Science.gov

Sample records for chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction

  1. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction Caused by Chronic Lyme Neuroborreliosis. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schefte, David F; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-07-30

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is often classified as idiopathic. The condition is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity, and treatment options are often unsatisfactory. A case of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a 66-year-old woman, presenting with back and abdominal pain, urinary retention and severe constipation is described. The patient lived in an area in which Lyme disease is endemic and had been bitten by ixodes ticks. Intrathecal synthesis of anti-borrelia IgM and IgG and lymphocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid was found, consistent with chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis since symptoms had lasted for more than six months. The patient's gastrointestinal function recovered and the pain subsided significantly following treatment with antibiotics. Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) often results in palsy, but rarely affects the autonomic nervous system. Three patients have been described with intestinal pseudoobstruction due to acute LNB. However, this is the first described case of intestinal pseudoobstruction due to chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. LNB must be suspected in patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction, in particular in patients who have been bitten by an ixodes tick and in patients living in an endemic area. PMID:26130639

  2. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction Caused by Chronic Lyme Neuroborreliosis. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Schefte, David F; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is often classified as idiopathic. The condition is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity, and treatment options are often unsatisfactory. A case of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a 66-year-old woman, presenting with back and abdominal pain, urinary retention and severe constipation is described. The patient lived in an area in which Lyme disease is endemic and had been bitten by ixodes ticks. Intrathecal synthesis of anti-borrelia IgM and IgG and lymphocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid was found, consistent with chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis since symptoms had lasted for more than six months. The patient’s gastrointestinal function recovered and the pain subsided significantly following treatment with antibiotics. Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) often results in palsy, but rarely affects the autonomic nervous system. Three patients have been described with intestinal pseudoobstruction due to acute LNB. However, this is the first described case of intestinal pseudoobstruction due to chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. LNB must be suspected in patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction, in particular in patients who have been bitten by an ixodes tick and in patients living in an endemic area. PMID:26130639

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Filamin A attaches (binds) to another protein called actin and helps it form the branching network of ... glossary definitions help with understanding intestinal pseudo-obstruction? actin ; autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; chromosome ; chronic ; ...

  4. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria as a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Angkathunyakul, Napat; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Molagool, Sani; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan

    2015-01-01

    Visceral myopathy is one of the causes of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Most cases pathologically reveal degenerative changes of myocytes or muscularis propia atrophy and fibrosis. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria is extremely rare. We report a case of a 9-mo-old Thai male baby who presented with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologic findings showed abnormal layering of small intestinal muscularis propria with an additional oblique layer and aberrant muscularization in serosa. The patient also had a short small bowel without malrotation, brachydactyly, and absence of the 2nd to 4th middle phalanges of both hands. The patient was treated with cisapride and combined parenteral and enteral nutritional support. He had gradual clinical improvement and gained body weight. Subsequently, the parenteral nutrition was discontinued. The previously reported cases are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26078585

  5. Radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Schuffler, M.D.; Mehta, S.J.; Everson, G.T.

    1986-10-01

    A case of intestinal pseudoobstruction occurring 30 yr after radiation therapy is described. Mechanical causes of obstruction were excluded by laparotomy. Histology of full-thickness sections of the small bowel revealed vascular ectasia and sclerosis, serosal fibrosis, neuronal proliferation within the submucosa, and degeneration of the muscle fibers of the circular layer of the muscularis propria. On the basis of the clinical and histologic findings we conclude that, in this patient, intestinal pseudoobstruction was due to muscular and neuronal injury from abdominal irradiation.

  6. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, H G; Hamel, B C; Rieu, P; Höweler, C J; Peters, F T

    1992-01-01

    We describe four myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients who developed recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Some episodes were associated with gastroenteritis, while abdominal crowding may have occurred in one case during the third trimester of pregnancy. In most instances, however, no apparent cause could be identified. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction may occur at any stage of DM. In one of our cases intestinal pseudo-obstruction preceded significant muscle weakness by 15 years. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is usually treated effectively with conservative measures. These include restriction of oral intake, intravenous fluids, and multiple enemas or colonoscopy. Improved intestinal function was noted in one case treated with the prokinetic agent cisapride. A partial sigmoid resection was performed in three cases with dolichomegacolon. No abnormalities were reported on histological examination. Since intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare complication of DM, it is of interest that two of our cases are sibs. Review of published reports showed several reports of familial occurrence of specific complications. These include cardiac conduction disturbances, focal myocarditis, mitral valve prolapse, pilomatrixomas, polyneuropathy, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and dilatation of the urinary tract. Myotonic dystrophy may show a tendency to familial clustering of organ specific involvement. PMID:1453429

  7. Extensive myenteric ganglionitis in a case of equine chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction associated with EHV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Pavone, S; Sforna, M; Gialletti, R; Prato, S; Marenzoni, M L; Mandara, M T

    2013-05-01

    A 7-year-old male trotter horse with a history of recurrent colic displayed clinical findings consistent with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP). At laparotomy, an impaction of the descending colon associated with marked atrophy of the right dorsal colon was found. The horse was humanely destroyed and tissues collected at necropsy examination revealed diffuse enteric ganglionitis comprising an infiltrate of CD3(+) T lymphocytes and plasma cells. At all levels of the intestinal tract the number of myenteric ganglia and of normal ganglion cells was decreased significantly. There were chromatolytic or necrotic neurons and the amount of connective tissue surrounding ganglia was increased. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated slightly reduced expression of neuron-specific enolase and a moderate increase in expression of S100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in a sample of right dorsal colon taken during the necropsy examination compared with a biopsy sample taken from the same location. Immunolabelling and semi-nested polymerase chain reaction for equine herpesvirus (EHV)-1 performed on the gut were positive, supporting an aetiological relationship between EHV-1 infection and the enteric ganglionitis. PMID:22935089

  8. Radiation-induced recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, J.L.; Anuras, S.

    1981-06-01

    The syndrome of intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a complex of signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction without evidence of mechanical obstruction of the intestinal lumen. A patient with radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction is described. The patient is a 74-year old woman with a history of chronic diarrhea, recurrent episodes of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since receiving a 13,000 rad radiation dose to the pelvis in 1954. She has been hospitalized on many occasions for symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal contrast roentgenograms with small bowel follow-through done during these episodes revealed multiple dilated loops of small bowel with no obstructing lesion. Barium enemas revealed no obstructing lesion. Each episode resolved with conservative therapy. Other secondary causes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction were ruled out in our patient. She gave no history of familial gastrointestinal disorders. Although postirradiation motility abnormalities have been demonstrated experimentally this is the first report of radiation induced intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  9. Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction caused by acquired visceral neuropathy localised in the left colon: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Amano, S; Matsumoto, K; Kitagawa, T; Masuda, T

    1987-07-01

    Two cases of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP) are reported. One is a 51-year-old man, and the other is a 47-year-old woman. Both patients presented with severe constipation and barium enema showed a marked dilation of the right colon, and a narrowing in the left colon. Studies done on the motility of the colon and anorectum revealed normal resting pressure profiles of the anorectom, a normal recto-anal reflex, and a normal resting tone of the collapsed colon. Administration of methacholine chloride, however, provoked large, non-propulsive movements in the collapsed colon, which were inhibited by the administration of atropin sulfate. Histologic examination disclosed a marked decrease in neurons and an increase of Schwann cells in the myenteric plexus of the collapsed colon. CIIP due to acquired visceral neuropathy localised in the left colon, was diagnosed as a result of manometric and histologic findings. One case was cured surgically, by a left hemi-colectomy, and the other was cured medically using choline antagonists and laxatives. PMID:2824898

  10. GAD Antibodies as Key Link Between Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction, Autonomic Neuropathy, and Limb Stiffness in a Nondiabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andrea; Mannartz, Vera; Wasmuth, Hermann; Trautwein, Christian; Neumann, Ulf-Peter; Weis, Joachim; Grosse, Joachim; Fuest, Matthias; Hilz, Max-J.; Schulz, Joerg B.; Haubrich, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP) can be a severe burden and even a life-threatening disorder. Typically, several years of uncertainty are passing before diagnosis. We are reporting the case of a young woman with a decade of severe, progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility. Unusually, she had also developed an autonomic neuropathy, and a stiff limb syndrome. In addition to achalasia and CIP the young woman also developed neuropathic symptoms: orthostatic intolerance, urinary retention, a Horner syndrome, and lower limb stiffness. Careful interdisciplinary diagnostics excluded underlying infectious, rheumatoid, metabolic or tumorous diseases. The detection of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies, however, seemed to link CIP, autonomic neuropathy, and limb stiffness and pointed at an autoimmune origin of our patient's complaints. This was supported by the positive effects of intravenous immunoglobulin. In response to this therapy the body weight had stabilized, orthostatic tolerance had improved, and limb stiffness was reversed. The case suggested that GAD antibodies should be considered in CIP also in nondiabetic patients. This may support earlier diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:26252289

  11. Filamin A Is Mutated in X-Linked Chronic Idiopathic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction with Central Nervous System Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Annagiusi; Auricchio, Renata; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Cotugno, Gabriella; Reardon, William; Milla, Peter J.; Ballabio, Andrea; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Auricchio, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We have previously reported that an X-linked recessive form of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIPX) maps to Xq28. To select candidate genes for the disease, we analyzed the expression in murine fetal brain and intestine of 56 genes from the critical region. We selected and sequenced seven genes and found that one affected male from a large CIIPX-affected kindred bears a 2-bp deletion in exon 2 of the FLNA gene that is present at the heterozygous state in the carrier females of the family. The frameshift mutation is located between two close methionines at the filamin N terminus and is predicted to produce a protein truncated shortly after the first predicted methionine. Loss-of-function FLNA mutations have been associated with X-linked dominant nodular ventricular heterotopia (PVNH), a central nervous system (CNS) migration defect that presents with seizures in females and lethality in males. Notably, the affected male bearing the FLNA deletion had signs of CNS involvement and potentially has PVNH. To understand how the severe frameshift mutation we found can explain the CIIPX phenotype and its X-linked recessive inheritance, we transiently expressed both the wild- type and mutant filamin in cell culture and found that filamin translation can start from either of the two initial methionines in these conditions. Therefore, translation of a normal shorter filamin can occur in vitro from the second methionine downstream of the 2-bp insertion we found. We confirmed this, demonstrating that the filamin protein is present in the patient’s lymphoblastoid cell line that shows abnormal cytoskeletal actin organization compared with normal lymphoblasts. We conclude that the filamin N terminal region between the initial two methionines is crucial for proper enteric neuron development. PMID:17357080

  12. Visceral smooth muscle α-actin deficiency associated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a Bengal cat (Felis catus x Prionailurus bengalensis).

    PubMed

    Imai, D M; Miller, J L; Leonard, B C; Bach, J; Drees, R; Steinberg, H; Teixeira, L B C

    2014-05-01

    An adult Bengal cat (Felis catus × Prionailurus bengalensis) with a prolonged history of partial anorexia, regurgitation, and weight loss and a clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic diagnosis of persistent megaesophagus and gastrointestinal ileus was submitted for necropsy. The intestinal tract was diffusely distended by gas and fluid with appreciable loss of muscle tone and an absence of luminal obstruction, consistent with the clinical history of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologically, the autonomic nervous system was intact, but the smooth muscle within the gastrointestinal wall exhibited a marked basophilia that was most pronounced in the jejunum. Immunohistochemistry for neurofilament, synaptophysin, CD117, and desmin demonstrated that the number of myenteric ganglia, number of interstitial cells, and leiomyocyte desmin content were similar when compared with the unaffected age- and species-matched control. Immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle α-actin demonstrated a striking loss of immunoreactivity, predominantly in the circular layer of the jejunum, that corresponded with the tinctorial change in leiomyocytes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed loss of myofibrils, loss of organelle polarity, and significantly larger central mitochondria (megamitochondria) in affected leiomyocytes, as well as nonspecific degenerative changes. Although the presence of a primary leiomyopathy and a causal relationship could not be confirmed in this case, leiomyopathies are considered a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in human medicine, and loss of smooth muscle α-actin immunoreactivity is one recognized marker for intestinal dysmotility. PMID:23774747

  13. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction: An uncommon condition with heterogeneous etiology and unpredictable outcome

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Eugen Florin; Vasile, Ion; Ionescu, Reanina

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) either acute or chronic is a condition including features of intestinal ileus in absence of mechanical obstruction. Our paper presents such a rare case of idiopathic IPO in a 53-year-old male patient with recurrent episodes of pseudo-obstruction, which were successfully resolved by anticholinesterase agents, motilin agonists or colonic decompression. However, the patient finally underwent total colectomy. Huge colonic dilatation was identified intraoperatively, while histology showed a neuropathic variant of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Etiologic mechanisms and current therapeutic methods are reviewed in this paper, which concludes that IPO is a condition in which conservative treatment usually fails. Total colectomy with ileoanal pouch may be the only solution in these situations. PMID:18240359

  14. Fatal Acute Intestinal Pseudoobstruction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Ricardo E; Morris, Winston E; Waldemarson, Anne Halldén; Hedenqvist, Patricia; Lindberg, Ronny

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe the epizootiology and pathology of spontaneous, fatal acute intestinal pseudoobstruction that occurred in a mouse colony of 1000 breeding pairs, mainly of the C57Bl/6 strain and free from known pathogenic agents. Most of the mice affected were dams in the second week of lactation. At necropsy, segments of the small intestines were distended with fluid contents. Widespread apoptosis of the villus epithelium of the small intestine and superficial epithelial cells of the large intestine, associated with strong expression of active caspase 3, was a distinctive feature. Necrotic enterocytes, mucosal erosions, and acute mucosal inflammation were prominent in some mice, and morphologic signs of toxemia were generally present. No light microscopic neuronal changes were apparent in the gut, and no etiologic agents were identified. These results indicate that sudden activation of apoptosis in the trophically stimulated gut epithelium during peak lactation was instrumental for the fatal outcome of the condition, but the primary cause of the motility dysfunction of the bowel was not established. PMID:18459715

  15. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to intestinal neuronal dysplasia type B (IND B), concerning one case].

    PubMed

    Junquera Bañares, S; Oria Mundín, E; Córdoba Iturriagagoitia, A; Botella-Carretero, J J

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal neuronal dysplasia type B (IND B) is an infrequent disease due to hyperplasia of the parasympathetic submucous plexus which causes alteration of intestinal motility, giving rise to symptoms of constipation and subocclusive manifestations. The disease is difficult to diagnose. It requires high clinical suspicion and should include differential diagnosis of patients with repeated subocclusive manifestations in order to make an early and correct diagnosis and avoid complications derived from unnecessary surgery that worsens the prognosis. We present the case of a 33-year-old Moroccan male who was admitted to our hospital on 2 occasions in 11 months, requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for five months. The immunohistochemical analysis of the ileostomy and colostomy stoma led to a diagnosis of IND B. Eighteen months later, the patients is leading a normal life and has recovered the 25 kilos lost following the dietary indications and with the enzymatic supplements. PMID:24871124

  16. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction following oral baclofen: An unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Senthilkumaran, Kuppusamy; Easwaran, Bettaiyagowder; Rajbhaskar, Rajamariappan

    2015-01-01

    Baclofen is a gamma- aminobutyric acid B (GABA B) agonist used for the management of spasticity associated with spinal cord injury. Oral baclofen might cause constipation, but intestinal pseudo-obstruction is very rare. We report a 50-year-old male with spasticity following cervical discectomy (C3-4) on oral baclofen for 6 months with intestinal pseudo-obstruction. He had undergone open suprapubic cystostomy for traumatic urethral injury, 45 days prior to the presentation and adhesive intestinal obstruction was also considered a possibility. However, there were no air fluid levels on abdominal radiographs and ultrasound abdomen was non-contributory. Withdrawal of baclofen was therapeutic in this patient. This case is being reported to highlight the rare possibility of oral baclofen induced intestinal pseudo-obstruction. PMID:26312004

  17. Acute and chronic pseudo-obstruction: a current update.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Maria-Pia; Warrier, Satish; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2015-10-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) are distinct clinical entities in which patients present similarly with symptoms of a mechanical obstruction without an occlusive lesion. Unfortunately, they also share the issues related to a delay in diagnosis, including inappropriate management and poor outcomes. Advancements have been made in our understanding of the aetiologies of both conditions. Several predisposing factors linked to critical illness have been implicated in ACPO. CIPO is a functional motility disorder, historically misdiagnosed, with unnecessary surgery being performed in many patients with dire consequences. This review discusses the pathophysiology, clinical and diagnostic features, and treatment of each. For ACPO, a safer pharmacological approach to treatment is presented in a modified up-to-date algorithm. The importance of CIPO as a differential diagnosis when seeing patients with recurrent admissions for abdominal pain and distention is also discussed, as well as specific indications for surgery. While surgery is often a last resort, the role of the surgeon in the management of both ACPO and CIPO cannot be undervalued. By characterizing each condition in a common review, the knowledge gleaned aims to optimize outcomes for these frequently complex patients. PMID:25943300

  18. Idiopathic Myenteric Ganglionitis Underlying Acute ‘Dramatic’ Intestinal Pseudoobstruction: Report of an Exceptional Case

    PubMed Central

    Racalbuto, A.; Magro, G.; Lanteri, R.; Aliotta, I.; Santangelo, M.; Di Cataldo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation of the myenteric plexus of the gastrointestinal tract is a very rare pathological condition, with few reports in the medical literature. This pathological condition causes atonic gut motor dysfunction and is principally secondary to other diseases, being reported nearly solely as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in neuroendocrine lung tumors, including small cell carcinomas or neuroblastomas. In addition it can also be associated with disorders of the central nervous system, although it has rarely been described in Chagas disease. It has been named ‘idiopathic myenteric ganglionitis’ because no apparent causes can be demonstrated. We report the clinicopathologic findings of an exceptional case of a young woman affected by severe chronic constipation suddenly changing into acute intestinal pseudoobstruction with dramatic evolution. Relationships between ganglionitis, idiopathic constipation and acute intestinal pseudoobstruction as well as therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:21897800

  19. Beneficial effects of naloxone in a patient with intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Schang, J.C.; Devroede, G.

    1985-06-01

    A 15-day course of Naloxone treatment was given to a patient with intestinal pseudoobstruction who had previously undergone subtotal colectomy with terminal ileostomy for invalidating constipation. The effects of the drug were assessed according to symptoms, by recording the myoelectric activity of the stomach, and by measuring gastric emptying of a radiolabeled solid-liquid meal and the intestinal transit time of radiopaque markers. All tests were performed 1) at baseline; 2) after 2 wk with Naloxone 1.6 mg subcutaneous per day; and 3) after 8 days of placebo. Results showed that before treatment gastric emptying of solids was delayed, emptying of liquids was normal, myoelectric activity of the stomach was normal, small intestinal transit time of radiopaque markers was considerably increased while ileal output was markedly decreased. After Naloxone, gastric emptying of solids was markedly accelerated, emptying of liquids remained normal, gastric electrical spiking activity increased, small intestinal transit time strikingly decreased, and ileal output increased. After placebo, a tendency to return to pretreatment values was observed. This observation suggests that Naloxone may be helpful in the treatment of some patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  20. [Intestinal transplantation. The first Swedish transplantation of the small intestine in an adult patient with pseudoobstruction].

    PubMed

    Duraj, F; Lindberg, G; Groth, C G; Eleborg, L; Wernersson, A; Saraste, L; Meurling, S; Wallander, J; Wahlberg, J; Ejderhamn, J; Wilczek, H

    1998-07-01

    Recent advances, first and foremost the development of new immunosuppressive agents, have markedly improved the outcome of intestinal transplantation, which is a treatment option for patients with serious intestinal diseases who have become dependent on total parenteral nutrition. The first small bowel transplantation in Sweden was performed at Huddinge Hospital in 1997, in the adult patient with intestinal pseudo-obstruction. The article reports the course of this patient and an update of international progress in intestinal transplantation. PMID:9700261

  1. GAD Antibodies as Key Link Between Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction, Autonomic Neuropathy, and Limb Stiffness in a Nondiabetic Patient: A CARE-Compliant Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Maier, Andrea; Mannartz, Vera; Wasmuth, Hermann; Trautwein, Christian; Neumann, Ulf-Peter; Weis, Joachim; Grosse, Joachim; Fuest, Matthias; Hilz, Max-J; Schulz, Joerg B; Haubrich, Christina

    2015-08-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP) can be a severe burden and even a life-threatening disorder. Typically, several years of uncertainty are passing before diagnosis. We are reporting the case of a young woman with a decade of severe, progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility. Unusually, she had also developed an autonomic neuropathy, and a stiff limb syndrome.In addition to achalasia and CIP the young woman also developed neuropathic symptoms: orthostatic intolerance, urinary retention, a Horner syndrome, and lower limb stiffness. Careful interdisciplinary diagnostics excluded underlying infectious, rheumatoid, metabolic or tumorous diseases.The detection of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies, however, seemed to link CIP, autonomic neuropathy, and limb stiffness and pointed at an autoimmune origin of our patient's complaints. This was supported by the positive effects of intravenous immunoglobulin. In response to this therapy the body weight had stabilized, orthostatic tolerance had improved, and limb stiffness was reversed.The case suggested that GAD antibodies should be considered in CIP also in nondiabetic patients. This may support earlier diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:26252289

  2. Occurrence of Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction in a Brainstem Hemorrhage Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-jee; Choi, Eun-seok; Jung, Sung-hee; Yoon, Jong-soo

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a massive colonic dilation with signs and symptoms of colonic obstruction, but without a mechanical cause. A 49-year-old female patient complained of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distension 1 month after a massive brainstem hemorrhage. No improvement was seen with conservative treatments. An extended-length rectal tube was inserted to perform glycerin enema. In addition, bethanechol (35 mg per day) was administered to stimulate colonic motility. The patient's condition gradually improved over a 2-month period without any surgical intervention. Extended length rectal tube enema and bethanechol can be used to improve intestinal pseudo-obstruction in stroke patients. PMID:22639755

  3. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A real diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    García López, Carlos Alberto; Laredo-Sánchez, Fernando; Malagón-Rangel, José; Flores-Padilla, Miguel G; Nellen-Hummel, Haiko

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare syndrome described in recent decades. There are slightly over 30 published cases in the English language literature, primarily associated with renal and hematological disease activity. Its presentation and evolution are a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. We present four cases of intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to lupus in young Mexican females. One patient had a previous diagnosis of SLE and all presented with a urinary tract infection of varying degrees of severity during their evolution. We consider that recognition of the disease is of vital importance because it allows for establishing appropriate management, leading to a better prognosis and avoiding unnecessary surgery and complications. PMID:25170234

  4. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a real diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    García López, Carlos Alberto; Laredo-Sánchez, Fernando; Malagón-Rangel, José; Flores-Padilla, Miguel G; Nellen-Hummel, Haiko

    2014-08-28

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare syndrome described in recent decades. There are slightly over 30 published cases in the English language literature, primarily associated with renal and hematological disease activity. Its presentation and evolution are a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. We present four cases of intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to lupus in young Mexican females. One patient had a previous diagnosis of SLE and all presented with a urinary tract infection of varying degrees of severity during their evolution. We consider that recognition of the disease is of vital importance because it allows for establishing appropriate management, leading to a better prognosis and avoiding unnecessary surgery and complications. PMID:25170234

  5. Characteristics of intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with mitochondrial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sekino, Yusuke; Inamori, Masahiko; Yamada, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Sakai, Eiji; Higurashi, Takuma; Iida, Hiroshi; Hosono, Kunihiro; Endo, Hiroki; Nonaka, Takashi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Koide, Tomoko; Abe, Yasunobu; Gotoh, Eiji; Koyano, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To reveal the frequency, characteristics and prog-nosis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) in mitochondrial disease patients. METHODS: Between January 2000 and December 2010, 31 patients (13 males and 18 females) were diagnosed with mitochondrial diseases at our hospital. We conducted a retrospective review of the patients’ sex, subclass of mitochondrial disease, age at onset of mitochondrial disease, frequency of CIP and the age at its onset, and the duration of survival. The age at onset or at the first diagnosis of the disorder that led to the clinical suspicion of mitochondrial disease was also examined. RESULTS: Twenty patients were sub-classified with mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), 8 with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), and 3 with myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF). Nine patients were diagnosed with CIP, 8 of the 20 (40.0%) patients with MELAS, 0 of the 8 (0.0%) patients with CPEO, and 1 of the 3 (33.3%) patients with MERRF. The median age (range) at the diagnosis and the median age at onset of mitochondrial disease were 40 (17-69) and 25 (12-63) years in patients with CIP, and 49 (17-81) and 40 (11-71) years in patients without CIP. During the survey period, 5 patients (4 patients with MELAS and 1 with CPEO) died. The cause of death was cardiomyopathy in 2 patients with MELAS, cerebral infarction in 1 patient with MELAS, epilepsy and aspiration pneumonia in 1 patient with MELAS, and multiple metastases from gastric cancer and aspiration pneumonia in 1 patient with CPEO. CONCLUSION: Patients with CIP tend to have disorders that are suspected to be related to mitochondrial diseases at younger ages than are patients without CIP. PMID:22969229

  6. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-lin; Liu, Gang; Liu, Tong; Wei, Jiang-peng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) is a rare but dangerous complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) when the patient has no other manifestations except gastrointestinal symptoms. We performed 1 patient with a 2-month history of recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. She admitted past surgical histories of cesarean section and appendectomy. A physical examination revealed tenderness in the right lower abdominal on palpation and bowel sounds were weak, 2 to 3?bpm. An x-ray and CT of her abdomen showed intestinal obstruction. The initial diagnosis was adhesive intestinal obstruction. She received surgical treatment because her symptoms had gradually become more frequent and persistent. But she vomited again 2 weeks later after the surgery. Further immunology tests indicated that she had an IPO secondary to SLE. We treated the patient with methylprednisolone pulse for 3 days and followed by prednisone orally. The patient had a good response. Complete remission was achieved on 8 years follow-up. The importance of IPO secondary to SLE lies in an early diagnosis. After the diagnosis is established, immunosuppressive therapy should be the initial and first-line treatment, and surgical intervention is often disappointing and should be carefully avoided. It is necessary to enhance awareness of doctors to IPO secondary to SLE. PMID:25546663

  7. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction--review and update 2008].

    PubMed

    Seidl, H; Pehl, C; Schepp, W; Schmidt, T

    2008-07-01

    The term chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction describes a syndrome of severly altered gastrointestinal motility that clinically resembles mechanical intestinal obstruction. The syndrome comprises numerous underlying primary or secondary neuropathies of the intrinsic or entrinsic nervous system as well myopathies. Almost a third of the patients requires long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN). However, emergency surgery and even small bowel transplantation as an ultimate option after failure of TPN may become necessary to evade a vital threat. Although our understanding of pathogenesis and therapeutical options is still evolving, current knowledge allows a differentiated diagnostic approach, classification of the primary and secondary causes and differentiated therapy. PMID:18618383

  8. Breath Hydrogen Gas Concentration Linked to Intestinal Gas Distribution and Malabsorption in Patients with Small-bowel Pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Urita, Yoshihisa; Watanabe, Toshiyasu; Maeda, Tadashi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Ishihara, Susumu; Hike, Kazuo; Sanaka, Masaki; Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Motonobu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The patient with colonic obstruction may frequently have bacterial overgrowth and increased breath hydrogen (H2) levels because the bacterium can contact with food residues for longer time. We experienced two cases with intestinal obstruction whose breath H2 concentrations were measured continuously. Case 1 A 70-year-old woman with small bowel obstruction was treated with a gastric tube. When small bowel gas decreased and colonic gas was demonstrated on the plain abdominal radiograph, the breath H2 concentration increased to 6 ppm and reduced again shortly. Case 2 A 41-year-old man with functional small bowel obstruction after surgical treatment was treated with intravenous administration of erythromycin. Although the plain abdominal radiograph demonstrated a decrease of small-bowel gas, the breath H2 gas kept the low level. After a clear-liquid meal was supplied, fasting breath H2 concentration increased rapidly to 22 ppm and gradually decreased to 9 ppm despite the fact that the intestinal gas was unchanged on X-ray. A rapid increase of breath H2 concentration may reflect the movement of small bowel contents to the colon in patients with small-bowel pseudo-obstruction or malabsorption following diet progression. Conclusions Change in breath H2 concentration had a close association with distribution and movement of intestinal gas. PMID:19652759

  9. Myotonic dystrophy as a cause of colonic pseudoobstruction: not just another constipated child

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Andrea M; Johnston, Jennifer H; Gleason, Wallace A; Rhoads, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Muscular dystrophy has been traditionally associated with common gastrointestinal symptoms such as reflux, constipation, and dysphasia. In myotonic dystrophy, there are rare reports of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPOS). We herein present a case of CIPOS requiring colectomy and with good results. PMID:26185641

  10. Clinical Analysis of 61 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients With Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction and/or Ureterohydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Na; Zhao, Jiuliang; Liu, Jinjing; Wu, Di; Zhao, Lidan; Wang, Qian; Hou, Yong; Li, Mengtao; Zhang, Wen; Zeng, Xuejun; Fang, Weigang; Huang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xuan; Tian, Xinping; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this article is to investigate the clinical features of intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) and/or ureterohydronephrosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Sixty-one SLE patients with IPO and/or ureterohydronephrosis were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 183 cases were randomly selected as controls from 3840 SLE inpatients without IPO and ureterohydronephrosis during the same period. Patients were assigned to 1 of the 3 groups (SLE with IPO and ureterohydronephrosis, SLE with IPO, and SLE with ureterohydronephrosis). The clinical characteristics, treatments, and prognosis were compared between the 3 groups. There were 57 females and 4 males, with a mean age of 32.0 years. IPO was the initial manifestation of SLE in 49.1% of the cases, whereas ureterohydronephrosis in 32.5%. All patients were initially treated with a high-dose steroid. Thirty-one of these patients (50.8%) also received intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Two patients died of bowel perforation and lupus encephalopathy, and the other 59 patients (96.7%) achieved remission after treatment. The incidences of fever, glomerulonephritis, nervous system involvement, serositis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate elevation, hypoalbuminemia, hypocomplementemia, and anti-SSA antibody positivity were significantly higher in patients with IPO and/or ureterohydronephrosis than in the control group (without IPO and ureterohydronephrosis). Also, patients with IPO and/or ureterohydronephrosis had higher SLE Disease Activity Index scores than control patients. Compared with SLE patients with IPO, the patients with IPO and ureterohydronephrosis had a significantly higher incidence of gallbladder wall thickening, biliary tract dilatation, and serositis, whereas the patients with ureterohydronephrosis had less mucocutaneous involvement and serositis. Eight of the 47 IPO patients who initially responded well to immunotherapy relapsed; however, all responded well to retreatment with adequate immunotherapy. Of these 8 patients, 4 relapsed following poor compliance and self-discontinuation of steroid or immunosuppressant therapy. The rate of poor compliance with immunotherapy and the number of organ systems involved in patients in the recurrent IPO group were significantly higher than those in the nonrecurrent IPO group. IPO and ureterohydronephrosis are severe complications of SLE. As patients usually respond readily to early optimal steroid treatment, early diagnosis and timely initiation of glucocorticoid are important to relieve symptoms, prevent complications, and improve prognosis. PMID:25634172

  11. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... specific instructions about eating and drinking after the test. Computerized tomography (CT) scan. CT scans use a combination of x rays and computer technology to create images. An x-ray technician performs ...

  12. Clinical analysis of 61 systemic lupus erythematosus patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction and/or ureterohydronephrosis: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Na; Zhao, Jiuliang; Liu, Jinjing; Wu, Di; Zhao, Lidan; Wang, Qian; Hou, Yong; Li, Mengtao; Zhang, Wen; Zeng, Xuejun; Fang, Weigang; Huang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xuan; Tian, Xinping; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the clinical features of intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) and/or ureterohydronephrosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Sixty-one SLE patients with IPO and/or ureterohydronephrosis were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 183 cases were randomly selected as controls from 3840 SLE inpatients without IPO and ureterohydronephrosis during the same period. Patients were assigned to 1 of the 3 groups (SLE with IPO and ureterohydronephrosis, SLE with IPO, and SLE with ureterohydronephrosis). The clinical characteristics, treatments, and prognosis were compared between the 3 groups. There were 57 females and 4 males, with a mean age of 32.0 years. IPO was the initial manifestation of SLE in 49.1% of the cases, whereas ureterohydronephrosis in 32.5%. All patients were initially treated with a high-dose steroid. Thirty-one of these patients (50.8%) also received intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Two patients died of bowel perforation and lupus encephalopathy, and the other 59 patients (96.7%) achieved remission after treatment. The incidences of fever, glomerulonephritis, nervous system involvement, serositis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate elevation, hypoalbuminemia, hypocomplementemia, and anti-SSA antibody positivity were significantly higher in patients with IPO and/or ureterohydronephrosis than in the control group (without IPO and ureterohydronephrosis). Also, patients with IPO and/or ureterohydronephrosis had higher SLE Disease Activity Index scores than control patients. Compared with SLE patients with IPO, the patients with IPO and ureterohydronephrosis had a significantly higher incidence of gallbladder wall thickening, biliary tract dilatation, and serositis, whereas the patients with ureterohydronephrosis had less mucocutaneous involvement and serositis. Eight of the 47 IPO patients who initially responded well to immunotherapy relapsed; however, all responded well to retreatment with adequate immunotherapy. Of these 8 patients, 4 relapsed following poor compliance and self-discontinuation of steroid or immunosuppressant therapy. The rate of poor compliance with immunotherapy and the number of organ systems involved in patients in the recurrent IPO group were significantly higher than those in the nonrecurrent IPO group. IPO and ureterohydronephrosis are severe complications of SLE. As patients usually respond readily to early optimal steroid treatment, early diagnosis and timely initiation of glucocorticoid are important to relieve symptoms, prevent complications, and improve prognosis. PMID:25634172

  13. Molecular and Cellular Characteristics of the Colonic Pseudo-obstruction in Patients With Intractable Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Yoon Suh; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kwak, Sun-Young; Cho, Soohan; Lee, Enoch; Song, Min Jeong; Yu, Chang Sik; Yoon, Yong Sik; Lee, Hye Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disorder characterized by recurrent symptoms suggestive of obstruction such as abdominal pain, proximal distension with extremely suppressed motility in the absence of lumen-occluding lesion, whose etiology/pathophysiology is poorly understood. In this study we investigated a functionally obstructive lesion that could underlie symptoms of CIPO. Methods We studied colons surgically removed from 13 patients exhibiting clinical/pathological features of pseudo-obstruction but were unresponsive to standard medical treatments. The colons were characterized morphologically, functionally and molecularly, which were compared between regions and to 28 region-matched controls obtained from colon cancer patients. Results The colons with pseudo-obstruction exhibited persistent luminal distension proximally, where the smooth muscle was hypertrophied with changes in the cell phenotypes. Distinct luminal narrowing was observed near the distal end of the dilated region, close to the splenic flexure, previously referred to as the “transition zone (TZ)” between the dilated and non-dilated loops. Circular muscles from the TZ responded less to depolarization and cholinergic stimulation, which was associated with down-regulation of L-type calcium channel expression. Smooth muscle contractile protein was also downregulated. Myenteric ganglia and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) positive cells were deficient, more severely in the TZ region. Interstitial cells of Cajal was relatively less affected. Conclusions The TZ may be the principal site of functional obstruction, leading to proximal distension and smooth muscle hypertrophy, in which partial nNOS depletion could play a key role. The neuromuscular abnormalities probably synergistically contributed to the extremely suppressed motility observed in the colonic pseudo-obstruction. PMID:26424041

  14. Chronic pancreatitis: Maldigestion, intestinal ecology and intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2009-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency caused by chronic pancreatitis results from various factors which regulate digestion and absorption of nutrients. Pancreatic function has been extensively studied over the last 40 years, even if some aspects of secretion and gastrointestinal adaptation are not completely understood. The main clinical manifestations of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency are fat malabsorption, known as steatorrhea, which consists of fecal excretion of more than 6 g of fat per day, weight loss, abdominal discomfort and abdominal swelling sensation. Fat malabsorption also results in a deficit of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) with consequent clinical manifestations. The relationships between pancreatic maldigestion, intestinal ecology and intestinal inflammation have not received particular attention, even if in clinical practice these mechanisms may be responsible for the low efficacy of pancreatic extracts in abolishing steatorrhea in some patients. The best treatments for pancreatic maldigestion should be re-evaluated, taking into account not only the correction of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extracts and the best duodenal pH to permit optimal efficacy of these extracts, but we also need to consider other therapeutic approaches including the decontamination of intestinal lumen, supplementation of bile acids and, probably, the use of probiotics which may attenuate intestinal inflammation in chronic pancreatitis patients. PMID:19360910

  15. “Ninjinto” (Ginseng Decoction), a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, Improves Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Immune Competence in Patients with Chronic Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Shuichiro; Ogawa, Keiko; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treating functional gastrointestinal disorders is extremely difficult. We herein report the effect of the oral administration of Ninjinto (NJT, ginseng decoction), a traditional Japanese Kampo medicine, on chronic intestinal failure. Patients and Methods. Seven patients with chronic intestinal failure treated with NJT were evaluated in this study. The primary diseases included chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO: n = 4), short bowel syndrome (SBS: n = 2), and intestinal atresia (n = 1). All patients orally received NJT extract granules at a dose of 0.3 g/kg BW per day. The treatment outcomes were then assessed according to the patients' symptoms and consecutive abdominal X-ray findings. Results. The targeted symptoms were abdominal distension in four patients, diarrhea in three patients, and frequent hospitalization due to infections in two patients. An improvement in the symptoms was observed in six of the seven patients, whereas one patient with SBS did not show any improvement. An improvement in an abdominal roentgenogram was observed in the four patients with remarkably dilated bowel loops due to CIPO. Conclusions. NJT may be effective in controlling functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with chronic intestinal failure. The use of Kampo medicine in the field of pediatric surgery may help to improve the quality of life in children suffering from such conditions. PMID:26495014

  16. Hypokalemia Associated with Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction (Ogilvie's Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Sunnoqrot, Naseem; Reilly, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hypokalemia resulting from colonic pseudo-obstruction or Ogilvie's syndrome. Colonic pseudo-obstruction is characterized by profuse watery diarrhea that has a low sodium and high potassium concentration. It is seen in a variety of medical and surgical conditions, but its exact cause remains unknown. It is thought to result from an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic input in the distal colon. The diarrhea is secretory and driven by potassium secretion rather than the inhibition of sodium reabsorption or chloride secretion, which are the most common pathophysiologic mechanisms of secretory diarrhea. Affected patients often lose >100 mmol of potassium daily. Colonic pseudo-obstruction is associated with a dramatic upregulation of the maxiK or BK potassium channel. This channel plays a prominent role in flow-mediated potassium secretion in the connecting tubule and collecting duct and is also upregulated in the distal colon in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In vitro studies show that the channel is regulated by catecholamine binding to the ? receptor and cyclic AMP upregulation, somatostatin and aldosterone, insights that can be used to help guide pharmacologic therapy. Nephrologists should be aware of colonic pseudo-obstruction as a cause of extrarenal potassium loss. PMID:26120577

  17. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Greydanus, M.P.; Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this condition may include decreased muscle tone (hypotonia) or stiffness (spasticity), weakness in the muscles that ... distention ; DNA ; egg ; embryo ; encephalopathy ; enteric ; gastrointestinal ; gene ; hypotonia ; idiopathic ; inherit ; inheritance ; inheritance pattern ; inherited ; malabsorption ; maternal ; ...

  19. A case of delayed oxaliplatin-induced pseudo-obstruction: an atypical presentation of oxaliplatin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, M; Pauwels, W; Bleecker, J De

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity is a serious complication of cancer treatment. Oxaliplatin, a third-generation platinum drug, has become one of the first-line therapies used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of platinum-based chemotherapy. Most commonly a sensory neuropathy occurs with cold-triggered symptoms in the acute phase and numbness and painful paresthesias as a late presentation. Autonomic neurotoxicity and late presentation, months after cessation of the therapy, has rarely been described. We report a patient who clinically presented with a pseudo-obstruction months after treatment with oxaliplatin for metastatic colorectal cancer. Intestinal adhesions and relapsing malignancy were carefully excluded. By exclusion the pseudo-obstruction was attributed to a toxic oxaliplatin-induced autonomic neuropathy which slowly improved during months of follow-up. PMID:25523317

  20. Fish Oil Enhances Recovery of Intestinal Microbiota and Epithelial Integrity in Chronic Rejection of Intestinal Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Chenyang; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Yanmei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2011-01-01

    Background The intestinal chronic rejection (CR) is the major limitation to long-term survival of transplanted organs. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity in chronic rejection of intestinal transplantation, and to find out whether fish oil enhances recovery of intestinal microbiota and epithelial integrity. Methods/Principal Findings The luminal and mucosal microbiota composition of CR rats were characterized by DGGE analysis at 190 days after intestinal transplant. The specific bacterial species were determined by sequence analysis. Furthermore, changes in the localization of intestinal TJ proteins were examined by immunofluorescent staining. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that gut microbiota in CR rats had a shift towards Escherichia coli, Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp and a decrease in the abundance of Lactobacillales bacteria in the intestines. Fish oil supplementation could enhance the recovery of gut microbiota, showing a significant decrease of gut bacterial proportions of E. coli and Bacteroides spp and an increase of Lactobacillales spp. In addition, CR rats showed pronounced alteration of tight junction, depicted by marked changes in epithelial cell ultrastructure and redistribution of occuldin and claudins as well as disruption in TJ barrier function. Fish oil administration ameliorated disruption of epithelial integrity in CR, which was associated with an improvement of the mucosal structure leading to improved tight junctions. Conclusions/Significance Our study have presented novel evidence that fish oil is involved in the maintenance of epithelial TJ integrity and recovery of gut microbiota, which may have therapeutic potential against CR in intestinal transplantation. PMID:21698145

  1. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as possible. PMID:26361414

  2. Subclinical intestinal inflammation in chronic granulomatous disease patients.

    PubMed

    Broides, Arnon; Sagi, Orli; Pinsk, Vered; Levy, Jacov; Yerushalmi, Baruch

    2016-02-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired neutrophil production of reactive oxygen species. Non-infectious colitis is common in chronic granulomatous disease, and high levels of antimicrobial antibodies that are associated with Crohn's disease are common even without colitis. Fecal calprotectin concentration is a marker for intestinal inflammation. We sought to determine whether subclinical intestinal inflammation occurs in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. Asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients without overt gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of colitis at the time of enrollment were studied for fecal calprotectin concentration, antibodies associated with Crohn's disease and systemic inflammatory markers. Eight patients were included, aged 54-176 months. In 7/8 (87.5 %) fecal calprotectin concentration was normal (<50) and elevated (137 mg/kg) in only one patient. This patient later developed colitis. In 7/8 (87.5 %) anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody was positive. C-reactive protein, albumin, complete blood count and p-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were normal in all 8 patients. Subclinical colitis is not evident in most asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients; however, in some patients, fecal calprotectin concentration may be elevated, possibly indicating the presence of subclinical colitis and predicting the occurrence of clinically relevant colitis. Serum anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody concentrations do not seem to correlate with fecal calprotectin concentration in asymptomatic chronic granulomatous disease patients. PMID:26603166

  3. Intestinal parasitic infection among Egyptian children with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Lerine Bahy El-Dine; El-Faramawy, Amel Abdel Magid; El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Ismail, Khadiga Ahmed; Fouad, Sally Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD) are often highly susceptible to parasitic infection due to a depressed immune system. The objective of this study was to detect the most commonly intestinal parasites found among Egyptian children with CLD. The present study was conducted on 50 children with CLD of different etiology (25 were having different intestinal symptoms, 25 without intestinal symptoms) and 50 non-CLD children with gastrointestinal complaints served as controls. All cases were subjected to stool examination and investigated by liver function tests. Also, anthropometric measurements were taken for all children including weight and height. It was found that the most commonly intestinal protozoa identified in the patients with CLD in order of frequency were: Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (16 %), Giardia lamblia (14 %), Blastocystis hominis (14 %), Cryptosporidium parvum (10 %), E. histolytica and G. lamblia (2 %), E. histolytica and B. hominis (2 %), G. lamblia and B. hominis (2 %), B. hominis and Entamoeba coli (2 %), Microsporidium (2 %) and no cases were found infected with Strongyloides stercoralis. As compared to the controls, the observed incidence of these organisms in CLD patients was significantly higher (p < 0.045) as regards stool examination by unstained techniques while, there was no significant difference between both groups as regards stool examination by stained techniques (p < 0.478). In addition, this study showed that the weight and height of studied patients were affected by parasitic infection while, there was no significant correlation between parasitic infection and liver function tests. In conclusion, chronic liver diseases affect the immunity of the patients as shown in significant increase in the incidence of intestinal parasites in cases compared to controls. PMID:25698851

  4. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN.

    PubMed

    Omran, Eman Kh; Mohammad, Asmaa N

    2015-08-01

    Information about intestinal parasites in Sohag (Upper Egypt) in patients with chronic abdominal pain is scarce. This study determined the intestinal parasites symptoms in 130 patients with chronic abdominal pain and cross-matched 20 healthy persons. Parasitic infection was confirmed by stool analysis.The most commonest clinical data with stool analysis was as following: 1-Entamoeba histolytica associated with nausea 20 (3 7.74%) followed by anorexia 19 (35.85%), 2-Entamoeba coli associated with diarrhea 3 (100%) followed by nausea 2 (66.67%) and vomiting 2 (66.67%), 3-Enetrobius vermicularis associated with nausea 2 (66.67%), diarrhea 2 (66.67%) followed by flatulence 1(33.33%), 4-Giardia lamblia associated with anorexia 3 (42.86%), vomiting 3 (42.86%) followed by diarrhea 2 (28.57%)., 6-Hymenolepis nana associated with anorexia 10 (40.00%) followed by flatulence 9 (36.00%), 7-Taenia saginata associated with dyspepsia 3 (60.00%) followed by flatulence 2 (40.00%), and 8-Ancylostoma duodenal associated with anorexia 2 (66.67%) and diarrhea 2 (66.67%). PMID:26485858

  5. Intraoperative video panendoscopy for diagnosing sites of chronic intestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Flickinger, E G; Stanforth, A C; Sinar, D R; MacDonald, K G; Lannin, D R; Gibson, J H

    1989-01-01

    Intraoperative video panendoscopy was performed in 14 patients with chronic, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. All of the study patients had undergone extensive and expensive diagnostic testing including multiple radiographic contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract, upper and lower endoscopy, nuclear bleeding scans, and selective mesenteric angiography without definition of the bleeding source. Intraoperative video panendoscopy, employing a segmental advance and look technique, allowed visualization and transillumination of the entire gut and identified mucosal disease in 13 patients (93 percent). Angiodysplasia of the colon and small intestine was the most common pathologic finding. Intraoperative video panendoscopy significantly influenced the operation performed in 13 patients (93 percent). Postoperative complications were minimal, with none being directly attributable to intraoperative video panendoscopy. Bleeding was totally controlled in 10 patients (71 percent) during a mean follow-up period of 25 months. Intraoperative video panendoscopy is a valuable technique for assisting in the management of the patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:2491932

  6. Intestinal transport of hexoses in the rat following chronic heat exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1979-01-01

    The study examines intestinal transport of sugars (D-glucose and D-galactose) in vitro and assesses organ maintenance in chronically heat-exposed rats. The results suggest that the response of intestinal absorption to heat exposure in the rat involves changes in intestinal weight and in glucose utilization. Despite the reduction in total intestinal weight, the ability of intestinal tissue to transport hexose per unit weight remains stable. Differences in intestinal weight and glucose utilization between pair-fed and heat-exposed animals suggest that the intestinal response to chronic heat exposure is not solely a function of the amount of food consumed. Alterations of hexose transport appear to be related to altered glucose metabolism and not altered transport capacity.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ability to absorb nutrients, which may lead to malnutrition. These symptoms resemble those caused by an intestinal ... It is unclear why SGOL1 gene mutations specifically affect the heart and intestines in CAID. Researchers suggest ...

  8. Intestinal carcinoid in a mare: an etiologic consideration for chronic colic in horses.

    PubMed

    Orsini, J A; Orsini, P G; Sepesy, L; Acland, H; Gillette, D

    1988-07-01

    Intestinal carcinoid, or argentaffinoma, should be an etiologic consideration for horses with chronic colic. A mare was referred with a history of chronic colic. Previously, the signs of colic had subsided in response to impiric treatment, but recent episodes of colic did not. Clinical signs and results of physical examination supported the finding of strangulating obstruction of the small intestine. Exploratory celiotomy revealed internal herniation with simultaneous volvulus of the jejunum and accompanying carcinoid. PMID:3417536

  9. [Intestinal fatty acid binding protein: marker of enterocyte damage in acute and chronic gastroenterological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Dorottya; Papp, Mária; Tornai, Tamás; Tulassay, Zsolt; Herszényi, László; Tóth, Miklós; Juhász, Márk

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal fatty acid binding protein, a small cytosolic protein abundantly present in mature enterocytes of small and large intestine, has proven to be a sensitive marker for damage to the intestinal epithelium. Upon cellular damage of the enterocyte, intestinal fatty acid binding protein is readily released into the systemic circulation, passes through the glomerular filter and can be detected in the urine. In this review, the authors review studies on the application of this protein as a biomarker in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(2), 59-64. PMID:26726140

  10. The Pathogenic Potential of Campylobacter concisus Strains Associated with Chronic Intestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Deshpande, Nandan P.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Tan, Chew Gee; Burgos-Portugal, Jose A.; Raftery, Mark J.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Mitchell, Hazel

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter concisus has garnered increasing attention due to its association with intestinal disease, thus, the pathogenic potential of strains isolated from different intestinal diseases was investigated. A method to isolate C. concisus was developed and the ability of eight strains from chronic and acute intestinal diseases to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells was determined. Features associated with bacterial invasion were investigated using comparative genomic analyses and the effect of C. concisus on host protein expression was examined using proteomics. Our isolation method from intestinal biopsies resulted in the isolation of three C. concisus strains from children with Crohn's disease or chronic gastroenteritis. Four C. concisus strains from patients with chronic intestinal diseases can attach to and invade host cells using mechanisms such as chemoattraction to mucin, aggregation, flagellum-mediated attachment, “membrane ruffling”, cell penetration and damage. C. concisus strains isolated from patients with chronic intestinal diseases have significantly higher invasive potential than those from acute intestinal diseases. Investigation of the cause of this increased pathogenic potential revealed a plasmid to be responsible. 78 and 47 proteins were upregulated and downregulated in cells infected with C. concisus, respectively. Functional analysis of these proteins showed that C. concisus infection regulated processes related to interleukin-12 production, proteasome activation and NF-κB activation. Infection with all eight C. concisus strains resulted in host cells producing high levels of interleukin-12, however, only strains capable of invading host cells resulted in interferon-γ production as confirmed by ELISA. These findings considerably support the emergence of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, but more significantly, provide novel insights into the host immune response and an explanation for the heterogeneity observed in the outcome of C. concisus infection. Moreover, response to infection with invasive strains has substantial similarities to that observed in the inflamed mucosa of Crohn's disease patients. PMID:22194985

  11. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-01-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00±1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines. PMID:26416815

  12. [The diagnostic algorithm in patients with severe chronic constipaton without aganglionosis of the large intestine].

    PubMed

    Revin, G O; MaÄ­strenko, N A; Kurygin, Al A

    2013-01-01

    The algorithm of special study in patients with severe chronic constipations includes the chronometry of passage of sulphate barium along the gastric tract with the assessment of evacuation function of each part of the large intestine, the irrigoscopy, the fibrocolonoscopy, the investigation of motor function of sigmoid colon. The proposed diagnostic algorithm allows the determination of part or parts of the large intestine with incompetent motor and evacuation functions and decision on the necessary extent of resection of the colon. PMID:24340986

  13. [Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction: Ogilvie syndrome].

    PubMed

    Keller, J; Layer, P

    2015-10-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) is characterized by marked colonic dilatation which develops over several days. ACPO is due to a motility disorder and is not caused by colonic obstruction and occurs in patients with severe, often acute underlying diseases or postoperatively. It is associated with a 25-30% mortality overall that increases to up to 50% in patients who develop complications (e.g. colonic ischemia and perforation). The pathogenesis of the disorder has not yet been clarified and clinical symptoms and signs are relatively unspecific. In particular, ACPO has to be differentiated from colonic obstruction and toxic megacolon. For this blood tests and radiological tests are required, e.g. plain abdominal radiograph, abdominal computed tomography (CT) and water soluble contrast enema, which are also required for detection of complications. Patients with ACPO should generally receive supportive therapy for decompression of the gastrointestinal tract (e.g. gastric and rectal tubes) and to minimize predisposing factors. In most uncomplicated cases this leads to resolution of colonic dilatation. Clinical and radiological controls at close intervals are required until the condition is resolved. If patients do not respond within 1-2 days or if ACPO has already reached a critical duration (>3-4 days) or extent (i.e. cecal diameter ≥12 cm), neostigmine should be administered and leads to durable success in approximately 3 out of 4 patients. Patients who are still refractory to treatment should receive endoscopic decompression. More invasive therapeutic options, such as cecostomy or (segmental) colonic resection should only be considered for patients who still do not respond to treatment or present with the abovementioned complications. PMID:26400054

  14. Probiotics prevent bacterial translocation and improve intestinal barrier function in rats following chronic psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Zareie, M; Johnson‐Henry, K; Jury, J; Yang, P‐C; Ngan, B‐Y; McKay, D M; Soderholm, J D; Perdue, M H; Sherman, P M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Chronic psychological stress, including water avoidance stress (WAS), induces intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction and impairs mucosal defences against luminal bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a defined probiotic regimen to prevent WAS induced intestinal pathophysiology. Methods Male rats were subjected to either WAS or sham stress for one hour per day for 10 consecutive days. Additional animals received seven days of Lactobacillus helveticus and L rhamnosus in the drinking water prior to stress and remained on these probiotics for the duration of the study. Rats were then sacrificed, intestinal segments assessed in Ussing chambers, and mesenteric lymph nodes cultured to determine bacterial translocation. Results All animals remained healthy for the duration of the study. Chronic WAS induced excess ion secretion (elevated baseline short circuit current) and barrier dysfunction (increased conductance) in both the ileum and colon, associated with increased bacterial adhesion and penetration into surface epithelial cells. Approximately 70% of rats subjected to WAS had bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes while there was no bacterial translocation in controls. Probiotic pretreatment alone had no effect on intestinal barrier function. However, WAS induced increased ileal short circuit current was reduced with probiotics whereas there was no impact on altered conductance. Pretreatment of animals with probiotics also completely abrogated WAS induced bacterial adhesion and prevented translocation of bacteria to mesenteric lymph nodes. Conclusion These findings indicate that probiotics can prevent chronic stress induced intestinal abnormalities and, thereby, exert beneficial effects in the intestinal tract. PMID:16638791

  15. Probiotics prevent bacterial translocation and improve intestinal barrier function in rats following chronic psychological stress.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Zareie M; Johnson-Henry K; Jury J; Yang PC; Ngan BY; McKay DM; Soderholm JD; Perdue MH; Sherman PM

    2006-11-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic psychological stress, including water avoidance stress (WAS), induces intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction and impairs mucosal defences against luminal bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a defined probiotic regimen to prevent WAS induced intestinal pathophysiology.METHODS: Male rats were subjected to either WAS or sham stress for one hour per day for 10 consecutive days. Additional animals received seven days of Lactobacillus helveticus and L rhamnosus in the drinking water prior to stress and remained on these probiotics for the duration of the study. Rats were then sacrificed, intestinal segments assessed in Ussing chambers, and mesenteric lymph nodes cultured to determine bacterial translocation.RESULTS: All animals remained healthy for the duration of the study. Chronic WAS induced excess ion secretion (elevated baseline short circuit current) and barrier dysfunction (increased conductance) in both the ileum and colon, associated with increased bacterial adhesion and penetration into surface epithelial cells. Approximately 70% of rats subjected to WAS had bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes while there was no bacterial translocation in controls. Probiotic pretreatment alone had no effect on intestinal barrier function. However, WAS induced increased ileal short circuit current was reduced with probiotics whereas there was no impact on altered conductance. Pretreatment of animals with probiotics also completely abrogated WAS induced bacterial adhesion and prevented translocation of bacteria to mesenteric lymph nodes.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that probiotics can prevent chronic stress induced intestinal abnormalities and, thereby, exert beneficial effects in the intestinal tract.

  16. A chronic oral reference dose for hexavalent chromium-induced intestinal cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M; Kirman, Christopher R; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Suh, Mina; Hays, Sean M; Hixon, J Gregory; Harris, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water induce villous cytotoxicity and compensatory crypt hyperplasia in the small intestines of mice (but not rats). Lifetime exposure to such cytotoxic concentrations increases intestinal neoplasms in mice, suggesting that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors involves chronic wounding and compensatory cell proliferation of the intestine. Therefore, we developed a chronic oral reference dose (RfD) designed to be protective of intestinal damage and thus intestinal cancer. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for chromium in mice was used to estimate the amount of Cr(VI) entering each intestinal tissue section (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) from the lumen per day (normalized to intestinal tissue weight). These internal dose metrics, together with corresponding incidences for diffuse hyperplasia, were used to derive points of departure using benchmark dose modeling and constrained nonlinear regression. Both modeling techniques resulted in similar points of departure, which were subsequently converted to human equivalent doses using a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. Applying appropriate uncertainty factors, an RfD of 0.006?mg?kg–1?day–1 was derived for diffuse hyperplasia—an effect that precedes tumor formation. This RfD is protective of both noncancer and cancer effects in the small intestine and corresponds to a safe drinking water equivalent level of 210 µg l–1. This concentration is higher than the current federal maximum contaminant level for total Cr (100 µg l–1) and well above levels of Cr(VI) in US drinking water supplies (typically???5 µg l–1). © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23943231

  17. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  18. Neutral Na-amino acid cotransport is differentially regulated by glucocorticoids in the normal and chronically inflamed rabbit small intestine.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Uma; Wisel, Sheik; Coon, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Neutral Na-amino acid cotransport by system ATB(0) [e.g., Na-alanine cotransport (NAcT)] is an important means of assimilation of amino acids in the intestine. NAcT is inhibited during chronic intestinal inflammation by an alteration in the affinity for the amino acid. How glucocorticoids, a standard of treatment for diseases characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, may affect NAcT during chronic enteritis is not known. Thus we first demonstrated that methylprednisolone (MP) stimulated NAcT in the normal intestine. The mechanism of stimulation was secondary to an increase in cotransporter numbers without an alteration in the affinity for the amino acid. Treatment with MP reversed the reduction in NAcT in villus cells from the chronically inflamed intestine. MP also alleviated the decrease in Na-K-ATPase activity in villus cells during chronic enteritis. However, MP treatment reversed the NAcT inhibition in villus cell brush border membrane vesicles from the inflamed intestine, which suggested an effect of MP at the level of the cotransporter itself. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the reversal of NAcT inhibition by MP was secondary to restoration in the affinity for the amino acid without a change in the V(max). Unaltered steady-state mRNA and immunoreactive protein levels of NAcT also indicated that the number of cotransporters was unchanged after MP treatment in the chronically inflamed intestine. These results indicated that MP reversed NAcT inhibition in the chronically inflamed intestine by restoring the affinity of the transporter for the amino acid while it stimulated NAcT in the normal intestine by increasing the cotransporter numbers. Therefore, MP differentially regulates NAcT in the normal and chronically inflamed intestine. PMID:17290012

  19. Chronic Psychological Stress in Rats Induces Intestinal Sensitization to Luminal Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping-Chang; Jury, Jennifer; Söderholm, Johan D.; Sherman, Philip M.; McKay, Derek M.; Perdue, Mary H.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that stress plays a role in the pathophysiology of chronic intestinal disorders, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies in rats have revealed that stress decreases gut barrier function and allows excessive uptake of luminal material. Here, we investigated whether chronic psychological stress acts to induce sensitization of intestinal tissues to oral antigens. Rats were subjected to 1 hour per day of water avoidance stress or sham stress daily for 10 days, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was delivered by gavage on day 5. Studies to determine sensitization were conducted on day 20. All stressed rats developed HRP-specific IgE antibodies, antigen-induced intestinal secretion, and increased numbers of inflammatory cells in gut mucosa. Luminal HRP was absorbed more readily by enterocytes of stressed animals. In addition, stressed rats had increased expression of interleukin-4 and decreased expression of interferon-? in gut mucosa, a cytokine profile that is typical of allergic conditions. Treatment of stressed rats with an antagonist to corticotropin-releasing hormone (previously shown to inhibit stress-enhanced gut permeability) eliminated the manifestations of intestinal hypersensitivity. Our results indicate that the presence of oral antigen during chronic psychological stress alters the immune response (to sensitization rather than oral tolerance) and causes subsequent antigen-induced gut pathophysiology. PMID:16400013

  20. Animal models to study acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Jiminez, Janelle A; Uwiera, Trina C; Douglas Inglis, G; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestine impart a significant and negative impact on the health and well-being of human and non-human mammalian animals. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of inflammatory disease is mandatory to develop effective treatment and prevention strategies. As inflammatory disease etiologies are multifactorial, the use of appropriate animal models and associated metrics of disease are essential. In this regard, animal models used alone or in combination to study acute and chronic inflammatory disease of the mammalian intestine paired with commonly used inflammation-inducing agents are reviewed. This includes both chemical and biological incitants of inflammation, and both non-mammalian (i.e. nematodes, insects, and fish) and mammalian (i.e. rodents, rabbits, pigs, ruminants, dogs, and non-human primates) models of intestinal inflammation including germ-free, gnotobiotic, as well as surgical, and genetically modified animals. Importantly, chemical and biological incitants induce inflammation via a multitude of mechanisms, and intestinal inflammation and injury can vary greatly according to the incitant and animal model used, allowing studies to ascertain both long-term and short-term effects of inflammation. Thus, researchers and clinicians should be aware of the relative strengths and limitations of the various animal models used to study acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the mammalian intestine, and the scope and relevance of outcomes achievable based on this knowledge. The ability to induce inflammation to mimic common human diseases is an important factor of a successful animal model, however other mechanisms of disease such as the amount of infective agent to induce disease, invasion mechanisms, and the effect various physiologic changes can have on inducing damage are also important features. In many cases, the use of multiple animal models in combination with both chemical and biological incitants is necessary to answer the specific question being addressed regarding intestinal disease. Some incitants can induce acute responses in certain animal models while others can be used to induce chronic responses; this review aims to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses in each animal model and to guide the choice of an appropriate acute or chronic incitant to facilitate intestinal disease. PMID:26561503

  1. Role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in severe small intestinal damage in chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug users.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Motoko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Machida, Hirohisa; Okazaki, Hirotoshi; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Enteric bacteria play a significant role in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal damage. However, the association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and NSAID-induced small intestinal damage remains unclear. The aim of the study was to examine the association between SIBO and the presence of NSAID-induced severe small intestinal damage or its symptoms in chronic NSAID users. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Forty-three patients who had been using NSAIDs for over 3 months were enrolled. They were examined by capsule endoscopy and a lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT). We defined severe small intestinal damage as the presence of more than four small erosions or large erosions/ulcers. The LHBT result was considered positive if there was an increase in the level of breath hydrogen gas of >20 ppm above baseline. RESULTS. Out of 43 patients, 22 (51%) had severe small intestinal damage. The LHBT was positive in 5 of 21 patients (24%) without severe small intestinal damage and in 13 of 21 patients (59%) with severe small intestinal damage. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that an LHBT-positive result was significantly associated with increased odds ratio for severe small intestinal damage (OR, 6.54; 95% CI, 1.40-30.50). There was no significant difference in the presence of symptoms between the LHBT-positive and LHBT-negative patients with severe small intestinal damage. CONCLUSION. SIBO might have a role in the development of severe small intestinal damage in chronic NSAID users. PMID:24417613

  2. The role for protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; McCole, Declan F.; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of IBD. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signalling processes.Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN2, PTPN11 and PTPN22 are altered in actively inflamed intestinal tissue. PTPN2 seems to be critical for protecting intestinal epithelial barrier function, regulating innate and adaptive immune responses and finally for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. These observations have been confirmed in PTPN2 knock-out mice in vivo. Those animals are clearly more susceptible to intestinal and systemic inflammation and feature alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. PTPN22 controls inflammatory signalling in lymphocytes and mononuclear cells resulting in aberrant cytokine secretion pattern and autophagosome formation. PTPN22-deficiency in vivo results in more severe colitis demonstrating the relevance of PTPN22 for intestinal homeostasis in vivo. Of note, loss of PTPN22 promotes MAPK-induced cytokine secretion, but limits secretion of NFκB-associated cytokines and autophagy in mononuclear cells. Loss of PTPN11 is also associated with increased colitis severity in vivo. In summary, dysfunction of those PTPs results in aberrant and uncontrolled immune responses that result in chronic inflammatory conditions. This way, it becomes more and more evident that dysfunction of PTPs displays an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation, in particular IBD. PMID:25581833

  3. Belgian multicenter experience with intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ceulemans, Laurens J; Monbaliu, Diethard; De Roover, Arnaud; Detry, Olivier; Troisi, Roberto I; Rogiers, Xavier; Reding, Raymond; Lerut, Jan P; Ysebaert, Dirk; Chapelle, Thierry; Pirenne, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal transplantation (ITx) has evolved from an experimental procedure toward a clinical reality but remains a challenging procedure. The aim of this survey was to analyze the multicenter Belgian ITx experience. From 1999 to 2014, 24 ITx in 23 patients were performed in Belgium, divided over five centers. Median recipient age was 38 years (8 months-57 years); male/female ratio was 13/10; six were children; and 17 adults. Intestinal failure was related to intestinal ischemia (n = 5), volvulus (n = 5), splanchnic thrombosis (n = 4), Crohn (n = 2), pseudo-obstruction (n = 2), microvillus inclusion (n = 2), Churg-Strauss (n = 1), necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 1), intestinal atresia (n = 1), and chronic rejection (n = 1). Graft type was isolated ITx (n = 9), combined liver-ITx (n = 11) and multivisceralTx (n = 4). One was a living donor-related transplantation and five patients received simultaneously a kidney graft. Early acute rejection occurred in 8; late acute rejection in 4; and chronic rejection in 2. Two patients developed a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. Nine patients have died. Among 14 survivors at last follow-up, 11 have been transplanted for more than 1 year. None of the latter has developed renal failure, and all were nutritionally independent with a Karnofsky score > 90%. One-/five-year patient and graft survivals were 71.1%, 62.8%, 58.7% and 53.1%, respectively. Based on this experience, ITx has come of age in Belgium as a lifesaving and potentially quality of life restoring therapy. PMID:26033472

  4. My gut feeling says rest: Increased intestinal permeability contributes to chronic diseases in high-intensity exercisers.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, Jason M; Wessells, Robert J; Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and many of these conditions are linked to chronic inflammation. One potential cause of chronic inflammation is an increased intestinal epithelial permeability. Recent studies have demonstrated that parasympathetic stimulation via the efferent abdominal vagus nerve increases the expression and proper localization of tight junction proteins and decreases intestinal epithelial permeability. This finding may provide a novel approach for treating and preventing many chronic conditions. Importantly, physical activity is associated with increased resting parasympathetic (vagal) activity and lower risk of chronic diseases. However, high intensity long duration exercise can be harmful to overall health. Specifically, individuals who frequently exercise strenuously and for longer time intervals have the same mortality rates as sedentary individuals. This may be explained, in part, by longer periods of reduced vagal activity as vagal activity is markedly reduced both during and after intense exercise. We hypothesize that one mechanism by which exercise provides its health benefits is by increasing resting vagal activity and decreasing intestinal epithelial permeability, thus decreasing chronic inflammation. Additionally, we hypothesize that long periods of reduced vagal activity in individuals who exercise at high intensities and for longer durations, decrease the integrity of the intestinal barrier, putting them at greater risk of chronic inflammation and a host of chronic diseases. Thus, this hypothesis provides a conceptual link between the well-established benefits of frequent exercise and the paradoxical deleterious effects of prolonged, high-intensity exercise without adequate rest. PMID:26415977

  5. Atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis resulting in large intestinal hypoperfusion: a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lotun, Kapildeo; Shetty, Ranjith; Topaz, On

    2012-11-01

    Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia results from intestinal hypoperfusion and is classically thought to result from involvement of two or more mesenteric arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery are most frequently implicated in this disease process, and their involvement usually results in symptoms of small intestinal ischemia. Symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia resulting predominantly from inferior mesenteric artery involvement has largely been overlooked but does gives rise to its own, unique clinical presentation with symptoms resulting from large intestinal ischemia. We present four patients with atherosclerotic inferior mesenteric artery stenosis with symptomatic chronic mesenteric ischemia that have unique clinical presentations consistent with large intestinal ischemia that resolved following percutaneous endovascular treatment of the inferior mesenteric artery stenosis. These cases represent a novel approach to the diagnosis and management of this disease process and may warrant a further subclassification of chronic mesenteric ischemia into chronic small intestinal ischemia and chronic large intestinal ischemia. PMID:22407990

  6. Role of altered intestinal microbiota in systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Denise; Lobo, Julie C; Barros, Amanda F; Koppe, Laetitia; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Fouque, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The normal intestinal microbiota plays a major role in the maintenance of health and disease prevention. In fact, the alteration of the intestinal microbiota has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of several pathological conditions, including obesity and insulin resistance, among others. Recent studies have revealed profound alterations of the gut microbial flora in patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Alterations in the composition of the microbiome in CKD may contribute to the systemic inflammation and accumulation of gut-derived uremic toxins, which play a central role in the pathogenesis of accelerated cardiovascular disease and numerous other CKD-associated complications. This review is intended to provide a concise description of the potential role of the CKD-associated changes in the gut microbiome and its potential role the pathogenesis of inflammation and uremic toxicity. In addition, the potential efficacy of pre- and pro-biotics in the restoration of the microbiome is briefly described. PMID:24762311

  7. Molecular mechanism of regulation of villus cell Na-K-ATPase in the chronically inflamed mammalian small intestine.

    PubMed

    Saha, Prosenjit; Manoharan, Palanikumar; Arthur, Subha; Sundaram, Shanmuga; Kekuda, Ramesh; Sundaram, Uma

    2015-02-01

    Na-K-ATPase located on the basolateral membrane (BLM) of intestinal epithelial cells provides a favorable intracellular Na+ gradient to promote all Na dependent co-transport processes across the brush border membrane (BBM). Down-regulation of Na-K-ATPase activity has been postulated to alter the absorption via Na-solute co-transporters in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Further, the altered activity of a variety of Na-solute co-transporters in intact villus cells has been reported in animal models of chronic enteritis. But the molecular mechanism of down-regulation of Na-K-ATPase is not known. In the present study, using a rabbit model of chronic intestinal inflammation, which resembles human IBD, Na-K-ATPase in villus cells was shown to decrease. The relative mRNA abundance of ?-1 and ?-1 subunits was not altered in villus cells during chronic intestinal inflammation. Similarly, the protein levels of these subunits were also not altered in villus cells during chronic enteritis. However, the BLM concentration of ?-1 and ?-1 subunits was diminished in the chronically inflamed intestinal villus cells. An ankyrin-spectrin skeleton is necessary for the proper trafficking of Na-K-ATPase to the BLM of the cell. In the present study, ankyrin expression was markedly diminished in villus cells from the chronically inflamed intestine resulting in depolarization of ankyrin-G protein. The decrease of Na-K-ATPase activity was comparable to that seen in ankyrin knockdown IEC-18 cells. Therefore, altered localization of Na-K-ATPase as a result of transcriptional down-regulation of ankyrin-G mediates the down-regulation of Na-K-ATPase activity during chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:25462166

  8. Chronic colitis induces expression of ?-defensins in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A; Fahlgren, A; Sundstedt, C; Hammarström, S; Danielsson, A; Hammarström, M-L

    2011-01-01

    Anti-microbial peptides are important effectors in innate immunity. In the gut they defend against pathogens, shape the commensal microbiota and probably control intestinal homeostasis. Ulcerative colitis (UC), but not Crohn's disease, shows increased expression of inducible ?-defensins (hBD-2, hBD-3 and hBD-4) in colonic epithelial cells. Does inducible defensin production precede the chronic intestinal inflammation characteristic of UC, or is it a consequence of the T cell-driven chronic inflammation? The aim was to analyse defensin mRNA and protein expression in colonic epithelial cells in two colitis mouse models resembling UC, the interleukin (IL)-2(-/-) mouse and the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse. Defensin mRNA was assayed by in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Defensin peptide was assayed by immunohistochemistry. Mouse ?-defensin 3 (mBD-3, orthologue to hBD-2) was up-regulated strongly in colonic epithelium of 15-week-old IL-2(-/-) mice and DSS-induced colitis mice with chronic bowel inflammation, but not in apparently healthy IL-2(-/-) 5-week-old mice, IL-2(+/-) 15-week-old mice or in acute stage DSS mice. Up-regulation was seen both at the mRNA- and at the protein level (only mBD-3 investigated). IL-17, but not several other cytokines, including interferon (IFN)-?, induced mBD-3 mRNA expression in mouse colon carcinoma cells. The mRNA expression level of the constitutively expressed ?-defensin, cryptdin-4, was up-regulated marginally in acute stage DSS-colitis mice and in IL-2(-/-) mice before signs of colitis. Inducible ?-defensin expression in colonic epithelium is the consequence of the chronic bowel inflammation caused by activated T cells releasing cytokines including IL-17. PMID:21039426

  9. Follow-up studies by peroral small intestinal biopsies and necropsy in dogs with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    van der Gaag, I; Happé, R P

    1990-09-01

    The results of follow-up studies in 82 dogs with clinical signs of chronic diarrhea are presented. Follow-up studies were performed by small intestinal biopsies only in 19 dogs, combined with necropsy in six dogs and follow-up necropsy only in 57 dogs. The times between the first and the last series of biopsies varied from 18 to 561 days, and from one to 656 days between the first series of biopsies and necropsy. From the 11 dogs with villous atrophy in the first series of biopsies, three also showed villous atrophy in the following biopsies or at necropsy, two had enteritis, one intestinal lymphangiectasia, one lymphosarcoma and four had no small intestinal lesions. Villous atrophy and enteritis found in 20 dogs in the initial biopsies were still present in 12 dogs in the following biopsies, in one only the villous atrophy remained in the following biopsies, in four lymphosarcoma was diagnosed, in one a colitis and in two changes outside the gastrointestinal tract were found at necropsy. In six of the seven dogs with enteritis in the initial biopsies this was diagnosed again, once with VA; in the seventh dog a hypertrophic gastritis was found. In five of the eight dogs with a diagnosis of lymphosarcoma in the initial biopsies a lymphosarcoma was found at necropsy, two had a villous atrophy with enteritis and in one only a differential diagnosis lymphosarcoma and/or enteritis could be made.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2123588

  10. Intestinal glutamine and ammonia metabolism during chronic hyperammonaemia induced by liver insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1993-01-01

    During liver insufficiency, besides portasystemic shunting, high arterial glutamine concentrations could enhance intestinal glutamine consumption and ammonia generation, thereby aggravating hyperammonaemia. To investigate this hypothesis, portal drained viscera (intestines) fluxes and jejunal tissue concentrations of ammonia and glutamine were measured in portacaval shunted rats with a ligated bile duct, portacaval shunted, and sham operated rats, seven and 14 days after surgery, and in normal unoperated controls. Effects of differences in food intake were minimised by pair feeding portacaval shunted and sham operated with portacaval shunted rats with biliary obstruction. At both time points, arterial ammonia was increased in the groups with liver insufficiency. Also, arterial glutamine concentration was raised in all operated groups compared with normal unoperated controls. At both time points, ammonia production by portal drained viscera was reduced in portacaval shunted rats with biliary obstruction, portacaval shunted, and sham operated rats compared with normal unoperated controls, and no major differences were found between these operated groups. At day 7 in all operated groups glutamine uptake by portal drained viscera was lower than in normal unoperated controls, but no major differences were found at day 14. These experiments show that ammonia generation by portal drained viscera remains unchanged in rats with chronic liver insufficiency despite alterations in arterial glutamine concentrations and intestinal glutamine uptake. The hyperammonaemia seems to be mainly determined by the portasystemic shunting. PMID:7909784

  11. Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoa among Saudi Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hawash, Yousry A.; Dorgham, Laila Sh.; Amir, El-Amir M.; Sharaf, Osama F.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes patients to infection with intestinal protozoa. We tested this hypothesis with a matched case-control study to determine the prevalence of these protozoa and their diarrhea associated symptoms among 50 patients with CRF (cases) from Taif, western Saudi Arabia. Fifty diarrheal patients without CRF were recruited in the study as controls. Participants were interviewed by a structured questionnaire and stool samples were collected. Samples were thoroughly examined with microscopy and three coproantigens detection kits. Enteric protozoa were detected in 21 cases and 14 controls. Blastocystis spp. were the most predominant parasite (16% in cases versus 8% in controls), followed by Giardia duodenalis (10% in cases versus 12% in controls) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10% in cases versus 6% in controls). Cyclospora cayetanensis was identified in two cases, while Entamoeba histolytica was described in one case and one control. Intestinal parasitism was positively associated with the male gender, urban residence, and travel history. Clinical symptoms of nausea/vomiting and abdominal pain were significantly varied between the parasitized cases and controls (P value ≤ 0.05). Given the results, we recommend screening all diarrheal feces for intestinal protozoa in the study's population, particularly those with CRF. PMID:26491455

  12. Bacteria- and host-derived mechanisms to control intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis: implications for chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Haller, Dirk

    2007-09-01

    The genetic predisposition to deregulated mucosal immune responses and the concurrent prevalence of certain environmental triggers in developed countries are strong etiologic factors for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in human subjects, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have shown that the intestinal microbes are critical for the initiation and progression of chronic intestinal inflammation. Activation of pattern recognition receptor signaling via members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like families initiates inflammatory defense mechanisms that are required to alert and protect the host. Key inflammatory mechanisms such as nuclear transcription factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses are controlled by a complex network of pathways that includes intrinsic feedback effectors and is targeted by immunosuppressive cytokines such as interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In the absence or after functional loss of these antiinflammatory feedback signals, physiological defense mechanisms may turn into pathological responses. The data discussed in the present review suggest that disturbances in the homeostasis between bacteria- and host-derived signals at the epithelial cell level lead to a break in the intestinal barrier function and to the development of mucosal immune disorders in genetically susceptible hosts. PMID:17476679

  13. Massive acute colonic pseudo-obstruction successfully managed with conservative therapy in a patient with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Derek R; Cooney, Norma L

    2011-01-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), also known as Ogilvie syndrome, is a massive dilation of the colon in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Treatment measures may include anticholinergic agents such as neostigmine, colonoscopy, or fluoroscopic decompression, surgical decompression, and partial or complete colectomy. We reviewed the case of a 26-year-old male with cerebral palsy who had a history of chronic intermittent constipation who presented to the emergency department (ED) with signs of impaction despite recurrent fleet enemas and oral polyethylene glycol 3350. The patient was found to have a massive colonic distention of 26 cm likely because of bowel dysmotility, consistent with ACPO. This article includes a discussion of the literature and images that represent clinical examination, x-ray, and computed tomography (CT) findings of this patient, who successfully underwent conservative management only. Emergency department detection of this condition is important, and early intervention may prevent surgical intervention and associated complications. PMID:21559070

  14. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  15. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25942314

  16. [Microfloral changes in the small and large intestines of chronic enteritis patients on diet therapy including sour milk products].

    PubMed

    Sukhov, S V; Kalamkarova, L I; Il'chenko, L A; Zhangabylov, A K

    1986-01-01

    The microflora of the small and large intestines was studied in 105 patients with chronic enteritis. Significant amounts of various microorganisms were detected in the small intestine. The content of E. coli, bacteroids, bifidobacteria in feces diminished, while that of staphylococcus, enterococcus and fungi rose. The patients were given diet N 4 (intended for enteritis patients) containing lactic acid products (200 ml, 5 times/day, during 24 days); 38 patients received shubat, 30--koumiss and 37--kefir. Koumiss proved to be most effective in the treatment of intestinal dysbacteriosis. Shubat possessed a lower antibiotic activity. Kefir administration did not produce significant shifts in the intestinal microflora. Lactic acid products were ineffective in fungous and Proteus dysbacteriosis. Koumiss and shubat could be recommended for the therapy of certain types of intestinal dysbacteriosis, thus restricting the use of antibacterial drugs. PMID:3765530

  17. Intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV infected patients with chronic diarrhea in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wanachiwanawin, D; Manatsathit, S; Lertlaituan, P; Thakerngpol, K; Suwanagool, P

    1998-12-01

    Microsporidia have been recognized as emerging opportunistic agents affecting multiple organs. Intestinal microsporidiosis caused by Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis is a common disease which is associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly in AIDS patients. So far, information on the frequency of this enteric disease in Thailand is not available. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV infected persons with chronic diarrhea. From 1995 to 1996, multiple diarrheal stool specimens were received and examined for the presence of the organism using Weber's modified trichrome staining method and transmission electron microscopy for confirmation. Twenty-two of 66 patients (33.3%) were positive for microsporidia which appeared as pink-red spores of 0.8-1.2 x 0.7-0.9 microm with the characteristic transverse or oblique band representing the coiled polar filament. Clinical features of these patients included chronic diarrhea (100%), weight loss (100%), abdominal pain (77%), fever (36%), vomiting (36%) and anorexia (18%). Transmission electron microscopic examination of fecal specimens from the 22 patients with positive staining results revealed E. bieneusi in 18 cases. PMID:10772562

  18. Ninety-five cases of intestinal transplantation at the University of Miami.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Seigo; Levi, David; Kato, Tomoaki; Nery, Jose R; Mittal, Naveen; Hadjis, Nicholas; Madariaga, Juan; Tzakis, Andreas G

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal failure requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Intestinal transplantation can be a lifesaving option for patients with intestinal failure who develop serious TPN-related complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate survival, surgical technique, and patient care in patients treated with intestinal transplantation. We reviewed data collected from 95 consecutive intestinal transplants performed between December 1994 and November 2000 at the University of Miami. Fifty-four of the patients undergoing intestinal transplantation were children and 41 were adults. The series includes 49 male and 46 female patients. The causes of intestinal failure included mesenteric venous thrombosis (n = 12), necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 11), gastroschisis (n = 11), midgut volvulus (n = 9), desmoid tumor (n = 8), intestinal atresia (n = 6), trauma (n = 5), Hirschsprung's disease (n = 5), Crohn's disease (n = 5), intestinal pseudoobstruction (n = 4), and others (n = 19). The procedures performed included 27 isolated intestine transplants, 28 combined liver and intestine transplants, and 40 multivisceral transplants. Since 1998, we have been using daclizumab (Zenepax) for induction of immunosuppression and zoom videoendoscopy for graft surveillance. We began to use intense cytomegalovirus prophylaxis and systemic drainage of the portal vein. The 1-year patient survival rates for isolated intestinal, liver and intestinal, and multivisceral transplantations were 75%, 40%, and 48%, respectively. Since 1998, the 1-year patient and graft survival rates for isolated intestinal transplants have been 84% and 72%, respectively. The causes of death were as follows: sepsis after rejection (n = 14), respiratory failure (n = 8), sepsis (n = 6), multiple organ failure (n = 4), arterial graft infection (n = 3), aspergillosis (n = 2), post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (n = 2), intracranial hemorrhage (n = 2), and fungemia, chronic rejection, graft vs. host disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, pancreatitis, pulmonary embolism, and viral encephalitis (n = 1 case of each). Intestinal transplantation can be a lifesaving alternative for patients with intestinal failure. The prognosis after intestinal transplantation is better when it is performed before the onset of liver failure. Rejection monitoring with zoom videoendoscopy and new immunosuppressive therapy with sirolimus, daclizumab, and campath-1H have contributed to the improvement in patient survival. PMID:11992809

  19. Modifications of inflammatory pathways in rat intestine following chronic ingestion of depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Dublineau, Isabelle; Grandcolas, Line; Grison, Stéphane; Baudelin, Cédric; Paquet, François; Voisin, Philippe; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2007-08-01

    The environmental contamination by dispersion of depleted uranium (DU) might result in its chronic ingestion of DU by local populations. The aim of this study was to determine if chronic ingestion of DU at low doses induces inflammatory reactions in intestine, first biological system exposed to uranium after ingestion. Experiments were performed with rats receiving uranium in drinking water (40 mg/l) during 3, 6, or 9 months. Several parameters referring to prostaglandin, histamine, cytokine, and nitric oxide (NO) pathways were assessed in ileum. Concerning the prostaglandin pathway, a twofold increase in gene expression of cyclooxygenase of type 2 was noted after 6 months, with no changes in prostaglandins levels. At the same time, a decrease in mast cell number was observed without any changes in histamine levels. Experiments on cytokines showed increased gene expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-10 at 6 months, and decreased messenger RNA level of CCL-2. This change was associated with decreased macrophage density. An opposite effect of DU was induced on neutrophils, since increased number was observed at 3 (x1.7) and 9 months (x3). The results obtained on NO pathway seemed to indicate that DU exposure inhibited this pathway (decreased endothelial NO synthase messenger RNA, inductive NO synthase activity and NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels) at 6 months. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that chronic ingestion of DU-induced time-dependent modifications of inflammatory pathways, notably in terms of immune cell content. The ultimate effects of DU contamination might be pathogenic by suppressing defense mechanisms or inducing hypersensitivity. Further experiments should be thus performed to determine real consequences on intestinal response to oral antigens. PMID:17566059

  20. Intestinal Microbiota, Microbial Translocation, and Systemic Inflammation in Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Duy M.; Volpe, Gretchen E.; Duffalo, Chad; Bhalchandra, Seema; Tai, Albert K.; Kane, Anne V.; Wanke, Christine A.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have increased microbial translocation and systemic inflammation. Alterations in the intestinal microbiota may play a role in microbial translocation and inflammation. Methods.?We profiled the fecal microbiota by pyrosequencing the gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and measured markers of microbial translocation and systemic inflammation in 21 patients who had chronic HIV infection and were receiving suppressive ART (cases) and 16 HIV-uninfected controls. Results.?The fecal microbial community composition was significantly different between cases and controls. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Enterobacteriales, Enterobacteriaceae, Erysipelotrichi, Erysipelotrichales, Erysipelotrichaceae, and Barnesiella was significantly enriched in cases, whereas that of Rikenellaceae and Alistipes was depleted. The plasma soluble CD14 level (sCD14) was significantly higher and the endotoxin core immunoglobulin M (IgM) level lower in cases, compared with controls. There were significant positive correlations between the relative abundances of Enterobacteriales and Enterobacteriaceae and the sCD14 level; the relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, Enterobacteriales, and Enterobacteriaceae and the interleukin 1? (IL-1?) level; the relative abundances of Enterobacteriales and Enterobacteriaceae and the interferon ? level; and the relative abundances of Erysipelotrichi and Barnesiella and the TNF-? level. There were negative correlations between endotoxin core IgM and IL-1? levels. Conclusions.?Patients who have chronic HIV infection and are receiving suppressive ART display intestinal dysbiosis associated with increased microbial translocation and significant associations between specific taxa and markers of microbial translocation and systemic inflammation. This was an exploratory study, the findings of which need to be confirmed. PMID:25057045

  1. The surgical treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia: results of a recent series.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Papaspiropoulos, V; Mancini, P; Ceccanei, G

    2004-04-01

    Due to the rarity of the condition, large and prospective series defining the optimal method of digestive arteries revascularization, for the treatment of chronic intestinal ischemia, are lacking. The aim of this consecutive sample clinical study was to test the hypothesis that flexible application of different revascularization methods, according to individual cases, will yield the best results in the management of chronic intestinal ischemia. Eleven patients, of a mean age of 56 years, underwent revascularization of 11 digestive arteries for symptomatic chronic mesenteric occlusive disease. Eleven superior mesenteric arteries and one celiac axis were revascularized. The revascularization techniques included retrograde bypass grafting in 7 cases, antegrade bypass grafting in 2, percutaneous arterial angioplasty in 1, and arterial reimplantation in one case. The donor axis for either reimplantation or bypass grafting was the infrarenal aorta in 4 cases, an infrarenal Dacron graft in 4, and the celiac aorta in one case. Grafting materials included 5 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and 3 Dacron grafts. Concomitant procedures included 3 aorto-ilio-femoral grafts and one renal artery revascularization. Mean follow-up duration was 31 months. There was no operative mortality. Cumulative survival rate was 88.9% at 36 months (SE 12.1%). Primary patency rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). The symptom free rate was 90% at 36 months (SE 11.6%). Direct reimplantation, antegrade and retrograde bypass grafting, all allow good mid-term results: the choice of the optimal method depends on the anatomic and general patient's status. Associated infrarenal and renal arterial lesions can be safely treated in the same time of digestive revascularization. Angioplasty alone yields poor results and should be limited to patients at poor risk for surgery. PMID:15154575

  2. Severe late radiation enteropathy is characterized by impaired motility of proximal small intestine.

    PubMed

    Husebye, E; Hauer-Jensen, M; Kjørstad, K; Skar, V

    1994-11-01

    Late radiation enteropathy (LRE) is a serious disorder, and therapeutic progress has thus far been hampered by insufficient understanding of the pathogenesis. This prospective study addresses whether alterations in proximal intestinal motility can predict the clinical severity of this disorder. Forty-one consecutive patients with chronic abdominal complaints after radiotherapy for gynecological cancer were examined by prolonged ambulatory manometry. Twenty-seven healthy adults served as controls. Impaired fasting motility was found in 12 of 41 patients (29%), and attenuated postprandial motor response after a liquid-solid meal was seen in 10 of 41 patients (24%). Postprandial delay of the migrating motor complex (MMC) was a good predictor of the degree of malnutrition (Cox regression, P < 0.01), and intensity of the MMC and postprandial motility index explained 69% (P < 0.001, multiple regression) of the variability in degree of malnutrition, assessed by weight loss and serum albumin level. The typical presentation of severe LRE was clinical symptoms suggesting intestinal pseudoobstruction, malnutrition, failure of a liquid-solid meal to induce postprandial motility, and delayed initiation and reduced intensity of MMC during nocturnal fasting. Prolonged ambulatory manometry was useful for detection of dysmotility in patients with symptoms of LRE and impaired motility of proximal small intestine seems to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of severe LRE. PMID:7956601

  3. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity

    PubMed Central

    van de Heijning, Bert J. M.; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%–75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  4. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    PubMed

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed. PMID:26184291

  5. Fecal lactoferrin and intestinal permeability are effective non-invasive markers in the diagnostic work-up of chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Caccaro, Roberta; D'Incà, Renata; Martinato, Matteo; Pont, Elisabetta Dal; Pathak, Surajit; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive markers able to identify patients with chronic diarrhea at risk of organic disease are missing. Aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic ability of intestinal permeability (IP) test and fecal lactoferrin (FL) in distinguishing functional from organic disease in patients with chronic diarrhea. We retrospectively enrolled patients referring to the gastroenterology outpatient clinic for chronic diarrhea. Among the 103 patients included, 40 % had an organic disease, with IP and FL levels significantly higher compared to those with a functional disorder (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, area under ROC curves of FL were superior to those of IP in discriminating functional and organic disease (FL: 87.8 and 93.6 %, 13.61 and 0.13, 0.9375; IP: 61.0 and 90.3 %, 6.3 and 0.43, 0.7691). When combining the two tests, the diagnostic ability of FL did not improve. In subgroup analysis, IP confirmed its ability to detect small bowel alterations, while FL could identify both small bowel and colonic alterations. In conclusion, FL is valid to detect inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract, while IP can effectively identify small bowel damage in chronic diarrhea patients. Together these tests could recognize both the presence of intestinal damage and its site. PMID:24831229

  6. Interleukin 6 Increases Production of Cytokines by Colonic Innate Lymphoid Cells in Mice and Patients With Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Nick; Lo, Jonathan W.; Biancheri, Paolo; Vossenkämper, Anna; Pantazi, Eirini; Walker, Alan W.; Stolarczyk, Emilie; Ammoscato, Francesca; Goldberg, Rimma; Scott, Paul; Canavan, James B.; Perucha, Esperanza; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Irving, Peter M.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Hayee, Bu; Howard, Jane K.; Parkhill, Julian; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Lord, Graham M.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a heterogeneous group of mucosal inflammatory cells that participate in chronic intestinal inflammation. We investigated the role of interleukin 6 (IL6) in inducing activation of ILCs in mice and in human beings with chronic intestinal inflammation. Methods ILCs were isolated from colons of Tbx21-/- × Rag2-/- mice (TRUC), which develop colitis; patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); and patients without colon inflammation (controls). ILCs were characterized by flow cytometry; cytokine production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cytokine bead arrays. Mice were given intraperitoneal injections of depleting (CD4, CD90), neutralizing (IL6), or control antibodies. Isolated colon tissues were analyzed by histology, explant organ culture, and cell culture. Bacterial DNA was extracted from mouse fecal samples to assess the intestinal microbiota. Results IL17A- and IL22-producing, natural cytotoxicity receptor–negative, ILC3 were the major subset of ILCs detected in colons of TRUC mice. Combinations of IL23 and IL1α induced production of cytokines by these cells, which increased further after administration of IL6. Antibodies against IL6 reduced colitis in TRUC mice without significantly affecting the structure of their intestinal microbiota. Addition of IL6 increased production of IL17A, IL22, and interferon-γ by human intestinal CD3-negative, IL7-receptor–positive cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions IL6 contributes to activation of colonic natural cytotoxicity receptor–negative, CD4-negative, ILC3s in mice with chronic intestinal inflammation (TRUC mice) by increasing IL23- and IL1α-induced production of IL17A and IL22. This pathway might be targeted to treat patients with IBD because IL6, which is highly produced in colonic tissue by some IBD patients, also increased the production of IL17A, IL22, and interferon-γ by cultured human colon CD3-negative, IL7-receptor–positive cells. PMID:25917784

  7. Induction of Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter expression mediates chronic potentiation of intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion by EGF.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Fiona; Toumi, Ferial; Mroz, Magdalena S; Ferguson, Gail; Keely, Stephen J

    2008-06-01

    Alterations in EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling occur in intestinal disorders associated with dysregulated epithelial transport. In the present study, we investigated a role for the EGFR in the chronic regulation of intestinal epithelial secretory function. Epithelial Cl(-) secretion was measured as changes in short-circuit current (Isc) across voltage-clamped monolayers of T84 cells in Ussing chambers. Acute treatment of T84 cells with EGF (100 ng/ml, 15 min) chronically enhanced Isc responses to a broad range of secretagogues. This effect was apparent within 3 h, maximal by 6 h, and sustained for 24 h after treatment with EGF. The Na+/K+/2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) inhibitor bumetanide (100 microM) abolished the effect of EGF, indicating increased responses are due to potentiated Cl(-) secretion. Neither basal nor agonist-stimulated levels of intracellular Ca2+ or PKA activity were altered by EGF, implying that the effects of the growth factor are not due to chronic alterations in levels of second messengers. EGF increased the expression of NKCC1 with a time course similar to that of its effects on Cl(-) secretion. This effect of EGF was maximal after 6 h, at which time NKCC1 expression in EGF-treated cells was 199.9 +/- 21.9% of that in control cells (n = 21, P < 0.005). EGF-induced NKCC1 expression was abolished by actinomycin D, and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated EGF increased expression of NKCC1 mRNA. These data increase our understanding of mechanisms regulating intestinal fluid and electrolyte transport and reveal a novel role for the EGFR in the chronic regulation of epithelial secretory capacity through upregulation of NKCC1 expression. PMID:18400987

  8. Spatial Localization and Binding of the Probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis to the Rat Intestinal Mucosa: Influence of Chronic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Arthur; Mercade-Loubière, Myriam; Salvador-Cartier, Christel; Ringot, Bélinda; Léonard, Renaud; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Ait-Belgnaoui, Afifa; Loubière, Pascal; Théodorou, Vassilia; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at detecting the exogenously applied probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis in rats, after exposure to IBS-like chronic stress, based on 4-day Water Avoidance Stress (WAS). The presence of L. farciminis in both ileal and colonic mucosal tissues was demonstrated by FISH and qPCR, with ileum as the preferential niche, as for the SFB population. A different spatial distribution of the probiotic was observed: in the ileum, bacteria were organized in micro-colonies more or less close to the epithelium whereas, in the colon, they were mainly visualized far away from the epithelium. When rats were submitted to WAS, the L. farciminis population substantially decreased in both intestinal regions, due to a stress-induced increase in colonic motility and defecation, rather than a modification of bacterial binding to the intestinal mucin Muc2. PMID:26367538

  9. [Virtual enteroscopy for the evaluation of stenosis in a case of chronic multiple ulcers of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toshiyuki; Shirane, Hisafumi; Matsuda, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoyuki; Kurokami, Takafumi; Taki, Yusuke; Arai, Kazumori; Kikuyama, Masataka

    2014-04-01

    A 39-year-old female presented to our hospital with diarrhea, vomiting, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Virtual enteroscopy was performed to evaluate the small bowel; we found annular stenoses at 89, 100, 116, 147, and 154 cm from the ligament of Treitz. Small bowel resection was performed, and annular ulcers were confirmed at 58, 71, 90, 130, 138, 218, and 225 cm from the ligament of Treitz. Clinical records and pathological examination failed to determine the cause of these ulcers, and we diagnosed chronic multiple ulcers of the small intestine. Thus, we believe that virtual enteroscopy can be beneficial in preoperatively diagnosing multiple ulcers and stenoses in the small bowel. PMID:24769465

  10. Successful use of pregabalin by the rectal route to treat chronic neuropathic pain in a patient with complete intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Doddrell, Charlotte; Tripathi, Shiva Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin is widely used for treatment of neuropathic pain and is only approved for oral use. This is the first reported case of using pregabalin by the rectal route for treatment in a 70-year-old patient with chronic neuropathic pain and complete intestinal failure. Therapies used in an attempt to manage his chronic pain have included a variety of doses and strengths of opioid preparations and cannabinoids, plus topical and alternative therapies. These were not effective, so it was decided to start a trial of pregabalin administered by the rectal route. Serum levels were measured to assess absorption. Within a few weeks of starting the treatment, the patient had improved pain control and appeared more comfortable and calm. PMID:26516246

  11. Fasting and postprandial overproduction of intestinally derived lipoproteins in an animal model of insulin resistance. Evidence that chronic fructose feeding in the hamster is accompanied by enhanced intestinal de novo lipogenesis and ApoB48-containing lipoprotein overproduction.

    PubMed

    Haidari, Mehran; Leung, Nathalie; Mahbub, Farhana; Uffelman, Kristine D; Kohen-Avramoglu, Rita; Lewis, Gary F; Adeli, Khosrow

    2002-08-30

    Insulin-resistant states are characterized by hypertriglyceridemia, predominantly because of overproduction of hepatic very low density lipoprotein particles. The additional contribution of intestinal lipoprotein overproduction to the dyslipidemia of insulin-resistant states has not been previously appreciated. Here, we have investigated intestinal lipoprotein production in a fructose-fed hamster model of insulin resistance previously documented to have whole body and hepatic insulin resistance, and hepatic very low density lipoprotein overproduction. Chronic fructose feeding for 3 weeks induced significant oversecretion of apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48)-containing lipoproteins in the fasting state and during steady state fat feeding, based on (a) in vivo Triton WR1339 studies of apoB48 production as well as (b) ex vivo pulse-chase labeling of intestinal enterocytes from fasted and fed hamsters. ApoB48 particle overproduction was accompanied by increased intracellular apoB48 stability, enhanced lipid synthesis, higher abundance of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mass, and a significant shift toward the secretion of larger chylomicron-like particles. ApoB48 particle overproduction was not observed with short-term fructose feeding or in vitro incubation of enterocytes with fructose. Secretion of intestinal apoB48 and triglyceride was closely linked to intestinal enterocyte de novo lipogenesis, which was up-regulated in fructose-fed hamsters. Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase inhibitor, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal apoB48 secretion. Overall, these findings further suggest that intestinal overproduction of apoB48 lipoproteins should also be considered as a major contributor to the fasting and postprandial dyslipidemia observed in response to chronic fructose feeding and development of an insulin-resistant state. PMID:12070142

  12. High Levels of Dietary Supplement Vitamins A, C and E are Absorbed in the Small Intestine and Protect Nutrient Transport Against Chronic Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roche, Marjolaine; Neti, Prasad V S V; Kemp, Francis W; Azzam, Edouard I; Ferraris, Ronaldo P; Howell, Roger W

    2015-11-01

    We examined nutrient transport in the intestines of mice exposed to chronic low-LET 137Cs gamma rays. The mice were whole-body irradiated for 3 days at dose rates of 0, 0.13 and 0.20 Gy/h, for total dose delivery of 0, 9.6 or 14.4 Gy, respectively. The mice were fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with high levels of vitamins A, C and E. Our results showed that nutrient transport was perturbed by the chronic irradiation conditions. However, no apparent alteration of the macroscopic intestinal structures of the small intestine were observed up to day 10 after initiating irradiation. Jejunal fructose uptake measured in vitro was strongly affected by the chronic irradiation, whereas uptake of proline, carnosine and the bile acid taurocholate in the ileum was less affected. D-glucose transport did not appear to be inhibited significantly by either 9.6 or 14.4 Gy exposure. In the 14.4 Gy irradiated groups, the diet supplemented with high levels of vitamins A, C and E increased intestinal transport of fructose compared to the control diet (day 10; t test, P = 0.032), which correlated with elevated levels of vitamins A, C and E in the plasma and jejunal enterocytes. Our earlier studies with mice exposed acutely to 137Cs gamma rays demonstrated significant protection for transport of fructose, glucose, proline and carnosine. Taken together, these results suggest that high levels of vitamins A, C and E dietary supplements help preserve intestinal nutrient transport when intestines are irradiated chronically or acutely with low-LET gamma rays. PMID:26484399

  13. Central Role of the Gut Epithelial Barrier in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Intestinal Inflammation: Lessons Learned from Animal Models and Human Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Pastorelli, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Mercado, Joseph R.; Vecchi, Maurizio; Pizarro, Theresa T.

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosa is constantly challenged by a bombardment of foreign antigens and environmental microorganisms. As such, the precise regulation of the intestinal barrier allows the maintenance of mucosal immune homeostasis and prevents the onset of uncontrolled inflammation. In support of this concept, emerging evidence points to defects in components of the epithelial barrier as etiologic factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In fact, the integrity of the intestinal barrier relies on different elements, including robust innate immune responses, epithelial paracellular permeability, epithelial cell integrity, as well as the production of mucus. The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate how alterations in the aforementioned epithelial components can lead to the disruption of intestinal immune homeostasis, and subsequent inflammation. In this regard, the wealth of data from mouse models of intestinal inflammation and human genetics are pivotal in understanding pathogenic pathways, for example, that are initiated from the specific loss of function of a single protein leading to the onset of intestinal disease. On the other hand, several recently proposed therapeutic approaches to treat human IBD are targeted at enhancing different elements of gut barrier function, further supporting a primary role of the epithelium in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation and emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy and effective intestinal barrier. PMID:24062746

  14. The histological appearance of peroral small intestinal biopsies in clinically healthy dogs and dogs with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    van der Gaag, I; Happé, R P

    1990-07-01

    A survey of the histology of 2,024 small intestinal suction and forceps biopsies in 400 dogs, consisting of 17 clinically healthy control dogs and 383 dogs with chronic diarrhea is presented. Three and a half percent of the suction biopsies and 22.6 percent of the forceps biopsies were unsuitable for examination, making a diagnosis impossible in 9 dogs, and in 0.4 percent antral mucosa was present. Biopsies could be obtained from the proximal one third of the small intestine. The normal histology, including mean villous length, its standard deviation and its range is described in the 17 control dogs. A classification of enteritis in dogs is given. Villous atrophy without enteritis was found in 55 dogs with chronic diarrhea; 51 dogs had moderate and four severe villous atrophy. Villous atrophy combined with enteritis was found in 93 dogs, 57 of which had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis, 14 had eosinophilic enteritis, six catarrhal, four ulcerative, 11 a combination of lymphocytic-plasmacytic and eosinophilic enteritis and one dog had a combination of lymphocytic-plasmacytic and catarrhal enteritis. Enteritis without villous atrophy was found in 50 dogs: 39 had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis, four eosinophilic, two catarrhal, one purulent (microabscesses), three a combination of lymphocytic-plasmacytic and eosinophilic enteritis and one dog had focal necrosis. Twelve dogs showed a lymphosarcoma and in eight other dogs a differential diagnosis of lymphosarcoma and/or enteritis was made. One carcinoma was found. Other findings were hemorrhages, oedema, erosions, muscular hypertrophy in the villi, an increased or decreased number of intraepithelial lymphocytes, an increased or decreased number of goblet cells, lymphangiectasia, crypt cysts, crypt abscesses and gastric metaplasia. Some breeds, such as the German Shepherd dog, Bouvier des Flandres, Spaniel, Collie, Great Dane and Retriever appear to be more susceptible than other breeds for villous atrophy and enteritis. A slight prevalence of the German Shepherd dog, Doberman Pinscher and Rottweiler was also observed for eosinophilic enteritis. Mild villous atrophy is mostly found in dogs aged 0-4 years, whereas severe villous atrophy is found in dogs older than 4 years. Further breed, age or sex predisposition could not be found. The method appears especially useful for diffuse mucosal lesions of the proximal small intestine. PMID:2120863

  15. Host-bacteria interactions in the intestine: homeostasis to chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Theolis; Rescigno, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade it has become clear that the gut constitutes an important frontier of the body, which not only regulates the selective entry of nutrients while keeping vigilant against pathogens but also is largely responsible for shaping the immune response to educate the organism to recognize self from non-self. The very notion of self has undergone a dramatic change, with the acknowledgment that our 'selves' include a plethora of microbial species that actively participate in our body's homeostasis. The immune system continuously adapts to the microbiota in a cyclic, dynamic cross talk where intestinal epithelial cells play an important role in instructing noninflammatory responses for a steady-state control of bacterial growth, or triggering inflammatory mechanisms that can clear the gut from harmful invaders. The system is complex and robust in the sense that many players with partially overlapping roles act to keep the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier. Failure of these mechanisms involves genetic and environmental triggers and leads to inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we seek to collect the state-of-the-art knowledge about how host and microbiota interact to promote gut homeostasis and provide evidences of malfunctioning of the described mechanisms in human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:20836012

  16. Effect of chronic (4 weeks) ingestion of ethanol on transport of proline into intestinal brush border membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Beesley, R.C.; Jones, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    Hamsters were separated into two groups and fed liquid diets ad lib. Controls were given a diet similar to that described by DeCarli and Lieber while alcoholics received the same diet containing 5% ethanol isocalorically substituted for sucrose. The volume of diet consumed daily and the gain in body weights of alcoholics were not significantly different from those of controls. After four weeks the animals were sacrificed and the upper third of the small intestine was used to prepare brush border membrane vesicles. In the presence of a Na/sup +/ gradient, uptake of proline into vesicles prepared from both groups was rapid, reaching a maximum accumulation in 1 to 2 min and then decreasing to the equilibrium level. To normalize the results, the amount of proline take up at each time point was divided by the amount present at equilibrium. From the normalized data it was concluded that both the rate of uptake and the maximum accumulation of proline into brush border membrane vesicles isolated from alcoholics were significantly less than those obtained with vesicles from controls. These results suggest that chronic ingestion of ethanol results in a reduction in Na/sup +/-dependent transport of proline across the brush border membrane and, thus, may contribute to the malnutrition which is frequently associated with chronic alcoholism.

  17. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  18. Neuromuscular and Vascular Hamartoma of the Small Intestine: An Exuberant Reparative Process Secondary to Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Crothers, Jessica W; Zenali, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    The term Neuromuscular and Vascular Hamartoma (NMVH) was initially coined by Fernando and McGovern in 1982 in their report of 2 cases. Whether this lesion is truly hamartomatous or represents a "burnt-out" phase of varying chronic pathologies has been debated since that time. Examples of NMVH-like proliferations have been reported in the setting of diaphragm disease, Crohn's disease, radiation, and ischemia. Herein we present the case of a 73-year-old female with partial small bowel obstruction and a past surgical history significant for cholecystectomy and abdominal hysterectomy. A computed tomography scan revealed an ill-defined mass with the same density as muscle extending into the mesentery, worrisome for malignancy and generating the differential of lymphoma versus metastatic disease. Upon laparotomy, a 2.5 cm, constrictive, predominantly mural-based mass was identified. The more proximal bowel was dilated, and there were dense serosal adhesions. Grossly, the transmural lesion had a tan-yellow cobweb-like cut surface and the overlying mucosa was flattened. Histologically, the lesion contained fascicles of smooth muscle, irregularly spaced large nerve bundles, and thick-walled vasculature in a haphazard arrangement within a hypocellular fibroadipose stroma. No stigmata of Crohn's disease were observed, and the uninvolved enteric tissue was unremarkable. The patient's medical history was negative for chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use and was otherwise unremarkable. This case of an NMVH-like lesion is presented as a reminder of benign mass-forming lesions causing bowel obstruction and suggests that such lesions may develop secondary to a chronic inflammatory process. PMID:26275621

  19. Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affects in vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Maria Assunta; Montagnani, Monica; Nacci, Carmela; De Salvia, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Background Green tea catechins seem to contribute toward reducing body weight and fat. Objective We aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin of green tea, reduces weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of metabolic syndrome, by increasing motor activity and/or by altering gastrointestinal motility. Design Nine-week-old SHR were randomly assigned to two groups and treated by gavage for 3 weeks with vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide or EGCG (200 mg/kg/day). Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats were treated with vehicle alone. The effect of chronic administration of EGCG was evaluated on open-field motor activity and on ex vivo colonic and duodenal motility. Moreover, in vitro acute effect of 20-min incubation with EGCG (100 µM) or vehicle was evaluated in colonic and duodenal specimens from untreated WKY rats and SHR. Results Vehicle-treated SHR were normoglycemic and hyperinsulinemic, and showed a reduction of plasma adiponectin when compared to vehicle-treated WKY rats. In addition, consistent with fasting glucose and insulin values, vehicle-treated SHR were more insulin resistant than age-matched vehicle-treated WKY rats. Chronic treatment for 3 weeks with EGCG improved insulin sensitivity, raised plasma adiponectin levels, and reduced food intake and weight gain in SHR. Vehicle-treated SHR showed increased open-field motor activity (both crossings and rearings) when tested after each week of treatment. The overall hyperactivity of vehicle-treated SHR was significantly reduced to the levels of vehicle-treated WKY rats after 2 and 3 weeks of EGCG treatment. Colonic and duodenal preparations obtained from SHR chronically treated in vivo with EGCG showed reduced responses to carbachol (0.05–5 µM) and increased inhibitory response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–10 Hz, 13 V, 1 msec, 10-sec train duration), respectively. In vitro acute EGCG incubation (100 µM, 20 min) of colonic and duodenum strips obtained from untreated SHR and WKY rats showed a reduced contractile colonic response to a fixed dose of carbachol (1.5 µM) only in SHR with respect to its own vehicle, whereas the inhibitory duodenal response to a fixed EFS frequency (5 Hz) was significantly reduced in both WKY rats and SHR groups with respect to their own vehicle. Conclusions These data suggest that EGCG affects body weight gain in rats and this effect seems to be due to the altered intestinal motility and not to increased motor activity. PMID:26899572

  20. Chronic Administration of ?9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory MicroRNA Expression during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Lawrance C.; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including ?9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of ?9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving ?9-THC (n = 3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n = 4) or THC (THC/SIV; n = 4). Chronic ?9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ?28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal inflammation. Whether similar miRNA modulation occurs in other tissues requires further investigation. IMPORTANCE Gastrointestinal (GI) tract disease/inflammation is a hallmark of HIV/SIV infection. Previously, we showed that chronic treatment of SIV-infected macaques with ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) increased survival and decreased viral replication and infection-induced gastrointestinal inflammation. Here, we show that chronic THC administration to SIV-infected macaques induced an anti-inflammatory microRNA expression profile in the intestine at 60 days p.i. These included several miRNAs bioinformatically predicted to directly target CXCL12, a chemokine known to regulate lymphocyte and macrophage trafficking into the intestine. Specifically, miR-99b was significantly upregulated in THC-treated SIV-infected macaques and confirmed to directly target NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), a reactive oxygen species generator known to damage intestinal epithelial cells. Elevated miR-99b expression was associated with a significantly decreased number of NOX4+ epithelial cells in the intestines of THC-treated SIV-infected macaques. Overall, our results show that selective upregulation of anti-inflammatory miRNA expression contributes to THC-mediated suppression of gastrointestinal inflammation and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:25378491

  1. Interdigestive intestinal motility in dogs with chronic exclusion of bile from the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Plourde, V; Trudel, L; Poitras, P

    1987-12-01

    To elucidate the role of bile delivery into the duodenum on the regulation of plasma motilin and on the interdigestive migrating complex, three dogs were operated upon to ligate the main bile duct and divert the biliary flow into the urinary bladder via a Foley catheter. After the operation, despite the chronic diversion of bile from the digestive tract, all animals maintained an excellent health status and exhibited recurrent periods of phase III motor activity migrating from the duodenum to the ileum, which were associated with cyclic increases in plasma motilin. Following the infusion of pooled dog bile (1 mL/min for 10 min) into the duodenum, a premature phase III and a concomitant rise in plasma motilin were observed. These results suggest, that although bile delivery into the duodenum can induce motilin increase in plasma and period of phase III activity in the gut, this phenomenon does not constitute an essential stimulus for the release of motilin and for the induction of the phase III of the interdigestive migrating complex. PMID:3449206

  2. Sleep quality and the treatment of intestinal microbiota imbalance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A pilot study☆

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melinda L.; Butt, Henry; Ball, Michelle; Lewis, Donald P.; Bruck, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a multisystem illness, which may be associated with imbalances in gut microbiota. This study builds on recent evidence that sleep may be influenced by gut microbiota, by assessing whether changes to microbiota in a clinical population known to have both poor sleep and high rates of colonization with gram-positive faecal Streptococcus, can improve sleep. Twenty-one CFS participants completed a 22- day open label trial. Faecal microbiota analysis was performed at baseline and at the end of the trial. Participants were administered erythromycin 400 mg b.d. for 6 days. Actigraphy and questionnaires were used to monitor sleep, symptoms and mood. Changes in patients who showed a clinically significant change in faecal Streptococcus after treatment (responders; defined as post-therapy distribution<6%) were compared to participants who did not respond to treatment. In the seven responders, there was a significant increase in actigraphic total sleep time (p=0.028) from baseline to follow up, compared with non-responders. Improved vigour scores were associated with a lower Streptococcus count (ρ=−0.90, p=0.037). For both the responders and the whole group, poorer mood was associated with higher Lactobacillus. Short term antibiotic treatment appears to be insufficient to effect sustainable changes in the gut ecosystem in most CFS participants. Some improvement in objective sleep parameters and mood were found in participants with reduced levels of gram-positive gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment, which is encouraging. Further study of possible links between gut microorganisms and sleep and mood disturbances is warranted. PMID:26779319

  3. Sleep quality and the treatment of intestinal microbiota imbalance in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Butt, Henry; Ball, Michelle; Lewis, Donald P; Bruck, Dorothy

    2015-11-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a multisystem illness, which may be associated with imbalances in gut microbiota. This study builds on recent evidence that sleep may be influenced by gut microbiota, by assessing whether changes to microbiota in a clinical population known to have both poor sleep and high rates of colonization with gram-positive faecal Streptococcus, can improve sleep. Twenty-one CFS participants completed a 22- day open label trial. Faecal microbiota analysis was performed at baseline and at the end of the trial. Participants were administered erythromycin 400 mg b.d. for 6 days. Actigraphy and questionnaires were used to monitor sleep, symptoms and mood. Changes in patients who showed a clinically significant change in faecal Streptococcus after treatment (responders; defined as post-therapy distribution<6%) were compared to participants who did not respond to treatment. In the seven responders, there was a significant increase in actigraphic total sleep time (p=0.028) from baseline to follow up, compared with non-responders. Improved vigour scores were associated with a lower Streptococcus count (?=-0.90, p=0.037). For both the responders and the whole group, poorer mood was associated with higher Lactobacillus. Short term antibiotic treatment appears to be insufficient to effect sustainable changes in the gut ecosystem in most CFS participants. Some improvement in objective sleep parameters and mood were found in participants with reduced levels of gram-positive gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment, which is encouraging. Further study of possible links between gut microorganisms and sleep and mood disturbances is warranted. PMID:26779319

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application. PMID:26617183

  5. Bacterial contamination of the small intestine as an important cause of chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain: diagnosis by breath hydrogen test.

    PubMed

    Davidson, G P; Robb, T A; Kirubakaran, C P

    1984-08-01

    Unsuspected bacterial contamination of the small intestine was indicated by breath hydrogen testing in nine patients aged 2 to 34 months during physical examinations for chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain. Elevated bacterial counts of questionable significance were found in duodenal aspirates before and after antibiotic treatment. There was no evidence of bile salt deconjugation or structural changes in the small intestine by light or electron microscopy. This may indicate that the site of colonization is distal to the biopsy site. Breath testing indicated lactose malabsorption in all patients, and four of five patients tested also malabsorbed sucrose. Duodenal disaccharidase levels in all patients were within the normal ranges, but in eight patients the lactase-sucrase ratio was greatly elevated (0.80 +/- 0.36; normal less than 0.45). Dietary restriction alone did not cause complete cessation of symptoms, whereas all patients responded dramatically to oral antibiotic therapy. When patients were well, the lactase-sucrase ratio had returned to normal in those tested, and all nine had normal lactose and lactulose breath hydrogen tests. Unsuspected bacterial contamination of the small intestine, which is easily detected using the breath hydrogen test, may be more commonly associated with chronic diarrhea in children than has been previously realized. In such cases, therapy should be directed at removing the contamination. PMID:6431389

  6. Retrospective study on the diagnostic value of full-thickness biopsies from the stomach and intestines of dogs with chronic gastrointestinal disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, S; Meneses, F; Nolte, I; Hewicker-Trautwein, M

    2006-11-01

    An evaluation of histologic findings in full-thickness biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) from 64 dogs with chronic GIT disease symptoms was performed. In the majority of cases (38/64; 59%), intestinal lymphangiectasia and mucosal edema of unknown etiology were present. In 10 dogs (16%) an eosinophilic colitis, either alone or together with gastritis and/or enteritis, was found. In 5 dogs (8%) lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or enterocolitis was diagnosed. Five dogs (8%) had an intestinal T-cell lymphoma. Samples from the remaining cases were histologically normal or did not allow for a final diagnosis. In contrast to reports about findings in endoscopic biopsies (which often are of varying quality or inadequate for diagnosis), in the majority of cases of this study, examination of full-thickness biopsies from the GIT allowed us to make a definitive histopathologic diagnosis. Furthermore, the study revealed that transmural biopsies are very helpful for diagnosing lymphoma. PMID:17099159

  7. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D'Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  8. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D’Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  9. Acute Colonic Pseudo-obstruction: Defining the Epidemiology, Treatment, and Adverse Outcomes of Ogilvie's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samuel W; Oommen, Bindhu; Wormer, Blair A; Walters, Amanda L; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd; Sing, Ronald F; Christmas, A Britton

    2016-02-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) is a rare but often fatal disease. Herein, we present the largest study to date on ACPO. The National Inpatient Sample was queried for ACPO diagnoses from 1998 to 2011. Patients were analyzed by treatment into four groups: medical management (MM), colonoscopy alone [(endoscopy-only group) ENDO], surgery alone (SURG), or surgery and colonoscopy (SAC). Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of adverse outcomes by treatment group. There were 106,784 cases of ACPO: 96,657 (90.5%) MM, 2,915 (2.7%) ENDO, 6,731 (6.3%) SURG, and 481 (0.5%) SAC. The medical complication (45.7%), procedural complication (15.9%), and mortality rates (7.7%) were high. Increasing procedure invasiveness was independently associated with higher odds of medical complications, procedural complications, and death (P < 0.0125). The odds of death were significantly higher in the ENDO [odds ratio (OR) = 1.2], SURG (OR 1.4), and SAC (OR = 1.8) groups (P < 0.0125). Those who fail MM and require procedures have increasing morbidity and mortality with increasing invasiveness, likely reflecting the severity of their conditions. PMID:26874130

  10. Chronic morphine-induced loss of the facilitative interaction between vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and delta-opioid: involvement of protein kinase C and phospholipase Cbetas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nai-Jiang; Chakrabarti, Sumita; Gintzler, Alan R

    2004-06-01

    This laboratory recently demonstrated a multiplicative interaction between the pelvic visceral afferent transmitter vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and the delta-opioid receptor (DOR)-selective agonist [D-Pen2,5] enkephalin (DPDPE) to regulate cAMP levels in spinal cord [Brain Res. 959 (2003) 103]. Although DOR activation is required for the manifestation of the VIP-DPDPE facilitative interaction, its relevance to opioid antinociception remains unclear. The current study investigates whether or not the VIP-DPDPE facilitation of cAMP formation is subject to tolerance formation, a hallmark characteristic of opioid antinociception. Chronic morphine exposure abolishes the VIP-DPDPE facilitative interaction, consistent with its relevance to DOR antinociception. However, acute in vitro inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) reinstates the VIP-DPDPE multiplicative interaction characteristic of opioid naïve spinal tissue. This suggests that its chronic morphine-induced loss requires a PKC phosphorylation. PKC phosphorylation negatively modulates phospholipase C (PLC)beta, enzymes intimately associated with phosphoinositide turnover and calcium trafficking. These are essential determinants of acute and chronic opioid effects. Accordingly, the effect of chronic morphine on their state of phosphorylation was also investigated. Central nervous system opioid tolerance is associated with the reciprocal phosphorylation (regulation) of two PLCbeta isoforms, PLCbeta1 and PLCbeta3. However, although chelerythrine reinstates the chronic morphine-induced loss of the multiplicative VIP-DPDPE interaction, it does not alter the associated changes in PLCbeta phosphorylation, possibly indicating different time courses of restitution of function and/or involvement of different kinases for different components of tolerance. These results could provide a mechanistic rubric for understanding positive modulation of opioid antinociception by afferent transmission. PMID:15126111

  11. Chronic effects of an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor (Bay o 1248) on intestinal disaccharidase activity in normal and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Bustamante, S; Flores, C; Bezerra, J; Goda, T; Koldovský, O

    1987-01-01

    Bay o 1248 is a potent alpha-glycosidase inhibitor that reduces postprandial hyperglycemia when administered p.o. with sucrose or maltose. The compound binds to and competitively inhibits the alpha-disaccharidases and is also readily absorbed across the intestinal mucosa. To evaluate its effect on the activity of disaccharidases and on metabolic control, groups of obese diabetic mice (C57BLKsJ db/db) were given the drug for periods of 3, 7 and 84 days as a drug food mixture (5 or 10 mg/100 g of food). Nondiabetic mice of the same strain were dosed for 3 and 7 days. The drug did not influence body growth, food intake or fasting blood glucose. However, urine glucose excretion was significantly decreased at the higher dose in the diabetic mice. The drug had no effect on the protein content of jejunum (proximal and middle thirds) or ileum (distal third) of the small intestine. The activity of sucrase and maltase was significantly decreased in practically all segments of the small intestine in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. These changes were evident after 3 days of drug administration. Lactase was not affected by the drug. The mechanism underlying these changes, although unclear, is of significant interest and deserves further investigation. PMID:3100764

  12. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of intestinal microbiota in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Frémont, Marc; Coomans, Danny; Massart, Sebastien; De Meirleir, Kenny

    2013-08-01

    Human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the maintenance of host health by providing energy, nutrients, and immunological protection. Intestinal dysfunction is a frequent complaint in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) patients, and previous reports suggest that dysbiosis, i.e. the overgrowth of abnormal populations of bacteria in the gut, is linked to the pathogenesis of the disease. We used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to investigate the presence of specific alterations in the gut microbiota of ME/CFS patients from Belgium and Norway. 43 ME/CFS patients and 36 healthy controls were included in the study. Bacterial DNA was extracted from stool samples, PCR amplification was performed on 16S rRNA gene regions, and PCR amplicons were sequenced using Roche FLX 454 sequencer. The composition of the gut microbiota was found to differ between Belgian controls and Norwegian controls: Norwegians showed higher percentages of specific Firmicutes populations (Roseburia, Holdemania) and lower proportions of most Bacteroidetes genera. A highly significant separation could be achieved between Norwegian controls and Norwegian patients: patients presented increased proportions of Lactonifactor and Alistipes, as well as a decrease in several Firmicutes populations. In Belgian subjects the patient/control separation was less pronounced, however some abnormalities observed in Norwegian patients were also found in Belgian patients. These results show that intestinal microbiota is altered in ME/CFS. High-throughput sequencing is a useful tool to diagnose dysbiosis in patients and could help designing treatments based on gut microbiota modulation (antibiotics, pre and probiotics supplementation). PMID:23791918

  13. Chronic inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract in cats: diagnostic advantages of full-thickness intestinal and extraintestinal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Sven; Harder, Jasmine; Nolte, Ingo; Marsilio, Sina; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2010-02-01

    An evaluation of histological findings in full-thickness biopsies from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and extraintestinal samples of 43 cats with chronic GIT disease signs was performed. In the majority of cases (46.5%) inflammatory bowel disease, ie, lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis/colitis (32.6%), eosinophilic gastroenterocolitis (11.6%) and mixed inflammatory infiltration (2.3%), was diagnosed. Furthermore, in four animals non-inflammatory mucosal band-shaped fibrosis (9.3%), and in 10 cats (23.3%) a diffuse lymphoma, was found. Six cats displayed only a gastritis (7.0%) or lymphangiectasia (7.0%), respectively. In two cats a mast cell tumour (4.7%) was diagnosed. In one cat no histopathological lesions were found. The availability of transmural biopsies from all segments of the intestine and the collection of extraintestinal samples, especially mesenteric lymph nodes, is especially helpful for diagnosing intestinal tumours such as lymphomas and tumours of mast cell origin. PMID:19664949

  14. Long-Term Intravenous Ketamine for Analgesia in a Child with Severe Chronic Intestinal Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Jennifer; Phillips, Leroy; Schechter, William

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is reported to be an effective adjuvant to opioids in the treatment of refractory cancer pain; however, the use of high doses of ketamine for extended periods in pediatric patients has not been described. We present a five-year-old male with grade IV intestinal GVHD whose abdominal pain required both hydromorphone and ketamine for a period of over four months. There was no evidence of hepatotoxicity, hemorrhagic cystitis, or other adverse effects. Possible withdrawal symptoms were mild and were readily mitigated by gradually weaning ketamine. PMID:26779350

  15. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26346678

  16. IGHV1-69 B Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Antibodies Cross-React with HIV-1 and Hepatitis C Virus Antigens as Well as Intestinal Commensal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Trama, Ashley M.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Chen, Xi; Wiehe, Kevin; Cooper, Abby J.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Wang, Minyue; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John; Alam, Munir; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; McKeating, Jane; Catera, Rosa; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Chu, Charles C.; Kelsoe, Garnett; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients expressing unmutated immunoglobulin heavy variable regions (IGHVs) use the IGHV1-69 B cell receptor (BCR) in 25% of cases. Since HIV-1 envelope gp41 antibodies also frequently use IGHV1-69 gene segments, we hypothesized that IGHV1-69 B-CLL precursors may contribute to the gp41 B cell response during HIV-1 infection. To test this hypothesis, we rescued 5 IGHV1-69 unmutated antibodies as heterohybridoma IgM paraproteins and as recombinant IgG1 antibodies from B-CLL patients, determined their antigenic specificities and analyzed BCR sequences. IGHV1-69 B-CLL antibodies were enriched for reactivity with HIV-1 envelope gp41, influenza, hepatitis C virus E2 protein and intestinal commensal bacteria. These IGHV1-69 B-CLL antibodies preferentially used IGHD3 and IGHJ6 gene segments and had long heavy chain complementary determining region 3s (HCDR3s) (?21 aa). IGHV1-69 B-CLL BCRs exhibited a phenylalanine at position 54 (F54) of the HCDR2 as do rare HIV-1 gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin stem neutralizing antibodies, while IGHV1-69 gp41 antibodies induced by HIV-1 infection predominantly used leucine (L54) allelic variants. These results demonstrate that the B-CLL cell population is an expansion of members of the innate polyreactive B cell repertoire with reactivity to a number of infectious agent antigens including intestinal commensal bacteria. The B-CLL IGHV1-69 B cell usage of F54 allelic variants strongly suggests that IGHV1-69 B-CLL gp41 antibodies derive from a restricted B cell pool that also produces rare HIV-1 gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin stem antibodies. PMID:24614505

  17. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  18. Immune-enhancing diet and cytokine expression during chronic sepsis: an immune-enhancing diet containing L-arginine, fish oil, and RNA fragments promotes intestinal cytokine expression during chronic sepsis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Matheson, Paul J; Mays, Michael P; Garrison, R Neal

    2006-01-01

    Chronic feeding with enteral immune-enhancing diets (IEDs) provides benefits based on composition of the diet, route of feeding, and timing of feeding in relation to timing of trauma or surgery. Our prior studies of acute feeding in naïve rats demonstrated that IED promotes blood flow and proinflammatory cytokines in the ileum. We hypothesized that chronic feeding with IED would shift gut immune status to an anti-inflammatory state during chronic sepsis, resulting in an altered state of cytokine expression in the gut. Five days prior to feeding, gauze was implanted subcutaneously in the backs of male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were fed for 3 days with either control diet (CD, Boost; Mead-Johnson, Evansville, IL) or IED (Impact; Novartis) and randomly assigned to one of four groups: saline control (NS) + control diet (CD), sepsis (EC) + CD, NS + IED, or EC + IED. EC rats were inoculated with 10(9) CFU Escherichia coli and 10(9) CFU Bacteroides fragilis in 2 ml normal saline into the back sponge while NS rats received 2 mL normal saline alone. After 3 days, animals were anesthetized and gut tissue samples were harvested and frozen at -80 degrees C. Tissue protein was extracted and ELISA was performed for interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and interferon (IFN)-gamma. In saline controls, IED feeding decreased IL-1beta, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma and increased IL-10 compared with CD-fed animals. In septic animals, IED feeding increased IL-5 and IL-6, while decreasing IFN-gamma and IL-10 in the distal third of the small intestine compared with CD-fed septic rats, whereas IL-1beta and TNF-alpha levels were unchanged. Chronic IED feeding produced a anti-inflammatory state via decreased IFN-gamma and increased IL-5 and IL-6, which both promote gut IgA class switching, suggesting that the gut is shifted toward humoral immunity during chronic IED feeding in septic rats. PMID:16368490

  19. Neostigmine to Relieve a Suspected Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction in a Burn Patient: A Case-Based Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gebre-Giorgis, Abel A.; Roderique, Ensign Joseph D.; Stewart, Dane; Feldman, Michael J.; Pozez, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neostigmine is one of the treatment options for colonic pseudo-obstruction in the medical patient. However, experience in using neostigmine for this indication in burn patients has not been reported in the literature. We will present a case of a woman who developed colonic pseudo-obstruction during her hospital stay. When conservative management failed, neostigmine was administered with no adverse effects and resolution of the pseudo-obstruction. We will review the literature regarding the pathophysiology and treatment options for acute colonic pseudo-obstruction in burn patients. Methods: A 27-year-old woman with 35% total body surface area deep-partial and full-thickness flame burns. On hospital day 17, she developed a nonobstructive ileus. She failed conservative medical therapy. After consultation with colleagues in trauma surgery and a review of the literature (MeSH/PubMed/NLM), the decision was made to try neostigmine therapy rather than a surgical/procedural option such as colonoscopy. Results: The patient was moved to the intensive care unit and 2 mg of neostigmine was administered intravenously over 4 minutes. After 30 minutes, all abdominal examination findings had returned to baseline. No significant adverse effects were noted, and she did not redevelop abdominal distension afterward. Conclusion: This case report provides an alternative treatment modality in which neostigmine was used successfully in a burn patient after conservative medical treatment had failed. The authors believe that neostigmine may be a viable alternative to decompressive colonoscopy in burn patients for whom mechanical obstruction is properly excluded. PMID:23359843

  20. GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-2 PROTECTS AGAINST TPN-INDUCED INTESTINAL HEXOSE MALABSORPTION IN ENTERALLY RE-FED PIGLETS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premature infants receiving chronic total parenteral nutrition (TPN) due to feeding intolerance develop intestinal atrophy and reduced nutrient absorption. Although providing the intestinal trophic hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) during chronic TPN improves intestinal growth and morphology,...

  1. A 4-year-old girl with chronic nonspecific multiple ulcers of the small intestine diagnosed by double-balloon endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Hisayuki; Kumagai, Hideki; Yano, Tomonori; Maisawa, Shun-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    We present the youngest patient reported to date with chronic nonspecific multiple ulcers of the small intestine (CNSU) diagnosed by double-balloon endoscopy (DBE). A 3-year-old girl was referred to our department with a 2-year history of iron-deficiency anemia. Failure to thrive and hypoproteinemia were also noted, and stool occult blood tests had been persistently positive. However, the C-reactive protein level and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were not elevated. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and double-contrast enema revealed no abnormality in the colon and terminal ileum. Retrograde DBE was performed when the patient was 4 years old. Linear ulcerations arranged in an oblique or circular pattern were present at 3 sites between 55 and 65 cm from the ileocecal valve. Microscopic examination showed nonspecific inflammatory changes, and no granuloma was present. Based on the clinical and endoscopic findings, the patient was diagnosed as having CNSU. The youngest previously reported patient with CNSU was 7 years old, whereas our present patient was diagnosed at the age of 4 years. In pediatric cases of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, it may be necessary to be aware of small bowel disease. PMID:26183631

  2. Chitinase 3-like 1 induces survival and proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells during chronic inflammation and colitis-associated cancer by regulating S100A9.

    PubMed

    Low, Daren; Subramaniam, Renuka; Lin, Li; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Ng, Aylwin; DeGruttola, Arianna K; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A; Andoh, Akira; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-11-01

    Many host-factors are inducibly expressed during the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), each having their unique properties, such as immune activation, bacterial clearance, and tissue repair/remodeling. Dysregulation/imbalance of these factors may have pathogenic effects that can contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Previous reports showed that IBD patients inducibly express colonic chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) that is further upregulated during CAC development. However, little is known about the direct pathogenic involvement of CHI3L1 in vivo. Here we demonstrate that CHI3L1 (aka Brp39) knockout (KO) mice treated with azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) developed severe colitis but lesser incidence of CAC as compared to that in wild-type (WT) mice. Highest CHI3L1 expression was found during the chronic phase of colitis, rather than the acute phase, and is essential to promote intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation in vivo. This CHI3L1-mediated cell proliferation/survival involves partial downregulation of the pro-apoptotic S100A9 protein that is highly expressed during the acute phase of colitis, by binding to the S100A9 receptor, RAGE (Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products). This interaction disrupts the S100A9-associated expression positive feedback loop during early immune activation, creating a CHI3L1hi S100A9low colonic environment, especially in the later phase of colitis, which promotes cell proliferation/survival of both normal IECs and tumor cells. PMID:26431492

  3. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abscesses Abdominal Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of ... Abscesses Abdominal Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of ...

  4. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  5. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive Tract An obstruction of ... Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive Tract NOTE: This is ...

  6. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  7. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  8. Abnormal intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Christopher W; Dieleman, Levinus A; Meddings, Jon B

    2012-07-01

    Increased small intestinal permeability is a longstanding observation in both Crohn's disease patients and in their healthy, asymptomatic first-degree relatives. However, the significance of this compromised gut barrier function and its place in the pathogenesis of the disease remains poorly understood. The association between abnormal small intestinal permeability and a specific mutation in the NOD2 gene, which functions to modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses to intestinal bacteria, suggests a common, genetically determined pathway by which an abnormal gut barrier could result in chronic intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, rodent colitis models show that gut barrier defects precede the development of inflammatory changes. However, it remains possible that abnormal permeability is simply a consequence of mucosal inflammation. Further insight into whether abnormal barrier function is the cause or consequence of chronic intestinal inflammation will be crucial to understanding the role of intestinal permeability in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. PMID:22731729

  9. Intestinal and hepatic first-pass extraction of the 11β-HSD1 inhibitor AMG 221 in rats with chronic vascular catheters.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiuxia; Kimura, Robert E; Zhang, Xiping; Nam, Joon; Amore, Benny M; Hickman, Dean; Greg Slatter, J; Emery, Maurice G

    2014-03-01

    1. A catheterized rat model was used to define the intestinal and hepatic components of oral bioavailability for an 11β-HSD1 inhibitor, AMG 221. These data were integrated with standard in vivo metabolism studies to elucidate the components contributing to the oral disposition of a novel drug candidate. 2. Intestinal and hepatic extraction ratios of AMG 221 obtained using a five-catheter rat model were 0.56 and 0.32, respectively. Therefore, both intestinal and hepatic extraction contributed to the first-pass component of oral bioavailability. There was no evidence for significant gut extraction of systemically administered drug. 3. Mass balance data and in vivo metabolite characterization obtained after administration of [(14)C] AMG 221 to rat showed that AMG 221 was completely absorbed from the gut lumen following an oral dose, primarily excreted in urine and was almost completely metabolized prior to excretion. 4. Hepatic bioavailability (FH), measured in two animals at various time points after oral dose administration was somewhat variable but generally characterized by an initial reduction during the absorption phase followed by an increase during the elimination phase, consistent with hepatic distribution of AMG 221. 5. The five-catheter rat model afforded estimates of hepatic and intestinal contribution to oral bioavailability that were used with other data to define the preclinical ADME characteristics of a drug candidate. PMID:23517558

  10. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... scar tissue growth after an abdominal operation, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Malrotation is twisting of the intestines (or ... Spleen and Lymphatic System Vomiting Congenital Heart Defects Inflammatory Bowel Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  11. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... intestine transplants are performed in conjunction with a liver transplant. During Recovery Postoperative care begins with a team ... Pediatric Living Donation Legal Site Map Contact Espanol © 2016 Transplant Living. A service of the United Network ...

  12. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ... MO: WB Saunders; 2012:chap 52. McKenzie S, Evers BM. Small intestine. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers ...

  13. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  14. Quadruple burden of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, chronic intestinal parasitoses, and multiple micronutrient deficiency in ethiopia: a summary of available findings.

    PubMed

    Amare, Bemnet; Moges, Beyene; Mulu, Andargachew; Yifru, Sisay; Kassu, Afework

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), and helminthic infections are among the commonest public health problems in the sub-Saharan African countries like Ethiopia. Multiple micronutrient deficiencies also known as the "hidden hunger" are common in people living in these countries either playing a role in their pathogenesis or as consequences. This results in a vicious cycle of multiple micronutrient deficiencies and infection/disease progression. As infection is profoundly associated with nutritional status resulting from decreased nutrient intake, decreased nutrient absorption, and nutrient losses, micronutrient deficiencies affect immune system and impact infection and diseases progression. As a result, micronutrients, immunity, and infection are interrelated. The goal of this review is therefore to provide a summary of available findings regarding the "quadruple burden trouble" of HIV, TB, intestinal parasitic infections, and multiple micronutrient deficiencies to describe immune-modulating effects related to disorders. PMID:25767808

  15. Quadruple Burden of HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, Chronic Intestinal Parasitoses, and Multiple Micronutrient Deficiency in Ethiopia: A Summary of Available Findings

    PubMed Central

    Amare, Bemnet; Moges, Beyene; Mulu, Andargachew; Yifru, Sisay; Kassu, Afework

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), and helminthic infections are among the commonest public health problems in the sub-Saharan African countries like Ethiopia. Multiple micronutrient deficiencies also known as the “hidden hunger” are common in people living in these countries either playing a role in their pathogenesis or as consequences. This results in a vicious cycle of multiple micronutrient deficiencies and infection/disease progression. As infection is profoundly associated with nutritional status resulting from decreased nutrient intake, decreased nutrient absorption, and nutrient losses, micronutrient deficiencies affect immune system and impact infection and diseases progression. As a result, micronutrients, immunity, and infection are interrelated. The goal of this review is therefore to provide a summary of available findings regarding the “quadruple burden trouble” of HIV, TB, intestinal parasitic infections, and multiple micronutrient deficiencies to describe immune-modulating effects related to disorders. PMID:25767808

  16. The role of hypoxia in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Yatrik M

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease of the intestine. IBD is a multifactorial disorder, and IBD-associated genes are critical in innate immune response, inflammatory response, autophagy, and epithelial barrier integrity. Moreover, epithelial oxygen tension plays a critical role in intestinal inflammation and resolution in IBD. The intestines have a dynamic and rapid fluctuation in cellular oxygen tension, which is dysregulated in IBD. Intestinal epithelial cells have a steep oxygen gradient where the tips of the villi are hypoxic and the oxygenation increases at the base of the villi. IBD results in heightened hypoxia throughout the mucosa. Hypoxia signals through a well-conserved family of transcription factors, where hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In inflamed mucosa, HIF-1α increases barrier protective genes, elicits protective innate immune responses, and activates an antimicrobial response through the increase in β-defensins. HIF-2α is essential in maintaining an epithelial-elicited inflammatory response and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. HIF-1α activation in colitis leads to a protective response, whereas chronic activation of HIF-2α increases the pro-inflammatory response, intestinal injury, and cancer. In this mini-review, we detail the role of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in intestinal inflammation and injury and therapeutic implications of targeting HIF signaling in IBD. PMID:26812949

  17. Intestinal spirochaetosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. D.; Kraszewski, A.; Gordon, J.; Howie, J. G. R.; McSeveney, D.; Harland, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    An abnormal condition of the large intestine is described in which the surface epithelium is infested by short spirochaetes. Diagnosis can be made by light microscopy. A review of 14 cases diagnosed by rectal biopsy and 62 cases involving the appendix shows no consistent symptom complex. The possible significance is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 1 PMID:5548558

  18. Role of Intestinal HIF-2? in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Shah, Yatrik M

    2016-02-10

    The intestine is supported by a complex vascular system that undergoes dynamic and transient daily shifts in blood perfusion, depending on the metabolic state. Moreover, the intestinal villi have a steep oxygen gradient from the hypoxic epithelium adjacent to the anoxic lumen to the relative higher tissue oxygenation at the base of villi. Due to the daily changes in tissue oxygen levels in the intestine, the hypoxic transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? and HIF-2? are essential in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. HIF-2? is essential in maintaining proper micronutrient balance, the inflammatory response, and the regenerative and proliferative capacity of the intestine following an acute injury. However, chronic activation of HIF-2? leads to enhanced proinflammatory response, intestinal injury, and colorectal cancer. In this review, we detail the major mechanisms by which HIF-2? contributes to health and disease of the intestine and the therapeutic implications of targeting HIF-2? in intestinal diseases. PMID:26667076

  19. Regulatory T Cells and Immune Tolerance in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Powrie, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the mammalian immune system is to eradicate pathogens while minimizing immunopathology. Instigating and maintaining immunological tolerance within the intestine represents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system. Regulatory T cells are critical for continued immune tolerance in the intestine through active control of innate and adaptive immune responses. Dynamic adaptation of regulatory T-cell populations to the intestinal tissue microenvironment is key in this process. Here, we discuss specialization of regulatory T-cell responses in the intestine, and how a breakdown in these processes can lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:23818502

  20. Rehabilitation of individuals with intestinal ostomy.

    PubMed

    Martins, Lívia Módolo; Sonobe, Helena Megumi; Vieira, Flávia De Siqueira; De Oliveira, Marissa Silva; Lenza, Nariman De Felício Bortucan; Da Silva Teles, André Aparecido

    2015-12-10

    This article will discuss an ethnographic study interpreting the rehabilitation experience of 15 individuals with an intestinal ostomy in Brazil, analysed using thematic analysis from the perspective of the sociology of health. The decoded meanings included: 'dealing with treatment and intestinal ostomy', and led to the theme 'the rehabilitation experience of patients with intestinal ostomy due to chronic illness', which addressed normality of life before intestinal illness, defining oneself and life, considering personal, family, social and therapeutic difficulties, and preparing to live with an intestinal ostomy, considering both the private and public spheres. This study will contribute to the specialised care provided in the various contexts of healthcare delivery, especially in relation to the humanisation of care of patients and implementation of appropriate strategies to meet the needs of patients. PMID:26653721

  1. Gastric-type extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in the blind pouch of a bypassed stomach, presenting as colonic pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Sarah; Manivel, Carlos J.; Ramaswamy, Archana; Mesa, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma after gastric bypass is rare. Extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (EWDA) of the stomach is a rare variant that has been mostly reported in Japan. We present a case of a 68-year-old man with EWDA arising in the bypassed stomach that presented as a colonic pseudo-obstruction (CPO). Several imaging, endoscopic and pathologic studies performed in the course of 2 months were non-diagnostic. An iatrogenic duodenal perforation during a diagnostic procedure led to an emergent exploratory laparotomy in which the dilated colonic segment was resected. Pathologic examination showed metastatic EWDA in the colonic wall. Post-operative complications led to the patient’s demise. At autopsy the primary tumor was identified in the blind pouch of the bypassed stomach. A literature review on gastric EWDA and carcinomas arising in bypassed stomachs is discussed. EWDA of the stomach is rare, difficult to diagnose, and shows an aggressive clinical course discordant with its near-benign histology. Gastric cancer arising in a bypassed stomach is uncommon; when it occurs it is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Surveillance of the blind pouch is not currently recommended. Malignant infiltration of the colonic wall should be included in the differential diagnosis of CPO of unclear etiology. PMID:26424554

  2. Effective and Safe Use of Neostigmine in Treatment of Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Colonic Pseudo-obstruction after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong Lyul

    2016-02-25

    Neostigmine can successfully decompress patients with acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) who are unresponsive to conservative therapy. However, neostigmine is contraindicated in renal failure, so it is underused in ACPO patients with renal failure who would be otherwise appropriate candidates. We described the first successfully treated case of acute kidney injury (AKI) with neostigmine in a patient with ACPO. A 72-year-old man who underwent a coronary artery bypass graft surgery 11 days prior presented to the emergency room with abdominal distension, peripheral edema, and dyspnea on exertion. Plain abdominal radiographs and abdomen computed tomography scan showed diffuse colonic dilatation without obstruction. Serum creatinine level was increased five-fold over baseline. We diagnosed the patient as ACPO with AKI. With conservative treatment, renal function failed to improve because the ACPO was not corrected. Administration of neostigmine rapidly resolved ACPO and renal function, avoiding more invasive procedures such as colonoscopic decompression and hemodialysis. Neostigmine appears to be an effective and safe treatment option for ACPO patients with renal failure. Prospective large-scale studies should be carried out to determine the safety and efficacy of neostigmine in ACPO patients with renal failure. PMID:26907487

  3. Putative intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    A heterogeneous set of intestinal stem cells markers has been described in intestinal glands but the ultrastructural identity of intestinal stem cells remains unknown. By using electron microscopy, this study demonstrated the presence of cells with stem morphology in the intestinal glands of mice of different ages. These putative intestinal stem cells have large, euchromatic, irregular shaped nucleus, large, visible nucleolus, few ER cisternae and mitochondria. Their morphology is distinct from the morphology of any other intestinal gland cell. Stem cells located at the base of intestinal glands undergo mitosis. This study enhances the hypothesis of a gland (crypt) base columnar cell that gives rise to all the intestinal lineages. PMID:26366225

  4. Natural compound methyl protodioscin protects against intestinal inflammation through modulation of intestinal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongli; Gilbert, Shila; Yao, Xinsheng; Vallance, Jefferson; Steinbrecher, Kris; Moriggl, Richard; Zhang, Dongsheng; Eluri, Madhu; Chen, Haifeng; Cao, Huiqing; Shroyer, Noah; Denson, Lee; Han, Xiaonan

    2015-01-01

    Dioscoreaceae, a kind of yam plant, has been recommended for treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms are poorly defined. Methyl protodioscin (MPD) is one of the main bioactive components in Dioscoreaceae. Here, we aim to determine the mechanisms by which MPD ameliorates intestinal inflammation. Surgical intestinal specimens were collected from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) patients to perform organ culture. Experimental colitis was induced in mice by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or Citrobacter rodentium, and was then treated with MPD. NF-κB activation, expression of mucosal pro-inflammatory cytokines, disease severity, and epithelial proliferation/apoptosis were determined. Mouse crypts and Caco-2 monolayers were cultured to observe the effect of MPD upon intestinal epithelial differentiation and barrier function. We found that MPD increased the percentage of survival from high-dose DSS-(4%) treated mice, and accelerated mucosal healing and epithelial proliferation in low-dose DSS-(2.5%) treated mice characterized by marked reduction in NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory cytokines expression and bacterial translocation. Consistently, MPD protected colonic mucosa from C. rodentium-induced colonic inflammation and bacterial colonization. In vitro studies showed that MPD significantly increased crypt formation and restored intestinal barrier dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, MPD ameliorates the intestinal mucosal inflammation by modulating the intestinal immunity to enhance intestinal barrier differentiation. MPD could be an alternative for treating chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:26038694

  5. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water. PMID:8644565

  6. Treatment for Chronic Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-11-07

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pain; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Circadian disorganization alters intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Green, Stefan J; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  8. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  9. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-07-21

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient. PMID:26217101

  10. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient. PMID:26217101

  11. [Intestinal ischemia: nosographic framework and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Andriulli, A; Pera, A; Gindro, T; Astegiano, M; Verme, G

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of intestinal ischaemia still presents numerous problems in terms of nosography, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment with the result that it is more often excluded than diagnosed. The aim of the present study was to discover whether intestinal ischaemia was clinically identifiable by any specific early signs and symptoms and whether there were any concomitant risk factors. The medical reports on 44 patients consecutively admitted to the San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin in 1985-86 with suspected intestinal ischaemia were therefore examined. It was found that intestinal ischaemia was only occasionally (30% of cases) diagnosed at the onset of clinical symptoms. In the 10 patients with ischaemic colitis, the risk factor linked to the causes of the disease was systemic hypovolaemia arising in diffuse atherosclerosis. In the 8 cases of chronic ischaemia and the 26 of intestinal infarction the remote anamnesis revealed symptoms that should have aroused suspicion of intestinal ischaemia partly because the patients were suffering from widespread atherosclerosis. In fact a review of the risk factors for the onset of atherosclerosis (i.e. high blood pressure, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity and age over 65) revealed that about 60% of the patients under study presented 3 or 4 them simultaneously. To conclude, the data emerging from the study indicate the existence of symptoms and risk factors to diffuse atherosclerosis that should permit the early diagnosis of intestinal ischaemia. PMID:2314616

  12. The Intestinal Immune System in Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Winer, Daniel A; Luck, Helen; Tsai, Sue; Winer, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with chronic inflammation in metabolic tissues such as adipose tissue and the liver. Recently, growing evidence has implicated the intestinal immune system as an important contributor to metabolic disease. Obesity predisposes to altered intestinal immunity and is associated with changes to the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier function, gut-residing innate and adaptive immune cells, and oral tolerance to luminal antigens. Accordingly, the gut immune system may represent a novel therapeutic target for systemic inflammation in insulin resistance. This review discusses the emerging field of intestinal immunity in obesity-related insulin resistance and how it affects metabolic disease. PMID:26853748

  13. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Hwan; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor ? antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  14. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dietary intake, intestinal loss of protein, and poor absorption of nutrients. Medical treatment is usually effective in ... disease. This is the principal area for intestinal absorption of bile acids, compounds that help transport and ...

  15. Mechanism of intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in insulin resistant humans.

    PubMed

    Duez, Hélène; Pavlic, Mirjana; Lewis, Gary F

    2008-09-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) derived from the intestine are increased in insulin resistant states both in the post-prandial and fasted state and are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Impaired clearance has long been invoked to explain this accumulation of intestinal TRLs, but more recent studies have highlighted the fact that the production rate of apolipoprotein (apo) B-48-containing particles is also increased in insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Recent data also indicate that the enterocyte, similar to the hepatocyte, overproduces lipoprotein particles in response to an elevation of plasma free fatty acids. It is not yet clear precisely how much this overproduction of intestinal lipoprotein particles contributes to the hypertriglyceridemia of insulin resistant states. We speculate that chronic intestinal overproduction of apoB-48 primes the intestine to rapidly and efficiently facilitate the absorption of ingested fat, enhancing the assembly and secretion of intestinal TRL, and hence contributing to post-prandial lipemia. PMID:18676184

  16. Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Stefania; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Mastronardi, Mauro; Jirillo, Emilio; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal tract represents the largest interface between the external environment and the human body. Nutrient uptake mostly happens in the intestinal tract, where the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to dietary antigens. Since inflammatory response toward these antigens may be deleterious for the host, a plethora of protective mechanisms take place to avoid or attenuate local damage. For instance, the intestinal barrier is able to elicit a dynamic response that either promotes or impairs luminal antigens adhesion and crossing. Regulation of intestinal barrier is crucial to control intestinal permeability whose increase is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. The cross talk among bacteria, immune, and dietary factors is able to modulate the mucosal barrier function, as well as the intestinal permeability. Several nutritional products have recently been proposed as regulators of the epithelial barrier, even if their effects are in part contradictory. At the same time, the metabolic function of the microbiota generates new products with different effects based on the dietary content. Besides conventional treatments, novel therapies based on complementary nutrients are now growing. Fecal therapy has been recently used for the clinical treatment of refractory Clostridium difficile infection instead of the classical antibiotic therapy. In the present review, we will outline the epithelial response to nutritional components derived from dietary intake and microbial fermentation focusing on the consequent effects on the integrity of the epithelial barrier. PMID:26697008

  17. Healing of intestinal inflammation by IL-22

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    An IL-10 family cytokine IL-22 is characterized by several unique biological properties, including 1) the target restricted to innate cells, 2) the distinct expression pattern between large and small intestines, 3) alteration of the cellular source depending on several factors, 4) the dual abilities to serve as protective versus proinflammatory mediators in inflammatory responses, and 5) the close association with some major IBD susceptibility genes. The major functions of IL-22 in the intestine are the stimulation of epithelial cells to produce a wide variety of antibacterial proteins, the reinforcement of mucus barrier through stimulation of mucin 1 production under intestinal inflammatory conditions, and the enhancement of epithelial regeneration with goblet cell restitution. Through these beneficial functions, IL-22 contributes to the improvement of some types of experimental chronic colitis, which are mediated by Th1 or Th2 responses. Most importantly, studies using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches have clearly demonstrated the ability of IL-22 to promote intestinal wound healing from acute intestinal injury. These findings highlight IL-22 as an attractive and promising target for future IBD therapy. Alternatively, the enormous progress in the field of IL-22 biology has also suggested more complicated mechanism with IL-22 pathway than previously predicted. This review article briefly summarizes previous and current knowledge on IL-22 particularly associated with intestinal inflammation. PMID:22359410

  18. Vertebrate Intestinal Endoderm Development

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jason R.; Lauf, Ryan; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-01-01

    The endoderm gives rise to the lining of the esophagus, stomach and intestines, as well as associated organs. To generate a functional intestine, a series of highly orchestrated developmental processes must occur. In this review, we attempt to cover major events during intestinal development from gastrulation to birth, including endoderm formation, gut tube growth and patterning, intestinal morphogenesis, epithelial reorganization, villus emergence as well as proliferation and cytodifferentiation. Our discussion includes morphological and anatomical changes during intestinal development as well as molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. PMID:21246663

  19. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  20. Testing of the Small Intestine (Intestinal Dysmotility)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bacterial overgrowth is most easily detected by the hydrogen breath test: The patient drinks a sugar solution ... amounts in the small intestine, they give off hydrogen, some of which is absorbed into the blood, ...

  1. Innate defenses of the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Müller, C A; Autenrieth, I B; Peschel, A

    2005-06-01

    The innate immune system plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the intestine and protecting the host against a vast number of potential microbial pathogens from resident and transient gut microflora. Mucosal epithelial cells and Paneth cells produce a variety of antimicrobial peptides (defensins, cathelicidins, crytdinrelated sequence peptides, bactericidal/permeabilityincreasing protein, chemokine CCL20) and bacteriolytic enzymes (lysozyme, group IIA phospholipase A2) that protect mucosal surfaces and crypts containing intestinal stem cells against invading microbes. Many of the intestinal antimicrobial molecules have additional roles of attracting leukocytes, alarming the adaptive immune system or neutralizing proinflammatory bacterial molecules. Dysfunction of components of the innate immune system has recently been implicated in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, illustrating the pivotal role of innate immunity in maintaining the delicate balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the gut. PMID:15971105

  2. Microbial imbalance and intestinal pathologies: connections and contributions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ye; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Microbiome analysis has identified a state of microbial imbalance (dysbiosis) in patients with chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer. The bacterial phylum Proteobacteria is often overrepresented in these individuals, with Escherichia coli being the most prevalent species. It is clear that a complex interplay between the host, bacteria and bacterial genes is implicated in the development of these intestinal diseases. Understanding the basic elements of these interactions could have important implications for disease detection and management. Recent studies have revealed that E. coli utilizes a complex arsenal of virulence factors to colonize and persist in the intestine. Some of these virulence factors, such as the genotoxin colibactin, were found to promote colorectal cancer in experimental models. In this Review, we summarize key features of the dysbiotic states associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer, and discuss how the dysregulated interplay between host and bacteria could favor the emergence of E. coli with pathological traits implicated in these pathologies. PMID:25256712

  3. Intestinal M cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer's patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  4. Diagnosis of megacystis-microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome with aplastic desmosis in adulthood: a case report.

    PubMed

    Trebicka, Jonel; Biecker, Erwin; Gruenhage, Frank; Stolte, Manfred; Meier-Ruge, William A; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Lammert, Frank

    2008-04-01

    Megacystis-microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMHIS or Berdon syndrome) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by chronic intestinal obstruction. Although the disease is often diagnosed in female infants we describe a man with late diagnosis in adulthood. Our patient presented soon after birth with intestinal obstruction and developed short bowel syndrome after multiple intestinal resections. Of note, the connective tissue net within the muscle layers of the intestinal wall was absent ('aplastic desmosis'). This case illustrates the variable clinical features of MMHIS and aplastic desmosis, which might delay the correct diagnosis of a severe disorder. PMID:18334881

  5. Hepatic and Intestinal Schistosomiasis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Tamer; Esmat, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic disease in Egypt caused by the trematode Schistosoma which has different species. Hepatic schistosomiasis represents the best known form of chronic disease with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is related to the host cellular immune response. This leads to granuloma formation and neo angiogenesis with subsequent periportal fibrosis manifested as portal hypertension, splenomegaly and esophageal varices. Intestinal schistosomiasis is another well identified form of chronic schistosomal affection. Egg deposition and granuloma formation eventually leads to acute then chronic schistosomal colitis and is commonly associated with polyp formation. It frequently presents as abdominal pain, diarrhea, tenesmus and anal pain. Definite diagnosis of schistosomiasis disease depends on microscopy and egg identification. Marked progress regarding serologic diagnosis occurred with development of recent PCR techniques that can confirm schistosomal affection at any stage. Many antischistosomal drugs have been described for treatment, praziquantel being the most safe and efficient drug. Still ongoing studies try to develop effective vaccines with identification of many target antigens. Preventive programs are highly needed to control the disease morbidity and to break the cycle of transmission. PMID:25685451

  6. Diversity of Intestinal Macrophages in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Anja A.; Erben, Ulrike; Kredel, Lea I.; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages as innate immune cells and fast responders to antigens play a central role in protecting the body from the luminal content at a huge interface. Chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases massively alters the number and the subset diversity of intestinal macrophages. We here address the diversity within the human intestinal macrophage compartment at the level of similarities and differences between homeostasis and chronic intestinal inflammation as well as between UC and CD, including the potential role of macrophage subsets for intestinal fibrosis. Hallmark of macrophages is their enormous plasticity, i.e., their capacity to integrate signals from their environment thereby changing their phenotype and functions. Tissue-resident macrophages located directly beneath the surface epithelium in gut homeostasis are mostly tolerogenic. The total number of macrophages increases with luminal contents entering the mucosa through a broken intestinal barrier in ulcerative colitis (UC) as well as in Crohn’s disease (CD). Although not fully understood, the resulting mixtures of tissue-resident and tissue-infiltrating macrophages in both entities are diverse with respect to their phenotypes and their distribution. Macrophages in UC mainly act within the intestinal mucosa. In CD, macrophages can also be found in the muscularis and the mesenteric fat tissue compartment. Taken together, the present knowledge on human intestinal macrophages so far provides a good starting point to dig deeper into the similarities and differences of functional subsets and to finally use their phenotypical diversity as markers for complex local milieus in health and disease. PMID:26697009

  7. Intestinal Polyps (in Children)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the large intestine). (continued on next page) NASPGHAN • PO Box 6 • Flourtown, PA 19031 • 215-233-0808 • Fax: 215-233-3918 REV 7/10 Intestinal Polyps continued How is the diagnosis made? If a child presents with a prolapse of a polyp, the ...

  8. [Cotard's syndrome in chronic schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Kato, K

    1993-05-01

    A middle-aged woman who developed Cotard's syndrome after suffering from chronic schizophrenia is described. She had the delusion of negation believing that she had no possessions, but also her lung, heart, and intestines were gone. She also considered herself immortal. Medication was not useful in removing her delusions of negation and immortality. PMID:8279243

  9. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... than 3 months. Chronic bronchitis often occurs with emphysema, and together these diseases are called chronic obstructive ... with chronic bronchitis? Am I at risk for emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)? What medicines ...

  10. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  11. Intestinal glucose metabolism revisited.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2014-09-01

    It is long known that the gut can contribute to the control of glucose homeostasis via its high glucose utilization capacity. Recently, a novel function in intestinal glucose metabolism (gluconeogenesis) was described. The intestine notably contributes to about 20-25% of total endogenous glucose production during fasting. More importantly, intestinal gluconeogenesis is capable of regulating energy homeostasis through a communication with the brain. The periportal neural system senses glucose (produced by intestinal gluconeogenesis) in the portal vein walls, which sends a signal to the brain to modulate hunger sensations and whole body glucose homeostasis. Relating to the mechanism of glucose sensing, the role of the glucose receptor SGLT3 has been strongly suggested. Moreover, dietary proteins mobilize intestinal gluconeogenesis as a mandatory link between their detection in the portal vein and their effect of satiety. In the same manner, dietary soluble fibers exert their anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects via the induction of intestinal gluconeogenesis. FFAR3 is a key neural receptor involved in the specific sensing of propionate to activate a gut-brain reflex arc triggering the induction of the gut gluconeogenic function. Lastly, intestinal gluconeogenesis might also be involved in the rapid metabolic improvements induced by gastric bypass surgeries of obesity. PMID:24969963

  12. High-fat Diet-induced Intestinal Hyperpermeability is Associated with Increased Bile Acids in the Large Intestine of Mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yuki; Tanabe, Soichi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by low-grade chronic systemic inflammation, which is associated with intestinal hyperpermeability. This study examined the effects of 3 high-fat diets (HFDs) composed of different fat sources (soybean oil and lard) on the intestinal permeability, tight junction (TJ) protein expression, and cecal bile acid (BA) concentrations in mice, and then analyzed their interrelations. C57/BL6 mice were fed the control diet, HFD (soybean oil), HFD (lard), and HFD (mix; containing equal concentrations of soybean oil and lard) for 8 wk. Glucose tolerance, intestinal permeability, TJ protein expression, and cecal BA concentration were evaluated. Feeding with the 3 HDFs similarly increased body weight, liver weight, and fat pad weight, and induced glucose intolerance and intestinal hyperpermeability. The expression of TJ proteins, zonula occludens-2 and junctional adhesion molecule-A, were lower in the colons of the 3 HFD groups than in the control group (P < 0.05), and these changes appeared to be related to intestinal hyperpermeability. Feeding with HFDs increased total secondary BA (SBA) and total BA concentrations along with increases in some individual BAs in the cecum. Significant positive correlations between intestinal permeability and the concentrations of most SBAs, such as deoxycholic acid and ?-muricholic acids, were detected (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the HFD-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is associated with increased BA secretion. The abundance of SBAs in the large intestine may be responsible for the hyperpermeability. PMID:26595891

  13. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  14. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function. PMID:21854830

  15. Tolerance exists towards resident intestinal flora but is broken in active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

    PubMed

    Duchmann, R; Kaiser, I; Hermann, E; Mayet, W; Ewe, K; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1995-12-01

    Hyporesponsiveness to a universe of bacterial and dietary antigens from the gut lumen is a hallmark of the intestinal immune system. Since hyperresponsiveness against these antigens might be associated with inflammation, we studied the immune response to the indigenous intestinal microflora in peripheral blood, inflamed and non-inflamed human intestine. Lamina propria monocuclear cells (LPMC) isolated from inflamed intestine but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of IBD patients with active inflammatory disease strongly proliferated after co-culture with sonicates of bacteria from autologous intestine (BsA). Proliferation was inhibitable by anti-MHC class II MoAb, suggesting that it was driven by antigen. LPMC from adjacent non-inflamed intestinal areas of the same IBD patients and PBMC or LPMC isolated from non-inflamed intestine of controls and patients with IBD in remission, in contrast, did not proliferate. PBMC or LPMC which had been tolerant to bacteria from autologous intestine, however, strongly proliferated after co-culture with bacterial sonicates from heterologous intestine (BsH). This proliferation was associated with an expansion of CD8+ T cells, increased expression of activation markers on both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets, and production of IL-12, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and IL-10 protein. These results show that tolerance selectively exists to intestinal flora from autologous but not heterologous intestine, and that tolerance is broken in intestinal inflammation. This may be an important mechanism for the perpetuation of chronic IBD. PMID:8536356

  16. Effect of pretransplant graft irradiation on canine intestinal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.W.; McClellan, T.; Peters, T.G.; Nag, S.; Dean, P.; Banner, B.; Vera, S.R.; Stenz, F.

    1988-09-01

    This study was done to define the tolerance of ex vivo administered irradiation to intestinal allograft and to assess the effect of irradiation on the incidence and severity of rejection and graft versus host disease after intestinal transplantation in dogs. Excessive intestinal damage was produced by 2,500 rads, but 750 and 1,500 rads produced no detectable acute or chronic damage in dogs observed from 100 days to two years. Using cyclosporine for postoperative immunosuppression, 1,500 rads reduced the incidence of acute (p = 0.05) and chronic rejection (p = 0.08), yet did not impair intestinal absorption of cyclosporine. The greatest improvement in survival occurred with 750 rads (p = 0.02). Histologic evidence of graft versus host disease appeared in the native small intestine in two of four long term surviving dogs receiving a nonirradiated graft but in none of the dogs receiving irradiated grafts. Irradiation of the graft may be a promising adjunct in the search for a clinically applicable method of intestinal transplantation.

  17. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePLUS

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide test ... or drink anything for 4 hours before the test. ... This test is used to confirm the presence of a VIPoma , a tumor that releases VIP. VIPoma's are extremely ...

  18. [Intestinal obstruction, an overview].

    PubMed

    Trilling, Bertrand; Girard, Edouard; Waroquet, Pierre Alexandre; Arvieux, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is a pathology commonly encountered in emergency and surgical departments. Its origin is usually mechanical, caused by obstruction of the digestive tract. It is a therapeutic emergency. Surgical treatment is required for the most severe cases. PMID:26743364

  19. The large intestine (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or large bowel) is the last structure to process food, taking the undigestible matter from the small intestine, absorbing water from it and leaving the waste product called feces. Feces are expelled from the ...

  20. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  1. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  2. Claudins in intestines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Ding, Lei; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Intestines are organs that not only digest food and absorb nutrients, but also provide a defense barrier against pathogens and noxious agents ingested. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most apical component of the junctional complex, providing one form of cell-cell adhesion in enterocytes and playing a critical role in regulating paracellular barrier permeability. Alteration of TJs leads to a number of pathophysiological diseases causing malabsorption of nutrition and intestinal structure disruption, which may even contribute to systemic organ failure. Claudins are the major structural and functional components of TJs with at least 24 members in mammals. Claudins have distinct charge-selectivity, either by tightening the paracellular pathway or functioning as paracellular channels, regulating ions and small molecules passing through the paracellular pathway. In this review, we have discussed the functions of claudin family members, their distribution and localization in the intestinal tract of mammals, their alterations in intestine-related diseases and chemicals/agents that regulate the expression and localization of claudins as well as the intestinal permeability, which provide a therapeutic view for treating intestinal diseases. PMID:24478939

  3. PTPN2 controls differentiation of CD4⁺ T cells and limits intestinal inflammation and intestinal dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Spalinger, M R; Kasper, S; Chassard, C; Raselli, T; Frey-Wagner, I; Gottier, C; Lang, S; Atrott, K; Vavricka, S R; Mair, F; Becher, B; Lacroix, C; Fried, M; Rogler, G; Scharl, M

    2015-07-01

    Loss-of-function variants within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 2 (PTPN2) are associated with increased risk for Crohn's disease (CD). A disturbed regulation of T helper (Th) cell responses causing loss of tolerance against self- or commensal-derived antigens and an altered intestinal microbiota plays a pivotal role in CD pathogenesis. Loss of PTPN2 in the T-cell compartment causes enhanced induction of Th1 and Th17 cells, but impaired induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in several mouse colitis models, namely acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate colitis, and T-cell transfer colitis models. This results in increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation and intestinal dysbiosis which is comparable with that observed in CD patients. We detected inflammatory infiltrates in liver, kidney, and skin and elevated autoantibody levels indicating systemic loss of tolerance in PTPN2-deficient animals. CD patients featuring a loss-of-function PTPN2 variant exhibit enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell, but reduced Treg markers when compared with PTPN2 wild-type patients in serum and intestinal tissue samples. Our data demonstrate that dysfunction of PTPN2 results in aberrant T-cell differentiation and intestinal dysbiosis similar to those observed in human CD. Our findings indicate a novel and crucial role for PTPN2 in chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:25492475

  4. Gut microbiota and probiotics in chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Claudia; Tiso, Angelo; Del Prete, Anna; Cariello, Rita; Tuccillo, Concetta; Cotticelli, Gaetano; Del Vecchio Blanco, Camillo; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut: the portal system receives blood from the gut, and intestinal blood content activates liver functions. The liver, in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion into the intestinal lumen. Alterations of intestinal microbiota seem to play an important role in induction and promotion of liver damage progression, in addition to direct injury resulting from different causal agents. Bacterial overgrowth, immune dysfunction, alteration of the luminal factors, and altered intestinal permeability are all involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis, such as infections, hepatic encephalopathy, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and renal failure. Probiotics have been suggested as a useful integrative treatment of different types of chronic liver damage, for their ability to augment intestinal barrier function and prevent bacterial translocation. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut microbiota and chronic liver disease, both in the pathogenesis and in the treatment by probiotics of the liver damage. PMID:21163715

  5. [Can diet prevent the reoccurrence of an intestinal obstruction?].

    PubMed

    Laubé, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical obstructions are mainly linked to old age which can favour constipation and faecal impaction, to abdominal surgery, to chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestine or to digestive tract malignant tumours. In addition to monitoring the patient and ensuring their compliance with prescribed treatments, educating the patient with the aim of restoring a good nutritional status is essential. PMID:26743368

  6. Interactions between the intestinal microbiome and helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, M M; Harris, N L

    2016-01-01

    Throughout evolution, both helminths and bacteria have inhabited our intestines. As intestinal helminths and bacteria inhabit the same environmental niche, it is likely that these organisms interact with, and impact on, each other. In addition, intestinal helminths are well known to alter intestinal physiology, permeability, mucous secretion and the production of antimicrobial peptides - all of which may impact on bacterial survival and spatial organization. Yet despite rapid advances in our understanding of host-intestinal bacteria interactions, the impact of helminths on this relationship has remained largely unexplored. Moreover, although intestinal helminths are generally accepted to possess potent immuno-modulatory activity, it is unknown whether this capacity requires interactions with intestinal bacteria. We propose that this 'ménage à trois' situation is likely to have exerted a strong selective pressure on the development of our metabolic and immune systems. Whilst such pressures remain in developing countries, the eradication of helminths in industrialized countries has shifted this evolutionary balance, possibly underlying the increased development of chronic inflammatory diseases. Thus, helminth-bacteria interactions may represent a key determinant of healthy homoeostasis. PMID:26345715

  7. Fecal microbiota transplantation broadening its application beyond intestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng-Que; Cao, Hai-Long; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Shan; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Yan, Fang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is now known to be a complication in a myriad of diseases. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), as a microbiota-target therapy, is arguably very effective for curing Clostridium difficile infection and has good outcomes in other intestinal diseases. New insights have raised an interest in FMT for the management of extra-intestinal disorders associated with gut microbiota. This review shows that it is an exciting time in the burgeoning science of FMT application in previously unexpected areas, including metabolic diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders, and tumors. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on FMT in metabolic syndrome by infusing microbiota from lean donors or from self-collected feces, with the resultant findings showing that the lean donor feces group displayed increased insulin sensitivity, along with increased levels of butyrate-producing intestinal microbiota. Case reports of FMT have also shown favorable outcomes in Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, myoclonus dystonia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. FMT is a promising approach in the manipulation of the intestinal microbiota and has potential applications in a variety of extra-intestinal conditions associated with intestinal dysbiosis. PMID:25574083

  8. Role of the Enteric Microbiota in Intestinal Homeostasis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Koboziev, Iurii; Webb, Cynthia Reinoso; Furr, Kathryn L.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestine encounters many more microorganisms than any other tissue in the body thus making it the largest and most complex component of the immune system. Indeed, there are greater than 100 trillion (1014) microbes within the healthy human intestine where the total number of genes derived from this diverse microbiome exceeds that of the entire human genome by at least 100-fold. Our coexistence with the gut microbiota represents a dynamic and mutually beneficial relationship that is thought to be a major determinant of health and disease. Because of the potential for intestinal microorganisms to induce local and/or systemic inflammation, the intestinal immune system has developed a number of immune mechanisms to protect the host from pathogenic infections while limiting the inflammatory tissue injury that accompanies these immune responses. Failure to properly regulate intestinal mucosal immunity is thought to be responsible for the inflammatory tissue injury observed in the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD; Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis). An accumulating body of experimental and clinical evidence strongly suggest that IBD results from a dysregulated immune response to components of the normal gut flora in genetically-susceptible individuals. The objective of this review is to present our current understanding of the role that enteric microbiota play in intestinal homeostasis and pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:24275541

  9. IL-10 gene-deficient mice lack TGF-beta/Smad-mediated TLR2 degradation and fail to inhibit proinflammatory gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells under conditions of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Shkoda, Anna; Kim, Sandra C; Sartor, R Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2006-08-01

    Nonpathogenic enteric bacterial species initiate and perpetuate experimental colitis in interleukin-10 geneeficient mice (IL-10(-/-)). Bacteria-specific effects on the epithelium are difficult to distinguish because of the complex nature of the gut microflora. We showed that IL-10(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice fail to inhibit pro-inflammatory gene expression in native intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization with colitogenic Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis. Of interest, pro-inflammatory gene expression was transient after 1 week of E. faecalis monoassociation in IECs from wild-type mice but persisted after 14 weeks of bacterial colonization in IL-10(-/-) mice. Accordingly, wild-type IECs expressed phosphorylated NF-kappaB subunit RelA (p65) and phosphorylated Smad2 only at day 7 after bacterial colonization, whereas E. faecalis-monoassociated IL-10(-/-) mice triggered persistent RelA but no Smad2 phosphorylation in IECs at days 3, 7, 14, and 28. Consistent with the induction of TLR2-mediated RelA phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory gene expression in E. faecalis-stimulated cell lines, TLR2 protein expression was absent after day 7 from E. faecalis-monoassociated wild-type mice but persisted in IL-10(-/-) IECs. Of note, TGF-beta-activated Smad signaling was associated with the loss of TLR2 protein expression and the inhibition of NF-kappa Bependent gene expression in E. faecalis-stimulated IEC lines. In conclusion, E. faecalis-monoassociated IL-10(-/-) but not wild-type mice lack protective TGF-beta/Smad signaling and fail to inhibit TLR2-mediated pro-inflammatory gene expression in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting a critical role for IL-10 and TGF-beta in maintaining normal epithelial cell homeostasis in the interplay with commensal enteric bacteria. PMID:17057220

  10. Mysterious chronic urticaria caused by Blastocystis spp.?

    PubMed

    Lepczyńska, Małgorzata; Chen, Wen-Chieh; Dzika, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    Species of the genus Blastocystis, which are single-cell, intestinal protozoan parasites of humans and animals, remain mysterious, with unclear clinical and epidemiologic significance. In recent years, many researchers have suggested a possible connection between Blastocystis spp. infection and chronic urticaria. In the present article, we review the literature and discuss the possible associations between the clinical symptomatology and pathogenicity of this organism in terms of its subtypes, morphologic forms, genetic diversity, and interactions with other intestinal microbiota. PMID:26469206

  11. [Volvulus of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A; Viiachki, I; Iar?mov, N; Viiachki, D; Gerzilov, P; Parunev, M

    1997-01-01

    Volvulus of the small intestine is a condition of bowel obstruction due to knotting and twisting of the small intestine. Two types of volvulus are described: 1) primary small intestinal volvulus where no predisposing factors exist, and 2) secondary volvulus where congenital or acquired conditions promote twisting of the small intestine. Over a 5-year period, 18 patients (eleven men and seven women) presenting volvulus of the small intestine are operated in the Emergency Surgery Clinic of the University Hospital "Queen Giovanna", representing 8.7 per cent of the total of 206 cases of small intestinal mechanical ileus (incarcerated herniations involving the small intestine are not included in the series). Primary volvulus is found in one patient. In those presenting secondary volvulus adhesions are the commonest underlying cause of small intestinal rotation--13 cases, next ranking primary tumor of the small intestine--one case, Meckel's diverticulum--one, carcinosis of peritoneum--one, and one patient with small intestine volvulation around colostomy. The most frequently encountered symptoms and laboratory examinations performed are analyzed. Intestinal necrosis is established in four instances (22 per cent). One patient dies of peritonitis and polyorganic insufficiency. Volvulus of the small intestine should be mandatorily considered in patients presenting mechanical ileus of the small intestine. Early operative intervention is a therapeutic approach contributing to preclude intestinal necrosis. PMID:9739871

  12. Intestinal Malrotation: A Rare Cause of Small Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Caglayan, Kasim; Arslan, Ergin; Erkoc, Mustafa Fatih; Aytekin, Faruk Onder

    2014-01-01

    Background. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation is established by the age of 1 year in most cases, and the condition is seldom seen in adults. In this paper, a patient with small intestinal malrotation-type intraperitoneal hernia who underwent surgery at an older age because of intestinal obstruction is presented. Case. A 73-year-old patient who presented with acute intestinal obstruction underwent surgery as treatment. Distended jejunum and ileum loops surrounded by a peritoneal sac and located between the stomach and transverse colon were determined. The terminal ileum had entered into the transverse mesocolon from the right lower part, resulting in kinking and subsequent segmentary obstruction. The obstruction was relieved, and the small intestines were placed into their normal position in the abdominal cavity. Conclusion. Small intestinal malrotations are rare causes of intestinal obstructions in adults. The appropriate treatment in these patients is placement of the intestines in their normal positions. PMID:25371842

  13. [Effect of diet therapy on the state of the intestinal barrier in digestive organ diseases].

    PubMed

    Chanturiia, Zh A; Ekisenina, N I

    1980-01-01

    The effect of diets with varying amount of protein (135 and 160 g) on the intestinal barrier was studied in patients with the inadequate absorption syndrome of different etiology (chronic enterocolitis, the postgastroresection syndrome, chronic colitis). The data obtained indicate that in spite of the progress attained in the care of such patients at the present time, they show disturbed permeability of the intestinal barrier, determined by the passive hemagglutination test (PHAT) with diverse fractions of milk protein. With the postgastroresection syndrome, the abnormalities in the intestinal barrier arise less frequently, are less pronounced and more amenable by therapy as compared to patients with chronic enterocolitis. However, the condition of the small intestine should be taken into consideration in making dietetic recommendations for the patients suffering from the above diseases. The clinical findings and PHAT dynamics indicate that inclusion into the diet of over 135 g protein is not desirable. PMID:7368669

  14. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  15. Neonatal intestinal lactase activity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, L T; Laker, M F; Nelson, R

    1986-09-01

    The sequential changes in intestinal lactase activity of 40 neonates were measured indirectly from the differential uptake and excretion of lactose and the non-metabolisable disaccharide lactulose contained in formula feeds. A daily decline in urinary lactose:lactulose excretion ratios, reflecting a rise in intestinal lactase activity, followed formula feeding. Percentage decline was related directly to gestation: full term infants displayed a fivefold greater decline in lactosuria than infants with a gestation of 28 weeks during the first 10 days of milk feeding. The difference between lactose:lactulose ingestion and excretion ratios suggests that within five days of starting feeds intestinal hydrolysis of lactose exceeds 98% efficiency, even in very preterm infants. PMID:3094461

  16. Classification of intestine polyps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Shih-Chen; Fuh, Chiou-Shann; Shieh, Ming J.

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method to classify hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps of large intestine semiautomatically. First, doctors locate the contour of the original polyp images by using other software package. We determine if there are gores on the polyp by using modified Sobel operator on eliminating specular reflection pixels of original color images. We then get the polyp's texture by summing the gradient magnitude of pixels within the polyps. After detecting the actual contour of the polyps, we can determined if the polyp's contour is obvious or not (i.e. if the polyp bulges smoothly or not). We then observe whether the polyp's color is redder than or whiter than its neighbors. Finally, we classify the polyp of the intestine by applying the above steps. The flow chart of classification is as shown. We apply our method on 77 color images with polyps of the intestine and compare the results with a doctor's diagnosis.

  17. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small intestine adenocarcinoma, by stage How is small intestine adenocarcinoma staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  18. Kaiso overexpression promotes intestinal inflammation and potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Christina C; Longo, Joseph; Mavor, Meaghan; Milosavljevic, Snezana B; Chaudhary, Roopali; Gilbreath, Ebony; Yates, Clayton; Daniel, Juliet M

    2015-09-01

    Constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a key contributor to colorectal cancer (CRC). Although inactivation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is recognized as an early event in CRC development, it is the accumulation of multiple subsequent oncogenic insults facilitates malignant transformation. One potential contributor to colorectal carcinogenesis is the POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso, whose depletion extends lifespan and delays polyp onset in the widely used Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer. These findings suggested that Kaiso potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis, but this was paradoxical as Kaiso was previously implicated as a negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To resolve Kaiso's role in intestinal tumorigenesis and canonical Wnt signaling, we generated a transgenic mouse model (Kaiso(Tg/+)) expressing an intestinal-specific myc-tagged Kaiso transgene. We then mated Kaiso(Tg/+) and Apc(Min/+) mice to generate Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice for further characterization. Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited reduced lifespan and increased polyp multiplicity compared to Apc(Min/+) mice. Consistent with this murine phenotype, we found increased Kaiso expression in human CRC tissue, supporting a role for Kaiso in human CRC. Interestingly, Wnt target gene expression was increased in Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice, suggesting that Kaiso's function as a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, as seen in Xenopus, is not maintained in this context. Notably, Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited increased inflammation and activation of NFκB signaling compared to their Apc(Min/+) counterparts. This phenotype was consistent with our previous report that Kaiso(Tg/+) mice exhibit chronic intestinal inflammation. Together our findings highlight a role for Kaiso in promoting Wnt signaling, inflammation and tumorigenesis in the mammalian intestine. PMID:26073433

  19. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or blood clotting disorders. Low blood pressure: Very low blood pressure in patients who already have narrowing of the intestinal arteries may also cause intestinal ischemia. This often occurs in people with other serious medical problems.

  20. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... N Vitamin deficiencies as a result of poor absorption in the intestine N Electrolyte and mineral deficiencies ... N Kidney stones or gallstones due to poor absorption of calcium or bile How is intestinal failure ...

  1. Intestinal obstruction repair - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... colon cancer. Adhesions are scars that form between loops of intestine, usually caused by prior surgery, which ... of weakness in the abdominal wall, through which loops of intestine can slip and become trapped. Colon ...

  2. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  3. Dai Huang Fu Zi Tang could ameliorate intestinal injury in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock by regulating intestinal blood flow and intestinal expression of p-VASP and ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dai Huang Fu Zi Tang (DHFZT), an oriental herbal formula, has long been used clinically in treatment of intestinal obstruction, acute pancreatitis, cholecystalgia and chronic diarrhea for thousands of years. Recent studies have demonstrated that DHFZT can reduce intestinal pathological injury and the concentration of enterogenous endotoxin in an animal model. But the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Methods SD male rats in adult were used to model HS and treated with DHFZT. The serum concentration of endotoxin were analyzed by dynamic turbidimetric method. In addition, the blood flow of small intestine were measured using laser speckle technique. Phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (p-VASP) and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 protein, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) were measured by Western Blotting, RT-PCR, ELISA respectively. Results Present study showed that DHFZT markedly elevated the blood flow of small intestine, protected the intestinal barrier function by up-regulating the expression of ZO-1 protein and down-regulating expression of p-VASP, and notely decreased serum concentration of IFABP and endotoxin in HS. Conclusions These results reveal that DHFZT improves intestinal blood flow, protects the intestinal barrier function, and ameliorates intestinal endotoxaemia in rats with HS. PMID:24580804

  4. Mimicry and Deception in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Intestinal Behçet Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Erika L.; Kane, Sunanda

    2012-01-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a rare, chronic, multisystemic, inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Intestinal BD occurs in 10–15% of BD patients and shares many clinical characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), making differentiation of the 2 diseases very difficult and occasionally impossible. The diagnosis of intestinal BD is based on clinical findings—as there is no pathognomonic laboratory test—and should be considered in patients who present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and rectal bleeding and who are susceptible to intestinal BD. Treatment for intestinal BD is similar to that for IBD, but overall prognosis is worse for intestinal BD. Although intestinal BD is extremely rare in the United States, physicians will increasingly encounter these challenging patients in the future due to increased immigration rates of Asian and Mediterranean populations. PMID:22485077

  5. Management of Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Grahame, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Effective treatment of chronic urticaria depends on identification of the etiologic factor, if possible, and its subsequent elimination, although symptoms may be suppressed by appropriate medication. The investigation of the patient who presents with chronic urticaria is discussed, with emphasis on the need for a detailed history, meticulous physical examination (including a search for occult infection) and full routine hematologic, biochemical and radiologic monitoring. The author discusses the use of intradermal skin tests, scratch tests for inhalants and the need for skin biopsy and gastro-intestinal tract screening. Dietary treatments reviewed include the elimination diet and the elemental diet, which is used in combination with gradual re-introduction of foods. Symptomatic treatments, including antihistamines, the newer H1-histamine receptor antagonists, used with tricyclic antidepressants and with combination therapy, and systemic corticosteroid therapy are also discussed. PMID:21263827

  6. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePLUS

    Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection in the small intestine. ... A sample of fluid from the small intestine is needed. A procedure ... done to get the sample. The fluid is placed in a special dish in ...

  7. [Mastocytes in the human intestinal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Drumcheva, M; Todorov, D; Sto?nov, S; Nikolov, N; Boneva, M

    1986-01-01

    A method has been for counting the mastocytes on 0.1 mm2 of intestinal mucosa in patients with chronic enterocolitis, gluten enteropathy, ulcerous colitis in a stage of exacerbation and in controls. The comparison of the results obtained in the separate groups of patients reveal an increased number of mastocytes in gluten enteropathy--mean = 21.01 +/- 6 as compared with the chronic enterocolitis, where mean = 9.79 +/- 3.83 (p = 0.002). Higher values of mastocytes in rectal mucosa were observed in the patients with ulcerous mucosa--mean = 15.83 +/- 4.49 as compared with the control subjects with means = 3.67 +/- 0.99 (p = 0.001). those data admit the participation of mastocytes in the morbid process in patients with gluten enteropathy and with ulcerous colitis. PMID:3716371

  8. [Pancreatitis in intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Gubergrits, N B; Lukashevich, G M; Golubova, O A; Fomenko, P G

    2010-01-01

    In article review of the literature and own data about pathogenesis of pancreatitis and secondary pancreatic insufficiency in various diseases of small and large intestines is presented. The special attention is given to pancreatic insufficiency in celiac disease and in inflammatory bowel disease. The main directions of pancreatitis and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency therapy are grounded. PMID:21268323

  9. Aging and the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Over the lifetime of the animal, there are many changes in the function of the body’s organ systems. In the gastrointestinal tract there is a general modest decline in the function of the esophagus, stomach, colon, pancreas and liver. In the small intestine, there may be subtle alterations in the intestinal morphology, as well as a decline in the uptake of fatty acids and sugars. The malabsorption may be partially reversed by aging glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) or dexamethasone. Modifications in the type of lipids in the diet will influence the intestinal absorption of nutrients: for example, in mature rats a diet enriched with saturated as compared with polysaturated fatty acids will enhance lipid and sugar uptake, whereas in older animals the opposite effect is observed. Thus, the results of studies of the intestinal adaptation performed in mature rats does not necessarily apply in older animals. The age-associated malabsorption of nutrients that occurs with aging may be one of the several factors which contribute to the malnutrition that occurs with aging. PMID:17171784

  10. Multiple Intestinal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastalier, B; Deaconescu, Violeta; Elaiah, W; Drăghici, C; Popp, Cristiana; Zurac, Sabina; Balea, M; Tevet, Mihaela; Botezatu, C

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common location for extralymphonodular lymphomas. The small intestine is affected only in 9% of the cases. Intestinal lymphoma may have single or multiple location. This paper describes a case of multiple location in the small intestine of a non-Hodgkin B-cell in a 53 years old patient, who was initially diagnosed with bilateral pneumonia with pleurisy with E. coli, steeper on the right side, but the persistence of symptoms as fever, malaise, despite appropriate treatment, required further investigation. The CT exam observed fluid collection in the hypogastrium around a digestive loop. The patient underwent surgery, the intraoperative foundings being: a large mesenteric tumor - 5 cm in diameter, a terminal ileal mesenteric tumor, a mesenteric tumor - 6 cm in diameter, omentum with nodular formations, a tumor - 3.3/2.5.1 cm in the abdominal wall, pseudotumoral appendix. Segmental. enterectomy with entero-enterostomy, excision of mesenteric tumors, appendectomy and omentectomy were performed. Pathological diagnosis was non-Hodgkin marginal zone B-cell MALT type lymphoma of the small intestine with extension to the appendix, meso, omentum and abdominal wall. Postoperatively, the patient received chemotherapy for remission. PMID:26076564

  11. Intestinal carcinogenesis: IKK can go all the way

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Yoshiaki; Wirth, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has long been suspected to support tumorigenesis in a variety of cancers. The I?B kinase (IKK)/NF-?B pathway is the critical signal transduction pathway regulating inflammation, and loss-of-function studies have demonstrated its involvement in tumorigenesis. In this issue of the JCI, Vlantis et al. present evidence that persistent genetic activation of IKK/NF-?B signaling in intestinal epithelial cells not only accelerates tumorigenesis in models of both carcinogen- and mutation-induced colorectal cancer, but also is sufficient to induce intestinal tumors. PMID:21701071

  12. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J.; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R.; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  13. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1?-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  14. Intestinal transplantation in composite visceral grafts or alone.

    PubMed Central

    Todo, S; Tzakis, A G; Abu-Elmagd, K; Reyes, J; Nakamura, K; Casavilla, A; Selby, R; Nour, B M; Wright, H; Fung, J J

    1992-01-01

    Under FK 506-based immunosuppression, the entire cadaver small bowel except for a few proximal and distal centimeters was translated to 17 randomly matched patients, of whom two had antigraft cytotoxic antibodies (positive cross-match). Eight patients received the intestine only, eight had intestine in continuity with the liver, and one received a full multivisceral graft that included the liver, stomach, and pancreas. One liver-intestine recipient died after an intestinal anastomotic leak, sepsis, and graft-versus-host disease. The other 16 patients are alive after 1 to 23 months, in one case after chronic rejection, graft removal, and retransplantation. Twelve of the patients have been liberated from total parenteral nutrition, including all whose transplantation was 2 months or longer ago. The grafts have supported good nutrition, and in children, have allowed growth and weight gain. Management of these patients has been difficult and often complicated, but the end result has been satisfactory in most cases, justifying further clinical trials. The convalescence of the eight patients receiving intestine only has been faster and more trouble free than after liver-intestine or multivisceral transplantation, with no greater difficulty in the control of rejection. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. PMID:1384443

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of intestinal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Speca, Silvia; Giusti, Ilaria; Rieder, Florian; Latella, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosis is a chronic and progressive process characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) leading to stiffening and/or scarring of the involved tissue. Intestinal fibrosis may develop in several different enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel disease. It develops through complex cell, extracellular matrix, cytokine and growth factor interactions. Distinct cell types are involved in intestinal fibrosis, such as resident mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) but also ECM-producing cells derived from epithelial and endothelial cells (through a process termed epithelial- and endothelial-mesenchymal transition), stellate cells, pericytes, local or bone marrow-derived stem cells. The most important soluble factors that regulate the activation of these cells include cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, components of the renin-angiotensin system, angiogenic factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin, and products of oxidative stress. It soon becomes clear that although inflammation is responsible for triggering the onset of the fibrotic process, it only plays a minor role in the progression of this condition, as fibrosis may advance in a self-perpetuating fashion. Definition of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal fibrosis may provide the key to developing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22851857

  16. Intestinal stem cells and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Piscaglia, Anna Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells (SCs) are the key to tissue genesis and regeneration. Given their central role in homeostasis, dysfunctions of the SC compartment play a pivotal role in the development of cancers, degenerative disorders, chronic inflammatory pathologies and organ failure. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to harsh mechanical and chemical conditions and most of the epithelial cells are replaced every 3 to 5 d. According to the so-called Unitarian hypothesis, this renewal is driven by a common intestinal stem cell (ISC) residing within the crypt base at the origin of the crypt-to-villus hierarchical migratory pattern. Celiac disease (CD) can be defined as a chronic immune-mediated disease that is triggered and maintained by dietary proteins (gluten) in genetically predisposed individuals. Many advances have been achieved over the last years in understanding of the pathogenic interactions among genetic, immunological and environmental factors in CD, with a particular emphasis on intestinal barrier and gut microbiota. Conversely, little is known about ISC modulation and deregulation in active celiac disease and upon a gluten-free diet. Nonetheless, bone marrow-derived SC transplantation has become an option for celiac patients with complicated or refractory disease. This manuscript summarizes the “state of the art” regarding CD and ISCs, their niche and potential role in the development and treatment of the disease. PMID:24772248

  17. Emerging therapies for intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2010-06-01

    Given the immeasurable human distress and health care burden associated with intestinal failure, medical therapies aimed at intestinal rehabilitation are needed. Following massive small-bowel resection, the residual intestine is known to adapt structurally and functionally in an attempt to compensate for the resected portion. However, parenteral nutrition may be associated with many short- and long-term complications, including prevention of intestinal adaptation and promotion of mucosal atrophy due to lack of stimulus provided by oral or enteral nutrition. However, data herein demonstrate that the addition of butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon by dietary fiber fermentation, stimulates intestinal adaptation when added to parenteral nutrition, indicating that current solutions could be formulated to optimize intestinal adaptation and to reduce dependence of individuals with intestinal failure receiving long-term parenteral nutrition regimens. PMID:20566971

  18. Intestinal-renal syndrome: mirage or reality?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    The recent interest in the role of the intestine in the cardiovascular stability of uremic patients, specifically on dialysis, but potentially also in chronic kidney disease, must be seen against the background of the recent great interest in the role of the gut in chronic heart failure [Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2008;11:632-639]. There has been a long-standing interest in the role of the intestine in renal failure, mainly concerning the role of metabolites of bacterial metabolism in the gut as potential uremic toxins. This area has recently been given a new twist by the finding that increased endotoxin concentrations in the blood of dialyzed patients are associated with hypotensive episodes and myocardial 'stunning'. Recent studies suggest that intradialytic underperfusion of myocardial areas, the so-called stunning, may be related to the entry of bacterial endotoxin and/or cytokines across the mucosal barrier into the circulation, where they have a negative impact on myocardial function (and presumably beyond the negative cardiac side effect also contribute to catabolism and malnutrition). Entry of bacterial endotoxin during dialysis sessions is presumably the result of intermittent underperfusion of the intestine if the effective blood volume is rapidly reduced causing breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Apart from the impact on myocardial perfusion, the entry of bacterial endotoxin and/or cytokines across the mucosal barrier may also contribute to malnutrition, wasting and reduced life expectancy in hemodialyzed patients. Such a causal relationship is absolutely plausible in view of an extensive literature on congestive heart failure where clinical and experimental evidence indicates that bacterial endotoxin and/or cytokines may escape from a hypoperfused edematous gut, entering the circulation, triggering an inflammatory response, upregulating circulating cytokines and interfering with the function of the heart through several pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:21228570

  19. Clinical Intestinal Transplantation: New Perspectives and Immunologic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Reyes, Jorge; Todo, Satoru; Rao, Abdul; Lee, Randall; Irish, William; Furukawa, Hiro; Bueno, Javier; McMichael, John; Fawzy, Ahmed T.; Murase, Noriko; Demetris, Jake; Rakela, Jorge; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although tacrolimus-based immunosuppression has made intestinal transplantation feasible, the risk of the requisite chronic high-dose treatment has inhibited the widespread use of these procedures. We have examined our 1990–1997 experience to determine whether immunomodulatory strategies to improve outlook could be added to drug treatment. Study Design Ninety-eight consecutive patients (59 children, 39 adults) with a panoply of indications received 104 allografts under tacrolimus-based immunosuppression: intestine only (n = 37); liver and intestine (n = 50); or multivisceral (n = 17). Of the last 42 patients, 20 received unmodified adjunct donor bone marrow cells; the other 22 were contemporaneous control patients. Results With a mean followup of 32 ± 26 months (range, 1–86 months), 12 recipients (3 intestine only, 9 composite grafts) are alive with good nutrition beyond the 5-year milestone. Forty-seven (48%) of the total group survive bearing grafts that provide full (91%) or partial (9%) nutrition. Actuarial patient survival at 1 and 5 years (72% and 48%, respectively) was similar with isolated intestinal and composite graft recipients, but the loss rate of grafts from rejection was highest with intestine alone. The best results were in patients between 2 and 18 years of age (68% at 5 years). Adjunct bone marrow did not significantly affect the incidence of graft rejection, B-cell lymphoma, or the rate or severity of graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions These results demonstrate that longterm rehabilitation similar to that with the other kinds of organ allografts is achievable with all three kinds of intestinal transplant procedures, that the morbidity and mortality is still too high for their widespread application, and that the liver is significantly but marginally protective of concomitantly engrafted intestine. Although none of the endpoints were markedly altered by donor leukocyte augmentation (and chimerism) with bone marrow, establishment of the safety of this adjunct procedure opens the way to further immune modulation strategies that can be added to the augmentation protocol. PMID:9583691

  20. Intestinal permeation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Aungst, B J

    2000-04-01

    This review addresses the field of improving oral bioavailability through the use of excipients that increase intestinal membrane permeability. The critical issues to consider in evaluating these approaches are 1) the extent of bioavailability enhancement achieved, 2) the influence of formulation and physiological variables, 3) toxicity associated with permeation enhancement, and 4) the mechanism of permeation enhancement. The categories of permeation enhancers discussed are surfactants, fatty acids, medium chain glycerides, steroidal detergents, acyl carnitine and alkanoylcholines, N-acetylated alpha-amino acids and N-acetylated non-alpha-amino acids, and chitosans and other mucoadhesive polymers. Some of these approaches have been developed to the stage of initial clinical trials. Several seem to have potential to improve oral bioavailabilities of poorly absorbed compounds without causing significant intestinal damage. In addition, the possible use of excipients that inhibit secretory transport is reviewed. PMID:10737905

  1. The Cystic Fibrosis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    De Lisle, Robert C.; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF) result from dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). The majority of people with CF have a limited life span as a consequence of CFTR dysfunction in the respiratory tract. However, CFTR dysfunction in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs earlier in ontogeny and is present in all patients, regardless of genotype. The same pathophysiologic triad of obstruction, infection, and inflammation that causes disease in the airways also causes disease in the intestines. This article describes the effects of CFTR dysfunction on the intestinal tissues and the intraluminal environment. Mouse models of CF have greatly advanced our understanding of the GI manifestations of CF, which can be directly applied to understanding CF disease in humans. PMID:23788646

  2. Unusual intestinal talcosis.

    PubMed

    Anani, P A; Ribaux, C; Gardiol, D

    1987-11-01

    A case of intestinal talcosis in a 46-year-old man is reported. At the age of 27, the patient was treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with tablets containing talc (183 g talc per 2,670 g total drug intake) over a period of 28 months. Eighteen years later, the patient was hospitalized for abdominal pain that remained refractory to antacids; he subsequently underwent a right hemicolectomy. Light-microscopic examination revealed a prominent fibrosis of the intestinal wall in which birefringent particles were demonstrated by polarized light. Using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, an analysis of these particles showed that they were predominantly composed of silicon and magnesium as well as small amounts of phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, and iron--the spectrum typically associated with talc. We believe that the source of this talc is the tablets ingested by the patient during prior antituberculosis therapy. PMID:3674285

  3. Intestinal sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Drozdowski, Laurie A; Thomson, Alan B R

    2006-03-21

    Carbohydrates are an important component of the diet. The carbohydrates that we ingest range from simple monosaccharides (glucose, fructose and galactose) to disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) to complex polysaccharides. Most carbohydrates are digested by salivary and pancreatic amylases, and are further broken down into monosaccharides by enzymes in the brush border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes. For example, lactase-phloridzin hydrolase and sucrase-isomaltase are two disaccharidases involved in the hydrolysis of nutritionally important disaccharides. Once monosaccharides are presented to the BBM, mature enterocytes expressing nutrient transporters transport the sugars into the enterocytes. This paper reviews the early studies that contributed to the development of a working model of intestinal sugar transport, and details the recent advances made in understanding the process by which sugars are absorbed in the intestine. PMID:16586532

  4. Alcohol and the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  5. Alcohol and the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheena; Behara, Rama; Swanson, Garth R.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction in a subset of alcoholics. However, a subset of alcoholics without any of these predisposing factors can develop alcohol-mediated organ injury. The gastrointestinal tract (GI) could be an important source of inflammation in alcohol-mediated organ damage. The purpose of review was to evaluate mechanisms of alcohol-induced endotoxemia (including dysbiosis and gut leakiness), and highlight the predisposing factors for alcohol-induced dysbiosis and gut leakiness to endotoxins. Barriers, including immunologic, physical, and biochemical can regulate the passage of toxins into the portal and systemic circulation. In addition, a host of environmental interactions including those influenced by circadian rhythms can impact alcohol-induced organ pathology. There appears to be a role for therapeutic measures to mitigate alcohol-induced organ damage by normalizing intestinal dysbiosis and/or improving intestinal barrier integrity. Ultimately, the inflammatory process that drives progression into organ damage from alcohol appears to be multifactorial. Understanding the role of the intestine in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can pose further avenues for pathogenic and treatment approaches. PMID:26501334

  6. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed. PMID:25386070

  7. Immune Responses to Intestinal Microbes in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jonathan J

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterized by chronic, T-cell-mediated inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract that can cause significant, lifelong morbidity. Data from both human and animal studies indicate that IBDs are likely caused by dysregulated immune responses to resident intestinal microbes. Certain products from mycobacteria, fungi, and Clostridia stimulate increased effector T cell responses during intestinal inflammation, whereas other bacterial products from Clostridia and Bacteroides promote anti-inflammatory regulatory T cell responses. Antibody responses to bacterial and fungal components may help predict the severity of IBDs. While most currently approved treatments for IBDs generally suppress the patient's immune system, our growing understanding of microbial influences in IBDs will likely lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and therapies that target the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26306907

  8. Surgical therapy of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Tobias; Paschold, Markus; Eckardt, Alexander J.; Lang, Hauke; Kneist, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder, especially in adults. It causes a local disruption of chylus transport and is part of the exudative gastroenteropathies. Conservative therapy includes dietary measures or somatostatin medication. Taking the differential diagnosis of PIL into consideration is a major challenge, since patients suffering from PIL may present with diarrhoea and lymphedema or chylous ascites. This can be explained by the chronic lymphedema of the bowel leading to dilation of the vessels (intraluminal loss) and sometimes even to a rupture (peritoneal loss). Push–pull enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy are the proper interventional diagnostic tools to discover PIL. Exploratory laparoscopy may be useful in unclear cases. Surgical resection of the altered intestine has been described with positive results. Exploratory laparoscopy may even be a diagnostic tool in unclear cases. Resection of the altered intestine is a treatment option in symptomatic and treatment-refractory cases. PMID:26169531

  9. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed. PMID:25386070

  10. Vasoative intestinal peptide and the watery diarrhea syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ebeid, A M; Murray, P D; Fischer, J E

    1978-01-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for the detection of vasoactive intestinal peptide has been used to study patients with the watery diarrhea syndrome. In eleven patients the syndrome was associated with tumors, and plasma levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide were elevated. VIP levels returned towards normal in five treated patients coincident with amelioration of symptoms. Normal values were obtained in patinets with chronic pancreatitis, sprue, medullary carcinoma, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome and laxative abuse. In six other patients with indistinguishable syndrome and no findings of tumor at laparotomy and autopsy, vasoactive intestinal peptide levels were normal. The results suggest that VIP may be the causative agent in patients with the watery diarrhea syndrome and tumors, but that an indistinguishable syndrome exists for which VIP is not the cause. PMID:148246

  11. Watery diarrhoea with a vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Y; Nose, O; Kai, H; Okada, A; Mori, T; Lee, P K; Kakudo, K; Yanaihara, N

    1980-01-01

    An 8-month-old boy with persistent watery diarrhoea and failure to thrive developed abdominal distension, hypokalaemia, and flushing of the face and trunk. A high concentration of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity was found in the serum. Soon after resection of a suprarenal mass, the serum level of vasoactive intestinal peptide became normal and the diarrhoea stopped. Histologically the tumour was a ganglioneuroblastoma: the cells showed fluorescence by the indirect immunofluorescence technique with anti-vasoactive intestinal peptide serum. Electron microscopical examination showed abundant secretory granules in the tumour cells. Reports of chronic watery diarrhoea in children due to neural crest tumours are reviewed, with particular respect to the clinical features of the syndrome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4a Fig. 4b PMID:7006519

  12. The Infectious Cause of the Chronic Effect.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrea A; Diehl, Gretchen E

    2015-10-14

    While acute infections cause short-term tissue damage, their long-term impact remains unknown. In a recent publication in Cell, Morais da Fonseca et al. (2015) demonstrate disruption of mesenteric lymph nodes and associated lymphatics after Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection and clearance. This leads to chronic inflammation and an inability to initiate subsequent intestinal immune responses. PMID:26468738

  13. Chronic cholecystitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Cholecystitis - chronic ... Most of the time, chronic cholecystitis is caused by repeated attacks of acute (sudden) cholecystitis. Most of these attacks are caused by gallstones in the gallbladder. These ...

  14. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count COPD Program This program offers comprehensive, individualized care for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) including emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Learn more. Doctors ...

  15. [Intestinal dysbacteriosis in patients with functional and inflammatory diseases of the large intestine].

    PubMed

    Sarkisian, B G; Agamalian, S S; Eloian, D I; Danielian, L A

    1989-02-01

    Data are given on the study of changes in microflora of the intestinal contents in patients with functional diseases: irritable colon syndrome (ICS), chronic catarrhal colitis (CCC) and non-specific ulcerous colitis (NUC). In ICS dysbacteriosis was absent in 40 per cent of the patients, 1st group dysbacteriosis was found in 44.3 per cent of cases; more serious dysbacteriosis (of the 2nd and 3rd groups) was found in CCC and NUC (34.3 and 52.3 per cent of cases, respectively). ICS, CCC and NUC patients had almost the same incidence of decreased Bifidobacterium level. PMID:2724874

  16. [Acute intestinal bleeding due to Taenia solium infection].

    PubMed

    De Simone, Paolo; Féron, Pascale; Loi, Patrizia; Van Nuffelen, Marc; Nagy, Nathalie; Van Gossum, André; Gelin, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Parasite infections of the digestive tract are a rare cause of acute haemorrhage in Western countries. We report here on a case of acute intestinal bleeding due to Taenia solium infection diagnosed at surgery. A 79-year-old white female patient was admitted to our institution for instable angina and severe anaemia secondary to acute intestinal bleeding. The patient's medical history was positive for long-standing microcytic anaemia. A recent diagnostic work-up had revealed the presence of chronic erosive antral gastritis and colonic diverticular disease without acute bleeding. On admission to our department the patient underwent antegrade bowel endoscopy which showed a bleeding site 120 cm caudad to the Treitz ligament in the absence of ulcers and/or neoplastic lesions. The patient was eventually referred to surgery for suspected intestinal angiodysplasia. At surgery no gross lesions of the stomach, bowel or colon were observed. We then performed a custom enterotomy 120 cm caudad to the Treitz ligament and discovered a 250-cm-long tapeworm. The parasite was removed with the aid of a second enterotomy 60 cm cephalad to the previous one and the entire bowel was explored with an intraoperative fiberoptic endoscope. Histology of the parasite revealed a T. solium species. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10 with a prescription of 2 g/day niclosamide. No recurrent digestive bleeding has so far been reported after a follow-up of 8 months. T. solium infection is a common cause of chronic microcytic anaemia in tropical and subtropical areas. In Western countries intestinal parasite infections are rarely taken into account in the diagnostic work-up of patients affected with chronic anaemia and/or acute digestive bleeding. The mechanisms responsible for acute intestinal bleeding in tapeworm infections are poorly understood and could be related to parasite-induced erosions of the bowel wall or be secondary to manipulations occurring during diagnostic manoeuvres. PMID:15038662

  17. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and chronic. Chronic bronchitis is one type of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The inflamed bronchi produce a lot of mucus. This leads to cough and difficulty getting air in and out of the lungs. Cigarette smoking is the most common cause. Breathing in other ...

  18. [Chronic diarrhea: value of microbiology in diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kist, M

    2000-09-28

    Chronic diarrhoea of the adult is defined as diarrhea during 30 days or longer. Frequent causes of chronic diarrhea in the immunocompetent adult without recent travel to developing countries are noninfectious processes, including laxatives misuse, diseases causing chronic maldigestion, osmotically active artificial sweeteners (i.e. sorbitol), hormonal disorders or drugs with intestinal side effects. Infectious agents as the cause of chronic diarrhea are important in two populations, namely in travelers returning from tropical countries bearing a significant risk of intestinal parasitic infections and in immunocompromised patients, especially AIDS patients with CD4 cell counts below 50 per microliter. Intestinal parasites and C. difficile, Y. enterocolitica, Shigellae and Cytomegalovirus are the most important causative agents of chronic diarrhea. Intestinal pathogens were identified in 46% of chronic, but only in 16.5% of acute diarrhea episodes of HIV-infected patients. An extensive medical history including recent travel as well as the detailed characteristics of onset of symptoms and of their time course is essential for the diagnosis. All patients should have a complete differential blood count, ESR, determination of electrolytes, liver enzymes, creatinine, blood glucose, and serum albumin. Tests to exclude hyperthyriodism, or pancreatic insufficiency as well as a d-xylose absorption test can be included, if appropriate. Microbiological-parasitological investigations are obligatory in patients with chronic diarrhea returning from countries with increased risk of traveler diarrhea, in cases of suspected immunodeficiency, if sudden onset of symptoms with fever is reported, after antibiotic treatment, and in children below six years of age. As a rule, stool specimens are appropriate, for the detection of cytomegalovirus colonic biopsies are necessary. In the latter case colonosigmoidoscopy has no diagnostic advantage. One single stool specimen is sufficient for the detection of bacteria or toxins, in contrast to parasitological investigations, where only three consecutive specimens provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity. PMID:11068510

  19. Activation of HIF-1? does not increase intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic response is mediated by two transcription factors, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? and HIF-2?. These highly homologous transcription factors are induced in hypoxic foci and regulate cell metabolism, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and cell survival. HIF-1? and HIF-2? are activated early in cancer progression and are important in several aspects of tumor biology. HIF-1? and HIF-2? have overlapping and distinct functions. In the intestine, activation of HIF-2? increases inflammation and colon carcinogenesis in mouse models. Interestingly, in ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the intestine, activation of HIF-1? is beneficial and can reduce intestinal inflammation. HIF-1? is a critical transcription factor regulating epithelial barrier function following inflammation. The beneficial value of pharmacological agents that chronically activate HIF-1? is decreased due to the tumorigenic potential of HIFs. The present study tested the hypothesis that chronic activation of HIF-1? may enhance colon tumorigenesis. Two models of colon cancer were assessed, a sporadic and a colitis-associated colon cancer model. Activation of HIF-1? in intestinal epithelial cells does not increase carcinogenesis or progression of colon cancer. Together, the data provide proof of principle that pharmacological activation of HIF-1? could be a safe therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24875099

  20. Histopathological changes in small and large intestines during hymenolepidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Kolasa, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta is a chronic parasite living in the small intestine of rats, mice and humans. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological changes in the rat intestine during experimental hymenolepidosis. Our results showed that in rats infected with H. diminuta slight changes occurred in the length of the villus and crypts in different parts of the digestive tract. The changes were most distinct in the duodenum and jejunum on the 16 days post H. diminuta infection. PMID:23342916

  1. Intestinal stem cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Asfaha, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    The intestinal epithelium is renewed every 3-5 days from at least two principal stem cell pools. Actively cycling crypt based columnar (CBC) Lgr5(+) cells and slower cycling Bmi1-expressing or Krt19-expressing cells maintain the small intestinal and colonic epithelium in homeostasis and injury. Following acute epithelial damage, Lgr5+ stem cells are susceptible to injury and a reserve stem cell or progenitor pool is responsible for regeneration of the epithelium. Current data suggests that intestinal stem cells respond to inflammatory signals to modulate their expansion during epithelial regeneration. Here, we review how inflammation and injury affect intestinal and colonic stem cells. PMID:26654865

  2. How to make an intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Spence, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    With the high prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders, there is great interest in establishing in vitro models of human intestinal disease and in developing drug-screening platforms that more accurately represent the complex physiology of the intestine. We will review how recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have made it possible to generate complex, three-dimensional, human intestinal tissues in vitro through directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. These are currently being used to study human development, genetic forms of disease, intestinal pathogens, metabolic disease and cancer. PMID:24496613

  3. Prolactin mediates psychological stress-induced dysfunction of regulatory T cells to facilitate intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Sun, Mingming; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Chen, Tengfei; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Feng, Bai-Sui; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Objective The dysfunction of immune regulation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory disorders, such as IBD. A close relationship between psychological stress and intestinal inflammation has been noted; the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to elucidate a pathological pathway between psychological stress and the dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg), and its effect on facilitating intestinal inflammation. Design A restraint stress model was employed to induce psychological stress in mice. The functions of Tregs were determined by assessing the immune suppressor effects in the intestine. A mouse model of intestinal inflammation was established using a low dose of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) or dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) together with the challenge of chronic stress. Results After treating mice with restraint stress, the suppressor function of intestinal Treg was compromised, although the frequency of Treg was not changed in the intestine. Further observation revealed that stress induced Tregs in the intestine to differentiate into foxhead box P3+ interleukin (IL)-17+ tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T cells. We also observed that exposure to stress-derived prolactin induced dendritic cells (DC) to produce IL-6 and IL-23 in vitro and in vivo, which played a critical role in altering Treg's phenotypes. Treating mice with chronic stress facilitated the initiation of intestinal inflammation by a low dose of TNBS or DSS, which was abolished by pretreatment with an inhibitor of prolactin, the cabergoline. Conclusions Psychological stress-derived prolactin alters DC and Treg's properties to contribute to intestinal inflammation. PMID:24550371

  4. Abnormal intestinal permeability and microbiota in patients with autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rui; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Bangmao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic, progressive, and immunologically mediated inflammatory liver disorder. The etiology of AIH still remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in intestinal permeability, bacterial translocation, and intestinal microbiome in patients with AIH and to evaluate the correlations of those changes with the stages of the disease. Methods: 24 patients with autoimmune hepatitis and 8 healthy volunteers were recruited for this study. We assessed (1) the integrity of tight junctions within the gut by immunohistochemical analysis of zona occludens-1 and occludin expression in duodenal biopsy specimens; (2) changes in the enteric microbiome by 16S rDNA quantitative PCR; and (3) the presence of bacterial translocation by the level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using ELISA. Results: Increased intestinal permeability, derangement of the microbiome and bacterial translocation occurred in AIH, which correlated with the severity of the disease. Conclusions: Autoimmune hepatitis is associated with leaky gut and intestinal microbiome dysbiosis. The impaired intestinal barrier may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AIH. PMID:26191211

  5. Role of the intestinal barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Laukoetter, Mike G; Nava, Porfirio; Nusrat, Asma

    2008-01-01

    A critical function of the intestinal mucosa is to form a barrier that separates luminal contents from the interstitium. The single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serves as a dynamic interface between the host and its environment. Cell polarity and structural properties of the epithelium is complex and is important in the development of epithelial barrier function. Epithelial cells associate with each other via a series of intercellular junctions. The apical most intercellular junctional complex referred to as the Apical Junction Complex (AJC) is important in not only cell-cell recognition, but also in the regulation of paracellular movement of fluid and solutes. Defects in the intestinal epithelial barrier function have been observed in a number of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is now becoming evident that an aberrant epithelial barrier function plays a central role in the pathophysiology of IBD. Thus, a better understanding of the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function in healthy and disease states such as IBD will foster new ideas for the development of therapies for such chronic disorders. PMID:18200662

  6. Neuron-macrophage crosstalk in the intestine: a “microglia” perspective

    PubMed Central

    Verheijden, Simon; Schepper, Sebastiaan De; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages are strategically located in different layers of the intestine, including the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa, where they perform complex tasks to maintain intestinal homeostasis. As the gastrointestinal tract is continuously challenged by foreign antigens, macrophage activation should be tightly controlled to prevent chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Unraveling the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue-specific control of macrophage activation is crucial to get more insight into intestinal immune regulation. Two recent reports provide unanticipated evidence that the enteric nervous system (ENS) acts as a critical regulator of macrophage function in the myenteric plexus. Both studies clearly illustrate that enteric neurons reciprocally interact with intestinal macrophages and are actively involved in shaping their phenotype. This concept has striking parallels with the central nervous system (CNS), where neuronal signals maintain microglia, the resident macrophages of the CNS, in a quiescent, anti-inflammatory state. This inevitably evokes the perception that the ENS and CNS share mechanisms of neuroimmune interaction. In line, intestinal macrophages, both in the muscularis externa and (sub)mucosa, express high levels of CX3CR1, a feature that was once believed to be unique for microglia. CX3CR1 is the sole receptor of fractalkine (CX3CL1), a factor mainly produced by neurons in the CNS to facilitate neuron-microglia communication. The striking parallels between resident macrophages of the brain and intestine might provide a promising new line of thought to get more insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling macrophage activation in the gut. PMID:26528133

  7. Cannabidiol Reduces Intestinal Inflammation through the Control of Neuroimmune Axis

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Carla; Cipriano, Mariateresa; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Scuderi, Caterina; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Cuomo, Rosario; Steardo, Luca; De Man, Joris G.; Iuvone, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) actively mediate acute and chronic inflammation in the gut; EGC proliferate and release neurotrophins, growth factors, and pro-inflammatory cytokines which, in turn, may amplify the immune response, representing a very important link between the nervous and immune systems in the intestine. Cannabidiol (CBD) is an interesting compound because of its ability to control reactive gliosis in the CNS, without any unwanted psychotropic effects. Therefore the rationale of our study was to investigate the effect of CBD on intestinal biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and from intestinal segments of mice with LPS-induced intestinal inflammation. CBD markedly counteracted reactive enteric gliosis in LPS-mice trough the massive reduction of astroglial signalling neurotrophin S100B. Histological, biochemical and immunohistochemical data demonstrated that S100B decrease was associated with a considerable decrease in mast cell and macrophages in the intestine of LPS-treated mice after CBD treatment. Moreover the treatment of LPS-mice with CBD reduced TNF-α expression and the presence of cleaved caspase-3. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured human derived colonic biopsies. In biopsies of UC patients, both during active inflammation and in remission stimulated with LPS+INF-γ, an increased glial cell activation and intestinal damage were evidenced. CBD reduced the expression of S100B and iNOS proteins in the human biopsies confirming its well documented effect in septic mice. The activity of CBD is, at least partly, mediated via the selective PPAR-gamma receptor pathway. CBD targets enteric reactive gliosis, counteracts the inflammatory environment induced by LPS in mice and in human colonic cultures derived from UC patients. These actions lead to a reduction of intestinal damage mediated by PPARgamma receptor pathway. Our results therefore indicate that CBD indeed unravels a new therapeutic strategy to treat inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:22163000

  8. Rifaximin Alters Intestinal Bacteria and Prevents Stress-Induced Gut Inflammation and Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dabo; Gao, Jun; Gillilland, Merritt; Wu, Xiaoyin; Song, Il; Kao, John Y.; Owyang, Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Rifaximin is used to treat patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, but little is known about its therapeutic mechanism. We propose that rifaximin modulates the ileal bacterial community, reduces subclinical inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, and improves gut barrier function to reduce visceral hypersensitivity. Methods We induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats, via chronic water avoidance or repeat restraint stressors, and investigated whether rifaximin altered the gut microbiota, prevented intestinal inflammation, and improved gut barrier function. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 454 pyrosequencing were used to analyze bacterial 16S rRNA in ileal contents from the rats. Reverse transcription, immunoblot, and histologic analyses were used to evaluate levels of cytokines, the tight junction protein occludin, and mucosal inflammation, respectively. Intestinal permeability and rectal sensitivity were measured. Results Water avoidance and repeat restraint stress each led to visceral hyperalgesia, accompanied by mucosal inflammation and impaired mucosal barrier function. Oral rifaximin altered the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum (Lactobacillus species became the most abundant) and prevented mucosal inflammation, impairment to intestinal barrier function, and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic stress. Neomycin also changed the composition of the ileal bacterial community (Proteobacteria became the most abundant species). Neomycin did not prevent intestinal inflammation or induction of visceral hyperalgesia induced by water avoidance stress. Conclusions Rifaximin alters the bacterial population in the ileum of rats, leading to a relative abundance of Lactobacillus. These changes prevent intestinal abnormalities and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic psychological stress. PMID:24161699

  9. Teleost intestinal immunology.

    PubMed

    Rombout, Jan H W M; Abelli, Luigi; Picchietti, Simona; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Kiron, Viswanath

    2011-11-01

    Teleosts clearly have a more diffuse gut associated lymphoid system, which is morphological and functional clearly different from the mammalian GALT. All immune cells necessary for a local immune response are abundantly present in the gut mucosa of the species studied and local immune responses can be monitored after intestinal immunization. Fish do not produce IgA, but a special mucosal IgM isotype seems to be secreted and may (partly) be the recently described IgZ/IgT. Fish produce a pIgR in their mucosal tissues but it is smaller (2 ILD) than the 4-5 ILD pIgR of higher vertebrates. Whether teleost pIgR is transcytosed and cleaved off in the same way needs further investigation, especially because a secretory component (SC) is only reported in one species. Teleosts also have high numbers of IEL, most of them are CD3-?+/CD8-?+ and have cytotoxic and/or regulatory function. Possibly many of these cells are TCR?? cells and they may be involved in the oral tolerance induction observed in fish. Innate immune cells can be observed in the teleost gut from first feeding onwards, but B cells appear much later in mucosal compartments compared to systemic sites. Conspicuous is the very early presence of putative T cells or their precursors in the fish gut, which together with the rag-1 expression of intestinal lymphoid cells may be an indication for an extra-thymic development of certain T cells. Teleosts can develop enteritis in their antigen transporting second gut segment and epithelial cells, IEL and eosinophils/basophils seem to play a crucial role in this intestinal inflammation model. Teleost intestine can be exploited for oral vaccination strategies and probiotic immune stimulation. A variety of encapsulation methods, to protect vaccines against degradation in the foregut, are reported with promising results but in most cases they appear not to be cost effective yet. Microbiota in fish are clearly different from terrestrial animals. In the past decade a fast increasing number of papers is dedicated to the oral administration of a variety of probiotics that can have a strong health beneficial effect, but much more attention has to be paid to the immune mechanisms behind these effects. The recent development of gnotobiotic fish models may be very helpful to study the immune effects of microbiota and probiotics in teleosts. PMID:20832474

  10. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  11. Chronic enteropathy and feeding.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Silvia; Hauser, Bruno; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2007-01-01

    Enteropathy defines abnormalities of the small intestinal mucosa, visible with the light microscope, of various etiologies, that can be separated into acute versus chronic conditions. This review focuses on these areas in which recent progress has been made. Severe infections increase mucosal permeability and induce local expression of co-stimulatory molecules allowing antigen penetration in the mucosa, T cell activation and possible disruption of oral tolerance. Biotherapeutics are of importance in the prevention and treatment of (chronic) enteropathy of infectious origin. Celiac disease and cow's milk protein allergy are key examples of chronic enteropathy. The dietary approach to allergy has evolved to include active stimulation of the immature immune system in order to support the establishment of tolerance. Supplementation with probiotics may provide maturational signals for the lymphoid tissue and improve the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Enteral polymeric feeding is effective in Crohn's disease. Dietary nucleotides may improve growth and immunity, optimize maturation, recovery and function of rapidly dividing tissue. Adequate dietary lipids are important not just for caloric value but also for immune-modulatory effects. Lipids may prevent allergic sensitization by downregulating inflammatory response (n-3 but not n-6 fatty acids) whilst protecting the epithelial barrier, regulating immune function and modifying the adherence of microbes to the mucosa, thereby contributing to host-microbe interactions. PMID:17245095

  12. Intestinal lymphangiectasia with protein losing enteropathy, toxic copper accumulation and hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, D; Myers, A M

    1990-04-01

    A 13-year-old girl presented with malabsorption which was ascribed to intestinal lymphangiectasia. Three years later a generalised seizure resulted from hypocalcaemia that was shown to be due to hypoparathyroidism during investigation of which toxic copper accumulation was recognised. The chance occurrence of three rare conditions is extremely remote making intestinal lymphangiectasia likely as the primary pathology. It is suggested that chronic intestinal loss of the copper-carrying caeruloplasmin resulted in toxic parathyroid deposition of copper leading to hypoparathyroidism with consequent hypocalcaemic seizure. PMID:2344321

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathryn S.; Frey, Mark R.; Martin, Katerina; Obey, Mitchel; McElroy, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC. PMID:25242872

  14. Motility Disorders of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Donate Motility Disorders of the Small Intestine The general function of the small intestine is the absorption of the food we eat. During and after a meal, the intestine normally shows very irregular or unsynchronized contractions. The ...

  15. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Promotes Intestinal Barrier Homeostasis and Protection Against Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S.; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R.; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S.; Yu, Hong B.; Waterhouse, Chris C. M.; Buchan, Allison M. J.; Popescu, Oana E.; Gibson, William T.; Waschek, James A.; Vallance, Bruce A.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP’s role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP’s role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  16. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide promotes intestinal barrier homeostasis and protection against colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S; Yu, Hong B; Waterhouse, Chris C M; Buchan, Allison M J; Popescu, Oana E; Gibson, William T; Waschek, James A; Vallance, Bruce A; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP's role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP's role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  17. Intestinal absorptive function.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C

    1994-01-01

    The normal gut is adapted to intermittent feeding with complex macromolecular substrates of low sodium content. The high permeability of the upper small intestine to sodium, together with sodium rich saliva and pancreaticobiliary secretions results in large sodium fluxes into the lumen. These substantial sodium influxes are matched by equally large effluxes from the ileum and proximal colon, which are comparatively impermeable to sodium and capable of active sodium absorption. Resection of these distal, sodium absorbing regions of the intestine, lead to problems with sodium depletion. Controlled transit of chyme is essential to permit time for optimum digestion and absorption and a range of feedback control mechanisms exist. Partially digested nutrients, both in the duodenum and ileum, exert inhibitory feedback to delay delivery of further nutrients and here again surgery may compromise these reflexes. Brush border hydrolase values are strongly influenced by luminal nutrient concentrations, being impaired by malnutrition and total parenteral nutrition, but restored by enteral feeding. Viscous fibre slows absorption and may delay transit through mechanisms that are as yet uncertain. Whether and how novel substrates activate normal control mechanisms will be important factors determining their effectiveness and patient acceptability. PMID:8125391

  18. Common intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Kucik, Corry Jeb; Martin, Gary L; Sortor, Brett V

    2004-03-01

    Intestinal parasites cause significant morbidity and mortality. Diseases caused by Enterobius vermicularis, Giardia lamblia, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, and Entamoeba histolytica occur in the United States. E. vermicularis, or pinworm, causes irritation and sleep disturbances. Diagnosis can be made using the "cellophane tape test." Treatment includes mebendazole and household sanitation. Giardia causes nausea, vomiting, malabsorption, diarrhea, and weight loss. Stool ova and parasite studies are diagnostic. Treatment includes metronidazole. Sewage treatment, proper handwashing, and consumption of bottled water can be preventive. A. duodenale and N. americanus are hookworms that cause blood loss, anemia, pica, and wasting. Finding eggs in the feces is diagnostic. Treatments include albendazole, mebendazole, pyrantel pamoate, iron supplementation, and blood transfusion. Preventive measures include wearing shoes and treating sewage. E. histolytica can cause intestinal ulcerations, bloody diarrhea, weight loss, fever, gastrointestinal obstruction, and peritonitis. Amebas can cause abscesses in the liver that may rupture into the pleural space, peritoneum, or pericardium. Stool and serologic assays, biopsy, barium studies, and liver imaging have diagnostic merit. Therapy includes luminal and tissue amebicides to attack both life-cycle stages. Metronidazole, chloroquine, and aspiration are treatments for liver abscess. Careful sanitation and use of peeled foods and bottled water are preventive. PMID:15023017

  19. Intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Blaut, Michael; Klaus, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The human gut harbors a highly diverse microbial ecosystem of approximately 400 different species, which is characterized by a high interindividual variability. The intestinal microbiota has recently been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Transplantation of gut microbiota from obese mice to nonobese, germ-free mice resulted in transfer of metabolic syndrome-associated features from the donor to the recipient. Proposed mechanisms for the role of gut microbiota include the provision of additional energy by the conversion of dietary fiber to short-chain fatty acids, effects on gut-hormone production, and increased intestinal permeability causing elevated systemic levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This metabolic endotoxemia is suggested to contribute to low-grade inflammation, a characteristic trait of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Finally, activation of the endocannabinoid system by LPS and/or high-fat diets is discussed as another causal factor. In conclusion, there is ample evidence for a role of gut microbiota in the development of obesity in rodents. However, the magnitude of its contribution to human obesity is still unknown. PMID:22249818

  20. Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Stemmer, Paul M.; Parker, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the biology of stem cells has resulted in significant interest in the development of normal epithelial cell lines from the intestinal mucosa, both to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration and to develop treatment models of degenerative disorders of the digestive tract. However, the difficulty of propagating cell lines of normal intestinal epithelium has impeded research into the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation of stem/progenitor cells into the various intestinal lineages. Several short-term organ/organoid and epithelial cell culture models have been described. There is a dearth of long-term epithelial and/or stem cell cultures of intestine. With an expanding role of stem cells in the treatment of degenerative disorders, there is a critical need for additional efforts to develop in vitro models of stem/progenitor epithelial cells of intestine. The objective of this review is to recapitulate the current status of technologies and knowledge for in vitro propagation of intestinal epithelial cells, markers of the intestinal stem cells, and gene and protein expression profiles of the intestinal cellular differentiation. PMID:19580443

  1. Alcohol Lowers Your (Intestinal) Inhibitions.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Namrata; Vaishnava, Shipra

    2016-02-10

    Alcohol causes microbiota dysbiosis and breaches intestinal integrity, resulting in liver inflammation and ultimately cirrhosis. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Wang et al. (2016) demonstrate that ethanol suppresses the intestinal anti-microbial response. This enables gut bacteria to trespass to the liver and thus exacerbates the disease progression. PMID:26867168

  2. [Intestinal permeability disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Dupont, C; Barau, E; Molkhou, P

    1991-03-01

    The intestinal mucosa has a certain degree of "porosity", which allows some molecules and macromolecules that are not subject to active transport, to cross the intestinal wall and enter the blood circulation. This permeability of the intestinal mucosa, which depends mostly on the size of the molecule and the state of the mucosa, can be studied with the assistance of protein macromolecules in an allergy-immunological investigation, or with inert markers, so permitting evaluation of the state of integrity of the small intestine. The markers used are polyethylene glycols (PEG) of various molecular weights, Cr EDTA, the monosaccharide sugars mannitol or rhamnose and the disaccharide sugars lactulose or cellobiose. Study of the intestinal permeability to inert markers allows detection of coeliac or Crohn's disease. It can be repeated, especially at the time of food provocation tests needed in the diagnosis of food intolerances in pediatrics in the enteropathology to cows milk proteins, atopic dermatitis and irritable colon in children. PMID:2069683

  3. Oxygen sensing in intestinal mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Flück, Katharina; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of chronically inflamed tissue. Hypoxia develops from vascular dysfunction and increased oxygen consumption by infiltrating leukocytes. With respect to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hypoxia is likely to be of particular importance: Impairment of the intestinal barrier during IBD allows anoxia from the lumen of the gut to spread to formerly normoxic tissue. In addition, disturbed perfusion of inflamed tissue and a higher oxygen demand of infiltrating immune cells lead to low oxygen levels in inflamed mucosal tissue. Here, cells become hypoxic and must now adapt to this condition. The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 complex is a key transcription factor for cellular adaption to low oxygen tension. HIF-1 is a heterodimer formed by two subunits: HIF-? (either HIF-1? or HIF-2?) and HIF-1?. Under normoxic conditions, hydroxylation of the HIF-? subunit by specific oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) leads to ubiquitin proteasome-dependent degradation. Under hypoxic conditions, however, PHD activity is inhibited; thus, HIF-? can translocate into the nucleus, dimerize with HIF-1?, and bind to hypoxia-responsive elements of HIF-1 target genes. So far, most studies have addressed the function of HIF-1? in intestinal epithelial cells and the effect of HIF stabilization by PHD inhibitors in murine models of colitis. Furthermore, the role of HIF-1? in immune cells becomes more and more important as T cells or dendritic cells for which HIF-1 is of critical importance are highly involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. This review will summarize the function of HIF-1? and the therapeutic prospects for targeting the HIF pathway in intestinal mucosal inflammation. PMID:26206140

  4. Intestinal Microbiota and Probiotics in Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grzeskowiak, Lukasz Marcin; de Sales Teixeira, Tatiana Fiche; Gouveia Peluzio, Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Celiac disease (CD) is a common chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten intake. To date, the only therapy for CD is the complete exclusion of dietary sources of grains and any food containing gluten. It has been hypothesized that the intestinal microbiota is somehow involved in CD. For this reason, probiotics are appearing as an interesting adjuvant in the dietetic management of CD. This review aims to discuss the characteristics of the microbiota in CD subjects and the use of probiotics as a novel therapy for CD. Comparisons between children with CD and controls show that their microbiota profiles differ; the former have fewer lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Specific probiotics have been found to digest or alter gluten polypeptides. It has also been demonstrated that some bacterial species belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium exert protective properties on epithelial cells from damage caused by gliadin. PMID:24982318

  5. Intestinal epithelial cell regulation of mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yimin; Sitaraman, Shanthi; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2004-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium serves as one of human's primary interfaces with the outside world. This interface is very heavily colonized with bacteria and yet permits absorption of life-sustaining nutrients while protecting the tissues below from microbial onslaught. Although the gut epithelium had been classically thought to achieve this function primarily by functioning as a passive, albeit highly selective, barrier, research over the last decade has demonstrated that in fact the epithelium plays a very active role in protecting the host from the bacteria that colonize it. As a consequence of its mediation of mucosal immunity, intestinal epithelial dysfunction appears to be central to diseases associated with aberrant gut mucosal immune responses such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This article reviews: (1) how the gut epithelium participates in regulating innate immune inflammatory responses to enteric pathogens, (2) how these responses may regulate the adaptive immune system, (3) mechanisms that may resolve acute inflammation, and (4) how epithelial dysfunction may participate in regulating both the active and chronic phases of IBD. PMID:15181270

  6. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  7. [Malaria and intestinal protozoa].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Marcos, Gerardo; Cuadros-González, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Malaria is life threatening and requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Incidence and mortality are being reduced in endemic areas. Clinical features are unspecific so in imported cases it is vital the history of staying in a malarious area. The first line treatments for Plasmodium falciparum are artemisinin combination therapies, chloroquine in most non-falciparum and intravenous artesunate if any severity criteria. Human infections with intestinal protozoa are distributed worldwide with a high global morbid-mortality. They cause diarrhea and sometimes invasive disease, although most are asymptomatic. In our environment populations at higher risk are children, including adopted abroad, immune-suppressed, travelers, immigrants, people in contact with animals or who engage in oral-anal sex. Diagnostic microscopic examination has low sensitivity improving with antigen detection or molecular methods. Antiparasitic resistances are emerging lately. PMID:26832999

  8. Schistosomiasis as a Cause of Chronic Lower Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Tom J.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Chronic intestinal schistosomiasis is rare in the United Kingdom. The symptoms are nonspecific and may mimic several other gastrointestinal conditions. We present a case of chronic intestinal schistosomiasis in a West Indian woman presenting to a genitourinary clinic. Case: The patient presented with chronic lower abdominal pain and dysuria. A sexually transmitted disease (STD) screen was negative and midstream urine cultures were sterile. A rectal biopsy revealed a non-necrotizing granulomatous reaction around the ova of Schistosoma. Her symptoms resolved with anti-schistosomiasis therapy. Conclusion: This case illustrates that physicians should be aware of chronic schistosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdominal pain in women who have come from or visited areas where schistosomiasis is endemic. PMID:18475400

  9. 78 FR 6404 - Agency Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... gastrointestinal illness in Persian Gulf Veterans was caused by ] the presence of bacteria in the intestines and whether eradication of these bacteria reduces symptoms of chronic diarrhea. An agency may not conduct...

  10. Campylobacter concisus - A new player in intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Kaakoush, Nadeem Omar; Mitchell, Hazel Marjory

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade Campylobacter concisus, a highly fastidious member of the Campylobacter genus has been described as an emergent pathogen of the human intestinal tract. Historically, C. concisus was associated with the human oral cavity and has been linked with periodontal lesions, including gingivitis and periodontitis, although currently its role as an oral pathogen remains contentious. Evidence to support the role of C. concisus in acute intestinal disease has come from studies that have detected or isolated C. concisus as sole pathogen in fecal samples from diarrheic patients. C. concisus has also been associated with chronic intestinal disease, its prevalence being significantly higher in children with newly diagnosed Crohn's disease (CD) and adults with ulcerative colitis than in controls. Further C. concisus has been isolated from biopsy specimens of patients with CD. While such studies support the role of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, its isolation from healthy individuals, and failure of some studies to show a significant difference in C. concisus prevalence in subjects with diarrhea and healthy controls has raised contention as to its role in intestinal disease. Such findings could argue against the role of C. concisus in intestinal disease, however, the fact that C. concisus strains are genetically diverse raises the possibility that differences exist in their pathogenic potential. Evidence to support this view comes from studies showing strain specific differences in the ability of C. concisus to attach to and invade cells and produce virulence factors, including toxins and hemolytic phospholipase A. Further, sequencing of the genome of a C. concisus strain isolated from a child with CD (UNSWCD) and comparison of this with the only other fully sequenced strain (BAA-1457) would suggest that major differences exist in the genetic make-up of this species which could explain different outcomes of C. concisus infection. PMID:22919596

  11. Recent advances in intestinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, advances in scanner technology and competition from other specialties have produced rapid changes in the way the intestines are imaged. MRI and CT scan along with the traditional enteroclysis examination have emerged at the forefront of intestinal imaging. Functional modalities such as diffusion and perfusion imaging are also changing the way tumors and inflammatory bowel diseases are evaluated. CT colonography is now a valid alterative to optical colonoscopy. Contrast-enhanced USG is being used for the assessment of inflammation and post-treatment changes. In this review, recent advances in intestinal imaging are described. PMID:22013290

  12. Probiotics and prebiotics in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ewaschuk, Julia B; Dieleman, Levinus A

    2006-01-01

    The prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells of the colon exist in a highly complex, but harmonious relationship. Disturbances in this remarkable symbiosis can result in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Although the etiology of IBD is not entirely understood, it is known that the chronic inflammation of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and chronic pouchitis are a result of an overly aggressive immune response to the commensal intestinal flora in genetically susceptible hosts. Recent studies have enhanced our ability to understand the interaction between the host and its intestinal microflora and the role the microflora plays in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. As we begin to understand the benefits conferred to the intestine by the microflora, the notion of modifying the composition of the bacterial load to improve human health has arisen. A significant body of research now exists investigating the role of probiotics and prebiotics in ameliorating chronic intestinal inflammation. This article will begin with an overview of the role of the commensal microflora in maintaining mucosal immune homeostasis, and how a dysregulated immune response to the intestinal microflora results in IBD. This will be followed by a summary of the use of probiotics and prebiotics in experimental and human IBD. PMID:17009391

  13. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  15. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  16. Chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review We review selected important clinical observations reported in 2012. Recent findings Celiac disease is a risk factor for pancreatitis. Patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis likely have chronic pancreatitis, do not benefit from pancreatic sphincterotomy, and may not benefit from biliary sphincterotomy. Analysis of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) images with an artificial neural network (ANN) program may improve chronic pancreatitis diagnosis compared with clinical interpretation of images. In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of chronic pancreatitis patients, 90 000 USP U of pancreatin with meals decreased fat malabsorption compared with placebo. Detection of visceral pain in chronic pancreatitis predicts pain relief from various treatments, but nonvisceral pain due to altered central pain processing may respond to agents such as pregabalin. Predictors of surgical pain relief include onset of symptoms less than 3 years and preoperatively no opioid use and less than five endoscopic procedures. Total pancreatectomy for presumed painful chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. Summary Celiacs are at risk for pancreatitis. The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis may be enhanced by ANN analysis of EUS imaging. Treatment of fat malabsorption requires 90 000 USP U of lipase with meals. Relief of pain from organ directed treatment of chronic pancreatitis may depend upon timing of interventions and whether pain is visceral or nonvisceral. PMID:23852141

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... complex helps control the placement of chromosomes during cell division. Before cells divide, they must copy all of ... to one another during the early stages of cell division. Cohesin holds the sister chromatids together, and in ...

  18. Perturbations of mucosal homeostasis through interactions of intestinal microbes with myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Regina; Danzer, Claudia; Mattner, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces represent the largest areas of interactions of the host with its environment. Subsequently, the mucosal immune system has evolved complex strategies to maintain the integrity of the host by inducing protective immune responses against pathogenic and tolerance against dietary and commensal microbial antigens within the broad range of molecules the intestinal epithelium is exposed to. Among many other specialized cell subsets, myeloid cell populations - due to their strategic location in the subepithelial lamina propria - are the first ones to scavenge and process these intestinal antigens and to send consecutive signals to other immune and non-immune cell subsets. Thus, myeloid cell populations represent attractive targets for clinical intervention in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) as they initiate and modulate inflammatory or regulatory immune response and shape the intestinal T cell pool. Here, we discuss the interactions of the intestinal microbiota with dendritic cell and macrophage populations and review in this context the literature on four promising candidate molecules that are critical for the induction and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand, but also for the initiation and propagation of chronic intestinal inflammation on the other. PMID:25466587

  19. Therapeutic approaches targeting intestinal microflora in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease, are chronic intestinal disorders of unknown etiology in which in genetically susceptible individuals, the mucosal immune system shows an aberrant response towards commensal bacteria. The gastrointestinal tract has developed ingenious mechanisms to coexist with its autologous microflora, but rapidly responds to invading pathogens and then returns to homeostasis with its commensal bacteria after the pathogenic infection is cleared. In case of disruption of this tightly-regulated homeostasis, chronic intestinal inflammation may be induced. Previous studies showed that some commensal bacteria are detrimental while others have either no influence or have a protective action. In addition, each host has a genetically determined response to detrimental and protective bacterial species. These suggest that therapeutic manipulation of imbalance of microflora can influence health and disease. This review focuses on new insights into the role of commensal bacteria in gut health and disease, and presents recent findings in innate and adaptive immune interactions. Therapeutic approaches to modulate balance of intestinal microflora and their potential mechanisms of action are also discussed. PMID:16874854

  20. Epigenetic control of intestinal barrier function and inflammation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Marjoram, Lindsay; Alvers, Ashley; Deerhake, M. Elizabeth; Bagwell, Jennifer; Mankiewicz, Jamie; Cocchiaro, Jordan L.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Willer, Jason; Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Rawls, John F.; Goll, Mary G.; Bagnat, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms a barrier protecting the organism from microbes and other proinflammatory stimuli. The integrity of this barrier and the proper response to infection requires precise regulation of powerful immune homing signals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Dysregulation of TNF leads to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but the mechanism controlling the expression of this potent cytokine and the events that trigger the onset of chronic inflammation are unknown. Here, we show that loss of function of the epigenetic regulator ubiquitin-like protein containing PHD and RING finger domains 1 (uhrf1) in zebrafish leads to a reduction in tnfa promoter methylation and the induction of tnfa expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The increase in IEC tnfa levels is microbe-dependent and results in IEC shedding and apoptosis, immune cell recruitment, and barrier dysfunction, consistent with chronic inflammation. Importantly, tnfa knockdown in uhrf1 mutants restores IEC morphology, reduces cell shedding, and improves barrier function. We propose that loss of epigenetic repression and TNF induction in the intestinal epithelium can lead to IBD onset. PMID:25730872

  1. Assessment of the mode of action underlying development of rodent small intestinal tumors following oral exposure to hexavalent chromium and relevance to humans

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water causes intestinal adenomas and carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Cr(VI) causes damage to intestinal villi and crypt hyperplasia in mice after only one week of exposure. After two years of exposure, intestinal damage and crypt hyperplasia are evident in mice (but not rats), as are intestinal tumors. Although Cr(VI) has genotoxic properties, these findings suggest that intestinal tumors in mice arise as a result of chronic mucosal injury. To better understand the mode of action (MOA) of Cr(VI) in the intestine, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted to collect histological, biochemical, toxicogenomic and pharmacokinetic data in intestinal tissues. Using MOA analyses and human relevance frameworks proposed by national and international regulatory agencies, the weight of evidence supports a cytotoxic MOA with the following key events: (a) absorption of Cr(VI) from the intestinal lumen, (b) toxicity to intestinal villi, (c) crypt regenerative hyperplasia and (d) clonal expansion of mutations within the crypt stem cells, resulting in late onset tumorigenesis. This article summarizes the data supporting each key event in the MOA, as well as data that argue against a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors. PMID:23445218

  2. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  3. Steroid metabolism with intestinal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Groh, H; Schade, K; Hörhold-Schubert, C

    1993-01-01

    As a result of the metabolic activities of numerous anaerobic microorganisms with sterols, bile acids and steroid hormones as substrates in connection with the enterohepatic circulation of these compounds, the intestine may be considered as an "endocrine" active site or organ. The review summarizes transformations of steroids by anaerobic intestinal bacteria, the physiological and supposed pathophysiological meaning thereof. The aim is to recommend further investigation in this field with respect to both the elucidation of the reactions and biological responses. PMID:8478793

  4. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema. PMID:10590745

  5. Adult intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J; Plumb, A; Burnett, H

    2010-05-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is the inability of the alimentary tract to digest and absorb sufficient nutrition to maintain normal fluid balance, growth, and health. It commonly arises from disease affecting the mesenteric root. Although severe IF is usually managed in specialized units, it lies at the end of a spectrum with degrees of nutritional compromise being widely encountered, but commonly under-recognized. Furthermore, in the majority of cases, the initial enteric insult occurs in non-specialist IF centres. The aim of this article is to review the common causes of IF, general principles of its management, some commoner complications, and the role of radiology in the approach to a patient with severe IF. The radiologist has a crucial role in helping provide access for feeding solutions (both enteral and parenteral) and controlling sepsis (via drainage of collections) in an initial restorative phase of treatment, whilst simultaneously mapping bowel anatomy and quality, and searching for disease complications to assist the clinicians in planning a later, restorative phase of therapy. PMID:20380940

  6. The equine intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcio C; Weese, J Scott

    2012-06-01

    The equine intestinal tract contains a complex microbial population (microbiota) that plays an important role in health and disease. Despite the undeniable importance of a 'normal' microbiota, understanding of the composition and function of this population is currently limited. As methods to characterize the microbiota and its genetic makeup (the microbiome) have evolved, the composition and complexity of this population are starting to be revealed. As is befitting a hindgut fermenter, members of the Firmicutes phylum appear to predominate, yet there are significant populations of numerous other phyla. The microbiome appears to be profoundly altered in certain disease states, and better understanding of these alterations may offer hope for novel preventive and therapeutic measures. The development and increasing availability of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics methods offer a revolution in microbiome evaluation and it is likely that significant advances will be made in the near future. Yet, proper use of these methods requires further study of basic aspects such as optimal testing protocols, the relationship of the fecal microbiome to more proximal locations where disease occurs, normal intra- and inter-horse variation, seasonal variation, and similar factors. PMID:22626511

  7. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Sachin B; Hinge (Ingle), Chitra R

    2014-01-01

    Primary idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia is an unusual disease featured by the presence of dilated lymphatic channels which are located in the mucosa, submucosa or subserosa leading to protein loosing enteropathy.Most often affected were children and generally diagnosed before third year of life but may be rarely seen in adults too. Bilateral pitting oedema of lower limb is the main clinical manifestation mimicking the systemic disease and posing a real diagnostic dilemma to the clinicians to differentiate it from other common systemic diseases like Congestive cardiac failure, Nephrotic Syndrome, Protein Energy Malnutrition, etc. Diagnosis can be made on capsule endoscopy which can localise the lesion but unable to take biopsy samples. Thus, recently double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy in combination can be used as an effective diagnostic tool to hit the correct diagnosis. Patients respond dramatically to diet constituting low long chain triglycerides and high protein content with supplements of medium chain triglyceride. So early diagnosis is important to prevent untoward complications related to disease or treatment for the sake of accurate pathological diagnosis. PMID:25325063

  8. [Chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Holle, D; Müller, D; Nägel, S; Rabe, K

    2013-12-01

    The classification of the International Headache Society (IHS) generally differentiates episodic from chronic headache. Chronic migraine is defined as headache on 15 and more days a month over more than 3 months and headache on 8 days or more fulfils the criteria for migraine or were triptan/ergot-responsive when thought to be migrainous in early stages of the attack. The prevalence of chronic migraine is estimated at 2-4?%. The quality of life is highly compromised in this condition and comorbidities are much more frequent compared to episodic migraine. Data from prospective randomized studies are scarce as most patients with chronic migraine were excluded from previous trials and only few studies were conducted for this condition. The efficacy for prophylactic treatment compared with placebo is proven for topiramate and onabotulinum toxin A. PMID:24337617

  9. Chronic Meningitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cause Lyme disease ( Borrelia burgdorferi —see Lyme Disease ) Fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans , Coccidioides immitis , Histoplasma capsulatum , and ... of chronic meningitis in the Western hemisphere. These fungi are more likely to cause meningitis in people ...

  10. Chronic Hiccups

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Families Recursos en Español Teaching Resources Medical and Science Glossaries More Quick Links Evaluating Health Information Financial ... Links About the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) GARD Home Diseases Chronic hiccups Diseases Genetic ...

  11. Chronic Pericarditis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... unknown. However, it may be caused by cancer, tuberculosis, or an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). Usually, the ... injury, heart surgery, or a bacterial infection. Previously, tuberculosis was the most common cause of chronic pericarditis ...

  12. The intestine and the kidneys: a bad marriage can be hazardous

    PubMed Central

    Vanholder, Raymond; Glorieux, Griet

    2015-01-01

    The concept that the intestine and chronic kidney disease influence each other, emerged only recently. The problem is multifaceted and bidirectional. On one hand, the composition of the intestinal microbiota impacts uraemic retention solute production, resulting in the generation of essentially protein-bound uraemic toxins with strong biological impact such as vascular damage and progression of kidney failure. On the other hand, the uraemic status affects the composition of intestinal microbiota, the generation of uraemic retention solutes and their precursors and causes disturbances in the protective epithelial barrier of the intestine and the translocation of intestinal microbiota into the body. All these elements together contribute to the disruption of the metabolic equilibrium and homeostasis typical to uraemia. Several measures with putative impact on intestinal status have recently been tested for their influence on the generation or concentration of uraemic toxins. These include dietary measures, prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics and intestinal sorbents. Unfortunately, the quality and the evidence base of many of these studies are debatable, especially in uraemia, and often results within one study or among studies are contradictory. Nevertheless, intestinal uraemic metabolite generation remains an interesting target to obtain in the future as an alternative or additive to dialysis to decrease uraemic toxin generation. In the present review, we aim to summarize (i) the role of the intestine in uraemia by producing uraemic toxins and by generating pathophysiologically relevant changes, (ii) the role of uraemia in modifying intestinal physiology and (iii) the therapeutic options that could help to modify these effects and the studies that have assessed the impact of these therapies. PMID:25815173

  13. [Interaction between humans and intestinal bacteria as a determinant for intestinal health : intestinal microbiome and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Haller, Dirk; Hörmannsperger, G

    2015-02-01

    Recent scientific results underline the importance of the intestinal microbiome, the totality of all intestinal microbes and their genes, for the health of the host organism. The intestinal microbiome can therefore be considered as a kind of "external organ". It has been shown that the intestinal microbiota is a complex and dynamic ecosystem that influences host immunity and metabolism beyond the intestine. The composition and functionality of the intestinal microbiota is of major importance for the development and maintenance of intestinal functions. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by dysregulated interactions between the host and its microbiota.The present contribution summarizes current knowledge of the composition and development of the intestinal microbiome and gives an overview of the bidirectional interaction between host and microbiota. The contribution informs about insights regarding the role of the intestinal microbiota in IBD and finally discusses the protective potential of microbial therapies in the context of IBD. PMID:25566836

  14. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression. PMID:23560564

  15. Effect of fluoride on the intestinal epithelial cell brush border membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, R.; Upreti, R.K.; Kidwai, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    Fluoride consumed by man and animals is chiefly absorbed in the intestine. Chronic fluoride exposure causes mottled teeth and osteosclerosis. Over-fluoridation (126 mM) of drinking water have been reported to cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Furthermore, the effect of acute and low concentrations of fluoride on gastric secretion, ion transport and other disorders have also been studied. Fluoride also causes alterations in the permeability of membranes and membrane bound enzymes. The intestinal cell lining plays an important role in digestion and absorption. It automatically becomes the most exposed site of contact to fluoride following ingestion. Earlier study have shown significant alterations in the formation of lipid peroxides in rat intestine following oral administration of fluoride. The present study was undertaken to investigate the damage of rat intestinal epithelium in situ caused by relatively high and low fluoride concentrations.

  16. [Immunologic correction with immunoglobulin of toxemia with exicosis in infants with acute intestinal infections].

    PubMed

    Vereshchagin, I A; Zhabotina, L A

    1992-04-01

    The clinical course of acute intestinal infections complicated by toxicosis and exicosis was studied in 150 infants undergoing multimodality therapy, including natural human immunoglobulin for intravenous injections. The use of the new complex in the treatment of intestinal toxicoses was accompanied by increasing host immunological reactivity within short periods and decreasing of the treatment duration by 5.0 +/- 1.3 days; there were no persisting and chronic forms of the diseases and fatal outcomes. It was concluded that the use of the immunoglobulin for intravenous injections in the multimodality therapy of intestinal toxicoses in infants made it possible to prevent death in complicated intestinal infections and at the same time to accelerate their recovery. PMID:1417316

  17. In vivo longitudinal cellular imaging of small intestine by side-view endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jinhyo; Choe, Kibaek; Wang, Taejun; Hwang, Yoonha; Song, Eunjoo; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of cellular dynamics in the gastrointestinal tract of living mouse model to investigate the pathophysiology has been a long-pursuing goal. Especially, for chronic disease such as Crohn’s disease, a longitudinal observation of the luminal surface of the small intestine in the single mouse is highly desirable to investigate the complex pathogenesis in sequential time points. In this work, by utilizing a micro-GRIN lens based side-view endomicroscope integrated into a video-rate confocal microscopy system, we successfully performed minimally-invasive in vivo cellular-level visualization of various fluorescent cells and microvasculature in the small intestinal villi. Also, with a transgenic mouse universally expressing photoconvertible protein, Kaede, we demonstrated repetitive cellular-level confocal endoscopic visualization of same area in the small intestinal lumen of a single mouse, which revealed the continuous homeostatic renewal of the small intestinal epithelium. PMID:26504646

  18. Innate lymphoid cell interactions with the microbiota: implications for intestinal health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Artis, David

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors trillions of beneficial commensal bacteria that are essential for the development of the immune system and for maintenance of physiologic processes in multiple organs. However, numerous chronic infectious, inflammatory and metabolic diseases in humans have been associated with alterations in the composition or localization of commensal bacteria that results in dysregulated host-commensal bacteria relationships. The mammalian immune system plays an essential role in regulating the acquisition, composition and localization of commensal bacterial communities in the intestine. Emerging research has implicated innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) as a critical immune cell population that orchestrates some of these host-commensal relationships that can impact immunity, inflammation and tissue homeostasis in the intestine. This review will discuss reciprocal interactions between intestinal commensal bacteria and ILCs in the context of health and disease. PMID:23084357

  19. Mechanisms of intestinal inflammation and development of associated cancers: Lessons learned from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Aya M.; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately 1/5th of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With regards to extraintestinal manifestations such as lymphoma, however, more suitable models are required to further investigate the complex and heterogeneous mechanisms that may be at play. PMID:20298806

  20. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... blocked, fluid can build up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when ...

  1. Factors Determining Colorectal Cancer: The Role of the Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Nistal, Esther; Fernández-Fernández, Nereida; Vivas, Santiago; Olcoz, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, holds a complex community of microorganisms, which are essential for maintaining homeostasis. However, in recent years, many studies have implicated microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), with this disease considered a major cause of death in the western world. The mechanisms underlying bacterial contribution in its development are complex and are not yet fully understood. However, there is increasing evidence showing a connection between intestinal microbiota and CRC. Intestinal microorganisms cause the onset and progression of CRC using different mechanisms, such as the induction of a chronic inflammation state, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation, the production of toxic metabolites, or heterocyclic amine activation of pro-diet carcinogenic compounds. Despite these advances, additional studies in humans and animal models will further decipher the relationship between microbiota and CRC, and aid in developing alternate therapies based on microbiota manipulation. PMID:26528432

  2. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase prevents metabolic syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Nasrin Alam, Sayeda; Moaven, Omeed; Patel, Palak; Malo, Nondita S; Ray, Madhury; Abtahi, Seyed M; Muhammad, Nur; Raychowdhury, Atri; Teshager, Abeba; Mohamed, Mussa M Rafat; Moss, Angela K; Ahmed, Rizwan; Hakimian, Shahrad; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Warren, H Shaw; Bhan, Atul K; Malo, Madhu S; Hodin, Richard A

    2013-04-23

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of related disorders that includes obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and fatty liver. Recently, gut-derived chronic endotoxemia has been identified as a primary mediator for triggering the low-grade inflammation responsible for the development of metabolic syndrome. In the present study we examined the role of the small intestinal brush-border enzyme, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), in preventing a high-fat-diet-induced metabolic syndrome in mice. We found that both endogenous and orally supplemented IAP inhibits absorption of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides) that occurs with dietary fat, and oral IAP supplementation prevents as well as reverses metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, IAP supplementation improves the lipid profile in mice fed a standard, low-fat chow diet. These results point to a potentially unique therapy against metabolic syndrome in at-risk humans. PMID:23569246

  3. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase prevents metabolic syndrome in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R.; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P.; Nasrin Alam, Sayeda; Moaven, Omeed; Patel, Palak; Malo, Nondita S.; Ray, Madhury; Abtahi, Seyed M.; Muhammad, Nur; Raychowdhury, Atri; Teshager, Abeba; Mohamed, Mussa M. Rafat; Moss, Angela K.; Ahmed, Rizwan; Hakimian, Shahrad; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Warren, H. Shaw; Bhan, Atul K.; Malo, Madhu S.; Hodin, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of related disorders that includes obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and fatty liver. Recently, gut-derived chronic endotoxemia has been identified as a primary mediator for triggering the low-grade inflammation responsible for the development of metabolic syndrome. In the present study we examined the role of the small intestinal brush-border enzyme, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), in preventing a high-fat-diet–induced metabolic syndrome in mice. We found that both endogenous and orally supplemented IAP inhibits absorption of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides) that occurs with dietary fat, and oral IAP supplementation prevents as well as reverses metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, IAP supplementation improves the lipid profile in mice fed a standard, low-fat chow diet. These results point to a potentially unique therapy against metabolic syndrome in at-risk humans. PMID:23569246

  4. [Intestinal microbiota and cardiometabolic risk: mechanisms and diet modulation].

    PubMed

    Moraes, Ana Carolina Franco de; Silva, Isis Tande da; Almeida-Pititto, Bianca de; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G

    2014-06-01

    The gut microbiota obtained after birth is composed of a large range of bacteria that play different roles in the human host, such as nutrient uptake, protection against pathogens and immune modulation. The intestinal bacterial content is not completely known, but it is influenced by internal, and mainly by external factors, which modulate its composition and function. Studies indicate that the gut microbiota differs in lean and obese individuals, and in individuals with different food habits. There is evidence that the relationship between diet, inflammation, insulin resistance, and cardiometabolic risk are, in part, mediated by the composition of intestinal bacteria. Knowledge about the gut microbiota may result in different strategies to manipulate bacterial populations and promote health. This review discusses the relevance of understanding the role of dietary factors or patterns in the composition of the microbiota, as well as pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic metabolic diseases, and the potential of prebiotics and probiotics on the cardiometabolic risk profile. PMID:24936725

  5. Solitary Large Intestinal Diverticulitis in Leatherback Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).

    PubMed

    Stacy, B A; Innis, C J; Daoust, P-Y; Wyneken, J; Miller, M; Harris, H; James, M C; Christiansen, E F; Foley, A

    2015-07-01

    Leatherback sea turtles are globally distributed and endangered throughout their range. There are limited data available on disease in this species. Initial observations of solitary large intestinal diverticulitis in multiple leatherbacks led to a multi-institutional review of cases. Of 31 subadult and adult turtles for which complete records were available, all had a single exudate-filled diverticulum, as large as 9.0 cm in diameter, arising from the large intestine immediately distal to the ileocecal junction. All lesions were chronic and characterized by ongoing inflammation, numerous intralesional bacteria, marked attenuation of the muscularis, ulceration, and secondary mucosal changes. In three cases, Morganella morganii was isolated from lesions. Diverticulitis was unrelated to the cause of death in all cases, although risk of perforation and other complications are possible. PMID:25239052

  6. Regulation of Intestinal Immune Responses through TLR Activation: Implications for Pro- and Prebiotics

    PubMed Central

    de Kivit, Sander; Tobin, Mary C.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Landay, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), allergic gastroenteritis (e.g., eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS), and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLRs play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation. PMID:24600450

  7. Regulation of Intestinal Immune Responses through TLR Activation: Implications for Pro- and Prebiotics.

    PubMed

    de Kivit, Sander; Tobin, Mary C; Forsyth, Christopher B; Keshavarzian, Ali; Landay, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly facing a high load of antigens including bacterial antigens derived from the microbiota and food. Despite this, the immune cells present in the gastrointestinal tract do not initiate a pro-inflammatory immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors expressed by various cells in the gastrointestinal tract, including intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and resident immune cells in the lamina propria. Many diseases, including chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), allergic gastroenteritis (e.g., eosinophilic gastroenteritis and allergic IBS), and infections are nowadays associated with a deregulated microbiota. The microbiota may directly interact with TLR. In addition, differences in intestinal TLR expression in health and disease may suggest that TLRs play an essential role in disease pathogenesis and may be novel targets for therapy. TLR signaling in the gut is involved in either maintaining intestinal homeostasis or the induction of an inflammatory response. This mini review provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding the contribution of intestinal epithelial TLR signaling in both tolerance induction or promoting intestinal inflammation, with a focus on food allergy. We will also highlight a potential role of the microbiota in regulating gut immune responses, especially through TLR activation. PMID:24600450

  8. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adam C N; Vanhove, Audrey S; Watnick, Paula I

    2016-03-01

    All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host-microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection. PMID:26935105

  9. Effect of Klebsiella pneumoniae enterotoxin on intestinal transport in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Klipstein, F A; Horowitz, I R; Engert, R F; Schnenk, E A

    1975-01-01

    The effects on intestinal transport of either a semipurified preparation of enterotoxin elaborated by Klebsiella pneumoniae or similaryly prepared control material were tested by marker perfusion studies in the small intestine of rats. At a concentration of 2 mg/ml, the enterotoxin produced net secretion of water, Na, and Cl in both jejunal and ileal segments; HCO3 transport was not affected. Net secretion was evident within 30 min after intorduction of the toxin and was maximal after 90 min. The addition of 56 mM glucose to the enterotoxin-containing perfusion fluid resulted in reversal of water and Na transport to net absorption in both intestinal segments. The enterotoxin also produced a significant depression of xylose absorption in both the jejunum and ileum but did not affect the absorption of either glucose or L-leucine. Intestinal structure was not altered after perfusion of the toxin but insillation of approximately one-quarter of the total perfusion dose into a ligated jejunal loop for 18 h produced fluid secretion and structural abnormalities. These observations confirm the fact that other species of coliform bacteria in addition to tescherichia coli are capable of elaborating an enterotoxin. Such species commonly contaminate the small intestine of persons with tropical sprue and it is suggested that chronic exposure of the intestinal mucosa to the enterotoxin elaborated by these bacteria may be a factor in the pathogenesis of intestinal abnormalities in thid disorder. Images PMID:169297

  10. Regenerative Inflammation: Lessons from Drosophila Intestinal Epithelium in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panayidou, Stavria; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is widely recognized as a pivotal player in health and disease. Defined cytologically as the infiltration of leukocytes in the lamina propria layer of the intestine, it can damage the epithelium and, on a chronic basis, induce inflammatory bowel disease and potentially cancer. The current view thus dictates that blood cell infiltration is the instigator of intestinal inflammation and tumor-promoting inflammation. This is based partially on work in humans and mice showing that intestinal damage during microbially mediated inflammation activates phagocytic cells and lymphocytes that secrete inflammatory signals promoting tissue damage and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, extensive parallel work in the Drosophila midgut shows that intestinal epithelium damage induces inflammatory signals and growth factors acting mainly in a paracrine manner to induce intestinal stem cell proliferation and tumor formation when genetically predisposed. This is accomplished without any apparent need to involve Drosophila hemocytes. Therefore, recent work on Drosophila host defense to infection by expanding its main focus on systemic immunity signaling pathways to include the study of organ homeostasis in health and disease shapes a new notion that epithelially emanating cytokines and growth factors can directly act on the intestinal stem cell niche to promote “regenerative inflammation” and potentially cancer. PMID:25437036

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of Tolerant and Tolerogenic Intestinal Dendritic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steimle, Alex; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    How does the host manage to tolerate its own intestinal microbiota? A simple question leading to complicated answers. In order to maintain balanced immune responses in the intestine, the host immune system must tolerate commensal bacteria in the gut while it has to simultaneously keep the ability to fight pathogens and to clear infections. If this tender equilibrium is disturbed, severe chronic inflammatory reactions can result. Tolerogenic intestinal dendritic cells fulfil a crucial role in balancing immune responses and therefore creating homeostatic conditions and preventing from uncontrolled inflammation. Although several dendritic cell subsets have already been characterized to play a pivotal role in this process, less is known about definite molecular mechanisms of how intestinal dendritic cells are converted into tolerogenic ones. Here we review how gut commensal bacteria interact with intestinal dendritic cells and why this bacteria-host cell interaction is crucial for induction of dendritic cell tolerance in the intestine. Hereby, different commensal bacteria can have distinct effects on the phenotype of intestinal dendritic cells and these effects are mainly mediated by impacting toll-like receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:26981546

  12. PTEN-deficient intestinal stem cells initiate intestinal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    He, Xi C; Yin, Tong; Grindley, Justin C; Tian, Qiang; Sato, Toshiro; Tao, W Andy; Dirisina, Raminarao; Porter-Westpfahl, Kimberly S; Hembree, Mark; Johnson, Teri; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Barrett, Terrence A; Hood, Leroy; Wu, Hong; Li, Linheng

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal polyposis, a precancerous neoplasia, results primarily from an abnormal increase in the number of crypts, which contain intestinal stem cells (ISCs). In mice, widespread deletion of the tumor suppressor Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) generates hamartomatous intestinal polyps with epithelial and stromal involvement. Using this model, we have established the relationship between stem cells and polyp and tumor formation. PTEN helps govern the proliferation rate and number of ISCs and loss of PTEN results in an excess of ISCs. In PTEN-deficient mice, excess ISCs initiate de novo crypt formation and crypt fission, recapitulating crypt production in fetal and neonatal intestine. The PTEN-Akt pathway probably governs stem cell activation by helping control nuclear localization of the Wnt pathway effector ?-catenin. Akt phosphorylates ?-catenin at Ser552, resulting in a nuclear-localized form in ISCs. Our observations show that intestinal polyposis is initiated by PTEN-deficient ISCs that undergo excessive proliferation driven by Akt activation and nuclear localization of ?-catenin. PMID:17237784

  13. Impact of Intestinal Microbiota on Intestinal Luminal Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kibe, Ryoko; Ooga, Takushi; Aiba, Yuji; Kurihara, Shin; Sawaki, Emiko; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Low–molecular-weight metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota play a direct role in health and disease. In this study, we analyzed the colonic luminal metabolome using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry with time-of-flight (CE-TOFMS) —a novel technique for analyzing and differentially displaying metabolic profiles— in order to clarify the metabolite profiles in the intestinal lumen. CE-TOFMS identified 179 metabolites from the colonic luminal metabolome and 48 metabolites were present in significantly higher concentrations and/or incidence in the germ-free (GF) mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), 77 metabolites were present in significantly lower concentrations and/or incidence in the GF mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p < 0.05), and 56 metabolites showed no differences in the concentration or incidence between GF and Ex-GF mice. These indicate that intestinal microbiota highly influenced the colonic luminal metabolome and a comprehensive understanding of intestinal luminal metabolome is critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions. PMID:22724057

  14. Obstructive cholestasis alters intestinal transit in mice: role of opioid system.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Kamyar; Savadkuhi, Shahab Tour; Honar, Hooman; Riazi, Kiarash; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Moezi, Leila; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad Reza; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Saeid Radjabzadeh; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2004-12-10

    Acute cholestasis is associated with increased activity of the endogenous opioid system. It is also known that opioid receptor agonists like morphine decrease the intestinal transit. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of cholestasis on the small intestine transit and the possible involvement of opioid system in this phenomenon in mice. Cholestasis was induced by bile duct-ligation and intestinal transit was measured with charcoal meal and calculation of percent of transit through small intestine. The effect of chronic administration of naltrexone and acute pretreatment with morphine on intestinal transit was evaluated in bile duct-ligated (BDL) as well as unoperated (CTL) and sham-operated (SHAM) animals. The plasma alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities were also measured. A significant decrease in small intestine transit (%transit) was observed in BDL mice compared to SHAM animals, which was prominent even after 24 h of cholestasis. Chronic pretreatment with an opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, (10 mg/kg, i.p for 2, 4 or 6 days) completely restored the cholestasis-induced decrease in %transit to that of control animals. Although the acute administration of morphine (2 mg/kg, s.c.) 20 min before charcoal feeding caused a significant decrease in the intestinal transit of CTL and SHAM animals, it did not decrease the %transit of BDL animals on the day 5 after operation. Our findings show that acute cholestasis is associated with a prominent decrease in small intestine transit in mice and opioid receptors maybe involved in this phenomenon. PMID:15530502

  15. Inhibition of miR122a by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant increases intestinal occludin expression and protects mice from alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhao, Cuiqing; Dong, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Fengyuan; Li, Xiaokun; McClain, Craig; Yang, Shulin; Feng, Wenke

    2015-05-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has a high morbidity and mortality. Chronic alcohol consumption causes disruption of intestinal microflora homeostasis, intestinal tight junction barrier dysfunction, increased endotoxemia, and eventually liver steatosis/steatohepatitis. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the bacteria-free LGG culture supernatant (LGGs) have been shown to promote intestinal epithelial integrity and protect intestinal barrier function in ALD. However, little is known about how LGGs mechanistically works to increase intestinal tight junction proteins. Here we show that chronic ethanol exposure increased intestinal miR122a expression, which decreased occludin expression leading to increased intestinal permeability. Moreover, LGGs supplementation decreased ethanol-elevated miR122a level and attenuated ethanol-induced liver injury in mice. Similar to the effect of ethanol exposure, overexpression of miR122a in Caco-2 monolayers markedly decreased occludin protein levels. In contrast, inhibition of miR122a increased occludin expression. We conclude that LGGs supplementation functions in intestinal integrity by inhibition of miR122a, leading to occludin restoration in mice exposed to chronic ethanol. PMID:25746479

  16. The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Harrison, Oliver J; Riffelmacher, Thomas; Moghaddam, Amin E; Pearson, Claire F; Laing, Adam; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Forman, Simon P; Grencis, Richard K; Sattentau, Quentin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphism in the autophagy gene Atg16l1 is associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it remains unclear how autophagy contributes to intestinal immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy is essential for maintenance of balanced CD4(+) T cell responses in the intestine. Selective deletion of Atg16l1 in T cells in mice resulted in spontaneous intestinal inflammation that was characterized by aberrant type 2 responses to dietary and microbiota antigens, and by a loss of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Specific ablation of Atg16l1 in Foxp3(+) Treg cells in mice demonstrated that autophagy directly promotes their survival and metabolic adaptation in the intestine. Moreover, we also identify an unexpected role for autophagy in directly limiting mucosal TH2 cell expansion. These findings provide new insights into the reciprocal control of distinct intestinal TH cell responses by autophagy, with important implications for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:26910010

  17. Anti-alpha-gliadin antibodies are not predictive of celiac disease in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lepore, L; Pennesi, M; Ventura, A; Torre, G; Falcini, F; Lucchesi, A; Perticarari, S

    1993-01-01

    Some authors have recently reported an increased level of antigluten antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, both in the adult and juvenile form. The real meaning of these antibodies is still unclear. We ascertained the levels of antigluten antibodies in a group of children with juvenile chronic arthritis to determine if these antibodies were linked with celiac disease and/or to increased intestinal permeability. In 18 of 53 patients (33.9%), the levels of antigluten antibodies (IgA or IgG) were higher than normal. No correlation was found between the increase in antigluten antibodies and the positive lactulose/mannitol test, used for determining increased intestinal permeability. In all eight patients undergoing intestinal biopsy due to abnormal levels of antigluten antibodies (IgA class), intestinal mucosa was normal. In conclusion, our study shows that in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis, immunological response to gluten is neither related to celiac disease nor to increased intestinal permeability. PMID:8338992

  18. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorders would harm the intestinal protective mechanism, or intestinal barrier function, and bacterial/endotoxin translocation, of intestinal failure (IF) would ensue. This review disscussed the theory of the intestinal failure, aiming at attracting recognition and valuable comments by clinicians. PMID:15052668

  19. Claudin-related intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barmeyer, Christian; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2015-06-01

    With up to 200 m(2) the human intestine is the organ with the largest absorptive surface of the body. It is lined by a single layer of epithelial cells that separates the host from the environment. The intestinal epithelium provides both, selective absorption of nutrients, ions, and water but also a highly effective barrier function which includes the first line of defense against environmental antigens. The paracellular part of this barrier function is provided by tight junction (TJ) proteins, especially the large family of claudins. Changes in abundance or molecular structure of claudins can generally result in three typical effects, (i) decreased absorptive passage, (ii) increased secretory passage of small solutes and water causing leak flux diarrhea and (iii) increased absorptive passage of macromolecules which may induce inflammatory processes. Several intestinal diseases are associated with such changes that can result in intestinal inflammation and symptoms like weight loss, abdominal pain or diarrhea. This review summarizes our current knowledge on barrier dysfunction and claudin dysregulation in several intestinal diseases gastroenterologists are often faced with, like inflammatory bowel disease, microscopic colitis, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gallstones and infectious diseases like HIV enteropathy, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium perfringens infection. PMID:25999319

  20. Intestinal immune responses to coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Lillehoj, H S; Lillehoj, E P

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal parasitism is a major stress factor leading to malnutrition and lowered performance and production efficiency of livestock and poultry. Coccidiosis is an intestinal infection caused by intracellular protozoan parasites belonging to several different species of Eimeria. Infection with coccidia parasites seriously impairs the growth and feed utilization of chickens and costs the US poultry industry more than $1.5 billion in annual losses. Although acquired immunity to Eimeria develops following natural infection, due to the complex life cycle and intricate host immune response to Eimeria, vaccine development has been difficult and a better understanding of the basic immunobiology of pertinent host-parasite interactions is necessary for developing effective immunological control strategies against coccidiosis. Chickens infected with Eimeria produce parasite specific antibodies in both the circulation and mucosal secretions but humoral immunity plays only a minor role in protection against this disease. Rather, recent evidence implicates cell-mediated immunity as the major factor conferring resistance to coccidiosis. This review will summarize current understanding of the avian intestinal immune system and its response to Eimeria as well as provide a conceptual overview of the complex molecular and cellular events involved in intestinal immunity to coccidiosis. It is anticipated that increased knowledge of the interaction between parasites and host immunity will stimulate the birth of novel immunological and molecular biological concepts in the control of intestinal parasitism. PMID:10717295

  1. Studies on mammalian intestinal peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, S; Jellinck, P H

    1982-01-01

    A peroxidase, purified from rat small intestine to apparent homogeneity as judged by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, exhibited an absorbance ratio (A412/A280) of 0.783. Its Mr (44000 +/- 1000) and spectral properties were similar to those of the pig intestinal enzyme. The velocity constant for the reaction between rat intestinal peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide was found to be 1.8 x 10(7) M-1 . s-1. Benzhydroxamic acid inhibited the peroxidative oxidation of guaiacol by intestinal peroxidase from both species but the concentration required to cause half-inhibition of the enzyme from the rat was higher by one order of magnitude than for the pig enzyme. The amino acid composition of highly-purified pig intestinal peroxidase showed a relative abundance of basic amino acids (lysine and arginine) and was similar to that of lactoperoxidase, but not that of myeloperoxidase. The initial ten amino acid residues of this enzyme (the first reported partial sequence for a mammalian peroxidase) were also determined. PMID:7138501

  2. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  3. Intestinal microbiota was assessed in cirrhotic patients with hepatitis B virus infection. Intestinal microbiota of HBV cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haifeng; Wu, Zhongwen; Xu, Wei; Yang, Jiezuan; Chen, Yunbo; Li, Lanjuan

    2011-04-01

    To unravel the profile of intestinal microecological parameters in Chinese patients with asymptomatic carriage of hepatitis B virus (HBV), chronic hepatitis B, decompensated HBV cirrhosis, and health controls and to establish their correlation with liver disease progression, we performed quantitative PCR and immunological techniques to investigate fecal parameters, including population of fecal predominant bacteria and the abundance of some virulence genes derived from Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium perfringens in fecal crude DNA and some immunological parameters in extracts of all fecal samples. Data analysis indicated that 16S rRNA gene copy numbers for Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacteriaceae, bifidobacteria, and lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, and Weissella) showed marked variation in the intestine of HBV cirrhotic patients. The Bifidobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae (B/E) ratio, which may indicate microbial colonization resistance of the bowel, was decreased significantly in turn from 1.15?±?0.11 in healthy controls, 0.99?±?0.09 in asymptomatic carriers, and 0.76?±?0.08 in patients with chronic hepatitis B to 0.64?±?0.09 in patients with decompensated HBV cirrhosis (for all, P?intestinal microecological disorder in the course of liver disease progression. The data for virulence gene abundance suggested increased diversity of virulence factors during liver disease progression. Fecal secretory IgA and tumor necrosis factor-? in decompensated HBV cirrhotic patients were present at higher levels than in other groups, which indicates that a complicated autoregulatory system tries to achieve a new intestinal microecological balance. PMID:21286703

  4. Changes in the composition of intestinal fungi and their role in mice with dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xinyun; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Xi; Wu, Na; Jiang, Weiwei; Li, Xia; Li, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yulan

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal fungi are increasingly believed to greatly influence gut health. However, the effects of fungi on intestinal inflammation and on gut bacterial constitution are not clear. Here, based on pyrosequencing method, we reveal that fungal compositions vary in different intestinal segments (ileum, cecum, and colon), prefer different colonization locations (mucosa and feces), and are remarkably changed during intestinal inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-colitis mouse models compare to normal controls: Penicillium, Wickerhamomyces, Alternaria, and Candida are increased while Cryptococcus, Phialemonium, Wallemia and an unidentified Saccharomycetales genus are decreased in the guts of DSS-colitis mice. Fungi-depleted mice exhibited aggravated acute DSS-colitis associated with gain of Hallella, Barnesiella, Bacteroides, Alistipes, and Lactobacillus and loss of butyrate-producing Clostridium XIVa, and Anaerostipes compare with normal control. In contrast, bacteria-depleted mice show attenuated acute DSS-colitis. Mice with severely chronic recurrent DSS-colitis show increased plasma (1,3)-?-D-glucan level and fungal translocation into the colonic mucosa, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen. This work demonstrate the different roles of fungi in acute and chronic recurrent colitis: They are important counterbalance to bacteria in maintaining intestinal micro-ecological homeostasis and health in acutely inflamed intestines, but can harmfully translocate into abnormal sites and could aggravate disease severity in chronic recurrent colitis. PMID:26013555

  5. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting, such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partI, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors, epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part II will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids. PMID:19152442

  6. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in adult patients with enteropathic AIDS in north-eastern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Tarimo, D S; Killewo, J Z; Minjas, J N; Msamanga, G I

    1996-06-01

    A six month study was conducted in north-eastern Tanzania to determine the prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites among adult patients with enteropathic AIDS. A total of 352 patients were recruited of whom 158 (45%) had chronic diarrhoea. Of the 352 patients, 123 (35%) had intestinal parasites. Of the 123, 77 (62.6%) patients had chronic diarrhoea. The types of parasites detected were Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Strongyloides stercoralis, Schistosoma mansoni, Trichuris, trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Entamoeba histolytica. The prevalence of intestinal parasites was significantly higher in patients with chronic diarrhoea than in those without (P < 0.05). Cryptosporidium and Isospora belli were only detected in patients with chronic diarrhoea and were thus the most likely cause of the diarrhoea. This study has established that coccidian parasites are the most important gut opportunistic infections in Tanzanian patients with enteropathic AIDS. The fact that a high proportion of patients with chronic diarrhoea (51.3%) had no identifiable parasitic agents, suggests that other infectious agents or alternative mechanisms other than infections are responsible for the diarrhoea. PMID:8840602

  7. Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Adalberto; de Diego, Alfredo; Domingo, Christian; Lamas, Adelaida; Gutierrez, Raimundo; Naberan, Karlos; Garrigues, Vicente; López Vime, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Chronic cough (CC), or cough lasting more than 8 weeks, has attracted increased attention in recent years following advances that have changed opinions on the prevailing diagnostic and therapeutic triad in place since the 1970s. Suboptimal treatment results in two thirds of all cases, together with a new notion of CC as a peripheral and central hypersensitivity syndrome similar to chronic pain, have changed the approach to this common complaint in routine clinical practice. The peripheral receptors involved in CC are still a part of the diagnostic triad. However, both convergence of stimuli and central nervous system hypersensitivity are key factors in treatment success. PMID:26165783

  8. Intestinal parasitic infections and micronutrient deficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Hesham, M S; Edariah, A B; Norhayati, M

    2004-06-01

    Malnutrition including vitamin A and iron deficiency and parasitic diseases have a strikingly similar geographical distribution with the same people experiencing both insults together for much of their lives. Parasitic infections are thought to contribute to child malnutrition and micronutrient deficiency through subtle reduction in digestion and absorption, chronic inflammation and loss of nutrients. Parasites may affect the intake of food; it's subsequent digestion and absorption, metabolism and the maintenance of nutrient pools. The most important parasites related to nutritional status are intestinal parasites especially soil transmitted helminthes, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, followed by other parasites such as the coccidia, Schistosoma sp. and malarial parasites. PMID:15559182

  9. Typhoid perforation of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Eustache, J M; Kreis, D J

    1983-11-01

    We reviewed 91 cases of intestinal perforation complicating typhoid fever treated at a rural hospital in Haiti over a ten-year period. Surgical management involved simple primary closure of the perforation (80 patients), small-bowel resection with anastomosis (two patients), simple drainage of the peritoneal cavity (two patients), and serosal patching of the perforation (one patient). Six patients died before surgery. The mortality was 30.8% for all 91 cases but 21.2% for those treated with primary closure of the perforation. We also reviewed the literature pertaining to the management of intestinal perforation complicating typhoid fever. PMID:6639337

  10. Ondansetron in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer and Chronic Nausea and Vomiting Not Caused by Cancer Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  12. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  13. Interactions between intestinal microbiota and innate immune system in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cucchiara, Salvatore; Stronati, Laura; Aloi, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of an altered immune homeostasis within the intestinal mucosa against the gut microbiota, leading to chronic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals. Under normal conditions, the immune system defends against pathogens and prevents the passage of excessive intestinal bacteria; regulatory pathways must maintain a low-grade, controlled inflammation in a healthy gut, but also induce a protective response against pathogens. The innate immune system is the first-line defense from microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, immediate response. The immune system constantly controls commensal bacteria and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to sustain immune homeostasis. The discovery that several genes linked to IBD modulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), and genes that mediate autophagy (ie, ATG16L1, IRGM), has highlighted the critical role of host-microbe interactions in controlling intestinal immune homeostasis. Commensal microorganisms actively interact with the intestinal mucosa and influence the activity of the immune system as well as the amplitude of the immune response. In contrast, host factors can influence microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. In this paper, we focus on the mechanisms that mediate host-microbe interactions and how the disruption of this balance leads to chronic intestinal inflammation in IBD. PMID:22955361

  14. The Neuromodulation of the Intestinal Immune System and Its Relevance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Verheijden, Simon; Bosmans, Goele; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    One of the main tasks of the immune system is to discriminate and appropriately react to “danger” or “non-danger” signals. This is crucial in the gastrointestinal tract, where the immune system is confronted with a myriad of food antigens and symbiotic microflora that are in constant contact with the mucosa, in addition to any potential pathogens. This large number of antigens and commensal microflora, which are essential for providing vital nutrients, must be tolerated by the intestinal immune system to prevent aberrant inflammation. Hence, the balance between immune activation versus tolerance should be tightly regulated to maintain intestinal homeostasis and to prevent immune activation indiscriminately against all luminal antigens. Loss of this delicate equilibrium can lead to chronic activation of the intestinal immune response resulting in intestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In order to maintain homeostasis, the immune system has evolved diverse regulatory strategies including additional non-immunological actors able to control the immune response. Accumulating evidence strongly indicates a bidirectional link between the two systems in which the brain modulates the immune response via the detection of circulating cytokines and via direct afferent input from sensory fibers and from enteric neurons. In the current review, we will highlight the most recent findings regarding the cross-talk between the nervous system and the mucosal immune system and will discuss the potential use of these neuronal circuits and neuromediators as novel therapeutic tools to reestablish immune tolerance and treat intestinal chronic inflammation. PMID:26635804

  15. Intestinal Microbiota and the Innate Immune System – A Crosstalk in Crohn’s Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Lea-Maxie; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorder that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. The precise etiology of CD is still unclear but it is widely accepted that a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the immune system and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and perpetuation of the disease. Increasing evidence from experimental and clinical studies implies the intestinal microbiota in disease pathogenesis, thereby supporting the hypothesis that chronic intestinal inflammation arises from an abnormal immune response against the microorganisms of the intestinal flora in genetically susceptible individuals. Given that CD patients display changes in their gut microbiota composition, collectively termed “dysbiosis,” the question raises whether the altered microbiota composition is a cause of disease or rather a consequence of the inflammatory state of the intestinal environment. This review will focus on the crosstalk between the gut microbiota and the innate immune system during intestinal inflammation, thereby unraveling the role of the microbiota in CD pathogenesis. PMID:26441993

  16. [Primary intestinal lymphangiectasis. A case treated surgically].

    PubMed

    Mercurella, A; Galloni, E; Danti, S; Valli, F; Colombo, B; Belloli, G

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of primary intestinal lymphangiectasis resolved with surgical treatment. Usually the natural course of the disease is relatively mild and medical nutritional treatment can be sufficient. In this case the lymphatic intestinal anomaly was generalized to the entire small intestine but a distal ileal segment was particularly involved. The surgical resection of this intestinal tract resolved the symptomatology. PMID:2235665

  17. PERK Limits Drosophila Lifespan by Promoting Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Response to ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifen; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal homeostasis requires precise control of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. In Drosophila, this control declines with age largely due to chronic activation of stress signaling and associated chronic inflammatory conditions. An important contributor to this condition is the age-associated increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here we show that the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) integrates both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous ER stress stimuli to induce ISC proliferation. In addition to responding to cell-intrinsic ER stress, PERK is also specifically activated in ISCs by JAK/Stat signaling in response to ER stress in neighboring cells. The activation of PERK is required for homeostatic regeneration, as well as for acute regenerative responses, yet the chronic engagement of this response becomes deleterious in aging flies. Accordingly, knocking down PERK in ISCs is sufficient to promote intestinal homeostasis and extend lifespan. Our studies highlight the significance of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response of the ER (UPRER) in intestinal homeostasis and provide a viable strategy to improve organismal health- and lifespan. PMID:25945494

  18. PERK Limits Drosophila Lifespan by Promoting Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation in Response to ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis requires precise control of intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. In Drosophila, this control declines with age largely due to chronic activation of stress signaling and associated chronic inflammatory conditions. An important contributor to this condition is the age-associated increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here we show that the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) integrates both cell-autonomous and non-autonomous ER stress stimuli to induce ISC proliferation. In addition to responding to cell-intrinsic ER stress, PERK is also specifically activated in ISCs by JAK/Stat signaling in response to ER stress in neighboring cells. The activation of PERK is required for homeostatic regeneration, as well as for acute regenerative responses, yet the chronic engagement of this response becomes deleterious in aging flies. Accordingly, knocking down PERK in ISCs is sufficient to promote intestinal homeostasis and extend lifespan. Our studies highlight the significance of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response of the ER (UPRER) in intestinal homeostasis and provide a viable strategy to improve organismal health- and lifespan. PMID:25945494

  19. Prostacyclin inhibits gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit in rats and dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwart, M.J.; Rush, B.D.

    1984-08-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) antagonizes 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2-induced diarrhea in rats, presumably by inhibiting the fluid accumulation of ''enteropooling'' in the small intestine. The effect of PGI2 on gastric emptying, small intestinal transit, and colonic transit was examined in rats and dogs to determine if interference with propulsion might also contribute to the antidiarrheal properties of this compound. Rats implanted with chronic duodenal cannulas were given subcutaneous PGI2 (0.1-1000 microgram/kg) followed 10 min later by intragastric /sup 2/Cr and a visually detectable duodenal transit marker. Forty-five minutes later, the animals were killed. Subcutaneous PGI2 inhibited gastric emptying maximally at 10 micrograms/kg. Small-intestinal transit was significantly decreased at 50 micrograms/kg and almost completely suppressed at 1.0 mg/kg. Subcutaneous naloxone (0.5 mg/kg) given 10 min before and 20 min after subcutaneous PGI2 administration did not block PGI2's effects. Intravenous or oral PGI2, had none of these effects. Small intestinal transit was only decreased by PGI2 infusion, suggesting that this parameter was more sensitive to a sustained blood level than gastric emptying. Hourly injections of subcutaneous PGI2 (0.5 mg/kg) had no effect on rat colonic transit measured over a 3-h period after deposition of the transit marker through a colonic cannula in a manner similar to that described for small-intestinal transit above. Small-intestinal transit was also measured in dogs given a barium suspension through a chronic duodenal cannula. In vehicle-treated dogs, barium reached the cecal area in an average of 2.8 h after instillation. In PGI2-treated dogs, barium never reached the cecum in the 5-h examination period. Thus, PGI2 inhibits gastric emptying in rat and small-intestinal transit in rat and dog but has no effect on rat colonic transit.

  20. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed. PMID:23942635

  1. Cancer of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2015 9,410 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.6% Estimated Deaths in 2015 1,260 % of All Cancer ... intestine cancer is rare. Common Types of Cancer Estimated New Cases 2015 Estimated Deaths 2015 1. Breast ...

  2. Environmental contaminants and intestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, John G.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental contaminants which have their major effects on the small intestine may be classified into five major categories: (1) bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents, (2) food and plant substances, (3) environmental and industrial products, (4) pharmaceutical agents, and (5) toxic agents whose metabolic effects are dependent on interreaction with intestinal bacterial flora, other physical agents (detergents), human intestinal enzyme deficiency states, and the nutritional state of the host. Bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents are the most important of all such agents, being responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in association with diarrheal diseases of adults and children. Several plant substances ingested as foods have unique effects on the small bowel as well as from contaminants such as fungi on poorly preserved grains and cereals. Environmental and industrial products, in spite of their widespread prevalence in industrial societies as contaminants, are less important unless unexpectedly intense exposure occurs to the intestinal tract. Pharmaceutical agents of several types interreact with the small bowel mucosa causing impairment of transport processes for fluid and electrolytes, amino acid, lipid and sugars as well as vitamins. These interreactions may be dependent on bacterial metabolic activity, association with detergents, mucosal enzyme deficiency state (disaccharidases), and the state of nutrition of the subject. PMID:540611

  3. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  4. Needleless transcutaneous electroacupuncture improves rectal distension-induced impairment in intestinal motility and slow waves via vagal mechanisms in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to compare the effects and mechanisms of transcutaneous electroacupuncture (TEA) on rectal distention (RD)-induced intestinal dysmotility with EA. Methods: six female dogs chronically implanted with a duodenal fistula, a proximal colon fistula and intestinal serosal electrodes were studied. EA and TEA were performed via needles and cutaneous electrodes placed at bilateral ST-36 (Zusanli) acupoints respectively; their effects on postprandial intestinal dysmotility (slow waves, contractions and transit) induced by RD, and autonomic functions were compared. Results: RD at a volume of 140 ml suppressed intestinal contractions; the motility index was reduced with RD (P = 0.001). Both EA and TEA ameliorated the suppressed contractions (P = 0.003 and 0.001) and their effects were comparable. RD reduced the percentage of normal intestinal slow waves (P = 0.002) that was increased with both EA and TEA (P = 0.005 and 0.035). No significant difference was noted between EA and TEA. EA and TEA reduced small bowel transit time (P = 0.001 and 0.007); these prokinetic effects were blocked by atropine. Both EA and TEA increased vagal activity assessed by the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (both P = 0.03). Conclusion: RD inhibits postprandial intestinal motility. Both EA and TEA at ST-36 are able to improve the RD-induced impairment in intestinal contractions, transit and slow waves mediated via the vagal mechanism. Needleless TEA is as effective as EA in ameliorating the intestinal hypomotility. PMID:26064396

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects against TPN-induced intestinal hexose malabsorption in enterally refed piglets.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, J J; Stoll, B; Buddington, R K; Stephens, J E; Cui, L; Chang, X; Burrin, D G

    2006-02-01

    Premature infants receiving chronic total parenteral nutrition (TPN) due to feeding intolerance develop intestinal atrophy and reduced nutrient absorption. Although providing the intestinal trophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) during chronic TPN improves intestinal growth and morphology, it is uncertain whether GLP-2 enhances absorptive function. We placed catheters in the carotid artery, jugular and portal veins, duodenum, and a portal vein flow probe in piglets before providing either enteral formula (ENT), TPN or a coinfusion of TPN plus GLP-2 for 6 days. On postoperative day 7, all piglets were fed enterally and digestive functions were evaluated in vivo using dual infusion of enteral ((13)C) and intravenous ((2)H) glucose, in vitro by measuring mucosal lactase activity and rates of apical glucose transport, and by assessing the abundances of sodium glucose transporter-1 (SGLT-1) and glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2). Both ENT and GLP-2 pigs had larger intestine weights, longer villi, and higher lactose digestive capacity and in vivo net glucose and galactose absorption compared with TPN alone. These endpoints were similar in ENT and GLP-2 pigs except for a lower intestinal weight and net glucose absorption in GLP-2 compared with ENT pigs. The enhanced hexose absorption in GLP-2 compared with TPN pigs corresponded with higher lactose digestive and apical glucose transport capacities, increased abundance of SGLT-1, but not GLUT-2, and lower intestinal metabolism of [(13)C]glucose to [(13)C]lactate. Our findings indicate that GLP-2 treatment during chronic TPN maintains intestinal structure and lactose digestive and hexose absorptive capacities, reduces intestinal hexose metabolism, and may facilitate the transition to enteral feeding in TPN-fed infants. PMID:16166344

  6. A COMPLICATED CASE OF STRONGYLOIDIASIS PRESENTING WITH INTESTINAL LYMPHADENOPATHY OBSTRUCTION: MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION.

    PubMed

    Chunlertrith, Kitti; Noiprasit, Athiwat; Kularbkaew, Churairat; Sanpool, Oranuch; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode, which can cause complications in immune-compromised hosts. We present a rare case of intestinal obstruction due to mesenteric lymphadenopathy, a complication due to strongyloidiasis, developing in a male subject chronically receiving corticosteroid for pemphigus vulgaris. DNA was extracted from biopsied lymph nodes containing nematode larvae and PCR amplified using primers specific for S. stercoralis 18S rDNA. Nucleotide sequence of the amplicon showed identity with that of S. stercoralis deposited in GenBank. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a diagnosis of strongyloidiasis from biopsied samples using molecular techniques. PMID:26513898

  7. SMALL INTESTINAL ADENOCARCINOMA WITH CARCINOMATOSIS IN A SWIFT FOX (VULPES VELOX).

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Shambhunath; Andrews, Gordon A; Carpenter, James W

    2015-09-01

    A 7-yr-old, intact, female swift fox (Vulpes velox) presented to the Veterinary Health Center at Kansas State University with a history of chronic weight loss, lethargy, inappetence, and myiasis. On physical examination, a firm mass was palpated in the mid- to cranial abdomen. The fox was euthanatized as a result of the grave prognosis. Gross necropsy and histologic findings included a small intestinal adenocarcinoma with diffuse transperitoneal spread throughout the abdominal cavity (carcinomatosis). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal adenocarcinoma with carcinomatosis in a swift fox. PMID:26352968

  8. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Management Tools Videos What Is Chronic Pain? What Is Chronic Pain? View Transcript Download Transcript If you ... with chronic pain, you know that chronic pain is different. Ed Covington, MD, director of the Cleveland ...

  9. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  10. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  11. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  12. Intestinal glutathione: determinant of mucosal peroxide transport, metabolism, and oxidative susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Aw, Tak Yee

    2005-05-01

    The intestine is a primary site of nutrient absorption and a critical defense barrier against dietary-derived mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidants. Accumulation of oxidants like peroxidized lipids in the gut lumen can contribute to impairment of mucosal metabolic pathways, enterocyte dysfunction independent of cell injury, and development of gut pathologies, such as inflammation and cancer. Despite this recognition, we know little of the pathways of intestinal transport, metabolism, and luminal disposition of dietary peroxides in vivo or of the underlying mechanisms of lipid peroxide-induced genesis of intestinal disease processes. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the determinants of intestinal absorption and metabolism of peroxidized lipids. I will review experimental evidence from our laboratory and others (Table 1) supporting the pivotal role that glutathione (GSH) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) play in mucosal transport and metabolism of lipid hydroperoxides and how reductant availability can be compromised under chronic stress such as hypoxia, and the influence of GSH on oxidative susceptibility, and redox contribution to genesis of gut disorders. The discussion is pertinent to understanding dietary lipid peroxides and GSH redox balance in intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the significance of luminal GSH in preserving the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:15845421

  13. Intestinal glutathione: determinant of mucosal peroxide transport, metabolism, and oxidative susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Aw, Tak Yee . E-mail: taw@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-01

    The intestine is a primary site of nutrient absorption and a critical defense barrier against dietary-derived mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidants. Accumulation of oxidants like peroxidized lipids in the gut lumen can contribute to impairment of mucosal metabolic pathways, enterocyte dysfunction independent of cell injury, and development of gut pathologies, such as inflammation and cancer. Despite this recognition, we know little of the pathways of intestinal transport, metabolism, and luminal disposition of dietary peroxides in vivo or of the underlying mechanisms of lipid peroxide-induced genesis of intestinal disease processes. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the determinants of intestinal absorption and metabolism of peroxidized lipids. I will review experimental evidence from our laboratory and others (Table 1) supporting the pivotal role that glutathione (GSH) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) play in mucosal transport and metabolism of lipid hydroperoxides and how reductant availability can be compromised under chronic stress such as hypoxia, and the influence of GSH on oxidative susceptibility, and redox contribution to genesis of gut disorders. The discussion is pertinent to understanding dietary lipid peroxides and GSH redox balance in intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the significance of luminal GSH in preserving the integrity of the intestinal epithelium.

  14. Increased oxidative stress and disrupted small intestinal tight junctions in cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwei; Wu, Qi; Xu, Long; Li, Xue; Duan, Jianmin; Zhan, Jingyan; Feng, Jing; Sun, Xin; Chen, Huaiyong

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem, and cigarette smoke (CS) is the primary risk factor. The pathology is often observed in the lung, but COPD is also associated with intestinal barrier disruption, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, a CS?exposed rat model was evaluated in the present study by analyzing small intestinal gene expression using reverse transcription?quantitative polymerase chain reaction. CS exposure caused upregulation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate?oxidase subunits nox2 and p22phox in the small intestine, while the antioxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase was downregulated. CS exposure also increased bax expression and decreased bcl?2 expression. This was associated with an elevation of hypoxia?inducible factor (HIF)?1?. Claudin?1 was decreased and claudin?2 increased, indicating a loosening of small intestinal tight junctions (TJs). These data suggest that during the development of COPD, HIF?1? expression is altered in the small intestine, which may be associated with the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, eventually resulting in disruption of the intestinal TJs. PMID:25606848

  15. Application of the Apc(Min/+) mouse model for studying inflammation-associated intestinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Qingzhu

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract have been known to increase risk of developing a form of colorectal cancer known as inflammation-associated cancer. The roles of inflammation in tumor formation and development in Apc(Min/+) mice have been broadly corroborated. The Apc(Min/+) mouse model contains a point mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and only develops intestinal precancerous lesions, the benign adenomas. Thus, it provides an excellent in vivo system to investigate the molecular events involved in the inflammatory process which may contribute to multistep tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis. Recent investigations that employ this model studied the effects of gene alterations, intestinal microorganisms, drugs, diet, exercise and sleep on the inflammatory process and tumor development, and revealed the mechanisms involved in the formation, promotion and carcinogenesis of adenomas with the background of inflammation. Herein, we focus our review on the application of the Apc(Min/+) mouse model for studying inflammation-associated intestinal tumor and find that anti-inflammation is a possible strategy in combating intestinal tumor, but sometimes anti-inflammation cannot help reduce tumor burden. Moreover, various inflammation-related genes are involved in different mechanistic stages of tumor in Apc(Min/+) mice and intricate regulatory effects of inflammation exist in the whole progression of intestinal tumor. PMID:25960239

  16. Innate lymphoid cells in intestinal immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bostick, John W; Zhou, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a new and distinct family of innate immune cells that play an important role in immunity and inflammation. In this review, we focus on the role of ILCs in mucosal tissues, especially in the gut, in health and disease. ILCs support intestinal homeostasis by protecting the intestine from pathogens, contributing to the development of gut lymphoid tissue, and helping to repair injuries. By cooperating with epithelial cells and other innate and adaptive immune cells, ILCs participate in the control of pathogens and tolerance of commensal bacteria. The development and maintenance of ILCs are influenced by nutrients and metabolites sourced from diet and/or gut bacteria. ILCs have been shown to be involved in host metabolism and to participate in various diseases of the intestine including infectious and chronic inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Thus, the elucidation of ILC biology provides an exciting potential for development of novel therapeutic means to modulate immune responses in various disease settings. PMID:26459449

  17. Bidirectional interactions between indomethacin and the murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xue; Bittinger, Kyle; Li, Xuanwen; Abernethy, Darrell R; Bushman, Frederic D; FitzGerald, Garret A

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate gut microbiota have been implicated in the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, motivating studies of microbe-driven metabolism of clinically important drugs. Here, we studied interactions between the microbiota and indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that inhibits cyclooxygenases (COX) -1 and -2. Indomethacin was tested in both acute and chronic exposure models in mice at clinically relevant doses, which suppressed production of COX-1- and COX-2-derived prostaglandins and caused small intestinal (SI) damage. Deep sequencing analysis showed that indomethacin exposure was associated with alterations in the structure of the intestinal microbiota in both dosing models. Perturbation of the intestinal microbiome by antibiotic treatment altered indomethacin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, which is probably the result of reduced bacterial ?-glucuronidase activity. Humans show considerable inter-individual differences in their microbiota and their responses to indomethacin — thus, the drug-microbe interactions described here provide candidate mediators of individualized drug responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08973.001 PMID:26701907

  18. Campylobacter infection in chickens modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Molnár, Andor; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Ghareeb, Khaled; Khayal, Basel; Hess, Claudia; Liebhart, Dieter; Dublecz, Károly; Hess, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Asymptomatic carriage of Campylobacter jejuni is highly prevalent in chicken flocks. Thus, we investigated whether chronic Campylobacter carriage affects chicken intestinal functions despite the absence of clinical symptoms. An experiment was carried out in which commercial chickens were orally infected with C. jejuni (1 × 10(8) CFU/bird) at 14 days of life. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial ion conductance (G(t)) in Ussing chambers. G(t) increased in cecum and colon of Campylobacter-infected chicken 7 d post-infection (DPI), whereas G t initially decreased in the jejunum at 7 DPI and increased thereafter at 14 DPI. The net charge transfer across the epithelium was reduced or tended to be reduced in all segments, as evidenced by a decreased I sc. Furthermore, the infection induced intestinal histomorphological changes, most prominently including a decrease in villus height, crypt depth and villus surface area in the jejunum at 7 DPI. Furthermore, body mass gain was decreased by Campylobacter carriage. This study demonstrates, for the first time, changes in the intestinal barrier function in Campylobacter-infected chickens and these changes were associated with a decrease in growth performance in otherwise healthy-appearing birds. PMID:24553586

  19. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Burrall, B. A.; Halpern, G. M.; Huntley, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  20. Prevalence of intestinal parasitism and associated symptomatology among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gil, Frederico F; Barros, Maxlene J; Macedo, Nazaré A; Júnior, Carmelino G E; Redoan, Roseli; Busatti, Haendel; Gomes, Maria A; Santos, Joseph F G

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal parasites are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Immunocompromised individuals may develop more severe forms of these infections. Taking into account the immunity impairment in patients suffering from chronic renal failure (CRF), we will determine the prevalence and associated symptoms of intestinal parasites in these patients. Controls without CRF were used for comparison. Stool samples were collected and processed for microscopic identification of parasites using the Formalin-ether concentration method. For Cryptosporidium diagnosis, the ELISA technique was used. One hundred and ten fecal samples from hemodialysis patients were analyzed, as well as 86 from a community group used as control group. A result of 51.6% of intestinal parasites was observed in hemodialysis patients and 61.6% in the control group. Cryptosporidium and Blastocystis were the most common infections in patients with CRF (26.4% and 24.5%, respectively). Blastocystis was the most common infection in the control group (41.9%), however no individual was found positive for Cryptosporidium. Among the CRF patients, 73.6% were symptomatic, 54.3% of these tested positive for at least one parasite, in contrast to 44.8% in asymptomatic patients (p = 0.38). The most common symptoms in this group were flatulence (36.4%), asthenia (30.0%) and weight loss (30.0%). In the control group, 91.9% were symptomatic, 60.8% of these tested positive for at least one parasite, in contrast to 71.4% in asymptomatic patients (p = 0.703). A significant difference between the two groups was observed with regard to symptoms, with bloating, postprandial fullness, and abdominal pain being more frequent in the control group than in the hemodialysis group (all p < 0.05). Comparing symptomatic with asymptomatic, there was no association in either group between symptoms or the prevalence of parasitic infection, nor with the type of parasite or with multiple parasitic infections. Patients with chronic renal failure are frequent targets for renal transplantation, which as well as the inherent immunological impairment of the disease itself, results in immunosuppression by medication. For this reason, carriers of intestinal parasites with pathogenic potential can develop serious clinical complications influencing the success of transplantation. This fact, coupled with the high prevalence of intestinal parasites and the dissociation between symptoms and infection in CRF patients, suggests that the stool test should be incorporated in routine propedeutics. Furthermore, preventive measures for the acquisition of parasites through the fecal-oral contamination route should be introduced. PMID:23563757

  1. IBD Candidate Genes and Intestinal Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F.

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the large scale analysis of human genetics have generated profound insights into possible genetic contributions to chronic diseases including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. To date, 163 distinct genetic risk loci have been associated with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with a substantial degree of genetic overlap between these 2 conditions. Although many risk variants show a reproducible correlation with disease, individual gene associations only affect a subset of patients, and the functional contribution(s) of these risk variants to the onset of IBD is largely undetermined. Although studies in twins have demonstrated that the development of IBD is not mediated solely by genetic risk, it is nevertheless important to elucidate the functional consequences of risk variants for gene function in relevant cell types known to regulate key physiological processes that are compromised in IBD. This article will discuss IBD candidate genes that are known to be, or are suspected of being, involved in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier and several of the physiological processes presided over by this dynamic and versatile layer of cells. This will include assembly and regulation of tight junctions, cell adhesion and polarity, mucus and glycoprotein regulation, bacterial sensing, membrane transport, epithelial differentiation, and restitution. PMID:25215613

  2. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Na; Hu, Shaomin

    2015-07-01

    The intestine harbors enormous numbers of commensal bacteria and is under frequent attack from food-borne pathogens and toxins. A properly regulated immune response is critical for homeostatic maintenance of commensals and for protection against infection and toxins in the intestine. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype antibodies function specifically in mucosal sites such as the intestines to help maintain intestinal health by binding to and regulating commensal microbiota, pathogens and toxins. IgA antibodies are produced by intestinal IgA antibody-secreting plasma cells generated in gut-associated lymphoid tissues from naïve B cells in response to stimulations of the intestinal bacteria and components. Research on generation, migration, and maintenance of IgA-secreting cells is important in our effort to understand the biology of IgA responses and to help better design vaccines against intestinal infections. PMID:25837997

  3. Involvement of beta-glucuronidase in intestinal microflora in the intestinal toxicity of the antitumor camptothecin derivative irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) in rats.

    PubMed

    Takasuna, K; Hagiwara, T; Hirohashi, M; Kato, M; Nomura, M; Nagai, E; Yokoi, T; Kamataki, T

    1996-08-15

    Irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), an antitumor camptothecin derivative, causes severe forms of diarrhea clinically. We characterized CPT-11-induced diarrhea histologically and enzymologically and assessed the relationships between intestinal toxicity and the activity of the enzymes that play a key role in the major metabolic pathway of CPT-11 in rats. CPT-11 (60 mg/kg i.v. for 4 days) induced intestinal toxicity characterized by severe chronic diarrhea, loss of body weight, and anorexia. Histological damage was most severe in the cecum. The segmental difference in the degree of the damage showed good correlation with the beta-glucuronidase activity in the contents of the lumen in each case, but not with the intestinal tissue carboxylesterase activity, which converts CPT-11 to its active form (7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin). Inhibition of the beta-glucuronidase activity in the intestinal microflora by antibiotics (1 mg penicillin and 2 mg streptomycin per ml of drinking water) markedly ameliorated the diarrhea and reduced cecal damage. Analysis of CPT-11 and its metabolites in the feces indicated that antibiotics completely inhibited the deconjugation of the glucuronic conjugate of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin by beta-glucuronidase. It is suggested that CPT-11-induced diarrhea would be attributable to the damage to the cecum, and that the inhibition of the beta-glucuronidase activity in the intestinal microflora is a major protective effect of antibiotics. PMID:8706020

  4. The intestinal microbiota and obesity.

    PubMed

    Kallus, Samuel J; Brandt, Lawrence J

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has been and continues to be an epidemic in the United States. Obesity has been addressed in multiple health initiatives, including Healthy People 2010, with no state meeting the proposed goal of a prevalence of obesity < 15% of the adult population. In contrast, obesity rates have continued to increase, with the self-reported prevalence of obesity among adults increasing by 1.1% from 2007 to the present. Indeed, since 2009, 33 states reported obesity prevalences of 25% or more with only 1 state reporting prevalence < 20%. There have been multiple approaches for the treatment of obesity, including fad diets, incentive-based exercise programs, and gastric bypass surgery; none of which have been optimal. In a murine model, it was shown that the majority of the intestinal microbiome consists of two bacterial phyla, the Bacteroidetes and the Firmicutes, and that the relative abundance of these two phyla differs among lean and obese mice; the obese mouse had a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (50% greater) than the lean mouse. The same results were appreciated in obese humans compared to lean subjects. The postulated explanation for this finding is that Firmicutes produce more complete metabolism of a given energy source than do Bacteroidetes, thus promoting more efficient absorption of calories and subsequent weight gain. Researchers were able to demonstrate that colonizing germ-free mice with the intestinal microbiome from obese mice led to an increased total body fat in the recipient mice despite a lack of change in diet. The converse, that, colonizing germ-free obese mice with the intestinal microbiome of thin mice causing a decreased total body fat in the recipient mice, has not yet been done. Other possible mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiome affects host obesity include induction of low-grade inflammation with lipopolysaccharide, regulation of host genes responsible for energy expenditure and storage, and hormonal communication between the intestinal microbiome and the host. The following review discusses the microbiome-obesity relationship and proposed mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota is hypothesized to influence weight gain. PMID:22064556

  5. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and pre-neoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and negative gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V.; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age 8.3±4.8y) with chronic gastritis (36 H. pylori +, 46 H. pylori -) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers CDX2, ephrin type-B receptor 4, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7/82 (9%) and intestinal metaplasia in 5/82 (6%) by routine histology, while 6 (7%) additional children (3 H. pylori +) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without intestinal metaplasia. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (p<0.0001). Atrophy and follicular pathology were more frequent in H. pylori + biopsies (p<0.0001), while intestinal metaplasia and CDX2 expression showed no significant correlation with H. pylori status. Antral biopsies demonstrating atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and/or aberrant CDX2 expression were seen in 21.95 % (18/82) of the children, potentially identifying those who would benefit from closer surveillance and preventive dietary strategies. Biomarkers CDX2, EphB4, MMP3, and MIF may be useful in the work-up of pediatric gastritis. PMID:24656654

  6. Antimicrobial defense of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Hooper, Lora V

    2015-01-20

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract is home to a dense community of resident bacteria and is also exposed to microorganisms from the external environment. The epithelial surface of the intestine plays a critical role in host protection by producing a diverse repertoire of antimicrobial proteins that directly kill or hinder the growth of microorganisms. Here we discuss the general principles that govern the mechanisms of action of epithelial antimicrobial proteins, regulation of antimicrobial protein expression and activity, and in vivo functions of intestinal antimicrobial proteins. We also consider how altered antimicrobial protein expression and function can contribute to disease and how these endogenous antibiotics might be harnessed for the benefit of human health. PMID:25607457

  7. Intestinal manometry: who needs it?

    PubMed Central

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Bologna, Sara; Ottaviani, Laura; Russo, Michele; Dore, Maria Pina

    2015-01-01

    The use of manometry, i.e. the recording of pressures within hollow viscera, after being successfully applied to the study of esophageal and anorectal motor dysfunctions, has also been used to investigate physiological and pathological conditions of the small bowel. By means of this technique, it has been possible to understand better the normal motor functions of the small intestine, and their relationship and variations following physiologic events, such as food ingestion. Moreover, intestinal manometry has proved useful to document motor abnormalities of the small bowel, although recognition of altered patterns specific for a determinate pathologic condition is still unavailable. However, this technique often permits the detection of abnormal gut motility in patients with abdominal symptoms such as unexplained vomiting and diarrhea, and it is sometimes also useful to address therapeutic targeting. PMID:26468344

  8. Intestinal absorption of Serratia protease

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, K.; Hirai, S.; Yashiki, T.; Tomoda, K.

    1980-04-01

    The intestinal absorption of Serratia protease (TSP) was studied in vivo with adult rats and dogs. After intraduodenal administration of TSP, the TSP levels in the blood and lymph were determined periodically by radioimmunoassay. The maximum concentration of TSP was observed within 1 h after administration in both the blood and lymph; it was higher in the latter. An apparent saturation phenomenon was observed in the absorption of TSP.

  9. Redox biology of the intestine.

    PubMed

    Circu, Magdalena L; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-11-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defence between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signalling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  10. Redox biology of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defense between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signaling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  11. [Intestinal involvement in Behçet's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Roge, J

    1985-03-01

    Intestinal lesions in Behçet's syndrome are much more common in Japan than in the Western World. Colonic or ileo-colonic lesions develop after several years of recurrent aphthae and are manifested by acute complications, such as perforation or massive haemorrhage, or by protracted haemorrhagic diarrhoea with progressive deterioration of the patient's general condition. Radiological and endoscopic findings are similar to those of severe acute colitis, such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The diagnosis of Behçet's syndrome involving the bowel rests on the presence of numerous extra-intestinal lesions and of extensive colonic ulceration often located in otherwise healthy parts of the mucosa. Histology shows, beside a non-specific inflammatory infiltrate affecting the entire wall of the colon, lesions of vasculitis and perivasculitis with images of leucocytoclasia and fibrinoid necrosis. Surgery is often necessary, requiring wide intestinal resections and long-term derivation ileostomies because of the high incidence of recurrent ulcers at the site of anastomosis, where fistulae may also develop. PMID:3157167

  12. Immunogenetic control of the intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Marietta, Eric; Rishi, Abdul; Taneja, Veena

    2015-07-01

    All vertebrates contain a diverse collection of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and fungi, on their various body surfaces, and the ecological community of these microorganisms is referred to as the microbiota. Mucosal sites, such as the intestine, harbour the majority of microorganisms, and the human intestine contains the largest community of commensal and symbiotic bacteria. This intestinal community of bacteria is diverse, and there is a significant variability among individuals with respect to the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Both genetic and environmental factors can influence the diversity and composition of the intestinal bacteria with the predominant environmental factor being diet. So far, studies have shown that diet-dependent differences in the composition of intestinal bacteria can be classified into three groups, called enterotypes. Other environmental factors that can influence the composition include antibiotics, probiotics, smoking and drugs. Studies of monozygotic and dizygotic twins have proven that genetics plays a role. Recently, MHC II genes have been associated with specific microbial compositions in human infants and transgenic mice that express different HLA alleles. There is a growing list of genes/molecules that are involved with the sensing and monitoring of the intestinal lumen by the intestinal immune system that, when genetically altered, will significantly alter the composition of the intestinal microflora. The focus of this review will be on the genetic factors that influence the composition of the intestinal microflora. PMID:25913295

  13. Observations on the colic motor complex in a pony with a small intestinal obstruction.

    PubMed

    King, J N; Gerring, E L

    1989-06-01

    Characteristic motility patterns were seen throughout the gastrointestinal tract in a pony prepared chronically with electromechanical recording devices after developing a simple obstruction of the small intestine. Gross distension of the stomach with fluid produced loss of gastric contractile activity and a chaotic electrogram. These changes were reversed instantaneously when the stomach was decompressed. In the jejunum, proximal to the obstruction, the unique 'colic motor complex' was observed with contractions of longer duration arranged in characteristic pulses of activity. The left dorsal colon showed continuous hyperactivity and the small colon remained active. Abnormal motility patterns occurring secondary to a small intestinal obstruction could play a role in the aetiology of small and large intestinal disorders. PMID:9118105

  14. The Intestinal Microbiota Contributes to the Ability of Helminths to Modulate Allergic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Mario M; Rapin, Alexis; Lebon, Luc; Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Mosconi, Ilaria; Sarter, Kerstin; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Menin, Laure; Walker, Alan W; Rougemont, Jacques; Paerewijck, Oonagh; Geldhof, Peter; McCoy, Kathleen D; Macpherson, Andrew J; Croese, John; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Junt, Tobias; Marsland, Benjamin J; Harris, Nicola L

    2015-11-17

    Intestinal helminths are potent regulators of their host's immune system and can ameliorate inflammatory diseases such as allergic asthma. In the present study we have assessed whether this anti-inflammatory activity was purely intrinsic to helminths, or whether it also involved crosstalk with the local microbiota. We report that chronic infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb) altered the intestinal habitat, allowing increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Transfer of the Hpb-modified microbiota alone was sufficient to mediate protection against allergic asthma. The helminth-induced anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion and regulatory T cell suppressor activity that mediated the protection required the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-41. A similar alteration in the metabolic potential of intestinal bacterial communities was observed with diverse parasitic and host species, suggesting that this represents an evolutionary conserved mechanism of host-microbe-helminth interactions. PMID:26522986

  15. Deregulation of intestinal anti-microbial defense by the dietary additive, maltodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Kourtney P; Chanin, Rachael; McDonald, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multi-factorial disease thought to arise from an inappropriate immune response to commensal bacteria in a genetically susceptible person that results in chronic, cyclical, intestinal inflammation. Dietary and environmental factors are implicated in the initiation and perpetuation of IBD; however, a singular causative agent has not been identified. As of now, the role of environmental priming or triggers in IBD onset and pathogenesis are not well understood, but these factors appear to synergize with other disease susceptibility factors. In previous work, we determined that the polysaccharide dietary additive, maltodextrin (MDX), impairs cellular anti-bacterial responses and suppresses intestinal anti-microbial defense mechanisms. In this addendum, we review potential mechanisms for dietary deregulation of intestinal homeostasis, postulate how dietary and genetic risk factors may combine to result in disease pathogenesis, and discuss these ideas in the context of recent findings related to dietary interventions for IBD. PMID:25738413

  16. Establishment of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in the intestine of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Sigurethardóttir, Olöf G; Valheim, Mette; Press, Charles McL

    2004-04-19

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis) is the cause of paratuberculosis, which is a chronic enteritis of ruminants characterized by granulomatous inflammation. The transmission of the infection is mainly by faecal contaminated feed. The bacteria are transported from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal wall via M cells, which overlie the domes of Peyer's patches. It is proposed that integrin receptors on the apical surface of M cells bind fibronectin-opsonized bacteria, facilitating phagocytosis by these cells. After crossing the epithelial barrier of the intestine, the bacteria are phagocytosed by macrophages, which are the target cell for this microorganism. Macrophages internalize the bacteria by binding to different receptors, including the complement receptor 3, and phagosomes containing the organisms are formed. Macrophages can destroy M. a. paratuberculosis, but not by way of oxidative compounds. The bacteria manipulate macrophages in order to survive, inhibiting the maturation and acidification of the phagosomes, and modulating macrophage cytokine production and antigen-presentation. PMID:15063592

  17. Intestinal stem cell proliferation and epithelial homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Carroll, Lynsey R; Cordero, Julia B

    2015-12-01

    Adult tissue homeostasis requires a tight balance between the removal of old or damaged cells and the production of new ones. Such processes are usually driven by dedicated stem cells that reside within specific tissue locations or niches. The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable regenerative capacity, which has made it a prime paradigm for the study of stem cell-driven tissue self-renewal. The discovery of the presence of stem cells in the adult midgut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has significantly impacted our understanding of the role of stem cells in intestinal homeostasis. Here we will review the current knowledge of the main mechanisms involved in the regulation of tissue homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut, with a focus on the role of stem cells in this process. We will also discuss processes involving acute or chronic disruption of normal intestinal homeostasis such as damage-induced regeneration and ageing. PMID:26024801

  18. The Intestinal Microbiota Contributes to the Ability of Helminths to Modulate Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Mario M.; Rapin, Alexis; Lebon, Luc; Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Mosconi, Ilaria; Sarter, Kerstin; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Menin, Laure; Walker, Alan W.; Rougemont, Jacques; Paerewijck, Oonagh; Geldhof, Peter; McCoy, Kathleen D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Croese, John; Giacomin, Paul R.; Loukas, Alex; Junt, Tobias; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intestinal helminths are potent regulators of their host’s immune system and can ameliorate inflammatory diseases such as allergic asthma. In the present study we have assessed whether this anti-inflammatory activity was purely intrinsic to helminths, or whether it also involved crosstalk with the local microbiota. We report that chronic infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb) altered the intestinal habitat, allowing increased short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Transfer of the Hpb-modified microbiota alone was sufficient to mediate protection against allergic asthma. The helminth-induced anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion and regulatory T cell suppressor activity that mediated the protection required the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-41. A similar alteration in the metabolic potential of intestinal bacterial communities was observed with diverse parasitic and host species, suggesting that this represents an evolutionary conserved mechanism of host-microbe-helminth interactions. PMID:26522986

  19. Deregulation of intestinal anti-microbial defense by the dietary additive, maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Kourtney P; Chanin, Rachael; McDonald, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multi-factorial disease thought to arise from an inappropriate immune response to commensal bacteria in a genetically susceptible person that results in chronic, cyclical, intestinal inflammation. Dietary and environmental factors are implicated in the initiation and perpetuation of IBD; however, a singular causative agent has not been identified. As of now, the role of environmental priming or triggers in IBD onset and pathogenesis are not well understood, but these factors appear to synergize with other disease susceptibility factors. In previous work, we determined that the polysaccharide dietary additive, maltodextrin (MDX), impairs cellular anti-bacterial responses and suppresses intestinal anti-microbial defense mechanisms. In this addendum, we review potential mechanisms for dietary deregulation of intestinal homeostasis, postulate how dietary and genetic risk factors may combine to result in disease pathogenesis, and discuss these ideas in the context of recent findings related to dietary interventions for IBD. PMID:25738413

  20. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Reactive T-cells from Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the intestine. The etiology is still unknown. One hypothesis is that CD is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in genetically predisposed individuals. MAP causes a similar disease in ruminants,...

  1. Infections and Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzik, Torsten; Maaser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the more recent years since the introduction of anti-TNF therapy, the treatment strategy in chronic inflammatory bowel disease has developed more towards an early intensive, often double immunosuppression. While this leads to an improved therapeutic success, this intensified therapy also increases the risk for side effects and especially for infectious complications. The early detection of this complication in the immunocompromised patient is often more difficult due to the potential broad spectrum of infectious agents, the often atypical presentation in conjunction with the immunosuppression as well as often similar symptoms regarding intestinal infectious complications common for a flare of the underlying disease. In the first part, this overview will discuss the broad spectrum of potential infectious complications, using pulmonary infections as an example and presenting an algorithm for detection and therapy. In the second part, common intestinal infectious complications will be discussed from diagnosis to therapy. PMID:26288602

  2. Chronic gastritis, alcohol, and non-ulcer dyspepsia 1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of 102 men comprising alcoholics, patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, and healthy controls is reported. It demonstrates that alcohol is a cause of chronic gastritis and the severity of the mucosal lesion is directly related to the duration of excess drinking. Contrary to popular belief, chronic gastritis does not give rise to symptoms. The effect of alcohol on the gastric mucosa is a direct one and is not mediated by malnutrition, hepatic damage, intestinal malabsorption, anaemia, ascorbic acid deficiency, or any disturbance in immune tolerance. The natural history of chronic gastritis is described, involving an initial hypertrophy and hyperfunction of the gastric mucosa, followed by atrophy and hypofunction. Cigarette smoking is confirmed as another cause of chronic gastritis. The non-ulcer dyspepsia syndrome is unrelated to chronic gastritis. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:5087067

  3. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-03-14

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases. PMID:25619169

  4. An intestinal Trojan horse for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Haisheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium forms an essential element of the mucosal barrier and plays a critical role in the pathophysiological response to different enteric disorders and diseases. As a major enteric dysfunction of the intestinal tract, inflammatory bowel disease is a genetic disease which results from the inappropriate and exaggerated mucosal immune response to the normal constituents in the mucosal microbiota environment. An intestine targeted drug delivery system has unique advantages in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. As a new concept in drug delivery, the Trojan horse system with the synergy of nanotechnology and host cells can achieve better therapeutic efficacy in specific diseases. Here, we demonstrated the feasibility of encapsulating DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles into primary isolated intestinal stem cells to form an intestinal Trojan horse for gene regulation therapy of inflammatory bowel disease. This proof-of-concept intestinal Trojan horse will have a wide variety of applications in the diagnosis and therapy of enteric disorders and diseases.

  5. [The potentials of echography in the diagnosis of chronic colitis].

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, B A; Tkach, S M; Klymenko, O P; Babko, S O; Denysova, M F

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic signs of colitis were studied in 24 adults aged 20 to 53 yr and 38 children aged 3-16 yr in whom chronic colitis was diagnosed. 2 adults and three children had ulcerative colitis. The results obtained showed that with the aid of echography it is possible to detect inflammatory lesions in the large intestine as well as to observe the time course of changes in its wall during the course of treatment. Ultrasonic investigation can be of screening type in detecting an inflammatory process in the large intestine, on the one hand, and a method of profound study of changes in its wall, on the other. PMID:7831876

  6. Contribution à l'étude quantitative de la flore bactérienne du gros intestin des porcs dysentériques

    PubMed Central

    Elazhary, M. A. S. Y.; Lagacé, A.; Roy, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterial flora and the pH of the large intestine of dysenteric swine during acute subacute and chronic phases have been submitted to quantitative and qualitative studies. The methods used are based on primary isolation and differentiation of the bacteria by the use of selective media and the subsequent differentiation using the replica plating technique. The most characteristic changes are the following: 1. A significant increase of the pH of the chyme in the large intestine during acute dysentery 2. A significant increase of Vibrio, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus in the colon and cecum during acute dysentery. 3. A significant increase of Shigella in the colon and cecum during subacute dysentery. 4. The almost total disappearance of Aeromonas and of the yeasts in the large intestine during acute, subacute and chronic dysentery. 5. A significant decrease of Klebsiella, in the cecum, during acute dysentery and of the fungi during subacute dysentery. 6. Decrease of Streptococcus in the colon during acute dysentery. 7. The total quantitative flora of the large intestine do not change very much. PMID:4270805

  7. Animal models of intestinal inflammation: clues to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Powrie, Fiona; Uhlig, Holm

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade a number of models of chronic intestinal inflammation have been described that resemble aspects of the pathology found in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Several themes have emerged from these studies that are of relevance to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Firstly, intestinal inflammation is a consequence of an aberrant chronic immune response triggered by enteric bacteria. Both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms can cause colitis and in many models there is evidence of differential activation of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cells. Targeting the Th1 pathway prevents experimental colitis and there is also evidence that this may be useful in Crohn's disease. Secondly, specialized populations of regulatory T cells have been shown to prevent colitis and in some systems cure it, suggesting immune responses in the intestine are subject to dominant T cell-mediated control. Here we focus on new insights into the pathogenesis and regulation of intestinal inflammation as revealed by model systems and how these may be harnessed for the treatment of IBD. PMID:15669641

  8. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  9. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Faculty of Human Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University, Osaka ; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Geriatric Medicine, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita ; Seino, Yutaka; Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka ; Inagaki, Nobuya; CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation , Kyoto

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway rather than through a GLP-1-mediated pathway.

  10. Concurrent gastro-intestinal nematode infection does not alter the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Brian; Helmby, Helena

    2008-07-01

    Concurrent helminth infections have been suggested to be associated with protection against cerebral malaria in humans, a condition characterised by systemic inflammation. Here we show that a concurrent chronic gastro-intestinal nematode infection does not alter the course of murine cerebral malaria. Mice infected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus, and co-infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA 14 days later, developed malaria parasitemia, weight loss and anemia, at the same rate as mice without nematode infection. Both groups developed cerebral malaria around the same time point. The data suggest that a chronic helminth infection does not affect the development of cerebral malaria in a murine model. PMID:18656411

  11. Upper GI and small bowel series

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the stomach may indicate the following problems: Gastric cancer Gastric ulcer - benign Gastritis Polyps (a tumor that is usually noncancerous and grows on the mucus membrane ) Pyloric stenosis ... ring Primary or idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

  12. Intestinal myofibroblasts: targets for stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mifflin, R. C.; Pinchuk, I. V.; Saada, J. I.

    2011-01-01

    The subepithelial intestinal myofibroblast is an important cell orchestrating many diverse functions in the intestine and is involved in growth and repair, tumorigenesis, inflammation, and fibrosis. The myofibroblast is but one of several α-smooth muscle actin-positive (α-SMA+) mesenchymal cells present within the intestinal lamina propria, including vascular pericytes, bone marrow-derived stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells or hematopoietic stem cells), muscularis mucosae, and the lymphatic pericytes (colon) and organized smooth muscle (small intestine) associated with the lymphatic lacteals. These other mesenchymal cells perform many of the functions previously attributed to subepithelial myofibroblasts. This review discusses the definition of a myofibroblast and reconsiders whether the α-SMA+ subepithelial cells in the intestine are myofibroblasts or other types of mesenchymal cells, i.e., pericytes. Current information about specific, or not so specific, molecular markers of lamina propria mesenchymal cells is reviewed, as well as the origins of intestinal myofibroblasts and pericytes in the intestinal lamina propria and their replenishment after injury. Current concepts and research on stem cell therapy for intestinal inflammation are summarized. Information about the stem cell origin of intestinal stromal cells may inform future stem cell therapies to treat human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:21252048

  13. Intestinal barriers to bacteria and their toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.I.; Owen, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Immunologic and nonimmunologic processes work together to protect the host from the multitude of microorganisms residing within the intestinal lumen. Mechanical integrity of the intestinal epithelium, mucus in combination with secretory antibody, antimicrobial metabolites of indigenous microorganisms, and peristalsis each limit proliferation and systemic dissemination of enteric pathogens. Uptake of microorganisms by Peyer's patches and other intestinal lymphoid structures and translocation circumvent the mucosal barrier, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Improved understanding of the composition and limitation of the intestinal barrier, coupled with advances in genetic engineering of immunogenic bacteria, development of oral delivery systems, and immunomodulators, now make enhancement of mucosal barriers feasible. 32 references.

  14. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    PubMed

    Keating, Niamh; Keely, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology. PMID:19765365

  15. Update on small intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration. PMID:23922464

  16. A critical appraisal of lubiprostone in the treatment of chronic constipation in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Gras-Miralles, Beatriz; Cremonini, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common disorder in the general population, with higher prevalence in the elderly, and is associated with worse quality of life and with greater health care utilization. Lubiprostone is an intestinal type-2 chloride channel activator that increases intestinal fluid secretion, small intestinal transit, and stool passage. Lubiprostone is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation and of irritable bowel syndrome with predominant constipation. This review outlines current approaches and limitations in the treatment of chronic constipation in the elderly and discusses the results, limitations, and applicability of randomized, controlled trials of lubiprostone that have been conducted in the general and elderly population, with additional focus on the use of lubiprostone in constipation in Parkinson’s disease and in opioid-induced constipation, two clinical entities that can be comorbid in elderly patients. PMID:23439964

  17. Irgm1-deficient mice exhibit Paneth cell abnormalities and increased susceptibility to acute intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Gulati, Ajay S.; Cantillana, Viviana; Henry, Stanley C.; Schmidt, Elyse A.; Daniell, Xiaoju; Grossniklaus, Emily; Schoenborn, Alexi A.; Sartor, R. Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the intestine that has been linked to numerous susceptibility genes, including the immunity-related GTPase (IRG) M (IRGM). IRGs comprise a family of proteins known to confer resistance to intracellular infections through various mechanisms, including regulation of phagosome processing, cell motility, and autophagy. However, despite its association with CD, the role of IRGM and other IRGs in regulating intestinal inflammation is unclear. We investigated the involvement of Irgm1, an ortholog of IRGM, in the genesis of murine intestinal inflammation. After dextran sodium sulfate exposure, Irgm1-deficient [Irgm1 knockout (KO)] mice showed increased acute inflammation in the colon and ileum, with worsened clinical responses. Marked alterations of Paneth cell location and granule morphology were present in Irgm1 KO mice, even without dextran sodium sulfate exposure, and were associated with impaired mitophagy and autophagy in Irgm1 KO intestinal cells (including Paneth cells). This was manifested by frequent tubular and swollen mitochondria and increased LC3-positive autophagic structures. Interestingly, these LC3-positive structures often contained Paneth cell granules. These results suggest that Irgm1 modulates acute inflammatory responses in the mouse intestine, putatively through the regulation of gut autophagic processes, that may be pivotal for proper Paneth cell functioning. PMID:23989005

  18. Intestinal Obstruction Due to Idiopathic Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ridvan; Akbulut, Sami; Babur, Mehmet; Demircan, Firat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is characterized by partial or complete encasement of small intestine by a thick fibrocollagenous membrane. Depending on underlying causes, SEP is divided into primary and secondary forms. Idiopathic SEP is also called idiopathic or abdominal cocoon syndrome. Herein we presented a case of idiopathic SEP. Case Presentation: A 90-year-old male patient presented to our emergency department with signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction and dehydration. Physical examination findings, patient's age and plain abdominal radiography were consistent with tumoral obstruction or viscus perforation. Explorative laparotomy revealed a fibrous capsule encasing intestines as well as dense adhesions between intestinal loops. Since the overall condition of the patient was not well enough to allow a wide dissection and membrane excision, the operation was terminated after performing a limited loop ileostomy. Unfortunately, the patient was lost due to organ failure at the postoperative period. Conclusions: Despite advances in radiological techniques, the exact diagnosis in many cases is still made according to intraoperative findings and histopathological properties of the excised membrane. While some cases of SEP remain asymptomatic for years, most cases are characterized by recurrent bouts of acute, subacute or chronic intestinal obstruction. To our knowledge, the case presented here is the oldest patient with idiopathic SEP in the literature. PMID:26082852

  19. The intestinal microbiota in health and disease: the influence of microbial products on immune cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Artis, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review A vast and diverse array of microbes colonizes the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. These microorganisms are integral in shaping the development and function of the immune system. Metagenomic sequencing analysis has revealed alterations in intestinal microbiota in patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. This review will discuss the mechanisms through which the innate immune system recognizes and responds to the intestinal microbiota as well as the effect of specific microbiota-derived signals on immune cell homeostasis. Recent findings Recent studies in murine model systems have demonstrated that manipulation of the intestinal microbiota can alter mammalian immune cell homeostasis. Specific microbial signals have been identified that can impact immune cell function both within the intestinal tract and in peripheral tissues. These microbiota-derived signals can either have an immunoregulatory effect, creating an immune state that is refractory to inflammation, or conversely, act as an adjuvant, aiding in the propagation of an immune response. Summary Associations between alterations in the microbiota and human disease implicate intestinal microbial signals in shaping immune responses. These signals are recognized by innate immune cells and influence the ability of these cells to modulate both the local and systemic immune response. PMID:19770652

  20. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Robert A; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S; Buffa, Jennifer A; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T; Britt, Earl B; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D; DiDonato, Joseph A; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J Mark; Krauss, Ronald M; Tang, W H Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-05-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline and phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We demonstrate here that metabolism by intestinal microbiota of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice. Omnivorous human subjects produced more TMAO than did vegans or vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. The presence of specific bacterial taxa in human feces was associated with both plasma TMAO concentration and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predicted increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA and TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but this did not occur if intestinal microbiota was concurrently suppressed. In mice with an intact intestinal microbiota, dietary supplementation with TMAO or either carnitine or choline reduced in vivo reverse cholesterol transport. Intestinal microbiota may thus contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and CVD risk. PMID:23563705

  1. Intestinal Permeability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Pathogenesis, Clinical Evaluation, and Therapy of Leaky Gut

    PubMed Central

    Michielan, Andrea; D'Incà, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial with data suggesting the role of a disturbed interaction between the gut and the intestinal microbiota. A defective mucosal barrier may result in increased intestinal permeability which promotes the exposition to luminal content and triggers an immunological response that promotes intestinal inflammation. IBD patients display several defects in the many specialized components of mucosal barrier, from the mucus layer composition to the adhesion molecules that regulate paracellular permeability. These alterations may represent a primary dysfunction in Crohn's disease, but they may also perpetuate chronic mucosal inflammation in ulcerative colitis. In clinical practice, several studies have documented that changes in intestinal permeability can predict IBD course. Functional tests, such as the sugar absorption tests or the novel imaging technique using confocal laser endomicroscopy, allow an in vivo assessment of gut barrier integrity. Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy reduces mucosal inflammation and restores intestinal permeability in IBD patients. Butyrate, zinc, and some probiotics also ameliorate mucosal barrier dysfunction but their use is still limited and further studies are needed before considering permeability manipulation as a therapeutic target in IBD. PMID:26582965

  2. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Robert A.; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S.; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J. Mark; Krauss, Ronald M.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline/phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Herein we demonstrate that intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis. Omnivorous subjects are shown to produce significantly more TMAO than vegans/vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. Specific bacterial taxa in human feces are shown to associate with both plasma TMAO and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predict increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (MI, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice significantly altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA/TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but not following suppression of intestinal microbiota. Dietary supplementation of TMAO, or either carnitine or choline in mice with intact intestinal microbiota, significantly reduced reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. Intestinal microbiota may thus participate in the well-established link between increased red meat consumption and CVD risk. PMID:23563705

  3. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePLUS

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Cause of CML is related to an abnormal chromosome called the Philadelphia chromosome. Radiation exposure can increase the risk of developing ...

  4. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sleep and Sleep Disorders Share Compartir Sleep and Chronic Disease As chronic diseases have assumed an increasingly common role in premature ... sleep health in the development and management of chronic diseases has grown. Notably, insufficient sleep has been linked ...

  5. Identification of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activities within Intestinal Mucosa of Clinically Healthy Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HANIFEH, Mohsen; RAJAMÄKI, Minna M; MÄKITALO, Laura; SYRJÄ, Pernilla; SANKARI, Satu; KILPINEN, Susanne; SPILLMANN, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 are zinc-dependent endopeptidases that contribute to the control of breakdown and reconstitution of extracellular matrix under both normal and pathological conditions. The main objective of this study was to identify the presence of MMP-2 and -9 in the mucosa of the small and large intestines of clinically healthy beagle dogs using gelatin zymography technique. Intestinal mucosa samples from four different parts of the intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon) were taken from 12 healthy laboratory beagle dogs and examined histologically. Based on WSAVA histology standards, recorded findings of all samples were considered insignificant. Pro-MMP-2 and -9 activities were found in 17/48 (35%) and 25/48 (52%) of the samples, respectively. Among four different parts of the intestine of 12 dogs, the ileum had the highest positivity rates of 7/12 (58.3%) and 8/12 (66.7%) for pro-MMP-2 and -9 activities, respectively. However, statistical analysis showed no significant difference of pro-MMP-2 and -9 activities between the separate parts of the intestine (P>0.05). None of the intestinal samples showed gelatinolytic activity corresponding to the control bands of active MMP-2 and MMP-9. This study showed that pro-MMP-2 and -9 could be detected in the intestinal mucosa of healthy dogs using zymography, which seems to be a useful tool to evaluate the role of MMP-2 and -9 in the pathogenesis of canine chronic enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:24748420

  6. Shaping the intestinal brush border.

    PubMed

    Crawley, Scott W; Mooseker, Mark S; Tyska, Matthew J

    2014-11-24

    Epithelial cells from diverse tissues, including the enterocytes that line the intestinal tract, remodel their apical surface during differentiation to form a brush border: an array of actin-supported membrane protrusions known as microvilli that increases the functional capacity of the tissue. Although our understanding of how epithelial cells assemble, stabilize, and organize apical microvilli is still developing, investigations of the biochemical and physical underpinnings of these processes suggest that cells coordinate cytoskeletal remodeling, membrane-cytoskeleton cross-linking, and extracellular adhesion to shape the apical brush border domain. PMID:25422372

  7. Shaping the intestinal brush border

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, Scott W.; Mooseker, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells from diverse tissues, including the enterocytes that line the intestinal tract, remodel their apical surface during differentiation to form a brush border: an array of actin-supported membrane protrusions known as microvilli that increases the functional capacity of the tissue. Although our understanding of how epithelial cells assemble, stabilize, and organize apical microvilli is still developing, investigations of the biochemical and physical underpinnings of these processes suggest that cells coordinate cytoskeletal remodeling, membrane-cytoskeleton cross-linking, and extracellular adhesion to shape the apical brush border domain. PMID:25422372

  8. [Chronic constipation. Use of cisapride].

    PubMed

    Uzcategui Arauz, A; Arias Guzman, Y; Jaen, D

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effect of Cisapride (10 mg vo every 8 hours) on the characteristics of the evacuations, orocoecal transit time and motility trough rectoanal manometry in patients diagnosed with chronic constipation. The patients (N = 51) received placebo and/or drug in a controlled, randomized, double blind, crossed study during two treatment phases of 30 days each. The end of each phase was followed by a clinical evaluation, a rectoanal manometry and hydrogen breath test. Cisapride increased the rhythm of ecacuations (5.53 days +/- 3.11 vs 1.59 days +/- 1.15 p < 0.05) improved the frequency of evacuations and diminished the consistency of the feces (p < 0.05), shortened the orocoecal transit time (271.57 min +/- 9.87 vs 201.18 min +/- 29.30 p < 0.05) and improved the parameters of the rectoanal manometry readings such as the pressure of internal anal sphincter (58.14 mmHg 7.33 vs 53.90 mmHg 5.19 p < 0.05), and its relaxation percentage (73.41% +/- 15.30 vs 66.84% +/- 11.83 p < 0.05). Side effects associated with Cisapride were not significant. It is concluded that Cisapride improves intestinal motility in chronic constipation. PMID:8598260

  9. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ratnaike, R N

    2003-07-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption occurs from skin contact and inhalation. Arsenic exerts its toxicity by inactivating up to 200 enzymes, especially those involved in cellular energy pathways and DNA synthesis and repair. Acute arsenic poisoning is associated initially with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and severe diarrhoea. Encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy are reported. Chronic arsenic toxicity results in multisystem disease. Arsenic is a well documented human carcinogen affecting numerous organs. There are no evidence based treatment regimens to treat chronic arsenic poisoning but antioxidants have been advocated, though benefit is not proven. The focus of management is to reduce arsenic ingestion from drinking water and there is increasing emphasis on using alternative supplies of water. PMID:12897217

  10. CHRONIC URTICARIA

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Sandeep; Gupta, Vibhanshu; Amin, Syed Suhail; Tahseen, Mohd

    2011-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a disturbing allergic condition of the skin. Although frequently benign, it may sometimes be a red flag sign of a serious internal disease. A multitude of etiologies have been implicated in the causation of CU, including physical, infective, vasculitic, psychological and idiopathic. An autoimmune basis of most of the ‘idiopathic’ forms is now hypothesized. Histamine released from mast cells is the major effector in pathogenesis and it is clinically characterized by wheals that have a tendency to recur. Laboratory investigations aimed at a specific etiology are not always conclusive, though may be suggestive of an underlying condition. A clinical search for associated systemic disease is strongly advocated under appropriate circumstances. The mainstay of treatment remains H1 antihistaminics. These may be combined with complementary pharmacopeia in the form of H2 blockers, doxepin, nifedipine and leukotriene inhibitors. More radical therapy in the form of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide may be required for recalcitrant cases. Autologous transfusion and alternative remedies like acupuncture have prospects for future. A stepwise management results in favorable outcomes. An update on CU based on our experience with patients at a tertiary care centre is presented. PMID:22345759

  11. Intestinal Microbiome and Lymphoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation. Our immune system protects us from pathogenic microbes at the same time that our bodies are host to trillions of microbes, symbionts, mutualists, and some that are essential to human health. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models have played an important role in elucidating the causation and establishing the mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review, we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to investigate links between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and have helped to reveal the mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there is a paucity of published studies demonstrating the interplay between the microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that the connection is real and that it can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and to improve the prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:24855006

  12. Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25257357

  13. Intestinal mucosa in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Iancu, T C; Lerner, A; Shiloh, H

    1987-01-01

    The major manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis are renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D-resistant rickets, and dwarfism. Cystine crystals are deposited in a variety of cells, mainly phagocytic, including macrophages of the intestinal lamina propria. Previously, ultrastructural changes were suggested to occur in the absorptive epithelium as well, possibly as a result of local cystine toxicity. We report here on the light- and electron-microscopic findings in the jejunal mucosa of two patients, aged 4 and 9 years with nephropathic cystinosis. Cystine crystals were easily identified in semithin sections of plastic-embedded specimens as brick- and hexagon-shaped spaces in macrophages. Electron microscopy showed that all crystals were in single-membrane-limited bodies (lysosomes), within phagocytic cells, and exclusively located in the lamina propria. In contrast to previous findings, the absorptive epithelium showed no abnormalities. We conclude that the growth failure in cystinosis is not a consequence of morphological toxic alterations in the intestinal epithelium, but is related to the known metabolic abnormalities of this condition. The use of rectal suction biopsy as a means of diagnosing cystinosis is also suggested as an alternative to other diagnostic methods. PMID:3430244

  14. Bacterial colonization and intestinal mucosal barrier development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Zhong; Zhu, Li-Bin; Li, Zhong-Rong; Lin, Jing

    2013-11-01

    The intestinal tract is colonized soon after birth with a variety of ingested environmental and maternal microflora. This process is influenced by many factors including mode of delivery, diet, environment, and the use of antibiotics. Normal intestinal microflora provides protection against infection, ensures tolerance to foods, and contributes to nutrient digestion and energy harvest. In addition, enteral feeding and colonization with the normal commensal flora are necessary for the maintenance of intestinal barrier function and play a vital role in the regulation of intestinal barrier function. Intestinal commensal microorganisms also provide signals that foster normal immune system development and influence the ensuing immune responses. There is increasingly recognition that alterations of the microbial gut flora and associated changes in intestinal barrier function may be related to certain diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the complex ecosystem of intestinal microbiota and its role in regulating intestinal barrier function and a few common pediatric diseases. Disruption in the establishment of a stable normal gut microflora may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, nosocomial infection, and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. PMID:25254174

  15. Bacterial colonization and intestinal mucosal barrier development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Zhong; Zhu, Li-Bin; Li, Zhong-Rong; Lin, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal tract is colonized soon after birth with a variety of ingested environmental and maternal microflora. This process is influenced by many factors including mode of delivery, diet, environment, and the use of antibiotics. Normal intestinal microflora provides protection against infection, ensures tolerance to foods, and contributes to nutrient digestion and energy harvest. In addition, enteral feeding and colonization with the normal commensal flora are necessary for the maintenance of intestinal barrier function and play a vital role in the regulation of intestinal barrier function. Intestinal commensal microorganisms also provide signals that foster normal immune system development and influence the ensuing immune responses. There is increasingly recognition that alterations of the microbial gut flora and associated changes in intestinal barrier function may be related to certain diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the complex ecosystem of intestinal microbiota and its role in regulating intestinal barrier function and a few common pediatric diseases. Disruption in the establishment of a stable normal gut microflora may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, nosocomial infection, and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. PMID:25254174

  16. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  17. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  18. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  19. Clinical radiology of the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Herlinger, H.; Maglinte, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book discussed embryology, anatomy, physiology, and immunology of the small intestine. Radiographic procedures in the small intestine especially enterolysis are presented. Focus is on the role of other types of imaging techniques including sonography, computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, angiography, biopsy, and enteroscopy.

  20. Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Diseases: Pharmacological Implications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of studies show that alterations in intestinal microbiota are linked with metabolic diseases. Here, we propose that intestinal microbiota regulation by polyphenols may be an important mechanism underlying their therapeutic benefits for metabolic diseases. This helps elucidate the intriguing pharmacology of polyphenols and optimize the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26706621

  1. Intestinal malabsorption in infants with histiocytosis X

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, J. W.; Harries, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    An infant with histiocytosis X had unequivocal evidence of intestinal malabsorption which was associated with histiocytic infiltration of the small intestine. 11 other fatal cases where histological material from the gastrointestinal tract was available are reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4703064

  2. Mercury methylation by fish intestinal contents.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, J W; Furutani, A; Turner, M A

    1980-01-01

    A new radiochemical method has been applied to the examination of mercury methylation in fish intestinal contents. Intestinal contents of six freshwater fish species were found capable of converting 203Hg2+ to CH3203Hg+. This activity was observed in fish from five of six lakes tested whether or not there was mercury pollution. Bacterial activity in the intestinal contents is most likely responsible for this methylation. Methylating activity of piscivors increased with decreasing quantity of intestinal contents. Generally, pike and walleye intestinal contents methylated a larger fraction of 203Hg2+ than those of whitefish and suckers. These data contradict the previous general conclusion that there is no mercury methylation in fish. PMID:7425625

  3. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives, due to their amphipathic characteristics. BAs are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver via transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated. The transport and synthesis of BAs are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors. In addition to their primary effect, BAs have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer, intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport. BAs are not equivalent in any of these biological activities, and structural requirements have been generally identified. In particular, some BAs may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease, although further research is necessary in this field. This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology. PMID:18837078

  4. Epithelial cell contributions to intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lora V

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial surfaces of the mammalian intestine interface directly with the external environment and thus continuously encounter pathogenic bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. The intestinal epithelium is also closely associated with complex communities of symbiotic microorganisms. Intestinal epithelial cells are thus faced with the unique challenge of directly interacting with enormous numbers of microbes that include both pathogens and symbionts. As a result, gut epithelia have evolved an array of strategies that contribute to host immunity. This chapter considers the various mechanisms used by epithelial cells to limit microbial invasion of host tissues, shape the composition of indigenous microbial communities, and coordinate the adaptive immune response to microorganisms. Study of intestinal epithelial cells has contributed fundamental insights into intestinal immune homeostasis and has revealed how impaired epithelial cell function can contribute to inflammatory disease. PMID:25727289

  5. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  6. Intestinal permeability in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Humbert, P; Bidet, A; Treffel, P; Drobacheff, C; Agache, P

    1991-07-01

    A possible relationship between intestinal structure and function in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has recently brought about considerable interest. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intestinal permeability in psoriatic patients by comparing it with healthy controls. 15 psoriatic patients and 15 healthy volunteers entered the study. Intestinal permeability was evaluated using the 51Cr-labeled EDTA absorption test. The 24-h urine excretion of 51Cr-EDTA from psoriatic patients was 2.46 +/- 0.81%. These results differed significantly from controls (1.95 +/- 0.36%; P less than 0.05). The difference in intestinal permeability between psoriatic patients and controls could be due to alterations in the small intestinal epithelium of psoriatics. PMID:1911568

  7. The intestinal lesion of autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-08-01

    This editorial briefly reviews the significance of lymphoid nodular hyperplasia in the intestinal tract of children with autistic spectrum disorder. The distinction between physiological and pathological lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestinal tract is of importance in the context of a possible causative link with autism. A primary intestinal lesion may occur as part of the broad spectrum of immunological disorders to which autistic children are prone. This could result in increased intestinal permeability to peptides of dietary origin which may then lead to disruption of neuroregulatory mechanisms required for normal brain development. Alternatively, there could be a primary defect in the translocation and processing of factors derived from the intestinal lumen. These possibilities deserve further investigation and should not be lost in the fog of the controversy regarding the role of measles/mumps/rubella vaccination in the aetiology of autistic spectrum disorder. PMID:16003130

  8. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Oxidative Stress and Intestinal Lipid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleme, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disorder in the Caucasian people. It is due to the mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene located on the long arm of the chromosome 7, which encodes for CFTR protein. The latter, an adenosine triphosphate binding cassette, is a transmembrane chloride channel that is also involved in glutathione transport. As glutathione/glutathione disulfide constitutes the most important pool of cellular redox systems, CFTR defects could thus disrupt the intracellular redox balance. Resulting multisystemic diseases are essentially characterized by a chronic respiratory failure, a pancreatic insufficiency, an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), and inadequate levels of antioxidant vitamins. Recent Advances: The pathophysiology of CF is complex; however, several mechanisms are proposed, including oxidative stress (OxS) whose implication is recognized and has been clearly demonstrated in CF airways. Critical Issues: Little is known about OxS intrinsic triggers and its own involvement in intestinal lipid disorders. Despite the regular administration of pancreatic supplements, high-fat high-calorie diets, and antioxidant fat-soluble vitamins, there is a persistence of steatorrhea, EFAD, and harmful OxS. Intriguingly, several trials with elevated doses of antioxidant vitamins have not yielded significant improvements. Future Directions: The main sources and self-maintenance of OxS in CF should be clarified to improve treatment of patients. Therefore, this review will discuss the potential sources and study the mechanisms of OxS in the intestine, known to develop various complications, and its involvement in intestinal lipid disorders in CF patients. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 614–631. PMID:25611180

  9. Intestinal microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: Friend of foe?

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Francesca; Danese, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises from disruption of immune tolerance to the gut commensal microbiota, leading to chronic intestinal inflammation and mucosal damage in genetically predisposed hosts. In healthy individuals the intestinal microbiota have a symbiotic relationship with the host organism and possess important and unique functions, including a metabolic function (i.e. digestion of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, fermentation of undigestible carbohydrates with production of short chain fatty acids), a mucosal barrier function (i.e. by inhibiting pathogen invasion and strengthening epithelial barrier integrity), and an immune modulatory function (i.e. mucosal immune system priming and maintenance of intestinal epithelium homeostasis). A fine balance regulates the mechanism that allows coexistence of mammals with their commensal bacteria. In IBD this mechanism of immune tolerance is impaired because of several potential causative factors. The gut microbiota composition and activity of IBD patients are abnormal, with a decreased prevalence of dominant members of the human commensal microbiota (i.e. Clostridium IXa and IV groups, Bacteroides, bifidobacteria) and a concomitant increase in detrimental bacteria (i.e. sulphate-reducing bacteria, Escherichia coli). The observed dysbiosis is concomitant with defective innate immunity and bacterial killing (i.e. reduced mucosal defensins and IgA, malfunctioning phagocytosis) and overaggressive adaptive immune response (due to ineffective regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells), which are considered the basis of IBD pathogenesis. However, we still do not know how the interplay between these parameters causes the disease. Studies looking at gut microbial composition, epithelial integrity and mucosal immune markers in genotyped IBD populations are therefore warranted to shed light on this obscure pathogenesis. PMID:21350704

  10. Cerebral Scedosporium apiospermum infection presenting with intestinal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lin, D; Kamili, Q; Qurat-Ul-Ain, K; Lai, S; Musher, D M; Hamill, R

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of cerebral Scedosporium apiospermum infection presenting with intestinal manifestations in a 64-year-old male patient on immunosuppression for orthotopic liver transplantation. At admission, the patient's chief complaint was chronic watery diarrhea and he was found to have colonic ulcers on endoscopy. His hospital course was complicated by a tonic-clonic seizure caused by a left frontal brain abscess, with the causative agent being identified by culture. He was treated with lobectomy, high-dose intravenous voriconazole, and liposomal amphotericin with clinical, endoscopic, and histologic improvement. To our knowledge, S. apiospermum has not been previously described as a cause of colitis. The septate branching appearance of the Scedosporium species is similar to the more common Aspergillus species. This case of gastrointestinal Scedosporium brings into question previously reported cases of isolated gastrointestinal aspergillosis diagnosed by histopathology. Clinical suspicion for S. apiospermum must be maintained in immunosuppressed patients presenting with neurologic and gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:23440749

  11. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  12. Paneth cells in intestinal homeostasis and tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Roth, Sabrina; Franken, Patrick; Sacchetti, Andrea; Kremer, Andreas; Anderson, Kurt; Sansom, Owen; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem cell niches are often co-inhabited by cycling and quiescent stem cells. In the intestine, lineage tracing has identified Lgr5(+) cells as frequently cycling stem cells, whereas Bmi1(+), mTert(+), Hopx(+) and Lrig1(+) cells appear to be more quiescent. Here, we have applied a non-mutagenic and cell cycle independent approach to isolate and characterize small intestinal label-retaining cells (LRCs) persisting in the lower third of the crypt of Lieberkühn for up to 100 days. LRCs do not express markers of proliferation and of enterocyte, goblet or enteroendocrine differentiation, but are positive for Paneth cell markers. While during homeostasis, LR/Paneth cells appear to play a supportive role for Lgr5(+) stem cells as previously shown, upon tissue injury they switch to a proliferating state and in the process activate Bmi1 expression while silencing Paneth-specific genes. Hence, they are likely to contribute to the regenerative process following tissue insults such as chronic inflammation. PMID:22745693

  13. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-01-01

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn’s disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment. PMID:25206258

  14. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-09-01

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn's disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment. PMID:25206258

  15. Oral Crohn’s disease without intestinal manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Harikishan, Gingisetty; Reddy, Nagate Raghavendra; Prasad, Harikrishnan; Anitha, Subappa

    2012-01-01

    Crohn?s disease is a granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease and was described in 1932 as a chronic granulomatous disorder of the terminal ileum and is now considered a distinct member of the inflammatory bowel disease family. It may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Oral Crohn?s disease has been reported frequently in the last three decades with or without intestinal manifestations. In the latter case, it is considered as one of the orofacial granulomatosis. There has been much doubt whether intestinal manifestations of Crohn?s disease will eventually develop in the orofacial granulomatosis. We present a female patient aged 22 years with prominent clinical findings such as persistent swelling of lower and upper lip with fissuring and angular cheilitis, granulomatous gingival enlargement, and cobblestone or corrugated appearance of labial mucosa, which are suggestive of Crohn?s disease, but with no evidence of other gastrointestinal involvement. The patient underwent surgical treatment with external gingivectomy procedure. A 6-month follow-up showed minimal recurrence. PMID:23066305

  16. Paneth Cells in Intestinal Homeostasis and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sabrina; Kremer, Andreas; Anderson, Kurt; Sansom, Owen; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem cell niches are often co-inhabited by cycling and quiescent stem cells. In the intestine, lineage tracing has identified Lgr5+ cells as frequently cycling stem cells, whereas Bmi1+, mTert+, Hopx+ and Lrig1+ cells appear to be more quiescent. Here, we have applied a non-mutagenic and cell cycle independent approach to isolate and characterize small intestinal label-retaining cells (LRCs) persisting in the lower third of the crypt of Lieberkühn for up to 100 days. LRCs do not express markers of proliferation and of enterocyte, goblet or enteroendocrine differentiation, but are positive for Paneth cell markers. While during homeostasis, LR/Paneth cells appear to play a supportive role for Lgr5+ stem cells as previously shown, upon tissue injury they switch to a proliferating state and in the process activate Bmi1 expression while silencing Paneth-specific genes. Hence, they are likely to contribute to the regenerative process following tissue insults such as chronic inflammation. PMID:22745693

  17. Functional Aerophagia in Children: A Frequent, Atypical Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Giuliana; Romeo, Claudia; Romano, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Aerophagia is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by repetitive air swallowing, abdominal distension, belching and flatulence. Pathologic aerophagia is a condition caused by the swallowing of excessive volumes of air with associated various gastrointestinal symptoms, such as burping, abdominal cramps, flatulence and a reduced appetite. It is a clinical entity that can simulate pediatric gastrointestinal motility disorders, such as gastroparesis, megacolon and intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and presents more frequently in children with mental retardation. Early recognition and diagnosis of functional aerophagia or pathologic aerophagia is required to avoid unnecessary, expensive diagnostic investigations or serious clinical complications. Functional aerophagia is frequent in the adult population, but rarely discussed in the pediatric literature. We present two pediatric clinical cases with a history of functional constipation in whom gaseous abdominal distension was the most important symptom. Mechanical intestinal obstruction, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, malabsorption and congenital aganglionic megacolon were ruled out. Extensive gaseous abdominal distension was due to aerophagia, and treatment consisted of parents’ reassurance and psychological counseling. PMID:24847194

  18. Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Better Method for Diagnosing Chronic Schistosoma mansoni Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas Hamed; Mohamed, Rabie M.; Belal, Usama S.; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M.; Naoi, Koji; Norose, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    For more effective diagnosis of the acute and chronic stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection in humans, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was compared with the Kato-Katz method. A total of 150 stool samples were collected from inpatient and outpatient clinics at the Department of Tropical Medicine, Minia University Hospital, Egypt. Three groups of patients, 50 with acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 70 with chronic intestinal schistosomiasis and 30 normal healthy controls were studied. Stool samples were analyzed by PCR and the Kato-Katz method. The mean number of eggs per gram of feces was 4.6 when estimated by the Kato-Katz method in positive stool samples from acute schistosomiasis cases but only 1.7 in chronic cases. In acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 15 and 45 out of 50 cases were positive by Kato-Katz and PCR, respectively. In the chronic intestinal schistosomiasis cases, 6 and 68 out of 70 cases were positive by the Kato-Katz and PCR methods, respectively. We conclude that PCR appears to be an effective diagnostic technique for S. mansoni infection, especially where a low worm burden exists, such as in chronic cases. PMID:26865821

  19. Blocking peripheral serotonin synthesis by telotristat etiprate (LX1032/LX1606) reduces severity of both chemical- and infection-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janice J; Wang, Huaqing; Terc, Joshua D; Zambrowicz, Brian; Yang, Qi M; Khan, Waliul I

    2015-09-15

    Mucosal inflammation is accompanied by an alteration in 5-HT. Intestinal 5-HT synthesis is catalyzed by tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and we have shown that mice deficient in this rate-limiting enzyme have reduced severity of intestinal inflammation in models of chemical-induced experimental colitis. Here, we investigated the effect of blocking peripheral 5-HT synthesis in generation of intestinal inflammation by a using peripheral Tph inhibitor, telotristat etiprate (LX1606), in models of intestinal inflammation. LX1606 was given orally either prophylactically or therapeutically to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis or with infection with Trichuris muris. Severity of intestinal inflammation was measured by assessment of disease activity scores, histological damage, and MPO and inflammatory cytokine levels. LX1606 significantly reduced intestinal 5-HT levels and delayed onset and severity of DSS-induced acute and chronic colitis. This was associated with decreased MPO and proinflammatory cytokine levels compared with vehicle-treated controls. In the infection-induced inflammation model, treatment with LX1606 enhanced worm expulsion as well as increased IL-10 production and goblet cell numbers. LX1606-treated mice had significantly lower MPO and IL-1β levels compared with controls postinfection. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT plays an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the generation of immune responses. Pharmacological reduction of peripheral 5-HT may serve as a potential strategy for modulating various intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26206858

  20. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral ?-opioid receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral ?-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by ?-opioid antagonist ?-funaltrexamine, but not by ?- and ?-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment. PMID:26712376

  1. CDX1 confers intestinal phenotype on gastric epithelial cells via induction of stemness-associated reprogramming factors SALL4 and KLF5.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yumiko; Yoshihashi, Kyoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Mutoh, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Shin; Yamagata, Yukinori; Seto, Yasuyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2012-12-11

    Intestinal metaplasia of the stomach, a mucosal change characterized by the conversion of gastric epithelium into an intestinal phenotype, is a precancerous lesion from which intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma arises. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of gastric intestinal metaplasia, and aberrant induction by H. pylori of the intestine-specific caudal-related homeobox (CDX) transcription factors, CDX1 and CDX2, plays a key role in this metaplastic change. As such, a critical issue arises as to how these factors govern the cell- and tissue-type switching. In this study, we explored genes directly activated by CDX1 in gastric epithelial cells and identified stemness-associated reprogramming factors SALL4 and KLF5. Indeed, SALL4 and KLF5 were aberrantly expressed in the CDX1(+) intestinal metaplasia of the stomach in both humans and mice. In cultured gastric epithelial cells, sustained expression of CDX1 gave rise to the induction of early intestinal-stemness markers, followed by the expression of intestinal-differentiation markers. Furthermore, the induction of these markers was suppressed by inhibiting either SALL4 or KLF5 expression, indicating that CDX1-induced SALL4 and KLF5 converted gastric epithelial cells into tissue stem-like progenitor cells, which then transdifferentiated into intestinal epithelial cells. Our study places the stemness-related reprogramming factors as critical components of CDX1-directed transcriptional circuitries that promote intestinal metaplasia. Requirement of a transit through dedifferentiated stem/progenitor-like cells, which share properties in common with cancer stem cells, may underlie predisposition of intestinal metaplasia to neoplastic transformation. PMID:23112162

  2. Inflammasomes of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Mikael E; Maslowski, Kendle M; Maloy, Kevin J; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-08-01

    While the functional importance of inflammasomes in blood-derived cell types is well established, it remains poorly understood how inflammasomes in nonhematopoietic cells contribute to mucosal immunity. Recent studies have revealed functional roles of inflammasomes - particularly NAIP/NLRC4, NLRP6, and noncanonical caspase-4 (caspase-11) - within epithelial cells of the gut in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Here, we review and discuss these findings in the broader context of tissue compartment-specific mucosal immunity. We propose several models whereby activities of the intestinal epithelial inflammasomes converge on mechanisms to remove compromised epithelial cells, maintain host-microbiota mutualism, and communicate with immune cells of the underlying lamina propria. PMID:26166583

  3. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  4. Intestinal Microbiota, Obesity and Prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Barczynska, R; Bandurska, K; Slizewska, K; Litwin, M; Szalecki, M; Libudzisz, Z; Kapusniak, J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a significant increase in the prevalence of obesity in both children and adults. Obesity is a disease that has reached epidemic levels on a global scale. The development of obesity is associated with both environmental and genetic factors. Recent studies indicate that intestinal microorganisms play an important function in maintaining normal body weight. One of the objectives in the gut microbiota research is to determine the role it plays and can it be a reliable biomarker of disease risk, including the predisposition to obesity. This article discusses (1) the role of prebiotics and gut microbiota in maintaining a healthy body weight and (2) potential influence on the gut microbiota in the prevention and treatment of obesity. PMID:26373167

  5. Intestinal metabolism of fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Enser, M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The effect of concentration on the oxidation and incorporation into lipids of lauric acid and linoleic acid by rings of rat small intestine has been studied in vitro. 2. In the absence of glucose, the oxidation of lauric acid in the range 0·01–5·0mm showed a maximum at 0·1mm. In the presence of glucose the maximum was at 0·5mm. The oxidation of linoleic acid in the presence of glucose increased throughout the concentration range 0·01–5·0mm. 3. The incorporation of lauric acid into lipids was maximal at 0·5–0·6mm in the presence of glucose, but at 10mm in the absence of glucose. At 0·8mm-lauric acid, in the presence of glucose, over 75% of the incorporated lauric acid was in triglycerides, but at 10mm they only contained 30%. The incorporation of glucose carbon into glycerides paralleled the incorporation of lauric acid. 4. In the range 0·01–2·5mm-linoleic acid the quantity incorporated into lipids increased. In the range 0·01–0·4mm linoleic acid was incorporated predominantly into triglycerides, but between 0·4 and 1·0mm most was in diglycerides, and between 2·5 and 5·0mm most was in monoglycerides. 5. The relationship of fatty acid concentration to the mechanism of absorption is discussed, together with the correlation between the distribution of the absorbed fatty acids within the tissue lipids and the lipase activity of intestinal mucosa. PMID:5837779

  6. Intestinal microbiota, diet and health.

    PubMed

    Power, Susan E; O'Toole, Paul W; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F

    2014-02-01

    The human intestine is colonised by 10¹³ to 10¹⁴ micro-organisms, the vast majority of which belong to the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Although highly stable over time, the composition and activities of the microbiota may be influenced by a number of factors including age, diet and antibiotic treatment. Although perturbations in the composition or functions of the microbiota are linked to inflammatory and metabolic disorders (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome and obesity), it is unclear at this point whether these changes are a symptom of the disease or a contributing factor. A better knowledge of the mechanisms through which changes in microbiota composition (dysbiosis) promote disease states is needed to improve our understanding of the causal relationship between the gut microbiota and disease. While evidence of the preventive and therapeutic effects of probiotic strains on diarrhoeal illness and other intestinal conditions is promising, the exact mechanisms of the beneficial effects are not fully understood. Recent studies have raised the question of whether non-viable probiotic strains can confer health benefits on the host by influencing the immune system. As the potential health effect of these non-viable bacteria depends on whether the mechanism of this effect is dependent on viability, future research needs to consider each probiotic strain on a case-by-case basis. The present review provides a comprehensive, updated overview of the human gut microbiota, the factors influencing its composition and the role of probiotics as a therapeutic modality in the treatment and prevention of diseases and/or restoration of human health. PMID:23931069

  7. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPAR? signaling.

    PubMed

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPAR? target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPAR?-dependent processes also in the small intestine. PMID:23220585

  8. [Chronic trichinellosis and neuromuscular diseases: clinical, serological and therapeutic observations].

    PubMed

    Fröscher, W; Gullotta, F; Saathoff, M

    1982-09-24

    In six males with chronic neurological signs who, 14-41 years previously, had an episode of acute trichinellosis cardinal symptoms were chronic muscle pain and lower-neuron damage. Other findings, probably related to trichinellosis, were episodes of pyrexia, chronic gastro-intestinal and cardiac symptoms, and in one case symptomatic epilepsy with psychomotor attacks. Significant laboratory findings were a chronic leukocytosis in one case, repeated elevations of eosinophil count in three. Muscle biopsy in all patients revealed live trichinella and (or) focal myositis. The serological findings did not correlate with the biopsy ones. If the live trichinae are encapsulated, antibody titres may be negative, while they may be markedly elevated when the trichinellae are dead. Whether encapsulated larvae can be influenced by tiabendazol or mebendazol is not clear from these observations. PMID:7117159

  9. Zingerone regulates intestinal transit, attenuates behavioral and oxidative perturbations in irritable bowel disorder in rats.

    PubMed

    Banji, David; Banji, Otilia J F; Pavani, Bandlapalli; Kranthi Kumar, Ch; Annamalai, A R

    2014-03-15

    Stress can lead to the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal disorders, the most prominent being irritable bowel disorder. The present study investigated the impact zingerone in ameliorating chronic water stress induced irritable bowel disorder, brain gut axis dysfunction and dysregulation of the intestinal barrier due to oxidative stress. Rats were randomly allocated to groups and subjected to chronic water stress for a period of 21 days for 1h and the fecal pellet output was measured. At the end of chronic stress, behavioral assessment for anxiety like behavior was recorded and plasma corticosterone levels were measured 60min after water stress. The colonic transit was determined, levels of oxidative and antioxidant biomarkers were measured in the colon homogenate. Myeloperoxidase activity was determined as an indirect index of neutrophil infiltration. Chronic water stress increased the rate of colonic transit, fecal output, induced behavioral changes, and decreased antioxidant levels. An increase in lipid peroxide levels, catalase and corticosterone was observed. Mast cell infiltration was evident in the stressed group. Zingerone significantly reduced colonic transit, fecal output, neutrophil infiltration, and lipid peroxide formation. The levels of catalase were not altered; however, a marginal increase in the levels of glutathione peroxidase was observed. Zingerone significantly enhanced the levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione and decreased the levels of corticosterone. Zingerone produced marked improvement in stress induced irritable bowel disorder which could be attributed to the powerful antioxidant nature, direct effect on the intestinal smooth muscle and adaptogenic nature. PMID:24262066

  10. Disruption of the Circadian Clock in Mice Increases Intestinal Permeability and Promotes Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Pathology and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Cavanaugh, Kate; Tang, Yueming; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Song, Shiwen

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates temporal patterns of physiology and behavior relative to the environmental light:dark cycle by generating and organizing transcriptional and biochemical rhythms in cells and tissues throughout the body. Circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate the physiology and function of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier enables the translocation of proinflammatory bacterial products, such as endotoxin, across the intestinal wall and into systemic circulation; a process that has been linked to pathologic inflammatory states associated with metabolic, hepatic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases – many of which are commonly reported in shift workers. Here we report, for the first time, that circadian disorganization, using independent genetic and environmental strategies, increases permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier (i.e., gut leakiness) in mice. Utilizing chronic alcohol consumption as a well-established model of induced intestinal hyperpermeability, we also found that both genetic and environmental circadian disruption promote alcohol-induced gut leakiness, endotoxemia and steatohepatitis, possibly through a mechanism involving the tight junction protein occludin. Circadian organization thus appears critical for the maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity, especially in the context of injurious agents, such as alcohol. Circadian disruption may therefore represent a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease, as well as other conditions associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and an endotoxin-triggered inflammatory state. PMID:23825629

  11. Potential role of chitinases and chitin-binding proteins in host-microbial interactions during the development of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hoa T.; Barnich, Nicolas; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    Summary The small and large intestines contain an abundance of luminal antigens derived from food products and enteric microorganisms. The function of intestinal epithelial cells is tightly regulated by several factors produced by enteric bacteria and the epithelial cells themselves. Epithelial cells actively participate in regulating the homeostasis of intestine, and failure of this function leads to abnormal and host-microbial interactions resulting in the development of intestinal inflammation. Major determinants of host susceptibility against luminal commensal bacteria include genes regulating mucosal immune responses, intestinal barrier function and microbial defense. Of note, it has been postulated that commensal bacterial adhesion and invasion on/into host cells may be strongly involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). During the intestinal inflammation, the composition of the commensal flora is altered, with increased population of aggressive and detrimental bacteria and decreased populations of protective bacteria. In fact, some pathogenic bacteria, including Adherent Invasive Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Vibrio cholerae are likely to initiate their adhesion to the host cells by expressing accessory molecules such as chitinases and/or chitin-binding proteins on themselves. In addition, several inducible molecules (e.g., chitinase 3-like-1, CEACAM6) are also induced on the host cells (e.g. epithelial cells, lamina proprial macrophages) under inflammatory conditions, and are actively participated in the host-microbial interactions. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the potential roles of these important molecules during the development of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:21938682

  12. How the Intricate Interaction among Toll-Like Receptors, Microbiota, and Intestinal Immunity Can Influence Gastrointestinal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Frosali, Simona; Gambassi, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The gut is able to maintain tolerance to microbial and food antigens. The intestine minimizes the number of harmful bacteria by shaping the microbiota through a symbiotic relationship. In healthy human intestine, a constant homeostasis is maintained by the perfect regulation of microbial load and the immune response generated against it. Failure of this balance may result in various pathological conditions. Innate immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), may be considered an interface among intestinal epithelial barrier, microbiota, and immune system. TLRs pathway, activated by pathogens, is involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious and inflammatory diseases. The alteration of the homeostasis between physiologic and pathogenic bacteria of intestinal flora causes a condition called dysbiosis. The breakdown of homeostasis by dysbiosis may increase susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases. It is evident that environment, genetics, and host immunity form a highly interactive regulatory triad that controls TLR function. Imbalanced relationships within this triad may promote aberrant TLR signaling, critically contributing to acute and chronic intestinal inflammatory processes, such as in IBD, colitis, and colorectal cancer. The study of interactions between different components of the immune systems and intestinal microbiota will open new horizons in the knowledge of gut inflammation. PMID:26090491

  13. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  14. [Sciatic hernia as a cause of chronic pelvic pain].

    PubMed

    De los Ríos, José F; Calle, Gustavo; Castañeda, Juan D; Serna, Eduardo A; Vásquez, Ricardo A; Arango, Adriana M; López, Claudia C

    2013-04-01

    Sciatic hernia constitutes the scarcest group of hernias of pelvic floor; however, they should be considered in the origin of chronic pelvic pain. The proper diagnosis of sciatic hernias has allowed to surgeons treating successfully patients with acute or chronic pelvic pain, with intestinal or ureteral obstruction and with urinary or gluteus sepsis. It has to be considered as differential diagnosis before the finding of a congenital or acquired gluteus mass. Laparoscopist gynecologist should know the existence of this defect, to be familiar with its aspect in laparoscopic view and to know the laparoscopic treatment of this disease. PMID:23720933

  15. Vitamin D and Intestinal Calcium Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J.; Seth, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)2D3 can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed. PMID:21664413

  16. OSR1-sensitive small intestinal Na+ transport.

    PubMed

    Pasham, Venkanna; Pathare, Ganesh; Fajol, Abul; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Michael, Diana; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Alesutan, Ioana; Rotte, Anand; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2012-12-01

    The oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (OSR1) contributes to WNK (with no K)-dependent regulation of renal tubular salt transport, renal salt excretion, and blood pressure. Little is known, however, about a role of OSR1 in the regulation of intestinal salt transport. The present study thus explored whether OSR1 is expressed in intestinal tissue and whether small intestinal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), small intestinal Na(+)-glucose cotransport (SGLT1), and/or colonic epithelium Na(+) channel (ENaC) differ between knockin mice carrying one allele of WNK-resistant OSR1 (osr1(+/KI)) and wild-type mice (osr1(+/+)). OSR1 protein abundance was determined by Western blotting, cytosolic pH from BCECF fluorescence, NHE activity from Na(+)-dependent realkalinization following an ammonium pulse, SGLT1 activity from glucose-induced current, and colonic ENaC activity from amiloride-sensitive transepithelial current in Ussing chamber experiments. As a result, OSR1 protein was expressed in small intestine of both osr1(+/KI) mice and osr1(+/+) mice. Daily fecal Na(+), K(+), and H(2)O excretion and jejunal SGLT1 activity were lower, whereas small intestinal NHE activity and colonic ENaC activity were higher in osr1(+/KI) mice than in osr1(+/+) mice. NHE3 inhibitor S-3226 significantly reduced NHE activity in both genotypes but did not abrogate the difference between the genotypes. Plasma osmolarity, serum antidiuretic hormone, plasma aldosterone, and plasma corticosterone concentrations were similar in both genotypes. Small intestinal NHE3 and colonic α-ENaC protein abundance were not significantly different between genotypes, but colonic phospho-β-ENaC (ser633) was significantly higher in osr1(+/KI) mice. In conclusion, OSR1 is expressed in intestine and partial WNK insensitivity of OSR1 increases intestinal NHE activity and colonic ENaC activity. PMID:23019198

  17. Intestinal absorption and metabolism of xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    1979-01-01

    There are five possible processes of intestinal absorption of xenobiotics. These are active transport, passive diffusions, pinocytosis, filtration through “pores,” and lymphatic absorption. The passive diffusion is major process for transport of foreign chemicals across the intestine. Though the lymphatic absorption of drugs is not of any major therapeutic significance, the uptake of toxic chemicals such as 3-MC, benzpyrene, and DDT through lymphatics may enhance their toxicity, since they are distributed to other organ systems in the body without being metabolized by liver. A number of factors such as diet, motility of intestine, interference with gastrointestinal flora, changes in the rate of gastric emptying, age of the animal, and dissolution rate of xenobiotic can alter the rate of absorption of chemicals. Liver is the major site of metabolism of xenobiotics, but the contribution of intestinal metabolism of xenobiotic can influence the overall bioavailability of chemicals. The xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes located in endoplasmic reticulum of intestine possess biochemical characteristics similar to that of liver. In general, the rate of metabolism of xenobiotics by intestinal microsomal preparation is lower than that observed with similar hepatic microsomal preparations. The in vitro intestinal metabolism of xenobiotics is affected by several factors including age, sex, diurnal variations, species, and nutritional status of the animal. The intestinal xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are stimulated by the pretreatment of animals with foreign chemicals, but this depends on the route of administration of chemicals, drug substrate and the animal species used. Rabbit intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes seem to be resistant to induction by foreign chemicals. PMID:540626

  18. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Cenit, María Carmen; Olivares, Marta; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Sanz, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD) patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD), compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant’s gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc.) could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections) in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis. PMID:26287240

  19. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    PubMed

    Cenit, María Carmen; Olivares, Marta; Codoñer-Franch, Pilar; Sanz, Yolanda

    2015-08-01

    It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD) patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD), compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant's gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc.) could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections) in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis. PMID:26287240

  20. Intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hamid M.

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the mechanisms and regulation of intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins under normal physiological conditions, and of the factors/conditions that affect and interfere with theses processes has been significantly expanded in recent years as a result of the availability of a host of valuable molecular/cellular tools. Although structurally and functionally unrelated, the water-soluble vitamins share the feature of being essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development, and that their deficiency leads to a variety of clinical abnormalities that range from anaemia to growth retardation and neurological disorders. Humans cannot synthesize water-soluble vitamins (with the exception of some endogenous synthesis of niacin) and must obtain these micronutrients from exogenous sources. Thus body homoeostasis of these micronutrients depends on their normal absorption in the intestine. Interference with absorption, which occurs in a variety of conditions (e.g. congenital defects in the digestive or absorptive system, intestinal disease/resection, drug interaction and chronic alcohol use), leads to the development of deficiency (and sub-optimal status) and results in clinical abnormalities. It is well established now that intestinal absorption of the water-soluble vitamins ascorbate, biotin, folate, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin and thiamin is via specific carrier-mediated processes. These processes are regulated by a variety of factors and conditions, and the regulation involves transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional mechanisms. Also well recognized now is the fact that the large intestine possesses specific and efficient uptake systems to absorb a number of water-soluble vitamins that are synthesized by the normal microflora. This source may contribute to total body vitamin nutrition, and especially towards the cellular nutrition and health of the local colonocytes. The present review aims to outline our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in intestinal absorption of water-soluble vitamins, their regulation, the cell biology of the carriers involved and the factors that negatively affect these absorptive events. PMID:21749321

  1. Investigation of coco-glucoside as a novel intestinal permeation enhancer in rat models.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Tanira A S; Rosa, Mónica; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Coulter, Ivan; Brayden, David J

    2014-11-01

    Due to instability in the GI tract and low intestinal permeability, peptides invariably have oral bioavailabilities below 1% and this has prevented the development of oral formulations. A mild plant-derived naturalalkyl polyglycoside (APG), coco-glucoside (CG), was studied for its capacity to enable rat intestinal permeation of the paracellular sugar marker, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000 (FD4), across isolated rat jejunal and colonic mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers, as well as the polypeptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT) following intra-intestinal instillations in rats. 0.1% (w/v) CG enabled a 2.9-fold increase in the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of FD4 over the basal Papp across colonic mucosae, but it was without effect in jejunal mucosae. In situ intestinal instillations revealed that although sCT was absorbed across rat colonic loops to a greater extent than jejunal, CG still improved sCT absolute bioavailability(F) from both segments. Histopathology of rat intestinal mucosae following exposure to CG indicated only minor perturbation with adequate maintenance of secretory function. High content analysis(HCA) on Caco-2 showed that acute and chronic exposure to a range of concentrations of CG did not cause sub-lethal damage at concentrations at which it was effective as an enhancer. Overall, CG increased bioavailability of sCT across rat jejunal and colonic loops without indication of tissue damage. Thus, CG has potential as a safe and effective intestinal enhancer for oral delivery of proteins and peptides. PMID:25445305

  2. [Multilocular tumors of small intestine (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, H F; Westhoff, D; Stein, P; Sturm, G

    1975-09-01

    Tumors of small intestine can be recognized in time and evaluated histologically by means of roentgenographic and endoscopical-bioptic methods, respectively. Among radiologic techniques, the double contrast examination of the small intestine has especially high diagnostic value. On the other hand, selective angiography reveals bleeding of accompanying small intestinal tumors. Out of 23 patients with these tumors -- diagnosed in the Medical Department of the Erlangen University from 1968 to July 1974 -- there was one case with multilocular occurrence; the diagnostic efficiency of double contrast technique proved to be particularly suitable in this patient. PMID:1188091

  3. Uterine Rotation: A Cause of Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Narbona, Isidoro; Cohen, Isaac; Villegas, Emilia; Cuenca, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is an uncommon surgical emergency during pregnancy that affects seriously the prognosis of gestation. The underlying cause can be identified in the majority of cases and usually consists of adhesions secondary to previous abdominal or pelvic surgery, followed in order of frequency by intestinal volvuli. In recent years there have been no reports in which the gravid uterus has been the cause of intestinal obstruction. We report the case of a woman in week 33 + 4 of pregnancy who developed extrinsic compression of the colon secondary to uterine rotation and pelvic impaction of the head of the fetus. PMID:23781360

  4. Gut inflammation in chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating disease characterized by unexplained disabling fatigue and a combination of accompanying symptoms the pathology of which is incompletely understood. Many CFS patients complain of gut dysfunction. In fact, patients with CFS are more likely to report a previous diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common functional disorder of the gut, and experience IBS-related symptoms. Recently, evidence for interactions between the intestinal microbiota, mucosal barrier function, and the immune system have been shown to play a role in the disorder's pathogenesis. Studies examining the microecology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have identified specific microorganisms whose presence appears related to disease; in CFS, a role for altered intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of the disease has recently been suggested. Mucosal barrier dysfunction promoting bacterial translocation has also been observed. Finally, an altered mucosal immune system has been associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss the interplay between these factors in CFS and how they could play a significant role in GI dysfunction by modulating the activity of the enteric nervous system, the intrinsic innervation of the gut. If an altered intestinal microbiota, mucosal barrier dysfunction, and aberrant intestinal immunity contribute to the pathogenesis of CFS, therapeutic efforts to modify gut microbiota could be a means to modulate the development and/or progression of this disorder. For example, the administration of probiotics could alter the gut microbiota, improve mucosal barrier function, decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines, and have the potential to positively influence mood in patients where both emotional symptoms and inflammatory immune signals are elevated. Probiotics also have the potential to improve gut motility, which is dysfunctional in many CFS patients. PMID:20939923

  5. Peptidases Compartmentalized to the Ascaris suum Intestinal Lumen and Apical Intestinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode intestine is a tissue of interest for developing new methods of therapy and control of parasitic nematodes. However, biological details of intestinal cell functions remain obscure, as do the proteins and molecular functions located on the apical intestinal membrane (AIM), and within the intestinal lumen (IL) of nematodes. Accordingly, methods were developed to gain a comprehensive identification of peptidases that function in the intestinal tract of adult female Ascaris suum. Peptidase activity was detected in multiple fractions of the A. suum intestine under pH conditions ranging from 5.0 to 8.0. Peptidase class inhibitors were used to characterize these activities. The fractions included whole lysates, membrane enriched fractions, and physiological- and 4 molar urea-perfusates of the intestinal lumen. Concanavalin A (ConA) was confirmed to bind to the AIM, and intestinal proteins affinity isolated on ConA-beads were compared to proteins from membrane and perfusate fractions by mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine predicted peptidases were identified including aspartic, cysteine, and serine peptidases, and an unexpectedly high number (16) of metallopeptidases. Many of these proteins co-localized to multiple fractions, providing independent support for localization to specific intestinal compartments, including the IL and AIM. This unique perfusion model produced the most comprehensive view of likely digestive peptidases that function in these intestinal compartments of A. suum, or any nematode. This model offers a means to directly determine functions of these proteins in the A. suum intestine and, more generally, deduce the wide array functions that exist in these cellular compartments of the nematode intestine. PMID:25569475

  6. Increased intestinal vitamin D receptor in genetic hypercalciuric rats. A cause of intestinal calcium hyperabsorption.

    PubMed

    Li, X Q; Tembe, V; Horwitz, G M; Bushinsky, D A; Favus, M J

    1993-02-01

    In humans, familial or idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH) is a common cause of hypercalciuria and predisposes to calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Intestinal calcium hyperabsorption is a constant feature of IH and may be due to either a vitamin D-independent process in the intestine, a primary overproduction of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], or a defect in renal tubular calcium reabsorption. Selective breeding of spontaneously hypercalciuric male and female Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in offspring with hypercalciuria, increased intestinal calcium absorption, and normal serum 1,25(OH)2D3 levels. The role of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the regulation of intestinal calcium absorption was explored in 10th generation male genetic IH rats and normocalciuric controls. Urine calcium excretion was greater in IH rats than controls (2.9 +/- 0.3 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg/24 h, P < 0.001). IH rat intestine contained twice the abundance of VDR compared with normocalciuric controls (536 +/- 73 vs. 243 +/- 42 nmol/mg protein, P < 0.001), with no difference in the affinity of the receptor for its ligand. Comparable migration of IH and normal intestinal VDR on Western blots and of intestinal VDR mRNA by Northern analysis suggests that the VDR in IH rat intestine is not due to large deletion or addition mutations of the wild-type VDR. IH rat intestine contained greater concentrations of vitamin D-dependent calbindin 9-kD protein. The present studies strongly suggest that increased intestinal VDR number and normal levels of circulating 1,25(OH)2D3 result in increased functional VDR-1,25(OH)2D3 complexes, which exert biological actions in enterocytes to increase intestinal calcium transport. Intestinal calcium hyperabsorption in the IH rat may be the first example of a genetic disorder resulting from a pathologic increase in VDR. PMID:8381825

  7. Apple-peel intestinal atresia: enteroplasty for intestinal lengthening and primary anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Onofre, Luciano Silveira; Maranhão, Renato Frota de Albuquerque; Martins, Elaine Cristina Soares; Fachin, Camila Girardi; Martins, Jose Luiz

    2013-06-01

    Apple-peel atresia (or Type-IIIb intestinal atresia) is an unusual type of jejunoileal atresia. They present with jejunal atresia near the ligament of Treitz and a foreshortened small bowel. Many surgical options have been used, but the optimal method of repair remains unclear. We present a case of a newborn with apple-peel intestinal atresia managed by enteroplasty for intestinal lengthening and primary anastomosis. PMID:23845656

  8. Fish oil increases blood flow in the ileum during chronic feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Garrison, R Neal; Derhake, Brian M; Matheson, Paul J

    2012-11-01

    Benefits of enteral feeding with immune-enhancing diets (IEDs) depend on route, timing, and composition. We hypothesized that chronic enteral feeding with certain individual immunonutrients would enhance gastrointestinal blood flow. Male rats were fed a standard enteral diet supplemented with immunonutrients for 5 days before study. Groups were (1) standard rat chow, (2) liquid control diet (CD) alone (CD), (3) CD + fish oil, (4) CD + L-arginine, and (5) CD + RNA fragments. Whole organ blood flow distribution was measured by colorimetric microsphere technique in antrum, small intestine (in thirds), colon, liver, spleen, pancreas, and kidneys. Chronic feeding for 5 days with CD + fish oil increased blood flow in the distal third of the small intestine compared with CD alone, whereas feeding with CD + L-arginine decreased blood flow in the small intestine (all segments) compared with CD alone. Acute gavage of CD + L-arginine or CD + fish oil increased blood flow in the proximal and middle third of the small intestine compared with CD alone. Control diet + RNA increased blood flow in the proximal small intestine compared with CD alone. These findings support prior acute feeding studies with CD, CD + individual immunonutrients, or IED. Our current data suggest that blood flow benefits associated with fish oil persist during chronic feeding in rats. Enhanced gastrointestinal perfusion might partially explain the benefits of early enteral feeding with IEDs not seen with regular enteral diets and parenteral immunonutrient delivery. PMID:23176794

  9. Epithelial-derived IL-18 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and Foxp3⁺ Treg cell function in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, O J; Srinivasan, N; Pott, J; Schiering, C; Krausgruber, T; Ilott, N E; Maloy, K J

    2015-11-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-18 (IL-18) are found in many chronic inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and polymorphisms in the IL18R1-IL18RAP locus are associated with IBD susceptibility. IL-18 is an IL-1 family cytokine that has been proposed to promote barrier function in the intestine, but the effects of IL-18 on intestinal CD4(+) T cells are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that IL-18R1 expression is enhanced on both effector and regulatory CD4(+) T cells in the intestinal lamina propria, with T helper type 17 (Th17) cells exhibiting particularly high levels. We further show that, during steady state, intestinal epithelial cells constitutively secrete IL-18 that acts directly on IL-18R1-expressing CD4(+) T cells to limit colonic Th17 cell differentiation, in part by antagonizing IL-1R1 signaling. In addition, although IL-18R1 is not required for colonic Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we found that IL-18R1 signaling was critical for Foxp3(+) Treg cell-mediated control of intestinal inflammation, where it promoted the expression of key Treg effector molecules. Thus IL-18 is a key epithelial-derived cytokine that differentially regulates distinct subsets of intestinal CD4(+) T cells during both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions, a finding with potential implications for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:25736457

  10. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-03-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  11. Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: Small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Elizabeth; Allan, Philip; Ramu, Amrutha; Vaidya, Anil; Travis, Simon; Lal, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn’s disease in particular, is a common cause of intestinal failure. Current therapeutic options include home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. For most patients, home intravenous therapy including parenteral nutrition, with a good probability of long-term survival, is the favoured choice. However, in selected patients, with specific features that may shorten survival or complicate home parenteral nutrition, intestinal transplantation presents a viable alternative. We present survival, complications, quality of life and economic considerations that currently influence individualised decision-making between home parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation. PMID:24696601

  12. Psychological Effects of Intestinal Bypass Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Richard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative intestinal bypass patients were evaluated. Results suggest that postoperative bypass patients have improved psychological health and an increased sense of freedom and well-being but may need assistance in improving self-concepts. (Author)

  13. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  14. Small intestinal permeability in pediatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, I; Hill, A; Bose, B; Bouchier, I A; Forsyth, J S

    1987-01-01

    Passive permeability of small intestine to lactulose and mannitol was studied in children suspected of having intestinal disease, using a hypertonic differential sugar absorption test. Children with coeliac disease and cows' milk intolerance were shown to have an elevated urinary lactulose/mannitol recovery ratio when compared with controls, children with normal jejunal biopsy, or children in whom alternative explanations for failure to thrive had been demonstrated. The abnormality in permeability ratio principally reflects a reduced urinary recovery of mannitol following oral administration. This study demonstrates that a hypertonic sugar absorption test is well tolerated even by young children, is practicable in routine clinical pediatric practice, and is capable of demonstrating abnormal intestinal function in children with small intestinal disease. PMID:3121835

  15. Intestinal microbiota and blue baby syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Collin L; Rutledge, John C

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common intestinal emergency among premature infants. Risk factors in premature infants include immature intestinal immunity and an intestinal microbiota dominated by hospital-acquired bacteria. Some probiotics have been shown to decrease the incidence of NEC in premature infants. Among term infants, NEC is rare. However, among term infants with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD), the incidence of NEC is similar to that of premature infants but with even greater mortality rates. Mechanisms by which NEC occurs in term infants with CCHD are unknown. Of central interest is the potential role of changes in the intestinal microbiota and whether these can be modified with probiotic bacteria; accordingly, we review the literature, propose hypotheses and present the rationale for future studies involving preliminary probiotic clinical trials. PMID:21468216

  16. Motility Disorders of the Large Intestine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the large intestine (colon) are to store food residues and to absorb water. Between what we drink ... a consequence of this pattern of motility, food residues remain in the colon on average about 30 ...

  17. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about symptoms that could be caused by a mass in the intestines and examine you, concentrating on ... a biopsy needle toward the location of the mass/tumor. CT scans are repeated until the doctors ...

  18. Small intestine biopotentials in rats after hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Stanciu, C.

    To study the effect of hypokinesia on rats small intestine (jejunum and ileum) biopotentials it was first necessary to characterize it. Biopotentials were recorded by intracellular placed microelectrodes from oral and caudal segments of the small intestine. The character of rats small intestine biopotentials differs from that of other species (man, cat, rabbit, dog, e.a.), the slow waves (SW) being smaller and the frequency of basal electrical rhythm higher (31.23 c/min orally and 24.50 caudally). Spike potentials are inscribed on the descending slope of SW but frequently delayed in each successive wave with a regular interval. Hypokinesia obtained by keeping rats in small cages for two weeks create only little changes in intestine biopotentials. The only clear difference was the increase of the slow waves amplitude. The other parameters were not specifically changed.

  19. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid inhibits experimental colitis by preventing early intestinal epithelial cell death.

    PubMed

    Laukens, Debby; Devisscher, Lindsey; Van den Bossche, Lien; Hindryckx, Pieter; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Vandewynckel, Yves-Paul; Cuvelier, Claude; Brinkman, Brigitta M; Libert, Claude; Vandenabeele, Peter; De Vos, Martine

    2014-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by increased epithelial cell death and subsequent breakdown of the intestinal epithelial barrier, which perpetuates chronic intestinal inflammation. Since fecal bile acid dysmetabolism is associated with UC and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) has been shown to improve murine colitis, we evaluated the effect of TUDCA on intestinal epithelial cell death in a mouse model of UC-like barrier dysfunction elicited by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). We identified the prevention of colonic caspase-3 induction, a key proapoptotic marker which was also over-activated in UC, as the earliest event resulting in a clear clinical benefit. Whereas vehicle-treated mice showed a cumulative mortality of 40%, all TUDCA-treated mice survived the DSS experiment during a 14-day follow-up period. In line with a barrier protective effect, TUDCA decreased bacterial translocation to the spleen and stimulated mucin production. Similarly, TUDCA inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal permeability and associated enterocyte apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic effect was confirmed in vitro by a dose-dependent inhibition of both receptor-dependent (using tumor necrosis factor and Fas ligand) and receptor-independent (staurosporine) caspase-3 induction in HT29 colonic epithelial cells. These data imply that caspase-3 activation is an early marker of colitis that is prevented by TUDCA treatment. These data, together with the previously reported beneficial effect in colitis, suggest that TUDCA could be an add-on strategy to current immunosuppressive treatment of UC patients. PMID:25310532

  20. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  1. Lactation and Intestinal Microbiota: How Early Diet Shapes the Infant Gut.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Felicia; O'Sullivan, Aifric; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Freeman, Samara L

    2015-12-01

    Breast milk is a multifunctional biofluid that provides nutrients along with highly diverse non-nutritive bioactive components such as antibodies, glycans, bacteria, and immunomodulatory proteins. Research over the past decade has confirmed the essential role of breast milk bioactives in the establishment a healthy intestinal microbiota within the infant. The intestinal microbiota of an exclusively breastfed baby is dominated by several species of Bifidobacteria - the most influential member of which is Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis (B. infantis) - and is referred to as the milk-oriented microbiome (MOM). MOM is associated with reduced risk of infection in infancy as well as a reduced risk of certain chronic illnesses in adulthood. Establishment and persistence of MOM is dependent on the selective digestion of complex sugar structures in breast milk that are otherwise indigestible to the infant by B. infantis and its relatives. This review focuses primarily on the influence of breast milk glycans and glycosylated proteins on the development of the intestinal microbiome, and how maternal phenotype may influence the development of MOM providing a framework to understand how variation in diet shapes a protective intestinal microbiome. PMID:26227402

  2. The role of innate signaling in the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jerry M; Loonen, Linda M P; Karczewski, Jurgen M

    2010-01-01

    In the intestine innate recognition of microbes is achieved through pattern recognition receptor (PRR) families expressed in immune cells and different cell lineages of the intestinal epithelium. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) families are emerging as key mediators of immunity through their role as maturation factors of immune cells and triggers for the production of cytokines and chemokines and antimicrobial factors. At the mucosal surface chronic activation of the immune system is avoided through the epithelial production of a glycocalyx, steady-state production of antimicrobial factors as well as the selective expression and localization of PRRs. Additionally, the polarization of epithelial TLR signaling and suppression of NF-kappaB activation by luminal commensals appears to contribute to the homeostasis of tolerance and immunity. Several studies have demonstrated that TLR signaling in epithelial cells contributes to a range of homeostatic mechanisms including proliferation, wound healing, epithelial integrity, and regulation of mucosal immune functions. The intestinal epithelium appears to have uniquely evolved to maintain mucosal tolerance and immunity, and future efforts to further understand the molecular mechanisms of intestinal homeostasis may have a major impact on human health. PMID:19783476

  3. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated with Inflammation History in Mice Experiencing Recurring Colitis.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Kuzyk, Orest; Rauch, Isabella; Heider, Susanne; Schwab, Clarissa; Hainzl, Eva; Decker, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Strobl, Birgit; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim; Wagner, Michael; Kenner, Lukas; Loy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Acute colitis causes alterations in the intestinal microbiota, but the microbiota is thought to recover after such events. Extreme microbiota alterations are characteristic of human chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, although alterations reported in different studies are divergent and sometimes even contradictory. To better understand the impact of periodic disturbances on the intestinal microbiota and its compositional difference between acute and relapsing colitis, we investigated the beginnings of recurrent inflammation using the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) mouse model of chemically induced colitis. Using bacterial 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing as well as quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization, we profiled the intestinal and stool microbiota of mice over the course of three rounds of DSS-induced colitis and recovery. We found that characteristic inflammation-associated microbiota could be detected in recovery-phase mice. Successive inflammation episodes further drove the microbiota into an increasingly altered composition post-inflammation, and signatures of colitis history were detectable in the microbiota more sensitively than by pathology analysis. Bacterial indicators of murine colitis history were identified in intestinal and stool samples, with a high degree of consistency between both sample types. Stool may therefore be a promising non-invasive source of bacterial biomarkers that are highly sensitive to inflammation state and history. PMID:26697002

  4. Intestinal Microbiota Signatures Associated with Inflammation History in Mice Experiencing Recurring Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David; Kuzyk, Orest; Rauch, Isabella; Heider, Susanne; Schwab, Clarissa; Hainzl, Eva; Decker, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Strobl, Birgit; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim; Wagner, Michael; Kenner, Lukas; Loy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Acute colitis causes alterations in the intestinal microbiota, but the microbiota is thought to recover after such events. Extreme microbiota alterations are characteristic of human chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, although alterations reported in different studies are divergent and sometimes even contradictory. To better understand the impact of periodic disturbances on the intestinal microbiota and its compositional difference between acute and relapsing colitis, we investigated the beginnings of recurrent inflammation using the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) mouse model of chemically induced colitis. Using bacterial 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing as well as quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization, we profiled the intestinal and stool microbiota of mice over the course of three rounds of DSS-induced colitis and recovery. We found that characteristic inflammation-associated microbiota could be detected in recovery-phase mice. Successive inflammation episodes further drove the microbiota into an increasingly altered composition post-inflammation, and signatures of colitis history were detectable in the microbiota more sensitively than by pathology analysis. Bacterial indicators of murine colitis history were identified in intestinal and stool samples, with a high degree of consistency between both sample types. Stool may therefore be a promising non-invasive source of bacterial biomarkers that are highly sensitive to inflammation state and history. PMID:26697002

  5. Human milk oligosaccharide consumption by intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Marcobal, A; Sonnenburg, J L

    2012-07-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) constitute the third most abundant class of molecules in breast milk. Since infants lack the enzymes required for milk glycan digestion, this group of carbohydrates passes undigested to the lower part of the intestinal tract, where they can be consumed by specific members of the infant gut microbiota. We review proposed mechanisms for the depletion and metabolism of HMO by two major bacterial genera within the infant intestinal microbiota, Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides. PMID:22647041

  6. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanis?aw; Nieciecki, Micha?; Charzy?ska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smekta?a, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls. PMID:26306670

  7. Methods for analysis of the intestinal microflora.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, D J

    2000-09-01

    The concept of probiotics has been around for about 100 years. Yet its impact on human nutrition is still an emerging concept. Lack of convincing scientific validation for the efficacy of any ingested probiotic bacterium on intestinal health, has been a major reason for the low impact of probiotics on human nutrition. Obtaining positive scientific validation requires the use of suitable probiotic strains and also the necessary tools to monitor the performance of these bacteria in the intestines of individuals. To date, selection of strains for probiotic purposes has not been based on a scientific directed approach, primarily because it is not yet fully known what specific traits a desirable probiotic strain should possess. Filling this knowledge void will depend largely on furthering our understanding of the human intestinal ecosystem and the functional role of specific bacteria for intestinal health. Traditional approaches for studying this ecosystem have provided a good foundation in this knowledge base. Complementation of the traditional approaches with the emergence of sophisticated molecular tools shows enormous promise for obtaining the necessary insight into the intestinal microflora. This review will cover the traditional methodologies which have been used to analyze the human intestinal microflora. It will also reveal the development of modern molecular approaches for studying the diversity and phylogeny of its flora, and the rapid molecular tools for monitoring the presence of specific strains in the intestine. Finally, it will address the advent of in situ analysis of individual microbial cells, which promises to provide tremendous advances in our understanding of the microflora and their metabolic activities in the human intestine. PMID:11709868

  8. Epigenetic regulation of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ellen N; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2015-11-01

    The intestinal epithelium is an ideal model system for the study of normal and pathological differentiation processes. The mammalian intestinal epithelium is a single cell layer comprising proliferative crypts and differentiated villi. The crypts contain both proliferating and quiescent stem cell populations that self-renew and produce all the differentiated cell types, which are replaced every 3-5 days. The genetics of intestinal development, homeostasis, and disease are well defined, but less is known about the contribution of epigenetics in modulating these processes. Epigenetics refers to heritable phenotypic traits, including gene expression, which are independent of mutations in the DNA sequence. We have known for several decades that human colorectal cancers contain hypomethylated DNA, but the causes and consequences of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In contrast, tumor suppressor gene promoters are often hypermethylated in colorectal cancer, resulting in decreased expression of the associated gene. In this review, we describe the role that epigenetics plays in intestinal homeostasis and disease, with an emphasis on results from mouse models. We highlight the importance of producing and analyzing next-generation sequencing data detailing the epigenome from intestinal stem cell to differentiated intestinal villus cell. PMID:26220502

  9. Anaphylactic release of intestinal goblet cell mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Lake, A M; Bloch, K J; Sinclair, K J; Walker, W A

    1980-01-01

    The effect of intestinal anaphylaxis on goblet cell mucus release was tested in rats immunized with small doses of egg albumin and alum and challenged intraduodenally with antigen. The alteration in vascular and mucosal permeability which accompanies intestinal anaphylaxis was reflected by increased retention of 125I-labelled rat serum albumin in gut wall segments and increased amounts of protein-bound radioactivity in the intestinal secretion from the segments. Intestinal goblet cell mucus was labelled in vivo with 35S. Infusion of antigen, into the duodenum of actively immunized rats led to the appearance of 35S-labelled high molecular weight glycoprotein, presumably of goblet cell origin, in the intestinal secretions. Goblet cell mucus release was dependent on the dose of antigen infused, was antigen-specific and was inhibited by pretreatment of rats with cyproheptidine. Enhanced release of goblet cell mucus was observed in normal rats prepared by intravenous injection of rat antiserum rich in IgE anti-egg albumin antibodies and challenged by intraduodenal infusion of antigen. Prior heating of the antiserum inhibited passive transfer of the reaction; this finding is consistent with the heat lability of IgE antibodies. The latter class of antibodies are presumed to be responsible for intestinal anaphylaxis and its associated mucus release in the model system examined. PMID:7380466

  10. Loss of HLTF function promotes intestinal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HLTF (Helicase-like Transcription Factor) is a DNA helicase protein homologous to the SWI/SNF family involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and the regulation of gene expression. HLTF has also been found to be frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human colon cancers. Whether this epigenetic event is required for intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Results To address the role of loss of HLTF function in the development of intestinal cancer, we generated Hltf deficient mice. These mutant mice showed normal development, and did not develop intestinal tumors, indicating that loss of Hltf function by itself is insufficient to induce the formation of intestinal cancer. On the Apcmin/+ mutant background, Hltf- deficiency was found to significantly increase the formation of intestinal adenocarcinoma and colon cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of colon tumor cells from Hltf -/-/Apcmin/+ mice revealed a high incidence of gross chromosomal instabilities, including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fragments and aneuploidy. None of these genetic alterations were observed in the colon tumor cells derived from Apcmin/+ mice. Increased tumor growth and genomic instability was also demonstrated in HCT116 human colon cancer cells in which HLTF expression was significantly decreased. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of HLTF function promotes the malignant transformation of intestinal or colonic adenomas to carcinomas by inducing genomic instability. Our findings highly suggest that epigenetic inactivation of HLTF, as found in most human colon cancers, could play an important role in the progression of colon tumors to malignant cancer. PMID:22452792

  11. Exercise, intestinal barrier dysfunction and probiotic supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Frauwallner, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Athletes exposed to high-intensity exercise show an increased occurrence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like cramps, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, and bleeding. These problems have been associated with alterations in intestinal permeability and decreased gut barrier function. The increased GI permeability, a so-called 'leaky gut', also leads to endotoxemia, and results in increased susceptibility to infectious and autoimmune diseases, due to absorption of pathogens/toxins into tissue and the bloodstream. Key components that determine intestinal barrier function and GI permeability are tight junctions, protein structures located in the paracellular channels between epithelial cells of the intestinal wall. The integrity of tight junctions depends on sophisticated interactions between the gut residents and their expressed substances, the intestinal epithelial cell metabolism and the activities of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Probiotic supplements are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals that could offer positive effects on athlete's gut and entire health. Some results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use on the athlete's immune system. There is also evidence that probiotic supplementation can beneficially influence intestinal barrier integrity in acute diseases. With regard to exercise-induced GI permeability problems, there is still a lack of studies with appropriate data and a gap to understand the underlying mechanisms to support such health beneficial statements implicitly. This article refers (i) to exercise-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction, (ii) provides suggestions to estimate increased gut barrier permeability in athletes, and (iii) discusses the potential of probiotic supplementation to counteract an exercise-induced leaky gut. PMID:23075554

  12. The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starvation not only affects the nutritional and health status of the animals, but also the microbial composition in the host’s intestine. Next-generation sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore gut microbial communities and their interactions with hosts. However, studies on gut microbiomes have been conducted predominantly in humans and land animals. Not much is known on gut microbiomes of aquatic animals and their changes under changing environmental conditions. To address this shortcoming, we determined the microbial gene catalogue, and investigated changes in the microbial composition and host-microbe interactions in the intestine of Asian seabass in response to starvation. Results We found 33 phyla, 66 classes, 130 orders and 278 families in the intestinal microbiome. Proteobacteria (48.8%), Firmicutes (15.3%) and Bacteroidetes (8.2%) were the three most abundant bacteria taxa. Comparative analyses of the microbiome revealed shifts in bacteria communities, with dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes, but significant depletion of Betaproteobacteria in starved intestines. In addition, significant differences in clusters of orthologous groups (COG) functional categories and orthologous groups were observed. Genes related to antibiotic activity in the microbiome were significantly enriched in response to starvation, and host genes related to the immune response were generally up-regulated. Conclusions This study provides the first insights into the fish intestinal microbiome and its changes under starvation. Further detailed study on interactions between intestinal microbiomes and hosts under dynamic conditions will shed new light on how the hosts and microbes respond to the changing environment. PMID:24708260

  13. Regulating intestinal function to reduce atherogenic lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Leung, Tung Ming; Zhou, Liye; Abu-Merhi, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    Significant knowledge regarding different molecules involved in the transport of dietary fat into the circulation has been garnered. Studies point to the possibility that accumulation of intestine-derived lipoproteins in the plasma could contribute to atherosclerosis. This article provides a brief overview of dietary lipid metabolism and studies in mice supporting the hypothesis that intestinal lipoproteins contribute to atherosclerosis. Deficiencies in lipoprotein lipase and Gpihbp1, and overexpression of heparanse in mice, are associated with increases in atherosclerosis, suggesting that defects in catabolism of larger lipoproteins in the plasma contribute to atherosclerosis. Furthermore, inositol-requiring enzyme 1?-deficient mice that produce more intestinal lipoproteins also develop more atherosclerosis. Thus, increases in plasma intestinal lipoproteins due to either overproduction or reduced catabolism result in augmented atherosclerosis. Intestinal lipoproteins tend to adhere strongly to subendothelial proteoglycans, elicit an inflammatory response by endothelial cells and activate macrophages, contributing to the initiation and progression of the disease. Thus, molecules that reduce intestinal lipid absorption can be useful in lowering atherosclerosis. PMID:24409204

  14. Autonomic modification of intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Laura E A; Tansey, Etain A; Johnson, Chris D; Roe, Sean M; Quinn, Joe G

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe this spontaneous activity and its modification by agents associated with parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activity. A section of the rabbit small intestine is suspended in an organ bath, and the use of a pressure transducer and data-acquisition software allows the measurement of tension generated by the smooth muscle of intestinal walls. The application of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter ACh at varying concentrations allows students to observe an increase in intestinal smooth muscle tone with increasing concentrations of this muscarinic receptor agonist. Construction of a concentration-effect curve allows students to calculate an EC50 value for ACh and consider some basic concepts surrounding receptor occupancy and activation. Application of the hormone epinephrine to the precontracted intestine allows students to observe the inhibitory effects associated with sympathetic nerve activation. Introduction of the drug atropine to the preparation before a maximal concentration of ACh is applied allows students to observe the inhibitory effect of a competitive antagonist on the physiological response to a receptor agonist. The final experiment involves the observation of the depolarizing effect of K(+) on smooth muscle. Students are also invited to consider why the drugs atropine, codeine, loperamide, and botulinum toxin have medicinal uses in the management of gastrointestinal problems. PMID:26873897

  15. Extra-intestinal malignancies in inflammatory bowel diseases: An update with emphasis on MDCT and MR imaging features.

    PubMed

    Dohan, A; Faraoun, S A; Barral, M; Guerrache, Y; Boudiaf, M; Dray, X; Hoeffel, C; Allez, M; Farges, O; Beaugerie, L; Aparicio, T; Marteau, P; Fishman, E K; Lucidarme, O; Eveno, C; Pocard, M; Dautry, R; Soyer, P

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers and more specifically in sites affected by chronic inflammation. However, patients with IBD have also an increased risk for developing a variety of extra-intestinal cancers. In this regard, hepatobiliary cancers, such as cholangiocarcinoma, are more frequently observed in IBD patients because of a high prevalence of primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is considered as a favoring condition. Extra-intestinal lymphomas, mostly non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and skin cancers are also observed with an increased incidence in IBD patients by comparison with that in patients without IBD. This review provides an update on demographics, risk factors and clinical features of extra-intestinal malignancies, including cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and lymphoma, that occur in patients with IBD along with a special emphasis on the multidetector row computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features of these uncommon conditions. PMID:25846686

  16. Biotransformation of 1-nitropyrene to 1-aminopyrene and N-formyl-1-aminopyrene by the human intestinal microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, B.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.; Federle, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    The nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) is an environmental pollutant, a potent bacterial and mammalian mutagen, and a carcinogen. The metabolism of 1-NP by the human intestinal microbiota was studied using a semicontinuous culture system that simulates the colonic lumen. (/sup 3/H)-1-Nitropyrene was metabolized by the intestinal microbiota to 1-aminopyrene (1-AP) and N-formyl-1-aminopyrene (FAP) as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Twenty-four hours after the addition of (/sup 3/H)-1-NP, the formylated compound and 1-AP accounted for 20 and 80% of the total metabolism respectively. This percentage increased to 66% for FAP after 24 h following 10 d of chronic exposure to unlabeled 1-NP, suggesting metabolic adaptation to 1-NP by the microbiota. Both 1-AP and FAP have been shown to be nonmutagenic towards Salmonella typhimurium TA98, which indicates that the intestinal microflora may potentially detoxify 1-NP.

  17. The effects of lactulose-sweetened yoghurt on the rate of gastric emptying and intestinal transit in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Porkka, L; Salminen, E; Salminen, S

    1988-09-01

    A non-invasive, radioisotopic method was utilised to study the effects of a lactulose-sweetened yoghurt product on gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Healthy human volunteers were given 99mtechnetium-DTPA-labelled lactulose yoghurt before and after adaptation to the product. A control group received a similarly labelled glucose solution. Gastric emptying and intestinal transit were evaluated by scintigraphy. The mean half-time for gastric emptying for glucose was 39.8 +/- 3.4 min and for lactulose yoghurt, 31.3 +/- 11.0 min. After 10 days' adaptation, the corresponding value for lactulose yoghurt was 25.2 +/- 8.2 min. Intestinal transit time was faster after lactulose yoghurt than after glucose solution and did not change during adaptation. The observed effects indicate that lactulose yoghurt may be beneficial in the treatment or chronic constipation using dietary methods. PMID:3070971

  18. Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID).

    PubMed

    Pervez, Shahid; Mumtaz, Khalid; Ullah, Syed Siddiq; Akhtar, Nake; Ali, Naureen; Aaqil, Hina

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the frequency, demographics, clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, histopathological features, treatment and outcome of 'Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease' (IPSID). Archives contained a total of 27 cases of IPSID diagnosed and treated over an 18-year period. A M: F ratio of 2.4:1 was seen with a mean and median ages of 28.7 and 25 years. Most patients (68.8%) presented with abdominal pain and diarrhoea. In the majority (62.5%), duodenum was the primary site of involvement. Endoscopy showed polypoidal, raised or flat lesions. Biopsy findings included blunting or flattening of villi with dense plasma cell infiltrate and lymphoepithelial lesions. Twenty-four cases were categorized as stage A and B (benign and intermediate) and three were categorized as stage C (malignant, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytoid features). Stage A and B patients responded well to antibiotic treatment (tetracycline) with regression of the lesions while for stage C patients standard CHOP chemotherapy was administered. PMID:21276391

  19. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

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  20. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...