists to normalize GI motility in patients with GI hypomotility disorders such as gastroparesis, post-operative ileus (POI), idiopathic chronic constipation and functional bowel disorders. PMID:21453735

  10. Gastrointestinal neuromuscular pathology in chronic constipation

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Charles H.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Some patients with chronic constipation may undergo colectomy yielding tissue appropriate to diagnosis of underlying neuromuscular pathology. The analysis of such tissue has, over the past 40 years, fuelled research that has explored the presence of neuropathy, myopathy and more recently changes in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). In this chapter, the data from these studies have been critically reviewed in the context of the significant methodological and interpretative issues that beset the field of gastrointestinal neuromuscular pathology. On this basis, reductions in ICC appear to a consistent finding but one whose role as a primary cause of slow transit constipation requires further evaluation. Findings indicative of significant neuropathy or myopathy are variable and in many studies subject to considerable methodological bias. Methods with practical diagnostic utility in the individual patient have rarely been employed and require further validation in respect of normative data. PMID:21382578

  11. Quality of life measurement in gastrointestinal and liver disorders

    PubMed Central

    BORGAONKAR, M; IRVINE, E

    2000-01-01

    Modern medicine has had a considerable impact on mortality rates for serious illness. Many chronic diseases which have previously been associated with an increased mortality now have survival rates approaching those of the background population. However, chronic diseases such as cancer, chronic pain syndromes, and chronic inflammatory conditions impose a considerable burden on families, the health care system, and society. Health related quality of life (HRQOL) is a concept that has developed from the need to estimate the impact of such chronic diseases. HRQOL measurement is a conceptual framework which attempts to predict daily function and well being based on subjective attitudes and experiences of physical, social, and emotional health. It has been evaluated predominantly from the patient's viewpoint as proxy respondents appear to underestimate the full effect of chronic illness on functional status. Measuring HRQOL in clinical research is most frequently undertaken using multi-item questionnaires to estimate daily function. Factors which affect HRQOL can be broadly classed as disease related and disease independent. The use of different assessment techniques permits comparisons between and within disorders. Generic and disease specific instruments used together enhance the ability to direct treatment for individuals and patient populations. Psychometrically sound questionnaires must be used. However, the type of instrument and research methods adopted depend on the question of interest. We have attempted to catalogue and critically assess the disease specific instruments used in the assessment of chronic gastrointestinal disease.

 PMID:10940286

  12. Approaches to gastrointestinal cytoprotection: from isolated cells, via animal experiments to healthy human subjects and patients with different gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mózsik, Gyula; Szabó, Imre L; Czimmer, József

    2011-01-01

    Our clinical observations proved that the the duodenal ulcer in patients healed without any inhibition of gastric acid secretion (1965), and the healing rates of atropine vs cimetidine vs Carbenoxolone were equal and superior to that of placebo in randomized, prospective and multiclinical study of DU patients (1978). The phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection was defined by André Robert in rats (1979). The essential point of this phenomenon is that the prostaglandins prevent the chemical-induced gastric mucosal damage without affecting gastric acid secretion, this being originally suggested as a reaction specific to prostaglandins. Since then gastrointestinal cytoprotection has been shown with various agents (anticholinergic agents, H(2)RA, growth factors, body protecting compound, BPC) and retinoids in animals; the latter differing from the actions of vitamin A. In examining the various components of gastrointestinal cytoprotection , different studies have performed in isolated cells, stable cell lines, animal experiments, healthy human subjects, in patients chronic gastric and duodenal ulcers, and with different gastrointestinal disorders. Our attention has focused on the effects of cytoprotective agents on cellular viability, mitochondrial and DNA damage, oxygen free radicals, natural antioxidant systems, mucosal biochemistry, vascular events, gastrointestinal mucosal protection as well as in their prevention of different human diseases. This paper gives an overview on the different approaches for the exploring gastrointestinal cytoprotection (at the level of isolated cells, animal experiments, healthy human beings and patients with different gastrointestinal disorders). It has been indicated that the gastric cytoprotection exists in animals, human healthy subjects, patients with different gastrointestinal disorders. The our human observation in patients with duodenal ulcer healed without any changes of gastric acid secretion, there were no significant

  13. Gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuhiro; Fukudo, Shin

    2015-10-01

    The two most clinically serious eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. A drive for thinness and fear of fatness lead patients with anorexia nervosa either to restrict their food intake or binge-eat then purge (through self-induced vomiting and/or laxative abuse) to reduce their body weight to much less than the normal range. A drive for thinness leads patients with bulimia nervosa to binge-eat then purge but fail to reduce their body weight. Patients with eating disorders present with various gastrointestinal disturbances such as postprandial fullness, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, gastric distension, and early satiety, with altered esophageal motility sometimes seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. Other common conditions noted in patients with eating disorders are postprandial distress syndrome, superior mesenteric artery syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and functional constipation. Binge eating may cause acute gastric dilatation and gastric perforation, while self-induced vomiting can lead to dental caries, salivary gland enlargement, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and electrolyte imbalance. Laxative abuse can cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Vomiting and/or laxative abuse can cause hypokalemia, which carries a risk of fatal arrhythmia. Careful assessment and intensive treatment of patients with eating disorders is needed because gastrointestinal symptoms/disorders can progress to a critical condition. PMID:26499370

  14. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  15. Efficacy and safety of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical trials and experimental studies strongly suggest a place for Saccharomyces boulardii as a biotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases. S. boulardii mediates responses resembling the protective effects of the normal healthy gut flora. The multiple mechanisms of action of S. boulardii and its properties may explain its efficacy and beneficial effects in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases that have been confirmed by clinical trials. Caution should be taken in patients with risk factors for adverse events. This review discusses the evidence for efficacy and safety of S. boulardii as a probiotic for the prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders in humans. PMID:22423260

  16. Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Adult Clients with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli-Carminati, G.; Chauvet, I.; Deriaz, N.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In clients with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), some authors have noticed the presence of gastrointestinal disorders and behavioural disorders. An augmented prevalence of different histological anomalies has also been reported. The aim of our study is to highlight the prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders in this adult with…

  17. Dietary proteins and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Erica; Crowe, Sheila E

    2013-05-01

    Food intolerance is a common complaint amongst patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders (FGIDs), including those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, as well as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although there has been a longstanding interest in the possible role of food allergy in IBS, there are limited data supporting the association. However, the prevalence of food allergy is sufficiently high that patients with FGID may also have food allergies or hypersensitivities. Food intolerances or sensitivities are reactions to foods, which are not due to immunological mechanisms. Lactose intolerance is common in the general population and can mimic symptoms of FGID or coexist with FGID. As discussed in other articles in this series, other carbohydrate intolerances may be responsible for symptom generation in patients with IBS and perhaps other FGIDs. There is a great interest in the role of a major dietary protein, gluten, in the production of symptoms that are very similar to those of patients with celiac disease without the enteropathy that characterizes celiac disease. Emerging research into a syndrome known as nonceliac gluten sensitivity suggests a heterogeneous condition with some features of celiac disease but often categorized as FGIDs, including IBS. This article summarizes the role of dietary proteins in the symptoms and pathophysiology of FGIDs. PMID:23567359

  18. Functional Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Allison M.; Schilpzand, Elizabeth; Bell, Clare; Walker, Lynn S.; Baber, Kari

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the incidence and correlates of functional gastrointestinal symptoms in children with anxiety disorders. Participants were 6-13 year old children diagnosed with one or more anxiety disorders (n = 54) and non-clinical control children (n = 51). Telephone diagnostic interviews were performed with parents to determine the presence…

  19. Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Children with neurodevelopmental disabilities such as cerebral palsy (CP), spina bifida, or inborn errors of metabolism frequently have associated gastrointestinal problems. These include oral motor dysfunction leading to feeding difficulties, risk of aspiration, prolonged feeding times, and malnutrition with its attendant physical compromise.…

  20. Managing Chronic Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Forde, Grace; Duarte, Robert A; Rosen, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Headaches are a very common disorder, more common than asthma and diabetes combined. Migraine is the most common headache disorder, but it remains underdiagnosed and therefore undertreated. The treatment of migraines is divided into acute and prophylaxis. Patients who are experiencing 8 or more headaches a month or those who experience disability with their headaches as determined by the Migraine Disability Assistance Score or MIDAS should be placed on prophylaxis. PMID:26614723

  1. Allergic gastrointestinal motility disorders in infancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2008-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, constipation and colic are among the most common disorders in infancy and early childhood. In at least a subset of infants with these functional disorders, improvement after dietary elimination of specific food proteins has been demonstrated. Gastrointestinal food allergy should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants presenting with persistent regurgitation, constipation or irritable behaviour, particularly if conventional treatment has not been beneficial. The diagnosis of food protein-induced gastrointestinal motility disorders is hampered by the absence of specific clinical features or useful laboratory markers. Gastrointestinal biopsies before commencing a hypoallergenic diet may provide the most important diagnostic clues. Early recognition is essential for the optimal management of these patients to prevent nutritional sequelae or aversive feeding behaviours. Treatment relies on hypoallergenic formulae, as well as maternal elimination diets in breast-fed infants. Further research is required to better define the pathological mechanisms and diagnostic markers of paediatric allergic gastrointestinal motility disorders. The following article will present three instructive cases followed by discussion of the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and natural history of food allergic motility disorders in infancy and early childhood. PMID:18713339

  2. Gastrointestinal Factors in Autistic Disorder: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Craig A.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Corkins, Mark R.; Posey, David J.; Fitzgerald, Joseph F.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in the gastrointestinal (GI) factors of autistic disorder (autism) has developed from descriptions of symptoms such as constipation and diarrhea in autistic children and advanced towards more detailed studies of GI histopathology and treatment modalities. This review attempts to critically and comprehensively analyze the literature as it…

  3. Advanced imaging and visualization in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Ødegaard, Svein; Berstad, Arnold; Viola, Ivan; Giertsen, Christopher; Hausken, Trygve; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging and visualization has a strong impact on research and clinical decision making in gastroenterology. The aim of this paper is to show how imaging and visualization can disclose structural and functional abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Imaging methods such as ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopy, endosonography, and elastography will be outlined and visualization with Virtual Reality and haptic methods. Ultrasonography is a versatile method that can be used to evaluate antral contractility, gastric emptying, transpyloric flow, gastric configuration, intragastric distribution of meals, gastric accommodation and strain measurement of the gastric wall. Advanced methods for endoscopic ultrasound, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, and tissue Doppler (Strain Rate Imaging) provide detailed information of the GI tract. Food hypersensitivity reactions including gastrointestinal reactions due to food allergy can be visualized by ultrasonography and MRI. Development of multi-parametric and multi-modal imaging may increase diagnostic benefits and facilitate fusion of diagnostic and therapeutic imaging in the future. PMID:17457973

  4. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urgency Digestive Disorders in Kids and Teens Support Digestive Health Research A growing number of Congressional Representatives ... in Some Diseases/ Nausea and Vomiting ... Read More Digestive Health Monthly - Aug... Listings on the US National ...

  5. Role of radionuclide studies in pediatric gastrointestinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.

    1982-04-01

    Radionuclide techniques are currently used to fully evaluate many congenital and acquired abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract of children. Frequently, the anatomic and functional data provided by the nuclear examination are definitive. In the study of many disease entities, tracer techniques have replaced more cumbersome or invasive procedures. Although the radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation are similar as applied to both children and adults, the uniqueness of children and their disease entities requires special consideration when performing and interpreting their studies. In this review, the principle radionuclide examinations used in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal disorders are detailed and examples are illustrated.

  6. Prokinetics in the Management of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-01-01

    A variety of common and some not common gastrointestinal syndromes are thought to be based on impaired gut motility. For some, the role of motility is well defined, for others and the functional gastrointestinal disorders, in particular, the role of hypo- or dysmotility remains unclear. Over the years pharmacological and physiological laboratories have developed drugs which stimulate gut motility; many have been evaluated in motility and functional disorders with what can best be described as mixed results. Lack of receptor specificity and resultant expected and unexpected adverse events have led to the demise of some of these agents. Newer, more selective agents offer promise but the heterogeneity of the clinical disorders they target continues to pose a formidable challenge to drug development in this area. PMID:26130629

  7. Faecal microbiota transplantation: applications and limitations in treating gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sbahi, Hani; Di Palma, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    The process of stool transfer from healthy donors to the sick, known as faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), has an ancient history. However, only recently researchers started investigating its applications in an evidence-based manner. Current knowledge of the microbiome, the concept of dysbiosis and results of preliminary research suggest that there is an association between gastrointestinal bacterial disruption and certain disorders. Researchers have studied the effects of FMT on various gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal diseases, but have been unable to precisely pinpoint specific bacterial strains responsible for the observed clinical improvement or futility of the process. The strongest available data support the efficacy of FMT in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection with cure rates reported as high as 90% in clinical trials. The use of FMT in other conditions including inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, obesity and metabolic syndrome is still controversial. Results from clinical studies are conflicting, which reflects the gap in our knowledge of the microbiome composition and function, and highlights the need for a more defined and personalised microbial isolation and transfer. PMID:27239328

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    AGARWAL, SHRADHA; MAYER, LLOYD

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders such as chronic or acute diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, and inflammatory bowel diseases can indicate immune deficiency. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest lymphoid organ in the body, so it is not surprising that intestinal diseases are common among immunodeficient patients. Gastroenterologists therefore must be able to diagnose and treat patients with primary immunodeficiency. Immune-related gastrointestinal diseases can be classified as those that develop primarily via autoimmunity, infection, an inflammatory response, or malignancy. Immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients with gastrointestinal diseases present with similar symptoms. However, intestinal biopsy specimens from immunodeficient patients often have distinct histologic features, and these patients often fail to respond to conventional therapies. Therefore, early recognition of symptoms and referral to an immunologist for a basic immune evaluation is required to select appropriate treatments. Therapies for primary immunodeficiency comprise immunoglobulin replacement, antibiotics, and, in severe cases, bone marrow transplantation. Treatment of immunodeficient patients with concomitant gastrointestinal disease can be challenging, and therapy with immunomodulators often is required for severe disease. This review aims to guide gastroenterologists in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency. PMID:23501398

  9. Neuroanatomy of lower gastrointestinal pain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Wim; De Man, Joris G; Pelckmans, Paul A; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2014-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain accompanying intestinal inflammation emerges from the hyperresponsiveness of neuronal, immune and endocrine signaling pathways within the intestines, the peripheral and the central nervous system. In this article we review how the sensory nerve information from the healthy and the hypersensitive bowel is encoded and conveyed to the brain. The gut milieu is continuously monitored by intrinsic enteric afferents, and an extrinsic nervous network comprising vagal, pelvic and splanchnic afferents. The extrinsic afferents convey gut stimuli to second order neurons within the superficial spinal cord layers. These neurons cross the white commissure and ascend in the anterolateral quadrant and in the ipsilateral dorsal column of the dorsal horn to higher brain centers, mostly subserving regulatory functions. Within the supraspinal regions and the brainstem, pathways descend to modulate the sensory input. Because of this multiple level control, only a small proportion of gut signals actually reaches the level of consciousness to induce sensation or pain. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients, however, long-term neuroplastic changes have occurred in the brain-gut axis which results in chronic abdominal pain. This sensitization may be driven on the one hand by peripheral mechanisms within the intestinal wall which encompasses an interplay between immunocytes, enterochromaffin cells, resident macrophages, neurons and smooth muscles. On the other hand, neuronal synaptic changes along with increased neurotransmitter release in the spinal cord and brain leads to a state of central wind-up. Also life factors such as but not limited to inflammation and stress contribute to hypersensitivity. All together, the degree to which each of these mechanisms contribute to hypersensitivity in IBD and IBS might be disease- and even patient-dependent. Mapping of sensitization throughout animal and human studies may significantly

  10. The microbiota-gut-brain axis in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giada; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl

    2014-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are highly prevalent and pose a significant burden on health care and society, and impact patients’ quality of life. FGIDs comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders, with unclear underlying pathophysiology. They are considered to result from the interaction of altered gut physiology and psychological factors via the gut-brain axis, where brain and gut symptoms are reciprocally influencing each other’s expression. Intestinal microbiota, as a part of the gut-brain axis, plays a central role in FGIDs. Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, a prototype of FGIDs, display altered composition of the gut microbiota compared with healthy controls and benefit, at the gastrointestinal and psychological levels, from the use of probiotics and antibiotics. This review aims to recapitulate the available literature on FGIDs and microbiota-gut-brain axis. PMID:24921926

  11. The microbiota-gut-brain axis in functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giada; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl

    2014-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are highly prevalent and pose a significant burden on health care and society, and impact patients' quality of life. FGIDs comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders, with unclear underlying pathophysiology. They are considered to result from the interaction of altered gut physiology and psychological factors via the gut-brain axis, where brain and gut symptoms are reciprocally influencing each other's expression. Intestinal microbiota, as a part of the gut-brain axis, plays a central role in FGIDs. Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, a prototype of FGIDs, display altered composition of the gut microbiota compared with healthy controls and benefit, at the gastrointestinal and psychological levels, from the use of probiotics and antibiotics. This review aims to recapitulate the available literature on FGIDs and microbiota-gut-brain axis. PMID:24921926

  12. A study of alternative health care use for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Giese, L A

    2000-01-01

    The discomfort and frustration often experienced by patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders may lead many to seek alternative health care (AHC). This study was conducted to describe AHC use by patients with GI disorders in a convenience sample (N = 73) from a tertiary hospital in Florida. AHC was explored within social exchange theory. Measurement instruments included the Alternative Health Care Gastrointestinal Sociodemographic Questionnaire, Alternative Health Care Use Questionnaire, and Alternative Health Care Advantages/Disadvantages Questionnaire. The study indicated that 32 subjects (43%) had used AHC for their GI disorders during the past 2 years. Most frequently used AHC included relaxation therapy, herbs, lifestyle diets, megavitamins, massage, and home remedies. There was a greater use of AHC by young persons (t = 2.39, p = .02) and by those not retired (chi 2 = 4.58, p = .03). AHC was associated with perceived rewards (r = .38, p = .03) and perceived profits (r = .38, p = .03). AHC was not associated with type or duration of GI disorder or other demographic variables. Subjects specifically cited benefits with relaxation therapy, vegetarian diets, spiritual healing, fish oil for inflammatory bowel disease, and use of milk thistle for hepatitis. PMID:11096804

  13. Management of common gastrointestinal disorders: quality criteria based on patients' views and practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Roger; Hunt, Claire; Stevens, Richard; Dalrymple, Jamie; Driscoll, Richard; Sleet, Sarah; Smith, Jonathan Blanchard

    2009-01-01

    Background Although gastrointestinal disorders are common in general practice, clinical guidelines are not always implemented, and few patient-generated quality criteria are available to guide management. Aim To develop quality criteria for the management of four common gastrointestinal disorders: coeliac disease, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. Design of study Qualitative study including thematic analysis of transcripts from patient focus groups and content analysis of published clinical practice guidelines. Emergent themes were synthesised by a consensus panel, into quality criteria for each condition. Setting Community-based practice in England, UK. Methods Fourteen focus groups were conducted (four for coeliac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease, and two for GORD) involving a total of 93 patients (64 females, 29 males; mean age 55.4 years). Quality criteria were based on patients' views and expectations, synthesised with an analysis of clinical practice guidelines. Results A chronic disease management model was developed for each condition. Key themes included improving the timeliness and accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, better provision of information for patients, including access to patient organisations, better communication with, and access to, secondary care providers, and structured follow-up and regular review, particularly for coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusion This study provides a model for the development of quality markers for chronic disease management in gastroenterology, which is likely to be applicable to other chronic conditions. PMID:19520018

  14. Part 2: Treatments for Chronic Gastrointestinal Disease and Gut Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Matthew J.; Plummer, Nigel T.

    2015-01-01

    Part 1 of this review discussed the connection between the human gut microbiota and health. Manipulation of the intestinal microbiota holds promise as a prospective therapy for gut dysbiosis, ameliorating symptoms of gastrointestinal and systemic diseases and restoring health. The concept of probiotics has existed for more than 100 y, and modern research methods have established sound scientific support for the perceived benefits of probiotic bacteria, which mainly include Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera. On the basis of these evidence-based functional approaches, dietary interventions that supplement the normal diet with probiotics or prebiotics are now considered as potentially viable alternatives or adjuncts to the use of steroids, immunosuppressants, and/or surgical interventions. Studies investigating the impact on gastrointestinal disorders, such as diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and systemic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity, in response to the use of probiotics and prebiotics are reviewed. Further, fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) is discussed as an exciting development in the treatment of gut dysbiosis using microbes. PMID:26770128

  15. Part 2: Treatments for Chronic Gastrointestinal Disease and Gut Dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew J; Plummer, Nigel T

    2015-02-01

    Part 1 of this review discussed the connection between the human gut microbiota and health. Manipulation of the intestinal microbiota holds promise as a prospective therapy for gut dysbiosis, ameliorating symptoms of gastrointestinal and systemic diseases and restoring health. The concept of probiotics has existed for more than 100 y, and modern research methods have established sound scientific support for the perceived benefits of probiotic bacteria, which mainly include Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera. On the basis of these evidence-based functional approaches, dietary interventions that supplement the normal diet with probiotics or prebiotics are now considered as potentially viable alternatives or adjuncts to the use of steroids, immunosuppressants, and/or surgical interventions. Studies investigating the impact on gastrointestinal disorders, such as diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and systemic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and obesity, in response to the use of probiotics and prebiotics are reviewed. Further, fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) is discussed as an exciting development in the treatment of gut dysbiosis using microbes. PMID:26770128

  16. Opioid peptides and gastrointestinal symptoms in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Cristiane P; Pondé, Milena P; Rodrigues, Luiz E A

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterized by deficits in the individual's ability to socialize, communicate, and use the imagination, in addition to stereotyped behaviors. These disorders have a heterogenous phenotype, both in relation to symptoms and regarding severity. Organic problems related to the gastrointestinal tract are often associated with ASD, including dysbiosis, inflammatory bowel disease, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, celiac disease, indigestion, malabsorption, food intolerance, and food allergies, leading to vitamin deficiencies and malnutrition. In an attempt to explain the pathophysiology involved in autism, a theory founded on opioid excess has been the focus of various investigations, since it partially explains the symptomatology of the disorder. Another hypothesis has been put forward whereby the probable triggers of ASDs would be related to the presence of bacteria in the bowel, oxidative stress, and intestinal permeability. The present update reviews these hypotheses. PMID:27304256

  17. Sleep and gastrointestinal disturbances in autism spectrum disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Klukowski, Mark; Wasilewska, Jolanta; Lebensztejn, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a neurodevelopmental disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 68 children, commonly presents with comorbid conditions which include sleep disorders. Sleep disorders reported in ASD include, among others, increased bedtime resistance, insomnia, parasomnia, sleep disordered breathing, morning rise problems, and daytime sleepiness. Polysomnography studies show that children with ASD have altered sleep architecture including shorter total sleep time and longer sleep latency than typically developing peers. Sleep-related problems have been shown to affect overall autism scores, social skills decits, stereotypic behavior, and cognitive performance. Additionally, problematic sleep in children with ASD has been associated with higher levels of parental stress. Underlying causes specically related to sleep disorders are not fully known. Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are commonly associated with sleep problems in these patients. Children with ASD and GI symptoms have been found to have a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances compared with typically developing peers who do not have GI symptoms. Treatment approaches to children with sleep disorders are varied and range from lifestyle modications and behavioral interventions to drug therapies and surgical interventions. Physicians should take into account GI disorders as possible underlying causes of sleep-related problems in children with ASD. Therapeutic interventions should begin with less invasive methods before progressing to more invasive options such as pharmacotherapy and should be based on medical indications in order to provide effective care while minimizing potential adverse health effects. Evidence-based studies concerning GI and sleep disorders in children with ASD are limited and further studies are warranted. PMID:26384115

  18. Challenges and prospects for pharmacotherapy in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Gareth J.; Chang, Lin; Bountra, Chas; Houghton, Lesley A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia, are complex conditions with multiple factors contributing to their pathophysiology. As a consequence they are difficult to treat and have posed significant challenges to the pharmaceutical industry when trying to develop new and effective treatments. This review provides an overview of these difficulties and how the industry is reshaping its drug developmental strategies. It describes some of the more significant and encouraging advances that have occurred, and discusses how future research might embrace the opportunities provided by advances in genetic and in particular, epigenetic research. PMID:21180610

  19. Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in a Primary Care Pediatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chelimsky, Thomas; Li, Hong; Chelimsky, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are a common problem in pediatric patients and can affect quality of life. However, the extent of these disorders may vary in different subpopulations of children. This study investigated the prevalence of FGIDs in an inner-city primary care practice. Healthy patients between the ages of 9 and 17 were administered a validated questionnaire that assessed for FGIDs and other somatic complaints. Eleven of 145 patients (7.5%) met criteria for FGIDs based on Rome III Diagnostic Criteria. Raynaud-like symptoms tended to occur more often in patients meeting criteria for FGIDs, although this association was not statistically significant (P = .07). The lower prevalence of FGIDs in this population compared with earlier studies may suggest a link between socioeconomic status and the prevalence of FGIDs. Larger population-based studies consisting of a heterogeneous cohort from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds are necessary to further elucidate the true connection between FGIDs and socioeconomic status. PMID:27335938

  20. Use of probiotics in gastrointestinal disorders: what to recommend?

    PubMed Central

    Verna, Elizabeth C.; Lucak, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Perturbation of bacterial microflora of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may play an important role in the pathophysiology of some GI disorders. Probiotics have been used as a treatment modality for over a century. They may restore normal bacterial microflora and effect the functioning of the GI tract by a variety of mechanisms. Probiotics are not currently regulated and only few randomized controlled trials exist investigating their efficacy in different GI disorders. They are available in a variety of formulations and delivery systems making interpretation and comparison of studies even more difficult. The efficacy of probiotics, either as a single strain or a combination of probiotics, has been tested in antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile colitis, infectious diarrhea, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, pouchitis, and irritable bowel syndrome, among other disorders. Results of the studies are reviewed in this article and recommendations for probiotic use in these disorders are made. Although probiotics appear to be generally safe in an outpatient setting, the situation may be different in immunocompromised, hospitalized patients who may be at a greater risk of developing probiotic sepsis. No studies exist addressing the issue of safety specifically. Many questions regarding use of probiotics in GI disorders remain to be answered in future studies, such as most optimal doses, duration of treatment, physiological and immunological effects, efficacy of specific probiotics in specific disease states, and safety in debilitated patients. PMID:21180611

  1. Short-chain carbohydrates and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Susan J; Lomer, Miranda C E; Gibson, Peter R

    2013-05-01

    Carbohydrates occur across a range of foods regularly consumed including grains such as wheat and rye, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. Short-chain carbohydrates with chains of up to 10 sugars vary in their digestibility and subsequent absorption. Those that are poorly absorbed exert osmotic effects in the intestinal lumen increasing its water volume, and are rapidly fermented by bacteria with consequent gas production. These two effects alone may underlie most of the induction of gastrointestinal symptoms after they are ingested in moderate amounts via luminal distension in patients with visceral hypersensitivity. This has been the basis of the use of lactose-free diets in those with lactose malabsorption and of fructose-reduced diets for fructose malabsorption. However, application of such dietary approaches in patients with functional bowel disorders has been restricted to observational studies with uncertain efficacy. As all dietary poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates have similar and additive effects in the intestine, a concept has been developed to regard them collectively as FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) and to evaluate a dietary approach that restricts them all. In patients with irritable bowel syndrome, there is now an accumulating body of evidence, based on observational and comparative studies, and on randomized-controlled trials that supports the notion that FODMAPs trigger gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with functional bowel disorders, and that a diet low in FODMAPs offers considerable symptom relief in the majority of patients who use it. PMID:23588241

  2. 77 FR 64597 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... gastrointestinal illness in Persian Gulf Veterans was caused by the presence of bacteria in the intestines and whether eradication of these bacteria reduces symptoms of chronic diarrhea. Affected Public:...

  3. 78 FR 6404 - Agency Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... gastrointestinal illness in Persian Gulf Veterans was caused by ] the presence of bacteria in the intestines and whether eradication of these bacteria reduces symptoms of chronic diarrhea. An agency may not conduct...

  4. Maladaptive Behavior and Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pusponegoro, Hardiono D.; Ismael, Sofyan; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Firmansyah, Agus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Various gastrointestinal factors may contribute to maladaptive behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). To determine the association between maladaptive behavior in children with ASD and gastrointestinal symptoms such as severity, intestinal microbiota, inflammation, enterocyte damage, permeability and absorption of opioid peptides. Methods This observational cross-sectional study compared children with ASD to healthy controls, aged 2-10 years. Maladaptive behavior was classified using the Approach Withdrawal Problems Composite subtest of the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory. Dependent variables were gastrointestinal symptom severity index, fecal calprotectin, urinary D-lactate, urinary lactulose/mannitol excretion, urinary intestinal fatty acids binding protein (I-FABP) and urinary opioid peptide excretion. Results We did not find a significant difference between children with ASD with severe or mild maladaptive behavior and control subjects for gastrointestinal symptoms, fecal calprotectin, urinary D-lactate, and lactulose/mannitol ratio. Urinary opioid peptide excretion was absent in all children. Children with ASD with severe maladaptive behavior showed significantly higher urinary I-FABP levels compared to those with mild maladaptive behavior (p=0.019) and controls (p=0.015). Conclusion In our series, maladaptive behavior in ASD children was not associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, intestinal inflammation (no difference in calprotectin), microbiota (no difference in urinary D-lactate) and intestinal permeability (no difference in lactulose/manitol ratio). ASD children with severe maladaptive behavior have significantly more enterocyte damage (increased urinary I-FABP) than ASD children with mild maladaptive behavior and normal children. PMID:26770897

  5. Are child anxiety and somatization associated with pain in pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated individual and incremental contributions of somatization and trait anxiety to pain report in children with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. Eighty children (7-10 years) with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders completed the State-Trait Anxiet...

  6. Ghrelin and motilin receptors as drug targets for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Gareth J; Furness, John B

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the major source of the related hormones ghrelin and motilin, which act on structurally similar G protein-coupled receptors. Nevertheless, selective receptor agonists are available. The primary roles of endogenous ghrelin and motilin in the digestive system are to increase appetite or hedonic eating (ghrelin) and initiate phase III of gastric migrating myoelectric complexes (motilin). Ghrelin and motilin also both inhibit nausea. In clinical trials, the motilin receptor agonist camicinal increased gastric emptying, but at lower doses reduced gastroparesis symptoms and improved appetite. Ghrelin receptor agonists have been trialled for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis because of their ability to increase gastric emptying, but with mixed results; however, relamorelin, a ghrelin agonist, reduced nausea and vomiting in patients with this disorder. Treatment of postoperative ileus with a ghrelin receptor agonist proved unsuccessful. Centrally penetrant ghrelin receptor agonists stimulate defecation in animals and humans, although ghrelin itself does not seem to control colorectal function. Thus, the most promising uses of motilin receptor agonists are the treatment of gastroparesis or conditions with slow gastric emptying, and ghrelin receptor agonists hold potential for the reduction of nausea and vomiting, and the treatment of constipation. Therapeutic, gastrointestinal roles for receptor antagonists or inverse agonists have not been identified. PMID:26392067

  7. Assessment of functional gastrointestinal disorders using the Gastro-Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Leibbrand, Rolf; Cuntz, Ulrich; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the reliability and factorial structure of the Gastro-Questionnaire for the screening and psychometric measurement of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGDs). The questionnaire contains 27 gastrointestinal symptom items drawn from the Rome-II criteria, which are rated by frequency and severity, as well as some items to exclude organic diseases. The questionnaire was administered to 259 normal participants and to 69 participants of the annual German meeting of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Reliability was good (Cronbach's alpha for frequency and severity items: alpha = .86 and alpha = .87). Factor analysis yielded a six-factor solution explaining 60.7% of the variance. Diagnostic frequencies ranged from 32.8% to 100% for FGDs in general, from 1.3% to 76.8% for irritable bowel syndrome, and from 7.0% to 100% for functional dyspepsia, depending on samples and symptom definitions. The Gastro-Questionnaire is a very economic, reliable, and content-valid instrument for the assessment of FGDs. PMID:12174533

  8. Nitric oxide-modulating agents for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Brendan J R

    2005-11-01

    Almost 20 years after the identification of the biological role of nitric oxide (NO), the full therapeutic potential of novel agents that mimic the activity of NO or interfere with its synthesis has yet to be realised for utilities involving the gastrointestinal tract. New utilities for classical NO donors, which were used as vasodilators for decades, in the treatment of motility disorders have been explored and a product for treating anal fissure was recently launched. New classes of compounds incorporating a NO-donating moiety into standard non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the NO-non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) or COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donors (CINODs) have also been developed. These have been shown to exhibit reduced gastrointestinal injury in experimental models, and reports on their efficacy and safety in Phase I and II studies are now available. Modulation of the inducible NO synthase isoform that generates excessive NO that can lead to subsequent cytotoxic moieties, such as peroxynitrite, may have therapeutic possibilities in a range of inflammatory diseases of the gut. Likewise, agents that promote the decomposition of peroxynitrite or removal of its other component, superoxide, may also prove to be of use. Further targets for pharmaceutical exploitation are likely to come from both genomic and molecular insights into the processes that regulate the NO system. PMID:16255675

  9. Emerging roles for enteric glia in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Enteric glia are important components of the enteric nervous system (ENS) and also form an extensive network in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Initially regarded as passive support cells, it is now clear that they are actively involved as cellular integrators in the control of motility and epithelial barrier function. Enteric glia form a cellular and molecular bridge between enteric nerves, enteroendocrine cells, immune cells, and epithelial cells, depending on their location. This Review highlights the role of enteric glia in GI motility disorders and in barrier and defense functions of the gut, notably in states of inflammation. It also discusses the involvement of enteric glia in neurological diseases that involve the GI tract. PMID:25689252

  10. The winding road to understanding the neonatal origins of inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mezoff, Ethan A; Aly, Hany

    2013-11-01

    Beginning with the observation that birth weight correlates with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the concept of neonatal programming, that the environmental influence on fetal and neonatal development results in modification of the risk profile for adult disease, has begun to emerge as an important component to understanding the origin of chronic diseases of many different organ systems. Until recently, the gastrointestinal system has not been considered. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of many intestinal inflammatory disorders is still incomplete; however, a brief review of what is known reveals several opportunities for the early intraluminal environment to affect the development of the intestinal immune system. Early clinical observations such as the increased risk of celiac disease observed in those born by cesarean section and the protective effect of breast-feeding against inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease support the role of neonatal programming in the development of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal disease. Additional, more robust clinical studies are needed to confirm this role. Furthermore, examination of the possible mechanisms of immune phenotype modification is necessary. PMID:23857343

  11. Chronic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Laura M.; Baum, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relationship between chronic stress and symptoms of posttraumatic stress syndrome in people living within five miles of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power station. Results provided evidence of substantive links between chronic stress and development of mild symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. (Author/BL)

  12. Chronic portomesenteic venous thrombosis complicated by a high flow arteriovenous malformation presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Plotnik, Adam N; Hebroni, Frank; McWilliams, Justin

    2016-02-01

    Portomesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The presenting symptoms of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis are often non-specific but may present with variceal bleeding. We present the first reported case of chronic portomesenteric venous thrombosis causing a high flow arteriovenous malformation that resulted in extensive gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25871943

  13. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  14. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  15. Child and parent perceived food-induced gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unknown whether children with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders identify specific foods that exacerbate their GI symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived role of food on GI symptoms and to determine the impact of food-induced symptoms on quality of life (...

  16. Targeting ion channels for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Beyder, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) functional and motility disorders are highly prevalent and responsible for long-term morbidity and sometimes mortality in the affected patients. It is estimated that one in three persons has a GI functional or motility disorder. However, diagnosis and treatment of these widespread conditions remains challenging. This partly stems from the multisystem pathophysiology, including processing abnormalities in the central and peripheral (enteric) nervous systems and motor dysfunction in the GI wall. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are central to the generation and propagation of the cyclical electrical activity and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are responsible for electromechanical coupling. In these and other excitable cells voltage-sensitive ion channels (VSICs) are the main molecular units that generate and regulate electrical activity. Thus, VSICs are potential targets for intervention in GI motility disorders. Research in this area has flourished with advances in the experimental methods in molecular and structural biology and electrophysiology. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the complex and variable electrical behavior of ICCs and SMCs remains incomplete. In this review, we focus on the slow waves and action potentials in ICCs and SMCs. We describe the constituent VSICs, which include voltage-gated sodium (NaV), calcium (CaV), potassium (KV, KCa), chloride (Cl–) and nonselective ion channels (transient receptor potentials [TRPs]). VSICs have significant structural homology and common functional mechanisms. We outline the approaches and limitations and provide examples of targeting VSICs at the pores, voltage sensors and alternatively spliced sites. Rational drug design can come from an integrated view of the structure and mechanisms of gating and activation by voltage or mechanical stress. PMID:22282704

  17. Design of Treatment Trials for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Irvine, E Jan; Tack, Jan; Crowell, Michael D; Gwee, Kok Ann; Ke, Meiyun; Schmulson, Max J; Whitehead, William E; Spiegel, Brennan

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes recent progress and regulatory guidance on design of trials to assess the efficacy of new therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). The double-masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design remains the accepted standard for evaluating treatment efficacy. A control group is essential, and a detailed description of the randomization process and concealed allocation method must be included in the study report. The control will most often be placebo, but for therapeutic procedures and for behavioral treatment trials, respectively, a sham procedure and control intervention with similar expectation of benefit, but lacking the treatment principle, are recommended. Investigators should be aware of, and attempt to minimize, expectancy effects (placebo, nocebo, precebo). The primary analysis should be based on the proportion of patients in each treatment arm who satisfy a treatment responder definition or a prespecified clinically meaningful change in a patient-reported outcome measure. Data analysis should use the intention-to-treat principle. Reporting of results should follow the Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials guidelines and include secondary outcome measures to support or explain the primary outcome and an analysis of harms data. Trials should be registered in a public location before initiation and results should be published regardless of outcome. PMID:27147123

  18. Neurological manifestations of gastrointestinal disorders, with particular reference to the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Zaffaroni, M

    2001-11-01

    Neurological manifestations of gastrointestinal disorders are described, with particular reference to those resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) on clinical or MRI grounds. Patients with celiac disease can present cerebellar ataxia, progressive myoclonic ataxia, myelopathy, or cerebral, brainstem and peripheral nerve involvement. Antigliadin antibodies can be found in subjects with neurological dysfunction of unknown cause, particularly in sporadic cerebellar ataxia ("gluten ataxia"). Patients with Whipple's disease can develop mental and psychiatric changes, supranuclear gaze palsy, upper motoneuron signs, hypothalamic dysfunction, cranial nerve abnormalities, seizures, ataxia, myorhythmia and sensory deficits. Neurological manifestations can complicate inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) due to vascular or vasculitic mechanisms. Cases with both Crohn's disease and MS or cerebral vasculitis are described. Epilepsy, chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy, muscle involvement and myasthenia gravis are also reported. The central nervous system can be affected in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection because of vasculitis associated with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is a disease caused by multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by peripheral neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, deafness, leukoencephalopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms due to visceral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations can be the consequence of vitamin B1, nicotinamide, vitamin B12, vitamin D, or vitamin E deficiency and from nutritional deficiency states following gastric surgery. PMID:11794474

  19. Analysis of gastrointestinal and hepatic chronic GVHD manifestations on major outcomes: A Chronic GVHD Consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, Joseph; Chai, Xiaoyu; Kurland, Brenda F.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Palmer, Jeanne; Khera, Nandita; Jagasia, Madan; Cutler, Corey; Arora, Mukta; Vogelsang, Georgia; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    While data support adverse prognosis of overlap subtype of chronic GVHD, the importance of site of gastrointestinal (GI) and type of hepatic involvement is not known. Using data from the Chronic GVHD Consortium observational cohort study (n=567, total of 2115 visits), we examined whether the site of GI (esophageal, upper GI, lower GI) and type of hepatic (bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase (AP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT)) involvement are associated with overall survival (OS)and non-relapse mortality (NRM), symptoms, quality of life (QOL) and functional status measures. In multivariate analysis utilizing data from enrollment visits only, lower GI involvement (HR 1.67, p=0.05) and elevated bilirubin (HR 2.46, p=0.001) were associated with OS; both were also associated with NRM. In multivariable analysis using all visits (time-dependent covariates), GI score greater than zero (HR 1.69, p=0.02) and elevated bilirubin (HR 3.73, p<0.001) were associated with OS; results were similar for NRM. Any esophageal involvement and GI score greater than zero were associated with both symptoms and QOL while elevated bilirubin was associated with QOL. We found no consistent evidence that upper GI involvement, AP, ALT, or NIH liver score add prognostic value for survival, overall symptom burden, or quality of life. These data support important differences in patient-reported outcomes according to GI and hepatic involvement among chronic GVHD affected patients, and identify those with elevated bilirubin or higher GI score at any time, or lower GI involvement at cohort enrollment, as patients at greater risk for mortality under current treatment approaches. PMID:23395601

  20. Clinical Dimensions of Bloating in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min Sun; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Ryu, Jae-in; Kim, Jung-Sook; Kong, Kyung Ae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Bloating is common bothersome symptoms and most studies conducted in the Western countries found that bloating was frequently associated with lower gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms but many patients complaint bloating as upper GI symptoms in the clinical setting. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of bloating, and to identify symptom grouping and finally document the impact of bloating in the diagnosis of functional GI disorders. Methods Participants in a comprehensive health-screening cohort were enrolled. They were asked about demographic, medical, and social history and upper and lower GI symptoms by using a validated questionnaire. Factor analysis with principal component analysis method with varimax rotation was used. Results Among the total of 1050 subjects (mean age, 44.6 ± 10.2 years; females, 46.4%), significant bloating symptoms were found in 282 (26.9%); the prevalence of functional bloating was 6.9%. Factor analysis revealed a 5-component structure with upper GI symptoms, constipation, diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), constipation-predominant IBS, and fecal incontinence. Abdominal bloating loaded on both the upper GI symptoms (0.51 of loadings) and constipation (0.40). On logistic regression analysis, bloating was more predictable for IBS (OR, 7.5; P < 0.001) than functional dyspepsia (FD; OR, 3.7; P = 0.002). Bloating was more frequently combined with IBS according to their severity, but this association was not detected in patients with FD. Conclusions Abdominal bloating is common symptom in about a quarter of patients and appears as upper as well as lower GI symptoms. However, abdominal bloating is more predictable for IBS, especially constipation-predominant IBS, than FD. PMID:26997537

  1. The association between cardiac and gastrointestinal disorders: causal or casual link?

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Michele; Scicchitano, Pietro; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo; Cortese, Francesca; Ciccone, Marco M

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide: among them, coronary artery disease and arrhythmias represent the most frequent pathological conditions. Similarly, the gastrointestinal disorders, that is, gastroesophageal reflux and inflammatory bowel diseases, have a high incidence in the general population.Several pieces of evidence have documented a link between cardiac and gastrointestinal disorders as they often share similar risk factors and symptoms. Furthermore, both can simultaneously occur in the same patient, thus creating problems in the correct clinical diagnosis.It is well known that gastrointestinal disorders may present with chest pain and mimic angina pectoris. In contrast, they can also unmask heart disease, such as in the case of the angina-linked ischemia.The aim of this review was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the relationship between cardiac and gastrointestinal diseases to better understand the causal or casual character of such a linkage. PMID:26702598

  2. Epidemiology of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Japan and in the World

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), represented by functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are a group of disorders that include variable combinations of chronic or recurrent gastrointestinal symptoms not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. FGIDs account for a significant percentage of patients seen in primary care settings with abdominal symptoms. Although the definition of FGIDs can easily affect the prevalence, the prevalences of dyspepsia/FD and IBS diagnosed by the Rome III criteria in the general population are 5.3–20.4% and 1.1–29.2%, respectively. Recent reports of FD and IBS defined by the Rome III criteria indicated a female predominance. Regarding the subtype prevalence of FD, postprandial distress syndrome was more prevalent than epigastric pain syndrome (5.6–13.9% vs 0.9–9.5%). The subtype prevalence of IBS is characterized by male predominance for IBS with diarrhea and female predominance for IBS with constipation. Factors affecting the development of FGIDs such as epidemiological factors including genetic and environmental factors, are important. Gene polymorphisms are involved in the development of FGIDs. The prevalence differs among races and geographic areas. Foods may affect the development of FGIDs, but the causal relationships between food and FGIDs are not conclusive. The symptoms often regress and appear in the course of these entities. Building a favorable patient-doctor relationship is effective for controlling symptoms of FGIDs. Physicians should explain that FGIDs are highly prevalent conditions, impair the patients’ quality of life even without evident underlying organic causes and are not life-threatening conditions to ensure patients’ understanding. PMID:26095436

  3. Myo-, neuro-, gastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE syndrome) due to partial deficiency of cytochrome-c-oxidase. A new mitochondrial multisystem disorder.

    PubMed

    Bardosi, A; Creutzfeldt, W; DiMauro, S; Felgenhauer, K; Friede, R L; Goebel, H H; Kohlschütter, A; Mayer, G; Rahlf, G; Servidei, S

    1987-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman had a 10-year history of external ophthalmoplegia, malabsorption resulting in chronic malnutrition, muscle atrophy and polyneuropathy. Computer tomography revealed hypodensity of her cerebral white matter. A metabolic disturbance consisted of lactic acidosis after moderate glucose loads with increased excretion of hydroxybutyric and fumaric acids. Post-mortem studies revealed gastrointestinal scleroderma as the morphological manifestation of her malabsorption syndrome, ocular and skeletal myopathy with ragged red fibers, peripheral neuropathy, vascular abnormalities of meningeal and peripheral nerve vessels. Biochemical examination of the liver and muscle tissues revealed a partial defect of cytochrome-c-oxidase (complex IV of the respiratory chain). This mitochondrial multisystem disorder may represent a separate entity to be classified between the spectrum of myoencephalopathies and oculo-gastrointestinal muscular dystrophy. PMID:2823522

  4. Representing Chronic Disorders of Consciousness:

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This article explores problems of voicelessness in Isabel Allende’s Paula (1995) through a focus on the story of Paula’s illness and subsequent death from porphyria in 1992. I argue that the language, categories and stories through which disorders of consciousness are constructed are central to ethical decision-making and shifting cultural understandings of these conditions. In Paula, Allende uses an experimental, hybrid narrative form that draws on illness narrative, magical realist novel, national history, letters, and memoir to challenge traditional depictions of “coma” and to create a new public space through which these issues of voicelessness can be addressed. PMID:25055709

  5. Alexithymia in Chronic Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Tella, Marialaura; Castelli, Lorys

    2016-07-01

    This review proposes a critical discussion of the recent studies investigating the presence of alexithymia in patients suffering from different chronic pain (CP) conditions. The term CP refers to pain that persists or progresses over time, while alexithymia is an affective dysregulation, largely observed in psychosomatic diseases. Overall, the examined studies showed a high prevalence of alexithymia, especially difficulties in identifying feelings, in all the different CP conditions considered. However, the association between alexithymia and pain intensity was not always clear and in some studies this relationship appeared to be mediated by negative effect, especially depression. The role of alexithymia in CP should be clarified by future studies, paying particular attention to two aspects: the use of additional measures, in addition to the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, to assess alexithymia, and the analysis of the potential differences in the evolution of different CP conditions with reference to the presence or absence of alexithymia. PMID:27215759

  6. Chronic complex dissociative disorders and borderline personality disorder: disorders of emotion dysregulation?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Lanius, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Emotion dysregulation is a core feature of chronic complex dissociative disorders (DD), as it is for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Chronic complex DD include dissociative identity disorder (DID) and the most common form of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS, type 1), now known as Other Specified Dissociative Disorders (OSDD, type 1). BPD is a common comorbid disorder with DD, although preliminary research indicates the disorders have some distinguishing features as well as considerable overlap. This article focuses on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, psychological profile, treatment, and neurobiology of chronic complex DD with emphasis placed on the role of emotion dysregulation in each of these areas. Trauma experts conceptualize borderline symptoms as often being trauma based, as are chronic complex DD. We review the preliminary research that compares DD to BPD in the hopes that this will stimulate additional comparative research. PMID:26401297

  7. Current and Emerging Therapies for the Management of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Orla F.; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The functional gastrointestinal disorders are common disorders that are associated with significant quality-of-life impairment and considerable economic burden on the healthcare system. They are frequently associated with a comorbid psychiatric condition; this, together with a striking lack of effective pharmacological therapies, means they represent a considerable therapeutic challenge to the treating physician. In this overview, we examine the evidence to support the use of agents currently used in the management of the more common functional gastrointestinal disorders and review emerging therapies. PMID:23251744

  8. Eosinophils in Gastrointestinal disorders- eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases and parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pooja; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The gastrointestinal tract provides an intriguing organ for considering the eosinophil’s role in health and disease. The normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, except for the esophagus, is populated by eosinophils that are present throughout the mucosa in varying numbers. This latter fact raises the possibility that eosinophils participate in innate mechanisms of defense. In contrast, a number of clinical studies provide a wealth of data that associates increased numbers of eosinophils with inflammatory GI diseases; these findings prompt concerns that eosinophils may have a deleterious effect on the gut. In this article we present clinical features of 4 disease processes that have been associated with eosinophilia and suggest areas requiring investigation as to their clinical significance and scientific relevance. PMID:26209893

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERLYING CAUSES OF CHRONIC UNSPECIFIC UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL-RELATED SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN, A PILOT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Hanan M; Abdulla, Nour A; El Naghy, Suzan; Hassan, Ehsan H; Abd El-Hamid, Amal

    2016-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptoms are not disease specific and of limited value in the differentiation of GIT disorders. The present study aimed to determine the etiology of chronic unspecific symptoms in children and to test the need for upper endoscopy in diagnosis. This is a prospective study for 30 Egyptian children presented with chronic upper GIT symptoms for at least 2 months. History regarding severity and frequency of GIT symptoms were asked for. Children with known disorder that explains presenting symptoms were excluded. Upper GIT endoscopy wa performed and 5 biopsies were obtained for pathological examination and for Hpylori testing. The results showed that children age ranged between 2.5-18 years with mean ± SD of 13.6 ± 3.4 and 63.3% were females. The main complaints were epigastric pain in 43.3%, hematemesis in 30% and vomiting in 26.7%. Motility disorders were diagnosed in 66.7% children; in the form of GERD in 63.3% and achalasia in one. Complication of GERD in the form of erosive esophagitis was present in 15.8% children, while Barrett's esophagus was not observed. H. pylori infection was diagnosed in 80% histologically. Eosinophilic esophagitis was not detected. PMID:27363051

  10. Psychological and sex features of delayed gut transit in functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E; Evans, P; Scott, A; Badcock, C; Shuter, B; Hoschl, R; Tennant, C; Kellow, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relation of demographic and psychological factors to the presence and extent of gut transit impairment in the functional gastrointestinal disorders has received little attention.
AIMS—To compare the psychosocial and demographic features of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and delayed transit in one region of the gastrointestinal tract with those displaying more widespread delayed transit (that is, delay in two or three regions), and those with normal transit in all three regions.
PATIENTS—Of 110 outpatient participants who satisfied standardised criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders, 46 had delayed transit in one region, 32 had delay in two or three regions, and 17 exhibited normal transit in all regions.
METHODS—Transit in the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine was assessed concurrently using a wholly scintigraphic technique; psychological status was assessed using established psychometric measures.
RESULTS—Patients with delayed transit displayed demographic and psychological features that contrasted with patients with normal transit in all regions. In particular, widespread delayed transit featured female sex, a highly depressed mood state, increased age, frequent control of anger, and more severe gastric stasis, while the features distinguishing normal transit were male sex and high levels of hypochondriasis.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest the existence of a distinct psychophysiological subgroup, defined by the presence of delayed transit, in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders.


Keywords: delayed gut transit; psychophysiology; sex; mood PMID:10601060

  11. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases. PMID:27597117

  12. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Integrated Treatment for Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Disorders by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Tao, Qin; Guo, Zihu; Fu, Yingxue; Chen, Xuetong; Shar, Piar Ali; Shahen, Mohamed; Zhu, Jinglin; Xue, Jun; Bai, Yaofei; Wu, Ziyin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and gastrointestinal disorders (GIDs) are different diseases associated with different organs, they are highly correlated clinically. Importantly, in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), similar treatment strategies have been applied in both diseases. However, the etiological mechanisms underlying them remain unclear. Here, an integrated systems pharmacology approach is presented for illustrating the molecular correlations between CVDs and GIDs. Firstly, we identified pairs of genes that are associated with CVDs and GIDs and found that these genes are functionally related. Then, the association between 115 heart meridian (HM) herbs and 163 stomach meridian (SM) herbs and their combination application in Chinese patent medicine was investigated, implying that both CVDs and GIDs can be treated by the same strategy. Exemplified by a classical formula Sanhe Decoration (SHD) treating chronic gastritis, we applied systems-based analysis to introduce a drug-target-pathway-organ network that clarifies mechanisms of different diseases being treated by the same strategy. The results indicate that SHD regulated several pathological processes involved in both CVDs and GIDs. We experimentally confirmed the predictions implied by the effect of SHD for myocardial ischemia. The systems pharmacology suggests a novel integrated strategy for rational drug development for complex associated diseases. PMID:27597117

  13. Chronic ulcerative gastroduodenitis as a first gastrointestinal manifestation of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome in a 10-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Poon, Kin-Hung; Lo, Wing-Hong; Wong, Lap-Gate

    2008-01-01

    A 10-year-old Chinese boy who had a history of congenital thrombocytopathy presented with severe iron deficiency anemia secondary to chronic gastric inflammation and duodenal ulcerations. Subtle oculocutaneous albinism led to the finding of diminished dense bodies in the platelets under electron microscopy, hence the diagnosis of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). Biopsies from the stomach and duodenum revealed a lymphocytic infiltration in the submucosa, but H pylori infection was absent. The gastroduodenitis responded to the treatment with omeprazole while iron deficiency anemia was corrected by oral iron therapy. HPS is a rare cause of congenital bleeding disorder with multisystemic manifestations. Upper gastrointestinal involvement is rare and should be distinguished from a mere manifestation of the bleeding diathesis. PMID:18473428

  14. Patterns of personality disorders in women with chronic eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Larsson, J O; Hellzén, M

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe patterns of personality disorders (PDs) in women with chronic eating disorders (EDs). An index group of nineteen women who have had EDs for an average of 8.5 years was compared with a control group of same-aged women from the general population. At the time of the study the index group received treatment at a tertiary treatment center in Stockholm. The PDs were assessed using the DSM-IV part of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q). In the index group, eighteen of nineteen fulfilled the criteria for one or more PD. The number of PD diagnoses for each women ranged from zero (n = 1) to eight (n = 2) with a median of three. Among the controls, only one woman fulfilled the criteria for one or more PD. The most prevalent disorders in the index group were Borderline, Avoidant, and Obsessive-Compulsive. The index group had significantly higher DIP-Q dimensional scores than the controls in the Paranoid, Schizoid, Schizotypal, Borderline, Histrionic, Avoidant, and Dependent scales. Although the assessment of PD symptoms was limited to self-reports, the high prevalence of PD diagnoses and PD symptoms most probably reflects the severe psychiatric impairments in patients suffering from chronic ED. PMID:15656014

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, Apameh; Tator, Charles H; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement. PMID:27021775

  16. T-EUS for Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Multicenter Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Biliary Stricture; Biliary Obstruction; Stent Obstruction; Proximal Duct Stricture; Distal Duct Stricture; Ampullary Cancer; Biliary Sphincter Stenosis; Impacted Stones; Chronic Pancreatitis; Peri-ampullary Diverticula; Altered Anatomy

  17. Treatment options for functional gastrointestinal disorders: From empiric to complementary approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) remain a common problem in the pediatric age group. These conditions were first recognized by Apley in 1958 when he coined the earlier term 'recurrent abdominal pain' (RAP) for a group of children with recurrent or persistent abdominal pain that interfer...

  18. Brief Report: Association between Behavioral Features and Gastrointestinal Problems among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maenner, Matthew J.; Arneson, Carrie L.; Levy, Susan E.; Kirby, Russell S.; Nicholas, Joyce S.; Durkin, Maureen S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports suggest certain behaviors among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may indicate underlying gastro-intestinal (GI) problems, and that the presence of these behaviors may help alert primary care providers to the need to evaluate a child with ASD for GI problems. The purpose of this population-based study of 487 children…

  19. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in a Sample of Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolov, Roumen N.; Bearss, Karen E.; Lettinga, Jelle; Erickson, Craig; Rodowski, Maria; Aman, Michael G.; McCracken, James T.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Tierney, Elaine; Vitiello, Benedetto; Arnold, L. Eugene; Shah, Bhavik; Posey, David J.; Ritz, Louise; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate gastrointestinal (GI) problems in a large, well-characterized sample of children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs). Methods: One hundred seventy two children entering one of two trials conducted by the Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP) Autism Network were assessed comprehensively prior to…

  20. Brief Report: Whole Blood Serotonin Levels and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marler, Sarah; Ferguson, Bradley J.; Lee, Evon Batey; Peters, Brittany; Williams, Kent C.; McDonnell, Erin; Macklin, Eric A.; Levitt, Pat; Gillespie, Catherine Hagan; Anderson, George M.; Margolis, Kara Gross; Beversdorf, David Q.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin levels are observed in more than 25% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are also common in ASD but have not previously been examined in relationship with hyperserotonemia, despite the synthesis of serotonin in the gut. In 82 children and adolescents with ASD,…

  1. Anxiety, Sensory Over-Responsivity, and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Micah O.; Vasa, Roma A.; Kalb, Luther G.; Kanne, Stephen M.; Rosenberg, Daniel; Keefer, Amy; Murray, Donna S.; Freedman, Brian; Lowery, Lea Ann

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience high rates of anxiety, sensory processing problems, and gastrointestinal (GI) problems; however, the associations among these symptoms in children with ASD have not been previously examined. The current study examined bivariate and multivariate relations among anxiety, sensory…

  2. Parent-Reported Gastro-Intestinal Symptoms in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Susie; Carcani-Rathwell, Iris; Charman, Tony; Pickles, Andrew; Loucas, Tom; Meldrum, David; Simonoff, Emily; Sullivan, Peter; Baird, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether parentally-reported gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms are increased in a population-derived sample of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) compared to controls. Participants included 132 children with ASD and 81 with special educational needs (SEN) but no ASD, aged 10-14 years plus 82…

  3. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  4. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-11-28

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  5. “Ninjinto” (Ginseng Decoction), a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, Improves Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Immune Competence in Patients with Chronic Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Shuichiro; Ogawa, Keiko; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treating functional gastrointestinal disorders is extremely difficult. We herein report the effect of the oral administration of Ninjinto (NJT, ginseng decoction), a traditional Japanese Kampo medicine, on chronic intestinal failure. Patients and Methods. Seven patients with chronic intestinal failure treated with NJT were evaluated in this study. The primary diseases included chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO: n = 4), short bowel syndrome (SBS: n = 2), and intestinal atresia (n = 1). All patients orally received NJT extract granules at a dose of 0.3 g/kg BW per day. The treatment outcomes were then assessed according to the patients' symptoms and consecutive abdominal X-ray findings. Results. The targeted symptoms were abdominal distension in four patients, diarrhea in three patients, and frequent hospitalization due to infections in two patients. An improvement in the symptoms was observed in six of the seven patients, whereas one patient with SBS did not show any improvement. An improvement in an abdominal roentgenogram was observed in the four patients with remarkably dilated bowel loops due to CIPO. Conclusions. NJT may be effective in controlling functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with chronic intestinal failure. The use of Kampo medicine in the field of pediatric surgery may help to improve the quality of life in children suffering from such conditions. PMID:26495014

  6. Fourth revolution in psychiatry – Addressing comorbidity with chronic physical disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv

    2010-01-01

    The moral treatment of mental patients, Electro Convulsive therapy (ECT), and Psychotropic medications constitute the first, second, and third revolution in psychiatry, respectively. Addressing comorbidities of mental illnesses with chronic physical illnesses will be the fourth revolution in psychiatry. Mind and body are inseparable; there is a bidirectional relationship between psyche and soma, each influencing the other. Plausible biochemical explanations are appearing at an astonishing rate. Psychiatric comorbidity with many chronic physical disorders has remained neglected. Such comorbidity with cardiac, respiratory, Gastrointestinal, endocrinal, and neurological disorders, trauma, and other conditions like HIV and so on, needs to be addressed too. Evidence base of prevalence and causal relationship of psychiatric comorbidities in these disorders has been highlighted and strategies to meet the challenge of comorbidity have been indicated. PMID:21180405

  7. Association between common variable immunodeficiency and collagenous infiltrative disorders of the gastrointestinal tract: A series of four patients.

    PubMed

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Burkart, Ashlie L; DiMarino, Anthony J; Rattan, Satish; Cohen, Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Hypogammaglobulinemia/common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) may lead to disruption of the gut mucosal immune barrier. Collagenous infiltrative disorders of the intestinal tract (colitis, gastritis, sprue) constitute a relatively new spectrum of gastrointestinal disorders. Our aims were (1) to determine the association between immunoglobulin deficiency state like CVID and collagenous infiltrative disorders of the gut and (2) to study the clinic-pathologic characteristics and treatment outcomes in these patients. A retrospective search was conducted to identify cases with concurrence of these two conditions at an academic center from 2007 to 2013. Four such patients were identified from our database: three with collagenous colitis and one with collagenous gastritis. All patients with collagenous colitis had normal colonic mucosa while the patient with collagenous gastritis had nodular gastric mucosa. Only one patient out of four had decreased plasma cells in the submucosa as expected in low immunoglobulin states. All patients had improvement in their symptoms on immunoglobulin therapy with considerable remission on budesonide. Literature search revealed reporting of four similar patients. In conclusion, (1) the association between collagenous infiltrative disorders of the gut and CVID and its prompt response to immunoglobulins with effective maintenance with budesonide are novel findings. Our study also shows that the presence of plasma cells should not rule out the possibility of CVID. (2) In patients with chronic diarrhea, hypogammaglobulinemia and collagenous colitis/sprue should be considered for the available effective treatments such as immunoglobulins and budesonide. PMID:27053352

  8. Effects of Plantago ovata husk on levodopa (with Carbidopa) bioavailability in rabbits with autonomic gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    García, Juan J; Fernández, Nélida; Calle, Angela P; Diez, M José; Sahagún, Ana; Sierra, Matilde

    2009-07-01

    Gastrointestinal dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease. Fiber therapy could be used to reduce the symptoms of gastrointestinal motility disorders. In a previous study, we showed that slowed gastrointestinal motility modified levodopa pharmacokinetics: area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) decreased and the elimination was delayed. In this study, we evaluated whether or not the hydrosoluble fiber Plantago ovata husk is useful in improving levodopa pharmacokinetics in rabbits with autonomic gastrointestinal disorders induced by the administration of the anticholinergic biperiden. Levodopa + carbidopa (20:5 mg/kg), biperiden (100 microg/kg), and P. ovata husk (at two different doses: 100 and 400 mg/kg) were administered orally to rabbits for two periods of time (7 or 14 days). In all groups of animals, the AUC values were approximately 50% higher on the final day of treatment than on day 1. C(max) was also higher, with the greater increase at the 400 mg/kg dose of fiber, which resulted in a boost of approximately 35%. On day 1 of treatment and with both doses of fiber, AUC values were very similar to those obtained in previous work in rabbits with normal gastrointestinal motility, but the C(max) was lower. However, after 7 or 14 days, the AUC values were higher, but C(max) remained lower. The greatest differences were observed in plasma concentration before drug administration (C(min)), for which the highest increase was obtained with the dose of 400 mg/kg fiber on day 14 of treatment (349.8%). P. ovata husk could be beneficial in patients with Parkinson's disease because it regulates stool transit in the intestine and because it improves levodopa pharmacokinetics when gastrointestinal peristalsis is slowed. These changes could lead to a possible delay in the onset of dyskinesias and to changes in prognosis. PMID:19389862

  9. Ferumoxytol versus placebo in iron deficiency anemia: efficacy, safety, and quality of life in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David C; Dahl, Naomi V; Strauss, William E; Barish, Charles F; Hetzel, David J; Bernard, Kristine; Li, Zhu; Allen, Lee F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and can adversely affect quality of life. Oral iron is poorly tolerated in many patients with GI disorders. Ferumoxytol is approved for the intravenous treatment of IDA in patients with chronic kidney disease. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ferumoxytol in patients with IDA and concomitant GI disorders. Patients and methods This analysis included 231 patients with IDA and GI disorders from a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating ferumoxytol (510 mg ×2) versus placebo in patients who had failed or were intolerant of oral iron therapy. The primary study end point was the proportion of patients achieving a ≥20 g/L increase in hemoglobin (Hgb) from baseline to Week 5. Other end points included mean change in Hgb, proportion of patients achieving Hgb ≥120 g/L, mean change in transferrin saturation, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Results Significantly more patients with IDA receiving ferumoxytol achieved a ≥20 g/L increase in Hgb versus placebo (82.1% vs 1.7%, respectively; P<0.001). Mean increase in Hgb (28.0 g/L vs −1.0 g/L, respectively; P<0.001) significantly favored ferumoxytol treatment. Ferumoxytol-treated patients demonstrated significantly greater improvements than placebo-treated patients relative to their very poor baseline PRO scores posttreatment, including improvements in the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue questionnaire and various domains of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Ferumoxytol-treated patients had a low rate of adverse events. Conclusion In this study, ferumoxytol was shown to be an efficacious and generally well-tolerated treatment option for patients with IDA and underlying GI disorders who were unable to use or had a history of unsatisfactory oral iron therapy. PMID:27468245

  10. Pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders: revisiting gastrointestinal involvement and immune imbalance.

    PubMed

    Samsam, Mohtashem; Ahangari, Raheleh; Naser, Saleh A

    2014-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a group of neurodevelopmental abnormalities that begin in early childhood and are characterized by impairment of social communication and behavioral problems including restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. Several genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ASD, most of them are involved in neuronal synaptogenesis. A number of environmental factors and associated conditions such as gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities and immune imbalance have been linked to the pathophysiology of ASD. According to the March 2012 report released by United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of ASD has sharply increased during the recent years and one out of 88 children suffers now from ASD symptoms. Although there is a strong genetic base for the disease, several associated factors could have a direct link to the pathogenesis of ASD or act as modifiers of the genes thus aggravating the initial problem. Many children suffering from ASD have GI problems such as abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, gastroesophageal reflux, and intestinal infections. A number of studies focusing on the intestinal mucosa, its permeability, abnormal gut development, leaky gut, and other GI problem raised many questions but studies were somehow inconclusive and an expert panel of American Academy of Pediatrics has strongly recommended further investigation in these areas. GI tract has a direct connection with the immune system and an imbalanced immune response is usually seen in ASD children. Maternal infection or autoimmune diseases have been suspected. Activation of the immune system during early development may have deleterious effect on various organs including the nervous system. In this review we revisited briefly the GI and immune system abnormalities and neuropeptide imbalance and their role in the pathophysiology of ASD and discussed some future research directions. PMID:25110424

  11. Child and parent perceived food-induced gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michelle J; Moore, Carolyn E; Tsai, Cynthia M; Shulman, Robert J; Chumpitazi, Bruno P

    2014-03-01

    It is unknown whether children with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders identify specific foods that exacerbate their GI symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived role of food on GI symptoms and to determine the impact of food-induced symptoms on quality of life (QOL) in children with functional GI disorders. Between August and November 2010, 25 children ages 11 to 17 years old with functional GI disorders and a parent completed a food symptom association questionnaire and validated questionnaires assessing FGID symptoms and QOL. In addition, children completed a 24-hour food recall, participated in focus groups to identify problematic foods and any coping strategies, and discussed how their QOL was affected. Statistical analyses were conducted using χ2, t test, Mann-Whitney U test, Wilcoxon signed rank, and Spearman's ρ. Children identified a median of 11 (range=2 to 25) foods as exacerbating a GI symptom, with the most commonly identified foods being spicy foods, cow's milk, and pizza. Several coping strategies were identified, including consuming smaller portions, modifying foods, and avoiding a median of 8 (range=1 to 20) foods. Children reported that food-induced symptoms interfered with school performance, sports, and social activities. Although the parent's assessment of their child's QOL negatively correlated with the number of perceived symptom-inducing foods in their child, this relationship was not found in the children. Findings suggest that specific foods are perceived to exacerbate GI symptoms in children with functional GI disorders. In addition, despite use of several coping strategies, food-induced symptoms can adversely impact children's QOL in several important areas. PMID:24360501

  12. Herbal traditional Chinese medicine and its evidence base in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Schulze, Johannes

    2015-04-21

    Herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat several ailments, but its efficiency is poorly documented and hence debated, as opposed to modern medicine commonly providing effective therapies. The aim of this review article is to present a practical reference guide on the role of herbal TCM in managing gastrointestinal disorders, supported by systematic reviews and evidence based trials. A literature search using herbal TCM combined with terms for gastrointestinal disorders in PubMed and the Cochrane database identified publications of herbal TCM trials. Results were analyzed for study type, inclusion criteria, and outcome parameters. Quality of placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials was poor, mostly neglecting stringent evidence based diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. Accordingly, appropriate Cochrane reviews and meta-analyses were limited and failed to support valid, clinically relevant evidence based efficiency of herbal TCM in gastrointestinal diseases, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastric or duodenal ulcer, dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease. In conclusion, the use of herbal TCM to treat various diseases has an interesting philosophical background with a long history, but it received increasing skepticism due to the lack of evidence based efficiency as shown by high quality trials; this has now been summarized for gastrointestinal disorders, with TCM not recommended for most gastrointestinal diseases. Future studies should focus on placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials, herbal product quality and standard criteria for diagnosis, treatment, outcome, and assessment of adverse herb reactions. This approach will provide figures of risk/benefit profiles that hopefully are positive for at least some treatment modalities of herbal TCM. Proponents of modern herbal TCM best face these promising challenges of pragmatic modern medicine by bridging the gap

  13. Herbal traditional Chinese medicine and its evidence base in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Schulze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat several ailments, but its efficiency is poorly documented and hence debated, as opposed to modern medicine commonly providing effective therapies. The aim of this review article is to present a practical reference guide on the role of herbal TCM in managing gastrointestinal disorders, supported by systematic reviews and evidence based trials. A literature search using herbal TCM combined with terms for gastrointestinal disorders in PubMed and the Cochrane database identified publications of herbal TCM trials. Results were analyzed for study type, inclusion criteria, and outcome parameters. Quality of placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials was poor, mostly neglecting stringent evidence based diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. Accordingly, appropriate Cochrane reviews and meta-analyses were limited and failed to support valid, clinically relevant evidence based efficiency of herbal TCM in gastrointestinal diseases, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastric or duodenal ulcer, dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease. In conclusion, the use of herbal TCM to treat various diseases has an interesting philosophical background with a long history, but it received increasing skepticism due to the lack of evidence based efficiency as shown by high quality trials; this has now been summarized for gastrointestinal disorders, with TCM not recommended for most gastrointestinal diseases. Future studies should focus on placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials, herbal product quality and standard criteria for diagnosis, treatment, outcome, and assessment of adverse herb reactions. This approach will provide figures of risk/benefit profiles that hopefully are positive for at least some treatment modalities of herbal TCM. Proponents of modern herbal TCM best face these promising challenges of pragmatic modern medicine by bridging the

  14. Experiences of patients with chronic gastrointestinal conditions: in their own words

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are chronic conditions affecting millions of individuals in the United States. The symptoms are well-documented and can be debilitating. How these chronic gastrointestinal (GI) conditions impact the daily lives of those afflicted is not well documented, especially from a patient's perspective. Methods Here we describe data from a series of 22 focus groups held at three different academic medical centers with individuals suffering from chronic GI conditions. All focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed. Two research team members independently analyzed transcripts from each focus group following an agreed upon coding scheme. Results One-hundred-thirty-six individuals participated in our study, all with a chronic GI related condition. They candidly discussed three broad themes that characterize their daily lives: identification of disease and personal identity, medications and therapeutics, and daily adaptations. These all tie to our participants trying to deal with symptoms on a daily basis. We find that a recurrent topic underlying these themes is the dichotomy of experiencing uncertainty and striving for control. Conclusions Study participants' open dialogue and exchange of experiences living with a chronic GI condition provide insight into how these conditions shape day-to-day activities. Our findings provide fertile ground for discussions about how clinicians might best facilitate, acknowledge, and elicit patients' stories in routine care to better address their experience of illness. PMID:22401607

  15. Antisecretory activity of plants used to treat gastrointestinal disorders in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Claudia; Calzada, Fernando; Torres, Javier; González, Felipe; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2006-01-01

    Aqueous and methanolic extracts from 26 medicinal plants used in Mexico to treat gastrointestinal disorders were screened to evaluate their antisecretory activity on cholera toxin-induced intestinal secretion in rat jejunal loops model. Extracts were tested at a dose of 300 mg/kg. From 56 samples tested, both extracts from Chiranthodendron pentadactylon, Hippocratea excelsa and Ocimum basilicum were the most potent with inhibition values ranging from 68.0 to 87.6%. On the other hand, the methanolic extract of Geranium mexicanum (aerial parts) and the aqueous extract of Bocconia frutescens showed the highest activity with inhibition values of 93.4 and 86.0%, respectively. The results obtained in this study give some scientific support to the use of the Mexican medicinal plants employed for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea. PMID:16174555

  16. Lead Assessment in Biological Samples of Children with Different Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faheem; Ullah, Naeem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Khan, Ajmal; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Khan, Zahid; Farooq, Umar

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) levels have been evaluated in the biological samples of children with different gastrointestinal disorders. Blood, scalp hair, and urine samples of children (of age 4-10 years) complaining about different gastrointestinal disorders were analyzed. For comparison, age matched healthy subjects were also included in this study. Biological samples were digested in a microwave oven prior to Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Significant differences in Pb profile were found between the diseased and referent children. Elevated Pb contents were observed in case of diseased children than WHO permissible limit, while normal results were obtained for healthy referents. The results were compared with those of healthy children having the same age, socioeconomic status, and residential areas. PMID:26085058

  17. Child and Parent Perceived Food-Induced Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Quality of Life in Children with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Michelle J.; Moore, Carolyn E.; Tsai, Cynthia M.; Shulman, Robert J.; Chumpitazi, Bruno P.

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) identify specific foods that exacerbate their gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. The objectives of this study were to determine the perceived role of food on GI symptoms and to determine the impact of food-induced symptoms on quality of life (QOL) in children with FGIDs. Between August and November 2010, 25 children ages 11–17 years old with FGIDs and a parent completed a food symptom association questionnaire and validated questionnaires assessing FGID symptoms and QOL. In addition, children completed a 24-hour food recall, participated in focus groups to identify problematic foods and any coping strategies, and discussed how their QOL was affected. Statistical analyses were conducted using chi-squared, t-testing, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed-rank, and Spearman’s rho. Children identified a median of 11 (range 2–25) foods as exacerbating a GI symptom, with the most commonly identified foods being spicy foods, cow’s milk, and pizza. Several coping strategies were identified including consuming smaller portions, modifying foods, and avoiding a median of 8 (range 1–20) foods. Children reported that food-induced symptoms interfered with school performance, sports, and social activities. Although the parent’s assessment of their child’s QOL negatively correlated with the number of perceived symptom-inducing foods in their child, this relationship was not found in the children. Findings suggest that specific foods are perceived to exacerbate GI symptoms in children with FGIDs. Moreover, despite use of several coping strategies, food-induced symptoms may adversely impact children’s QOL in several important areas. PMID:24360501

  18. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  19. Organ-specific eosinophilic disorders of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dagmar; Wardlaw, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that increase in various tissues in a variety of disorders. Locally, they can be involved in the initiation and propagation of diverse inflammatory responses. In this review, the clinical association of eosinophils with diseases of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract is summarized. An approach to determining the causal role of eosinophils in these diseases is presented. Recent findings concerning molecular diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20392477

  20. [Cognitive disorders in patients with chronic mercury intoxication].

    PubMed

    Katamanova, E V; Shevchenko, O I; Lakhman, O L; Denisova, I A

    2014-01-01

    To assess severity of cognitive disorders in chronic mercury intoxication, the authors performed claster and discrimination analysis of neuropsychologic and neurophysiologic research data from workers exposed to mercury during long length of service, from patients with early and marked stages of chronic mercurial intoxication. Cognitive disorders in chronic mercurial intoxication have three severity degrees, in the light degree disorders patients demonstrate lower amplitude of cognitive evoked potentials, poor long-term memory and associative thinking. Moderate cognitive disorders are characterized by decreased visual, long-term memory, concentration of attention, poor optic and spatial gnosis. Marked cognitive disorders with chronic mercurial intoxication present with more decreased long-term, short-term, picturesque memory, poor intellect, optic and spatial gnosis and associative thinking. PMID:25051667

  1. Effect of the herbal medicine dai-kenchu-to on gastrointestinal motility in patients with megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) and chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP): report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Ueno, Shigeru; Matuda, Hiromitu; Hinoki, Tomoya; Kato, Yuko

    2009-04-01

    Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo medicine), composed of zanthoxylum fruit, ginseng root, dried ginger rhizome and malt sugar, is clinically effective for postoperative ileus and chronic constipation. MMIHS and CIIP are severe motility disorder associated with high morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DKT on functional intestinal obstruction. DKT was clinically effective for gastrointestinal motility in a case with MMIHS, but not effective in one with CIIP. MMIHS and CIIP are speculated to have different pathogenesis regarding gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction based upon the effect of this drug. PMID:21318994

  2. Bugs and Guts: Practical Applications of Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Danielle; Yeh, Ann Ming

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics are foods or products that contain live microorganisms that benefit the host when administered. In this clinical review, we evaluate the literature associated with using probiotics in common pediatric gastrointestinal disorders, focusing specifically on antibiotic-associated diarrhea, acute gastroenteritis, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), colic, inflammatory bowel disease, and functional gastrointestinal diseases. Meta-analysis of several randomized controlled trials have confirmed benefit for the administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii to prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea and to treat acute infectious diarrhea. Individual studies have also suggested benefit of probiotics to prevent acute gastroenteritis and serve as an adjunct in ulcerative colitis, pouchitis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, CDI, functional abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, and colic in breastfed babies. Although promising, larger well-designed studies need to confirm these findings. There is currently insufficient evidence to recommend probiotics for the treatment of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome or Crohn's disease. PMID:26538058

  3. The incidence and prevalence of comorbid gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, ocular, pulmonary, and renal disorders in multiple sclerosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reider, Nadia; Stuve, Olaf; Trojano, Maria; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Cutter, Gary R; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Background: As new disease-modifying therapies emerge a better knowledge of the risk of comorbid disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) is needed. Objective: To estimate the incidence and prevalence of comorbid gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, ocular, pulmonary, and renal disorders in MS. Methods: We systematically reviewed the world literature by searching PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, the Web of Knowledge, and reference lists of retrieved articles. For selected articles, one reviewer abstracted data using a standardized form. The abstraction was verified by a second reviewer. The quality of all selected studies was assessed. For population-based studies we quantitatively assessed studies using the I2 statistic, and conducted random effects meta-analyses. Results: Study designs were heterogeneous with respect to populations, case definitions, and methods of ascertainment. Incidence of the studied comorbidities was rarely reported. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic lung disease had a prevalence of more than 10% in the MS population. Irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, cataracts and glaucoma were more common than expected in the MS population. Conclusion: Although they have been the subject of less study than other comorbidities, irritable bowel syndrome, arthritis, and chronic lung disease are common in the MS population and occur more often than expected when compared to the general population. PMID:25538150

  4. Burnout in Patients with Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clementz, Gunilla; Borsbo, Bjorn; Norrbrink, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess burnout and its relation to pain, disability, mood and health-related quality of life in a group of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Forty-five patients with chronic WAD ([greater than or equal to] 3 months) referred to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation centre were included. A questionnaire…

  5. Hypnosis Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Comprehensive Review of the Empirical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Olafur S

    2015-10-01

    Hypnotherapy has been investigated for 30 years as a treatment for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. There are presently 35 studies in the published empirical literature, including 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have assessed clinical outcomes of such treatment. This body of research is reviewed comprehensively in this article. Twenty-four of the studies have tested hypnotherapy for adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 5 have focused on IBS or abdominal pain in children. All IBS hypnotherapy studies have reported significant improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms, and 7 out of 10 RCTs in adults and all 3 RCTs in pediatric patient samples found superior outcomes for hypnosis compared to control groups. Collectively this body of research shows unequivocally that for both adults and children with IBS, hypnosis treatment is highly efficacious in reducing bowel symptoms and can offer lasting and substantial symptom relief for a large proportion of patients who do not respond adequately to usual medical treatment approaches. For other GI disorders the evidence is more limited, but preliminary indications of therapeutic potential can be seen in the single randomized controlled trials published to date on hypnotherapy for functional dyspepsia, functional chest pain, and ulcerative colitis. Further controlled hypnotherapy trials in those three disorders should be a high priority. The mechanisms underlying the impact of hypnosis on GI problems are still unclear, but findings from a number of studies suggest that they involve both modulation of gut functioning and changes in the brain's handling of sensory signals from the GI tract. PMID:26264539

  6. Recovery from chronic factitious disorder (Munchausen's syndrome): a personal account.

    PubMed

    Bass, Christopher; Taylor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This case report provides an account by a patient (with permission) of chronic factitious disorder and the factors that led to recovery. Such accounts are extremely rare in the literature. This account also throws into sharp focus current controversies in the classification of factitious disorders. PMID:24343927

  7. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Motility Disorders in Women, Gastroparesis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Zia, Jasmine K; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the sex differences in upper gastrointestinal (GI) motility for both healthy and common dysmotility conditions. It focuses on gastroesophageal reflux disease and other esophageal motor disorders for the esophagus and on gastroparesis and accelerated gastric emptying for the stomach. It also describes differences in upper GI motility signs and symptoms during each female hormonal stage (ie, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause) for both healthy participants and those suffering from one of the aforementioned upper GI dysmotility conditions. More research still needs to be conducted to better understand sex differences in upper GI motility. PMID:27261896

  8. Methylphenidate and Comorbid Anxiety Disorder in Children with both Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder and ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Nolan, Edith E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine if comorbid anxiety disorder is associated with differential response to immediate release methylphenidate (MPH-IR) in children with both ADHD and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). Method: Children with (n = 17) and without (n = 37) diagnosed anxiety disorder (ANX) were evaluated in an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial…

  9. [Fiber, food intolerances, FODMAPs, gluten and functional gastrointestinal disorders--update 2014].

    PubMed

    Leiß, O

    2014-11-01

    The controversial effects of dietary fiber on symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders are summarized. Studies concerning adverse reaction to foods are mentioned and the possible role of food allergy and food intolerances, especially pseudoallergic reactions to biogenes amines, in symptom provocation is discussed. The known effects of lactose deficiency and fructose malabsorption are reviewed. The FODMAP concept (fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols) is presented in more detail and recent studies on pathophysiological effects of FODMAP constituents and of therapeutic effects of a low FODMAP diet on symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome are discussed. Finally, studies on the new disorder non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are summarized and the state of the discussion whether wheat intolerance is due to gluten or the grains is given. PMID:25390215

  10. Action of pinaverium bromide, a calcium-antagonist, on gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Christen, M O

    1990-01-01

    1. The evidence reviewed here indicates that pinaverium bromide (Dicetel) relaxes gastrointestinal (GI) structures primarily by inhibiting Ca2+ influx through potential-dependent channels of surface membranes of smooth muscle cells. 2. The in vivo selectivity of pinaverium bromide for the GI tract appears to be due mainly to its pharmacokinetic properties. Because of its low absorption (typical for quaternary ammonium compounds) and marked hepatobiliary excretion, most of the orally-administered dose of pinaverium bromide remains in the GI tract. 3. Orally-administered pinaverium bromide does not elicit adverse cardiovascular side-effects at doses that effectively relieve GI spasm, pain, transit disturbances and other symptoms related to motility disorders. 4. Pinaverium bromide is the only Ca2(+)-antagonist with known therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and certain other functional intestinal disorders. PMID:2177709

  11. Community-based study on psychological comorbidity in functional gastrointestinal disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Justin C Y

    2011-04-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) is one of the commonest digestive diseases worldwide. Current evidence supports a bio-psycho-social pathophysiological model for FGID, which underscores the importance of psychological and social factors in development of FGID. Concomitant psychological disorders, which include anxiety, depression and somatization, have been shown to be associated with FGID in both specialist and community-based studies. This suggests that the association is genuine rather than biased observation in referral centers. Furthermore, psychological distress such as depression, anxiety and phobia are strongly correlated with severity of FGID symptoms. There are biologically plausible mechanisms that support the causal role of psychological disorders in FGID. Psychological distress, in particular anxiety, can induce aggravation of visceral hyperalgesia as well as hypervigilance in FGID patients. This leads to poorer quality of life and increased utilization of healthcare service in addition to worsening of symptoms. Despite the numerous reports on the potential therapeutic value of psychotropic agents and psychological intervention, the importance of screening for concomitant psychological disorder in FGID patients has not been fully recognized in daily practice. Most FGID patients tend to have very low awareness of their mood symptoms, which lead to delayed diagnosis, deterioration of disease and unnecessary investigations. Many of these patients may be reluctant to accept the diagnosis of concomitant psychological disorders and therefore a good doctor-patient rapport and therapeutic relationship are essential for management of these patients. PMID:21443703

  12. Impaired adaptation of gastrointestinal motility following chronic stress in maternally separated rats.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; Babygirija, Reji; Cerjak, Diana; Yoshimoto, Sazu; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to early life stress causes increased stress responsiveness and permanent changes in the central nervous system. We recently showed that delayed gastric emptying (GE) and accelerated colonic transit (CT) in response to acute restraint stress (ARS) were completely restored following chronic homotypic stress (CHS) in rats via upregulation of hypothalamic oxytocin (OXT) expression. However, it is unknown whether early life stress affects hypothalamic OXT circuits and gastrointestinal motor function. Neonatal rats were subjected to maternal separation (MS) for 180 min/day for 2 wk. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated-plus-maze test. GE and CT were measured under nonstressed (NS), ARS, and CHS conditions. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and OXT in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was evaluated by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. MS increased anxiety-like behaviors. ARS delayed GE and accelerated CT in control and MS rats. After CHS, delayed GE and accelerated CT were restored in control, but not MS, rats. CRF mRNA expression was significantly increased in response to ARS in control and MS rats. Increased CRF mRNA expression was still observed following CHS in MS, but not control, rats. In response to CHS, OXT mRNA expression was significantly increased in control, but not MS, rats. The number of OXT-immunoreactive cells was increased following CHS in the magnocellular part of the PVN in control, but not MS, rats. MS impairs the adaptation response of gastrointestinal motility following CHS. The mechanism of the impaired adaptation involves downregulation of OXT and upregulation of CRF in the hypothalamus in MS rats. PMID:22241856

  13. Prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders in Taiwan: questionnaire-based survey for adults based on the Rome III criteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Yuan; Chen, Po-Hon; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Pan, Wen-Harn; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Wu, Shin-Jiuan; Yeh, Nai-Hua; Tang, Ren-Bin; Wu, Lite; James, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are a group of disorders of the digestive system in which the chronic or recurrent symptoms cannot be explained by the presence of structural or tissue abnormality. This survey used a modified Rome III questionnaire on the health and nutrition status of a general population in Taiwan during 2005-2008. A total of 4,275 responders completed the questionnaire. The sample was evenly distributed for men (n=2,137) and women (n=2,138). The prevalence of FGID was 26.2%. Unspecified functional bowel disorder was the most prevalent (8.9%). The second was functional dyspepsia (5.3%), and the third were irritable bowel syndrome (4.4%) and functional constipation (4.4%). Women had a greater prevalence than males (33.2% compared to 22.4%, p<0.05) with regards to total FGID. Most categories of FGID were significantly prominent in women, except functional diarrhea. The FGID groups took fewer servings of vegetables and fruits than the non-FGID group each day (vegetables 2.51 vs 2.70, p<0.001; fruits 0.82 vs 0.91, p<0.001). Smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel nut chewing had no significant impaction on prevalence of FGID. The mean BSRS (brief-symptom rating scale) for screening depression and suicide ideation was higher in the FGID group (2.86 vs 1.63, p<0.001). In conclusion, FGID diagnosed with Rome III criteria are not uncommon in Taiwan's general population. Subjects who met the Rome III criteria for FGID in Taiwan were younger, had less vegetables and fruits intake, higher BSRS scores and were of greater female predominance. PMID:23017318

  14. Increased prevalence of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID) in pediatric PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes (PHTS)

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Carol J.; Ngeow, Joanne; Collins, Margaret H.; Martin, Lisa J.; Putnam, Philip E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Marsolo, Keith; Eng, Charis; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes (PHTS) are a collection of disorders caused by germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID) are rare diseases characterized by food-induced, eosinophil-dominant inflammation in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. On the basis of our clinical observations of several patients with EGID-PHTS, we investigated whether there is an association between these two disorders. Methods: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) Informatics for Integrating Biology & the Bedside (i2b2) warehouse was queried for the years 2007-2012 using ICD 9 codes for PTEN-related diseases; the results were cross-referenced with participants enrolled in the Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorder’s EGID database to identify patients with both disorders. Similarly, the Cleveland Clinic Genomic Medicine Institute PTEN database was queried for cases between 2005 and 2012. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, history of PHTS, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and/or colonoscopy with at least one histologic EGID diagnosis confirmed by a CCHMC pathologist. Pearson’s Chi-square was used to determine the odds of EGID enrichment in PHTS. Results: Of the 1,058,260 CCHMC distinct patients identified by the i2b2 search, 53 had clinical diagnoses suggestive of PHTS. Thirteen of the 53 had PTEN mutations, with 8/13 (62%) having had an EGD and/or colonoscopy. Five of the 8 had confirmed EGID. At the Cleveland Clinic, 3/75 patients with PHTS had confirmed EGID. CCHMC i2b2 query data showed a substantial enrichment of EGID in PHTS (OR=272; CI 89-831, p<0.0001). An EGID prevalence estimate from the i2b2 query supported a marked enrichment of EGID in PHTS in the Cleveland Clinic database (p<0.0001). Among the 8 subjects with EGID and PHTS, the age at EGID and PHTS diagnosis was 7.6 ± 3.2 and 7.9 ± 5.8 years, respectively. Patients with EGID-PHTS had excess eosinophils

  15. Bite force and temporomandibular disorder in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, B; Kjellberg, H; Kiliaridis, S

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional condition of the stomatognathic system in children suffering from juvenile chronic arthritis, with respect to bite force and temporomandibular disorder in relation to radiographic abnormalities of the mandibular condyle, occlusal factors and systemic disease parameters. Thirty-five children with juvenile chronic arthritis were compared to 89 healthy children with an Angle Class I occlusion and 62 children with an Angle Class II malocclusion. Subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorder and radiographic mandibular condylar changes were more common in children with juvenile chronic arthritis than in the two comparison groups. Maximal molar and incisal bite forces and maximal molar bite force endurance times were also significantly reduced in children with juvenile chronic arthritis. It is concluded that the differences between the groups are caused mainly by the systemic inflammatory disease itself, but a functional influence of weakened masticatory muscles cannot be excluded. PMID:7472737

  16. Probiotics in the mechanism of protection against gut inflammation and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Dylag, Katarzyna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Surmiak, Marcin; Szmyd, Jakub; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of experimental and clinical evidence supports the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota markedly influences function and the structure of the mucosal lining. Intestinal microbiota can potentially cause damage to the mucosa either directly by releasing toxins or indirectly by causing a detrimental immune response. Probiotic bacteria have been defined as live microorganisms, which when consumed in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit for the host. In recent years, the therapeutic and preventive application of probiotics for several gastrointestinal and liver disorders has received increasing attention. Probiotics appear to be beneficial for premature infants who suffer necrotizing enterocolitis. The effectiveness of certain probiotics as treatment for infectious and antibioticassociated diarrhea in adults and for allergic disorders in children has been supported by clinical studies; however, the potential mechanism( s) remains to be studied. Experimental studies and clinical trials for probiotic treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have yielded conflicting results. Daily intake of selected probiotics was effective in the prevention of ulcerative colitis and the attenuation of the active onset of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis but others failed to show a beneficial effect. The combination of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces boulardi and the treatment with Escherichia coli Nissle were found beneficial in inducing and maintaining remission of disease activity of gut inflammation and moderately severe ulcerative colitis. Probiotic bacteria were considered in some studies as a safe adjuvant when added to triple eradication therapy against the symptoms induced by the major gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori. This review attempted to overview these new exciting advances in the role of these microbes in the pathogenesis, management and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23755726

  17. Incidence and recent trends in functional gastrointestinal disorders, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amelia G; Hu, Zheng; Cost, Angelia A

    2016-06-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common chronic conditions with an unknown pathophysiology and etiology. FGIDs elevate healthcare costs and cause substantial burden to public health and the military, including diminished readiness, productivity, and quality of life. This retrospective cohort study of active component U.S. military personnel covered a 10-year surveillance period, 2005-2014. The Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) was the data source. Incident cases were identified and rates were calculated and stratified by important covariates. Trends were described over the surveillance period. Incidence rates among deployed personnel were compared to rates in non-deployed personnel, stratified by age and sex. An increasing trend in functional constipation was observed during 2005-2012. Being female, black, in the Army or Air Force, and younger than 20 years of age or 40 years of age or older was associated with higher incidence rates. Deployment-exposed personnel had incidence rates that were 53% higher than those of non-deployed personnel. Elevated rates in personnel younger than 20 years of age and deployed personnel evoke interest concerning readiness and cost implications for the Military Health System. These subgroups should be examined in future studies. PMID:27362344

  18. Management of chronic pain with chronic opioid therapy in patients with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ping; Compton, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs), whether active or in remission, are often encountered in patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Clinicians are challenged when managing chronic pain while facing substance abuse issues during the course of chronic opioid therapy (COT). Further, the interrelated behavioral symptomatology of addiction and chronic pain suggests that if one disorder is untreated, effective treatment of the other in not possible. Incomplete understanding of the overlapping presentations of the two disorders, coupled with insufficient management of both conditions, leads to undertreated pain and premature discharge of SUD patients from pain treatment. In order to achieve pain relief and optimal functionality, both conditions need to be carefully managed. This paper reviews the prevalence of SUDs in chronic pain patents; the overlapping presentation of the two disorders; risk factors and stratification for addiction; identification of addiction in the chronic pain population; and suggestions for treating patients with COT, with an emphasis on relapse prevention. With appropriate assessment and treatment, COT for chronic pain patients with a history of SUD can be successful, leading to improved functionality and quality of life. PMID:24341916

  19. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by rupture of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis: an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiltrop, Nick; Vanhauwaert, Anke; Palmers, Pieter-Jan Liesbeth Herman; Cool, Mike; Deboever, Guido; Lambrecht, Guy

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 52-year old female patient with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia. Repeated endoscopic investigation revealed no diagnosis, but contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. A distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, most frequently associated with chronic pancreatitis. Erosion of a peripancreatic artery by a pseudocyst can cause a pseudoaneurysm and rupture occurs in up to 10% of the cases. Bleeding from a pseudocyst wall or rupture of an atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysm is rare. Angiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and endoscopic findings can be diagnostic in the majority of cases. Angiographic embolization or surgery are both therapeutic options depending on underlying nonvascular pancreas related indications requiring surgery. We discuss diagnostic pitfalls and current therapeutic strategies in the management of this disease. PMID:26712055

  20. Use of Clostridium botulinum toxin in gastrointestinal motility disorders in children

    PubMed Central

    Arbizu, Ricardo A; Rodriguez, Leonel

    2015-01-01

    More than a century has elapsed since the identification of Clostridia neurotoxins as the cause of paralytic diseases. Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous group of Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming, obligate anaerobic bacteria that produce a potent neurotoxin. Eight different Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins have been described (A-H) and 5 of those cause disease in humans. These toxins cause paralysis by blocking the presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. Advantage can be taken of this blockade to alleviate muscle spams due to excessive neural activity of central origin or to weaken a muscle for treatment purposes. In therapeutic applications, minute quantities of botulinum neurotoxin type A are injected directly into selected muscles. The Food and Drug Administration first approved botulinum toxin (BT) type A in 1989 for the treatment of strabismus and blepharospasm associated with dystonia in patients 12 years of age or older. Ever since, therapeutic applications of BT have expanded to other systems, including the gastrointestinal tract. Although only a single fatality has been reported to our knowledge with use of BT for gastroenterological conditions, there are significant complications ranging from minor pain, rash and allergic reactions to pneumothorax, bowel perforation and significant paralysis of tissues surrounding the injection (including vocal cord paralysis and dysphagia). This editorial describes the clinical experience and evidence for the use BT in gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. PMID:25992183

  1. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Refractory Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Shino; Ishimura, Norihisa; Mikami, Hironobu; Okimoto, Eiko; Uno, Goichi; Tamagawa, Yuji; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Sato, Shuichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). However, the prevalence and clinical conditions of SIBO in patients with FGID remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the frequency of SIBO in patients with refractory FGID. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with refractory FGID based on Rome III criteria. A glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) was performed using a gas analyzer after an overnight fast, with breath hydrogen concentration measured at baseline and every 15 minutes after administration of glucose for a total of 3 hours. A peak hydrogen value ≥ 10 ppm above the basal value between 60 and 120 minutes after administration of glucose was diagnosed as SIBO. Results A total of 38 FGID patients, including 11 with functional dyspepsia (FD), 10 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and 17 with overlapping with FD and IBS, were enrolled. Of those, 2 (5.3%) were diagnosed with SIBO (one patient diagnosed with FD; the other with overlapping FD and IBS). Their symptoms were clearly improved and breath hydrogen levels decreased to normal following levofloxacin administration for 7 days. Conclusions Two patients initially diagnosed with FD and IBS were also diagnosed with SIBO as assessed by GHBT. Although the frequency of SIBO is low among patients with FGID, it may be important to be aware of SIBO as differential diagnosis when examining patients with refractory gastrointestinal symptoms, especially bloating, as a part of routine clinical care. PMID:26554916

  2. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori. PMID:24031496

  3. Brief Report: Whole Blood Serotonin Levels and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Marler, Sarah; Ferguson, Bradley J; Lee, Evon Batey; Peters, Brittany; Williams, Kent C; McDonnell, Erin; Macklin, Eric A; Levitt, Pat; Gillespie, Catherine Hagan; Anderson, George M; Margolis, Kara Gross; Beversdorf, David Q; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin levels are observed in more than 25% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are also common in ASD but have not previously been examined in relationship with hyperserotonemia, despite the synthesis of serotonin in the gut. In 82 children and adolescents with ASD, we observed a correlation between a quantitative measure of lower GI symptoms and whole blood serotonin levels. No significant association was seen between functional constipation diagnosis and serotonin levels in the hyperserotonemia range, suggesting that this correlation is not driven by a single subgroup. More specific assessment of gut function, including the microbiome, will be necessary to evaluate the contribution of gut physiology to serotonin levels in ASD. PMID:26527110

  4. What effect does chiropractic treatment have on gastrointestinal (GI) disorders: a narrative review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Katherine; Asgharifar, Sepideh; Gleberzon, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a narrative review of the literature of studies describing the management of disorders of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract using ‘chiropractic therapy’ broadly defined here as spinal manipulation therapy, mobilizations, soft tissue therapy, modalities and stretches. Search limiters include access to full text studies published between 1980 and November 2012 in peer-reviewed journals, English language only involving human subjects. Twenty-one articles were found that met our inclusion criteria. Retrievable articles varied from case reports to clinical trials to review articles of management options. The majority of articles chronicling patient experiences under chiropractic care reported they demonstrated mild to moderate improvements in presenting symptoms. No adverse side effects were reported. This suggests chiropractic care can be considered as an adjunctive therapy for patients with various GI conditions providing there are no co-morbidities. PMID:26136604

  5. Brief Report: Whole Blood Serotonin Levels and Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Sarah; Ferguson, Bradley J.; Lee, Evon Batey; Peters, Brittany; Williams, Kent C.; McDonnell, Erin; Macklin, Eric A.; Levitt, Pat; Gillespie, Catherine Hagan; Anderson, George M.; Margolis, Kara Gross; Beversdorf, David Q.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin levels are observed in more than 25 % of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Co-occurring gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are also common in ASD but have not previously been examined in relationship with hyperserotonemia, despite the synthesis of serotonin in the gut. In 82 children and adolescents with ASD, we observed a correlation between a quantitative measure of lower GI symptoms and whole blood serotonin levels. No significant association was seen between functional constipation diagnosis and serotonin levels in the hyperserotonemia range, suggesting that this correlation is not driven by a single subgroup. More specific assessment of gut function, including the microbiome, will be necessary to evaluate the contribution of gut physiology to serotonin levels in ASD. PMID:26527110

  6. Epstein–Barr Virus-Positive T/NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Manifested as Gastrointestinal Perforations and Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai-Juan; Li, Ji; Song, Hong-Mei; Li, Zheng-Hong; Dong, Mei; Zhou, Xiao-Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Systemic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) of childhood is a highly aggressive EBV-positive T/natural killer (NK)-cell LPD, which emerges in the background of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or shortly after primary acute EBV infection. The clinical presentations of CAEBV are varied; patients with atypical manifestations are easily misdiagnosed. We described a 14-year-old boy suffering from digestive disorders and intermittent fever for 1 year and 9 months, whose conditions worsened and skin lesions occurred 2 months before hospitalization. He was diagnosed as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and treated accordingly. His other clinical features, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated inflammatory marks, were found in hospitalization. The boy suffered from repeatedly spontaneous intestinal perforations shortly after hospitalization and died of intestinal hemorrhea. The pathological results of intestine and skin both showed EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD (lymphoma stage). There are rare studies reporting gastrointestinal perforations in EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD, let alone repeatedly spontaneous perforations. Based on the clinical features and pathological results of this patient, the disease progressed from CAEBV (T-cell type) to systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood (lymphoma). Not all the patients with CAEBV could have unusual patterns of anti-EBV antibodies. However, the presence of high EBV loads (EBV-encoded early small ribonucleic acid (RNA) (EBER) in affected tissues and/or EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in peripheral blood) is essential for diagnosing CAEBV. Maybe because of his less common clinical features for CAEBV and negative anti-EBV antibodies, the boy was not diagnosed correctly. We should have emphasized the test for EBER or EBV-DNA. Meanwhile, for the IBD patients whose manifestations were not typical, and whose conditions were not improved by

  7. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in autism spectrum disorder: the role of the mitochondria and the enteric microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Richard E.; Rose, Shannon; Slattery, John; MacFabe, Derrick F.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects a significant number of individuals worldwide with the prevalence continuing to grow. It is becoming clear that a large subgroup of individuals with ASD demonstrate abnormalities in mitochondrial function as well as gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Interestingly, GI disturbances are common in individuals with mitochondrial disorders and have been reported to be highly prevalent in individuals with co-occurring ASD and mitochondrial disease. The majority of individuals with ASD and mitochondrial disorders do not manifest a primary genetic mutation, raising the possibility that their mitochondrial disorder is acquired or, at least, results from a combination of genetic susceptibility interacting with a wide range of environmental triggers. Mitochondria are very sensitive to both endogenous and exogenous environmental stressors such as toxicants, iatrogenic medications, immune activation, and metabolic disturbances. Many of these same environmental stressors have been associated with ASD, suggesting that the mitochondria could be the biological link between environmental stressors and neurometabolic abnormalities associated with ASD. This paper reviews the possible links between GI abnormalities, mitochondria, and ASD. First, we review the link between GI symptoms and abnormalities in mitochondrial function. Second, we review the evidence supporting the notion that environmental stressors linked to ASD can also adversely affect both mitochondria and GI function. Third, we review the evidence that enteric bacteria that are overrepresented in children with ASD, particularly Clostridia spp., produce short-chain fatty acid metabolites that are potentially toxic to the mitochondria. We provide an example of this gut–brain connection by highlighting the propionic acid rodent model of ASD and the clinical evidence that supports this animal model. Lastly, we discuss the potential therapeutic approaches that could be helpful for GI

  8. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in autism spectrum disorder: the role of the mitochondria and the enteric microbiome.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E; Rose, Shannon; Slattery, John; MacFabe, Derrick F

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects a significant number of individuals worldwide with the prevalence continuing to grow. It is becoming clear that a large subgroup of individuals with ASD demonstrate abnormalities in mitochondrial function as well as gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Interestingly, GI disturbances are common in individuals with mitochondrial disorders and have been reported to be highly prevalent in individuals with co-occurring ASD and mitochondrial disease. The majority of individuals with ASD and mitochondrial disorders do not manifest a primary genetic mutation, raising the possibility that their mitochondrial disorder is acquired or, at least, results from a combination of genetic susceptibility interacting with a wide range of environmental triggers. Mitochondria are very sensitive to both endogenous and exogenous environmental stressors such as toxicants, iatrogenic medications, immune activation, and metabolic disturbances. Many of these same environmental stressors have been associated with ASD, suggesting that the mitochondria could be the biological link between environmental stressors and neurometabolic abnormalities associated with ASD. This paper reviews the possible links between GI abnormalities, mitochondria, and ASD. First, we review the link between GI symptoms and abnormalities in mitochondrial function. Second, we review the evidence supporting the notion that environmental stressors linked to ASD can also adversely affect both mitochondria and GI function. Third, we review the evidence that enteric bacteria that are overrepresented in children with ASD, particularly Clostridia spp., produce short-chain fatty acid metabolites that are potentially toxic to the mitochondria. We provide an example of this gut-brain connection by highlighting the propionic acid rodent model of ASD and the clinical evidence that supports this animal model. Lastly, we discuss the potential therapeutic approaches that could be helpful for GI

  9. Psychosocial Stress in Nurses With Shift Work Schedule Is Associated With Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Mingoo; Oh, Da Yeon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Ji Won

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the role of psychosocial problems and their associations with rotating shift work in the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Methods In this cross-sectional observation study, survey was administered to nurses and nurse assistants in a referral hospital. In addition to demographic questions, subjects were asked to complete the Rome III Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Rome III Psychosocial Alarm Questionnaire. Results Responses from 301 subjects were assessed. The overall prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional dyspepsia (FD) were 15.0% and 19.6%, respectively. Psychosocial alarms were prevalent in the nursing personnel (74.8% with alarm presence and 23.3% with serious condition) and were more frequent among rotating shift workers (84.7% vs. 74.5% for alarm presence and 28.1% vs. 13.3% for serious condition). The prevalence of both IBS and FD significantly increased with psychosocial risk. An independent risk factor for IBS was serious psychosocial alarm (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 10.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.30–88.99; P = 0.028). Serious psychosocial alarm was an independent risk factor for FD (aOR, 7.84; 95% CI, 1.98–31.02; P = 0.003). Marriage (aOR 0.30; 95% CI, 0.09–0.93; P = 0.037) was associated with the decreased risk of FD. Conclusions The high prevalence of psychosocial stress among nurses who work rotating shifts is associated with the development of functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25230903

  10. Bloating and functional gastro-intestinal disorders: Where are we and where are we going?

    PubMed Central

    Iovino, Paola; Bucci, Cristina; Tremolaterra, Fabrizio; Santonicola, Antonella; Chiarioni, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Bloating is one of the most common and bothersome symptoms complained by a large proportion of patients. This symptom has been described with various definitions, such as sensation of a distended abdomen or an abdominal tension or even excessive gas in the abdomen, although bloating should probably be defined as the feeling (e.g. a subjective sensation) of increased pressure within the abdomen. It is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome, but when bloating is not part of another functional bowel or gastrointestinal disorder it is included as an independent entity in Rome III criteria named functional bloating. In terms of diagnosis, major difficulties are due to the lack of measurable parameters to assess and grade this symptom. In addition, it is still unclear to what extent the individual patient complaint of subjective bloating correlates with the objective evidence of abdominal distension. In fact, despite its clinical, social and economic relevance, bloating lacks a clear pathophysiology explanation, and an effective management endorsement, turning this common symptom into a true challenge for both patients and clinicians. Different theories on bloating etiology call into questions an increased luminal contents (gas, stools, liquid or fat) and/or an impaired abdominal empting and/or an altered intra-abdominal volume displacement (abdomino-phrenic theory) and/or an increased perception of intestinal stimuli with a subsequent use of empirical treatments (diet modifications, antibiotics and/or probiotics, prokinetic drugs, antispasmodics, gas reducing agents and tricyclic antidepressants). In this review, our aim was to review the latest knowledge on bloating physiopathology and therapeutic options trying to shed lights on those processes where a clinician could intervene to modify disease course. PMID:25339827

  11. Practice guidance on the management of acute and chronic gastrointestinal problems arising as a result of treatment for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Susan E; Gillespie, Catherine; Allum, William H; Swarbrick, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Backgound The number of patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms after cancer therapies which have a moderate or severe impact on quality of life is similar to the number diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease annually. However, in contrast to patients with inflammatory bowel disease, most of these patients are not referred for gastroenterological assessment. Clinicians who do see these patients are often unaware of the benefits of targeted investigation (which differ from those required to exclude recurrent cancer), the range of available treatments and how the pathological processes underlying side effects of cancer treatment differ from those in benign GI disorders. This paper aims to help clinicians become aware of the problem and suggests ways in which the panoply of syndromes can be managed. Methods A multidisciplinary literature review was performed to develop guidance to facilitate clinical management of GI side effects of cancer treatments. Results Different pathological processes within the GI tract may produce identical symptoms. Optimal management requires appropriate investigations and coordinated multidisciplinary working. Lactose intolerance, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and bile acid malabsorption frequently develop during or after chemotherapy. Toxin-negative Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus infection may be fulminant in immunosuppressed patients and require rapid diagnosis and treatment. Hepatic side effects include reactivation of viral hepatitis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, steatosis and steatohepatitis. Anticancer biological agents have multiple interactions with conventional drugs. Colonoscopy is contraindicated in neutropenic enterocolitis but endoscopy may be life-saving in other patients with GI bleeding. After cancer treatment, simple questions can identify patients who need referral for specialist management of GI symptoms. Other troublesome pelvic problems (eg, urinary, sexual, nutritional) are frequent

  12. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Methods Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. Results The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and malondialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones. PMID:25537679

  13. Diets/dietary habits and certain gastrointestinal disorders in the tropics: a review.

    PubMed

    Nneli, R O; Nwafia, W C; Orji, J O

    2007-01-01

    Against the background that what one eats affects the gastrointestinal tract (G.I T), the role of diet and dietary habits including fibres, food additives and preservatives on the aetiology of gastric cancers, colorectal cancers and other G.I disorders in the tropics are herein reviewed. Carcinomas of the gut believed to be on the decline in the developed countries have plateaued and increasing cases are being reported in the tropics. Africa and Nigeria in particular, with little or no cases previously are currently experiencing patterns of incidence similar to those of the Western Hemisphere. All these developments are premeditated by the nature of diets and dietary factors contained therein. Some of these factors contain chemical carcinogens, irritants as additives or preservatives, high cholesterol, highly spiced foods, alcohol, nicotine, xanthines, caffeine, most of which provoke gastric acid secretions dyspepsia and heartburn, and they lack vegetables and dietary fibres known to protect the G.I tract against various diseases. The roles of dietary hygiene implicating certain microorganisms associated with G.I diseases like Helicobacter Pylori are also discussed. It presupposes that well articulated diet and proper dietary manipulations remain the cure for all diet induced G.I disorders while avoidance of such habits that predispose to them must be encouraged to ensure proper and healthy G.I T. PMID:18379611

  14. Continuous consumption of fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium bifidum YIT 10347 improves gastrointestinal and psychological symptoms in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Urita, Yoshihisa; Goto, Mayu; Watanabe, Toshiyasu; Matsuzaki, Makoto; Gomi, Atsushi; Kano, Mitsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Kouji; Kaneko, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether consumption of probiotic fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium bifidum YIT 10347 improves symptoms in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Thirty-seven FGID patients (18 male, 19 female) aged 12-80 years (mean ± SD, 52.6 ± 17.5 years) whose condition had not improved despite being seen at several medical institutions consumed 100 mL/day of B. bifidum YIT 10347 fermented milk for 4 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated after the enrollment period (BL: baseline), sample consumption period (CP) and 4 weeks after the CP (FP: follow-up period). Gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (FSSG); psychological symptoms were evaluated using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) short form. Concentrations of salivary stress markers and the oxidative stress marker urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured. GSRS subscale scores for abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation significantly improved relative to BL after consumption of the fermented milk, as did FSSG subscale scores for symptoms of acid-related dyspepsia. Some subjective psychological symptoms improved. POMS scores significantly improved, and "Anger-Hostility" subscale scores significantly decreased after the consumption period, while "Vigor" subscale scores marginally increased during the consumption period. The concentrations of urinary 8-OHdG and the stress marker salivary cortisol were significantly lower at CP but returned to baseline levels at FP. Continuous consumption of B. bifidum YIT 10347 fermented milk is expected to improve gastrointestinal symptoms and reduce psychological stress in FGID patients. PMID:25918671

  15. Chronic cough in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Chan, K K Y; Ing, A J; Laks, L; Cossa, G; Rogers, P; Birring, S S

    2010-02-01

    Chronic cough can be the sole presenting symptom for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. We investigated the prevalence, severity and factors associated with chronic cough in patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). We invited 108 consecutive patients who had been referred for evaluation of SDB to complete a comprehensive questionnaire on respiratory and sleep health, which included the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (cough specific quality of life; LCQ), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Mayo Clinic gastro-oesophageal questionnaire. Chronic cough was defined as cough for a duration of >2 months. 33% of patients with SDB reported a chronic cough. Patients with a chronic cough had impaired cough related-quality of life affecting all health domains (mean+/-sem LCQ score 17.7+/-0.7; normal = 21). Patients with SDB and chronic cough were predominantly females (61% versus 17%; p<0.001) and reported more nocturnal heartburn (28% versus 5%; p = 0.03) and rhinitis (44% versus 14%; p = 0.02) compared to those without SDB. There were no significant differences in ESS, respiratory disturbance index, body mass index, or symptoms of breathlessness, wheeze, snoring, dry mouth and choking between those with cough and those without. Chronic cough is prevalent in patients with SDB and is associated with female sex, symptoms of nocturnal heartburn and rhinitis. Further studies are required to investigate the impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on cough associated with SDB to explore the mechanism of this association. PMID:20123846

  16. Chronic Pain, Psychopathology, and DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joel; Rosenbloom, Brittany N; Fashler, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    Unlike acute pain that warns us of injury or disease, chronic or persistent pain serves no adaptive purpose. Though there is no agreed on definition of chronic pain, it is commonly referred to as pain that is without biological value, lasting longer than the typical healing time, not responsive to treatments based on specific remedies, and of a duration greater than 6 months. Chronic pain that is severe and intractable has detrimental consequences, including psychological distress, job loss, social isolation, and, not surprisingly, it is highly comorbid with depression and anxiety. Historically, pain without an apparent anatomical or neurophysiological origin was labelled as psychopathological. This approach is damaging to the patient and provider alike. It pollutes the therapeutic relationship by introducing an element of mutual distrust as well as implicit, if not explicit, blame. It is demoralizing to the patient who feels at fault, disbelieved, and alone. Moreover, many medically unexplained pains are now understood to involve an interplay between peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms that have gone awry. The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, somatic symptom disorder overpsychologizes people with chronic pain; it has low sensitivity and specificity, and it contributes to misdiagnosis, as well as unnecessary stigma. Adjustment disorder remains the most appropriate, accurate, and acceptable diagnosis for people who are overly concerned about their pain. PMID:26174215

  17. Chronic Pain, Psychopathology, and DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Joel; Rosenbloom, Brittany N; Fashler, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Unlike acute pain that warns us of injury or disease, chronic or persistent pain serves no adaptive purpose. Though there is no agreed on definition of chronic pain, it is commonly referred to as pain that is without biological value, lasting longer than the typical healing time, not responsive to treatments based on specific remedies, and of a duration greater than 6 months. Chronic pain that is severe and intractable has detrimental consequences, including psychological distress, job loss, social isolation, and, not surprisingly, it is highly comorbid with depression and anxiety. Historically, pain without an apparent anatomical or neurophysiological origin was labelled as psychopathological. This approach is damaging to the patient and provider alike. It pollutes the therapeutic relationship by introducing an element of mutual distrust as well as implicit, if not explicit, blame. It is demoralizing to the patient who feels at fault, disbelieved, and alone. Moreover, many medically unexplained pains are now understood to involve an interplay between peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms that have gone awry. The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, somatic symptom disorder overpsychologizes people with chronic pain; it has low sensitivity and specificity, and it contributes to misdiagnosis, as well as unnecessary stigma. Adjustment disorder remains the most appropriate, accurate, and acceptable diagnosis for people who are overly concerned about their pain. PMID:26174215

  18. [The adolescent with a chronic somatic disorder].

    PubMed

    Bettschart, W

    1992-01-25

    Adolescence, a period of psychic reorganization which allows for new adjustments in order to face future life and reorganize the experience of the past, is one of the critical phases of existence. It is described as a "new birth", a successful achievement of individuation and separation processes. For the adolescent with an infirmity or chronic illness, and for his family, there exist specific problems in addition to those encountered by a healthy adolescent. The painful realization of social, professional and relational barriers is reactivated. The feeling of failure and helplessness, the impairment of self-esteem, and anger at being the victim of the unfairness of destiny, represent a supplementary affective burden for the adolescent and his family. This results in a risk of deterioration, either towards affective and social withdrawal expressed by overadaptation and weakening of psychic functions, or towards autoaggressive acting-out or various forms of marginalization. Preventive and therapeutic action by the individual and the family are discussed in the light of the case history of an adolescent suffering from a facial malformation. PMID:1734504

  19. Skin Prick Test in Patients with Chronic Allergic Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Pooja; Dogra, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic allergic skin disorders are the inflammatory and proliferative conditions in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are among the most common chronic allergic skin disorders. These can be provoked by various food and aeroallergens. Skin prick tests (SPTs) represent the cheapest and most effective method to diagnose type I hypersensitivity. Positive skin tests with a history suggestive of clinical sensitivity strongly incriminate the allergen as a contributor to the disease process. Aims and Objectives: To determine the incidence of positive SPT in patients with chronic allergic skin disorders and to identify the various allergens implicated in positive SPT. Methods: Fifty patients of chronic allergic disorders were recruited in this study. They were evaluated by SPT with both food and aeroallergens. Results: In our study, SPT positivity in patients of CIU was 63.41% and in AD was 77.78%. Out of the 41 patients of CIU, the most common allergen groups showing SPT positivity were dust and pollen, each comprising 26.83% patients. SPT reaction was positive with food items (21.6%), insects (17.07%), fungus (12.20%), and Dermatophagoides farinae, that is, house dust mite (HDM) (7.32%). The allergen which showed maximum positivity was grain dust wheat (19.51%). Among nine patients of AD, maximum SPT positivity was seen with Dermatophagoides farinae, pollen Amaranthus spinosus, grain dust wheat, and cotton mill dust; each comprising 22.22% of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that a significant number of patients of CIU and AD showed sensitivity to dust, pollen, insects, Dermatophagoides farinae, and fungi on SPT. Thus, it is an important tool in the diagnosis of CIU and AD. PMID:25814704

  20. Epidemiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders in infants and toddlers: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Maia, Ana Paula; Matijasevich, Alicia; Wang, Yuan-Pang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) prevalence in infants and toddlers. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus were searched for original articles from inception to February 2016. The literature search was made in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). For inclusion, each study had to report epidemiological data of FGID on children up to 4 years old and contain standardized outcome Rome II or III criteria. The overall quality of included epidemiological studies was evaluated in accordance to Loney’s proposal for prevalence studies of health literature. Two reviewers assessed each study for inclusion and extracted data. Discrepancies were reconciled through discussion. RESULTS: It was identified a total of 101 articles through the databases and two through the manual search. A total of 28 articles fulfilled the eligibility criteria. After reading the full articles, 13 of them were included in the present review. Twelve studies were written in English and one in Chinese, and published between 2004 and 2015. Eight articles (61.5%) were performed in Europe, three (23.1%) in America and two (15.4%) in Asia. Sample size varied between 45 and 9660 subjects. Cross-sectional frequency was reported in majority of studies (k = 9) and four studies prospectively followed the subjects. 27.1% to 38% of participants have met any of Rome’s criteria for gastrointestinal syndromes, of those 20.8% presented two or more FGID. Infant regurgitation and functional constipation were the most common FGID, ranging from less than 1% to 25.9% and less than 1% to 31%, respectively. Most included studies were of moderate to poor data quality with respect to absence of confidential interval for prevalence rate and inadequate sampling methods. CONCLUSION: The scarcity and heterogeneity of FGID data call for the necessity of well-designed epidemiological research in different levels of pediatric practice and

  1. Autoimmune diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and the microbiome in schizophrenia: More than a gut feeling

    PubMed Central

    Severance, Emily G.; Yolken, Robert H.; Eaton, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and schizophrenia have been associated with one another for a long time. This paper reviews these connections and provides a context by which multiple risk factors for schizophrenia may be related. Epidemiological studies strongly link schizophrenia with autoimmune disorders including enteropathic celiac disease. Exposure to wheat gluten and bovine milk casein also contribute to non-celiac food sensitivities in susceptible individuals. Co-morbid GI inflammation accompanies humoral immunity to food antigens, occurs early during the course of schizophrenia and appears to be independent from antipsychotic-generated motility effects. This inflammation impacts endothelial barrier permeability and can precipitate translocation of gut bacteria into systemic circulation. Infection by the neurotropic gut pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, will elicit an inflammatory GI environment. Such processes trigger innate immunity, including activation of complement C1q, which also functions at synapses in the brain. The emerging field of microbiome research lies at the center of these interactions with evidence that the abundance and diversity of resident gut microbiota contribute to digestion, inflammation, gut permeability and behavior. Dietary modifications of core bacterial compositions may explain inefficient gluten digestion and how immigrant status in certain situations is a risk factor for schizophrenia. Gut microbiome research in schizophrenia is in its infancy, but data in related fields suggest disease-associated altered phylogenetic compositions. In summary, this review surveys associative and experimental data linking autoimmunity, GI activity and schizophrenia, and proposes that understanding of disrupted biological pathways outside of the brain can lend valuable information regarding pathogeneses of complex, polygenic brain disorders. PMID:25034760

  2. Autoimmune diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and the microbiome in schizophrenia: more than a gut feeling.

    PubMed

    Severance, Emily G; Yolken, Robert H; Eaton, William W

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmunity, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and schizophrenia have been associated with one another for a long time. This paper reviews these connections and provides a context by which multiple risk factors for schizophrenia may be related. Epidemiological studies strongly link schizophrenia with autoimmune disorders including enteropathic celiac disease. Exposure to wheat gluten and bovine milk casein also contribute to non-celiac food sensitivities in susceptible individuals. Co-morbid GI inflammation accompanies humoral immunity to food antigens, occurs early during the course of schizophrenia and appears to be independent from antipsychotic-generated motility effects. This inflammation impacts endothelial barrier permeability and can precipitate translocation of gut bacteria into systemic circulation. Infection by the neurotropic gut pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, will elicit an inflammatory GI environment. Such processes trigger innate immunity, including activation of complement C1q, which also functions at synapses in the brain. The emerging field of microbiome research lies at the center of these interactions with evidence that the abundance and diversity of resident gut microbiota contribute to digestion, inflammation, gut permeability and behavior. Dietary modifications of core bacterial compositions may explain inefficient gluten digestion and how immigrant status in certain situations is a risk factor for schizophrenia. Gut microbiome research in schizophrenia is in its infancy, but data in related fields suggest disease-associated altered phylogenetic compositions. In summary, this review surveys associative and experimental data linking autoimmunity, GI activity and schizophrenia, and proposes that understanding of disrupted biological pathways outside of the brain can lend valuable information regarding pathogeneses of complex, polygenic brain disorders. PMID:25034760

  3. Comprehensive psychological intervention to improve outcome in functional gastrointestinal disorder: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Tien; Kwok, Kah Foo Victor; Tan, Shian Ming; Yek, Ming Hwei; Ong, Wai Choung; Barbier, Sylvaine; Ng, Beng Yeong

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) have a decreased quality of life (QoL). Psychological illnesses are strongly associated with FGIDs. This study examined the effect of a comprehensive psychological intervention programme designed for refractory FGID patients. METHODS Refractory FGID patients at a tertiary gastroenterology unit were encouraged to participate in a psychological intervention programme, which included screening for anxiety and depression in patients, educating patients and physicians on FGIDs, and providing early access to psychiatric consultation for patients with significant psychological illnesses. The duration of follow-up was six months. Outcomes were measured using the Irritable Bowel Syndrome-QoL (IBS-QoL) instrument and the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 1,189 patients (68% female, 80% Chinese, mean age 48.6 years) participated in the programme. Among these participants, 51% had a significant psychological disorder (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS] anxiety or depression score > 7). These participants had a significantly poorer QoL (IBS-QoL and EQ-5D, both p < 0.0001), and were more likely to be single or English-speaking, as compared to the participants without psychological disorders. Participants who completed ≥ 3 months of follow-up (n = 906) showed significant and durable improvement. High baseline HADS anxiety score predicted improvement (p < 0.001), with participant IBS-QoL and EQ-5D scores decreasing over time. CONCLUSION The intervention programme was associated with a clinically meaningful improvement in the QoL of patients with refractory FGIDs. High baseline anxiety was predictive of improvement. PMID:26243975

  4. Multicomponent Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Trauma Management Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Samuel M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe and chronic mental disorder that is highly prevalent within Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers. A severe psychiatric disorder, combat-related PTSD is typically accompanied by multiple comorbid psychiatric disorders, symptom chronicity, and extreme social maladjustment. Thus, PTSD is a complex…

  5. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL. PMID:26482250

  6. Predicting chronic benzodiazepine use in adults with depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Jean-Daniel; Roberge, Pasquale; Courteau, Josiane; Vanasse, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify predictive variables of incident chronic benzodiazepine (BZD) use that could be assessed by prescribing physicians. Design Retrospective cohort study using public health and drug insurance administrative data. Setting Quebec. Participants New adult BZD users from January 1, 1999, to March 31, 2006, with a diagnosis of depressive disorder in the previous year were included. Chronic BZD use was defined as BZD availability at least 50% of the days between day 181 and day 365 following initiation. Main outcome measures Potential associations between chronic BZD use and age; sex; drug insurance status; recent hospitalization; comorbidity; presence of chronic pain; use of psychotropic medication; mental health diagnoses; number, type, and duration of BZDs prescribed; and the prescribing physician’s specialty. Results Selection led to an exhaustive cohort of 13 688 patients aged 18 to 64 years, and 3683 aged 65 and older. For the 18 to 64 age group, the combination of disability insurance and more than 1 BZD increased the proportion of chronic users from 14.4% to 53.4%. For patients 65 and older, the main correlates of chronic BZD use included claiming more than 1 BZD (adjusted odds ratio 2.24, 99% CI 1.65 to 3.06) and recent hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio 1.70, 99% CI 1.38 to 2.10). Recently hospitalized older patients with a prescription duration of less than 8 days were the highest-risk group identified (57.8%). Conclusion Physicians should be aware that patients are more likely to become chronic BZD users if they receive disability insurance or following a hospitalization. Combination of BZDs is a potentially problematic practice that could be increasing the risk of chronic use. PMID:27521413

  7. The Genus Aloe: Phytochemistry and Therapeutic Uses Including Treatments for Gastrointestinal Conditions and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E

    2015-01-01

    Plants of the genus Aloe have perhaps the longest recorded history of medicinal usage and are amongst the most widely used plants for traditional medicinal purposes worldwide. Aloe vera, Aloe ferox, Aloe arborescens and Aloe perryi are the best known and most widely used, but many other species are also used for their therapeutic properties. The Aloes have been used since ancient times, particularly for the treatment of microbial infections, gastrointestinal disorders and inflammatory conditions. In addition to their myriad uses in traditional therapeutics, the Aloes have also been used as components of cosmetic formulations, and in the food and beverage industries. Despite their wide acceptance, studies from different laboratories often report wide variations in the therapeutic bioactivities from within the same Aloe species, even when the same extraction procedures are used. Furthermore, leaves from individual Aloe plants within the same species may have widely varying levels of the bioactive phytochemicals. Phytochemical analyses have shown that many Aloe species contain various carbohydrate polymers (notably glucomannans) and a range of other low molecular weight phenolic compounds including alkaloids, anthraquinones, anthrones, benzene and furan derivatives, chromones, coumarins, flavonoids, phytosterols, pyrans and pyrones. There has been a wealth of information published about the phytochemistry and therapeutic potential of the Aloes (especially Aloe vera). Much of this has been contradictory. Intra- and interspecies differences in the redox state of the individual Aloe components and in the ratios of these components may occur between individual plants. These factors may all affect the physiological properties of Aloe extracts. Due to the structure and chemical nature of many of the Aloe phytochemicals, it is likely that many of the reported medicinal properties are due to antioxidant or prooxidant effects. The antioxidant/prooxidant activities of many Aloe

  8. The microbiota–gut–brain axis in gastrointestinal disorders: stressed bugs, stressed brain or both?

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giada; Collins, Stephen M; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2014-01-01

    The gut–brain axis is the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain, which occurs through multiple pathways that include hormonal, neural and immune mediators. The signals along this axis can originate in the gut, the brain or both, with the objective of maintaining normal gut function and appropriate behaviour. In recent years, the study of gut microbiota has become one of the most important areas in biomedical research. Attention has focused on the role of gut microbiota in determining normal gut physiology and immunity and, more recently, on its role as modulator of host behaviour (‘microbiota–gut–brain axis’). We therefore review the literature on the role of gut microbiota in gut homeostasis and link it with mechanisms that could influence behaviour. We discuss the association of dysbiosis with disease, with particular focus on functional bowel disorders and their relationship to psychological stress. This is of particular interest because exposure to stressors has long been known to increase susceptibility to and severity of gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:24756641

  9. Feasibility of confocal endomicroscopy in the diagnosis of pediatric gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Krishnappa; Cohen, Marta; Evans, Clair; Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Taylor, Christopher; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Kiesslich, Ralf; Thomson, Mike

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and utility of confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) in the description of normal gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa and in the diagnosis of GI disorders in children, in comparison to histology. METHODS: Forty-four patients (19 female) median age 10.9 years (range 0.7-16.6 years) with suspected or known GI pathology underwent esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (OGD) (n = 36) and/or ileocolonoscopy (IC) (n = 31) with CLE using sodium fluorescein and acriflavine as contrast agents. Histological sections were compared with same site confocal images by two experienced pediatric and GI histopathologists and endoscopists, respectively. RESULTS: Duodenum and ileum were intubated in all but one patient undergoing OGD and IC. The median procedure time was 16.4 min (range 7-25 min) for OGD and 27.9 min (range 15-45 min) for IC. A total of 4798 confocal images were compared with 153 biopsies from the upper GI tract from 36 procedures, and 4661 confocal images were compared with 188 biopsies from the ileocolon from 31 procedures. Confocal images were comparable to conventional histology both in normal and in pathological conditions such as esophagitis, Helicobacter pylori gastritis, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, colonic heterotopia, and graft versus host disease. CONCLUSION: CLE offers the prospect of targeting biopsies to abnormal mucosa, thereby increasing diagnostic yield, reducing the number of biopsies, decreasing the burden on the histopathological services, and reducing costs. PMID:19437560

  10. Clinicopathological studies of gastrointestinal tract disorders in sheep with parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarvan; Jakhar, K. K.; Singh, Satyavir; Potliya, Sandeep; Kumar, Kailash; Pal, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was envisaged to elucidate the parasitological aspects of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders of sheep. Materials and Methods: Fecal, blood and serum samples collected from 31 sheep/lambs of Sheep Breeding Farm, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Hisar. Results: Of 25 cases, strongyle eggs (12 cases, 48%) were a major infection, followed by Strongyloides spp. (8 cases, 32%) and Moniezia spp. (5 case, 20%). In one case, massive infection of strongyle particularly Haemonchus contortus and Moniezia spp. was observed. All these animals were found negative for hemoprotozoan parasites in blood smear examination. Hematological studies revealed that significantly decreased values of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV) and total erythrocytic count (TEC). Absolute leukocytic count revealed significant leukocytosis due to neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, monocytosis and eosinophilia. Serum biochemical profiles of diarrheic sheep/lambs in present study were significant decrease in values of total protein, serum globulin, glucose where as significant increase in the albumin: Globulin ratio, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatise (ALKP) and bilirubin. Conclusions: From the present study, it is reasonable to conclude that major parasitic infection of sheep/lamb observed was strongyle, followed by Strongyloides spp. and Moniezia spp. Hemato-biochemical studies revealed significant leukocytosis and increase in AST, ALT, ALKP and bilirubin. PMID:27046991

  11. Differentiation between diseases using a programmable hand-held calculator and Bayes' theorem: application to lower gastrointestinal tract disorders.

    PubMed

    van de Merwe, J P

    1984-01-01

    A program is presented for the Hewlett-Packard HP-41C programmable pocket calculator that computes posterior probabilities of more than 200 diseases on the basis of Bayes' theorem. Data for specific applications are stored in ASCII files. The program and data are retained in the non-volatile memory of the calculator. An example of the application of the program to six lower gastrointestinal tract disorders is given using data from the literature. PMID:6391801

  12. Role of chronic health disorders in perimenopausal fractures.

    PubMed

    Huopio, Jukka; Honkanen, Risto; Jurvelin, Jukka; Saarikoski, Seppo; Alhava, Esko; Kröger, Heikki

    2005-11-01

    Only a few studies have examined the risk of individual chronic health disorders on perimenopausal (i.e., around menopause) fractures in a single study. We evaluated the effect of chronic illnesses on fracture rate in a prospective cohort study of 3,078 women. These women were a stratified sample from the population base of 14,220 women aged 47-56 years and residing in the province of Kuopio in eastern Finland in 1989. Data on physician-diagnosed chronic diseases were collected by a baseline questionnaire in 1989. For certain diseases, questionnaire information of self-reported chronic disorders were compared with drug reimbursement data provided by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. Axial bone mineral density (BMD) measurements from the femoral neck and lumbar spine were performed in 1989-91. Two hundred sixty-five (265) women experienced at least one fracture during the follow-up period of 3.6 years (SD+/-0.78). The first fracture during the follow-up period was taken to be the end-point event. The risk of follow-up fracture for an individual health disorder was estimated with the Cox's proportional hazards model. Several chronic health disorders increased the fracture risk in perimenopausal women. However, hypertension was a statistically significant (p=0.018) risk factor for fracture (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.9), especially in overweight and obese (body mass index > or =28) women (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). In addition, coronary heart disease (adjusted HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.13-2.76), hyperthyroidism (adjusted HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9), epilepsy (adjusted HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6), alcoholism (adjusted HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.5) and chronic hepatic disease (adjusted HR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.7-16.4) predicted fracture. BMD was either normal or even elevated in disease groups. However, women with a fracture during the follow-up usually had decreased bone density, although the difference was statistically significant

  13. Pathomorphological and microbiological studies in sheep with special emphasis on gastrointestinal tract disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarvan; Jakhar, K. K.; Nehra, Vikas; Pal, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was envisaged to elucidate the pathomorphological and microbiological aspects of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders of sheep/lambs. Materials and Methods: Samples for research were collected from 12 sheep died with a history of GIT disorders which were brought for post-mortem examination to the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar, for pathomorphological and microbiological examination. Results: Gross pathological changes in various organs noticed were abomasitis, congestion and hemorrhages in intestine; necrotic foci on liver surface; enlarged, hard, and indurated mesenteric lymph nodes, hydropericardium, congestion, hemorrhages and consolidation of lungs and congestion and soft kidneys as the major change. On histopathological examination, there were abomasitis with leukocyte infiltration, enteritis with desquamation of mucosal epithelium and goblet cell hyperplasia, lymphadenitis with depletion of lymphocytes in the germinal center of lymphoid follicle, and splenitis with depletion of lymphocytes in the white pulp. In the liver congestion, degenerative changes in hepatocytes including cloudy swelling, fatty changes, congestion in sinusoids, and dilatation of sinusoids leading to atrophy of hepatocytes. Lungs evidenced edema, congestion, emphysema, serous inflammation, thickening of interlobular septa, fibrinous pleuritis, and peribronchiolar lymphoid follicle formation. Heart revealed sarcocystosis, fibrinous pericarditis, and hyalinization of the myocardium. In kidneys, congestion, focal interstitial nephritis, hyaline degeneration, and coagulative necrosis were seen. For microbiological aspects; cultural isolation was done from samples of liver, abomasum, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, heart blood, lungs, and kidneys from the carcasses of sheep/lambs. Escherichia coli was the only bacterium isolated during present studies. E. coli isolates from different tissues of

  14. Anxiety Symptoms in Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttmann-Steinmetz, Sarit; Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Crowell, Judy

    2010-01-01

    We compared symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and separation anxiety disorder (SAD) in 5 groups of boys with neurobehavioral syndromes: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) plus autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ADHD plus chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD), ASD only, ADHD only, and community Controls. Anxiety symptoms were…

  15. [Ventilatory disorders in patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grzywa-Celińska, Anna; Dyczko, Monika; Rękas-Wójcik, Agata; Szmygin-Milanowska, Katarzyna; Witczak, Agnieszka; Ostrowski, Stanisław; Barud, Wojciech; Mosiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a condition in which both structure and functional capacity of cardiac muscle are impaired, resulting in ineffective peripheral tissue perfusion. Affecting numerous organs and systems, it is currently considered to be a systemic illness. Among significant, however until now, hardly recognized consequences of CHF there are ventilatory disorders. Their presence may be explained by proximity of heart and lungs inside rib cage or by close functional cooperation between these two organs. Ventilatory disorders clinically manifest as exacerbations of the underlying disease, i.e. intense dyspnea--primarily exertional in nature, over time, present even at rest. On the basis of functional pulmonary tests, ventilatory disorders may be classified into three categories: restrictive, obstructive and most commonly--mixed. The restrictive model is represented in bodypletysmography as reduction in the total lung capacity to values less than 5th percentile of the predicted values for normals, while Tiffeneau index remains intact. Such condition may probably result from the chronic inflammatory process affecting lung tissue, for which the reaction of macrophage cells to both pulmonary stasis, as well as increased volume of interstitial and alveolar fluid remains the underlying cause. The increased formation of connective tissue fibers engenders thickening of alveolar-capillary membrane, occurrence of disturbed oxygen diffusion and emergence of hypoxemic respiratory failure. Ventilatory disorders of obstructive nature are characterised by reduction of Tiffeneau index--the calculated ratio between forced expiratory volume in 1. second and forced vital capacity--to values below 5th percentile of the predicted range. The research results indicate for the presence of bronchiolar narrowing--dominant in small-diameter bronchi and bronchioles, with larger structures being unaffected--clearly depicted in spirometry as reduced levels of forced expiratory flow

  16. Predictors of response to a behavioral treatment in patients with chronic gastric motility disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashed, Hani; Cutts, Teresa; Abell, Thomas; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; El-Gammal, Ahmed; Adl, Dima

    2002-01-01

    Chronic gastric motility disorders have proven intractable to most traditional therapies. Twenty-six patients with chronic nausea and vomiting were treated with a behavioral technique, autonomic training (AT) with directed imagery (verbal instructions), to help facilitate physiological control. After treatment, gastrointestinal symptoms decreased by >30% in 58% of the treated patients. We compared those improved patients to the 43% who did not improve significantly. No significant differences existed in baseline symptoms and autonomic measures between both groups. However, baseline measures of gastric emptying and autonomic function predicted treatment outcome. Patients who improved manifested mild to moderate delay in baseline gastric emptying measures. The percent of liquid gastric emptying at 60 mins and the sympathetic adrenergic measure of percent of change in the foot cutaneous blood flow in response to cold stress test predicted improvement in AT outcome, with clinical diagnostic values of 77% and 71%, respectively. We conclude that AT treatment can be efficacious in some patients with impaired gastric emptying and adrenergic dysfunction. More work is warranted to compare biofeedback therapy with gastric motility patients and controls in population-based studies.

  17. Uncertainty, culture and pathways to care in paediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Sylvie; Gauthier, Annie; Gomez, Liliana; Faure, Christophe; Bibeau, Gilles; Rasquin, Andrée

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how children and families of diverse ethnic backgrounds perceive, understand and treat symptoms related to functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). It is questioned how different ways of dealing with medical uncertainty (symptoms, diagnosis) may influence treatment pathways. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 43 children of 38 family groups of immigrant and non-immigrant backgrounds. The analysis takes into account (a) the perceived symptoms; (b) the meaning attributed to them; and (c) the actions taken to relieve them. The social and cultural contexts that permeate these symptoms, meanings and actions were also examined. It is found that, in light of diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainty, non-immigrant families are more likely to consult health professionals. Immigrant families more readily rely upon home remedies, family support and, for some, religious beliefs to temper the uncertainty linked to abdominal pain. Furthermore, non-immigrant children lead a greater quest for legitimacy of their pain at home while most immigrant families place stomach aches in the range of normality. Intracultural variations nuance these findings, as well as family dynamics. It is concluded that different courses of action and family dynamics reveal that uncertainty is dealt with in multiple ways. Family support, the network, and trust in a child's expression of distress are key elements in order to tolerate uncertainty. Lastly, the medical encounter is described as a space permeated with relational uncertainty given the different registers of expression inherent within a cosmopolitan milieu. Narrative practices being an essential dynamic of this encounter, it is questioned whether families' voices are equally heard in these clinical spaces. PMID:24670161

  18. Development and Validation of the Korean Rome III Questionnaire for Diagnosis of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung Ho; Min, Byung-Hoon; Youn, Young Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Keum, Bo Ra; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims A self-report questionnaire is frequently used to measure symptoms reliably and to distinguish patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) from those with other conditions. We produced and validated a cross-cultural adaptation of the Rome III questionnaire for diagnosis of FGIDs in Korea. Methods The Korean version of the Rome III (Rome III-K) questionnaire was developed through structural translational processes. Subsequently, reliability was measured by a test-retest procedure. Convergent validity was evaluated by comparing self-reported questionnaire data with the subsequent completion of the questionnaire by the physician based on an interview and with the clinical diagnosis. Concurrent validation using the validated Korean version of the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) was adopted to demonstrate discriminant validity. Results A total of 306 subjects were studied. Test-retest reliability was good, with a median Cronbach's α value of 0.83 (range, 0.71-0.97). The degree of agreement between patient-administered and physician-administered questionnaires to diagnose FGIDs was excellent; the κ index was 0.949 for irritable bowel syndrome, 0.883 for functional dyspepsia and 0.927 for functional heartburn. The physician's clinical diagnosis of functional dyspepsia showed the most marked discrepancy with that based on the self-administered questionnaire. Almost all SF-36 domains were impaired in participants diagnosed with one of these FGIDs according to the Rome III-K. Conclusions We developed the Rome III-K questionnaire though structural translational processes, and it revealed good test-retest reliability and satisfactory construct validity. These results suggest that this instrument will be useful for clinical and research assessments in the Korean population. PMID:24199012

  19. Chronic organophosphate-induced neuropsychiatric disorder: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Shree Ram; Parajuli, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Chronic organophosphate (OP)-induced neuropsychiatric disorder is a rare condition following prolonged exposure to OP compounds. Due to the lack of valid diagnostic tools and criteria, very few cases are seen in clinical practice and are often misdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis can lead to inappropriate treatment that may increase the risk of morbidity or suicidality. In this paper, we present the case of a 35-year-old male who needed support in breathing from a mechanical ventilator and developed neuropsychiatric behavioral problems following ingestion of OP compounds, which lead to suicidality. The patient was treated by the psychiatric team with antipsychotic and antidepressants and improved following the regular use of medication. PMID:26893566

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Ethnomedicinal Practices for Treating Gastrointestinal Disorders Used by Communities Living in Three National Parks (Korea)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Song, Mi-Jang; Brian, Heldenbrand; Choi, Kyoungho

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively analyze the ethnomedicinal practices on gastrointestinal disorders within communities in Jirisan National Park, Gayasan National Park, and Hallasan National Park of Korea. Data was collected through participant observations and indepth interviews with semistructured questionnaires. Methods for comparative analysis were accomplished using the informant consensus factor, fidelity level, and internetwork analysis. A total of 490 ethnomedicinal practices recorded from the communities were classified into 110 families, 176 genera, and 220 species that included plants, animals, fungi, and alga. The informant consensus factor values in the disorder categories were enteritis, and gastralgia (1.0), followed by indigestion (0.94), constipation (0.93), and abdominal pain and gastroenteric trouble (0.92). In terms of fidelity levels, 71 plant species showed fidelity levels of 100%. The internetwork analysis between disorders and all medicinal species are grouped in the center by the four categories of indigestion, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and gastroenteric trouble, respectively. Regarding the research method of this study, the comparative analysis methods will contribute to the availability of orally transmitted ethnomedicinal knowledge. Among the methods of analysis, the use of internetwork analysis as a tool for analysis in this study provides imperative internetwork maps between gastrointestinal disorders and medicinal species. PMID:25202330

  1. Inherited Metabolic Disorders: Aspects of Chronic Nutritional Management

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, SW; Barclay, LJ; Burrage, LC

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of newborn screening and the development of new therapies have led to an expanding population of patients with inherited metabolic disorders, and these patients are now entering adulthood. Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for many of these disorders and thus, trained metabolic dietitians are critical members of the multidisciplinary team required for management of such patients. The main goals of dietary therapy in inborn errors of metabolism are the maintenance of normal growth and development while limiting offending metabolites and providing deficient products. Typically, the offending metabolite is either significantly reduced or removed completely from the diet and then reintroduced in small quantities until blood levels are within the normal range. Such treatment is required in infancy, childhood and adulthood and requires careful monitoring of micronutrient and macronutrient intake throughout the lifespan. The goal of this review is to highlight the basic principles of chronic nutritional management of the inborn errors of protein, carbohydrate and fat metabolism. PMID:26079521

  2. Hurt, tired and queasy: Specific variants in the ATPase domain of the TRAP1 mitochondrial chaperone are associated with common, chronic "functional" symptomatology including pain, fatigue and gastrointestinal dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Boles, Richard G; Hornung, Holly A; Moody, Alastair E; Ortiz, Thomas B; Wong, Stacey A; Eggington, Julie M; Stanley, Christine M; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi; McLaughlin, Stephen; Zare, Amir S; Sheldon, Katherine M; Skolnick, Jeffrey; McKernan, Kevin J

    2015-07-01

    Functional disorders are common conditions with a substantial impact on a patients' wellbeing, and can be diagnostically elusive. There are bidirectional associations between functional disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, provided clinical information and the exon sequence of the TRAP1 mitochondrial chaperone were retrospectively reviewed with a focus on the functional categories of chronic pain, fatigue and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Very-highly conserved TRAP1 variants were identified in 73 of 930 unrelated patients. Functional symptomatology is strongly associated with specific variants in the ATPase binding pocket. In particular, the combined presence of all three functional categories is strongly associated with p.Ile253Val (OR 7.5, P = 0.0001) and with two other interacting variants (OR 18, P = 0.0005). Considering a 1-2% combined variant prevalence and high odds ratios, these variants may be an important factor in the etiology of functional symptomatology. PMID:26022780

  3. Hurt, tired and queasy: Specific variants in the ATPase domain of the TRAP1 mitochondrial chaperone are associated with common, chronic “functional” symptomatology including pain, fatigue and gastrointestinal dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    Hornung, Holly A.; Moody, Alastair E.; Ortiz, Thomas B.; Wong, Stacey A.; Eggington, Julie M.; Stanley, Christine M.; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi; McLaughlin, Stephen; Zare, Amir S.; Sheldon, Katherine M.; Skolnick, Jeffrey; McKernan, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional disorders are common conditions with a substantial impact on a patients’ wellbeing, and can be diagnostically elusive. There are bidirectional associations between functional disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, provided clinical information and the exon sequence of the TRAP1 mitochondrial chaperone were retrospectively reviewed with a focus on the functional categories of chronic pain, fatigue and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Very-highly conserved TRAP1 variants were identified in 73 of 930 unrelated patients. Functional symptomatology is strongly associated with specific variants in the ATPase binding pocket. In particular, the combined presence of all three functional categories is strongly associated with p.Ile253Val (OR 7.5, P=0.0001) and with two other interacting variants (OR 18, P=0.0005). Considering a 1–2% combined variant prevalence and high odds ratios, these variants may be an important factor in the etiology of functional symptomatology. PMID:26022780

  4. Evidence-Based Pharmacotherapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Chronic Tic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Storch, Eric A.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in pharmacotherapy for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and chronic tic disorders (CTDs). What were previously considered relatively intractable conditions now have an array of efficacious medicinal (and psychosocial) interventions available at clinicians’ disposal, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, atypical antipsychotics, and alpha-2 agonists. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence base for pharmacotherapy with pediatric OCD and CTDs with regard to efficacy, tolerability, and safety, and to put this evidence in the context of clinical management in integrated behavioral healthcare. While there is no single panacea for these disorders, there are a variety of medications that provide considerable relief for children with these disabling conditions. PMID:23861643

  5. An Investigation of Comorbid Psychological Disorders, Sleep Problems, Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Epilepsy in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannion, Arlene; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated comorbidity in eighty-nine children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Ireland. Comorbidity is the presence of one or more disorders in addition to a primary disorder. The prevalence of comorbid psychological disorders, behaviours associated with comorbid psychopathology, epilepsy, gastrointestinal…

  6. Plant folk medicines for gastrointestinal disorders among the main tribes of Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Salazar, S F; Robles-Zepeda, R E; Johnson, D E

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the herbal remedies used by ethnic groups from Sonora, Mexico, for treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Twelve types of these illnesses are cured using 85 different species which belong to 38 families. Thirty nine spp. are used to treat diarrhea, 28 for stomach-ache, 12 for constipation, 9 for intestinal parasites, 6 for indigestion, 3 for stomach or intestinal cancer, 3 for stomach inflammation and only 1 to treat gastrointestinal sicknesses, ulcers, gastritis, colitis and colic. Regarding the use of species of plant per ethnic group the following was observed: Mayo 47; Seri, 27; Yaqui, 13; Guarijio, 12, Pima, 5 and Papago, 3. The plants are used by two or more tribes, for the same or different illness but always related to the gastrointestinal system. PMID:17881152

  7. Race and Ethnic Group Differences in Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Chronic Medical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Daphne C; Assari, Shervin; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    This study tested whether race and ethnic group differences exist for lifetime major depressive disorder and/or general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions. Data from the National Survey of American Life, which included 3570 African American, 1438 Caribbean Black, and 891 non-Hispanic White adults were analyzed. Outcomes included at least one and multiple chronic medical conditions, from a list of 14 medical conditions (e.g., arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, etc.). Logistic regressions were fitted to data to determine how the association between major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder, and one or more chronic medical conditions vary across race and ethnicity. Lifetime major depressive disorder (but not lifetime general anxiety disorder) was associated with at least one chronic medical condition among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, but not non-Hispanic Whites. Lifetime major depressive disorder was similarly associated with multiple chronic medical conditions among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. For Caribbean Blacks, stronger associations were found between major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions compared to African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Findings suggest that race and ethnicity may shape the links between comorbid psychiatric disorders and chronic medical conditions. Mental health screening of individuals with chronic medical conditions in primary health-care settings may benefit from tailoring based on race and ethnicity. More research is needed to understand why associations between physical and mental health vary among race and ethnic groups. PMID:26863467

  8. [Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic anemia secondary to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola Capón, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can cause asthenia, cognitive and functional impairment, and decompensation of underlying diseases. Iron deficiency anemia is not a disease but is the result of a potentially serious medical problem. Consequently, patients should always undergo investigation of the underlying cause. In men and postmenopausal women, the condition is caused by gastrointestinal loss and malabsorption of iron. In this group, recommended procedures are gastroscopy, colonoscopy and serological testing for celiac disease. If the results of these tests are negative, repeat examinations and iron therapy should be considered. In treatment-refractory or recurrent anemia, the small intestine should be investigated. In this case, the procedure of choice is capsule endoscopy. Iron deficiency anemia should always be treated until iron deposits have returned to normal levels. A wide variety of preparations are available, in both oral and parental formulations. PMID:25443541

  9. Iron in Chronic Brain Disorders: Imaging and Neurotherapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, James; Panter, Scott S; Neema, Mohit; Arora, Ashish; Batt, Courtney; Bakshi, Rohit

    2007-01-01

    Summary Iron is important for brain oxygen transport, electron transfer, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin production. Though iron deposition has been observed in the brain with normal aging, increased iron has also been shown in many chronic neurologic disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. In vitro studies have demonstrated that excessive iron can lead to free radical production, which can promote neurotoxicity. However, the link between observed iron deposition and pathologic processes underlying various diseases of the brain is not well understood. It is not known whether excessive in vivo iron directly contributes to tissue damage or is solely an epiphenomenon. In this article we focus on the imaging of brain iron and the underlying physiology and metabolism relating to iron deposition. We conclude with a discussion of the potential implications of iron-related toxicity to neurotherapeutic development. PMID:17599703

  10. Smart medical stocking using memory polymer for chronic venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bipin; Hu, Jinlian; Pan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Proper level of pressure or compression generated by medical stocking or hosiery is the key element for successful treatment or management of chronic venous disorders such as oedema, leg ulcers, etc. However achieving the recommended compression level and, more importantly, sustaining it using stockings has been a major challenge to the health practitioners supervising the treatment. This work aims to investigate and design a smart compression stocking using shape-memory polymer that allows externally controlling the pressure level in the wrapped position on the leg. Based on thermodynamical rubber theories, we first derived several criteria that have to be satisfied simultaneously in order to achieve the controlled pressure adjustment using external heat stimuli. We then presented a case where such a stocking is developed using a blend yarn consists of selected shape-memory polyurethane and nylon filaments. Extensive experimental work has also been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and explore the influencing factors involved. PMID:26513411

  11. Association between inherited monogenic liver disorders and chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Piekuse, Linda; Kreile, Madara; Zarina, Agnese; Steinberga, Zane; Sondore, Valentina; Keiss, Jazeps; Lace, Baiba; Krumina, Astrida

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequencies of mutations that cause inherited monogenic liver disorders in patients with chronic hepatitis C. METHODS: This study included 86 patients with chronic hepatitis C (55 men, 31 women; mean age at diagnosis, 38.36 ± 14.52 years) who had undergone antiviral therapy comprising pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Viral load, biochemical parameter changes, and liver biopsy morphological data were evaluated in all patients. The control group comprised 271 unrelated individuals representing the general population of Latvia for mutation frequency calculations. The most frequent mutations that cause inherited liver disorders [gene (mutation): ATP7B (H1069Q), HFE (C282Y, H63D), UGT1A1 (TA)7, and SERPINA1 (PiZ)] were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), bidirectional PCR allele-specific amplification, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and sequencing. RESULTS: The viral genotype was detected in 80 of the 86 patients. Viral genotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in 61 (76%), 7 (9%), and 12 (15%) patients, respectively. Among all 86 patients, 50 (58%) reached an early viral response and 70 (81%) reached a sustained viral response. All 16 patients who did not reach a sustained viral response had viral genotype 1. Case-control analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in only the H1069Q mutation between patients and controls (patients, 0.057; controls, 0.012; odds ratio, 5.514; 95%CI: 1.119-29.827, P = 0.022). However, the H1069Q mutation was not associated with antiviral treatment outcomes or biochemical indices. The (TA) 7 mutation of the UGT1A1 gene was associated with decreased ferritin levels (beta regression coefficient = -295.7, P = 0.0087). CONCLUSION: Genetic mutations that cause inherited liver diseases in patients with hepatitis C should be studied in detail. PMID:24575168

  12. Peer Victimization in Youth with Tourette Syndrome and Other Chronic Tic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinner, Samuel H.; Conelea, Christine A.; Glew, Gwen M.; Woods, Douglas W.; Budman, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic tic disorders including Tourette syndrome have negative impact across multiple functional domains. We explored associations between peer victimization status and tic subtypes, premonitory urges, internalizing symptoms, explosive outbursts, and quality of life among youth with chronic tic disorders, as part of the internet-based omnibus…

  13. Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. 1. Screening of 84 plants against enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Caceres, A; Cano, O; Samayoa, B; Aguilar, L

    1990-08-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders are important causes of morbidity in developing countries. Natural healing is the traditional way of treating these diseases in Guatemala. Ethnobotanical surveys and literature reviews showed that 385 plants from 95 families are used in Guatemala for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The activity of 84 of the most commonly used plants was screened in vitro against five enterobacteria pathogenic to man (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella flexneri). Results indicate that 34 (40.48%) plants inhibit one or more of the enterobacteria tested. The most commonly inhibited bacterium was S. typhi (33.73%) and the most resistant was E. coli (7.35%). The plants of American origin which exhibited the best antibacterial activity were: Byrsonima crassifolia, Diphysa robinioides, Gnaphalium stramineum, Guazuma ulmifolia, Psidium guajava, Sambucus mexicana, Simarouba glauca, Smilax lundelii, Spondias purpurea and Tagetes lucida. These results indicate a scientific basis for use of these medicinal plants for attacking enterobacterial infections in man. PMID:2214824

  14. Telemedical Wearable Sensing Platform for Management of Chronic Venous Disorder.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruya; Nie, Baoqing; Zhai, Chengwei; Cao, Jennifer; Pan, Jian; Chi, Yung-Wei; Pan, Tingrui

    2016-07-01

    Enabled by emerging wearable sensors, telemedicine can potentially offer personalized medical services to long-term home care or remote clinics in the future, which can be particularly helpful in the management of chronic diseases. The wireless wearable pressure sensing system reported in this article provides an excellent example of such an innovation, whereby periodic or continuous monitoring of interface pressure can be obtained to guide routine compression therapy, the cornerstone of chronic venous disorder management. By applying a novel capacitive, iontronic sensing technology, a flexible, ultrathin, and highly sensitive pressure sensing array is seamlessly incorporated into compression garments for the monitoring of interface pressure. The linear pressure sensing array assesses pressure distribution along the limb in a real-time manner (up to a scanning rate of 5 kHz), and the measurement data can be processed and displayed on a mobile device locally, as well as transmitted through a Bluetooth communication module to a remote clinical service. The proposed interface pressure measuring system provides real-time interface pressure distribution data and can be utilized for both clinical and self-management of compression therapy, where both treatment efficacy and quality assurance can be ascertained. PMID:26530542

  15. Circulating Omentin-1 and Chronic Painful Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Jennifer B.; Sanders, Anne E.; Wilder, Rebecca S.; Essick, Greg K.; Slade, Gary D.; Hartung, Jane E.; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS The biological basis for painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD) remains unclear. An emerging literature implicates circulating inflammatory cytokines in the development of pain sensitivity and painful TMD. One newly discovered anti-inflammatory adipokine, omentin-1, has decreased expression in several inflammatory conditions including osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between omentin-1 levels and painful TMD. METHODS Using a case-control design, chronic painful TMD cases (n=90) and TMD-free controls (n=54) were selected participants in the multisite OPPERA study (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment). Painful TMD case status was determined by examiner using established Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD. Levels of omentin-1 were measured in stored blood plasma samples using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binary logistic regression calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence limits (CLs) for the association between omentin-1 and painful TMD. Models adjusted for study site, age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS The unadjusted association between omentin-1 and chronic painful TMD was statistically non-significant (P=.072) Following adjustment of the negative confounding bias of covariates, odds of painful decreased 36% per standard deviation increase in circulating omentin-1 (adjusted OR=0.64, 95% CL: 0.43, 0.96. P=.031). CONCLUSION Circulating levels of omentin-1 were significantly lower in painful TMD cases than controls, suggesting that painful TMD pain is mediated by inflammatory pathways. PMID:27472522

  16. Education and Hypnosis for Treatment of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGIDs) in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Tania

    2015-07-01

    FGIDs in children and adolescents (ROME III classification) have a significant impact on the daily functioning and quality of life. Often it is the pain that is one of the main contributors to the burden of functional dyspepsia, functional abdominal pain (syndrome), and irritable bowel syndrome. Current knowledge confirms that a number of integrated networks at cortical and subcortical sites are responsible for the experience of pain. From the work of Mayer and Tillisch (2011), mainly based on structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, it has become clear that abdominal pain syndromes are disorders of the bi-directional mind-brain-gut interactions. In this multi-factorial bio-psycho-social model we recognize the importance of neurobiological processes in the mind-brain-gut interactions, leading to alterations in motility, sensation, and immune functions. Medical treatment often offers little or no relief. Until now pharmaceutical research has not succeeded in developing safe new drugs with an effect on the brain-gut axis. More recent published research shows the rationale for the use of medical hypnosis in FGID. In this article the author will illustrate her specific approach in a pediatric gastroenterology clinic with children and adolescents with FGIDs. Being a pediatric gastroenterologist, the author emphasizes the importance of a clear diagnosis, explains the rationale for educating the patient and his or her parents on the multi-factorial bio-psycho-social model and the concepts of chronic pain, discusses the specific settings and pitfalls for hypnosis treatment in children, and last but not least, provides some examples of hypnotic sessions used with FGIDs. PMID:26046720

  17. Chronic pain in adolescence and internalizing mental health disorders: a nationally representative study.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melanie; Groenewald, Cornelius B; Beals-Erickson, Sarah E; Gebert, J Thomas; Palermo, Tonya M

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain in childhood and adolescence has been shown to heighten the risk for depressive and anxiety disorders in specific samples in adulthood; however, little is known about the association between a wider variety of chronic pains and internalizing mental health disorders. Using nationally representative data, the objectives of this study were to establish prevalence rates of internalizing mental health disorders (anxiety and depressive disorders) among cohorts with or without adolescent chronic pain, and to examine whether chronic pain in adolescence is associated with lifetime history of internalizing mental health disorders reported in adulthood. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) was used (N = 14,790). Individuals who had chronic pain in adolescence subsequently reported higher rates of lifetime anxiety disorders (21.1% vs 12.4%) and depressive disorders (24.5% vs 14.1%) in adulthood as compared with individuals without a history of adolescent chronic pain. Multivariate logistic regression confirmed that chronic pain in adolescence was associated with an increased likelihood of lifetime history of anxiety disorders (odds ratio: 1.33; 95% confidence interval: 1.09-1.63, P = 0.005) and depressive disorders (odds ratio: 1.38; confidence interval: 1.16-1.64, P < 0.001) reported in adulthood. Future research is needed to examine neurobiological and psychological mechanisms underlying these comorbidities. PMID:26901806

  18. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  19. Low Vitamin D Status Is Associated with Systemic and Gastrointestinal Inflammation in Dogs with a Chronic Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Helen F.; Gow, Adam G.; Kilpatrick, Scott; Cartwright, Jennifer A.; Milne, Elspeth M.; Philbey, Adrian W.; Berry, Jacqueline; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D deficiency, as assessed by serum concentrations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been linked to the development of over-zealous and inappropriate inflammation in humans. However, the relationship between vitamin D status and inflammation in dogs is ill-defined. Chronic enteropathies (CE) are frequently diagnosed in client owned dogs, have a wide range of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, and represent a spontaneous model in which to probe the relationship between vitamin D and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would be negatively associated with systemic and gastrointestinal inflammation in dogs with a CE. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and markers of systemic and gastrointestinal inflammation in a cohort of dogs with CE. Methods and Materials Serum 25(OH)D concentrations, together with neutrophil, monocyte, eosinophil and lymphocyte counts, duodenal histopathology scores, serum IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNFα concentrations and were measured in 39 dogs with histologically confirmed CE. A linear regression model examined the relationship between serum 25(OH)D status and measures of inflammation. Results Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were negatively associated with neutrophil and monocyte counts, duodenal histopathology scores and serum IL-2 and IL-8 concentrations. Dogs with low serum 25(OH)D concentrations typically had an inflammatory signature characterised by high monocyte and neutrophil numbers together with low lymphocyte numbers. There is a need to establish whether low vitamin D status is a cause or consequence of inflammation. PMID:26333093

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    PubMed

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  1. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  2. Family Health and Characteristics in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Emotional Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Luiza; Garralda, M. Elena; Jeffs, Jim; Rose, Gillian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare family health and characteristics in children with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and emotional disorders. Method: Parents of 28 children and adolescents aged 11 to 18 years with CFS, 30 with JRA, and 27 with emotional disorders (i.e., anxiety and/or depressive disorders) were…

  3. Comparative Study of Children with ADHD Only, Autism Spectrum Disorder + ADHD, and Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder + ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Schneider, Jayne

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Identification of differences among children with ADHD only, autism spectrum disorder (ASD)+ADHD, and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD)+ADHD may lead to better understanding of clinical phenotypes. Method: Children were evaluated using the parent- and teacher-completed questionnaires. Results: All three groups were highly similar in…

  4. Analysis of Gastric and Duodenal Eosinophils in Children with Abdominal Pain Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders According to Rome III Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) is common in children and adults. However, the mechanism of AP-FGID is not clearly known. Recently, micro-inflammation, especially eosinophilia in the gastrointestinal tract, was suggested in the pathophysiology of AP-FGID in adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of gastric and duodenal eosinophilia with pediatric AP-FGID. Methods In total, 105 pediatric patients with AP-FGID were recruited and classified into 4 subgroups based on the Rome III criteria. Eosinophil counts in the gastric and duodenal tissues of children with AP-FGID were compared to those from normal pathology references or those of children with Helicobacter pylori infection. Tissue eosinophil counts were also compared among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Results Eosinophil counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with AP-FGID than normal reference values. Duodenal eosinophil counts were higher in children with AP-FGID, but not significantly when compared with normal reference values. There were no significant differences in eosinophil counts of the stomach or duodenum among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Eosinophils counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with H. pylori infection than in those with AP-FGID. Duodenal eosinophilia was prominent in cases of H. pylori infection, but not statistically significant when compared with AP-FGID. Conclusions Our study revealed that gastric eosinophilia is associated with AP-FGID in children, regardless of the subtype of functional abdominal pain. This suggests some contribution of gastrointestinal eosinophils in the development of pediatric AP-FGID. PMID:27053514

  5. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  6. Hypnosis and Guided Imagery Treatment for Gastrointestinal Disorders: Experience With Scripted Protocols Developed at the University of North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Olafur S; van Tilburg, Miranda

    2015-07-01

    Completely scripted treatment courses for verbatim interventions are uncommon in the field of clinical hypnosis. This approach was adopted for by a North Carolina research team for treating gastrointestinal disorders 20 years ago and has been used in hypnosis treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis, as well as in guided imagery treatment for functional abdominal pain. Treatment with these scripted protocols is delivered in a fixed series of sessions over a 2- or 3-month period. They have been found efficacious for improving bowel symptoms in several clinical trials, even in patients who have been entirely unresponsive to medical treatment. Response rates in clinical trials have ranged from 53% to 94%, and the therapeutic benefits have been shown to be well maintained at 6-, 10-, or 12-month follow-ups in different studies. This article describes the development and research on these protocols and summarizes the advantages and limitations of this fully scripted treatment approach. PMID:26046714

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive T/NK-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders Manifested as Gastrointestinal Perforations and Skin Lesions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai-Juan; Li, Ji; Song, Hong-Mei; Li, Zheng-Hong; Dong, Mei; Zhou, Xiao-Ge

    2016-02-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) of childhood is a highly aggressive EBV-positive T/natural killer (NK)-cell LPD, which emerges in the background of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) or shortly after primary acute EBV infection. The clinical presentations of CAEBV are varied; patients with atypical manifestations are easily misdiagnosed. We described a 14-year-old boy suffering from digestive disorders and intermittent fever for 1 year and 9 months, whose conditions worsened and skin lesions occurred 2 months before hospitalization. He was diagnosed as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and treated accordingly. His other clinical features, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated inflammatory marks, were found in hospitalization. The boy suffered from repeatedly spontaneous intestinal perforations shortly after hospitalization and died of intestinal hemorrhea. The pathological results of intestine and skin both showed EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD (lymphoma stage).There are rare studies reporting gastrointestinal perforations in EBV-positive T/NK-cell LPD, let alone repeatedly spontaneous perforations. Based on the clinical features and pathological results of this patient, the disease progressed from CAEBV (T-cell type) to systemic EBV-positive T-cell LPD of childhood (lymphoma). Not all the patients with CAEBV could have unusual patterns of anti-EBV antibodies. However, the presence of high EBV loads (EBV-encoded early small ribonucleic acid (RNA) (EBER) in affected tissues and/or EBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in peripheral blood) is essential for diagnosing CAEBV. Maybe because of his less common clinical features for CAEBV and negative anti-EBV antibodies, the boy was not diagnosed correctly. We should have emphasized the test for EBER or EBV-DNA. Meanwhile, for the IBD patients whose manifestations were not typical, and whose conditions were not improved by suitable

  8. [Chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders with hairy cells].

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Édouard

    2015-01-01

    The standardized blood smear examination is the first step in the diagnosis of a B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and can guide further investigations. In the laboratory, the identification of hairy cells on blood smear is a matter of daily practice. Hairy cell proliferations represent heterogeneous entities and their respective diagnoses can be difficult. If hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) represent separate entities, the variant form of HCL (HCLv) and splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRPL) remain provisional entities in the 2008 WHO classification. We discuss the main clinical and biological characteristics of these four entities and appropriate means to characterize, identify and distinguish from each other; standardized blood smear examination, multiparameter flow cytometry analysis, analysis of the repertoire of immunoglobulins heavy chains genes and their mutational status (mutated or unmutated profile), molecular analyses: BRAF gene V600E mutation in HCL and MAP2K1 gene mutations in HCLv. We also discuss the main therapeutic aspects with emphasis on the new targeted drugs that enter into force in the therapeutic arsenal. PMID:25858127

  9. Altered Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vállez García, David; Doorduin, Janine; Willemsen, Antoon T M; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Otte, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of central hyperexcitability in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (cWAD). However, little is known about how an apparently simple cervical spine injury can induce changes in cerebral processes. The present study was designed (1) to validate previous results showing alterations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in cWAD, (2) to test if central hyperexcitability reflects changes in rCBF upon non-painful stimulation of the neck, and (3) to verify our hypothesis that the missing link in understanding the underlying pathophysiology could be the close interaction between the neck and midbrain structures. For this purpose, alterations of rCBF were explored in a case-control study using H2(15)O positron emission tomography, where each group was exposed to four different conditions, including rest and different levels of non-painful electrical stimulation of the neck. rCBF was found to be elevated in patients with cWAD in the posterior cingulate and precuneus, and decreased in the superior temporal, parahippocampal, and inferior frontal gyri, the thalamus and the insular cortex when compared with rCBF in healthy controls. No differences in rCBF were observed between different levels of electrical stimulation. The alterations in regions directly involved with pain perception and interoceptive processing indicate that cWAD symptoms might be the consequence of a mismatch during the integration of information in brain regions involved in pain processing. PMID:27444853

  10. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    KIANI, Hamed; HAGHIGHI, Ali; ROSTAMI, Ali; AZARGASHB, Eznollah; TABAEI, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; SOLGI, Abbas; ZEBARDAST, Nozhat

    2016-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs), their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs) was 32.2% (419/1,301). Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6%) were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6%) presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%), followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%), Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3%) and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%). Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001), contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02), age above 15 years (p = 0.001) and seasons (p = 0.001) were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001) and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04). Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted. PMID:27253744

  11. A comparison of traditional and quantitative analysis of acid-base and electrolyte imbalances in horses with gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marga; Monreal, Luis; Segura, Dídac; Armengou, Lara; Añor, Sònia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and quantitative approaches in analysis of the acid-base and electrolyte imbalances in horses with acute gastrointestinal disorders. Venous blood samples were collected from 115 colic horses, and from 45 control animals. Horses with colic were grouped according to the clinical diagnosis into 4 categories: obstructive, ischemic, inflammatory, and diarrheic problems. Plasma electrolytes, total protein, albumin, pH, pCO2, tCO2, HCO3-, base excess, anion gap, measured strong ion difference (SIDm), nonvolatile weak buffers (A(tot)), and strong ion gap were determined in all samples. All colic horses revealed a mild but statistically significant decrease in iCa2+ concentration. Potassium levels were mildly but significantly decreased in horses with colic, except in those within the inflammatory group. Additionally, the diarrheic group revealed a mild but significant decrease in Na+, tCa, tMg, total protein, albumin, SIDm, and A(tot). Although pH was not severely altered in any colic group, 26% of the horses in the obstructive group, 74% in the ischemic group, 87% in the inflammatory group, and 22% in the diarrheic group had a metabolic imbalance. In contrast, when using the quantitative approach, 78% of the diarrheic horses revealed a metabolic imbalance consisting mainly of a strong ion acidosis and nonvolatile buffer ion alkalosis. In conclusion, mild acid-base and electrolyte disturbances were observed in horses with gastrointestinal disorders. However, the quantitative approach should be used in these animals, especially when strong ion imbalances and hypoproteinemia are detected, so that abnormalities in acid-base status are evident. PMID:16355683

  12. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hamed; Haghighi, Ali; Rostami, Ali; Azargashb, Eznollah; Tabaei, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; Solgi, Abbas; Zebardast, Nozhat

    2016-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs), their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs) was 32.2% (419/1,301). Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6%) were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6%) presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%), followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%), Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3%) and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%). Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001), contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02), age above 15 years (p = 0.001) and seasons (p = 0.001) were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001) and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04). Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted. PMID:27253744

  13. Remote ischemic preconditioning as treatment for non-ischemic gastrointestinal disorders: beyond ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo

    2014-04-01

    Common gastrointestinal diseases such as radiation enteritis (RE), acute pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and drug-induced hepatotoxicity share pathophysiological mechanisms at the molecular level, mostly involving the activation of many pathways of the immune response, ultimately leading to tissue injury. Increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine release, inflammatory cell infiltration and activation and the up-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors participate in the pathophysiology of these complex entities. Treatment varies in each specific disease, but at least in the cases of RE and IBD immunosuppressors are effective. However, full therapeutic responses are not always achieved. The pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury shares many of these mechanisms. Brief and repetitive periods of ischemia in an organ or limb have been shown to protect against subsequent major IR injury in distant organs, a phenomenon called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIP). This procedure has been shown to protect the gut, pancreas and liver by modulating many of the same inflammatory mechanisms. Since RIP is safe and tolerable, and has shown to be effective in some recent clinical trials, I suggest that RIP could be used as a physiologically relevant adjunct treatment for non-ischemic gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions. PMID:24707140

  14. [The role of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and therapy of gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Gasztonyi, Beáta; Hamvas, József; Pakodi, Ferenc; Szepes, Attila; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is one of those diagnostic methods in gastrointestinal endoscopy which has developed rapidly in the last decade and has became exceedingly available to visualize the walls of the internal organs in details corresponding to histological layers, or analyze the adjacent structures. Fine needles and other endoscopic accessories can be introduced into the neighbouring tissues under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasound, and diagnostic and minimally invasive therapeutic interventions can be performed. The endoscopic ultrasound became more widely available in Hungary in recent years. This review focuses on the indications, benefits and complications of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. We recommend this article to gastroenterologists, surgeons, internists, pulmonologists, and to specialists in oncology and radiology. This recommendation was based on the consensus of the Board members of the Endoscopic Ultrasound Section of the Hungarian Gastroenterological Society. PMID:24681675

  15. K+ channels as potential targets for the treatment of gastrointestinal motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Currò, Diego

    2014-06-15

    K(+) channels play important functional roles in excitable cells, as neurons and muscle cells. The activation or inhibition of K(+) channels hyperpolarizes or depolarizes the cell membrane, respectively. These effects determine in the smooth muscle decrease or increase in Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV1.2) channels and relaxation or contraction, respectively. Recent studies highlight the importance of voltage-dependent type 7 K(+) (KV7 or KCNQ) channels in regulating muscle tone and contractility in stomach and colon. KV7 channels, that include 5 subtypes (KV7.1-7.5), are activated at relatively negative potential values, close to those of the resting membrane potential for the smooth muscle cells of some segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, they contribute to set the resting membrane potential and their blockade induces increase in smooth muscle contractility in stomach and colon. In addition, KV7 channel activation produces profound relaxations of gastric and colonic smooth muscle. Therefore, KV7 channel activators could be used to relax the smooth muscle and relieve symptoms in diseases such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome with prevalent diarrhea. The discovery of activators selective for the channel subtypes present in the smooth muscle, mainly KV7.4 and 7.5, would allow avoiding adverse cardiac and nervous system effects. A further step forward would be characterizing putative differences among the KV7 channel subtypes expressed in the various smooth muscles and synthesizing molecules specific for the gastrointestinal smooth muscle. PMID:24726846

  16. Psychotherapeutic Treatment of a Gastrointestinal Disorder: Individual and Family Systems Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauknight, S. Terry

    A 17-year-old boy presented for treatment with chronic diarrhea that had proven refractory to medical treatment for a period of five years. The problem was sufficiently debilitating to cause highly erratic school attendance. Anamnesis revealed no precipitating event, though it was discovered that the patient's mother was a moderately compensated,…

  17. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic inflammatory joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; van Halm, V P; Nurmohamed, M T

    2016-05-15

    Inflammatory joint disorders (IJD), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (ASp) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), are prevalent conditions worldwide with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. IJD are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) disease-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we present an overview of the literature. Standardised mortality ratios are increased in IJD compared with the general population, that is, RA 1.3-2.3, ASp 1.6-1.9 and PsA 0.8-1.6. This premature mortality is mainly caused by atherosclerotic events. In RA, this CV risk is comparable to that in type 2 diabetes. Traditional CV risk factors are more often present and partially a consequence of changes in physical function related to the underlying IJD. Also, chronic systemic inflammation itself is an independent CV risk factor. Optimal control of disease activity with conventional synthetic, targeted synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs decreases this excess risk. High-grade inflammation as well as anti-inflammatory treatment alter traditional CV risk factors, such as lipids. In view of the above-mentioned CV burden in patients with IJD, CV risk management is necessary. Presently, this CV risk management is still lacking in usual care. Patients, general practitioners, cardiologists, internists and rheumatologists need to be aware of the substantially increased CV risk in IJD and should make a combined effort to timely initiate CV risk management in accordance with prevailing guidelines together with optimal control of rheumatic disease activity. CV screening and treatment strategies need to be implemented in usual care. PMID:26888573

  18. Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability and Co-Occurring Somatic Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oeseburg, B.; Groothoff, J. W.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Reijneveld, S. A.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence on the association between somatic chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and the full range of pervasive developmental disorder behavior (PDD behavior) is scarce. The aim of the present study is to assess the association between somatic chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and mild PDD behavior. We obtained data on 1044 ID-adolescents, aged…

  19. Anxiety in Boys with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder with and without Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Crowell, Judith A.; Sprafkin, Joyce

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study examined the psychosocial and behavioral concomitants of anxiety in clinic-referred boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with and without chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). Method ADHD boys with (n = 65) and without (n = 94) CMTD were evaluated with measures of psychiatric symptoms, mental health risk factors, and academic and social performance. Results Boys with CMTD evidenced more severe anxiety and less social competence and were more likely to be living with only one biological parent than the ADHD Only group, but the magnitude of group differences was generally small. The severity of generalized anxiety, separation anxiety, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms were uniquely associated with a different pattern of risk factors, and there was some evidence that these patterns differed for the two groups of boys. Conclusion Boys with CMTD had a relatively more severe and complex pattern of anxiety that was associated with different clinical features, all of which suggests that ADHD plus CMTD might better be conceptualized as a distinct clinical entity from ADHD Only. However, findings from the extant literature are mixed, and therefore this remains a topic for further study. PMID:20035592

  20. Gastrointestinal mucosal barrier function and diseases.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal barrier plays an essential role in the separation of the inside of the body from the outside environment. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most important component for construction of a constitutive barrier of epithelial cells, and they regulate the permeability of the barrier by tightly sealing the cell-cell junctions. TJ proteins are represented by claudins, occludin, junctional adhesion molecules, and scaffold protein zonula occludens. Among these TJ proteins, claudins are the major components of TJs and are responsible for the barrier and the polarity of the epithelial cells. Gastrointestinal diseases including reflux esophagitis, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and cancers may be regulated by these molecules, and disruption of their functions leads to chronic inflammatory conditions and chronic or progressive disease. Therefore, regulation of the barrier function of epithelial cells by regulating the expression and localization of TJ proteins is a potential new target for the treatment of these diseases. Treatment strategies for these diseases might thus be largely altered if symptom generation and/or immune dysfunction could be regulated through improvement of mucosal barrier function. Since TJ proteins may also modify tumor infiltration and metastasis, other important goals include finding a good TJ biomarker of cancer progression and patient prognosis, and developing TJ protein-targeted therapies that can modify patient prognosis. This review summarizes current understanding of gastrointestinal barrier function, TJ protein expression, and the mechanisms underlying epithelial barrier dysregulation in gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27048502

  1. Intergenerational transmission of chronic physical disease via chronic mental disorders: the potential role of addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Renee D

    2008-11-01

    There has been growing evidence of a link between chronic respiratory diseases, asthma in particular, and mental disorders among youth. The mechanism for this link remains unknown. Several studies have empirically addressed the question of this pathway, and accumulating results may shed new light on the nature of this association. The goal of the current paper is to provide an integrative summary of the literature to date and to present a new interdisciplinary hypothesis for one possible mechanism explaining the link between asthma and anxiety/depression among youth. This hypothesis posits that comorbid anxiety/depression and nicotine dependence among adults, may be one pathway leading to the comorbidity of asthma and anxiety/depression among youth. We propose this mechanism operates via exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and/or prenatal tobacco use, which confers an increased risk for asthma, and parental anxiety/depression which confers increased risk of anxiety/depression among offspring via familial transmission. We predict that further testing of this hypothesis will help to reveal the largely neglected problem of nicotine dependence especially among women - and the far-reaching impact of this addiction on the health of children. PMID:18657913

  2. Psychopathological Profile in Children with Chronic Tic Disorder and Co-Existing ADHD: Additive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessner, Veit; Becker, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the co-occurrence of chronic tic disorders (CTD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unclear. Especially in the field of psychopathology, the relationship of CTD and ADHD remains to be clarified. Thus, the aim of the present chart review study was to specify the contribution of CTD and/or ADHD to the…

  3. Immediate-Release Methylphenidate for ADHD in Children with Comorbid Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Sverd, Jeffrey; Nolan, Edith E.; Sprafkin, Joyce; Schneider, Jayne

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of immediate-release methylphenidate (MPH-IR) for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children (ages 6-12 years) with Tourette's syndrome (96%) or chronic motor tic disorder (4%). Method: Two cohorts of prepubertal children (N = 71) received placebo and three doses of…

  4. Nutritional aspects in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and motor dysfunction in the gut. Working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG).

    PubMed

    Simrén, M; Abrahamsson, H; Bosaeus, I; Brummer, R J; Dolk, A; Lindberg, G; Nyhlin, H; Ohlsson, B; Sjölund, K; Törnblom, H

    2007-05-01

    In reviews regarding the management of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and motility disturbances within the gut nutritional aspects and dietary advice is often put forward as being of great importance. However, there are relatively few high-quality, interventional studies in the literature supporting an important role for general dietary advice to improve symptoms in these patients. Nutritional supplementation to patients with malnutrition due to severe dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract is of course less controversial, even though different views on how this should be performed exist. The content of this article is based on presentations given by the authors during the second meeting of the Swedish Motility Group held in Gothenburg in March 2005, and aims to give an overview on the role of dietary advice and nutritional supplementation to patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction of different severity. PMID:17368120

  5. Endoscopic evaluation and biopsy collection of the gastrointestinal tract in the green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris): application in a case of chronic regurgitation with gastric mucus gland hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Meegan, Jenny; Sidor, Inga F; Field, Cara; Roddy, Nicole; Sirpenski, Gayle; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    A green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) was evaluated for chronic regurgitation. By using flexible endoscopy, the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated and revealed multifocal proliferative gastric masses and an intestinal ulcer. Biopsy specimens revealed gastric mucus gland hyperplasia, intestinal nematodiasis, and mild enteritis. Esophagoscopy and gastroscopy were performed by using a larger endoscope (length, 200 cm). A smaller endoscope (length, 100 cm) facilitated entering the intestinal tract in normograde or retrograde directions. A control eel was also evaluated, and no gross or histologic abnormalities were detected. The case eel was treated with metoclopramide and fenbendazole, responded well to therapy, and regurgitation decreased. A year later, the animal died of unrelated causes. Necropsy revealed coelomic gastric adhesions. The gastric proliferative lesions were associated with degeneration and necrosis of gastric pit mucosa without significant inflammation; etiology was unknown. Gastrointestinal endoscopy proved a useful diagnostic tool for evaluation and biopsy collection in this eel species. PMID:23082527

  6. Pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic hemolytic anemia and other blood disorders.

    PubMed

    Machado, Roberto F; Farber, Harrison W

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged as a major complication of several hematologic disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, red cell membrane disorders, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and splenectomy. With the exception of sickle cell disease, there are a limited number of studies systematically evaluating the prevalence of PH using the gold standard right heart catheterization in these disorders. The cause of the PH in patients with hematologic disorders is multifactorial, and a thorough diagnostic evaluation is essential. More importantly, there are virtually no high-quality data on the safety and efficacy of PH-targeted therapy in this patient population. PMID:24267302

  7. Chronic obstructive lung disease and posttraumatic stress disorder: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Thad E; Blevins, Amy; Weg, Mark W Vander

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported on the co-occurrence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and psychiatric conditions, with the most robust evidence base demonstrating an impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on COPD-related outcomes. In recent years, research has sought to determine if there is a co-occurrence between COPD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as for associations between PTSD and COPD-related outcomes. To date, there have been no published reviews summarizing this emerging literature. Objectives The primary objective of this review was to determine if there is adequate evidence to support a co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Secondary objectives were to: 1) determine if there are important clinical considerations regarding the impact of PTSD on COPD management, and 2) identify targeted areas for further research. Methods A structured review was performed using a systematic search strategy limited to studies in English, addressing adults, and to articles that examined: 1) the co-occurrence of COPD and PTSD and 2) the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes. To be included, articles must have addressed some type of nonreversible obstructive lung pathology. Results A total of 598 articles were identified for initial review. Upon applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, n=19 articles or abstracts addressed our stated objectives. Overall, there is inconclusive evidence to support the co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Studies finding a significant co-occurrence generally had inferior methods of identifying COPD; in contrast, studies that utilized more robust COPD measures (such as a physician exam) generally failed to find a relationship. Among studies that examined the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes, there was more consistent evidence that PTSD affects the perception of respiratory symptom burden and management. In addition, methods for measuring an important confounder (smoking) were generally

  8. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Aboitiz, Francisco; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26904302

  9. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Aboitiz, Francisco; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26904302

  10. Tic disorders in the differential diagnosis of chronic cough in children in relation to four cases

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Işık; Şişmanlar, Şahika Gülen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic cough is a frequent reason for medical referrals in childhood. In patients who do not have signs or symptoms of an underlying respiratory system disease and who do not respond to experimental treatment, psychogenic cough should be considered. In this paper, four patients who were referred to our department with a prediagnosis of psychogenic cough, found to have tic disorder as a result of the assessments performed and improved with antipsychotic medication are presented. The differantial diagnosis of chronic cough in children should include tic disorders as well as psychogenic cough. Tic disorders can be diagnosed easily with detailed history and their response to medical treatment is rather satisfactory. Recognition of these disorders by pediatricians will minimize erroneous diagnoses and inappropriate therapies in children with a complaint of chronic cough. PMID:26568694

  11. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective. PMID:26683238

  12. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a risk factor for dialysis and all-cause mortality: a cohort study of chronic kidney disease patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective Impaired renal function is associated with higher risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with chronic kidney disease and not on dialysis (CKD-ND). It is unclear if UGIB increases risk of chronic dialysis. The aim of the study was to investigate risk of chronic dialysis in CKD-ND patients with UGIB. Setting All CKD-ND stage 3–5 patients of a CKD programme in one hospital between 2003 and 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until September 2012. Primary and secondary outcome measures Chronic dialysis (dialysis for more than 3 months) started and all-cause mortality. The risk of chronic dialysis was analysed using Cox proportional hazard regression with adjustments for age, gender and renal function, followed by competing-risks analysis. Results We analysed 3126 CKD-ND patients with a mean age of 65±14 years for 2.8 years. Of 3126 patients, 387 (12.4%) patients developed UGIB, 989 (31.6%) patients started chronic dialysis and 197 (6.3%) patients died. UGIB increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR (aHR): 1.51, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.13) and the risk of chronic dialysis (aHR; 1.29, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.50). The subdistribution HR (SHR) of UGIB for chronic dialysis (competing event: all-cause mortality) was 1.37 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.64) in competing-risks analysis with adjustments for age, renal function, gender, diabetes, haemoglobin, albumin and urine protein/creatinine ratio. Conclusions UGIB is associated with increased risk of chronic dialysis and all-cause mortality in patients with CKD-ND stages 3–5. This association is independent of age, gender, basal renal function, haemoglobin, albumin and urine protein levels. PMID:27150184

  13. Advances and New Approaches to Managing Sleep-Disordered Breathing Related to Chronic Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Sevilla Berrios, Ronaldo A; Gay, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease affecting about 20 million US adults. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) problems are frequent and poorly characterized for patients with COPD. Both the well-known success of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in the acute COPD exacerbation in the hospital setting and that NIV is the cornerstone of chronic therapy for SDBs have urged the attention of the medical community to determine the impact of NIV on chronic COPD management with and without coexisting SDBs. Early observational studies showed decreased long-term survival rates on patients with COPD with concomitant chronic hypercapnia when compared with normocapnic patients. PMID:27236061

  14. Pharmabiotic manipulation of the microbiota in gastrointestinal disorders, from rationale to reality.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Fergus; Collins, Stephen M

    2010-09-01

    The viewpoints of enthusiasts and skeptics in relation to the role of probiotics should not be allowed to distract clinicians from the bigger issue, which is the pivotal role of the microbiota in the protection against many disorders and in the pathogenesis of others. However, all probiotics, like all bacteria, are not created equal, and therapeutic deployment in a generic sense is as absurd as the administration of pills or tablets without regard for the nature of the active ingredient and the intended effect. The rationale for therapeutic manipulation or supplementation of the microbiota is sound in conditions where the intestinal ecosystem is poorly developed, such as in low birth weight neonates, or where it is profoundly disturbed, such as after broad-spectrum antibiotics. In other conditions, such as irritable bowel disorder (IBD), the efficacy of some, but not all, probiotics has been a welcome surprise. However, the impact of probiotics is likely to be modest and is probably more complicated in IBD. In choosing a probiotic strategy, clinicians should adhere to the principles of evidence-based therapeutics. These include: selection from a reputable supplier, with appropriate documentation of contents and shelf life; anticipation of strain-specific effects; avoidance of cocktails without documentation of the activities of each ingredient with absence of interstrain antagonism; and published evidence of efficacy from clinical trials. PMID:20951927

  15. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  16. Review of sleep studies of patients with chronic insomnia at a sleep disorder unit

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sheau-Hwa; Ng, Beng-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chronic insomnia is associated with many physical and psychiatric illnesses, and its underlying aetiology needs to be identified in order to achieve safe and effective treatment. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) are common primary sleep disorders that can lead to chronic insomnia. Patients with these conditions are evaluated using polysomnography (PSG). METHODS The PSG records of 106 patients with chronic insomnia who presented to a multidisciplinary sleep clinic in Singapore over a five-year period were reviewed. To examine the utility of PSG in the evaluation of chronic insomnia, the clinical diagnoses of the patients before and after the sleep studies were compared. RESULTS Among the 106 patients, 69 (65.4%) were suspected to have primary sleep disorders based on clinical history and examination alone. Following PSG evaluation, 42.5% and 4.7% of the study population were diagnosed with OSA and PLMD, respectively. OSA was found in 35.9% of the 39 patients who had underlying psychiatric conditions. CONCLUSION This study illustrates that many patients with chronic insomnia have underlying primary sleep disorders. It also highlights the danger of attributing chronic insomnia in psychiatric patients to their illness, without giving due consideration to other possible aetiologies. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for the presence of other aetiologies, and make timely and targeted referrals for sleep studies where appropriate. PMID:26106238

  17. Chronic pain as a variant of depressive disease: the pain-prone disorder.

    PubMed

    Blumer, D; Heilbronn, M

    1982-07-01

    Review of the literature shows that the common syndrome of chronic pain of uncertain origin appears to be perpetuated by central mechanisms. No plausible neurological theory has been proposed. While the alternative concept of chronic pain as a psychogenic disorder has remained a vague entity, there is strong support to view chronic pain as the prime expression of a muted depressive state. This form of masked depression, however, tends to be associated with a number of characteristic traits. Our studies of patients with chronic pain have led to the identification of a well defined psychobiological disorder with characteristic clinical, psychodynamic, biographic, and genetic features. This syndrome is termed the pain-prone disorder and is viewed as a variant of depressive disease. It proves a distinct entity when compared with a group of patients whose pain can be related to a well defined somatic disease. The chronicity of the disorder appears partially related to the practice of protracted, costly, and futile physical procedures, focusing on a phantom peripheral source of the pain-- a practice commonly pursued by patients and physicians. Recognition of the disorder allows for early, rational, and more effective treatment approaches. PMID:7086394

  18. Addressing Neuroplastic Changes in Distributed Areas of the Nervous System Associated With Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, René; Higgins, Johanne; Bourbonnais, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Present interventions utilized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation are guided, in large part, by a biomedical model where peripheral structural injury is believed to be the sole driver of the disorder. There are, however, neurophysiological changes across different areas of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including peripheral receptors, dorsal horn of the spinal cord, brain stem, sensorimotor cortical areas, and the mesolimbic and prefrontal areas associated with chronic musculoskeletal disorders, including chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and tendon injuries. These neurophysiological changes appear not only to be a consequence of peripheral structural injury but also to play a part in the pathophysiology of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Neurophysiological changes are consistent with a biopsychosocial formulation reflecting the underlying mechanisms associated with sensory and motor findings, psychological traits, and perceptual changes associated with chronic musculoskeletal conditions. These changes, therefore, have important implications in the clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, and treatment of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal rehabilitation professionals have at their disposal tools to address these neuroplastic changes, including top-down cognitive-based interventions (eg, education, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness meditation, motor imagery) and bottom-up physical interventions (eg, motor learning, peripheral sensory stimulation, manual therapy) that induce neuroplastic changes across distributed areas of the nervous system and affect outcomes in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Furthermore, novel approaches such as the use of transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be utilized to help renormalize neurological function. Comprehensive treatment addressing peripheral structural injury as well as neurophysiological changes occurring across

  19. Quality of life and self-esteem in children with chronic tic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hesapçıoğlu, Selma Tural; Tural, Mustafa Kemal; Kandil, Sema

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the quality of life and self-esteem in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome (TS) and other chronic motor or vocal tic disorders in comparison with the control group. This is the first study examining the effects of quality of life and self-esteem on each other in chronic tic disorders. Material and Methods: Among 62 patients aged between 6 and 16 years who were diagnosed with chronic tic disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV, 57 patients who met the study inclusion criteria constituted the study group and 57 age- and gender-matched individuals constituted the control group (Ethics committee file number: 2009/69; ethics committee meeting number: 2009/14 (11.06.2009); ethics committee decision number: 16). The Rosenberg self-esteem scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Children’s Depression Inventory, Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, Maudsley Obsessional Compulsive Inventory and the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime version were applied to the children and adolescents. Results: In the study group, all quality of life subtests were found to be lower compared to the control group both in children and adolescents except for self-reported emotional functionality and social functionality. Being below the age of 12 years and female gender were found to be predictors of low self-esteem in tic disorder. In the reports obtained from the children and adolescents, low self-esteem was related with decreased quality of life in all areas except for academic functionality. Conclusions: Children and adolescents with tic disorder experience functional disruption with a higher rate compared to the group without a psychiatric disorder or severe medical condition. Applying holistic approaches considering other clinical psychiatric symptoms as a part of chronic tic disorder will be useful in increasing the quality of life and self

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodynamic Instability, and Endoscopic High-Risk Appearance Are Associated with 30-Day Rebleeding in Patients with Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Hah, Yu Jin; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    The results of studies that evaluated predictive factors for rebleeding in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding in these patients. A consecutive 312 patients presenting symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Clinical and demographic characteristics and endoscopic findings were evaluated for potential factors associated with 30-day rebleeding using logistic regression analysis. Overall, 176 patients were included (male, 80.1%; mean age, 59.7±16.0 yr). Rebleeding within 7 and 30 days occurred in 21 (11.9%) and 27 (15.3%) patients, respectively. We found that chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR, 10.29; 95% CI, 2.84-37.33; P<0.001), tachycardia (pulse>100 beats/min) during the admission (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.25-11.49; P=0.019), and Forrest classes I, IIa, and IIb (OR, 6.14; 95% CI, 1.36-27.66; P=0.018) were significant independent predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding. However, neither Rockall nor Blatchford scores showed statistically significant relationships with 30-day rebleeding in a multivariate analysis. CKD, hemodynamic instability during hospitalization, and an endoscopic high-risk appearance are significantly independent predictors of 30-day rebleeding in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. These factors may be useful for clinical management of such patients. PMID:24133356

  1. Adverse Food Reaction and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: Role of the Dietetic Approach.

    PubMed

    Pasqui, Francesca; Poli, Carolina; Colecchia, Antonio; Marasco, Giovanni; Festi, Davide

    2015-09-01

    Bloating, abdominal discomfort or pain, disturbed bowel habits are very common symptoms, frequently reported by the patients soon after food ingestion. These symptoms may occur in different clinical conditions, such as functional bowel disorders, food adverse reactions, gluten-related syndromes, which frequently are interrelated. Consequently, in clinical practice, it is necessary to perform a correct diagnosis in order to identify, for the single patient, the most appropriate therapeutic strategy, which may include not only specific drugs, but also, and mainly, life style changes (healthy nutritional behavior and constant physical activity). The aim of this review is to provide to the general physician, according to the available evidence, the most appropriate diagnostic work-ups for recognizing the different clinical scenarios (i.e. food allergy and intolerance, functional bowel diseases, gluten-related syndromes), to identify their clinical interrelationships and to suggest the most appropriate management. In fact, as far as food intolerances are concerned, it is well known that the number of patients who believe that their symptoms are related to food intolerance is increasing and consequently they restrict their diet, possibly causing nutritional deficiencies. Furthermore, there is an increasing use of unconventional diagnostic tests for food intolerance which lack accurate scientific evidence; the application of their results may induce misdiagnosis and unhealthy therapeutic choices. Consequently the recognition of food intolerance has to be performed on the basis of reliable tests within an agreed diagnostic workup. PMID:26405704

  2. Pharmacological explanation for the medicinal use of Juniperus excelsa in hyperactive gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2012-04-01

    Crude extract of Juniperus excelsa (JeExt), which tested positive for the presence of anthraquinone, flavonoids, saponins, sterols, terpenes and tannin, exhibited a protective effect against castor oil-induced diarrhoea in mice at 100-1000 mg/kg. In rabbit jejunum preparations, JeExt (0.01-1.0 mg/mL) caused relaxation of spontaneous and K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions at similar concentrations to papaverine, whereas verapamil was relatively more potent against K(+). JeExt (0.03-0.3 mg/mL) shifted Ca(2+) concentration-response curves to the right, like papaverine or verapamil. JeExt (0.003-0.01 mg/mL) caused a leftward shift of isoprenaline-induced inhibitory concentration-response curves, similar to papaverine. JeExt (1.0-30 mg/kg) caused suppression of carbachol (CCh, 100 μg/kg)-induced increase in inspiratory pressure of anaesthetized rats. In guinea-pig trachea, JeExt (0.001-3.0 mg/mL) relaxed CCh (1 μM)- and high K(+)-induced contractions and shifted isoprenaline-induced inhibitory curves to the left. This study suggests that Juniperus excelsa possibly exhibits a combination of Ca(2+) antagonist and phosphodiesterase inhibitory effects, which provides a pharmacological basis for its traditional use in disorders of gut and airways hyperactivity, such as diarrhoea, colic and asthma. PMID:22134420

  3. Law in everyday life and death: a socio-legal study of chronic disorders of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Simon; Kitzinger, Celia; Kitzinger, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses, from a socio-legal perspective, the question of the significance of law for the treatment, care and the end-of-life decision making for patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. We use the phrase ‘chronic disorders of consciousness’ as an umbrella term to refer to severely brain-injured patients in prolonged comas, vegetative or minimally conscious states. Based on an analysis of interviews with family members of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness, we explore the images of law that were drawn upon and invoked by these family members when negotiating the situation of their relatives, including, in some cases, the ending of their lives. By examining ‘legal consciousness’ in this way (an admittedly confusing term in the context of this study,) we offer a distinctly sociological contribution to the question of how law matters in this particular domain of social life. PMID:26041944

  4. [The potential role of microbiota in major psychiatric disorders: Mechanisms, preclinical data, gastro-intestinal comorbidities and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Chevalier, Grégoire; Eberl, Gerard; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    While forecasts predict an increase in the prevalence of mental health disorders in the worldwide general population, the response rate to classical psychiatric treatment remains unsatisfactory. Resistance to psychotropic drugs can be due to clinical, pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic factors. Among these factors, recent animal findings suggest that microbiota may have an underestimated influence on its host's behavior and on drug metabolism that may explain ineffectiveness or increased side effects of psychiatric medications such as weight gain. The following issues were identified in the present review: (i) microbiota dysbiosis and putative consequences on central nervous system functioning; (ii) chronic microbiota dysbiosis-associated illnesses in humans; (iii) microbiota-oriented treatments and their potential therapeutic applications in psychiatry. PMID:26653939

  5. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  6. Frequency shifts in the anterior default mode network and the salience network in chronic pain disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent functional imaging studies on chronic pain of various organic etiologies have shown significant alterations in both the spatial and the temporal dimensions of the functional connectivity of the human brain in its resting state. However, it remains unclear whether similar changes in intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) also occur in patients with chronic pain disorder, defined as persistent, medically unexplained pain. Methods We compared 21 patients who suffered from chronic pain disorder with 19 age- and gender-matched controls using 3T-fMRI. All neuroimaging data were analyzed using both independent component analysis (ICA) and power spectra analysis. Results In patients suffering from chronic pain disorder, the fronto-insular ‘salience’ network (FIN) and the anterior default mode network (aDMN) predominantly oscillated at higher frequencies (0.20 - 0.24 Hz), whereas no significant differences were observed in the posterior DMN (pDMN) and the sensorimotor network (SMN). Conclusions Our results indicate that chronic pain disorder may be a self-sustaining and endogenous mental process that affects temporal organization in terms of a frequency shift in the rhythmical dynamics of cortical networks associated with emotional homeostasis and introspection. PMID:23497482

  7. Gastrointestinal care for older people.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Penny; Harrison, Penny

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses gastrointestinal (GI) healthcare in older people. It outlines the physiological changes that occur in the GI tract as a result of ageing, and discusses common GI disorders in older people. These GI disorders include dysphagia, gastrointestinal reflux disease, colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, constipation and anaemia. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the factors that may influence gastrointestinal health in older people, including nutrition, hydration and alcohol use, which are important considerations when delivering person-centred care. PMID:27380703

  8. Autoinflammatory bone disorders with special focus on chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sterile bone inflammation is the hallmark of autoinflammatory bone disorders, including chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) with its most severe form chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Autoinflammatory osteopathies are the result of a dysregulated innate immune system, resulting in immune cell infiltration of the bone and subsequent osteoclast differentiation and activation. Interestingly, autoinflammatory bone disorders are associated with inflammation of the skin and/or the intestine. In several monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders mutations in disease-causing genes have been reported. However, regardless of recent developments, the molecular pathogenesis of CNO/CRMO remains unclear. Here, we discuss the clinical presentation and molecular pathophysiology of human autoinflammatory osteopathies and animal models with special focus on CNO/CRMO. Treatment options in monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders and CRMO will be illustrated. PMID:24359092

  9. Interpretability of the PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigates the clinical interpretability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and Worry Scales in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison with healthy controls....

  10. [Nutrition and gastrointestinal intolerance].

    PubMed

    Madl, C; Holzinger, U

    2013-06-01

    The functional integrity of the gastrointestinal tract is an essential prerequisite in intensive care patients for the sufficient administration of enteral nutrition. Up to 65% of patients in intensive care units develop symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction with high residual gastric volume, vomiting and abdominal distension. The pathophysiological alterations of gastrointestinal intolerance and the subsequent effect on the tolerance of enteral nutrition can affect the whole gastrointestinal tract. Gastroduodenal motility disorders in particular, with increased gastroesophageal reflux lead to intolerance. In more than 90% of intensive care patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders an adequate postpyloric enteral nutrition can be carried out using a jejunal tube. In addition to improved tolerance of enteral nutrition this leads to a reduction of gastroesophageal reflux and the incidence of ventilation-associated pneumonia. Apart from the possibility of endoscopic application of the jejunal tube, alternative techniques were developed which allow a faster positioning of the jejunal tube with less complications. Furthermore, there are therapeutic options for improvement of gastrointestinal motility disorders and apart from general measures, also medicinal options for treatment of gastrointestinal intolerance which allow a sufficient enteral nutrition for intensive care patients. PMID:23740106

  11. Translation and Validation of Enhanced Asian Rome III Questionnaires in Bengali Language for Diagnosis of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M Masudur; Ghoshal, Uday C; Rowshon, A H M; Ahmed, Faruque; Kibria, Md Golam; Hasan, Mahmud; Gwee, Kok-Ann; Whitehead, William E

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), diagnosed by symptom-based criteria due to lack of biomarkers, need translated-validated questionnaires in different languages. As Bengali, the mother tongue of Bangladesh and eastern India, is the seventh most spoken language in the world, we translated and validated the Enhanced Asian Rome III questionnaire (EAR3Q) in this language. Methods The EAR3Q was translated in Bengali as per guideline from the Rome Foundation. The translated questionnaire was validated prospectively on Bengali-speaking healthy subjects (HS, n = 30), and patients with functional dyspepsia (FD, n = 35), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, n = 40) and functional constipation (FC, n = 12) diagnosed by clinicians using the Rome III criteria. The subjects were asked to fill-in the questionnaire again after 2 weeks, to check for its reproducibility. Results During translation, the original and the backward translated English versions of the questionnaire demonstrated high concordance. Sensitivity of the Bengali questionnaire to diagnose patients with FD, IBS, FC, and HS was 100%, 100%, 75%, and 100%, respectively, considering diagnosis by the clinicians as the gold standard. On test-retest reliability analysis, Kappa values for FD, IBS, FC, and HS were 1.0, 1.0, 0.83, and 1.0, respectively. The Bengali questionnaire detected considerable overlap of FD symptoms among patients with IBS, IBS among patients with FD, and FD among patients with FC, which were not detected by the clinicians. Conclusions We successfully translated and validated the EAR3Q in Bengali. We believe that this translated questionnaire will be useful for clinical evaluation and research on FGIDs in the Bengali-speaking population. PMID:26690730

  12. Costs associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders and related signs and symptoms in infants: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, Julie; Ludwig, Thomas; Lifschitz, Carlos; Mahon, James; Miqdady, Mohamad; Saps, Miguel; Hock Quak, Seng; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, Irene; Wood, Hannah; Szajewska, Hania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and FGID-related signs and symptoms have a fundamental impact on the psychosocial, physical and mental well-being of infants and their parents alike. Recent reviews and studies have indicated that FGIDs and related signs and symptoms may also have a substantial impact on the budgets of third-party payers and/or parents. The objective of this systematic review is to investigate these costs. Methods and analysis The population of interest is healthy term infants (under 12 months of age) with colic, regurgitation and/or functional constipation. Outcomes of interest will include the frequency and volume of reported treatments, the cost to third-party payers and/or parents for prescribed or over the counter treatments, visits to health professionals and changes in infant formula purchases, and the loss of income through time taken off work and out of pocket costs. Relevant studies will be identified by searching databases from 2005 onwards (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, NEXIS, DARE, Health Technology Assessment database, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database and others), conferences from the previous 3 years and scanning reference lists of eligible studies. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment will be conducted by two independent reviewers and disagreements resolved in discussion with a third reviewer. Quality assessment will involve study design-specific checklists. Relevant studies will be summarised narratively and presented in tables. An overview of treatments and costs will be provided, with any geographical or other differences highlighted. An assessment of how the totals for cost differ across countries and elements that contribute to the differences will be generated. Ethics and dissemination This is a systematic review of published studies that will be submitted for publication to a peer-reviewed journal. Ethical committee approval is not required. Trial

  13. Sodium and Volume Disorders in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sana; Floris, Matteo; Pani, Antonello; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2016-07-01

    The kidney has a remarkable ability to modulate sodium and water excretion to maintain homeostasis despite a widely varying dietary intake. However, as glomerular filtration rate falls to less than 30 mL/min, this ability can be compromised leading to an increased risk for disorders of serum sodium and extracellular volume. In all cases, these disorders are associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality. Management strategies to both prevent and treat these conditions are available but requiring special attention to the unique circumstance of advanced CKD to maximize therapeutic response and prevent complications. PMID:27324677

  14. Multiple chronic disorders - health care system’s modern challenge in the Maccabi Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges health care systems face in modern time is treating chronic disorders. In recent years, the increasing occurrence of multiple chronic disorders (MCC) in single individuals has compounded the complexity of health care. In 2008, it was estimated that worldwide as many as one quarter of the population between the ages of sixty five to sixty nine suffered from two or more chronic conditions and this prevalence rose with age. Clinical guidelines provide guidance for management of single disorders, but not for MCC. The aim of the present study was the study of the prevalence, distribution and impact of MCC in a large Israeli health system. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of MCC in the Maccabi Healthcare System (MHS), Israel’s second largest healthcare service, providing care for approximately two million people. Data regarding chronic conditions was collected through electronic medical records and organizational records, as was demographic and socioeconomic data. Age and sex specific data were compared with previously published data from Scotland. Results Two thirds of the population had two or more chronic disorders. This is significantly higher than previously published rates. A correlation between patient age and number of chronic disorders was found, as was a correlation between number of chronic disorders and low socioeconomic status, with the exception of children due to a high prevalence of learning disabilities, asthma, and visual disturbances. Discussion MCC is very prevalent in the MHS population, increases with age, and except for children is more prevalent in lower socioeconomic classes, possibly due to the a combination of the structure of the Israeli universal insurance and requirements of the ministry of education for exemptions and benefits. A higher than previously reported prevalence of MCC may be due to the longtime use of use of integrated electronic medical records. Conclusions To effectively deal

  15. Prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elderly Brazilians: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Population ageing is a worldwide phenomenon that has recently challenged public healthcare systems. The knowledge of the burden of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elders is still limited, particularly in the developing world. This systematic review aimed to investigate the prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in elderly Brazilians. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed in five electronic databases (from inception to January 2012) and completed by additional searches in reference lists. Two review authors independently selected the eligible studies and extracted data on participants’ characteristics and rates of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. One review author extracted methodological quality data. We performed a critical synthesis of the results, which were grouped into the diagnoses “chronic musculoskeletal pain” or “specific musculoskeletal diagnoses”. Results Twenty five studies reporting on a total of 116,091 elderly Brazilians were included. Eight studies (32%) were of high methodological quality. There was a large variation in the measure of prevalence used by individual studies and in their definition of chronic pain. Prevalence estimates reached 86% for chronic musculoskeletal pain in any location. Studies investigating multiple pain sites found the lower limb and the spine to be the most prevalent complaints (50% each). Arthritis and rheumatism (including osteoarthritis) were the most prevalent specific musculoskeletal diagnoses (9% to 40%), followed by herniated disc (6% to 27%). Conclusions Despite the growth of the elderly population worldwide, high-quality research on the burden of chronic musculoskeletal disorders in the elderly is still scarce. Future healthcare research focusing on this age group should be a priority in developing countries since their public healthcare systems are not yet fully prepared to accommodate the needs of an aging population. PMID:22642899

  16. [Transition to adult care for children with chronic neurological disorders; which is the best way to make it?].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic neurological disorders in children have significant effects on adult medical and social function. Transition from pediatric to adult services is a complex process. No objective data are available to inform physicians about the most effective approach. Nevertheless the most recommended approach is a joint pediatric/adult transition clinic. Malnutrition, either under or overnutrition, is a common condition among neurologically impaired children. Undernutrition is most prevalent, and its causes are diverse: insufficient caloric intake, excessive nutrient losses and abnormal energy metabolism. Malnutrition is associated with significant morbidity, while nutritional rehabilitation improves overall health as well as quality of life. It is not easy to determine which the nutritional needs in these patients are. Besides, they often present difficulties for oral feeding, mainly due to oromotor dysfunction. Gastrointestinal symptoms, gastro esophageal reflux and constipation, as well as spasticity, scoliosis and joint deformities contribute to these difficulties. Because of that, an assessment of nutritional status should be performed periodically, and to assess efficacy and security of oral intake. If modifying oral diet we cannot confirm an adequate support, a nasogastric tube or a gastrostomy need to be considered. Often, a fundoplication is associated to the placement of a gastrostomy. Although the outcomes in a better nutritional status and quality of life are often obtained, it is not an easy decision for families. PMID:25077342

  17. Delirium in older adults: a chronic cognitive disorder?

    PubMed

    Cole, Martin G; Mccusker, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Delirium is defined as a neurocognitive disorder characterized by sudden onset, fluctuating course, and disturbances in level of consciousness, attention, orientation, memory, thought, perception, and behavior (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). It occurs in hyperactive, hypoactive, or mixed forms in up to 50% of older hospital patients (Inouye et al., 2014) and 70% of older long-term care residents (McCusker et al., 2011), many with pre-existing dementia (Fick et al., 2002). PMID:27246118

  18. MMPI-2 F Scale as a Predictor of Acute Versus Chronic Disorder Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Reardon, Maureen Lyons; Donohue, Keith F.; Joiner, Jr., Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relation between elevation of the infrequency (F) scale on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and the classification of psychological disorders as chronic or acute in an outpatient mental health setting. MMPI-2 and clinician rating data at time of intake were considered for 158 adult patients from an…

  19. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Psychophysiological Disorders and Chronic Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Chambliss, Catherine

    In training counseling students, it is increasingly important to acquaint them with the clinical research literature exploring the efficacy of particular treatments. This review of empirically supported treatments (EST's) concerning psychophysiological disorders and chronic pain is intended to facilitate the educational process. EST's, or…

  20. Treating co-occurring chronic low back pain & generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Kristina; Peters-Watral, Brenda

    2016-01-16

    The complex, bidirectional correlation between chronic low back pain (CLBP) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), common ailments in primary care, can increase the risk of inadequate treatment. This article will review the relationship between CLBP and GAD and provide optimal management strategies for NPs caring for individuals with this dyad. PMID:26642348

  1. Symptom Differences in Acute and Chronic Presentation of Childhood Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famularo, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four child abuse victims, age 5-13, were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children with the acute form of PTSD exhibited such symptoms as difficulty falling asleep, hypervigilance, nightmares, and generalized anxiety. Children exhibiting chronic PTSD exhibited increased detachment, restricted range of affect,…

  2. Exploring the Impact of Chronic Tic Disorders on Youth: Results from the Tourette Syndrome Impact Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conelea, Christine A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Zinner, Samuel H.; Budman, Cathy; Murphy, Tanya; Scahill, Lawrence D.; Compton, Scott N.; Walkup, John

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that chronic tic disorders (CTD) are associated with functional impairment across several domains. However, methodological limitations, such as data acquired by parental report, datasets aggregated across child and adult samples, and small treatment-seeking samples, curtail interpretation. The current study explored…

  3. Durability, Negative Impact, and Neuropsychological Predictors of Tic Suppression in Children with Chronic Tic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Douglas W.; Himle, Michael B.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Carr, James E.; Osmon, David C.; Karsten, Amanda M.; Jostad, Candice; Bosch, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Chronic tic disorders are characterized by involuntary motor and vocal tics, which are influenced by contextual factors. Recent research has shown that (a) children can suppress tics for brief periods of time, (b) suppression is enhanced when programmed reinforcement is provided for tic-free intervals, and (c) short periods of suppression do not…

  4. [Features of therapy for chronic pancreatitis associated with anxious depressive disorders in railway workers].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Lubavskaya, S S; Batishcheva, G A; Chernov, Yu N

    2016-01-01

    The article presents data on peculiarities of chronic pancreatitis course in railway transport workers (engine operators, engine operator assistants, dispatchers) with anxious depressive disorders. Pain and dyspepsia in patients with affective disorders appeared to be constant and more intense than in the patients without concomitant anxious depression. Psychophysiologic tests in 83% of patients with comorbid conditions revealed significant psychomotor dullness manifested in reliable lower speed of visual motor reactions. Pharmacologic correction via anxiolytics (Adaptol, Afobasol) combined with standard therapy for chronic pancreatitis exacerbation enabled to improve clinical symptoms, but Adaptol appeared to slow simple visual motor reactions, therefore has to be ruled out in engine operators. Pharmacotherapy of chronic pancreatitis, that included Afobasol in addition to standard treatment, promoted reliable improvement of occupationally important psychophysiologic functions. This study received a patent. PMID:27396150

  5. Clinical and Economic Burden of Mental Disorders Among Children With Chronic Physical Conditions, United States, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Suryavanshi, Manasi S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of chronic physical and mental disorders is increasing among children and adolescents in the United States. In this study, we investigated the association between mental health disorders and chronic physical conditions among children, and we assessed whether having mental disorders is associated with increased health care costs for children with chronic physical conditions, using Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data from 2008 through 2013. Methods Children aged 5 to 17 with at least 1 chronic physical condition were included in the study. Chronic physical conditions and mental disorders were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. We used logistic regression to assess the relationship between mental disorders and chronic physical conditions, and we used generalized linear models with gamma distribution and log link to estimate direct medical costs. Results Of 42,130 children, 4,640 had at least 1 chronic physical condition. After controlling for sociodemographic and health care access characteristics, we found that children with at least 1 chronic physical condition were 62% more likely to have a mental health disorder than were children without chronic physical conditions (odds ratio = 1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–1.92). Having a mental disorder was a significant predictor of total health care cost (β = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43–0.85; P < .001). The adjusted annual incremental cost due to mental disorders among children with chronic physical conditions was $2,631 (P < .001). Conclusion Having chronic physical conditions in childhood is a significant predictor of mental health disorders and total health care expenditures. PMID:27236382

  6. Peer victimization in youth with Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Samuel H; Conelea, Christine A; Glew, Gwen M; Woods, Douglas W; Budman, Cathy L

    2012-02-01

    Chronic tic disorders including Tourette syndrome have negative impact across multiple functional domains. We explored associations between peer victimization status and tic subtypes, premonitory urges, internalizing symptoms, explosive outbursts, and quality of life among youth with chronic tic disorders, as part of the internet-based omnibus Tourette Syndrome Impact Survey. A mixed methods design combined child self-report and parental proxy-report (i.e., parent reporting on the child) demographic and quantitative data for affected youth ages 10-17 years addressing gender, mean age, ethnicity and other socioeconomic features, and presence of tic disorders and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Peer "Victim" versus "Non-victim" status was determined using a subset of four questions about being bullied. "Victim" status was identified for those youth who endorsed the frequency of the occurrence of being bullied in one or more of the four questions as "most of the time" or "all of the time". Data from 211 eligible youth respondents and their parents/guardians showed 26% reporting peer victimization. Victim status was associated with greater tic frequency, complexity and severity; explosive outbursts; internalizing symptoms; and lower quality of life. Peer victimization among youth with chronic tic disorders is common and appears associated with tic morbidity, anxiety, depression, explosive outbursts, and poorer psychosocial functioning. Anticipatory guidance, specific bullying screening and prevention, and further studies are indicated in this population. PMID:21879319

  7. Internet-based adherence interventions for treatment of chronic disorders in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Alexandria M; Farhangian, Michael E; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment adherence is a ubiquitous challenge in medicine, particularly in the adolescent population with chronic disorders. Web-based adherence interventions may be particularly useful in adolescents, due to their familiarity with and frequent use of the Internet. Objective To review web-based interventions used to improve adherence to medication in adolescent patients with chronic disorders. Methods A PubMed search was performed for full-text, English, clinical trials in adolescents using keywords “adherence” or “compliance”, “Internet” or “web”, and “treatment” from inception until November 2014. Articles were selected if they involved using the Internet to provide support to adolescents to help improve their adherence to treatment, excluding those focused on solely providing medical services through the Internet and articles focusing on preventative care, rather than treatment of an illness. Results Fourteen studies were found concentrating on chronic adolescent disorders. Interventions included online surveys, physician chat lines, monitoring programs, and interactive programs. All interventions experienced either greater improvement in adherence or another disease control measure or no statistically significant difference compared with the control group (in-clinic visits). Limitations Few clinical trials studying web-based interventions to improve adherence in adolescents were found. Due to not having one standard outcome measured in all of the studies, it was also difficult comparing the effectiveness of the interventions. Conclusion Web-based interventions play a role in improving adherence in adolescents with chronic disorders by being more time saving and cost effective compared with in-clinic visits. Further research focusing on adherence interventions using the Internet is necessary to determine the ideal ways of utilizing the Internet to improve adherence in adolescents with chronic disorders. PMID:26113787

  8. Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Allergic Diseases Food Allergy Immune System Parasitic Infections National Library of Medicine, ... fish and shellfish. Read more about EoE and food allergy. Some people with EoE require a stricter diet ...

  9. Cancer complicating chronic ulcerative and scarifying mucocutaneous disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, R.P. )

    1987-01-01

    Skin affected by a burn cancer is scarred, ulcerated, and often appears as erythema ab igne clinically in adjacent skin. The latent period in burn scar malignancy is much longer for SCC than BCC. Malignant melanoma and various sarcomas are reported to arise in burn scars, too. The other extreme on the temperature scale can less often result in enough permanent acral damage that poor wound healing may eventually result in cancer, usually SCC. About 1% of patients with chronic osteomyelitis develop cancer, usually SCC in sinus tracts. As with tumors arising in burn scars and chronic leg ulcers of varied etiology, black patients are disproportionately overrepresented in osteomyelitic malignancy. In nearly all of the patients with radiation-induced skin cancer, concomitant radiodermatitis is present. As with burn scar and osteomyelitic cancer, x-ray related cancer has a long latent period. Similar to burn scar cancer, SCC predominates in osteomyelitis and occurs on the extremities. BCC, when it arises, is more common on the face and neck in burn- and radiation-induced tumors. Multiple tumors are frequent as is recurrence in x-ray malignancy. Mortality is high: one out of three to four patients with burn scar, osteomyelitic, and radiation cancer die of dermatosis-related malignancy. Recently, radioactivity-contaminated gold rings have been implicated in causing SCC. Carcinoma tends to occur in irradiated benign dermatoses whereas sarcomas tend to complicate irradiated malignancies. Stasis ulceration and anogenital fistulae may rarely lead to cancer, SCC in the former and adenocarcinoma in the latter. SCC can rarely develop in four related conditions (acne conglobata, dissecting perifolliculitis of the scalp, hidradenitis suppurativa, and pilonidal sinus) after a lengthy latent period; prognosis is poor with a high metastatic rate. 147 references.

  10. Understanding the Molecular Mechanisms of Rifaximin in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders--A Focus on the Modulation of Host Tissue Function.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Rifaximin is a broad-spectrum oral antibiotic, exhibiting limited systemic absorption, that is used clinically to treat a variety of gastrointestinal disorders, including traveller's diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, irritable bowel syndrome, and the inflammatory bowel diseases. Rifaximin's antimicrobial properties, in the context of enteric infections, and its effects on the host's intestinal microbiota have been well characterized. More recently, it has been reported that rifaximin can modulate host tissue function through the activation of distinct molecular events. Within the gastrointestinal tract, rifaximin is a selective agonist of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to xenobiotic metabolism and drug detoxification. The PXR can also elicit immunomodulatory effects through its interaction with a variety of intracellular signaling cascades, including the nuclear factor kappa B and c-jun N-terminal kinase pathways. In this review, we will summarize the clinical uses of rifaximin and discuss its mechanism of action in relation to the modulation of the intestinal microbiota and the regulation of gastrointestinal host cell function, with a specific focus on PXR-dependent pathways. PMID:26202186

  11. Early Risk Factors and Developmental Pathways to Chronic High Inhibition and Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Essex, Marilyn J.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Slattery, Marcia J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Kalin, Ned H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that chronic high levels of behavioral inhibition are a precursor of social anxiety disorder (SAD). This study identified the early risk factors for and developmental pathways to chronic high inhibition among school-age children and its association with SAD by adolescence. Method A community sample of 238 children was followed from birth to Grade 9. Mothers, children, and teachers reported on children's behavioral inhibition from Grades 1 to 9. Lifetime history of psychiatric disorders was available for the subset of 60 (25%) children who participated in an intensive laboratory assessment at Grade 9. Four early risk factors were assessed: female gender; exposure to maternal stress during the infancy and preschool periods and at child age 4.5 years; early manifestation of behavioral inhibition, and elevated afternoon salivary cortisol levels. Results All four risk factors predicted higher and more chronic inhibition from Grade 1 to Grade 9, and together, defined two developmental pathways. The first pathway in female children was partially mediated by early evidence of behavioral inhibition and elevated cortisol levels at age 4.5 years. The second pathway began with exposure to early maternal stress and was also partially mediated by childhood cortisol levels. By Grade 9, chronic high inhibition was associated with a lifetime history of SAD. Conclusions Chronic high levels of behavioral inhibition are associated with SAD by adolescence. The identification of two developmental pathways suggests the potential importance of considering both sets of risk factors in developing preventive interventions for SAD. PMID:19917594

  12. Severity of Anxiety Disorders in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Safa, Mitra; Fallah Tafti, Saeed; Talischi, Firrouzeh; Ghassem Boroujerdi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with chronic physical diseases sometimes show increased loss of function; such patients need more care. Anxiety is a well-known symptom that is prevalent among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients that can prolong and increase the risk of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the severity of anxiety in the mentioned patients and to examine the presence of symptoms and appropriate treatment strategies to understand the role of psychological functions in physical patients. Methods : This was a cross sectional study conducted in Masih Daneshvari Hospital. One hundred forty- three patients entered into the project by accessible method and signed the informed consent; they filled demographic information and Hamilton anxiety and depression questionnaires. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16. Results : Of the participants, 68% were above 60 years of age; 78% were male; 89% were married; and 38% were self-employed. Also, among the participants, 51% were illiterate; 72% had history of smoking; 46% had history of substance abuse; and 49% had moderate to severe anxiety disorder. Moreover, of the patients with severe anxiety, 41.3% had severe muscle spasms; and severe sleeplessness was found in 38.5% of those with severe anxiety disorder. Severe anxiety related symptoms were found in 20.3% of the patients with severe anxiety disorder. Depressed mood was found in 27.3% of the patients with severe anxiety disorder. Severe physical and muscular signs were found in 35.7% of those with severe anxiety disorder. Conclusion : According to our findings, many chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may contain anxiety and depression which result in vulnerability. Therefore, evaluation of anxiety in such patients is of importance for alleviating the disease. PMID:26884790

  13. Decreased plasma and tissue isoleucine levels after simulated gastrointestinal bleeding by blood gavages in chronic portacaval shunted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Olde Damink, S W; Dejong, C H; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, arterial concentrations of the essential branched chain amino acid isoleucine (Ile) were found to have decreased by more than 50% after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients and after intragastric blood administration in healthy humans and pigs. Hypothetically, this induced hypoisoleucinaemia could deplete tissue Ile pools. AIMS: To study the effect of repeated blood gavages on arterial and tissue Ile levels during normal and impaired liver function. SUBJECTS: Male Wistar rats. METHODS: 14 days after portacaval shunting or sham surgery, rats received 3 ml bovine erythrocytes or saline at 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours via a gastrostomy catheter in the duodenum. At 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours arterial blood and at 8 hours intestine, liver, muscle, and cerebral cortex were sampled for determination of ammonia and amino acid concentrations. RESULTS: In both groups repeated blood administration resulted in a marked decrease in plasma Ile (40-60%). This was accompanied by decreased tissue Ile concentrations in liver (50%), muscle (40-60%), and cerebral cortex (40-50%), but unaltered intestinal Ile levels. In contrast, the arterial and tissue concentrations of ammonia, urea, and of most amino acids increased, most strikingly of the other two branched chain amino acids, valine and leucine. CONCLUSIONS: Simulated gastrointestinal bleeding by blood gavages in rats with and without impaired liver function leads to hypoisoleucinaemia and decreased tissue Ile pools. PMID:9135535

  14. Locally disordered methylation forms the basis of intratumor methylome variation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Landau, Dan A; Clement, Kendell; Ziller, Michael J; Boyle, Patrick; Fan, Jean; Gu, Hongcang; Stevenson, Kristen; Sougnez, Carrie; Wang, Lili; Li, Shuqiang; Kotliar, Dylan; Zhang, Wandi; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Garraway, Levi; Fernandes, Stacey M; Livak, Kenneth J; Gabriel, Stacey; Gnirke, Andreas; Lander, Eric S; Brown, Jennifer R; Neuberg, Donna; Kharchenko, Peter V; Hacohen, Nir; Getz, Gad; Meissner, Alexander; Wu, Catherine J

    2014-12-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity plays a critical role in tumor evolution. To define the contribution of DNA methylation to heterogeneity within tumors, we performed genome-scale bisulfite sequencing of 104 primary chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLLs). Compared with 26 normal B cell samples, CLLs consistently displayed higher intrasample variability of DNA methylation patterns across the genome, which appears to arise from stochastically disordered methylation in malignant cells. Transcriptome analysis of bulk and single CLL cells revealed that methylation disorder was linked to low-level expression. Disordered methylation was further associated with adverse clinical outcome. We therefore propose that disordered methylation plays a similar role to that of genetic instability, enhancing the ability of cancer cells to search for superior evolutionary trajectories. PMID:25490447

  15. Clinical features associated with an early onset in chronic tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Richer, Francois; Daghfal, Roula; Rouleau, Guy A; Lespérance, Paul; Chouinard, Sylvain

    2015-12-30

    In chronic tic disorders such as Tourette syndrome (TS), tics often appear between 4 and 8 years but they can also appear in early childhood, a period in which symptom expression may be affected by early brain development. The present study examined whether symptom expression in early-onset TS was distinct from that observed in TS with a later onset. We compared the clinical characteristics in children with TS who developed tics before age 4 or after age 6. Early-onset TS was significantly associated with an increased rate of stuttering and other speech disfluencies as well as an increased rate of oppositional defiant disorder, symptoms that often appear before age 4. Early-onset TS was also linked to maternal transmission of tics. Early-onset TS was not significantly associated with tic severity, obsessive-compulsive behavior or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The results suggest that an early onset affects symptom expression in tic disorders. PMID:26596364

  16. Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Lessons from a Rare Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Segal, B H; Veys, P; Malech, H; Cowan, M J

    2010-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency with x-linked or autosomal recessive inheritance involving defects in genes encoding phox proteins which are the subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This results in failure to produce superoxide anion and downstream antimicrobial oxidant metabolites and to activate antimicrobial proteases. Affected patients are susceptible to severe, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation characterized by granulomatous enteritis resembling Crohn's disease and genitourinary obstruction. Early diagnosis of CGD and rapid treatment of infections are critical. Prophylaxis with antibacterial and mould-active antifungal agents and the administration of interferon-γ has significantly improved the natural history of CGD. Currently, the only cure is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) although there remains controversy as to which patients with CGD should get a transplant. Allele-based HLA typing of alternative donors, improved supportive care measures and use of reduced toxicity conditioning have resulted in EFS of at least 80% even with an unrelated donor and even better when the patient has no active infections/inflammation. Gene correction of CGD would eliminate the risks of GVHD and the immunoablative chemotherapy required for allogeneic HCT. Based on gene therapy trials in patients with SCID-X1, ADA-SCID and the early experience with CGD, it is clear that at least some degree of myeloablation will be necessary for CGD as there is no inherent selective growth advantage for gene-corrected cells. Current efforts for gene therapy focus on use of lentivector constructs which are thought to be safer from the standpoint of insertional mutagenesis and more efficient in transducing hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:21195301

  17. Sleep disordered breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takuya; Akinori, Ebihara; Yogo, Yurika; Sakamaki, Fumio; Suzuki, Yukio; Suemasu, Keiichi

    2005-06-01

    Sleep-related disordered breathing (SDB) and its influence on desaturation were examined in stable COPD patients with waking SpO2 > 90%. With respiratory inductance plethysmography, thoracic-abdominal respiratory movements for all events with more than 4% desaturation were analyzed in 26 patients. Types of SDB were confirmed by full polysomnography. Irregular breathing induced desaturation, while stable respiration continued during some desaturation events. Three types of altered ventilation were observed: hypoventilation, paradoxical movement and periodic breathing. An unusual type of paradoxical movement, with normal airflow despite progressive desaturation, was observed in REM sleep. Patients were divided into desaturation (15 patients) and non-desaturation (11 patients) groups. Daytime arterial blood gas, lung function values, and 6-min walking distance did not differ. Awake, mode, maximum and minimum nocturnal SpO2 were lower in the desaturation group. SDB-induced desaturation events in the desaturation group were more frequent (9.2+/-3.5 vs. 1.8+/-2.2 times), a greater SpO2 decrease (11.4+/-7.1% vs. 5.2+/-2.1%) and longer duration (73.2+/-34.8 vs. 18.8+/-39.0 min). Patterns of SDB in the desaturation group were hypoventilation (74.4+/-23.4%), paradoxical movement (10.2+/-14.5%), periodic breathing (12.1+/-18.3%) and unclassified (5.8+/-11.2%). These results reveal that lower SpO2 and SDB influence nocturnal desaturation in stable COPD patients. PMID:17136951

  18. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Co-morbid Gastrointestinal and Extra-gastrointestinal Functional Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dekel, Roy

    2010-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the best known of the functional gastrointestinal tract disorders. Many IBS patients have at least one co-morbid somatic complaint and many meet diagnostic criteria for other functional disorders. Patients with IBS and another functional disorder, in comparison with patients with IBS only, have more severe IBS symptoms, a higher rate of psychopathology, greater impairment of quality of life, and more illness-related work absenteeism. Estimates of the prevalence of IBS in patients with fibromyalgia range from 30-35% to as high as 70%. Studies of IBS among patients with chronic fatigue syndrome have reported a prevalence ranging from 35-92%. The prevalence of IBS among patients with chronic fatigue syndrome is reported to be 14%. IBS patients with other co-morbid functional disorders appear to manifest a greater degree of somatization. It has been suggested that the presence of multiple co-morbid disorders may be a marker for psychological influences on etiology. This raises the question of whether the functional syndromes represent the same pathophysiological process, i.e., are the same entity that has been separated into different clinical entities because of medical sub-specialization, or are indeed separate disorders. While the answer to this question awaits further research, it would appear that most functional patients who meet formal diagnostic criteria for more than one functional disorder manifest one disorder clinically more that the others and seek consultation differentially for that set of symptoms. PMID:20535341

  19. The Emerging Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Chronic Stress-Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, Daniel; Flor, Peter J; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression, and alcohol abuse are an enormous public health concern. The etiology of these pathologies is complex, with psychosocial stressors being among the most frequently discussed risk factors. The brain glutamatergic neurotransmitter system has often been found involved in behaviors and pathophysiologies resulting from acute stress and fear. Despite this, relatively little is known about the role of glutamatergic system components in chronic psychosocial stress, neither in rodents nor in humans. Recently, drug discovery efforts at the metabotropic receptor subtypes of the glutamatergic system (mGlu1-8 receptors) led to the identification of pharmacological tools with emerging potential in psychiatric conditions. But again, the contribution of individual mGlu subtypes to the manifestation of physiological, molecular, and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stress remains still largely unaddressed. The current review will describe animal models typically used to analyze acute and particularly chronic stress conditions, including models of psychosocial stress, and there we will discuss the emerging roles for mGlu receptor subtypes. Indeed, accumulating evidence indicates relevance and potential therapeutic usefulness of mGlu2/3 ligands and mGlu5 receptor antagonists in chronic stress-related disorders. In addition, a role for further mechanisms, e.g. mGlu7-selective compounds, is beginning to emerge. These mechanisms are important to be analyzed in chronic psychosocial stress paradigms, e.g. in the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) model. We summarize the early results and discuss necessary future investigations, especially for mGlu5 and mGlu7 receptor blockers, which might serve to suggest improved therapeutic strategies to treat stress-related disorders. PMID:27296643

  20. Major depressive disorder and sleep disturbance in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Patricia C; Wilson, Keith G; Kowal, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Disturbed sleep is a common problem in both chronic pain and major depressive disorder (MDD). Moreover, many patients with chronic pain are depressed. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of depression on the sleep behaviour of chronic pain patients by comparing patients who did or did not meet diagnostic criteria for MDD. METHODS: A total of 60 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain underwent structured diagnostic interviews for MDD and insomnia, and completed questionnaires assessing pain severity, disability, sleep quality, beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and sleep hygiene. For four consecutive days, they also completed a sleep diary, and reported on sleep hygiene practices and presleep arousal. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients (55%) met diagnostic criteria for MDD, most of whom (n=32 [97%]) also fulfilled criteria for insomnia disorder. Insomnia was also common among patients without MDD (21 of 27 [78%]). Participants with MDD had higher self-reports of pain, disability, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and, on a prospective basis, greater presleep arousal and poorer sleep hygiene. However, diary assessments of specific sleep parameters (eg, sleep onset latency, total sleep time, sleep efficiency) did not differ between the groups. DISCUSSION: Chronic pain patients with comorbid MDD exhibited more dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, poorer sleep hygiene practices and greater presleep arousal; however, diary-recorded sleep characteristics may not differ from those of patients without MDD. Chronic pain itself may disturb sleep so extensively that MDD introduces little additive effect. CONCLUSION: MDD in chronic pain may be related to the cognitive and behavioural aspects of insomnia, rather than to an incremental disturbance in the initiation or maintenance of sleep. PMID:24367795

  1. Chronic HPA Axis Response to Stress in Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cynthia A.; Sanders, Anne; Wilder, Rebecca S.; Slade, Gary D.; Van Uum, Stan; Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; Maixner, William

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perceived stress is associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but whether cortisol levels are elevated in individuals with TMD is unknown. We hypothesized that cortisol concentration, a biomarker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, was elevated in TMD cases relative to controls, and that perceived stress was positively correlated with cortisol concentration. Methods In this case control study, TMD case status was determined by examiners using TMD Research Diagnostic Criteria. Participants (n=116) aged 18 to 59 years were recruited from within a 50 mile radius of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Following examination, cases (n=45) and controls (n=71) completed the 14-item Perceived Stress Scale using a reference interval of the past 3 months. Approximately 100 strands of hair were cut from the posterior vertex segment of their scalp. The 3 centimeters of hair most proximal to the scalp was analyzed with a commercially available salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay adapted for hair cortisol. This length corresponds to the last 3 months of systemic HPA axis activity. Results TMD cases perceived higher stress than controls (p=0.001). However, hair cortisol concentration was lower in TMD cases than controls (p<0.001). The correlation coefficient revealed a weak negative relationship (r=−0.188) between perceived stress and hair cortisol concentration (p=0.044). In analysis stratified by case status, the relationship of perceived stress and hair cortisol concentration was non-significant for cases (p=0.169) and controls (p=0.498). Conclusion Despite greater perceived stress, TMD cases had lower hair cortisol concentrations than controls and the 2 measures of stress were weakly and negatively correlated. PMID:25071145

  2. Sleep Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Etiology, Impact, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Siddiqi, Tauseef A.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and may frequently be complicated by sleep disorders. Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea are commonly encountered in patients with COPD. Nocturnal hypoxemia is also prevalent in COPD may occur despite adequate awake oxygenation and can be especially severe in rapid eye movement sleep. Additionally, several factors—some of them unique to COPD—can contribute to sleep-related hypoventilation. Recognition of hypoventilation can be vital as supplemental oxygen therapy itself can acutely worsen hypoventilation and lead to disastrous consequences. Finally, accruing data establish an association between restless leg syndrome and COPD— an association that may be driven by hypoxemia and/or hypercapnia. Comorbid sleep disorders portend worse sleep quality, diminished quality of life, and multifarious other adverse consequences. The awareness and knowledge regarding sleep comorbidities in COPD has continued to evolve over past many years. There are still several lacunae, however, in our understanding of the etiologies, impact, and therapies of sleep disorders, specifically in patients with COPD. This review summarizes the latest concepts in prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of diverse sleep disorders in COPD. Citation: Budhiraja R, Siddiqi TA, Quan SF. Sleep disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: etiology, impact, and management. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):259–270. PMID:25700872

  3. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Children with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handen, Benjamin L.; Melmed, Raun D.; Hansen, Robin L.; Aman, Michael G.; Burnham, David L.; Bruss, Jon B.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the extent and possible causal relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and autism. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, dose-ranging study of oral, human immunoglobulin (IGOH 140, 420, or 840 mg/day) was utilized with 125 children (ages 2-17 years) with autism and persistent GI…

  4. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bidaki, Reza; Zarepur, Ehsan; Akrami, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse's trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  5. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BIDAKI, Reza; ZAREPUR, Ehsan; AKRAMI, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse’s trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  6. Quality of Life in Youth with Tourette's Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Merlo, Lisa J.; Lack, Caleb; Milsom, Vanessa A.; Geffken, Gary R.; Goodman, Wayne K.; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to examine quality of life (QoL) in clinic-referred children and adolescents (n = 59, M age = 11.4[plus or minus]2.6 years) with a chronic tic disorder. The QoL scores for tic patients were lower than for healthy controls but higher than for the psychiatric sample on the majority of domains. Children's self-reported QoL scores…

  7. Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder: Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and management.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects 23 million Americans and is associated with many complications, one of the most complex of which is mineral and bone disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms begin to occur early in CKD but when the glomerular filtration rate declines to <50% of normal, biochemical and bone matrix abnormalities, which vary and are multifactorial, begin to be clinically apparent. Mainstays of treatment remain management of hyperphosphatemia and prevention or treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27272731

  8. Posterior structural brain volumes differ in maltreated youth with and without chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Michael D; Hooper, Stephen R; Chen, Steven D; Provenzale, James M; Boyd, Brian D; Glessner, Christopher E; MacFall, James R; Payne, Martha E; Rybczynski, Robert; Woolley, Donald P

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging studies of maltreated children with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that maltreatment-related PTSD is associated with adverse brain development. Maltreated youth resilient to chronic PTSD were not previously investigated and may elucidate neuromechanisms of the stress diathesis that leads to resilience to chronic PTSD. In this cross-sectional study, anatomical volumetric and corpus callosum diffusion tensor imaging measures were examined using magnetic resonance imaging in maltreated youth with chronic PTSD (N = 38), without PTSD (N = 35), and nonmaltreated participants (n = 59). Groups were sociodemographically similar. Participants underwent assessments for strict inclusion/exclusion criteria and psychopathology. Maltreated youth with PTSD were psychobiologically different from maltreated youth without PTSD and nonmaltreated controls. Maltreated youth with PTSD had smaller posterior cerebral and cerebellar gray matter volumes than did maltreated youth without PTSD and nonmaltreated participants. Cerebral and cerebellar gray matter volumes inversely correlated with PTSD symptoms. Posterior corpus callosum microstructure in pediatric maltreatment-related PTSD differed compared to maltreated youth without PTSD and controls. The group differences remained significant when controlling for psychopathology, numbers of Axis I disorders, and trauma load. Alterations of these posterior brain structures may result from a shared trauma-related mechanism or an inherent vulnerability that mediates the pathway from chronic PTSD to comorbidity. PMID:26535944

  9. Chronic Vomiting in Cats: Etiology and Diagnostic Testing.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Shannon Ryan; Gisselman, Kelly; Cordner, Amy; Nicholson, Angela Gasser

    2016-01-01

    Chronic vomiting in cats is a common presenting problem seen in veterinary practice today. The initial step when presented with a vomiting patient is to differentiate between vomiting and regurgitation or dysphagia. There are numerous causes for chronic vomiting in cats, and therefore a detailed and comprehensive patient history and a systematic diagnostic approach are key steps in determining the cause for vomiting and the most appropriate treatment plan. Common causes for chronic vomiting in cats may include inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, gastrointestinal motility disorders, neoplasia, and extra-gastrointestinal diseases, such as renal disease, hepatobiliary disease, and hyperthyroidism. PMID:27487349

  10. Endogenous neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders: with particular regard to the kynurenines

    PubMed Central

    Zádori, Dénes; Klivényi, Péter; Plangár, Imola; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are progressive chronic neurodegenerative disorders that are accompanied by a considerable impairment of the motor functions. PD may develop for familial or sporadic reasons, whereas HD is based on a definite genetic mutation. Nevertheless, the pathological processes involve oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity in both cases. A number of metabolic routes are affected in these disorders. The decrease in antioxidant capacity and alterations in the kynurenine pathway, the main pathway of the tryptophan metabolism, are features that deserve particular interest, because the changes in levels of neuroactive kynurenine pathway compounds appear to be strongly related to the oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity involved in the disease pathogenesis. Increase of the antioxidant capacity and pharmacological manipulation of the kynurenine pathway are therefore promising therapeutic targets in these devastating disorders. PMID:21155972

  11. Managing Chronic Pain in Adults with or in Recovery from Substance Use Disorders. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) is common in the general population as well as in people who have a substance use disorder (SUD) (Exhibit 1-1). Chronic pain is not harmless; it has physiological, social, and psychological dimensions that can seriously harm health, functioning, and well-being. As a multidimensional condition with both objective and…

  12. Prescription opioid abuse, chronic pain, and primary care: a Co-occurring Disorders Clinic in the chronic disease model.

    PubMed

    Pade, Patricia A; Cardon, Karen E; Hoffman, Richard M; Geppert, Cynthia M A

    2012-12-01

    Abuse of opioids has become a public health crisis. The historic separation between the addiction and pain communities and a lack of training in medical education have made treatment difficult to provide, especially in primary care. The Co-occurring Disorders Clinic (COD) was established to treat patients with co-morbid chronic pain and addiction. This retrospective chart review reports results of a quality improvement project using buprenorphine/naloxone to treat co-occurring chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) and opioid dependence in a primary care setting. Data were collected for 143 patients who were induced with buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) between June 2009 and November 2011. Ninety-three patients (65%) continued to be maintained on the medication and seven completed treatment and were no longer taking any opioid (5%). Pain scores showed a modest, but statistically significant improvement on BUP/NLX, which was contrary to our expectations and may be an important factor in treatment retention for this challenging population. PMID:22980449

  13. Overlapping Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Relapse to Opioid Use Disorder and Chronic Pain: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ghitza, Udi E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a steeply growing number of persons with chronic non-cancer pain have been using opioid analgesics chronically to treat it, accompanied by a markedly increased prevalence of individuals with opioid-related misuse, opioid use disorders, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, admissions to drug treatment programs, and drug overdose deaths. This opioid misuse and overdose epidemic calls for well-designed randomized-controlled clinical trials into more skillful and appropriate pain management and for developing effective analgesics that have lower abuse liability and are protective against stress induced by chronic non-cancer pain. However, incomplete knowledge regarding effective approaches to treat various types of pain has been worsened by an under-appreciation of overlapping neurobiological mechanisms of stress, stress-induced relapse to opioid use, and chronic non-cancer pain in patients presenting for care for these conditions. This insufficient knowledge base has unfortunately encouraged common prescription of conveniently available opioid pain-relieving drugs with abuse liability, as opposed to treating underlying problems using team-based multidisciplinary, patient-centered, collaborative-care approaches for addressing pain and co-occurring stress and risk for opioid use disorder. This paper reviews recent neurobiological findings regarding overlapping mechanisms of stress-induced relapse to opioid misuse and chronic non-cancer pain, and then discusses these in the context of key outstanding evidence gaps and clinical-treatment research directions that may be pursued to fill these gaps. Such research directions, if conducted through well-designed randomized-controlled trials, may substantively inform clinical practice in general medical settings on how to effectively care for patients presenting with pain-related distress and these common co-occurring conditions. PMID:27199787

  14. Gastrointestinal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Entero-enteral fistula; Enterocutaneous fistula; Fistula - gastrointestinal ... cause diarrhea , malabsorption of nutrients, and dehydration . Entero-enteral fistulas may have no symptoms. Enterocutaneous fistulas cause ...

  15. Experience With and Attitudes Toward Psychotherapy and Antidepressants Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: An Online Patient Survey to Inform System Design.

    PubMed

    Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Andrews, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore and compare experiences with and attitudes toward psychotherapy and antidepressants of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGiDs). Patients from gastroenterology clinic databases were invited to an online survey. Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square test, and Fisher's test were used to compare patients with IBD and FGiD on demographics and variables of interest. Of 86 participants, 56 (65%) had IBD and 30 (35%) had FGiDs. Mean levels of anxiety, depressive, and stress symptoms were within the moderate to severe range. Psychological care and antidepressants were offered to significantly more FGiD than to IBD respondents (37% vs. 9%; p = .009). Although the symptoms were generally reduced after the prescription of antidepressants, only 30% of IBD respondents and 21% of FGiD respondents using antidepressants would recommend them to others. In contrast, 53% of IBD respondents and 69% of FGiD respondents who used psychotherapy would recommend it to others. Both these therapies were valued by recipients; however, neither was reported to improve gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Given the high desire for and positive experiences of psychological care for these 2 common GI conditions, access to formal psychological support services within GI clinics would appear to be the most efficient model. PMID:27148830

  16. Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Pediatric Headache and Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic pediatric headache disorders are pervasive, debilitating, and associated with high rates of comorbid anxiety disorders. The combination of headaches and anxiety presents unique challenges for clinicians. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising treatment for pediatric headache, however, available treatments fail to…

  17. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. II. Uses for treatment and antioxidant properties].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    In the first part of our editorial we reviewed the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. The present paper presents the results of studies proving, that mucolytics are useful in adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Current evidence indicate, that these drugs are effective, especially in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and acute bronchitis. They produce a modest improvement in symptom control and lung function. It has been demonstrated that there is a synergism between mucolytics and antibiotics in the treatment of exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. Moreover, they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. Ambroxol is able to inhibit mediator release involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. As mucolytics are cheap and well-tolerated they are beneficial in the therapy of patients suffering from respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053601

  18. Improved cognitive, affective and anxiety measures in patients with chronic systemic disorders following structured physical activity.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Robson Bonoto; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas; de Sá Junior, Antonio Reis; de Carvalho, Cristiane Junqueira; da Silva Moura, Tiago Augusto; Lade, Carlos Gabriel; Rizvanov, Albert A; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Mukhamedyarov, Marat A; Zefirov, Andrey L; Palotás, András; Lima, Luciana Moreira

    2015-11-01

    Mental illnesses are frequent co-morbid conditions in chronic systemic diseases. High incidences of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment complicate cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle changes including regular exercise have been advocated to reduce blood pressure and improve glycaemic control. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect of physical training on the most prevalent corollary psychiatric problems in patients with chronic organic ailments. This longitudinal study assessed the mental health of hypertensive (age: 57 ± 8 years) and/or diabetic (age: 53 ± 8 years) patients using mini-mental state examination, Beck's depression inventory, Beck's anxiety inventory and self-reporting questionnaire-20 before and after a 3-month supervised resistance and aerobic exercise programme comprising structured physical activity three times a week. Clinically relevant improvement was observed in the Beck's depression inventory and Beck's anxiety inventory scores following the 12-week training (61%, p = 0.001, and 53%, p = 0.02, respectively). Even though statistically not significant (p = 0.398), the cognitive performance of this relatively young patient population also benefited from the programme. These results demonstrate positive effects of active lifestyle on non-psychotic mental disorders in patients with chronic systemic diseases, recommending exercise as an alternative treatment option. PMID:26410835

  19. Gastroduodenal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Chan, Francis K L; Hasler, William L; Malagelada, Juan R; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tack, Jan; Talley, Nicholas J

    2016-05-01

    Symptoms that can be attributed to the gastroduodenal region represent one of the main subgroups among functional gastrointestinal disorders. A slightly modified classification into the following 4 categories is proposed: (1) functional dyspepsia, characterized by 1 or more of the following: postprandial fullness, early satiation, epigastric pain, and epigastric burning, which are unexplained after a routine clinical evaluation; and includes 2 subcategories: postprandial distress syndrome that is characterized by meal-induced dyspeptic symptoms and epigastric pain syndrome that does not occur exclusively postprandially; the 2 subgroups can overlap; (2) belching disorders, defined as audible escapes of air from the esophagus or the stomach, are classified into 2 subcategories, depending on the origin of the refluxed gas as detected by intraluminal impedance measurement belching: gastric and supragastric belch; (3) nausea and vomiting disorders, which include 3 subcategories: chronic nausea and vomiting syndrome; cyclic vomiting syndrome; and cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome; and (4) rumination syndrome. PMID:27147122

  20. Mechanisms Involved in the Development of the Chronic Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Nonhuman Primates after Total-Body Irradiation with Bone Marrow Shielding.

    PubMed

    Shea-Donohue, Terez; Fasano, Alessio; Zhao, Aiping; Notari, Luigi; Yan, Shu; Sun, Rex; Bohl, Jennifer A; Desai, Neemesh; Tudor, Greg; Morimoto, Motoko; Booth, Catherine; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    In this study, nonhuman primates (NHPs) exposed to lethal doses of total body irradiation (TBI) within the gastrointestinal (GI) acute radiation syndrome range, sparing ∼5% of bone marrow (TBI-BM5), were used to evaluate the mechanisms involved in development of the chronic GI syndrome. TBI increased mucosal permeability in the jejunum (12-14 Gy) and proximal colon (13-14 Gy). TBI-BM5 also impaired mucosal barrier function at doses ranging from 10-12.5 Gy in both small intestine and colon. Timed necropsies of NHPs at 6-180 days after 10 Gy TBI-BM5 showed that changes in small intestine preceded those in the colon. Chronic GI syndrome in NHPs is characterized by continued weight loss and intermittent GI syndrome symptoms. There was a long-lasting decrease in jejunal glucose absorption coincident with reduced expression of the sodium-linked glucose transporter. The small intestine and colon showed a modest upregulation of several different pro-inflammatory mediators such as NOS-2. The persistent inflammation in the post-TBI-BM5 period was associated with a long-lasting impairment of mucosal restitution and a reduced expression of intestinal and serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Mucosal healing in the postirradiation period is dependent on sparing of stem cell crypts and maturation of crypt cells into appropriate phenotypes. At 30 days after 10 Gy TBI-BM5, there was a significant downregulation in the gene and protein expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5 but no change in the gene expression of enterocyte or enteroendocrine lineage markers. These data indicate that even a threshold dose of 10 Gy TBI-BM5 induces a persistent impairment of both mucosal barrier function and restitution in the GI tract and that ALP may serve as a biomarker for these events. These findings have important therapeutic implications for the design of medical countermeasures. PMID:27223826

  1. Living with tics: reduced impairment and improved quality of life for youth with chronic tic disorders.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph F; Arnold, Elysse; Park, Jennifer M; Nadeau, Joshua M; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2015-02-28

    Pharmacological and behavioral interventions have focused on reducing tic severity to alleviate tic-related impairment for youth with chronic tic disorders (CTDs), with no existing intervention focused on the adverse psychosocial consequences of tics. This study examined the preliminary efficacy of a modularized cognitive behavioral intervention ("Living with Tics", LWT) in reducing tic-related impairment and improving quality of life relative to a waitlist control of equal duration. Twenty-four youth (ages 7-17 years) with Tourette Disorder or Chronic Motor Tic Disorder and psychosocial impairment participated. A treatment-blind evaluator conducted all pre- and post-treatment clinician-rated measures. Youth were randomly assigned to receive the LWT intervention (n=12) or a 10-week waitlist (n=12). The LWT intervention consisted of up to 10 weekly sessions targeted at reducing tic-related impairment and developing skills to manage psychosocial consequences of tics. Youth in the LWT condition experienced significantly reduced clinician-rated tic-impairment, and improved child-rated quality of life. Ten youth (83%) in the LWT group were classified as treatment responders compared to four youth in the waitlist condition (33%). Treatment gains were maintained at one-month follow-up. Findings provide preliminary data that the LWT intervention reduces tic-related impairment and improves quality of life for youth with CTDs. PMID:25500348

  2. Spasmolytic activity of some plants used by the Otomi Indians of Quéretaro (México) for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A; Bah, M; Rojas, J I; Serrano, V; Pacheco, S

    1999-11-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of chloroform-methanol (1:1) extracts derived from Baccharis heterophylla H. B. K (Asteraceae), Desmodium grahami Gray (Leguminosae), Dyssodia pinnata var. pinnata Rob. (Asteraceae), Gentiana spathacea H. B. K. (Gentianaceae), Loeselia mexicana Brand. (Polemoniaceae), Selaginella pallescens Spring. (Selaginellaceae) and Zornia diphylla Pers. (Fabaceae) on the spontaneous contractions of isolated rat ileum. The concentration-response curves and IC50 values were obtained and the respective relaxant potencies were compared with that of the CHCl3-MeOH (1:1) extract of Datura lanosa. The data showed that all the extracts produce a concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous ileum contractions. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of the extracts against pathogenic enterobacteria was tested. The pharmacological actions shown by the extracts of the selected species tend to support ethnomedical use of the plants for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:11962546

  3. An experimental model for simultaneous chronic sampling of portal and systemic blood and gastrointestinal lymph via cannulae in conscious swine.

    PubMed

    Manolas, K J; Farmer, H M; Cussen, M; Welbourn, R B

    1983-10-01

    Surgical techniques are described whereby safe chronic cannulations of the portal vein, the external iliac artery and vein and the cisterna chyli of pigs were performed. The pigs tolerated the operations well and there was a short recovery period. They were unrestrained during the subsequent feeding experiments, when large sequential blood and lymph samples were withdrawn readily. The experimental periods varied from 3 to 46 days (mean : 13.4 days, SE: 2.0). All of 22 arterial cannulae remained patent (mean : 16 days, SE : 2.2), nineteen of 22 portal cannulae (mean : 15 days, SE : 1.8) and eighteen of 22 venous cannulae (mean : 14 days, SE : 1.9). The lymph cannula patency varied from 2 to 7 days, but lymph samples were easily obtained through all but one of them during the third postoperative day. PMID:6627950

  4. Pain, not chronic disease, is associated with the recurrence of depressive and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that poor physical health might be associated with increased depression and anxiety recurrence. The objectives of this study were to determine whether specific chronic diseases and pain characteristics are associated with depression and anxiety recurrence and to examine whether such associations are mediated by subthreshold depressive or anxiety symptoms. Methods 1122 individuals with remitted depressive or anxiety disorder (Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety) were followed up for a period of four years. The impact of specific chronic diseases and pain characteristics on recurrence was assessed using Cox regression and mediation analyses. Results Chronic diseases were not associated with recurrence. Neck (HR 1.45, p < .01), chest (HR 1.65, p < .01), abdominal (HR 1.52, p < .01) pain, an increase in the number of pain locations (HR 1.10, p < .01) and pain severity (HR 1.18, p = .01) were associated with an increased risk of depression recurrence but not anxiety. Subthreshold depressive symptoms mediated the associations between pain and depression recurrence. Conclusions Pain, not chronic disease, increases the likelihood of depression recurrence, largely through its association with aggravated subthreshold depressive symptoms. These findings support the idea of the existence of a mutually reinforcing mechanism between pain and depression and are indicative of the importance of shedding light on neurobiological links in order to optimize pain and depression management. PMID:24965597

  5. [Differential diagnosis of chronic diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Louis, E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diarrhoea is a frequent clinical presentation in our population. It may correspond to many gastrointestinal or systemic pathologies. Most frequent causes are irritable bowel syndrome, functional intestinal disorders or lactose intolerance, but organic diseases have also to be searched. Focused patient questioning and some specific aspects of clinical examination play a key-role in diagnosis orientation and the use of complementary explorations. The present paper proposes a structured diagnostic procedure aiming at an optimal use of complementary explorations. PMID:24640309

  6. Patients with borderline personality disorder who are chronically suicidal: therapeutic alliance and therapeutic limits.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Xavier F

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic work with patients who are chronically suicidal and have borderline personality disorder (BPD) is challenging, and clinicians often resort to setting firm limits or excessively cautious interventions in efforts to prevent manipulation, regression, or over-dependence. Litigation and malpractice fears reinforce these stances, and reduced compensation for additional time and energy devoted to patients adds further disincentives to sole providers. However, elements of the working alliance and therapeutic limits are within the therapist's control. A case vignette illustrates an individual therapist's modification of usual therapeutic limits while working with a chronically suicidal patient with BPD within a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) framework over a 16-week period. Discussions regarding the case, interventions used, DBT, and legality concerns follow. PMID:23909059

  7. Systematic Analysis of Integrated Gene Functional Network of Four Chronic Stress-related Lifestyle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Souvick; Chakraborty, Abhik; Ghosh, Chinmoy; Banerjee, Birendranath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress is a term used to define factors involved in changes in the physiological balances resulting in disease conditions. Chronic exposure to stress conditions in modern lifestyles has resulted in a group of disorders called lifestyle disorders. Genetic background and environmental factors are interrelated to lifestyle in determining the health status of individuals. Hence, identification of disease-associated genes is the primary step toward explanations of pathogenesis of these diseases. In functional genomics, large-scale molecular and physiological data are used for the identification of causative genes associated with a disease. Aim: The objective of our study was to find a common set of genes involved in chronic stress-related lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertension (HTN), and obesity. Materials and Methods: In our study, we have performed a systematic analysis of the functional gene network of four chronic stress-related lifestyle diseases by retrieving genes from published databases. We have tried to systematically construct a functional protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The goals of establishing this network were the functional enrichment study of interacting partners as well as functional disease ontology annotation (FunDO) of the enriched genes. Results: This study enabled the identification of key genes involved in these stress-related lifestyle diseases by prioritizing candidate genes based on their degree of involvement. In this systematic analysis, we have found key genes for these diseases based on their involvement and association at the gene network level and PPI. Conclusion: We have deciphered a group of genes that in combination play a crucial role and may impact the function of the whole genome in the four lifestyle disorders mentioned. PMID:27330735

  8. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  9. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  10. Pulmonary rehabilitation for respiratory disorders other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Carolyn L; Fairburn, Carl; Crouch, Rebecca H

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an important therapeutic intervention that should no longer be considered suitable only for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A strong rationale exists for providing PR to persons with a broad range of respiratory disorders other than COPD. Evidence shows that PR for these patients is feasible, safe and effective. A disease-relevant approach should be undertaken, based on individual patients' needs. Further research is needed to better understand the optimal program content, duration and outcomes measures, to enable diverse patients to achieve maximal benefits of PR. PMID:24874132

  11. Sleep disturbances in veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul; Masoudi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder is related to a wide range of medical problems, with a majority of neurological, psychological, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes, as well as sleep disorders. Although the majority of studies reveal the association between PTSD and sleep disturbances, there are few studies on the assessment of sleep disruption among veterans with PTSD. In this review, we attempt to study the sleep disorders including insomnia, nightmare, sleep-related breathing disorders, sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias among veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD. It is an important area for further research among veterans with PTSD. PMID:27093088

  12. Mineral and bone disorder and vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Pércio, Pedro Paulo Verona

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications has been associated with bone and mineral disorders. The alterations in the serum level of calcium concentrations and phosphate are importants factors implicated in the arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is a complex mechanism and not completely clear, being able to correspond to an active process of cellular transformation and heterotopic ossification. Beyond the hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, they are involved in this process changes in the metabolism of inhibitors and promoters of calcification such as fetuin A, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, and matrix gla protein. For the diagnosis of the calcified arterial injury are available several complementary methods, a method of estimate of the cardiovascular risk based on plain radiographs of the lumbar column and another method based on simple x-rays of the pelvis and hands. Below, we will present a review approching the link between vascular calcifications and mineral disorders. PMID:25055361

  13. Neurobiologically informed treatment for adults with anorexia nervosa: a novel approach to a chronic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Knatz, Stephanie; Wierenga, Christina E.; Murray, Stuart B.; Hill, Laura; Kaye, Walter H.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating disorder with significant medical and psychological sequelae. To date, there are no effective treatments for adults, resulting in high rates of chronicity, morbidity, and mortality. Recent advances in brain imaging research have led to an improved understanding of etiology and specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms. Despite this, there are no treatments focused on targeting symptoms using this empirically supported mechanistic understanding of the illness. Updated treatment approaches focused on targeting neurobiological mechanisms underlying core AN symptomatology are necessary to improve treatment out-comes for this population. Neurobiologically Enhanced With Family Eating Disorder Trait Response Treatment (NEW FED TR) is a neurobiologically informed treatment targeting key temperament constructs associated with the illness through the delivery of psychoeducation and skills training to patients and nominated carers. PMID:26246796

  14. Neurobiologically informed treatment for adults with anorexia nervosa: a novel approach to a chronic disorder.

    PubMed

    Knatz, Stephanie; Wierenga, Christina E; Murray, Stuart B; Hill, Laura; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating disorder with significant medical and psychological sequelae. To date, there are no effective treatments for adults, resulting in high rates of chronicity, morbidity, and mortality. Recent advances in brain imaging research have led to an improved understanding of etiology and specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms. Despite this, there are no treatments focused on targeting symptoms using this empirically supported mechanistic understanding of the illness. Updated treatment approaches focused on targeting neurobiological mechanisms underlying core AN symptomatology are necessary to improve treatment out-comes for this population. Neurobiologically Enhanced With Family Eating Disorder Trait Response Treatment (NEW FED TR) is a neurobiologically informed treatment targeting key temperament constructs associated with the illness through the delivery of psychoeducation and skills training to patients and nominated carers. PMID:26246796

  15. [Fenibut and its citrate prevent psychoneurological disorders caused by chronic stress (paradoxical sleep deprivation)].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Bagmetova, V V; Borodkina, L E; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2012-01-01

    The antistress protective action of two structural analogs of GABA, fenibut and its salt with citric acid (fenibut citrate, citrocard, RGPU-147), has been studied using a model of chronic stress caused by seven-fold 24-h deprivation of paradoxical sleep phase at an interval of 24 h between the deprivations. It is established that fenibut and fenibut citrate produce a protective action by (i) reducing the intensity of emotional disorders in the open-field test and elevated plus maze test, (ii) decreasing cognitive disorders in the tests for conditioned avoidance response and extrapolatory deliverance; and (iii) limiting stress reaction due to a decrease in the intensity of adrenal hypertrophy, thymus involution, and stomach mucous membrane ulceration. Fenibut citrate surpasses fenibut in the intensity of antistress protective action. PMID:22891435

  16. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children with early stages of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi Chaijan, Parsa; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Salehi, Bahman; Rafiei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood neurological disorder. This disorder is more prevalent in some chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate ADHD in children with early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to compare it with healthy children. Methods: Seventy five 5-16-year-old children with early stages of CKD (stage 1, 2 and 3) and 75 healthy children without CKD were included in this case – control study as case and control groups, respectively. The participants were selected from those children who were referred to the pediatric clinic of Amir Kabir Hospital of Arak (Iran) in the form of simple probability and based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. ADHD was diagnosed using Conner's Parent Rating Scale – 48 (CPRS-48) and DSM-IV criteria and was confirmed by a psychologist consultant. Data were analyzed by Binomial test in SPSS18. Results: ADHD inattentive type was observed in 8 cases (10.6%) with CKD and 2 controls (2.6%) (p= 0.109). Moreover, in the case and control groups, 7 (9.3%) and 6 (8%) children were affected by ADHD hyperactiveimpulsive type (p= 0.997), and 9 (12%) and 12 (16%) children were affected by ADHD mixed type (p= 0.664), respectively. Conclusion: No differences were found between the prevalence of ADHD in the children with early stages of CKD and the control group. However, due to the importance of the relationships between different types of psychiatric disorders and CKD and lack of enough evidence concerning the relationship between ADHD and different stages of CKD in children, conducting further studies in this field is recommended. PMID:26034734

  17. Behavioral disorders and low quality of life in children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Renata C; Soares, Cristina M Bouissou; Diniz, José Silvério S; Lima, Eleonora M; Silva, Jose Maria P; Canhestro, Monica R; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Melo, Carla Cristina D; Dias, Cristiane S; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Correa, Humberto; Oliveira, Eduardo A

    2011-02-01

    Recent years has seen an increasing interest in the quality of life (QOL) of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of behavioral disorders and to assess the health-related QOL (HRQOL) in 136 patients with CKD. To estimate the prevalence of behavior disorders and analyze HRQOL, we used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and Pediatric Inventory of Quality of Life (PedsQL) Core Scales as assessment tools for both the patients and caregivers. When compared to healthy controls, the CKD group had significantly lower scores in almost all PedsQL domains. After adjustment, only absence of religion/other religions remained significantly associated with a lower global HRQOL score [odds ratio (OR) 6.2, P=0.009]. Among the parents, two factors remained significantly associated with a lower global HRQOL score: patients' age >10 years (OR 5.4, P=0.033) and absence of religion/other religions (OR 3.2, P=0.038). The CKD group demonstrated a higher proportion of behavioral and emotional disorders in all SDQ domains. There was a negative correlation between the presence of behavior and emotional disorders and HRQOL score (r= -0.552, P<0.001). Our findings suggest the importance of evaluating behavioral and social repercussions of CKD in order to improve the life quality of this pediatric population. PMID:21110044

  18. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  19. Gastrointestinal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Ghio, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2014-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune chronic disease characterised by microvascular, muscular and immunologic abnormalities that lead to progressive and systemic deposition of connective tissue in the skin and internal organs. The gastrointestinal tract is often overlooked by physicians but it is the most affected organ after the skin, from the mouth to the anus. Indeed, 80% of SSc patients may present with gastrointestinal involvement. Gastrointestinal manifestations range from bloating and heartburn to dysphagia and anorectal dysfunction to severe weight loss and malabsorption. However, the gastrointestinal involvement is rarely the direct cause of death, but has great impact on quality of life and leads to several comorbidities that subsequently affect patients' survival. Treatments, including nutritional support and prokinetics provide limited benefits and do not arrest the progressive course of the disease, but earlier detection of gastrointestinal involvement may reduce the risk of complications such as malnutrition. PMID:25179275

  20. [Opioid use disorder in patients with chronic non-cancer pain].

    PubMed

    Brabant, Michel; Brissette, Suzanne; Lauzon, Pierre; Marsan, Stéphanie; Ouellet-Plamondon, Clairélaine; Pelletier, Marie-Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiology Canada now has the second highest number of opioid prescriptions per capita in the world. The rate of prescriptions has increased over the last decade, most notably in adults over 55 years of age. A recognition of the importance of treating pain has influenced this increase, but higher rates of opioid prescribing have produced undesirable outcomes including the misuse of medication as well as an increased number of deaths and emergency department visits attributable to opioids. Diverse psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, now also occur in 40% of those with an opioid use disorder (OUD). Neuroscience We now understand that addictive behaviors are caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Although OUD has historically been perceived as a weakness of character, it is now clear that it is a chronic disease, which results from a complex interaction between a substance, such as opioid, environmental factors, and an individual's genotype. Unfortunately, this evidence has yet to be successfully translated into clinical practice and most physicians are unable to diagnose and manage OUD patients appropriately.Clinical guidelines Many clinical guidelines for the management of chronic, non-cancer pain are available. All guidelines identify the need to assess the patient appropriately and screen for factors associated with misuse before prescribing opioids. Guidelines generally acknowledge that patients should not be denied appropriate pain management, but that some patients will require close supervision and frequent follow-up to prevent the misuse of prescription opioids. PMID:25590547

  1. Assessing depression and anxiety in the caregivers of pediatric patients with chronic skin disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Ana Paula Dornelles da Silva; Weber, Magda Blessmann; Nagatomi, Aline Rodrigues da Silva; Pereira, Rita Langie; Townsend, Roberta Zaffari; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The literature has shown that the presence of emotional disturbances in caregivers of children with skin diseases affects the course and treatment of the disease. Anxiety and depression are among the most frequently reported psychiatric diagnoses related to this fact. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression in caregivers of pediatric patients with chronic skin disorders, exemplified by atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and vitiligo, and correlate them to the quality of life of the patients. METHODS The sample consisted of 118 patients with atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis, monitored by their main caregiver. The levels of anxiety and depression in the caregivers were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index was applied. RESULTS Anxiety was observed in 36% of the caregivers of the patients with atopic dermatitis, in 36% of those of children affected by psoriasis, and in 42% of those responsible for pediatric patients with vitiligo. Depression occurred in 36% of the caregivers of patients with atopic dermatitis, in 36% of those of children affected by psoriasis and in 26% of those responsible for pediatric patients with vitiligo. There was a significant correlation between poor quality of life scores in patients with vitiligo and the presence of depression and anxiety in their caregivers. CONCLUSION Emotional disorders tend to be present among close family members of children with the chronic skin diseases studied and their prevention can help in controlling and treating these diseases. PMID:24474096

  2. Attitudes antecedent to transition to self-management of a chronic genetic disorder.

    PubMed

    Giarelli, E; Bernhardt, B A; Pyeritz, R E

    2008-10-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is the exemplar of chronic genetic disorders that require multiorgan system management by health care providers (HCPs) and lifelong self-management by affected individuals. This article describes the ways to facilitate transition to self-management (TSM) by the adolescent with MFS. This thematic content analysis uses data collected for a larger grounded theory investigation of TSM of a chronic genetic disorder in adolescents and focuses on the system issues related to transition. A total sample of 107 included three groups of participants: parents (n = 39), adolescents (n = 37, ages 14-21 years) and young adults (n = 16, ages 22-34 years) with MFS, and HCPs (n = 15), including physicians, genetic counselors, and nurses. Data were derived from 180 transcripts of audiotaped interviews and a sociodemographic survey. Frames of mind that are antecedent to transition were belief in the diagnosis, wanting to understand and appreciate the cause and effect of MFS, and willing to share responsibility in problem solving. These frames of mind occurred primarily within the context of the family relationship. Parents taught children self-surveillance as 'listening to one's body'. The parent's fears and need to stay involved in the child's health care slowed the child's independent work on self-management responsibilities. A systematic, institutionalized transition program for adolescents might involve parents and the child soon after diagnosis and incrementally build acknowledgment, understanding, and rapport. PMID:18616734

  3. Management of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder: Korean working group recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eunah; Choi, Bum Soon; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Kwon, Young Joo; Kim, Gheun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    For Korean dialysis patients, chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disorder is a serious burden because of cardiovascular calcification and mortality. However, recent epidemiologic data have demonstrated that many patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis are out of the target ranges of serum calcium, phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone. Thus, we felt the necessity for the development of practical recommendations to treat abnormal serum phosphorus, calcium, and iPTH in dialysis patients. In this paper, we briefly comment on the measurement of serum calcium, phosphorus, iPTH, dialysate calcium concentration, dietary phosphorus restriction, use of phosphate binders, and medical and surgical options to correct secondary hyperparathyroidism. In particular, for the optimal management of secondary hyperparathyroidism, we suggest a simplified medication adjustment according to certain ranges of serum phosphorus and calcium. Large-scale, well-designed clinical studies are required to support our strategies to control chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disorder in this country. Based on such data, our practice guidelines could be established and better long-term outcomes should be anticipated in our dialysis patients. PMID:26484013

  4. Commonly used gastrointestinal drugs.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the spectrum and mechanisms of neurologic adverse effects of commonly used gastrointestinal drugs including antiemetics, promotility drugs, laxatives, antimotility drugs, and drugs for acid-related disorders. The commonly used gastrointestinal drugs as a group are considered safe and are widely used. A range of neurologic complications are reported following use of various gastrointestinal drugs. Acute neurotoxicities, including transient akathisias, oculogyric crisis, delirium, seizures, and strokes, can develop after use of certain gastrointestinal medications, while disabling and pervasive tardive syndromes are described following long-term and often unsupervised use of phenothiazines, metoclopramide, and other drugs. In rare instances, some of the antiemetics can precipitate life-threatening extrapyramidal reactions, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, or serotonin syndrome. In contrast, concerns about the cardiovascular toxicity of drugs such as cisapride and tegaserod have been grave enough to lead to their withdrawal from many world markets. Awareness and recognition of the neurotoxicity of gastrointestinal drugs is essential to help weigh the benefit of their use against possible adverse effects, even if uncommon. Furthermore, as far as possible, drugs such as metoclopramide and others that can lead to tardive dyskinesias should be used for as short time as possible, with close clinical monitoring and patient education. PMID:24365343

  5. Cell sizing in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: an aid to differential diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H D; Markey, G M; Nolan, R L; Morris, T C

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if leucocyte volume distribution analysis (LVDA), obtained using a Coulter Counter Model S Plus IV, can be used to aid differentiation of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder (CLPD) subtypes. METHODS: Mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width were measured on each patient (n = 90) using a hard copy of an amplified LVDA histogram. The mean lymphocyte volume was taken as the mean of the values on either side of the peak at half maximum height. The lymphocyte distribution width was taken as the range of cell values between the two values used to calibrate the mean lymphocyte volume. A template showing typical histograms from commonly occurring CLPD was also produced on an acetate sheet. This was used to examine the histogram from each new patient to evaluate its usefulness as an alternative to the calculation of mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width. RESULTS: Mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width were significantly higher in B cell lymphocytic leukaemia of mixed cell type (B CLL/PL), B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with peripheral blood spill, hairy cell leukaemia and T cell prolymphocytic leukaemia than in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B CLL). The mean lymphocyte volume, but not the lymphocyte distribution width, was also significantly higher in T cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia than in B CLL. The template gave an immediate preliminary indication of possible subtype(s) of disorder and could be used as an alternative to measurement of mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width. CONCLUSIONS: Electronic haematology analysers producing an LVDA provide a useful, cost effective cell sizing analysis which can aid the differentiation of subtypes of CLPD. Images PMID:1430257

  6. Evaluation of the mRNA and Protein Expressions of Nutritional Biomarkers in the Gastrointestinal Mucosa of Patients with Small Intestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanao; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of biomarkers related to absorption in the small intestinal mucosa of humans and determine the relationships between small intestinal diseases and nutrition. Methods The study subjects consisted of patients scheduled to undergo double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) or total colonoscopy for suspected gastrointestinal disorder in a clinical practice. Biopsies were taken from apparently normal mucosa in the visible areas of 6 parts of the intestines from the duodenum to the colon. The mRNA expression of specific biomarkers (SGLT1, SGLT5, GIP, GLP, LAT1, LAT2, and NPC1L1) in the mucosa was compared among three patient groups: Inflammation, Tumor, and Control. Results Sixty-six patients participated in this study. Both routes of DBE were performed in 20 patients, in whom biopsy samples were obtained from the mucosa for all sections. There were no remarkable differences in the mRNA expression levels among the 3 groups. However, SGLT1, GIP, GLP, and NPC1L1 exhibited specific distribution patterns. The expression levels of GIP and NPC1L1 were highest in the upper jejunum, but were extremely low in the terminal ileum and colon. A comparison of the mRNA expression profile in each intestinal section revealed that the SGLT1 mRNA expression in the Tumor group and the GIP mRNA expression in the Inflammation group were significantly higher than the corresponding levels in the Control group in the upper jejunum. Conclusion The gastrointestinal mucosa of patients with small bowel diseases can maintain proper nutrient absorption, except in the upper jejunum. PMID:27522989

  7. Clinical factors associated with prescription drug use disorder in urban primary care patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Liebschutz, Jane M.; Saitz, Richard; Weiss, Roger D.; Averbuch, Tali; Schwartz, Sonia; Meltzer, Ellen C.; Claggett-Borne, Elizabeth; Cabral, Howard; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined characteristics associated with prescription drug use disorder (PDUD) in primary care patients with chronic pain from a cross-sectional survey conducted at an urban academically-affiliated safety-net hospital. Participants were 18–60 years old, had pain for ≥ 3 months, took prescription or non-prescription analgesics, and spoke English. Measurements included the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (PDUD, other substance use disorders (SUD), Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)); Graded Chronic Pain Scale, smoking status; family history of SUD; and time spent in jail. Of 597 patients (41% male, 61% black, mean age 46 years), 110 (18.4%) had PDUD of whom 99 (90%) had another SUD. In adjusted analyses, those with PDUD were more likely than those without any current or past SUD to report jail time (OR 5.1, 95% CI 2.8–9.3), family history of SUD (OR 3.4, 1.9–6.0), greater pain-related limitations (OR 3.8,1.2–11.7), cigarette smoking (OR 3.6, 2.0–6.2), or to be white (OR 3.2, 1.7–6.0), male (OR 1.9, 1.1–3.5) or have PTSD (OR 1.9, 1.1–3.4). PDUD appears increased among those with easily identifiable characteristics. The challenge is to determine who among those with risk factors can avoid, with proper management, developing the increasingly common diagnosis of PDUD. PMID:20338815

  8. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  9. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. PMID:26520197

  10. Acquired haemophilia complicated with gastrointestinal bleeding and spontaneous iliopsoas muscle haematoma in a woman with chronic C hepatitis under treatment with pegylated IFN alpha 2a and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Boţianu, Ana-Maria; Demian, Smaranda; Macarie, Ioan; Georgescu, Dan; Oltean, Galafteon; Băţagă, Simona

    2012-03-01

    Acquired haemophilia A is a very rare (1-2 cases per million people) but often life-threatening haemorrhagic disorder characterized by antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII. We report the case of a 55-year old woman under treatment with Pegylated alpha 2a interferon (IFN) and Ribavirin for chronic viral C hepatitis, who developed a progressive severe haemorrhagic syndrome diagnosed as acquired haemophilia based on supplementary laboratory data (prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, extremely low factor VIII level - 1%, high titre of factor VIII inhibitor - 30 Bethesda U/ml).The onset was insidious, about three months before presenting to our unit. Antiviral therapy had been stopped three weeks before current admission. Emergency intensive treatment included: haemostatic agents - rFVII (Novoseven), FEIBA (Factor VIII Inhibitor Bypassing Activity), vitamin K, adrenostazin, cryoprecipitate, fresh frozen plasma, as well as immunosuppressive therapy (high dose corticotherapy and cyclophoshamide), immunoglobulins (Humaglobin), prophylactic PPI and antibiotics. The evolution was slowly favourable with the remission of the haemorrhagic syndrome and regression of the iliopsoas muscle haematoma. Clinicians should be aware that acquired forms of haemophilia do exist, representing a rare diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of acquired haemophilia in Romania, in a patient with chronic viral C hepatitis under antiviral treatment. PMID:22457865

  11. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Hypersuppression Is Associated with Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Karling, Pontus; Wikgren, Mikael; Adolfsson, Rolf; Norrback, Karl-Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal symptoms and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction are frequently observed in patients with major depression. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between HPA-axis function and self-perceived functional gastrointestinal symptoms in major depression. Methods Patients with major depression (n = 73) and controls representative of the general population (n = 146) underwent a weight-adjusted very low dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Patients and controls completed the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale-iritable bowel syndrome (GSRS-IBS) and the hospital anxiety depression scale. Medical records of the patients were screened over a ten year period for functional gastrointestinal disorder and pain conditions. Results Patients with high GSRS-IBS scores (above median) exhibited HPA-axis hypersuppression more often than controls (defined by the lowest 10% cutoff of the post-DST cortisol values among controls, adjusted OR 7.25, CI 1.97–26.7) whereas patients with low GSRS-IBS scores did not differ from controls concerning their post-DST cortisol values. Patients who had consulted primary care for functional gastrointestinal disorder (P = 0.039), lumbago (P = 0.006) and chronic multifocal pain (P = 0.057) also exhibited an increased frequency of hypersuppression. Conclusions HPA-axis hypersuppression is associated with functional gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with major depression. PMID:26507800

  12. Epstein-Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with old organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yasuo; Ohta, Masaru; Ohshima, Koichi; Niino, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Okada, Yosuke; Nakashima, Shinji

    2012-06-01

    This report describes a case of an immunocompetent 77-year-old male with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with calcified chronic subdural hematoma (CSH). On the day prior to consultation in our outpatient clinic, the patient fell from his bed, striking his frontal head on the floor. Magnetic resonance imaging showed ill-defined lesions in the right frontal-temporal subdural regions. At surgery, a hard and thickened outer membrane of a CSH and muddy organized subdural hematoma were observed. However, macroscopic neoplastic lesions were not apparent. Histologically, there were atypical lymphoid cells scattered or conglomerated in some areas of the thick outer membrane of the CSH. They were composed of occasional large atypical lymphoid cells. The lesions were accompanied by necrosis. Atypical lymphoid cells were immunopositive for B-cell markers but not for T-cell markers. EBNA2 was seen in the nuclei of tumor cells. Atypical lymphoid cells showed positive signals for EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) on in situ hybridization. These findings were consistent with EBV-positive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with CSH. These results also suggested that EBV and the inflammatory reaction found in the CSH could be the etiological factors in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:22612510

  13. Social deficits in children with chronic tic disorders: phenomenology, clinical correlates and quality of life.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph F; Hanks, Camille; Lewin, Adam B; Storch, Eric A; Murphy, Tanya K

    2013-10-01

    Youth with chronic tic disorders (CTD) experience social problems that have been associated with functional impairment and a diminished quality of life. Previous examinations have attributed social difficulties to either tic severity or the symptom severity of coexisting conditions, but have not directly explored performance deficits in social functioning. This report examined the presence and characteristics of social deficits in youth with CTD and explored the relationship between social deficits, social problems, and quality of life. Ninety-nine youth (8-17years) and their parents completed a battery of assessments to determine diagnoses, tic severity, severity of coexisting conditions, social responsiveness, and quality of life. Parents reported that youth with CTD had increased social deficits, with 19% reported to have severe social deficits. The magnitude of social deficits was more strongly associated with inattention, hyperactivity, and oppositionality than with tic severity. Social deficits predicted internalizing and social problems, and quality of life above and beyond tic severity. Social deficits partially mediated the relationship between tic severity and social problems, as well as tic severity and quality of life. Findings suggest that youth with CTD have social deficits, which are greater in the presence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. These social deficits play an influential role in social problems and quality of life. Future research is needed to develop interventions to address social performance deficits among youth with CTD. PMID:23806708

  14. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  15. A multinational health professional perspective of the prevalence of mood disorders in patients with acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Upton, Dominic; Solowiej, Kazia; Woo, Kevin Y

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has started to identify mood disorders and problems associated with acute and chronic wounds, which have been shown to contribute to delayed healing, poor patient well-being and a reduced quality of life. Furthermore, mood disorders have been shown to have a negative impact on financial costs for service providers and the wider society in terms of treatment and sickness absence. This study aimed to survey a multinational sample of health professionals to explore their perspective and awareness of mood disorders amongst acute and chronic wound patients. Responses were received from n = 908 health professionals working in Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, North America and South America. A strong awareness of the prevalence of mood disorders appeared to be widespread among the health professionals across the world, in addition to a view on the potential factors contributing to these problems with mood. Despite this, it was thought that few patients were actually receiving treatment for their mood disorders. Implications for clinical practice include the need for health professionals to engage actively with their patients to enable them to learn from their experiences. Studies that explore the benefits of treatments and techniques appropriate for minimising mood disorders in patients with wounds would provide empirical evidence for health professionals to make recommendations for patients with acute and chronic wounds. PMID:23289905

  16. Detection of monoclonal T populations in patients with KIR-restricted chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Passeri, Francesca; De March, Elena; Carraro, Samuela; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Berno, Tamara; Barilà, Gregorio; Martini, Veronica; Piazza, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Facco, Monica; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of chronic large granular lymphocyte proliferations is largely unknown. Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cell types (T and natural killer) with specific genetic features and abnormalities, several lines of evidence suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism. According to this interpretation, we speculated that in patients with natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder, together with natural killer cells, also T lymphocytes undergo a persistent antigenic pressure, possibly resulting in an ultimate clonal T-cell selection. To strengthen this hypothesis, we evaluated whether clonal T-cell populations were detectable in 48 patients with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. At diagnosis, in half of the patients studied, we found a clearly defined clonal T-cell population, despite the fact that all cases presented with a well-characterized natural killer disorder. Follow-up analysis confirmed that the TCR gamma rearrangements were stable over the time period evaluated; furthermore, in 7 patients we demonstrated the appearance of a clonal T subset that progressively matures, leading to a switch between killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type disorder to a monoclonal T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Our results support the hypothesis that a common mechanism is involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:25193965

  17. Peritraumatic dissociation mediates the relationship between acute panic and chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Brooks, Robert; Silove, Derrick; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2011-05-01

    Although peritraumatic dissociation predicts subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is understood about the mechanism of this relationship. This study examines the role of panic during trauma in the relationship between peritraumatic dissociation and subsequent PTSD. Randomized eligible admissions to 4 major trauma hospitals across Australia (n=244) were assessed during hospital admission and within one month of trauma exposure for panic, peritraumatic dissociation and PTSD symptoms, and subsequently re-assessed for PTSD three months after the initial assessment (n=208). Twenty (9.6%) patients met criteria for PTSD at 3-months post injury. Structural equation modeling supported the proposition that peritraumatic derealization (a subset of dissociation) mediated the effect of panic reactions during trauma and subsequent PTSD symptoms. The mediation model indicated that panic reactions are linked to severity of subsequent PTSD via derealization, indicating a significant indirect relationship. Whereas peritraumatic derealization is associated with chronic PTSD symptoms, this relationship is influenced by initial acute panic responses. PMID:21457945

  18. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  19. Approach to the pharmacological management of chronic pain in patients with an alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Laura; Ng, Karen WK; Su, Victoria CH; Woodworth-Giroux, Sarah; Levy, Todd S; Sproule, Beth A; Furlan, Andrea D

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of research, guidelines, and clinical considerations for the use of medications for chronic pain in the management of patients with an alcohol use disorder. A review of the literature identified randomized controlled trials, epidemiological cohort studies, consensus guidelines, and one systematic review and meta-analysis. Where gaps in the literature existed, clinical experience of the authors is included. Use of nonopioid medications should be given priority and may offer a more favorable risk profile as well as benefits beyond pain management, such as improvement in anxiety, depression, or insomnia. Pregabalin and gabapentin have additional benefits to decrease alcohol cravings or time to relapse after a period of abstinence from alcohol. Drug interactions between selected analgesics and alcohol, disulfiram, or naltrexone require careful consideration. PMID:26664156

  20. Frequency of Latent and Smear Positive Tuberculosis in Chronic Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Hannan; Mohammadi, Alieh; Jahromi, Sina Khajeh; Naghdipour, Misa; Ebrahimi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective Screening is one of the ways to combat Tuberculosis (TB) and should be mostly concentrated on groups showing some symptoms of the disease. Tuberculosis can be transferred from person to person in laboratories, prisons and psychiatry hospitals. The purpose of this study was to survey pulmonary TB in patients with schizophrenia in Rasht. Methods In this descriptive-cross sectional, Two hundred fifty seven consecutive patients with chronic psychotic disorder hospitalized in psychotic hospitals underwent purified protein derivative (PPD) test. PPD test was done with the unit 5T which was injected subcutaneously on anterior surface and at the top of left forearm. The results of the test were interpreted by the pen technique method and based on transverse diameter of induration of about 48-72 hrs. Induration size due to hypersensitivity to PPD more than 10mm was considered positive. Patients with positive PPD test underwent complementary sputum smear. Data were analyzed using chi- square and T test. Results The mean age of patients was 45±10 years; 75.5% were male, 74.7% were single, 10.5% married, 7.8% divorced, and 68.1% were smokers. These patients suffered from chronic psychotic disorder at the mean time of 15±7.9 years. In 74 patients (28%) positive PPD test were recorded, but active pulmonary TB was not found in complementary experiments of PPD sample. Based on data analysis, only age and gender showed a significant relationship with the results of the PPD test (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study showed that patients with positive PPD test are much more than the normal population, but active pulmonary TB was not observed in our samples. Since these patients are in clinical and closed places, more programs for screening are required. PMID:23682252

  1. Effects of erythromycin in chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Minami, T; Nishibayashi, H; Shinomura, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    1996-12-01

    The prokinetic effects of erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, on the gastrointestinal tract as a motilin receptor agonist and its potential value for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders have recently attracted interest. The effects of erythromycin on the clinical symptoms and gastrointestinal motility of patients with chronic idiopathic pseudo-obstruction have not been investigated extensively. We presented a case of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, in a 67-year-old man in whom oral erythromycin (900 mg/day) dramatically improved postprandial abdominal distention, nausea, and vomiting. Other agents with prokinetic effects on intestinal motility, i.e., cisapride, domperidone, metoclopramide, and trimebutine maleate did not have a favorable effect. Gastric emptying, measured by the sulfamethizole method; and intestinal transit, evaluated using radio-opaque markers, were markedly improved by treatment with erythromycin. Our experience suggests that the prokinetic effects of erythromycin may be of therapeutic value in chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. PMID:9027652

  2. The effect of stress hormones on cerebral hemodynamics in patients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Dikanović, Marinko; Kadojić, Dragutin; Demarin, Vida; Trkanjec, Zlatko; Mihaljević, Ivan; Bitunjac, Milan; Kadojić, Mira; Matić, Ivo; Sapina, Lidija; Vuletić, Vladimir; Cengić, Ljiljana

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible correlation between catecholamine and cortisol levels and changes in cerebral hemodynamics in patients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study included 50 patients with chronic PTSD first ever hospitalized for psychiatric treatment and 50 healthy control subjects. All study subjects were aged 30-50. In PTSD patients, 24-h urine levels of the epinephrine and norepinephrine metabolites vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) and cortisol were determined and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed on day 1 of hospital stay and repeated after 21-day psychiatric medicamentous treatment. On initial testing, increased level of 24-h VMA, decreased cortisol level and elevated mean blood flow velocity (MBFV) in the circle of Willis vessels were recorded in 25 (50.00%) patients. Repeat findings obtained after 21-day psychopharmaceutical therapy showed increased 24-h VMA, decreased cortisol and elevated MBFV in the circle of Willis vessels in seven (14.00%) patients (initial vs. repeat testing, P = 0.0002). Such parameters were not recorded in any of the control subjects (initial PTSD patient testing vs. control group, P = 0.0000). Study results pointed to a significant correlation between increased catecholamine levels, decreased cortisol level and elevated MBFV in the circle of Willis vessels caused by cerebral vasospasm. Psychiatric medicamentous therapy administered for three weeks significantly reduced the proportion of patients with concurrently altered cerebral hemodynamics, increased levels of catecholamine metabolites and decreased level of cortisol. PMID:20405635

  3. Antihypertensive therapy in patients on chronic lithium treatment for bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bisogni, Valeria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Reghin, Francesco; Padrini, Roberto; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorders are chronic conditions treated with lithium, which exerts deleterious effects on the kidney, among which nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, tubular acidosis and ultimately chronic kidney disease. Conversely, drugs that alter renal function can modify its serum levels and lead to the potentially fatal lithium intoxication. A search in the main library databases from 1975 to 2015 to identify interactions between antihypertensive drugs and lithium using the Population Intervention Comparison Outcome strategy provided only 30 reports of lithium intoxication. A regression analysis showed that the severity of lithium intoxication was significantly predicted by female, age, and use of certain classes of antihypertensive agents. A model including certain albeit not all diuretics and/or inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system, but not age, serum lithium or creatinine levels at baseline and/or on admission to the hospital, predicted lithium toxicity. The true incidence of lithium intoxication is unknown but probably low, albeit underestimated. Nonetheless, in patients treated with lithium, monitoring of the serum lithium levels and clinical conditions is mandatory after the introduction of antihypertensive drugs, as diuretics and renin-aldosterone system inhibitors. PMID:26630207

  4. Teeth contacting habit as a contributing factor to chronic pain in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Fumiaki; Kino, Koji; Sugisaki, Masashi; Haketa, Tadasu; Amemori, Yoko; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Shibuya, Toshihisa; Amagasa, Teruo; Shibuya, Tomoaki; Tanabe, Haruyasu; Yoda, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Omura, Ken; Miyaoka, Hitoshi

    2006-06-01

    Many different factors are known to cause and perpetuate the symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the roles of parafunctional factors have not been clearly elucidated. We found one of these habits in the clinical setting. This parafunctional habit involves daily light touching of the upper and lower teeth, when the mouth is closed. We named this habit Teeth Contacting Habit (TCH). [OBJECTIVES] To investigate the following hypotheses: 1) TCH is associated with perpetuation of chronic pain of TMD patients; 2) TCH is associated with other behavioral factors. [METHODS] Two hundred and twenty-nine TMD outpatients with chronic pain were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression models. [RESULTS] TCH was found in 52.4% of patients. Patients with TCH and pain lasting for more than four months were less likely to experience improvements in pain at the first visit (OR = 1.944, p = 0.043). Other factors associated with TCH were as follows: unilateral chewing (OR = 2.802) and involvement in a precision job (OR = 2.195). [CONCLUSION] TCH can prolong TMD pain and is associated with other behavioral factors. PMID:16913571

  5. Usefulness of CD79b expression in the diagnosis of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    McCarron, K F; Hammel, J P; Hsi, E D

    2000-06-01

    We evaluated anti-CD79b for its usefulness in the diagnosis of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (BCLPDs), particularly chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We analyzed 100 BCLPDs for CD5, CD19, CD20, CD23, CD79b, and surface immunoglobulin light chain (sIg) expression by 4-color flow cytometry. CD20, CD79b, and sIg expression were quantified. Correlational analysis and univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the best combination of antigens for the immunophenotypic classification of CLL vs other BCLPDs. Positive and statistically significant Spearman pairwise correlations between CD20, CD79b, and sIg fluorescence intensity were demonstrated. In the simplest models in which a single variable was considered, cutoff points were chosen that gave misclassification rates for CLL of 16% for CD79b, 19% for sIg, and 18% for CD20. Low-intensity CD79b, CD20, and sIg are associated highly with CLL. A panel containing CD5, CD19, CD23, and sIg allowed correct classification of most cases. Addition of CD20 or CD79b improved diagnostic accuracy; CD79b was slightly better than CD20. CD79b seems to be a useful addition to a standard flow cytometry panel for the evaluation of BCLPDs. PMID:10874881

  6. Effect of zolpidem in chronic disorders of consciousness: a prospective open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Thonnard, Marie; Gosseries, Olivia; Demertzi, Athena; Lugo, Zulay; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Chatelle, Camille; Thibaut, Aurore; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Habbal, Dina; Schnakers, Caroline; Laureys, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Summary Zolpidem has been reported as an “awakening drug” in some patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). We here present the results of a prospective open-label study in chronic DOC patients. Sixty patients (35±15 years; 18 females; mean time since insult ± SD: 4±5.5 years; 31 with traumatic etiology) with a diagnosis of vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (n=28) or minimally conscious state (n=32) were behaviorally assessed using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) before and one hour after administration of 10 mg of zolpidem. At the group level, the diagnosis did not change after intake of zolpidem (p=0.10) and CRS-R total scores decreased (p=0.01). Twelve patients (20%) showed improved behaviors and/or CRS-R total scores after zolpidem administration but in only one patient was the diagnosis after zolpidem intake found to show a significant improvement (functional object use), which suggested a change of diagnosis. However, in this patient, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial was performed in order to better specify the effects of zolpidem, but the patient, on this trial, failed to show any clinical improvements. The present open-label study therefore failed to show any clinically significant improvement (i.e., change of diagnosis) in any of the 60 studied chronic DOC patients. PMID:24598393

  7. Clinical significance of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor in chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Kawatani, T; Endo, A; Tajima, F; Ooi, S; Kawasaki, H

    1997-02-01

    Serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) levels were determined in patients with chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD): 18 with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase (CML in CP), seven with CML in accelerated phase (AP) or blastic crisis (BC), six with polycythemia vera (PV), eight with essential thrombocythemia (ET), one with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), and 50 controls. The mean (+/-S.E.M.) levels were higher in CMPD than in controls (CML in AP or BC, 2693 +/- 694 U/ml, P < 0.0001; CML in CP, 792 +/- 63 U/ml, P < 0.0001; PV 553 +/- 89 U/ml, P < 0.05; ET, 449 +/- 56 U/ml; PMF, 628 U/ml vs. controls, 395 +/- 25 U/ml). Patients with CML in CP had significantly higher serum sIL-2R levels than patients with ET (P < 0.005), and levels were markedly elevated in AP and BC (P < 0.001). Serum sIL-2R levels were positively correlated with WBC count and lactic dehydrogenase in CMPD, and in CML in CP. Serum sIL-2R levels in CMPD were negatively correlated with RBC and platelet counts. Serum sIL-2R levels were significantly lower in patients with CML in CP who showed a cytogenetic response after interferon (IFN) therapy than in those who showed no response (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that a high serum sIL-2R level reflects the leukocyte growth in CMPD and is useful both for differentiating CML from other CMPD and for predicting the response to IFN therapy in CML. PMID:9071816

  8. Probiotics and Chronic Gastrointestinal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarner, Francisco

    Human beings are associated in a symbiotic relationship with a huge population of microorganisms. During millennia, a considerable number of microbes have evolved and adapted to live and grow in the human intestine. The intestinal habitat of an individual contains billions of microorganisms including bacteria, protozoa, archaea, fungi, and viruses (Guarner and Malagelada, 2003; Ley et al., 2006), and the number of microbial cells within the gut lumen appears to be ten times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells of the human body. Some of these bacteria are potential pathogens and can be a source of infection and sepsis under some circumstances, for instance when the integrity of the bowel barrier is physically or functionally breached. However, growing evidence suggests that important health benefits to the human host derive from the constant interaction with its microbial guests. Recognition of these benefits in recent years is drawing particular attention to the functional implications of the gut microbial communities in host physiology.

  9. Initial Psychometric Properties of a Brief Parent-Report Instrument for Assessing Tic Severity in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Susanna; Himle, Michael B.; Tucker, Benjamin T. P.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development and initial psychometric properties of the Parent Tic Questionnaire (PTQ)--a new measure assessing the number, frequency, and intensity of motor and vocal tics in children and adolescents with Chronic Tic Disorder (CTD). Parents of 40 children with a CTD completed the PTQ as part of a larger assessment…

  10. Establishing the Feasibility of Direct Observation in the Assessment of Tics in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himle, Michael B.; Chang, Susanna; Woods, Douglas W.; Pearlman, Amanda; Buzzella, Brian; Bunaciu, Liviu; Piacentini, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Behavior analysis has been at the forefront in establishing effective treatments for children and adults with chronic tic disorders. As is customary in behavior analysis, the efficacy of these treatments has been established using direct-observation assessment methods. Although behavior-analytic treatments have enjoyed acceptance and integration…

  11. Impairment and Coping in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Comparative Study with Other Paediatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garralda, M. Elena; Rangel, Luiza

    2004-01-01

    Background: Functional impairment is a key feature of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) of childhood. Aim: To compare impairment, illness attitudes and coping mechanisms in childhood CFS and in other paediatric disorders. Method: Participants were 28 children and adolescents with CFS, 30 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 27 with emotional…

  12. Elevated amygdala responses to emotional faces in youths with chronic irritability or bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Laura A; Kim, Pilyoung; Bones, Brian L; Hinton, Kendra E; Milch, Hannah S; Reynolds, Richard C; Adleman, Nancy E; Marsh, Abigail A; Blair, R J R; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    A major controversy in child psychiatry is whether bipolar disorder (BD) presents in children as severe, non-episodic irritability (operationalized here as severe mood dysregulation, SMD), rather than with manic episodes as in adults. Both classic, episodic BD and SMD are severe mood disorders characterized by deficits in processing emotional stimuli. Neuroimaging techniques can be used to test whether the pathophysiology mediating these deficits are similar across the two phenotypes. Amygdala dysfunction during face emotion processing is well-documented in BD, but little is known about amygdala dysfunction in chronically irritable youth. We compared neural activation in SMD (n=19), BD (n=19), and healthy volunteer (HV; n=15) youths during an implicit face-emotion processing task with angry, fearful and neutral expressions. In the right amygdala, both SMD and BD exhibited greater activity across all expressions than HV. However, SMD and BD differed from each other and HV in posterior cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and inferior parietal lobe. In these regions, only SMD showed deactivation in response to fearful expressions, whereas only BD showed deactivation in response to angry expressions. Thus, during implicit face emotion processing, youth with BD and those with SMD exhibit similar amygdala dysfunction but different abnormalities in regions involved in information monitoring and integration. PMID:23977455

  13. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products. PMID:23775628

  14. Sleep-disordered breathing and oxidative stress in preclinical chronic mountain sickness (excessive erythrocytosis)

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Vargas, Enrique; Gonzales, Marcelino; Dávila, R. Daniela; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Schoo, Caroline; Powers, Robert W.; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Moore, Lorna G.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is considered to be a loss of ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude (>2500 m) resulting in marked arterial hypoxemia and polycythemia. This case-control study explores the possibility that sleep-disordered breathing (SBD) and associated oxidative stress contribute to the etiology of CMS. Nocturnal respiratory and SaO2 patterns were measured using standard polysomnography techniques and compared between male high-altitude residents (aged 18–25) with preclinical CMS ([excessive erythrocytosis (EE)], n=20) and controls (n=19). Measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant status included isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF2 alpha), superoxide dismutase and ascorbic acid. EE cases had a greater apnea-hypopnea index, a higher frequency of apneas (central and obstructive) and hypopneas during REM sleep, and lower nocturnal SaO2 compared to controls. 8-iso-PGF2alpha was greater in EE than controls, negatively associated with nocturnal SaO2, and positively associated with hemoglobin concentration. Mild sleep-disordered breathing and oxidative stress are evident in preclinical CMS, suggesting that the resolution of nocturnal hypoxemia or antioxidant treatment may prevent disease progression. PMID:23380170

  15. The water maze paradigm in experimental studies of chronic cognitive disorders: Theory, protocols, analysis, and inference.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Minesh; Xu, Josie; Sakic, Boris

    2016-09-01

    An instrumental step in assessing the validity of animal models of chronic cognitive disorders is to document disease-related deficits in learning/memory capacity. The water maze (WM) is a popular paradigm because of its low cost, relatively simple protocol and short procedure time. Despite being broadly accepted as a spatial learning task, inference of generalized, bona fide "cognitive" dysfunction can be challenging because task accomplishment is also reliant on non-cognitive processes. We review theoretical background, testing procedures, confounding factors, as well as approaches to data analysis and interpretation. We also describe an extended protocol that has proven useful in detecting early performance deficits in murine models of neuropsychiatric lupus and Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we highlight the need for standardization of inferential criteria on "cognitive" dysfunction in experimental rodents and exclusion of preparations of a limited scientific merit. A deeper appreciation for the multifactorial nature of performance in WM may also help to reveal other deficits that herald the onset of neurodegenerative brain disorders. PMID:27229758

  16. Elevated [11C]-D-Deprenyl Uptake in Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorder Suggests Persistent Musculoskeletal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Appel, Lieuwe; Fredrikson, Mats; Gordh, Torsten; Söderlund, Anne; Långström, Bengt; Engler, Henry

    2011-01-01

    There are few diagnostic tools for chronic musculoskeletal pain as structural imaging methods seldom reveal pathological alterations. This is especially true for Whiplash Associated Disorder, for which physical signs of persistent injuries to the neck have yet to be established. Here, we sought to visualize inflammatory processes in the neck region by means Positron Emission Tomography using the tracer 11C-D-deprenyl, a potential marker for inflammation. Twenty-two patients with enduring pain after a rear impact car accident (Whiplash Associated Disorder grade II) and 14 healthy controls were investigated. Patients displayed significantly elevated tracer uptake in the neck, particularly in regions around the spineous process of the second cervical vertebra. This suggests that whiplash patients have signs of local persistent peripheral tissue inflammation, which may potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker. The present investigation demonstrates that painful processes in the periphery can be objectively visualized and quantified with PET and that 11C-D-deprenyl is a promising tracer for these purposes. PMID:21541010

  17. Elevated [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake in chronic Whiplash Associated Disorder suggests persistent musculoskeletal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Appel, Lieuwe; Fredrikson, Mats; Gordh, Torsten; Söderlund, Anne; Långström, Bengt; Engler, Henry

    2011-01-01

    There are few diagnostic tools for chronic musculoskeletal pain as structural imaging methods seldom reveal pathological alterations. This is especially true for Whiplash Associated Disorder, for which physical signs of persistent injuries to the neck have yet to be established. Here, we sought to visualize inflammatory processes in the neck region by means Positron Emission Tomography using the tracer (11)C-D-deprenyl, a potential marker for inflammation. Twenty-two patients with enduring pain after a rear impact car accident (Whiplash Associated Disorder grade II) and 14 healthy controls were investigated. Patients displayed significantly elevated tracer uptake in the neck, particularly in regions around the spineous process of the second cervical vertebra. This suggests that whiplash patients have signs of local persistent peripheral tissue inflammation, which may potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker. The present investigation demonstrates that painful processes in the periphery can be objectively visualized and quantified with PET and that (11)C-D-deprenyl is a promising tracer for these purposes. PMID:21541010

  18. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  19. [Gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Velázquez, Carlos; Aguirre-Valadez, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Diet is considered an important triggering factor for gastrointestinal symptoms whose physiopathology includes not only measurable, inflammatory reactions, but also functional disorders, where no organic effects may be measured or demonstrated. Moreover, the prevalence of the perceived intolerance to certain foods ranges from 20-25% (within the general population) to 50-70% in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome. This intolerance has been observed particularly after the consumption of milk and dairy products, which are frequently considered as causative of gastrointestinal symptoms, thus limiting their ingestion. However, this behavior reduces the dietary sources of calcium and consequently may lead to malnutrition and bone decalcification, amongst other complications. The true dairy intolerance (intestinal lactase deficiency) explains most of the symptoms ensuing their consumption, but the frequency of such alteration on the different gastrointestinal diseases has not been determined. This review focuses on the most frequent gastrointestinal diseases and the existing evidence regarding the alterations and symptoms related to the consumption of milk or dairy products. PMID:27603892

  20. Cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD): the CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD).

    PubMed

    Hruska, Keith A; Choi, Eric T; Memon, Imran; Davis, T Keefe; Mathew, Suresh

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to cardiovascular complications, obtained through observational studies, demonstrate that vascular calcification and hyperphosphatemia are major cardiovascular risk factors. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that these two risk factors are related and that hyperphosphatemia directly stimulates vascular calcification. The role of hyperphosphatemia in stimulating vascular calcification in CKD is associated with a block to the skeletal reservoir function in phosphate balance due to excess bone resorption. This has led to the realization that renal osteodystrophy is linked to vascular calcification by disordered mineral homeostasis (phosphate) and that a multiorgan system fails in CKD, leading to cardiovascular mortality. In children with renal disease, the multiorgan system fails, just as in adults, but the outcomes have been less well studied, and perceptions of differences from adults are possibly incorrect. Vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality are less prevalent among pediatric patients, but they are present. However, CKD-induced vascular disease causes stiffness of the arterial tree causing, in turn, systolic hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy as early manifestations of the same pathology in the adult. Because of the role of the skeleton in these outcomes, renal osteodystrophy has been renamed as the CKD mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). This review, which focuses on the pediatric patient population, describes our current state of knowledge with regards to the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including the new discoveries related to early stages of CKD. As a new necessity, cardiovascular function issues are incorporated into the CKD-MBD, and new advances in our knowledge of this critical component of the disorder will lead to improved outcomes in CKD. PMID:19898875

  1. Chronic Constipation and Constipation-Predominant IBS: Separate and Distinct Disorders or a Spectrum of Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Siah, Kewin T. H.; Wong, Reuben K.

    2016-01-01

    Rome III diagnostic criteria separate patients with idiopathic chronic constipation into mutually exclusive categories of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) or functional constipation (FC). However, several experts think that these conditions are not different disorders, but parts of a continuum. To shed light on this issue, we examined studies that compared IBS-C with FC with respect to symptoms, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and treatment response. When the Rome III requirement that patients meeting criteria for IBS cannot also be given a diagnosis of FC is suspended, most patients meet criteria for both, and, contrary to expectation, IBS-C patients have more symptoms of constipation than patients with FC. No symptoms reliably separate IBS-C from FC. Physiologic tests are not reliably associated with diagnosis, but visceral pain hypersensitivity tends to be more strongly associated with IBS-C than with FC, and delayed colonic transit tends to be more common in FC. Although some treatments are effective for both IBS-C and FC, such as prosecretory agents, other treatments are specific to IBS-C (eg, antidepressants, antispasmodics, cognitive behavior therapy) or FC (eg, prucalopride, biofeedback). Future studies should permit IBS-C and FC diagnoses to overlap. Physiologic tests comparing these disorders should include visceral pain sensitivity, colonic transit time, time to evacuate a water-filled balloon, and anal pressures or electromyographic activity from the anal canal. To date, differential responses to treatment provide the strongest evidence that IBS-C and FC may be different disorders, rather than parts of a spectrum. PMID:27231446

  2. Chronic Constipation and Constipation-Predominant IBS: Separate and Distinct Disorders or a Spectrum of Disease?

    PubMed

    Siah, Kewin T H; Wong, Reuben K; Whitehead, William E

    2016-03-01

    Rome III diagnostic criteria separate patients with idiopathic chronic constipation into mutually exclusive categories of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) or functional constipation (FC). However, several experts think that these conditions are not different disorders, but parts of a continuum. To shed light on this issue, we examined studies that compared IBS-C with FC with respect to symptoms, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and treatment response. When the Rome III requirement that patients meeting criteria for IBS cannot also be given a diagnosis of FC is suspended, most patients meet criteria for both, and, contrary to expectation, IBS-C patients have more symptoms of constipation than patients with FC. No symptoms reliably separate IBS-C from FC. Physiologic tests are not reliably associated with diagnosis, but visceral pain hypersensitivity tends to be more strongly associated with IBS-C than with FC, and delayed colonic transit tends to be more common in FC. Although some treatments are effective for both IBS-C and FC, such as prosecretory agents, other treatments are specific to IBS-C (eg, antidepressants, antispasmodics, cognitive behavior therapy) or FC (eg, prucalopride, biofeedback). Future studies should permit IBS-C and FC diagnoses to overlap. Physiologic tests comparing these disorders should include visceral pain sensitivity, colonic transit time, time to evacuate a water-filled balloon, and anal pressures or electromyographic activity from the anal canal. To date, differential responses to treatment provide the strongest evidence that IBS-C and FC may be different disorders, rather than parts of a spectrum. PMID:27231446

  3. Can Substance Use Disorders be Managed Using the Chronic Care Model? Review and Recommendations from a NIDA Consensus Group

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, A. Thomas; Starrels, Joanna L.; Tai, Betty; Gordon, Adam J.; Brown, Richard; Ghitza, Udi; Gourevitch, Marc; Stein, Jack; Oros, Marla; Horton, Terry; Lindblad, Robert; McNeely, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Brain imaging and genetic studies over the past two decades suggest that substance use disorders are best considered chronic illnesses. The passing of the Affordable Care Act in the United States has set the occasion for integrating treatment of substance use disorders into mainstream healthcare; and for using the proactive, team-oriented Chronic Care Model (CCM). This paper systematically examines and compares whether and how well the CCM could be applied to the treatment of substance use disorders, using type 2 diabetes as a comparator. The chronic illness management approach is still new in the field of addiction and research is limited. However comparative findings suggest that most proactive, team treatment-oriented clinical management practices now used in diabetes management are applicable to the substance use disorders; capable of being implemented by primary care teams; and should offer comparable potential benefits in the treatment of substance use disorders. Such care should also improve the quality of care for many illnesses now negatively affected by unaddressed substance abuse. PMID:26568649

  4. Potential neurobiological benefits of exercise in chronic pain and posttraumatic stress disorder: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scioli-Salter, Erica; Forman, Daniel E; Otis, John D; Tun, Carlos; Allsup, Kelly; Marx, Christine E; Hauger, Richard L; Shipherd, Jillian C; Higgins, Diana; Tyzik, Anna; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the effects of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and cardiorespiratory fitness on plasma neuropeptide Y (NPY), allopregnanolone and pregnanolone (ALLO), cortisol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and their association with pain sensitivity. Medication-free trauma-exposed participants were either healthy (n = 7) or experiencing comorbid chronic pain/posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n = 5). Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) during exercise testing was used to characterize cardiorespiratory fitness. Peak VO2 correlated with baseline and peak NPY levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.05 and r = 0.69, p < 0.05, respectively), as well as exercise-induced changes in ALLO (r = 0.89, p < 0.001) and peak ALLO levels (r = 0.71, p < 0.01). NPY levels at the peak of exercise correlated with pain threshold 30 min after exercise (r = 0.65, p < 0.05), while exercise-induced increases in ALLO correlated with pain tolerance 30 min after exercise (r = 0.64, p < 0.05). In contrast, exercise-induced changes in cortisol and DHEA levels were inversely correlated with pain tolerance after exercise (r = -0.69, p < 0.05 and r = -0.58, p < 0.05, respectively). These data suggest that cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with higher plasma NPY levels and increased ALLO responses to exercise, which in turn relate to pain sensitivity. Future work will examine whether progressive exercise training increases cardiorespiratory fitness in association with increases in NPY and ALLO and reductions in pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients with PTSD. PMID:27006290

  5. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. PMID:26022877

  6. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI with the diagnosis of depression, pain intensity, and disability. Methods One hundred consecutive chronic pain patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) according to DSM-IV. Two subscales of BDI (negative view of self and somatic-physical function) were created according to the factor model presented by Morley. Results In the regression analysis, the somatic-physical function factor associated with MDD, while the negative view of self factor did not. Patients with MDD had higher scores in several of the BDI items when analysed separately. Insomnia and weight loss were not dependent on the depression diagnosis. Limitations The relatively small sample size and the selected patient sample limit the generalisability of the results. Conclusions Somatic symptoms of depression are also common in chronic pain and should not be excluded when diagnosing depression in pain patients. Regardless of the assessment method, diagnosing depression in chronic pain remains a challenge and requires careful interpretation of symptoms. PMID:27008161

  7. Comparison of Behcet's disease and recurrent aphthous ulcer according to characteristics of gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Young-Bae; Lee, Eun-So

    2005-12-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic chronic inflammatory disease. It is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, uveitis, skin lesions and other manifestations, including neurologic, vascular, joint, and gastrointestinal ulcers of variable severity. Recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU) represents a very common, but poorly understood, mucosal disorder. If a patient of RAU without any other typical symptoms of BD has gastrointestinal symptoms, it is difficult to distinguish this RAU from true BD with gastrointestinal involvement. Because pathognomonic clinical features and tools are absent, the differential diagnosis of these two diseases relies on the characteristic clinical features and the judgement of an experienced physician. Sixty-five out of a total 960 RAU patients and forty-four of 556 BD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms between January 1996 and December 2003 participated in this study. All were evaluated with esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy. Clinical, endoscopic and histopathologic findings were analyzed and ELISA tests were conducted to detect serum levels of ASCA and pANCA. No significant difference was found between the two groups. Differential diagnosis between RAU with gastrointestinal symptoms and BD with gastrointestinal involvement requires further prospective, large-scale study. PMID:16361807

  8. Chronic orthostatic and antiorthostatic restraint induce neuroendocrine, immune and neurophysiological disorders in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assenmacher, I.; Mekaouche, M.; Maurel, D.; Barbanel, G.; Givalois, L.; Boissin, J.; Malaval, F.; Ixart, G.

    rhythmicity of major physiological variables, the loss of normal correlations between ACTH and CORT, and inflammatory-immune hyperreactivity. These pathophysiological disorders may all be parts of a complex chronic stress syndrome.

  9. Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct

    PubMed Central

    Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

  10. Pharmacological agents currently in clinical trials for disorders in neurogastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal, gastrointestinal, and colonic diseases resulting from disorders of the motor and sensory functions represent almost half the patients presenting to gastroenterologists. There have been significant advances in understanding the mechanisms of these disorders, through basic and translational research, and in targeting the receptors or mediators involved, through clinical trials involving biomarkers and patient responses. These advances have led to relief of patients’ symptoms and improved quality of life, although there are still significant unmet needs. This article reviews the pipeline of medications in development for esophageal sensorimotor disorders, gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, chronic constipation (including opioid-induced constipation), and visceral pain. PMID:24084743

  11. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  12. Gender Difference in Associations between Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders and General Quality of Life in Koreans: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Yoon; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Me-riong; Ahn, Yong-jun; Park, Ki Byung; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is known to have strong correlations with psychological factors and to display gender disparity. However, while chronic TMD is known to affect quality of life, large-scale studies investigating the influence on quality of life by gender are scarce. Methods This cross-sectional study assessed the data of 17,198 participants aged ≥19 years who completed chronic TMD and EuroQol-5 Dimension sections in the 4th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2009). We adjusted for covariates (health behavior, sociodemographic factors) in regression analysis for complex sampling design to calculate regression coefficients and 95% CIs for gender difference in the association between chronic TMD and quality of life. We also evaluated which covariates of somatic health, mental health, health behavior, and sociodemographic factors weakened the relationship between TMD and EQ-5D. Results Prevalence of chronic TMD was 1.6% (men 1.3%, women 1.8%), and chronic TMD persisted to negatively impact quality of life even after adjusting for confounding variables. Low sociodemographic factors and health behavior had a negative effect on quality of life. Somatic health and mental health were most affected by chronic TMD. As for quality of life, women were affected to a greater extent than men by TMD. Women were more affected by osteoarthritis and general mental health (stress, depressive symptoms, and thoughts of suicide), and men by employment. Conclusions These results imply that chronic diseases and psychological factors are important in chronic TMD, and that there may be physiological and pathological gender differences in TMD. PMID:26673219

  13. Sensory and sympathetic disorders in chronic non-specific neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; MingϮ, Zhiyong; Närhi, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Summary The signs of sympathetic and sensory nerve-related disorders are not widely investigated in chronic nonspecific neck pain (NNP) patients. Thus, we performed skin temperature (Tsk), evaporation and touch threshold (TT) measurements to reveal possible dysfunctions at the fingertips of NNP patients (n=60) compared with healthy controls (n=11). Neck pain intensity was the main modifier of Tsk, and age the main modifier of TT in a multivariate model. On comparisons of the subgroups of NNP patients with unilateral (n=26) and bilateral (n=34) symptoms and controls, TT differed and Tsk tended to differ, the unilateral pain patients being found to demonstrate higher TT values on both sides. Interrelations between the measured parameters were found in the controls, but not in the patients. The NNP patients exhibited signs of functional impairment of innervation reflected in changes in tactile sensitivity and vasoactive sympathetic function. These changes may be based on both central and peripheral mechanisms, which possibly differ in patients with unilateral and bilateral symptoms. PMID:26415033

  14. Association of microsatellite instability and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder in isocyanate-Exposed population of Bhopal

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Protiti; Bathri, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Survivors of the Bhopal gas disaster still suffer from various respiratory ailments. We examined the effects of exposures among a cross-section of current residents suffering from COPD by ISSR-PCR. AIMS: Molecular screening of the gas-affected population of Bhopal with COPD for microsatellite instability due to exposure of MIC. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The isocyanate-exposed population of Bhopal city suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Inter-(SSR) analysis was used to characterize microsatellite instability in 52 MIC victims of Bhopal, suffering from COPD using (CA)8RG and (CA)8R[Y-Q] primer. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Association analyses were performed using regression analysis. RESULTS: The study on the MIC-affected population in Bhopal showed weak association between microsatellite instability and age (r = + 0.37); exposure distance from site (r = −0.44); and smoking status(r = + 0.12); while regression analysis of the above parameters displayed supporting evidence. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of smoking coupled with aging and poor living habits threatens, to further increase COPD incidences among this population, highlighting the need for enhanced screening efforts. PMID:23162291

  15. Unravelling motor networks in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness: A promising minimally invasive approach.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Buda, Antonio; Manuli, Alfredo; Bramanti, Alessia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Behavioral responsiveness and awareness levels correlate with the degree of functional connectivity within cortical-thalamocortical networks, whose breakdown accounts for chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC). Our study was aimed at assessing the role of the primary motor area (M1) and premotor-M1 circuitry dysfunction in motor output deterioration in minimally conscious state (MCS) and unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) patients. As a control group, we included a healthy subject (HC) sample in the study. We evaluated the effects of different types of transcranial magnetic stimuli over M1 by recording post-stimulus time histogram (PSTH), which includes a series of peaks of unit firing activity that match with D and I-waves, characterizing the descending corticospinal volleys evoked by transcranial magnetic stimuli. As compared to HC, DOC patients showed a dysfunction of intra-M1 and premotor-M1 circuits, which correlated with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised scorings. Nonetheless, one UWS patient showed a partially preserved premotor-M1 circuitry, paralleled by a severe intra-M1 circuitry dysfunction. Our data suggest that motor unresponsiveness in some DOC patients may be due to a pure motor output failure, as in the functional locked-in syndrome (fLIS), rather than to a premotor-motor connectivity impairment, which instead characterizes MCS and UWS. PMID:27288702

  16. Use of benzodiazepines, hypnotics, and anxiolytics in major depressive disorder: association with chronic pain diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianchen; Ye, Wenyu; Watson, Peter; Tepper, Ping

    2010-08-01

    We examined the use of benzodiazepines (BZD), hypnotics, and anxiolytics and their associations with chronic pain diseases (CPD) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). A retrospective analysis of 153,913 MDD patients (18-64 years) in a large administrative insured claims database during the year 2006 was performed. Results showed that during the study year, 33.1% of the patients had been prescribed BZD; 16.9%, hypnotics; and 6.1%, anxiolytics. The use of BZD and hypnotics increased with age. Patients with CPD were more likely than those without CPD to use BZD (41.2% vs. 27.0%, p < 0.001), hypnotics (21.7% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.001), and anxiolytics (7.8% vs. 4.8%, p < 0.01). After adjustment for demographics and comorbidities, CPD was still significantly associated with increased use of BZD (OR = 1.62), hypnotics (OR = 1.49), and anxiolytics (OR = 1.51). Further research is needed to examine the long-term benefits and risks of BZD and hypnotics in the treatment of MDD and CPD. PMID:20699718

  17. Calcimimetics in the chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Bover, Jordi; Aguilar, Armando; Baas, Juan; Reyes, Joselyne; Lloret, Maria-J; Farré, Neus; Olaya, Mayte; Canal, Cristina; Marco, Helena; Andrés, Enric; Trinidad, Pedro; Ballarin, José

    2009-02-01

    Mineral and bone disorders (MBD) are both an early and very common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is now accepted that they represent a significant risk factor, explaining the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in CKD patients. During the last decade, we have been witnessing many advances in the nomenclature, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD and some of its complications, such as CKD-MBD. The identification of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) involvement in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and the availability of a new class of drugs called calcimimetics are two outstanding examples. Cinacalcet, the only available calcimimetic, has been shown to be a very effective therapeutic tool in CKD-MBD. Many clinical trials with cinacalcet in hemodialysis patients with SHPT have shown a reduction in parathyroid hormone, calcium (Ca), phosphate (P) and Ca x P product levels, allowing far greater success in reaching therapeutic goals as recommended by international guidelines. Additionally, some studies have shown that the use of cinacalcet may improve other aspects of CKD-MBD, reducing the risk of vascular calcification and parathyroidectomy, among others. Prospective studies on dialysis patients, with hard endpoint data, are currently underway. This review summarizes the most significant aspects of calcimimimetics based on both experimental and clinical results, underlining their possibilities not only for the treatment of isolated SHPT but also for other CKD-MBD related conditions. PMID:19363783

  18. Mismatch negativity to the patient's own name in chronic disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pengmin; Di, Haibo; Yan, Xiaodan; Yu, Senming; Yu, Dan; Laureys, Steven; Weng, Xuchu

    2008-12-19

    Previous studies implicated potential value of mismatch negativity (MMN) in predicting recovery of consciousness in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). We have adopted a novel MMN evoked by subject's own name (SON), a self-referential stimulus thought to be powerful in evoking residual brain activity, and examined the correlation between the MMN and recovery of consciousness in patients with chronic (>1 month) DOC. Twelve patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls were investigated. The patients were diagnosed as coma (n=4), vegetative state (VS, n=6), and minimally conscious state (MCS, n=2), mainly based on the JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised. The SON-evoked MMN (SON-MMN) was present in seven patients. Critically, the presence of SON-MMN was significantly correlated with recovery of consciousness. While four of the five patients (three VS and two coma) showing SON-MMN changed to MCS 3 months later, the rest of the patients (three VS and two coma) without SON-MMN failed to show any clinical improvement. Our study thus illustrates that the subject's own name is effective in evoking MMN in patients with DOC, and that SON-MMN has potential prognostic values in predicting recovery of consciousness. PMID:18938213

  19. The relationship of thought disorder to third ventricle width and calcification of the pineal gland in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1993-01-01

    Since the early writings of Bleuler in 1908, it has been recognized that schizophrenia is a heterogenous disorder with diversity in symptomatology, course, prognosis, and probably etiology. Over the past 50 years, considerable research has been devoted to the prognosis of schizophrenia and despite variability among findings, certain historical and clinical predictors have been established. A recent study undertaken in 58 DSM-III diagnosed schizophrenic inpatients found that of the various clinical clusters assessed prospectively, thought disorder stood out as the single most salient predictor of poor outcome (Kay & Murrill, 1990). In the present study I have investigated the relationship of thought disorder to CT scan measures of third ventricle width (TVW), prefrontal cortical atrophy, and cortical atrophy in 14 chronic schizophrenic patients. In addition, I have studied the relationship of thought disorder to pineal calcification (PC) and choroid plexus (CP) sizes in 20 chronic schizophrenic patients. TVW and PC size were the only neuroradiological measures found to be associated with the degree of thought disorder. These findings suggest that both diencephalic damage and calcification of the pineal gland may be related to disorganized thinking in schizophrenia and, by inference, to an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:8063514

  20. Prevalence, onset, and risk of psychiatric disorders in men with chronic low back pain: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J H; Slater, M A; Patterson, T L; Grant, I; Garfin, S R

    1991-05-01

    This study used structured diagnostic interviews and DSM-III criteria to assess lifetime prevalence and pre-morbid risk of psychiatric disorder in a sample of men with long-standing chronic back pain (CLPB) attending a primary care clinic. A control group of age and demographically matched men without history of back pain was also studied. Compared to controls, men with CLBP had significantly higher lifetime rates of major depression (32% vs. 16%), alcohol use disorder (64.9% vs. 38.8%), and a major anxiety disorder (30.9% vs. 14.3%). Almost all CLBP men ever experiencing a mood disorder reported recurrent, not single, episodes. The 6 month point prevalence of major depression, but not other disorders, was also significantly elevated for men with CLBP. In CLBP, the first episode of major depression generally (58.1%) followed pain onset. While the initial major depressive episode usually commenced within the first 2 years of established pain, late onset mood disorder was also common. By comparison in most cases (81%) onset of alcohol use disorders considerably preceded pain. When an age-matching procedure was used to gauge relative vulnerability to psychiatric illness in patients and controls, CLBP patients had significantly higher pre-pain rates of alcohol use disorder but not depression. After age of pain onset, CLBP subjects had over 9 times the risk of developing major depression, but had similar rates of developing alcoholism. We conclude that (1) alcohol use disorders rather than depression may increase risk of developing CLBP, and (2) risk of new onset and recurrent major depression remains high for men throughout their pain career. This suggests that psychological adaptation to long-standing pain may be less successful than previously thought, especially with regard to recurrent mood disorder. PMID:1831555

  1. Identification of clusters of individuals relevant to temporomandibular disorders and other chronic pain conditions: the OPPERA study.

    PubMed

    Bair, Eric; Gaynor, Sheila; Slade, Gary D; Ohrbach, Richard; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Dubner, Ronald; Smith, Shad B; Diatchenko, Luda; Maixner, William

    2016-06-01

    The classification of most chronic pain disorders gives emphasis to anatomical location of the pain to distinguish one disorder from the other (eg, back pain vs temporomandibular disorder [TMD]) or to define subtypes (eg, TMD myalgia vs arthralgia). However, anatomical criteria overlook etiology, potentially hampering treatment decisions. This study identified clusters of individuals using a comprehensive array of biopsychosocial measures. Data were collected from a case-control study of 1031 chronic TMD cases and 3247 TMD-free controls. Three subgroups were identified using supervised cluster analysis (referred to as the adaptive, pain-sensitive, and global symptoms clusters). Compared with the adaptive cluster, participants in the pain-sensitive cluster showed heightened sensitivity to experimental pain, and participants in the global symptoms cluster showed both greater pain sensitivity and greater psychological distress. Cluster membership was strongly associated with chronic TMD: 91.5% of TMD cases belonged to the pain-sensitive and global symptoms clusters, whereas 41.2% of controls belonged to the adaptive cluster. Temporomandibular disorder cases in the pain-sensitive and global symptoms clusters also showed greater pain intensity, jaw functional limitation, and more comorbid pain conditions. Similar results were obtained when the same methodology was applied to a smaller case-control study consisting of 199 chronic TMD cases and 201 TMD-free controls. During a median 3-year follow-up period of TMD-free individuals, participants in the global symptoms cluster had greater risk of developing first-onset TMD (hazard ratio = 2.8) compared with participants in the other 2 clusters. Cross-cohort predictive modeling was used to demonstrate the reliability of the clusters. PMID:26928952

  2. Hydrogen breath tests in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen breath tests are widely used to explore pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and carbohydrate malabsorption are disorders detected by these tests that have been proposed to be of great importance for symptoms of GI diseases. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for diagnosis of SIBO whereas lactose and fructose hydrogen breath tests are used for detection of lactose and fructose maldigestion respectively. Lactulose hydrogen breath test is also used widely to measure the orocecal transit time for GI motility. These methods are noninvasive and inexpensive. Many patients with functional gut disorders are unaware of the relationship between diet and GI symptoms they present. In particular, patients with chronic symptoms may regard their condition as normal and may not be aware that their symptoms can be effectively managed following a proper diagnosis. Patients with symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and altered bowel movements (diarrhea and constipation), or with a medical diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome or celiac disease, may have undiagnosed carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO. Hydrogen breath tests are specific and sensitive diagnostic tests that can be used to either confirm or eliminate the possibility of carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO in such patients. Breath tests, though valuable tools, are underutilized in evaluating dyspepsia and functional bloating and diarrhea as well as suspected malabsorption. However, because of their simplicity, reproducibility and safety of procedure they are now being substituted to more uncomfortable and expensive techniques that were traditionally used in gastroenterology. PMID:25298621

  3. Osteoporosis in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Linke, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis occurs as an isolated pathology or co-exists with types I and II osteoporosis. The gastroenterologist may come across osteoporosis or osteopenia in a patient with a gastrointestinal disease. This is often a young patient in whom investigations should be carried out and appropriate treatment initiated, aimed at preventing bone fractures and the formation of the best peak bone mass. Osteoporosis occurs in patients with the following conditions: Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, post gastrectomy patients, patients with short bowel syndrome, chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, treated with steroids (steroid-induced osteoporosis) and patients using proton pump inhibitors chronically (state of achlorhydria). It is therefore necessary to approve a list of risk factors of secondary osteoporosis, the presence of which would be an indication for screening for osteoporosis, including a DXA study and the development of a separate algorithm for the therapeutic management of secondary osteoporosis accompanying gastrointestinal diseases, especially in premenopausal young women and young men, because there are currently no registered drugs with proven antifracture activity for this group of patients. PMID:26935513

  4. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  5. Validity and reliability of chronic tic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder diagnoses in the Swedish National Patient Register

    PubMed Central

    Rück, Christian; Larsson, K Johan; Lind, Kristina; Perez-Vigil, Ana; Isomura, Kayoko; Sariaslan, Amir; Lichtenstein, Paul; Mataix-Cols, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The usefulness of cases diagnosed in administrative registers for research purposes is dependent on diagnostic validity. This study aimed to investigate the validity and inter-rater reliability of recorded diagnoses of tic disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR). Design Chart review of randomly selected register cases and controls. Method 100 tic disorder cases and 100 OCD cases were randomly selected from the NPR based on codes from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8th, 9th and 10th editions, together with 50 epilepsy and 50 depression control cases. The obtained psychiatric records were blindly assessed by 2 senior psychiatrists according to the criteria of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) and ICD-10. Primary outcome measurement Positive predictive value (PPV; cases diagnosed correctly divided by the sum of true positives and false positives). Results Between 1969 and 2009, the NPR included 7286 tic disorder and 24 757 OCD cases. The vast majority (91.3% of tic cases and 80.1% of OCD cases) are coded with the most recent ICD version (ICD-10). For tic disorders, the PPV was high across all ICD versions (PPV=89% in ICD-8, 86% in ICD-9 and 97% in ICD-10). For OCD, only ICD-10 codes had high validity (PPV=91–96%). None of the epilepsy or depression control cases were wrongly diagnosed as having tic disorders or OCD, respectively. Inter-rater reliability was outstanding for both tic disorders (κ=1) and OCD (κ=0.98). Conclusions The validity and reliability of ICD codes for tic disorders and OCD in the Swedish NPR is generally high. We propose simple algorithms to further increase the confidence in the validity of these codes for epidemiological research. PMID:26100027

  6. [Electrolyte and acid-base balance disorders in advanced chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Alcázar Arroyo, R

    2008-01-01

    1. The kidneys are the key organs to maintain the balance of the different electrolytes in the body and the acid-base balance. Progressive loss of kidney function results in a number of adaptive and compensatory renal and extrarenal changes that allow homeostasis to be maintained with glomerular filtration rates in the range of 10-25 ml/min. With glomerular filtration rates below 10 ml/min, there are almost always abnormalites in the body's internal environment with clinical repercussions. 2. Water Balance Disorders: In advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), the range of urine osmolality progressively approaches plasma osmolality and becomes isostenuric. This manifests clinically as symptoms of nocturia and polyuria, especially in tubulointerstitial kidney diseases. Water overload will result in hyponatremia and a decrease in water intake will lead to hypernatremia. Routine analyses of serum Na levels should be performed in all patients with advanced CKD (Strength of Recommendation C). Except in edematous states, a daily fluid intake of 1.5-2 liters should be recommended (Strength of Recommendation C). Hyponatremia does not usually occur with glomerular filtration rates above 10 ml/min (Strength of Recommendation B). If it occurs, an excessive intake of free water should be considered or nonosmotic release of vasopressin by stimuli such as pain, anesthetics, hypoxemia or hypovolemia, or the use of diuretics. Hypernatremia is less frequent than hyponatremia in CKD. It can occur because of the provision of hypertonic parenteral solutions, or more frequently as a consequence of osmotic diuresis due to inadequate water intake during intercurrent disease, or in some circumstance that limits access to water (obtundation, immobility). 3. Sodium Balance Disorders: In CKD, fractional excretion of sodium increases so that absolute sodium excretion is not modified until glomerular filtration rates below 15 ml/min (Strength of Recommendation B). Total body content of sodium is

  7. Chronic idiopathic urticaria and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): an under-recognized comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2012-01-01

    A large body of literature supports the role of psychologic stress in urticaria; however, the comorbidity between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a classic stress-mediated syndrome, has received little attention. The underlying etiology of urticaria is not identifiable in about 70% of patients, possibly because of difficulties with identification of a direct cause-and-effect relationship between a potential causative factor and the onset of urticaria. The core features of PTSD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision [DSMIV-TR]) that are important in urticaria include (1) autonomic nervous system reactivity and state of sympathetic hyperarousal that can manifest as CIU, and (2) the persistent re-experiencing of the traumatic events in PTSD, which can manifest as urticaria or angioedema, or both, affecting a previously traumatized body region (eg, urticarial wheals affecting the body region where the patient had been stabbed years earlier). The following features of PTSD make it difficult to use the cause-and-effect model for the determination of causation: (1) PTSD may first emerge years after the initial trauma and is classified as PTSD with Delayed Onset (DSMIV-TR); and (2) the traumatic triggers that precipitate the PTSD symptoms may be unique and idiosyncratic to the patient and not even qualify as stressful or traumatic by standard criteria (eg, precipitating events for the PTSD may include smell of a certain cologne that was used by the perpetrator or witnessing a scene in a movie that was reminiscent of the location where the abuse occurred). Finally, in PTSD with Delayed Onset, patients may not make a conscious association between their recurrent urticaria and their earlier traumas because they can develop classically conditioned associations between stimuli that are reminiscent of the original abuse situation and their somatic reactions such as urticaria. The clinician

  8. Chronic fatigue syndrome and seasonal affective disorder: comorbidity, diagnostic overlap, and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Terman, M; Levine, S M; Terman, J S; Doherty, S

    1998-09-28

    This study aimed to determine symptom patterns in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), in summer and winter. Comparison data for patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) were used to evaluate seasonal variation in mood and behavior, atypical neurovegetative symptoms characteristic of SAD, and somatic symptoms characteristic of CFS. Rating scale questionnaires were mailed to patients previously diagnosed with CFS. Instruments included the Personal Inventory for Depression and SAD (PIDS) and the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Effects (SAFTEE), which catalogs the current severity of a wide range of somatic, behavioral, and affective symptoms. Data sets from 110 CFS patients matched across seasons were entered into the analysis. Symptoms that conform with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definition of CFS were rated as moderate to very severe during the winter months by varying proportions of patients (from 43% for lymph node pain or enlargement, to 79% for muscle, joint, or bone pain). Fatigue was reported by 92%. Prominent affective symptoms included irritability (55%), depressed mood (52%), and anxiety (51%). Retrospective monthly ratings of mood, social activity, energy, sleep duration, amount eaten, and weight change showed a coherent pattern of winter worsening. Of patients with consistent summer and winter ratings (n = 73), 37% showed high global seasonality scores (GSS) > or = 10. About half this group reported symptoms indicative of major depressive disorder, which was strongly associated with high seasonality. Hierarchical cluster analysis of wintertime symptoms revealed 2 distinct clinical profiles among CFS patients: (a) those with high seasonality, for whom depressed mood clustered with atypical neurovegetative symptoms of hypersomnia and hyperphagia, as is seen in SAD; and (b) those with low seasonality, who showed a primary clustering of classic CFS symptoms (fatigue, aches, cognitive disturbance

  9. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  10. Chronic physical illness: a psychophysiological approach for chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that psychological risk variables can contribute to physical disease. In an effort to thoroughly investigate potential etiological origins and optimal interventions, this broad review is divided into five sections: the stress response, chronic diseases, mind-body theoretical models, psychophysiological interventions, and integrated health care solutions. The stress response and its correlation to chronic disorders such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, autoimmune, metabolic syndrome, and chronic pain are comprehensively explored. Current mind-body theoretical models, including peripheral nerve pathway, neurophysiological, and integrative theories, are reviewed to elucidate the biological mechanisms behind psychophysiological interventions. Specific interventions included are psychotherapy, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and psychopharmacology. Finally, the author advocates for an integrated care approach as a means by which to blur the sharp distinction between physical and psychological health. Integrated care approaches can utilize psychiatric nurse practitioners for behavioral assessment, intervention, research, advocacy, consultation, and education to optimize health outcomes. PMID:23483831

  11. Chronic Physical Illness: A Psychophysiological Approach for Chronic Physical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that psychological risk variables can contribute to physical disease. In an effort to thoroughly investigate potential etiological origins and optimal interventions, this broad review is divided into five sections: the stress response, chronic diseases, mind-body theoretical models, psychophysiological interventions, and integrated health care solutions. The stress response and its correlation to chronic disorders such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, autoimmune, metabolic syndrome, and chronic pain are comprehensively explored. Current mind-body theoretical models, including peripheral nerve pathway, neurophysiological, and integrative theories, are reviewed to elucidate the biological mechanisms behind psychophysiological interventions. Specific interventions included are psychotherapy, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and psychopharmacology. Finally, the author advocates for an integrated care approach as a means by which to blur the sharp distinction between physical and psychological health. Integrated care approaches can utilize psychiatric nurse practitioners for behavioral assessment, intervention, research, advocacy, consultation, and education to optimize health outcomes. PMID:23483831

  12. Cannabidiol Limits T Cell–Mediated Chronic Autoimmune Myocarditis: Implications to Autoimmune Disorders and Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Shin; Erdelyi, Katalin; Matyas, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Varga, Zoltan V; Liaudet, Lucas; Hask’, György; ’iháková, Daniela; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pal

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death in young adults and adolescents. Many cases of myocarditis are associated with autoimmune processes in which cardiac myosin is a major autoantigen. Conventional immunosuppressive therapies often provide unsatisfactory results and are associated with adverse toxicities during the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana that exerts antiinflammatory effects independent of classical cannabinoid receptors. Recently, 80 clinical trials have investigated the effects of CBD in various diseases from inflammatory bowel disease to graft versus host disease. CBD-based formulations are used for the management of multiple sclerosis in numerous countries, and CBD also received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of refractory childhood epilepsy and glioblastoma multiforme. Herein, using a well-established mouse model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced by immunization with cardiac myosin emmulsified in adjuvant resulting in T cell–mediated inflammation, cardiomyocyte cell death, fibrosis and myocardial dysfunction, we studied the potential beneficial effects of CBD. EAM was characterized by marked myocardial T-cell infiltration, profound inflammatory response and fibrosis (measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunohistochemistry analyses) accompanied by marked attenuation of both systolic and diastolic cardiac functions measured with a pressure-volume conductance catheter technique. Chronic treatment with CBD largely attenuated the CD3+ and CD4+ T cell–mediated inflammatory response and injury, myocardial fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction in mice. In conclusion, CBD may represent a promising novel treatment for managing autoimmune myocarditis and possibly other autoimmune disorders and organ transplantation. PMID:26772776

  13. Disordered mineral metabolism and vascular calcification in nondialyzed chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2006-04-01

    It is well established that abnormalities in mineral metabolism are apparent early in the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and result in clinically relevant consequences such as renal osteodystrophy. Furthermore, there is emerging evidence linking some of these abnormalities (hyperphosphatemia) to the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality experienced by nondialyzed patients with CKD. Most studies have evaluated vascular calcification in patients with stage 5 CKD. Reports published over the last 2 years show that the process begins rather early in CKD and is particularly severe among elderly and type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, "calcium begets calcium", such that the calcification burden in early CKD is an important predictor of subsequent progression, including the rapid increase seen in stage 5 CKD. There is an increasing body of evidence that supports the thesis that elevated serum levels of phosphorus and calcium and deficiency of inhibitors of calcification (for example, fetuin-A) are important in the progression of vascular calcification in patients with end-stage renal disease. However, the concentrations of calcium and phosphorus shown to induce mineralization in cell culture studies are not observed in most patients until late in stage 4 or stage 5 CKD. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have also been unable to show a correlation between serum levels of markers of disordered mineral metabolism and severity of vascular calcification. Future studies should evaluate the pathogenetic role of phosphorus retention, which occurs early in the course of CKD, in the induction and/or progression of vascular calcification. Finally, there is a need to identify alternative pathogenetic mechanisms that may be important causes of the high calcification burden observed early in CKD. PMID:16567266

  14. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Differences in maladaptive schemas between patients suffering from chronic and acute posttraumatic stress disorder and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Alireza; Mirzaee, Jafar; Omidbeygi, Maryam; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background War, as a stressor event, has a variety of acute and chronic negative consequences, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this context, early maladaptive schema-based problems in PTSD have recently become an important research area. The aim of this study was to assess early maladaptive schemas in patients with acute and chronic PTSD. Method Using available sampling methods and diagnostic criteria, 30 patients with chronic PTSD, 30 patients with acute PTSD, and 30 normal military personnel who were matched in terms of age and wartime experience were selected and assessed with the Young Schema Questionnaire-Long Form, Beck Depression Inventory second version (BDI-II), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Impact of Events Scale (IES). Results Both acute and chronic PTSD patients, when compared with normal military personnel, had higher scores for all early maladaptive schemas. Additionally, veterans suffering from chronic PTSD, as compared with veterans suffering from acute PTSD and veterans without PTSD, reported more impaired schemas related, for instance, to Self-Control, Social Isolation, and Vulnerability to Harm and Illness. Discussion The results of the present study have significant preventative, diagnostic, clinical, research, and educational implications with respect to PTSD. PMID:26203249

  16. Neuropathological Changes and Clinical Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder Participants Are Similar to that Reported in Congenital and Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Humans and Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Anatomic, histopathologic, and MRI/SPET studies of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) patients' brains confirm existence of very early developmental deficits. In congenital and chronic murine toxoplasmosis several cerebral anomalies also have been reported, and worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with T. "gondii"…

  17. PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms module feasibility reliability and validity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to report on the measurement properties of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Module for patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders (FGIDs) and organic GI diseases, hereafter referred to as "GI disorders," for pati...

  18. Vulnerability to chronic subordination stress-induced depression-like disorders in adult 129SvEv male mice.

    PubMed

    Dadomo, Harold; Sanghez, Valentina; Di Cristo, Luisana; Lori, Andrea; Ceresini, Graziano; Malinge, Isabelle; Parmigiani, Stefano; Palanza, Paola; Sheardown, Malcolm; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to stressful life events is intimately linked with vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depression. Pre-clinical animal models offer an effective tool to disentangle the underlying molecular mechanisms. In particular, the 129SvEv strain is often used to develop transgenic mouse models but poorly characterized as far as behavior and neuroendocrine functions are concerned. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of 129SvEv male mice's vulnerability to social stress-induced depression-like disorders and physiological comorbidities. We employed a well characterized mouse model of chronic social stress based on social defeat and subordination. Subordinate 129SvEv mice showed body weight gain, hyperphagia, increased adipose fat pads weight and basal plasma corticosterone. Home cage phenotyping revealed a suppression of spontaneous locomotor activity and transient hyperthermia. Subordinate 129SvEv mice also showed marked fearfulness, anhedonic-like response toward a novel but palatable food, increased anxiety in the elevated plus maze and social avoidance of an unfamiliar male mouse. A direct measured effect of the stressfulness of the living environment, i.e. the amount of daily aggression received, predicted the degree of corticosterone level and locomotor activity but not of the other parameters. This is the first study validating a chronic subordination stress paradigm in 129SvEv male mice. Results demonstrated remarkable stress vulnerability and establish the validity to use this mouse strain as a model for depression-like disorders. PMID:21093519

  19. Occurrence of sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with chronic urticaria at its asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic stages

    PubMed Central

    Kruszewski, Jerzy; Gutkowski, Piotr; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Kłos, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic urticaria (CU), in view of its manifestations (pruritus, wheals), chronic and recurrent nature is very bothersome for patients and significantly influences their quality of life. Aim To assess the importance of sleep problems and sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) declared by CU patients, for their quality of life. Material and methods Twenty-eight patients with CU at an asymptomatic stage or with minimal symptoms and signs were qualified for the study. In these patients, assessment of urticaria severity, QoL and SRBDs incidence was carried out. Results In a questionnaire study (CU-Q2oL), about 54% of the patients with CU complained of sleeping problems, about 80% reported significant fatigue and lack of concentration in the daytime. Respiratory polygraphy, an objective measure of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) demonstrated their higher incidence in patients with CU than in the general population, but these disorders were mild and had no influence on the reduced quality of life of the study patients, compared with a group of patients without SRBDs. Conclusions The occurrence of SRBDs was found in 25% of patients with CU at asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic stages. The SRBDs in those patients were mild, required no treatment and their occurrence did not cause any significant reduction in their quality of life. PMID:26985182

  20. Substance P at the Nexus of Mind and Body in Chronic Inflammation and Affective Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    For decades, research has demonstrated that chronic diseases characterized by dysregulation of inflammation are particularly susceptible to exacerbation by stress and emotion. Likewise, rates of depression and anxiety are overrepresented in individuals suffering from chronic inflammatory disease. In recent years, substance P has been implicated in…

  1. Social capital and chronic post-traumatic stress disorder among survivors of the 2007 earthquake in Pisco, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Elaine C; Carnero, Andres M; Bayer, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and both structural and cognitive social capital in adult survivors of the 2007 earthquake in Pisco, Peru. Cognitive social capital measures trust, sense of belonging and interpersonal relationships in the community and structural social capital measures group membership, support from community groups and individuals, and involvement in citizenship activities. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in five counties in Pisco, selecting 1012 adults through complex, multi-stage random sampling. All participants completed socio-demographic questions and validated Spanish-language versions of the Adapted Social Capital Assessment Tool (SASCAT) and the civilian PTSD checklist (PCL-C). After performing descriptive and bivariate analyses, we carried out prevalence ratio (PR) regression. The overall prevalence of chronic PTSD was 15.9% (95% CI: 12.3, 19.8), much higher than anticipated based on existing evidence. Cognitive social capital was found to be negatively associated with chronic PTSD, while no significant association was found for structural social capital. Specifically, those with high cognitive social capital had an almost two times lower prevalence of chronic PTSD (PR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.50, 2.22) compared with those with low cognitive social capital. No independent association between structural social capital and chronic PTSD was found (PR = 1.44, 95% CI: 0.70, 2.97). In conclusion, cognitive social capital, but not structural social capital, has a protective influence on the occurrence of chronic PTSD in survivors of natural disasters. These results may have public health implications. For example, pre- and post-disaster community-based interventions that catalyze and foster dimensions of cognitive social capital may aid in ameliorating the effect of earthquakes and other natural disasters on populations with high vulnerability to such events

  2. Social capital and chronic post-traumatic stress disorder among survivors of the 2007 earthquake in Pisco, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Elaine C.; Carnero, Andres M.; Bayer, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and both structural and cognitive social capital in adult survivors of the 2007 earthquake in Pisco, Peru. Cognitive social capital measures trust, sense of belonging and interpersonal relationships in the community and structural social capital measures group membership, support from community groups and individuals, and involvement in citizenship activities. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in five counties in Pisco, selecting 1012 adults through complex, multi-stage random sampling. All participants completed socio-demographic questions and validated Spanish-language versions of the Adapted Social Capital Assessment Tool (SASCAT) and the civilian PTSD checklist (PCL-C). After performing descriptive and bivariate analyses, we carried out prevalence ratio (PR) regression. The overall prevalence of chronic PTSD was 15.9% (95% CI: 12.3, 19.8), much higher than anticipated based on existing evidence. Cognitive social capital was found to be negatively associated with chronic PTSD, while no significant association was found for structural social capital. Specifically, those with high cognitive social capital had an almost two times lower prevalence of chronic PTSD (PR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.50, 2.22) compared with those with low cognitive social capital. No independent association between structural social capital and chronic PTSD was found (PR = 1.44, 95% CI: 0.70, 2.97). In conclusion, cognitive social capital, but not structural social capital, has a protective influence on the occurrence of chronic PTSD in survivors of natural disasters. These results may have public health implications. For example, pre- and post-disaster community-based interventions that catalyze and foster dimensions of cognitive social capital may aid in ameliorating the effect of earthquakes and other natural disasters on populations with high vulnerability to such events and

  3. Evidence for Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder Associated With Metabolic Pathway Changes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiong; Lai, Xueli; Zhu, Zhenyu; Hong, Zhanying; Dong, Xin; Wang, Tieyun; Wang, Haiyan; Lou, Ziyang; Lin, Qishan; Guo, Zhiyong; Chai, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Abnormalities in the levels of calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in serum are typical for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). They are used routinely to predict the onset of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD). However, CKD-MBD associated with metabolic pathway imbalance is not well understood. The objective of the study was to identify endogenous metabolic signatures in patients with intact PTH using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. This study was a cross-sectional study. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight/mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling was employed to analyze serum samples from 19 disease controls (DCs) (intact parathyroid hormone [iPTH] 150–300 pg/mL) and 19 secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) patients (iPTH >300 pg/mL) (the training data set) to identify metabolic biomarkers for CKD-MBD. Then, another set of samples including 19 DCs (iPTH 150–300 pg/mL) and 19 SHPT patients (iPTH >300 pg/mL) (the test data set) were used to validate the potential biomarkers identified. Metabolic profiling analyses revealed different patterns of endogenous metabolites between the SHPT and the DC groups. A total of 32 unique metabolites were identified and 30 metabolites were elevated in the iPTH compared with control serum pools. Cytidine and l-phenylalanine were downregulated in the SHPT patients. The metabolic signatures identified were assessed respectively by an internal 10-fold cross validation with an accuracy of 91.4% and an external validation with an accuracy of 71.1%, a sensitivity of 73.7%, and a specificity of 68.4%. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analyses for SHPT patients promises immense potential for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Our results indicated that the onset of CKD-MBD is associated with pathway changes of protein synthesis and metabolism, amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, and steroid hormone metabolism, with obvious promise for better

  4. Outcomes associated with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder requiring hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Gajanan S; Rajesh, BP; Chaudhury, Alisha; Hattiholi, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (AECOPD) are known to be associated with increased morbidity and mortality and have a significant socioeconomic impact. The factors that determine frequent hospital readmissions for AECOPD are poorly understood. The present study was done to ascertain failures rates following AECOPD and to evaluate factors associated with frequent readmissions. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study among 186 patients with COPD with one or more admissions for acute exacerbations in a tertiary care hospital. Frequency of previous re-admissions for AECOPD in the past year, and clinical characteristics, including spirometry were ascertained in the stable state both before discharge and at 6-month post-discharge. Failure rates following treatment were ascertained during the follow-up period. All the patients were followed up for a period of 2 years after discharge to evaluate re-admissions for the AECOPD. Results: Of 186 COPD patients admitted for AECOPD, 54% had one or more readmission, and another 45% had two or more readmissions over a period of 2 years. There was a high prevalence of current or ex-heavy smokers, associated co-morbidity, underweight patients, low vaccination prevalence and use of domiciliary oxygen therapy among COPD patients. A total of 12% mortality was observed in the present study. Immediate failure rates after first exacerbation was observed to be 34.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that duration >20 years (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), use of Tiotropium (OR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12-4.69) and use of co-amoxiclav during first admission (OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.21-4.79) were significantly associated with higher immediate failure rates. The multivariate analysis for repeated admissions revealed that disease duration >10 years (OR = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27-0.93), low usage of inhaled ICS + LABA (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.08-4.54), and MRC dyspnea grade >3 (OR = 2.51; 95% CI: 1.08-5.82) were

  5. Factors affecting patients’ self-management in chronic venous disorders: a single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Barański, Kamil; Chudek, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The conservative treatment of chronic venous disorders (CVDs) includes pharmacotherapy, compression therapy, physiotherapy, and changes in lifestyle. These methods are available without prescription and not reimbursed by Polish National Health Service. Adherence to therapy is affected by poorly characterized patient-related factors. Objective The aim of the study was to perform an assessment of factors that affect the usage and resignation from conservative methods in CVD self-management. Methods A structured interview concerning self-management was carried out with 407 consecutive CVD patients of mean age 64.4 years (range: 23–87 years). All the patients had recently undergone Doppler examination and were classified in accordance with Clinical, Etiology, Anatomy, and Pathophysiology (CEAP) classification. Results Pharmacotherapy was the most frequently (85.0% of respondents) used method in CVD self-management. Obese (odds ratio [OR] =1.75 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.99–3.05]) and subjects with longer duration of the disease (OR =1.74 [95% CI 1.16–2.62]) were more likely to use venoactive drugs, while females used ointments commonly containing heparin (OR =1.82 [95% CI 1.08–3.03]). Compression therapy was perceived by respondents as the most difficult method in self-management (OR =2.50 [95% CI 1.61–3.88]) and was also recognized as the most effective method of treatment (OR =13.9 [95% CI 7.35–26.4]). Longer duration of CVD (≥15 years) increased (OR =1.78 [95% CI 1.16–2.71]) while obesity decreased (OR =0.38 [95% CI 0.20–0.72]) the utilization of compression therapy. Females were more likely to adhere to lifestyle changes than males (OR =1.68 [95% CI 0.97–2.90]). Physiotherapy was rarely used by the patients. Conclusion Obesity and longer duration of CVDs increase the use of venoactive drugs. Subjects with longer duration of the disease and without obesity are more likely to utilize compression therapy, the method considered to be

  6. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  7. A Brief Historic Overview of Clinical Disorders Associated with Tryptophan: The Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM).

    PubMed

    Blankfield, Adele

    2012-01-01

    Last century there was a short burst of interest in the tryptophan related disorders of pellagra and related abnormalities that are usually presented in infancy.1,2 Nutritional physiologists recognized that a severe human dietary deficiency of either tryptophan or the B group vitamins could result in central nervous system (CNS) sequelae such as ataxia, cognitive dysfunction and dysphoria, accompanied by skin hyperpigmentation.3,4 The current paper will focus on the emerging role of tryptophan in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). PMID:23032646

  8. A Brief Historic Overview of Clinical Disorders Associated with Tryptophan: The Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM)

    PubMed Central

    Blankfield, Adele

    2012-01-01

    Last century there was a short burst of interest in the tryptophan related disorders of pellagra and related abnormalities that are usually presented in infancy.1,2 Nutritional physiologists recognized that a severe human dietary deficiency of either tryptophan or the B group vitamins could result in central nervous system (CNS) sequelae such as ataxia, cognitive dysfunction and dysphoria, accompanied by skin hyperpigmentation.3,4 The current paper will focus on the emerging role of tryptophan in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). PMID:23032646

  9. Ovarian function and gastrointestinal motor activity.

    PubMed

    Palomba, S; Di Cello, A; Riccio, E; Manguso, F; La Sala, G B

    2011-12-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders are strictly related to the ovary function. In fact, it is noted that the prevalence of visceral pain disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gallbladder and biliary tract diseases are significantly higher in women. Furthermore, symptom such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, distension, satiety, bloating, diarrhoa or constipation, frequently appears in relation with pregnancy, luteal phase of the menstrual cycle or perimenopausal and menopausal states. Further support for the contribution of ovarian steroids to functional gastrointestinal disorders comes from studies demonstrating that pharmacological ovariectomy reduces abdominal pain symptoms. Therefore, addressing the influence of sex and sex hormones in the modulation of visceral pain appears critical to develop new strategies of diagnosis and therapy sex-directed for gastro-intestinal disorders. PMID:22322653

  10. Completion of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Treatment in Interferon-Induced Major Depressive Disorder with Psychotic Features

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-associated psychiatric disorders can be managed without interruption to hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. The limited number of cases in the literature reporting psychotic depression as an adverse drug reaction to IFN resulted in discontinuation of HCV therapy. The author reports a case of a 49 year-old man with chronic HCV genotype 1a treated with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin developing major depressive disorder with psychotic features. The patient was successfully treated with both an antidepressant and antipsychotic for this suspected IFN-associated adverse drug effect while continuing 12 months of uninterrupted HCV treatment and subsequently achieving sustained hepatitis C virological response. Although IFN can cause distressing psychiatric disturbances, appropriate treatment with psychotropic agents and careful monitoring allows patients to be maintained on a full course of HCV treatment. PMID:22216051

  11. Gastrointestinal dysmotility in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy is caused by mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Sebastiani, Mariangela; De Giorgio, Roberto; Travaglini, Claudia; Tancredi, Andrea; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Bellan, Marzio; Cossarizza, Andrea; Hirano, Michio; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2008-10-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a life-threatening condition of unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be a feature of mitochondrial disorders, such as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene. MNGIE patients show elevated circulating levels of thymidine and deoxyuridine, and accumulate somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. The present study aimed to clarify the molecular basis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in MNGIE. Using laser capture microdissection, we correlated the histopathological features with mtDNA defects in different tissues from the gastrointestinal wall of five MNGIE and ten control patients. We found mtDNA depletion, mitochondrial proliferation, and smooth cell atrophy in the external layer of the muscularis propria, in the stomach and in the small intestine of MNGIE patients. In controls, the lowest amounts of mtDNA were present at the same sites, as compared with other layers of the gastrointestinal wall. We also observed mitochondrial proliferation and mtDNA depletion in small vessel endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, visceral mitochondrial myopathy likely causes gastrointestinal dysmotility in MNGIE patients. The low baseline abundance of mtDNA molecules may predispose smooth muscle cells of the muscularis propria external layer to the toxic effects of thymidine and deoxyuridine, and exposure to high circulating levels of nucleosides may account for the mtDNA depletion observed in the small vessel wall. PMID:18787099

  12. Autism Spectrum Disorders May Be Due to Cerebral Toxoplasmosis Associated with Chronic Neuroinflammation Causing Persistent Hypercytokinemia that Resulted in an Increased Lipid Peroxidation, Oxidative Stress, and Depressed Metabolism of Endogenous and Exogenous Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 2 billion people are chronically infected with "Toxoplasma gondii" with largely yet unknown consequences. Patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) similarly as mice with chronic toxoplasmosis have persistent neuroinflammation, hypercytokinemia with hypermetabolism associated with enhanced lipid peroxidation, and…

  13. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-04-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Obesity and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Ai; Hoteya, Shu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Ogawa, Osamu; Mitani, Toshifumi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Matsui, Akira; Nakamura, Masanori; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamada, Akihiro; Nishida, Noriko; Arase, Koji; Hashimoto, Mitsuyo; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the Japanese population has been increasing dramatically in step with the Westernization of lifestyles and food ways. Our study demonstrated significant associations between obesity and a number of gastrointestinal disorders in a large sample population in Japan. We demonstrated that reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia were strongly related to obesity (BMI > 25) in the Japanese. In particular, obesity with young male was a high risk for these diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that obesity is also associated with Barrett's esophagus and colorectal adenoma; however, obesity was not a risk factor for these diseases in our study. The difference of ethnicity of our subjects may partly explain why we found no data to implicate obesity as a risk factor for Barrett's esophagus. Arterial sclerosis associated with advanced age and hyperglycemia was accompanied by an increased risk of colorectal adenoma. PMID:23781242

  15. Obesity and gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ai; Hoteya, Shu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Ogawa, Osamu; Mitani, Toshifumi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Matsui, Akira; Nakamura, Masanori; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Yamada, Akihiro; Nishida, Noriko; Arase, Koji; Hashimoto, Mitsuyo; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the Japanese population has been increasing dramatically in step with the Westernization of lifestyles and food ways. Our study demonstrated significant associations between obesity and a number of gastrointestinal disorders in a large sample population in Japan. We demonstrated that reflux esophagitis and hiatal hernia were strongly related to obesity (BMI > 25) in the Japanese. In particular, obesity with young male was a high risk for these diseases. On the other hand, it has been reported that obesity is also associated with Barrett's esophagus and colorectal adenoma; however, obesity was not a risk factor for these diseases in our study. The difference of ethnicity of our subjects may partly explain why we found no data to implicate obesity as a risk factor for Barrett's esophagus. Arterial sclerosis associated with advanced age and hyperglycemia was accompanied by an increased risk of colorectal adenoma. PMID:23781242

  16. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  17. 'Is she alive? Is she dead?' Representations of chronic disorders of consciousness in Douglas Coupland's Girlfriend in a Coma.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Depictions of coma have come to dominate literary and filmic texts over the last half century, a phenomenon coinciding with advancements in medical technology that have led to remarkable increases in the survival rates of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. Authors of coma fiction are preoccupied with the imagined subjective experience of coma, often creating complex, dream-like worlds from which the protagonist must escape if survival is to be achieved. However, such representations appear to conflict with medical case studies and patient narratives that reveal that most often survivors of coma have no recollection of the coma itself. Providing a close reading of Douglas Coupland's Girlfriend in a Coma (1998) against the context of medical literature and diagnoses, this article examines how the coma patient is represented, often depicting the realities of a prolonged vegetative state, in contrast with other popular representations of coma. It explores how the author develops a work of 'fantastic' fiction (a genre defined by the structuralist critic Tzvetan Todorov), using the condition of coma as a metaphor for a postmodern existential crisis, while simultaneously employing mimetic techniques that raise important medical, ethical and philosophical questions surrounding the ontological status of the comatose patient. It is argued that coma fiction, even in its misrepresentation of the condition, can help us to engage with and interrogate how we think about chronic disorders of consciousness, thereby providing a valuable insight into our attitudes towards illness and mortality. PMID:26988694

  18. The pain drawing as an instrument for identifying cervical spine nerve involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bernhoff, Gabriella; Landén Ludvigsson, Maria; Peterson, Gunnel; Bertilson, Bo Christer; Elf, Madeleine; Peolsson, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a standardized assessment of pain drawing with regard to clinical signs of cervical spine nerve root involvement. Design This cross-sectional study included data collected in a randomized controlled study. Patients: Two hundred and sixteen patients with chronic (≥6 months) whiplash-associated disorders, grade 2 or 3, were included in this study. Methods The validity, sensitivity, and specificity of a standardized pain drawing assessment for determining nerve root involvement were analyzed, compared to the clinical assessment. In addition, we analyzed the interrater reliability with 50 pain drawings. Results Agreement was poor between the standardized pain drawing assessment and the clinical assessment (kappa =0.11, 95% CI: −0.03 to 0.20). Sensitivity was high (93%), but specificity was low (19%). Interrater reliability was good (kappa =0.64, 95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76). Conclusion: The standardized pain drawing assessment of nerve root involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders was not in agreement with the clinical assessment. Further research is warranted to optimize the utilization of a pain/discomfort drawing as a supportive instrument for identifying nerve involvement in cervical spinal injuries. PMID:27358576

  19. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Four Resource-Limited Settings in Peru: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Association with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Noah G.; Rattner, Adi; Schwartz, Alan R.; Mokhlesi, Babak; Gilman, Robert H.; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Miranda, J. Jaime; Checkley, William

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a highly prevalent condition in high-income countries, with major consequences for cardiopulmonary health, public safety, healthcare utilization, and mortality. However, its prevalence and effect in low- and middle-income countries are less well known. We sought to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidities of SDB symptoms in four resource-limited settings. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort, a population-based age- and sex-stratified sample. Setting: Four resource-limited settings in Peru varying in altitude, urbanization, and air pollution. Participants: There were 2,682 adults aged 35 to 92 y. Measurements and Results: Self-reported SDB symptoms (habitual snoring, observed apneas, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), sociodemographics, medical history, anthropometrics, spirometry, blood biomarkers were reported. We found a high prevalence of habitual snoring (30.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 28.5–32.0%), observed apneas (20.9%, 95% CI 19.4–22.5%) and excessive daytime sleepiness (18.6%, 95% CI 17.1–20.1%). SDB symptoms varied across sites; prevalence and adjusted odds for habitual snoring were greatest at sea level, whereas those for observed apneas were greatest at high altitude. In multivariable analysis, habitual snoring was associated with older age, male sex, body mass index (BMI), and higher socioeconomic status; observed apneas were associated with BMI; and excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with older age, female sex, and medium socioeconomic status. Adjusted odds of cardiovascular disease, depression, and hypertension and total chronic disease burden increased progressively with the number of SDB symptoms. A threefold increase in the odds of having an additional chronic comorbid disease (adjusted odds ratio 3.57, 95% CI 2.18–5.84) was observed in those with all three versus no SDB symptoms. Conclusions: Sleep disordered breathing symptoms were highly

  20. Prospective open-label study of add-on and monotherapy topiramate in civilians with chronic nonhallucinatory posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Berlant, Jeffrey L

    2004-01-01

    Background In order to confirm therapeutic effects of topiramate on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) observed in a prior study, a new prospective, open-label study was conducted to examine acute responses in chronic, nonhallucinatory PTSD. Methods Thirty-three consecutive newly recruited civilian adult outpatients (mean age 46 years, 85% female) with DSM-IV-diagnosed chronic PTSD, excluding those with concurrent auditory or visual hallucinations, received topiramate either as monotherapy (n = 5) or augmentation (n = 28). The primary measure was a change in the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) score from baseline to 4 weeks, with response defined as a ≥ 30% reduction of PTSD symptoms. Results For those taking the PCL-C at both baseline and week 4 (n = 30), total symptoms declined by 49% at week 4 (paired t-test, P < 0.001) with similar subscale reductions for reexperiencing, avoidance/numbing, and hyperarousal symptoms. The response rate at week 4 was 77%. Age, sex, bipolar comorbidity, age at onset of PTSD, duration of symptoms, severity of baseline PCL-C score, and monotherapy versus add-on medication administration did not predict reduction in PTSD symptoms. Median time to full response was 9 days and median dosage was 50 mg/day. Conclusions Promising open-label findings in a new sample converge with findings of a previous study. The use of topiramate for treatment of chronic PTSD, at least in civilians, warrants controlled clinical trials. PMID:15315714

  1. Chronic posttraumatic movement disorder alleviated by insertion of meso-diencephalic deep brain stimulating electrode.

    PubMed

    Hooper, J; Simpson, P; Whittle, I R

    2001-10-01

    Incapacitating and drug-resistant posttraumatic movement disorders have successfully been treated by stereotactic thalamotomy. We describe the case of a young man with a posttraumatic hemiballismoid type movement disorder of the left arm, persistent for 2 years, who was selected for treatment with a thalamic deep brain stimulator. However, placement of the stimulating electrode tip at the junction of the zona incerta and subthalamic regions caused abolition of the movement disorder, and the pulse generator was not required. Reassessment over a 44-month period using multiple clinical and functional tests has confirmed continued benefit. This case adds to the reports of alleviation of movement disorders following either stereotactic thalamic mapping or placement of stimulating electrodes without macroscopic thalamic lesioning. PMID:11708550

  2. Chronic Cough in Musculoskeletal disorders: Using high resolution oesophageal manometry in search of an Aetiology.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, Sega; Morjaria, Jaymin B; Jackson, Warren; Morice, Alyn H

    2012-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom carrying significant morbidity which can occur as a result of oesophageal dysmotility. Here we report 2 patients with musculoskeletal disease presenting with chronic cough to our tertiary cough clinic. Prior to referral both patients had been extensively investigated to determine the basis of their cough, with no cause found. Oesophageal studies, using high resolution oesophageal manometry, demonstrated oesophageal dysmotility with consequent airway reflux. Anti-reflux therapy resulted in a good response in both patients. These are the first reports of the recently developed technique of high resolution manometry aiding the diagnosis of chronic cough. This technique may provide important clues into aetiological mechanism in patients with conditions predisposing to reflux into the airways. PMID:23021351

  3. Chronic Cough in Musculoskeletal disorders: Using high resolution oesophageal manometry in search of an Aetiology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom carrying significant morbidity which can occur as a result of oesophageal dysmotility. Here we report 2 patients with musculoskeletal disease presenting with chronic cough to our tertiary cough clinic. Prior to referral both patients had been extensively investigated to determine the basis of their cough, with no cause found. Oesophageal studies, using high resolution oesophageal manometry, demonstrated oesophageal dysmotility with consequent airway reflux. Anti-reflux therapy resulted in a good response in both patients. These are the first reports of the recently developed technique of high resolution manometry aiding the diagnosis of chronic cough. This technique may provide important clues into aetiological mechanism in patients with conditions predisposing to reflux into the airways. PMID:23021351

  4. Amygdala, Hippocampus, and Ventral Medial Prefrontal Cortex Volumes Differ in Maltreated Youth with and without Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Morey, Rajendra A; Haswell, Courtney C; Hooper, Stephen R; De Bellis, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is considered a disorder of recovery where individuals fail to learn and retain extinction of the traumatic fear response. In maltreated youth, PTSD is common, chronic, and associated with comorbidity. Studies of extinction-related structural volumes (amygdala, hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)) and this stress diathesis, in maltreated youth were not previously investigated. In this cross-sectional study, neuroanatomical volumes associated with extinction in maltreated youth with PTSD (N=31), without PTSD (N=32), and in non-maltreated healthy volunteers (n=57) were examined using magnetic resonance imaging. Groups were sociodemographically similar. Participants underwent extensive assessments for strict inclusion/exclusion criteria and DSM-IV disorders. Maltreated youth with PTSD demonstrated decreased right vmPFC volumes compared with both maltreated youth without PTSD and non-maltreated controls. Maltreated youth without PTSD demonstrated larger left amygdala and right hippocampal volumes compared with maltreated youth with PTSD and non-maltreated control youth. PTSD symptoms inversely correlated with right and left hippocampal and left amygdala volumes. Confirmatory masked voxel base morphometry analyses demonstrated greater medial orbitofrontal cortex gray matter intensity in controls than maltreated youth with PTSD. Volumetric results were not influenced by psychopathology or maltreatment variables. We identified volumetric differences in extinction-related structures between maltreated youth with PTSD from those without PTSD. Alterations of the vmPFC may be one mechanism that mediates the pathway from PTSD to comorbidity. Further longitudinal work is needed to determine neurobiological factors related to chronic and persistent PTSD, and to PTSD resilience despite maltreatment. PMID:26171720

  5. A prospective, descriptive study of hour-to-hour and day-to-day temperature variability of skin affected by chronic venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Kelechi, Teresa J; McNeil, Rebecca B

    2008-04-01

    Evidence suggests that skin temperature is elevated in the lower legs of individuals with the most severe stages of chronic venous disorder-related skin inflammation. Fifteen (15) patients (average age 67.7 years) with several chronic health conditions, chronic venous disorders, and a history of leg ulcers volunteered to participate in a prospective, descriptive, two-part (hourly and daily) study to test two hypotheses: 1) that skin temperature variations of chronically inflamed skin of lower legs affected by chronic venous disorders exhibit no differences in hour-to-hour and day-to-day rhythmic patterns associated with sleep and activities such as walking, exercise, or compression stocking use among four selected skin sites (two per leg) or between the legs of individuals with chronic venous disorders; and 2) that the difference in temperature between sites is unequal between legs. All study participants were at high risk for developing venous ulcers (CEAP stage 4 and 5). Skin temperature was obtained at sites with highest temperatures and/or areas of healed ulcers and mapped hourly over a 2-day period with a data logger and daily for 30 days with an infrared thermometer. No consistent, visually detectable effects due to caffeine use, eating, activity, or other variables assessed were found; only sleeping resulted in a consistent increase in skin temperature. Difference in skin temperature between measurement sites was found to be dependent on the leg on which the sites were located (P=0.1127). Because skin temperature variability could not be explained by the variables assessed, a temperature change could suggest the presence of a pathological process such as an infection or increased inflammation. Future studies to determine whether variability of skin temperature over sites affected by chronic venous disorders heralds further skin impairment are warranted. PMID:18480503

  6. Modeling bipolar disorder in mice by increasing acetylcholine or dopamine: Chronic lithium treats most, but not all features

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Geyer, Mark A.; Young, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Bipolar disorder (BD) is a disabling and life-threatening disease characterized by states of depression and mania. New and efficacious treatments have not been forthcoming partly due to a lack of well-validated models representing both facets of BD. Objectives We hypothesized that cholinergic- and dopaminergic-pharmacological manipulations would model depression and mania respectively, each attenuated by lithium treatment. Methods C57BL/6J mice received the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine or saline before testing for ‘behavioral despair’ (immobility) in the tail-suspension test (TST) and forced-swim test (FST). Physostigmine effects on exploration and sensorimotor gating were assessed using the cross-species behavioral pattern monitor (BPM) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) paradigms. Other C57BL/6J mice received chronic lithium drinking water (300, 600, or 1200 mg/l) before assessing their effects alone in the BPM or with physostigmine on FST performance. Another group was tested with acute GBR12909 (dopamine transporter inhibitor) and chronic lithium (1000 mg/l) in the BPM. Results Physostigmine (0.03 mg/kg) increased immobility in the TST and FST without affecting activity, exploration, or PPI. Lithium (600 mg/l) resulted in low therapeutic serum concentrations and normalized the physostigmine-increased immobility in the FST. GBR12909 induced mania-like behavior in the BPM of which hyper-exploration was attenuated, though not reversed, after chronic lithium (1000 mg/ml). Conclusions Increased cholinergic levels induced depression-like behavior and hyperdopaminergia induced mania-like behavior in mice, while chronic lithium treated some, but not all, facets of these effects. These data support a cholinergic-monoaminergic mechanism for modeling BD aspects and provide a way to assess novel therapeutics. PMID:26141192

  7. A research synthesis of therapeutic interventions for whiplash-associated disorder (WAD): Part 4 – noninvasive interventions for chronic WAD

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W; McClure, J Andrew; Walton, David; Pretty, Jason; Salter, Katherine; Meyer, Matthew; Sequeira, Keith; Death, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a significant public health problem, resulting in substantial social and economic costs throughout the industrialized world. While many treatments have been advocated for patients with WAD, scientific evidence supporting their effectiveness is often lacking. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the strength of evidence for various WAD therapies. Multiple databases (including Web of Science, EMBASE and PubMed) were searched to identify all studies published from January 1980 through March 2009 that evaluated the effectiveness of any clearly defined treatment for acute (less than two weeks), subacute (two to 12 weeks) or chronic (longer than 12 weeks) WAD. The present article, the fourth in a five-part series, evaluates the evidence for noninvasive interventions initiated during the chronic phase of WAD. Twenty-two studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified, 12 of which were randomized controlled trials with ‘good’ overall methodological quality (median Physiotherapy Evidence Database score of 6). For the treatment of chronic WAD, there is evidence to suggest that exercise programs are effective in relieving whiplash-related pain, at least over the short term. While the majority of a subset of nine studies supported the effectiveness of interdisciplinary interventions, the two randomized controlled trials provided conflicting results. Finally, there was limited evidence, consisting of one supportive case series each, that both manual joint manipulation and myofeedback training may provide some benefit. Based on the available research, exercise programs were the most effective noninvasive treatment for patients with chronic WAD, although many questions remain regarding the relative effectiveness of various exercise regimens. PMID:21038010

  8. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  9. Comparison of the frequency of psychiatric disorders among patients with chronic low back pain and control group

    PubMed Central

    Farajirad, Elnaz; Tohidi, Hadi; Farajirad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common complaints of patients referred to the clinics. Studies indicated that psychosocial factors have great impact on the patients’ complaints and disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate a broad range of psychiatric disorders in patients with chronic LBP (CLBP) and compare them with those of the control group. Patients and Methods: We applied Symptom Checklist 90-R to compare 50 CLBP patients in the case group with 100 participants without it in the control group. The questionnaire measured somatization, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety, phobic anxiety, hostility, interpersonal sensitivity, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. Results: Average “global severity index” was 1.10 in the case and 0.5 in the control group. Average “positive symptom total” was 45.26 in the case and 27.41 in the control group. Average “positive symptom distress index” was 2.50 in the case and 1.50 in the control group. Average scores for all test dimensions were significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.00). Conclusions: All dimensions were significantly more common in CLBP patients. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of these disorders may improve the outcome of CLBP. PMID:27366258

  10. Gastrointestinal manifestations as initial presenting features in a 40 years old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Q M; Arafat, S M; Azad, A K; Chowdhury, M J; Hasan, M K; Ahmed, F; Ananna, M A

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). These symptoms can be due to primary GI disorders like peptic ulcer disease, pancreatitis or intestinal obstruction. But they can be due to SLE itself or complications of treatment of SLE. In this case report, we describe a 40 years old woman who presented initially with GI complaints. Later she was diagnosed as a case of SLE with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO). The problems related to diagnosis and management is also discussed. PMID:25725689

  11. The effects of race, ethnicity, and mood/anxiety disorders on the chronic physical health conditions of men from a national sample.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Griffith, Derek M; Watkins, Daphne C

    2013-07-01

    Racial/ethnic differences in health are evident among men. Previous work suggests associations between mental and physical health but few studies have examined how mood/anxiety disorders and chronic physical health conditions covary by age, race, and ethnicity among men. Using data from 1,277 African American, 629 Caribbean Black, and 371 non-Hispanic White men from the National Survey of American Life, we examined associations between race/ethnicity and experiencing one or more chronic physical health conditions in logistic regression models stratified by age and 12-month mood/anxiety disorder status. Among men <45 years without mood/anxiety disorders, Caribbean Blacks had lower odds of chronic physical health conditions than Whites. Among men aged 45+ years with mood/anxiety disorders, African Americans had greater odds of chronic physical health conditions than Whites. Future studies should explore the underlying causes of such variation and how studying mental and chronic physical health problems together may help identify mechanisms that underlie racial disparities in life expectancy among men. PMID:23609347

  12. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  13. The role of inflammatory cytokines and ERK1/2 signaling in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome with related mental health disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Yang, Hualan; Zhao, Yanfang; Chen, Xiang; Dong, Yinying; Li, Long; Dong, Yehao; Cui, Jiefeng; Zhu, Tongyu; Zheng, Ping; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Dai, Jican

    2016-01-01

    Mental health disorders(MHD) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) have been widely studied. However, the underlying role of inflammatory cytokines and their associated signaling pathways have not been investigated. Here, we report the potential role of cytokines and associated signaling pathways in CP/CPPS patients with MHD and in a CP/CPPS animal model. CP/CPPS patients (n = 810) and control subjects (n = 992) were enrolled in this case-control multicenter study, and serum cytokine levels were measured. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received multiple intracutaneous injections of an immuno-agent along with a pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus triple vaccine for autoimmune CP/CPPS development. The results revealed that, in CP/CPPS patients with significant MHD, elevated IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α serum levels were observed. The above five cytokines in CP/CPPS rats were significantly elevated in prostate tissue (p < 0.05), and IL-1β levels were elevated in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In behavioral tests, CP/CPPS rats showed anxiety- and depression-like symptoms, and impaired spatial and associative memory performance (p < 0.05). In the CP/CPPS group, ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and decreased in the hippocampus, but not caudate nucleus. Thus, prostate-derived cytokines, especially IL-1β, cross the blood brain barrier and may lead to enhanced ERK1/2 signaling in several brain areas, possibly underlying induction of CP/CPPS-related MHD. PMID:27334333

  14. The role of inflammatory cytokines and ERK1/2 signaling in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome with related mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Yang, Hualan; Zhao, Yanfang; Chen, Xiang; Dong, Yinying; Li, Long; Dong, Yehao; Cui, Jiefeng; Zhu, Tongyu; Zheng, Ping; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Dai, Jican

    2016-01-01

    Mental health disorders(MHD) in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) have been widely studied. However, the underlying role of inflammatory cytokines and their associated signaling pathways have not been investigated. Here, we report the potential role of cytokines and associated signaling pathways in CP/CPPS patients with MHD and in a CP/CPPS animal model. CP/CPPS patients (n = 810) and control subjects (n = 992) were enrolled in this case-control multicenter study, and serum cytokine levels were measured. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received multiple intracutaneous injections of an immuno-agent along with a pertussis-diphtheria-tetanus triple vaccine for autoimmune CP/CPPS development. The results revealed that, in CP/CPPS patients with significant MHD, elevated IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α serum levels were observed. The above five cytokines in CP/CPPS rats were significantly elevated in prostate tissue (p < 0.05), and IL-1β levels were elevated in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In behavioral tests, CP/CPPS rats showed anxiety- and depression-like symptoms, and impaired spatial and associative memory performance (p < 0.05). In the CP/CPPS group, ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels were increased in the amygdala and nucleus accumbens, and decreased in the hippocampus, but not caudate nucleus. Thus, prostate-derived cytokines, especially IL-1β, cross the blood brain barrier and may lead to enhanced ERK1/2 signaling in several brain areas, possibly underlying induction of CP/CPPS-related MHD. PMID:27334333

  15. Trimebutine: mechanism of action, effects on gastrointestinal function and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, M; Wingate, D

    1997-01-01

    The actions of trimebutine [3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 2-(dimethylamino)-2-phenylbutylester] on the gastrointestinal tract are mediated via (i) an agonist effect on peripheral mu, kappa and delta opiate receptors and (ii) release of gastrointestinal peptides such as motilin and modulation of the release of other peptides, including vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and glucagon. Trimebutine accelerates gastric emptying, induces premature phase III of the migrating motor complex in the intestine and modulates the contractile activity of the colon. Recently, trimebutine has also been shown to decrease reflexes induced by distension of the gut lumen in animals and it may therefore modulate visceral sensitivity. Clinically, trimebutine has proved to be effective in the treatment of both acute and chronic abdominal pain in patients with functional bowel disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, at doses ranging from 300 to 600 mg/day. It is also effective in children presenting with abdominal pain. PMID:9364286

  16. Chronic dopaminergic stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from dyskinesias to impulse control disorders.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Wickens, Jeff; Baunez, Christelle; Rodriguez, Manuel; Pavon, Nancy; Juncos, Jorge L; Obeso, José A; Bezard, Erwan

    2009-12-01

    Dopamine is an essential neurotransmitter for many brain functions, and its dysfunction has been implicated in both neurological and psychiatric disorders. Parkinson's disease is an archetypal disorder of dopamine dysfunction characterised by motor, cognitive, behavioural, and autonomic symptoms. While effective for motor symptoms, dopamine replacement therapy is associated not only with motor side-effects, such as levodopa-induced dyskinesia, but also behavioural side-effects such as impulse control disorders (eg, pathological gambling and shopping, binge eating, and hypersexuality), punding (ie, abnormal repetitive non-goal oriented behaviours), and compulsive medication use. We review clinical features, overlapping molecular mechanisms, and a specific cognitive mechanism of habit learning that might underlie these behaviours. We integrate these mechanisms with the emerging view of the basal ganglia as a distributive system involved in the selection and facilitation of movements, acts, and emotions. PMID:19909912

  17. Roles and Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils in Immunity and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, YunJae; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils have been considered to be destructive end-stage effector cells that have a role in parasitic infections and allergy reactions by the release of their granule-derived cytotoxic proteins. However, an increasing number of experimental observations indicate that eosinophils also are multifunctional leukocytes involved in diverse inflammatory and physiologic immune responses. Under homeostatic conditions, eosinophils are particularly abundant in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract where their involvement in various biological processes within the gastrointestinal tract has been posited. In this review, we summarize the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and describe eosinophil trafficking to the gastrointestinal tract. We synthesize the current findings on the phenotypic and functional properties of gastrointestinal eosinophils and the accumulating evidence that they have a contributory role in gastrointestinal disorders, with a focus on primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Finally, we discuss the potential role of eosinophils as modulators of the intestinal immune system. PMID:25049430

  18. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  19. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  20. [The relationship between selenium and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dániel Tamás; Fülesdi, Béla; Hallay, Judit

    2013-10-13

    The cell-membrane toxicity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) plays an increasing role in the pathomechanism of gastrointestinal tract diseases. Trace elements are important parts of antioxidant protecting system, especially the selenium (Se), which, in the form of glutathione peroxidase contributes to the immunity of the gut (GALT). Due to the absorptional disorders and consequent malnutrition observed in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) an important role is associated with nutritional therapy, including energy-, protein- and trace element-support. Human studies show, that IBD is mostly accompanied by lower serum Se concentrations, reduced antoxidant and increased proinflammatory activity. Adequate Se-replacement may reduce the severity of organ failure and infections, but not mortality. However, it is encouraging that in animal studies obvious preventive effect of Se has been found on IBD and chronic inflammation induced colon cancer . PMID:24095913

  1. The Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Phillip A.; Green, Stefan J.; Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The excessive use of alcohol is a global problem causing many adverse pathological health effects and a significant financial health care burden. This review addresses the effect of alcohol consumption on the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Although data are limited in humans, studies highlight the importance of changes in the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-related disorders. Alcohol-induced changes in the GIT microbiota composition and metabolic function may contribute to the well-established link between alcohol-induced oxidative stress, intestinal hyperpermeability to luminal bacterial products, and the subsequent development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), as well as other diseases. In addition, clinical and preclinical data suggest that alcohol-related disorders are associated with quantitative and qualitative dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota and may be associated with increased GIT inflammation, intestinal hyperpermeability resulting in endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and tissue damage/organ pathologies including ALD. Thus, gut-directed interventions, such as probiotic and synbiotic modulation of the intestinal microbiota, should be considered and evaluated for prevention and treatment of alcohol-associated pathologies. PMID:26695747

  2. [Chronic fatigue syndrome--a disease entity or an unspecified psychosomatic disorder?].

    PubMed

    Albus, C

    1997-12-01

    In spite of its nature as an often severe and disabeling disease, it is still unclear, whether the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is an entire disease of its own right or not. Moreover, there is a growing evidence that patients with CFS belong to an inhomogeneous group with different etiologic constellations. Specific somatic factors, e.g. viruses, seem to be less important for onset than certain personality-traits like depressiveness and workaholism. These traits lead to an increased vulnerability to unspecific psychological or biological stressors that may cause chronic fatigue by complex psychosomatic interferences. Concerning diagnosis, there are no specific methods or results available, the same is true for pharmacological treatment. As a consequence, practitioners should be aware not to miss a somatic disease causing fatigue, and, parallel to this, start right from the beginning talking about the psychosomatic background of CFS. Furthermore, psychotherapy has shown to be effective in CFS. PMID:9487622

  3. Chronic Disease Risks in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Forewarned Is Forearmed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Carl V.; Schramm, Sarah C.; Karafa, Matthew; Tang, Anne S.; Jain, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    An emerging, cost-effective method to examine prevalent and future health risks of persons with disabilities is electronic health record (EHR) analysis. As an example, a case-control EHR analysis of adults with autism spectrum disorder receiving primary care through the Cleveland Clinic from 2005 to 2008 identified 108 adults with autism spectrum…

  4. Generation of Functional Neutrophils from a Mouse Model of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disorder Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayandip; Santilli, Giorgia; Blundell, Michael P.; Navarro, Susana; Bueren, Juan A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models of human genetic disorders provide a valuable tool for investigating the scope for application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Here we present a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate generation of iPSC from a mouse model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), and their successful differentiation into haematopoietic progenitors of the myeloid lineage. We further demonstrate that additive gene transfer using lentiviral vectors encoding gp91phox is capable of restoring NADPH-oxidase activity in mature neutrophils derived from X-CGD iPSC. In the longer term, correction of iPSC from human patients with CGD has therapeutic potential not only through generation of transplantable haematopoietic stem cells, but also through production of large numbers of autologous functional neutrophils. PMID:21408614

  5. [Therapeutic potential of micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) of diosmin and hesperidin in treatment chronic venous disorder].

    PubMed

    Hnátek, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Chronic venous disorder (CVD) is a common illness with high incidence existing especially in Europe and North America. The main goal of micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) of diosmin and hesperidin is to eliminate the symptoms of CVD (venous pain, fatigue, etc). But MPFF of diosmin and hesperidin has good effectiveness for treatment of venous oedema and venous ulcer too. There are many papers that prove its effectiveness in the experiment and in the microcirculation too. The other indications for MPFF of diosmin hesperidin is hemorrhoidal disease and the accessory treatment of lymphedema. It is proved that this substance could be used as an effective supplementary treatment of symptoms after venous intervention. Only MPFF diosmin and hesperidin received the best recommendation - 1B in the last guidelines for VAD therapy. PMID:26465280

  6. Intravascular disorders of microcirculation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the results of clinical and morphological examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiodorova, Tatiana A.

    1999-05-01

    We have evaluated the results of clinical and morphological study of microcirculation and its intravascular factors in 120 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Conjunctival biomicroscopy with quantitative evaluation of microcirculatory changes we performed. This data were compared with the results of laboratory study of erythrocytes and thrombocytes aggregation, some plasma hemostasis indices and morphological examination of microcirculation. The results of conjunctival biomicroscopy showed the close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease, the degree of respiratory failure and the degree of microcirculatory disorders. Progress of the disease with the development of respiratory failure and cor pulmonale was characterized by the expansion of the process of erythrocytes aggregation to the whole parts of the microcirculatory bad and was associated with perivascular hemorrhages. In some patients with severe COPD laboratory data showed chronic disseminated intravascular microcoagulation (DVS-syndrome). Intravascular platelets, erythrocytes and mixed aggregates which completely cork the vessels and compressed endothelium were uncovered by electron microscopy. Platelets membrane injuring with its degranulation was seen. This discovered correlation between microcirculatory abnormalities in lungs and in conjunctiva in patients with COPD demonstrate that this abnormalities of microcirculation are prevalent. This allows to use in clinical accessible and informative method of conjunctival biomicroscopy to estimate the condition of microcirculation in this pathology.

  7. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  8. Evidence Revealing Deregulation of The KLF11-Mao A Pathway in Association with Chronic Stress and Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sharonda; Johnson, Shakevia; Duncan, Jeremy W; Udemgba, Chinelo; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Albert, Paul R; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Ou, Xiao-Ming; Stockmeier, Craig A; Wang, Jun Ming

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical pathways underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic stress are not well understood. However, it has been reported that monoamine oxidase A (MAO A, a major neurotransmitter-degrading enzyme) is significantly increased in the brains of human subjects affected with MDD and rats exposed to chronic social defeat (CSD) stress, which is used to model depression. In the current study, we compared the protein levels of a MAO A-transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 11 (KLF11 , also recognized as transforming growth factor-beta-inducible early gene 2) between the brains of 18 human subjects with MDD and 18 control subjects. We found that, indeed, the expression of KLF11 is increased by 36% (p<0.02) in the postmortem prefrontal cortex of human subjects with MDD compared with controls. We also observed a positive correlation between KLF11 levels and those of its target gene, MAO A, both in association with MDD. KLF11 protein expression was also increased by 44% (p<0.02) in the frontal cortex of KLF11 wild-type mice (Klf11+/+) vs Klf11−/− when both exposed to CSD stress. In contrast, locomotor activities, central box duration and sucrose preference were significantly reduced in the stressed Klf11+/+ mice, suggesting that Klf11+/+ mice are more severely affected by the stress model compared with Klf11−/− mice. These results serve to assign an important role of KLF11 in upregulating MAO A in MDD and chronic social stress, suggesting that inhibition of the pathways regulated by this transcription factor may aid in the therapeutics of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Thus, the new knowledge derived from the current study extends our understanding of transcriptional mechanisms that are operational in the pathophysiology of common human diseases and thus bears significant biomedical relevance. PMID:25502632

  9. Dry-needling and exercise for chronic whiplash-associated disorders: a randomized single-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Michele; Vicenzino, Bill; Souvlis, Tina; Connelly, Luke B

    2015-04-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dry-needling and exercise compared with sham dry-needling and exercise for chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). The setting was a single university centre and 4 physiotherapy practices in Queensland, Australia. Eighty patients with chronic WAD (>3 months) were enrolled between June 2009 and August 2012 with 1-year follow-up completed in August 2013. The interventions were 6 weeks of dry-needling to posterior neck muscles (n = 40) and exercise or sham dry-needling and exercise (n = 40). The primary outcomes of the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and self-rated recovery were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months by a blinded assessor. Analysis was intention to treat. An economic evaluation was planned but missing data deemed further analysis unwarranted. Seventy-nine patients (99%) were followed up at 6 weeks, 78 (98%) at 12 weeks, 74 (93%) at 6 months, and 73 (91%) at 12 months. The dry-needling and exercise intervention was more effective than sham dry-needling and exercise in reducing disability at 6 and 12 months but not at 6 and 12 weeks. The treatment effects were small and not clinically worthwhile. At 6 weeks, the treatment effect on the 0-100 NDI was -0.3 (95% confidence interval -5.4 to 4.7), 12 weeks -0.3 (-5.2 to 4.9), 6 months -4.4 (-9.6 to -0.74), and 12 months -3.8 (-9.1 to -0.5). There was no effect for self-rated recovery. In patients with chronic WAD, dry-needling and exercise has no clinically worthwhile effects over sham dry-needling and exercise. PMID:25790454

  10. Comparing the Areas of Interest in the Field of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder and Neurogastroenterology and Motility Between the East and the West

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kim, Gi Hyun

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that compare the differences in published articles submitted from the East and the West in the area of neurogastroenterology and motility (NM). To compare the article topics from the East and the West which have been published, 5 Western (Gastroenterology, Gut, American Journal of Gastroenterology, American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, and Neurogastroenterology and Motility) and 3 Eastern gastrointestinal journals (Journal of Gastroenterology, Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility) were selected based on the impact factor. Published papers were classified into 12 categories and 60 subcategories. The titles and abstracts of review articles, original articles, and meta-analyses from these journals were reviewed for the last 2 years (2013–2014). In case of Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility which is published quarterly, this search was performed for 5 years (2010–2014). Of the total 2656 reviewed articles, 842 (260 from the East and 582 from the West) were classified into the category of NM. The most frequently published papers from the Western researchers were categorized as brain-gut interaction, visceral hypersensitivity, and irritable bowel syndrome, whereas those from the Eastern researchers were categorized as gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. This difference between the East and the West is not just due to the journal itself, but it also depends on the author’s affiliation and their ability to perform high quality research in the area of the NM. These data provide evidence for the research trend and give valuable information to the researchers for determining subjects for the study and for selecting proper journals for publishing their studies. PMID:26351091

  11. Essential Elements of an Academic Program for Whatcom County Public School Students Challenged with Social/Emotional and/or Chronic Mental Health Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell-Jenkins, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    This study identifies essential program elements for Whatcom Discovery Center, a Northwest Educational Service District cooperative program providing academic and social/emotional development services to students who are challenged with severe social/emotional and/or chronic mental health disorders. The seven (7) Superintendents and seven (7)…

  12. Differences in Depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Lifetime Trauma Exposure in Formerly Abused Women with Mild versus Moderate to Severe Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Janice; Cooper, Bruce A.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Although associations between intimate partner violence, chronic pain, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and lifetime trauma exposure are well known, previous studies are limited by their recruitment of women from shelters. These relationships were explored with a community-based sample of formerly abused women ( N = 84).…

  13. A systematic review of sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Silva, Anderson Soares; Peixoto, Roger Andre Oliveira; Urbano, Giovanni Julioti; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Santos, Israel Reis; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on sleep disorders in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). [Subjects and Methods] Two independent reviewers performed a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS, and BIREME Virtual Health Library medical databases from their inception to November 2015. [Results] One thousand one hundred twenty-six articles were found that met the inclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they were not in English, the patients did not undergo HD, or the studies were not cross-sectional or clinical trials. After reading the full text, a further 300 studies were excluded because they did not use polysomnography. The remaining 18 studies with ESRD patients undergoing HD comprised 8 clinical trials and 10 cross-sectional studies. This systematic review followed the criteria outlined by the PRISMA declaration. [Conclusion] In this systematic review, a high prevalence of sleep disorders was observed in ESRD, including sleep-disordered breathing. This knowledge may enable health professionals to devise new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve their quality of life. PMID:27512289

  14. A systematic review of sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Nina Teixeira; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Silva, Anderson Soares; Peixoto, Roger Andre Oliveira; Urbano, Giovanni Julioti; Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Santos, Israel Reis; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Insalaco, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on sleep disorders in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). [Subjects and Methods] Two independent reviewers performed a computer-assisted search of the MEDLINE, SciELO, LILACS, and BIREME Virtual Health Library medical databases from their inception to November 2015. [Results] One thousand one hundred twenty-six articles were found that met the inclusion criteria. Articles were excluded if they were not in English, the patients did not undergo HD, or the studies were not cross-sectional or clinical trials. After reading the full text, a further 300 studies were excluded because they did not use polysomnography. The remaining 18 studies with ESRD patients undergoing HD comprised 8 clinical trials and 10 cross-sectional studies. This systematic review followed the criteria outlined by the PRISMA declaration. [Conclusion] In this systematic review, a high prevalence of sleep disorders was observed in ESRD, including sleep-disordered breathing. This knowledge may enable health professionals to devise new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve their quality of life. PMID:27512289

  15. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  16. Novel therapeutic approaches for chronic kidney disease due to glomerular disorders.

    PubMed

    Del Nogal-Avila, Maria; Donoro-Blazquez, Hector; Saha, Manish K; Marshall, Caroline B; Clement, Lionel C; Macé, Camille E A; Chugh, Sumant S

    2016-07-01

    Improved understanding of glomerular disease mechanisms over the past decade has led to the emergence of new and targeted therapeutic strategies for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most promising among these are the administration of recombinant mutated human angiopoietin-like 4, sialic acid-related sugars that induce sialylation in vivo, compounds related to Bis-T-23, and immune depletion of the soluble urokinase receptor from the circulation. Taking these therapeutic strategies into clinical trials will be the first step away from repurposed and relatively toxic drugs currently used for treating kidney disease. PMID:27147672

  17. Cognitive disturbances in chronic schizophrenia: formal thought disorder and basic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Simhandl, C; Dietzel, M; Lesch, O M; Musalek, M; Strobl, R

    1986-01-01

    We investigated 37 chronic schizophrenic patients with two objective rating scales (AMDP and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale; BPRS) and compared the questioned symptoms with the Frankfurter Beschwerde Fragebogen (FBF), a questionnaire for subjective complaints which are close to the uncharacteristic 'basic' symptoms of schizophrenic patients. It was pointed out that the questions in the FBF relate mainly to uncharacteristic symptoms like disturbances of perception, concentration, attention, perceiving, and memory. These subjective symptoms of the FBF show a few correlations with the AMDP/BPRS rating. The total score of the FBF gave no further information about social functioning of patients with cognitive disturbances. PMID:2882543

  18. [The computerized electroencephalogram in evaluating the action of vasoactive and eumetabolic drugs in chronic cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Martucci, N; Bocola, V; Mearelli, S; Agnoli, A

    1980-01-01

    In this work the authors estimated the effect, on cortical bioelectric activity, of two groups of drugs commonly used in the so-called chronic vascular cerebropathies. Through the computerized analysis of EEG the authors estimated vasoactive drugs (papaverine hydrochloride and xanthinol-nicotinate) and eumetabolic drugs (cytidin, uridin, cytidin + 1-glutamine association) in two groups of subjects (healthy volunteers and patients suffering from stabilized conditions of acute cerebrovascular insufficiency). As to vasoactive drugs, a different action of papaverine hydrochloride as compared to xanthinol-nicotinate was pointed out. Eumetabolic drugs showed an action of electroencephalographic activation statistically significant only if administered associated between them and with glutamine. PMID:6110238

  19. Chronic stress and brain plasticity: Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Radley, Jason; Morilak, David; Viau, Victor; Campeau, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans. PMID:26116544

  20. Gene correction of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a murine model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disorder.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sayandip; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy presents an attractive alternative to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for treating patients suffering from primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID). The conceptual advantage of gene correcting a patient's autologous HSCs lies in minimizing or completely avoiding immunological complications arising from allogeneic transplantation while conferring the same benefits of immune reconstitution upon long-term engraftment. Clinical trials targeting X-linked chronic granulomatous disorder (X-CGD) have shown promising results in this context. However, long-term clinical benefits in these patients have been limited by issues of poor engraftment of gene-transduced cells coupled with transgene silencing and vector induced clonal proliferation. Novel vectors incorporating safety features such as self-inactivating (SIN) mutations in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) along with synthetic promoters driving lineage-restricted sustainable expression of the gp91phox transgene are expected to resolve the current pitfalls and require rigorous preclinical testing. In this chapter, we have outlined a protocol in which X-CGD mouse model derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been utilized to develop a platform for investigating the efficacy and safety profiles of novel vectors prior to clinical evaluation. PMID:24557920

  1. Child abuse and neglect in complex dissociative disorder, abuse-related chronic PTSD, and mixed psychiatric samples.

    PubMed

    Dorahy, Martin J; Middleton, Warwick; Seager, Lenaire; Williams, Mary; Chambers, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Only a select number of studies have examined different forms of child maltreatment in complex dissociative disorders (DDs) in comparison to other groups. Few of these have used child abuse-related chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) and mixed psychiatric (MP) patients with maltreatment as comparison groups. This study examined child sexual, physical, and emotional abuse as well as physical and emotional neglect in DD (n = 39), C-PTSD (n = 13), and MP (n = 21) samples, all with abuse and neglect histories. The predictive capacity of these different forms of maltreatment across the 3 groups was assessed for pathological dissociation, shame, guilt, relationship esteem, relationship anxiety, relationship depression, and fear of relationships. All forms of maltreatment differentiated the DD from the MP group, and sexual abuse differentiated the DD sample from the C-PTSD group. Childhood sexual abuse was the only predictor of pathological dissociation. Emotional abuse predicted shame, guilt, relationship anxiety, and fear of relationships. Emotional neglect predicted relationship anxiety and relationship depression. Physical neglect was associated with less relationship anxiety. Different forms of abuse and neglect are associated with different symptom clusters in psychiatric patients with maltreatment histories. PMID:26275087

  2. Mineral and bone disorders, morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal failure patients on chronic dialysis

    PubMed Central

    MOLDOVAN, DIANA; RUSU, CRINA; KACSO, INA MARIA; POTRA, ALINA; PATIU, IOAN MIHAI; GHERMAN-CAPRIOARA, MIRELA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim In spite of numerous interventions, the control of mineral disturbances remains poor in end-stage renal failure (ESRF) patients. Chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) represent an important cause of mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between mineral and bone disorders (MBD) and their components impact on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular (CDV) mortality and morbidity in chronic dialysis patients. Methods This prospective study was carried out in a cohort of 92 randomly selected patients with ESRF treated with hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). The data regarding demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded, including vascular disease (coronary, cerebral, peripheral). The follow-up lasted 40 months and the final evaluation included the number and causes of deaths, CDV events and disease. Serum Ca, P, ALP, iPTH, albumin, cholesterol, urea and creatinine levels were measured. The plain radiographic films of hands and pelvis evaluated all bone abnormalities suggestive of renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and peripheral vascular calcification (VC). Results All-cause annual mortality represented 9.25% in HD and 9.09% in PD patients. The CDV mortality represented almost 44% in HD patients and 66% in PD patients from all deaths. There was a high prevalence of CDV diseases and events. High and low serum P levels were associated with a worse survival rate. Hypercalcaemia was associated with high risk for CDV events in HD patients. In PD patients, the relationship between increased ALP levels and all-cause mortality was significant. Other mineral markers were not predictive of the outcome in the studied patients. In the HD patients the severity of VC was associated with all-cause and CDV mortality, and with CDV events. Male gender, hypercholesterolemia, decreased URR, albumin and creatinine were identified as risk factors for all-cause mortality. The diabetics had higher

  3. Imaging of complications of oncological therapy in the gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Chitra; Bhosale, Priya; Moorthy Ganeshan, Dhakshin; Truong, Myelene T.; Silverman, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of cancer involves a multidisciplinary approach consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy and radiation therapy. These therapies work on the tumor cells to result in cell stasis or cell death. The same mechanism can result in toxicity to the normal gastrointestinal tract. Radiation therapy can cause acute and chronic injury. The chronic injury results from involvement of the vascular supply of the gastrointestinal tract and by causing fibrosis. The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging of complications resulting from oncologic treatment in the gastrointestinal system. PMID:22571819

  4. Impact of Chronic Pain on Treatment Prognosis for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Brittany B; Bawor, Monica; Naji, Leen; Chan, Carol K; Varenbut, Jaymie; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillaume; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND While a number of pharmacological interventions exist for the treatment of opioid use disorder, evidence evaluating the effect of pain on substance use behavior, attrition rate, and physical or mental health among these therapies has not been well established. We aim to evaluate these effects using evidence gathered from a systematic review of studies evaluating chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) in patients with opioid use disorder. METHODS We searched the Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ProQuest Dissertations and theses Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry databases to identify articles evaluating the impact of pain on addiction treatment outcomes for patients maintained on opioid agonist therapy. RESULTS Upon screening 3,540 articles, 14 studies with a combined sample of 3,128 patients fulfilled the review inclusion criteria. Results from the meta-analysis suggest that pain has no effect on illicit opioid consumption [pooled odds ratio (pOR): 0.70, 95%CI 0.41–1.17; I2 = 0.0] but a protective effect for reducing illicit non-opioid substance use (pOR: 0.57, 95%CI 0.41–0.79; I2 = 0.0). Studies evaluating illicit opioid consumption using other measures demonstrate pain to increase the risk for opioid abuse. Pain is significantly associated with the presence of psychiatric disorders (pOR: 2.18; 95%CI 1.6, 2.9; I2 = 0.0%). CONCLUSION CNCP may increase risk for continued opioid abuse and poor psychiatric functioning. Qualitative synthesis of the findings suggests that major methodological differences in the design and measurement of pain and treatment response outcomes are likely impacting the effect estimates. PMID:26417202

  5. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  6. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns. PMID:27210744

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of erythrocyte membranes in chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Morariu, V V; Petrov, L

    1986-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the apparent water diffusional exchange through erythrocyte membranes in cases of policitemia vera, chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis was measured by using a nuclear magnetic resonance method in the presence of Mn2+. The thermal transition shifted to lower temperatures in all cases, regardless of the stage of the disease, suggesting a structural alteration of the membrane. The shift of transition indirectly suggests a lower penetration of the erythrocytes by Mn2+. The water exchange time at 37 degrees C also increased, mainly in the blast crisis; it seems to have a prognostic value of some clinical interest. No simple correlation of the water exchange and the following clinical investigations was observed: the white count, the percentage of promyelocites and myeloblasts, the sedimentation rate of blood, the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes, the total concentration of proteins, albumin and immunoglobulins, respectively, in plasma. PMID:3742482

  8. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns. PMID:27210744

  9. HLA class II genes in chronic hepatitis C virus-infection and associated immunological disorders.

    PubMed

    Congia, M; Clemente, M G; Dessi, C; Cucca, F; Mazzoleni, A P; Frau, F; Lampis, R; Cao, A; Lai, M E; De Virgiliis, S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the factors that may confer susceptibility or protection to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and to HCV-associated immunological disorders, we designed two studies on 420 Sardinian transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients followed in our department in Cagliari since 1974. The first one was an epidemiological survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HCV infection and HCV-associated immunological disorders. In the second study, the distribution of different HLA class II genes was examined by DNA analysis in 116 HCV positive patients, 30 HCV negative patients, and 606 healthy controls. Three hundred fourteen patients became infected with HCV (74.7%) after 5.6 +/- 2.8 years of regular transfusion program. Mixed cryoglobulinemia, purpura, arthritis, proteinuria, decreased complement levels, rheumatoid factor and anti-GOR, smooth muscle antibody (SMA), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), and liver, kidney microsome (LKM) autoantibodies were significantly more represented in HCV positive patients than in negative ones (P < .05). A significant increase of HLA class II DR2 subtype (DRB1*1601,DQB1*0502) was observed in a group of 30 HCV negative patients who despite 10.3 +/- 2.2 years in a regular blood transfusion program did not show any evidence of HCV infection (Pc < .0092). Our results represent clear evidence for a relationship between HCV infection and immune extrahepatic abnormalities. A gene(s) located in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may play an important role in conferring protection against HCV infection. PMID:8938157

  10. Evaluation and management of chronic work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the distal upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Piligian, G; Herbert, R; Hearns, M; Dropkin, J; Landsbergis, P; Cherniack, M

    2000-01-01

    This clinical review will describe the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of the following work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) of the distal upper extremity: deQuervain's disease, extensor and flexor forearm tendinitis/tendinosis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, cubital tunnel syndrome, and hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). These conditions were selected for review either because they were among the most common WMSDs among patients attending the New York State Occupational Health Clinics (NYSOHC) network, or because there is strong evidence for work-relatedness in the clinical literature. Work-related carpal tunnel syndrome is discussed in an accompanying paper. In an attempt to provide evidence-based treatment recommendations, literature searches on the treatment of each condition were conducted via Medline for the years 1985-1999. There was a dearth of studies evaluating the efficacy of specific clinical treatments and ergonomic interventions for WMSDs. Therefore, many of the treatment recommendations presented here are based on a consensus of experienced public health-oriented occupational medicine physicians from the NYSOHC network after review of the pertinent literature. A summary table of the clinical features of the disorders is presented as a reference resource. PMID:10573598

  11. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  12. [Reactive anxiety crisis and chronic adjustment disorder: a unique case of work injury and suspected occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Taino, Giuseppe; Pizzuto, Cristina; Pezzuto, Cristina; Pucci, Ennio; Imbriani, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to describe a case of work injury and occupational disease which is unique for the type of disease diagnosed, conditions of onset and mode of management by INAIL (Italian National Institute of Insurance for Injuries at Work and Occupational Diseases). A worker, after a verbal animated dispute with some collegues and superiors, had an acute psychiatric agitation attack and went to the nearest emergency room, where he was subjected to clinical exams. No neuropsychiatric alteration was found, but the physicians diagnosed an anxiety crisis reactive to the work environment. Consequently, the medical certificate for work injury was edited and sent to INAIL. The worker has been off work for 110 days because of a anxious and depressive syndrome, due to the verbal conflict. In a later assessment, INAIL recognized only the first 30 days of the employee's time off as injury at work, while judging the following period off work as related to affectivity disturbance due to common disease, not related to work environment. The following year, "anxious-depressive syndrome" is worsened and attributed by the same worker to the recurrence of acts of persecution and discrimination against him at work. For this reason he applied for recognition of occupational disease diagnosed as "Chronic Adjustment Disorder with prolonged depressive reaction and somatic anxiety, which developed into a protracted conflict marked the employment situation". INAIL rejected that request, but in the same year the employee has submitted the complaint for "mobbing". Even this request was rejected. Literature shows many examples of traumatic events during working activities which cause psychiatric disturbances. These events include industrial disasters, explosions, transport and mining accidents, accidents in psychiatric units with high risks of assaults, armed conflicts, war, assault and sexual assault, natural disasters. Victims show symptoms of acute stress disorder (ASD) or post

  13. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  14. A psychophysiological investigation of emotion regulation in chronic severe posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Steven H; Shurick, Ashley A; Alvarez, Jennifer; Kuo, Janice; Nonyieva, Yuliana; Blechert, Jens; McRae, Kateri; Gross, James J

    2015-05-01

    There have been few direct examinations of the volitional control of emotional responses to provocative stimuli in PTSD. To address this gap, an emotion regulation task was administered to 27 Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom combat veterans and 23 healthy controls. Neutral and aversive photographs were presented to participants who did or did not employ emotion regulation strategies. Objective indices included corrugator electromyogram, the late positive potential, and the electrocardiogram. On uninstructed trials, participants with PTSD exhibited blunted cardiac reactivity rather than the exaggerated cardioacceleratory responses seen in trauma cue reactivity studies. On interleaved regulation trials, no measure evidenced group differences in voluntary emotion regulation. Persons with PTSD may not differ from normals in their capacity to voluntarily regulate normative emotional responses to provocative stimuli in the laboratory, though they may nevertheless respond differentially on uninstructed trials and endorse symptoms of dyscontrol pathognomonic of the disorder outside of the laboratory. PMID:25516381

  15. Efficacy of Azacitidine in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders associated with myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fraison, Jean-Baptiste; Mekinian, Arsène; Grignano, Eric; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Arlet, Jean-Benoit; Decaux, Olivier; Denis, Guillaume; Buchdahl, Anne-Laure; Omouri, Mohamed; Maigne, Gwenola; Aouba, Achille; Leon, Nathalie; Berthier, Sabine; Liozon, Eric; Park, Sophie; Gardin, Claude; Lortholary, Olivier; Rossignol, Julien; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier; Braun, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    This retrospective study describes efficacy of Azacitidine on autoimmune disorders (AID) associated with MDS/CMML in 22 patients. Response of AID to Azacitidine was observed in 19 patients (86%). Reduction or discontinuation of steroids and/or immunosuppressive therapy (IST) was possible in 16 cases (73%). Hematologic response was seen in 55% of the patients. MDS/CMML and AID evolution was concordant in 13 cases (59%): both favorable (n=11), both unfavorable (n=2), but AID improved while MDS/CMML worsened (n=8) and vice versa (n=1). Azacitidine frequently seems effective in controlling steroid-dependent AID associated with MDS/CMML, but prospective studies are necessary to confirm those findings. PMID:26922775

  16. Pilot Testing Behavior Therapy for Chronic Tic Disorders in Neurology and Developmental Pediatrics Clinics.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Emily J; Gilbert, Donald L; Zinner, Samuel H; Mink, Jonathan W; Lipps, Tara D; Wiegand, Geoffrey A; Vierhile, Amy E; Ely, Laura J; Piacentini, John; Walkup, John T; Woods, Douglas W

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) is an efficacious treatment with limited regional availability. As neurology and pediatric clinics are often the first point of therapeutic contact for individuals with tics, the present study assessed preliminary treatment response, acceptability, and feasibility of an abbreviated version, modified for child neurology and developmental pediatrics clinics. Fourteen youth (9-17) with Tourette disorder across 2 child neurology clinics and one developmental pediatrics clinic participated in a small case series. Clinician-rated tic severity (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale) decreased from pre- to posttreatment, z = -2.0, P < .05, r = -.48, as did tic-related impairment, z = -2.4, P < .05, r = -.57. Five of the 9 completers (56%) were classified as treatment responders. Satisfaction ratings were high, and therapeutic alliance ratings were moderately high. Results provide guidance for refinement of this modified CBIT protocol. PMID:26271790

  17. Predicting chronic posttraumatic stress disorder in bereaved relatives: a 6-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Tina E; Elklit, Ask; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Palic, Sabina

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to examine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to identify predicative risk factors for PTSD in bereaved people after a terminal illness. Fifty-four persons (mean age 60 years) participated in the study. Demographic, peritraumatic, and psychosocial factors were assessed in order to identify variables that affected PTSD severity. Six months after the loss, 21.6 % of the subjects had PTSD, an 8.6 % decrease from PTSD measured one month after the loss. Intake of medicine after the loss, place of death, not having a close intimate, negative affectivity, and the A2 criterion predicted 65 % of PTSD severity. A considerable number of the bereaved were still at great risk for developing PTSD six months after loss. PMID:23687214

  18. Sex differences in the JAK2V617F allele burden in chronic myeloproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Brady L.; Williams, Donna M.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Rogers, Ophelia; Isaacs, Mary Ann; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Spivak, Jerry L.; Moliterno, Alison R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The JAK2V617F allele burden is a variable measure, determined by the frequency of mitotic recombination events and the expansion of JAK2V617F clones. Since variability in the JAK2V617F allele burden is partly responsible for the distinct phenotypes seen in the myeloproliferative disorders, the objective of this study was to identify modifiers of the allele burden. Design and Methods Blood samples were obtained between May 2005 and January 2009 from 272 patients with essential thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis. The JAK2V617F allele burden was measured by an allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction using DNA from purified neutrophils. Repeated measures, on average 2 years apart, were available for 104 patients. Results Sex, age at diagnosis, and disease duration all independently influenced the JAK2V617F allele burden. When considering all patients with myeloproliferative disorders, women had significantly lower allele burdens than men (P=0.04). In those patients with repeated measures, the increase in allele burden per year between the first and second evaluations was significantly less in females than in males. Among those who experienced disease evolution, females were 4.5 times more likely to have evolution from essential thrombocytosis to polycythemia vera, but 0.23 times as likely to have evolution from essential thrombocytosis to myelofibrosis. Conclusions Sex is an independent factor accounting for variability in the JAK2V617F allele burden. We speculate that lower allele burdens in females reflect a lower frequency of mitotic recombination events in females than in males, and should be considered when evaluating the relationship of allele burden to disease phenotype and also in evaluating responses to JAK2V617F-inhibitors. Because sex may influence genotype and/or clonal expansion, underpinning the variability in JAK2V617F allele burden, it will be important to explore factors that determine susceptibility to

  19. Role of ghrelin in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cynthia K; Wu, Justin Che-Yuen

    2013-09-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that plays multiple roles in humans and other mammals. The functions of ghrelin include food intake regulation, gastrointestinal (GI) motility, and acid secretion by the GI tract. Many GI disorders involving infection, inflammation, and malignancy are also correlated with altered ghrelin production and secretion. Although suppressed ghrelin responses have already been observed in various GI disorders, such as chronic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and cachexia, elevated ghrelin responses have also been reported in celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Moreover, we recently reported that decreased fasting and postprandial ghrelin levels were observed in female patients with functional dyspepsia compared with healthy subjects. These alterations of ghrelin responses were significantly correlated with meal-related symptoms (bloating and early satiation) in female functional dyspepsia patients. We therefore support the notion that abnormal ghrelin responses may play important roles in various GI disorders. Furthermore, human clinical trials and animal studies involving the administration of ghrelin or its receptor agonists have shown promising improvements in gastroparesis, anorexia, and cancer. This review summarizes the impact of ghrelin, its family of peptides, and its receptors on GI diseases and proposes ghrelin modulation as a potential therapy. PMID:24073306

  20. Why myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) may kill you: disorders in the inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways may explain cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank Nm

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that disorders in inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative (IO&NS) pathways and a lowered antioxidant status are important pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning myalgic encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Important precipitating and perpetuating factors for ME/CFS are (amongst others) bacterial and viral infections; bacterial translocation due to an increased gut permeability; and psychological stress. Recently, Jason et al (2006) reported that the mean age of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome dying from heart failure, i.e. 58.7 years, is significantly lower than the age of those dying from heart failure in the general US population, i.e. 83.1 years. These findings implicate that ME/CFS is a risk factor to cardio-vascular disorder. This review demonstrates that disorders in various IO&NS pathways provide explanations for the earlier mortality due to cardiovascular disorders in ME/CFS. These pathways are: a) chronic low grade inflammation with extended production of nuclear factor kappa B and COX-2 and increased levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha; b) increased O&NS with increased peroxide levels, and phospholipid oxidation including oxidative damage to phosphatidylinositol; c) decreased levels of specific antioxidants, i.e. coenzyme Q10, zinc and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate; d) bacterial translocation as a result of leaky gut; e) decreased omega-3 polyunsatutared fatty acids (PUFAs), and increased omega-6 PUFA and saturated fatty acid levels; and f) the presence of viral and bacterial infections and psychological stressors. The mechanisms whereby each of these factors may contribute towards cardio-vascular disorder in ME/CFS are discussed. ME/CFS is a multisystemic metabolic-inflammatory disorder. The aberrations in IO&NS pathways may increase the risk for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:20038921

  1. Transcranial direct current stimulation and exercises for treatment of chronic temporomandibular disorders: a blind randomised-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L B; Lopes, T S; Soares, C; Maluf, R; Goes, B T; Sá, K N; Baptista, A F

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of adding transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to exercises for chronic pain, dysfunction and quality of life in subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Participants were selected based on the RDC/TMD criteria and assessed for pain intensity, pressure pain threshold over temporomandibular joint and cervical muscles and quality of life. After initial assessment, all individuals underwent a 4-week protocol of exercises and manual therapy, together with active or sham primary motor cortex tDCS. Stimulation was delivered through sponge electrodes, with 2 mA amplitude, for 20 min daily, over the first 5 days of the trial. A total of 32 subjects (mean age 24.7 ± 6.8 years) participated in the evaluations and treatment protocol. Mean pain intensity pre-treatment was 5.5 ± 1.4 for active tDCS group, and 6.3 ± 1.2 for sham tDCS. Both groups showed a decrease in pain intensity scores during the trial period (time factor--F(4.5,137.5) = 28.7, P < 0.001; group factor--F(1.0,30.0 = 7.7), P < 0.05). However, there were no differences between the groups regarding change in pain intensity (time*group interaction--F(4.5,137.5) = 1.5, P = 0.137). This result remained the same after 5 months (t-test t = 0.29, P > 0.05). Pressure pain thresholds decrease and improvement in quality of life were also noticeable in both groups, but again without significant differences between them. Absolute benefit increase was 37.5% (CI 95%: -15.9% to 90.9%), and number needed to treat was 2.66. This study suggests that there is no additional benefit in adding tDCS to exercises for the treatment of chronic TMD in young adults. PMID:25891021

  2. Effects of oral motor exercises and laser therapy on chronic temporomandibular disorders: a randomized study with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Mazzetto, Marcelo Oliveira; Da Silva, Marco Antonio M Rodrigues; de Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with oral motor exercises (OM-exercises) for rehabilitation of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Eighty-two patients with chronic TMD and 20 healthy subjects (control group) participated in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups: GI (LLLT + OM exercises), GII (orofacial myofunctional therapy-OMT-which contains pain relief strategies and OM-exercises), and GIII (LLLT placebo + OM-exercises) and GIV (LLLT). LLLT (AsGaAl; 780-nm wavelength; average power of 60 mW, 40 s, and 60 ± 1.0 J/cm²) was used to promote analgesia, while OM-exercises were used to reestablish the orofacial functions. Evaluations at baseline (T1), after treatment immediate (T2), and at follow-up (T3) were muscle and joint tenderness to palpation, TMD severity, and orofacial myofunctional status. There was a significant improvement in outcome measures in all treated groups with stability at follow-up (Friedman test, P < 0.05), but GIV did not show difference in orofacial functions after LLLT (P > 0.05). Intergroup comparisons showed that all treated groups had no difference in tenderness to palpation of temporal muscle compared to GC at follow-up (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01). Moreover, GI, GII, and GIII showed no difference from GC in orofacial functional condition (T2 and T3) while they differed significantly from GIV (P < 0.01). In conclusion, LLLT combined with OM-exercises was more effective in promoting TMD rehabilitation than LLLT alone was. Similar treatment results were verified with the OMT protocol. PMID:27085322

  3. Intractable colitis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Aytaç; Kuloğlu, Zarife; Doğu, Figen; İkincioğulları, Aydan; Ensari, Arzu; Çiftçi, Ergin; Kansu, Aydan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an autosomal recessive or X-linked disorder caused by NADPH oxidase deficiency leading to an impaired ability of reactive superoxide anion and metabolite formation and recurring severe bacterial and fungal infections, with a high mortality rate. Diarrhea, colitis, ileus, perirectal abscess formation and anal fissures are reported gastrointestinal findings in these patients. We report a case of intractable colitis associated with CGD in a young girl. PMID:26690604

  4. Central role of carotid body chemoreceptors in disordered breathing and cardiorenal dysfunction in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Noah J.; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory breathing (OB) patterns are observed in pre-term infants, patients with cardio-renal impairment, and in otherwise healthy humans exposed to high altitude. Enhanced carotid body (CB) chemoreflex sensitivity is common to all of these populations and is thought to contribute to these abnormal patterns by destabilizing the respiratory control system. OB patterns in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients are associated with greater levels of tonic and chemoreflex-evoked sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which is associated with greater morbidity and poor prognosis. Enhanced chemoreflex drive may contribute to tonic elevations in SNA by strengthening the relationship between respiratory and sympathetic neural outflow. Elimination of CB afferents in experimental models of CHF has been shown to reduce OB, respiratory-sympathetic coupling, and renal SNA, and to improve autonomic balance in the heart. The CB chemoreceptors may play an important role in progression of CHF by contributing to respiratory instability and OB, which in turn further exacerbates tonic and chemoreflex-evoked increases in SNA to the heart and kidney. PMID:25505417

  5. Mitochondrial antibodies in chronic liver diseases and connective tissue disorders: further characterization of the autoantigens.

    PubMed Central

    Meek, F; Khoury, E L; Doniach, D; Baum, H

    1980-01-01

    The heterogeneity of mitochrondrial autoantibodies in a variety of diseases states has been critically re-examined by a combination of immunofluorescence staining (IFL) and complement fixation tests (CFT). The different mitochondrial IFL patterns described by other workers were confirmed and extra criteria using new substrates are presented for their differential recognition. Biochemically defined mitochondrial subfractions were used in the CFT to confirm and extend the IFL classifications. The 'M1' cardiolipin antibodies of syphilis did not react with the ATPase fraction but the antigen was present in all membrane preparations and found to be chemically resistant. The major antibody specificity of the 'M3' pattern associated with drug-induced pseudolupus syndrome is a firmly bound, outer membrane component; and a second, minor reactivity is apparently to a mercurial-insensitive antigen present in the chloroform-released ATPase preparation. The 'M5' antibody pattern correlates with a digitonin-sensitive outer membrane component. Although it was not possible to differentiate within the group of liver diseases between the 'M2' antibodies of primary biliary cirrhosis and the previously described 'M4' antibodies of other chronic liver diseases, several antibody specificities were demonstrated. All sera from liver disease patients contain the antibody directed against a mercurial-sensitive protein found in the chloroform-released ATPase preparation, and, in addition, varying titres of antibodies against two or more mercurial-resistant membrane components, of which at least one is on the inner membrane and one on the outer membrane. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6449333

  6. [Influence of antidepressant therapy on psychovegetative disorders in patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis in perioperative period].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Shchekotov, V V; Tret'iakova, Iu I; Solov'eva, I V; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    2008-01-01

    The results of prospective study of the stage of vascular endothelium and neutrophil phagocytic activity (NPA) in patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis (CCC) in perioperative period, who had anxious depressive disturbances (ADD), were represented. 61 patients were examined 3 weeks before cholecystectomy (CE). Intensity of anxiety and depression, vegetative tonus, desquamated endotheliocytes (DE) in blood and phagocytosis degree were assessed. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. The patients of 1st group (n = 30) received antidepressant coaxil during perioperative period (6 weeks); 2nd group (the control) was composed of 31 patients and was treated without coaxil. In 1st group significant decrease in AAD and symptoms of vegetative dystonia (VD) in 3 weeks after CE was detected; number of DE in blood was considerable reduces, and NPA was significantly increased vs. control group. Correlation analysis made possible to show that the higher AAD and VD intensity, the more frequently epithelium desquamation was detected, and percentage of phagocytes was reduced at increase in DE in blood. Use of balanced antidepressant coaxil in perioperative period in CCC patients makes possible to reduce occurrence and intensity of AAD and VD after operation, improve vascular endothelium state, increase NPA and adaptive reserves of organism. PMID:18720713

  7. Gastrointestinal nuclear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains paper grouped under the headings of: salivary scintigraphy, abscess detection with radionuclides; pediatric gastroenterology; liver spleen, and miscellaneous GI studies: gastrointestinal.

  8. The pharmacology of neurotrophic treatment with Cerebrolysin: brain protection and repair to counteract pathologies of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Masliah, E; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2012-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors are considered as part of the therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders like dementia, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation which mimics the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors on brain protection and repair. In dementia models, Cerebrolysin decreases β-amyloid deposition and microtubule-associated protein tau phosphorylation by regulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity, increases synaptic density and restores neuronal cytoarchitecture. These effects protect integrity of the neuronal circuits and thus result in improved cognitive and behavioral performance. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, the basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental studies in stroke animal models have shown that Cerebrolysin stabilizes the structural integrity of cells by inhibition of calpain and reduces the number of apoptotic cells after ischemic lesion. Cerebrolysin induces restorative processes, decreases infarct volume and edema formation and promotes functional recovery. Stroke-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was also promoted by Cerebrolysin, thus supporting the brain's self-repair after stroke. Both, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury conditions stimulate the expression of natural neurotrophic factors to promote repair and regeneration processes -axonal regeneration, neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis- that is considered to be crucial for the future recovery. Neuroprotective effects of Cerebrolysin on experimentally induced traumatic spinal cord injury have shown that Cerebrolysin prevents apoptosis of lesioned motoneurons and promotes functional recovery. This section summarizes the most relevant data on the pharmacology of Cerebrolysin obtained from in vitro assays (biochemical and cell cultures) and in vivo animal models of acute and chronic neurological disorders. PMID

  9. Chronic Subordination Stress Induces Hyperphagia and Disrupts Eating Behavior in Mice Modeling Binge-Eating-Like Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Razzoli, Maria; Sanghez, Valentina; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eating disorders are associated with physical morbidity and appear to have causal factors like stressful life events and negative affect. Binge-eating disorder (BED) is characterized by eating in a discrete period of time a larger than normal amount of food, a sense of lack of control over eating, and marked distress. There are still unmet needs for the identification of mechanisms regulating excessive eating, which is in part due to the lack of appropriate animal models. We developed a naturalistic murine model of subordination stress-induced hyperphagia associated with the development of obesity. Here, we tested the hypotheses that the eating responses of subordinate mice recapitulate the BED and that limiting hyperphagia could prevent stress-associated metabolic changes. Methods: Adult male mice were exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress (CSS) associated with the automated acquisition of food intake and we performed a detailed meal pattern analysis. Additionally, using a pair-feeding protocol we tested the hypothesis that the manifestation of obesity and the metabolic syndrome could be prevented by limiting hyperphagia. Results: The architecture of feeding of subordinate mice was disrupted during the stress protocol due to disproportionate amount of food ingested at higher rate and with shorter satiety ratio than control mice. Subordinate mice hyperphagia was further exacerbated in response to either hunger or to the acute application of a social defeat. Notably, the obese phenotype but not the fasting hyperglycemia of subordinate mice was abrogated by preventing hyperphagia in a pair-feeding paradigm. Conclusion: Overall, these results support the validity of our CSS to model BED allowing for the determination of the underlying molecular mechanisms and the generation of testable predictions for innovative therapies, based on the understanding of the regulation and the control of food intake. PMID:25621284

  10. Chronic orthostatic intolerance: a disorder with discordant cardiac and vascular sympathetic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Snell, M.; Robertson, D.; Porta, A.; Harris, P.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic orthostatic intolerance (COI) is a debilitating autonomic condition in young adults. Its neurohumoral and hemodynamic profiles suggest possible alterations of postural sympathetic function and of baroreflex control of heart rate (HR). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 16 COI patients and 16 healthy volunteers, intra-arterial blood pressure (BP), ECG, central venous pressure (CVP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded at rest and during 75 degrees tilt. Spectral analysis of RR interval and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) variabilities provided indices of sympathovagal modulation of the sinoatrial node (ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency components, LF/HF) and of sympathetic vasomotor control (LFSAP). Baroreflex mechanisms were assessed (1) by the slope of the regression line obtained from changes of RR interval and MSNA evoked by pharmacologically induced alterations in BP and (2) by the index alpha, obtained from cross-spectral analysis of RR and SAP variabilities. At rest, HR, MSNA, LF/HF, and LFSAP were higher in COI patients, whereas BP and CVP were similar in the two groups. During tilt, BP did not change and CVP fell by the same extent in the 2 groups; the increase of HR and LF/HF was more pronounced in COI patients. Conversely, the increase of MSNA was lower in COI than in control subjects. Baroreflex sensitivity was similar in COI and control subjects at rest; tilt reduced alpha similarly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: COI is characterized by an overall enhancement of noradrenergic tone at rest and by a blunted postganglionic sympathetic response to standing, with a compensatory cardiac sympathetic overactivity. Baroreflex mechanisms maintain their functional responsiveness. These data suggest that in COI, the functional distribution of central sympathetic tone to the heart and vasculature is abnormal.

  11. Investigation of automatic avoidance in displaced individuals with chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Charlotte E; Behmer, Friederike; Muhtz, Christoph; Fritzsche, Anja; Moritz, Steffen; Jelinek, Lena

    2015-08-30

    Avoidance of trauma-related stimuli is a key feature of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). However, avoidance has almost exclusively been investigated with explicit measures targeting more strategic aspects of behavior. The aim of the present study was to examine automatic avoidance in older individuals displaced as children at the end of World War II with (n=22) and without PTSD (n=26) and in non-traumatized control participants (n=23) with an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants were instructed to respond to the color (gray, brown) of trauma-related, neutral, and control pictures by pushing or pulling a joystick. Groups did not differ significantly as to their behavioral tendencies towards trauma-related pictures. Thus, there was no evidence for automatic avoidance in individuals with PTSD. However, high vigilance was associated with stronger implicit avoidance towards trauma-related pictures in the PTSD group. Several explanations for the non-significant results as well as implications and limitations of the present findings are discussed. PMID:26027440

  12. The Serotonin Transporter 5-HTTPR Polymorphism is associated with Current and Lifetime Depression in Persons with Chronic Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Javier; Hare, Liz; Camarena, Beatriz; Glahn, David; Dassori, Albana; Medina, Rolando; Contrerasa, Salvador; Ramirez, Mercedes; Armas, Regina; Munoz, Rodrigo; Mendoza, Rick; Raventos, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Palmer, Raymond; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Variation in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter region has been shown to influence depression in persons who have been exposed to a number of stressful life events. Method We evaluated whether genetic variation in 5-HTTLPR, influences current depression, lifetime history of depression and quantitative measures of depression in persons with chronic psychotic disorders. This is an association study of a genetic variant with quantitative and categorical definitions of depression conducted in the Southwest United States, Mexico, and Costa Rica. We analyzed 260 subjects with a history of psychosis, from a sample of 129 families. Results We found that persons carrying at least one short allele had a statistically significant increased lifetime risk for depressive syndromes (p<.02, Odds Ratio=2.18, 95% CI=1.10–4.20). Conclusion The “ss” or “sl” genotype at the 5-HTTLPR promoter polymorphic locus increases the risk of psychotic individuals to develop major depression during the course of their illness. PMID:19016667

  13. Towards a method to differentiate chronic disorder of consciousness patients' awareness: The Low-Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography Analysis.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Placido; Leo, Antonino; Cacciola, Alberto; Bramanti, Alessia; Manuli, Alfredo; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2016-09-15

    Assessing residual signs of awareness in patients suffering from chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC) is a challenging issue. DOC patient behavioral assessment is often doubtful since some individuals may retain covert traces of awareness; thus, some Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (UWS) patients may be misdiagnosed. The aim of our study was to explore possible differences between the source powers within poly-modal cortices to differentiate Minimally Conscious State (MCS) from UWS. To this end, we recorded an electroencephalogram (EEG) during awake resting state and performed a Low-Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA), which is a 3D source localization method allowing the visualization of the most probable neuroanatomical generators of EEG differences. MCS and UWS patients showed significant variations concerning the frontal source power of delta-band, frontal and parietal of theta, parietal and occipital of alpha, central of beta, and parietal of gamma, in correlation with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) score. The alpha-band was the most significant LORETA data correlating with the consciousness level. In addition, we observed a significant correlation between central beta-peaks and the motor abilities and a dissociation between theta and gamma bands within parietal regions. Our findings suggest that LORETA analysis may be useful in DOC differential diagnosis since distinct neurophysiological correlates in some UWS patients could be used to assess deeper the residual cerebral activity of brain areas responsible for covert awareness. PMID:27538628

  14. Assessing Environmental Consequences of Ticcing in Youth with Chronic Tic Disorders: The Tic Accommodation and Reactions Scale

    PubMed Central

    Capriotti, Matthew R.; Piacentini, John C.; Himle, Michael B.; Ricketts, Emily J.; Espil, Flint M.; Lee, Han Joo; Turkel, Jennifer E.; Woods, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Tics associated with Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders (CTDs) often draw social reactions and disrupt ongoing behavior. In some cases, such tic-related consequences may function to alter moment-to-moment and future tic severity. These observations have been incorporated into contemporary biopsychosocial models of CTD phenomenology, but systematic research detailing the nature of the relationship between environmental consequences and ticcing remains scarce. This study describes the development of the Tic Accommodation and Reactions Scale (TARS), a measure of the number and frequency of immediate consequences for ticcing experienced by youth with CTDs. Thirty eight youth with CTDs and their parents completed the TARS as part of a broader assessment of CTD symptoms and psychosocial functioning. The TARS demonstrated good psychometric properties (i.e., internal consistency, parent-child agreement, convergent validity, discriminant validity). Differences between parent-reported and child-reported data indicated that children may provide more valid reports of tic-contingent consequences than parents. Although preliminary, results of this study suggest that the TARS is a psychometrically sound measure of tic-related consequences suited for future research in youth with CTDs. PMID:27076696

  15. A pilot study of the effects of chronic paroxetine administration on hippocampal N-acetylaspartate in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Mathew, S J; Price, R B; Shungu, D C; Mao, X; Smith, E L P; Amiel, J M; Coplan, J D

    2010-08-01

    The neural basis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is poorly characterized. The effect of chronic administration (12 weeks) of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal viability, was evaluated in adults with GAD using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((1)H MRSI) at 1.5 T. We hypothesized that, pretreatment abnormalities in hippocampal NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) would normalize with symptomatic improvement. Nine GAD patients (mean age = 41.7 year; 4 females) received 12 weeks of open-label paroxetine treatment, flexibly dosed up to 60 mg/day. Clinical outcome was assessed with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). Multislice ( 1)H MRSI scans were performed at unmedicated baseline and following 6 and 12 weeks of treatment. Ten untreated healthy volunteers (HVs) (mean age = 37.1 year; 4 females) received scans at the same intervals. All patients achieved remission (HAM-A

  16. New strategies in treatment of mineral and bone disorders and associated cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce

    2008-11-01

    Mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients along with the use of calcium-based phosphate binders may result in vascular calcification (VC) development and associated increase in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) mortality. A few treatment modalities to control hyperphosphatemia, VC and CVD over the years have failed. Recently appeared calcium-aluminum free phosphate binders (sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate) have reduced hypercalcemic adverse events compared to calcium-based binders, although beneficial effects on CVD outcome to justify further widespread utilization of these agents in CKD patients are not reported so far. At present long-term safety of lanthanum administration has been challenged based on its similarities with aluminum and associated liver toxicity reported in experimental rat models. However, recent evidence in CKD patients and the absence of solid arguments for any particular rat organ toxicity, suggest that lanthanum is safe and efficient in treatment of hyperphosphatemia. Classical interventions aimed to reduce PTH concentration are associated with an increase in Ca x P product. A major breakthrough here was achieved with introduction of calcimimetics (cinacalcet). Apart from its effectiveness in reduction of PTH and Ca x P product, a lot of controversy appeared on the cost-effectiveness of this drug in absence of CVD outcome evidence. Hence, adoption of these new therapeutical strategies might be reserved for adamantine cases when there is no economical constraint for this long-term treatment. In this regard, new therapeutic strategies and patents in CKD patients will be discussed in this review. PMID:18991797

  17. Employment outcomes for hard-to-reach persons with chronic and severe substance use disorders receiving assertive community treatment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Paul B; Meisler, Neil; Duross, Deborah; Bailey, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Many persons with chronic and severe substance use disorders (SUDs) enter and exit public substance dependence treatment systems with limited benefit, but continue overuse of high-cost health and human services. Less than a third holds jobs, earning income below U.S. federal poverty levels. Long-term integrated substance dependency treatment, rehabilitation, and support services will be essential to resolve substance dependence and employment problems. This single-group program evaluation reports adaptation of Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), a multi-component, team-based service model originally designed for persons with severe mental illnesses and multiple disabilities, for effectiveness with persons with severe SUDs. The ACT model delivers an integrated package of treatment, rehabilitation, and support to reduce substance misuse and increase employment. Of the 35 clients admitted 12 months prior to conclusion of this 2-year service demonstration, only one left treatment prematurely. Generally, clients modestly reduced substance misuse and increased employment. However, the evaluation design and small sample limit inferences of causation and generalizability of these promising outcomes. Persuading states to adopt expensive team-based approaches for this population will require firm evidence of favorable cost-benefit ratios. PMID:15603010

  18. Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation in Patients with Chronic Disorder of Consciousness: A Possible Way to Cut the Diagnostic Gordian Knot?

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Placido; Leo, Antonino; Russo, Margherita; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) is a chronic disorder of consciousness (DOC) characterized by a lack of awareness and purposeful motor behaviors, owing to an extensive brain connectivity impairment. Nevertheless, some UWS patients may retain residual brain connectivity patterns, which may sustain a covert awareness, namely functional locked-in syndrome (fLIS). We evaluated the possibility of bringing to light such residual neural networks using a non-invasive neurostimulation protocol. To this end, we enrolled 15 healthy individuals and 26 DOC patients (minimally conscious state-MCS- and UWS), who underwent a γ-band transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We measured the effects of tACS on power and partial-directed coherence within local and long-range cortical networks, before and after the protocol application. tACS was able to specifically modulate large-scale cortical effective connectivity and excitability in all the MCS participants and some UWS patients, who could be, therefore, considered as suffering from fLIS. Hence, tACS could be a useful approach in supporting a DOC differential diagnosis, depending on the level of preservation of the cortical large-scale effective connectivity. PMID:27062669

  19. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-02-15

    Curcumin, also known as diferuloylmethane, is derived from the plant Curcuma longa and is the active ingredient of the spice turmeric. The therapeutic activities of curcumin for a wide variety of diseases such as diabetes, allergies, arthritis and other chronic and inflammatory diseases have been known for a long time. More recently, curcumin's therapeutic potential for preventing and treating various cancers is being recognized. As curcumin's therapeutic promise is being explored more systematically in various diseases, it has become clear that, due to its increased bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract, curcumin may be particularly suited to be developed to treat gastrointestinal diseases. This review summarizes some of the current literature of curcumin's anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer potential in inflammatory bowel diseases, hepatic fibrosis and gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:21607160

  20. The effects of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders on quality of life across the lifespan: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joel; Seri, Stefano; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and other chronic tic disorders are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by the presence of tics and associated behavioral problems. Whilst converging evidence indicates that these conditions can affect patients' quality of life (QoL), the extent of this impairment across the lifespan is not well understood. We conducted a systematic literature review of published QoL studies in GTS and other chronic tic disorders to comprehensively assess the effects of these conditions on QoL in different age groups. We found that QoL can be perceived differently by child and adult patients, especially with regard to the reciprocal contributions of tics and behavioral problems to the different domains of QoL. Specifically, QoL profiles in children often reflect the impact of co-morbid attention-deficit and hyperactivity symptoms, which tend to improve with age, whereas adults' perception of QoL seems to be more strongly affected by the presence of depression and anxiety. Management strategies should take into account differences in age-related QoL needs between children and adults with GTS or other chronic tic disorders. PMID:26880181