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Sample records for chronic ischemic stroke

  1. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  2. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Jul 12,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  3. Enhanced recovery from chronic ischemic injury by bone marrow cells in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Seo, Jin-Ju; Eom, Jang-Hyeon; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2015-01-01

    Even after decades of intensive studies, therapeutic options for patients with stroke are rather limited. Thrombolytic drugs effectively treat the very acute stage of stroke, and several neuroprotectants that are designed to treat secondary injury following stroke are being tested in clinical trials. However, these pharmacological approaches primarily focus on acute stroke recovery, and few options are available for treating chronic stroke patients. In recent years, stem cell-mediated regenerative approaches have emerged as promising therapeutic strategies for treating the chronic stage of stroke. In this study, we examined whether systemically administered bone marrow cells (BMCs) could have beneficial effects in a rat model of chronic ischemia. Our transplantation experiments using BMCs obtained from ischemic donor rats showed functional and structural recovery during the chronic stage of stroke. BMC-mediated neural proliferation was prominent in the brains of rats with chronic stroke, and most of the new cells eventually became neurons instead of astrocytes. BMC-mediated enhanced neural proliferation coincided with a significant reduction (∼50%) in the number of activated microglia, which is consistent with previous reports of enhanced neural proliferation being linked to microglial inactivation. Strikingly, approximately 57% of the BMCs that infiltrated the chronic ischemic brain were CD25(+) cells, suggesting that these cells may exert the beneficial effects associated with BMC transplantation. Based on the reported anti-inflammatory role of CD25(+) regulatory T-cells in acute experimental stroke, we propose a working model delineating the positive effects of BMC transplantation during the chronic phase of stroke; infiltrating BMCs (mostly CD25(+) cells) reduce activated microglia, which leads to enhanced neural proliferation and enhanced recovery from neuronal damage in this rat model of chronic stroke. This study provides valuable insights into the effect

  4. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Advocate Share Spread the Word Contact Us Contact Us 1-800-STROKES (787-6537) 9707 E. ... Stroke En Espanol Stroke Facts Come Back Strong Contact Us 1-800-787-6537 9707 E. Easter ...

  5. Aging aggravates ischemic stroke-induced brain damage in mice with chronic peripheral infection.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Denes, Adam; Valonen, Piia; Wojciechowski, Sara; Magga, Johanna; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Humphreys, Neil; Grencis, Richard; Rothwell, Nancy; Koistinaho, Jari

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is confounded by conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and infection, all of which alter peripheral inflammatory processes with concomitant impact on stroke outcome. The majority of the stroke patients are elderly, but the impact of interactions between aging and inflammation on stroke remains unknown. We thus investigated the influence of age on the outcome of stroke in animals predisposed to systemic chronic infection. Th1-polarized chronic systemic infection was induced in 18-22 month and 4-month-old C57BL/6j mice by administration of Trichuris muris (gut parasite). One month after infection, mice underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and infarct size, brain gliosis, and brain and plasma cytokine profiles were analyzed. Chronic infection increased the infarct size in aged but not in young mice at 24 h. Aged, ischemic mice showed altered plasma and brain cytokine responses, while the lesion size correlated with plasma prestroke levels of RANTES. Moreover, the old, infected mice exhibited significantly increased neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of both plasma interleukin-17α and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. Neither age nor infection status alone or in combination altered the ischemia-induced brain microgliosis. Our results show that chronic peripheral infection in aged animals renders the brain more vulnerable to ischemic insults, possibly by increasing the invasion of neutrophils and altering the inflammation status in the blood and brain. Understanding the interactions between age and infections is crucial for developing a better therapeutic regimen for ischemic stroke and when modeling it as a disease of the elderly. PMID:23725345

  6. Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Murphy, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Each year, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke and by 2030, it is estimated that 4% of the U.S. population will have had a stroke. Home healthcare clinicians will be increasingly called upon to assist stroke survivors and their caregivers adjust to disability and assist the survivor during their reintegration into the community. Therapeutic modalities are changing with advanced technology. Great strides are being made in the treatment of acute stroke; particularly endovascular interventions. More patients are surviving the acute stroke event and therefore will need to learn how to live with various degrees of disability. It is important for home healthcare clinicians to understand the process from acute event to medical stabilization, and from rehabilitation to long-term adaptation. PMID:27145407

  7. Multiparametric, Longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Reveals Acute Injury and Chronic Recovery in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Can, Anil; Blasi, Francesco; Climov, Mihail; Daneshmand, Ali; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yu, Esther; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H.; Sakadžić, Sava; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Progress in experimental stroke and translational medicine could be accelerated by high-resolution in vivo imaging of disease progression in the mouse cortex. Here, we introduce optical microscopic methods that monitor brain injury progression using intrinsic optical scattering properties of cortical tissue. A multi-parametric Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) platform for longitudinal imaging of ischemic stroke in mice, through thinned-skull, reinforced cranial window surgical preparations, is described. In the acute stages, the spatiotemporal interplay between hemodynamics and cell viability, a key determinant of pathogenesis, was imaged. In acute stroke, microscopic biomarkers for eventual infarction, including capillary non-perfusion, cerebral blood flow deficiency, altered cellular scattering, and impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow, were quantified and correlated with histology. Additionally, longitudinal microscopy revealed remodeling and flow recovery after one week of chronic stroke. Intrinsic scattering properties serve as reporters of acute cellular and vascular injury and recovery in experimental stroke. Multi-parametric OCT represents a robust in vivo imaging platform to comprehensively investigate these properties. PMID:23940761

  8. Influence of Kinesitherapy on Gait in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Danche; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Dimitrova, Antoaneta; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on gait in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted with 56 patients with ISChP (duration of the disease up to 1 year). For determining changes in gait before and after the treatment a cadence of gait and maximum movement speed were taken into consideration. To determine the cadence, steps are counted for covering 6 meters and 10 meters respectively. The maximum speed of the gait is determined in m / min by dividing undergone distance (m) and time (min). RESULTS: Patients were found to significantly normalize the parameters of gait. Compared to the initial data, there is a significant reduction in the number of steps on 6 and 10 meters and a tendency to increase the speed of gait, with the significant change during the 1st month with a level of significance of p <0.001. CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as exercise program at home, which significantly improved gait cadence and speed of movement in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period and is with a supportive prolonged exposure. PMID:27275297

  9. Influence of Kinesitherapy on Balance Reactions in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Danche; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Dimitrova, Antoaneta; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on balance reactions in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective, multicenter study with 56 patients with ISChP. Evaluation of balance reactions using Berg Balance Scale - BBS, includes implementation of 14 tasks with increasing difficulty reflecting the usual activities of everyday life. The first 5 assignments are used to assess the main balance potential and the remaining 9 (6th to 14th task) include more sophisticated balance tasks. RESULTS: The patients were found with a significant improvement in balance opportunities, according to the scale of Berg. Compared to initial data there is a significant increase in the number of points in the measured indicators for functional and static balance. In absolute terms, positive change is most pronounced during the 1st month with a level of significance of p <0.001. CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as adapted exercise program at home, and significantly improved equilibrium reactions in patients with postural disorders because of ischemic stroke and is with a supportive prolonged exposure. PMID:27275294

  10. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  11. Compromised Blood-Brain Barrier Competence in Remote Brain Areas in Ischemic Stroke Rats at Chronic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Williams, Stephanie N.; Haim, Eithan D.; Tajiri, Naoki; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a life threatening disease leading to long-term disability in stroke survivors. Cerebral functional insufficiency in chronic stroke might be due to pathological changes in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion, i.e. diaschisis. Previously, we showed that the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) was implicated in subacute diaschisis. The present study investigated BBB competence in chronic diaschisis using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) rat model. Our results demonstrated significant BBB damage mostly in the ipsilateral striatum and motor cortex in rats at 30 days after tMCAO. The BBB alterations were also determined in the contralateral hemisphere via ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses. Major BBB pathological changes in contralateral remote striatum and motor cortex areas included: (1) vacuolated endothelial cells containing large autophagosomes, (2) degenerated pericytes displaying mitochondria with cristae disruption, (3) degenerated astrocytes and perivascular edema, (4) Evans Blue extravasation, and (5) appearance of parenchymal astrogliosis. Importantly, discrete analyses of striatal and motor cortex areas revealed significantly higher autophagosome accumulation in capillaries of ventral striatum and astrogliosis in dorsal striatum in both cerebral hemispheres. These widespread microvascular alterations in ipsilateral and contralateral brain hemispheres suggest persistent and/or continued BBB damage in chronic ischemia. The pathological changes in remote brain areas likely indicate chronic ischemic diaschisis, which should be considered in the development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:24610730

  12. Orthostatic Reactivity in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Danche; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta

    2015-01-01

    AIM: This study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on orthostatic reactivity in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: An active orthostatic test is used for the evaluation of the orthostatic reactions. The arterial blood pressure and heart rate were defined in the 10 minutes of supine position, before and after 1, 5 and 10 minutes of active upright position. The orthostatic autoregulation is evaluated four times - at the beginning of the study, on the 10th day, on the 1st month and three months after the start of the KT. The classification by Thulesius was used to separate the patients into two groups depending on the type of their orthostatic reactivity. RESULTS: At the beginning of the study of infringements symptomatic type orthostatic reactivity (SOR) was observed in 24 patients and hypertensive type orthostatic reactivity (HOR) was observed in the remaining 32 patients. Once applied SKTM establish improvement of orthostatic autoregulation for the groups SOR and HOR at the 10th day and the 1st month with a level of significance p <0.05. CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as an adapted exercise program at home, has significantly improved the orthostatic reactivity in patients with orthostatic dysregulation due to the ISChP.

  13. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  14. Ischemic Stroke after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Acampa, Maurizio; Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Guideri, Francesca; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular complications after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) are more common in comparison with neurological sequelae subsequent to routine cardiac surgery. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are more common (with an incidence of up to 13%) than intracranial hemorrhage (2.5%). Clinically, ischemic stroke is manifested by the appearance of focal neurologic deficits, although sometimes a stroke may be silent or manifests itself by the appearance of encephalopathy, reflecting a diffuse brain disorder. Ischemic stroke subtypes distribution in perioperative and postoperative period after OHT is very different from classical distribution, with different pathogenic mechanisms. Infact, ischemic stroke may be caused by less common and unusual mechanisms, linked to surgical procedures and to postoperative inflammation, peculiar to this group of patients. However, many strokes (40%) occur without a well-defined etiology (cryptogenic strokes). A silent atrial fibrillation (AF) may play a role in pathogenesis of these strokes and P wave dispersion may represent a predictor of AF. In OHT patients, P wave dispersion correlates with homocysteine plasma levels and hyperhomocysteinemia could play a role in the pathogenesis of these strokes with multiple mechanisms increasing the risk of AF. In conclusion, stroke after heart transplantation represents a complication with considerable impact not only on mortality but also on subsequent poor functional outcome. PMID:26915504

  15. Ischemic Stroke after Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Acampa, Maurizio; Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Guideri, Francesca; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular complications after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) are more common in comparison with neurological sequelae subsequent to routine cardiac surgery. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are more common (with an incidence of up to 13%) than intracranial hemorrhage (2.5%). Clinically, ischemic stroke is manifested by the appearance of focal neurologic deficits, although sometimes a stroke may be silent or manifests itself by the appearance of encephalopathy, reflecting a diffuse brain disorder. Ischemic stroke subtypes distribution in perioperative and postoperative period after OHT is very different from classical distribution, with different pathogenic mechanisms. Infact, ischemic stroke may be caused by less common and unusual mechanisms, linked to surgical procedures and to postoperative inflammation, peculiar to this group of patients. However, many strokes (40%) occur without a well-defined etiology (cryptogenic strokes). A silent atrial fibrillation (AF) may play a role in pathogenesis of these strokes and P wave dispersion may represent a predictor of AF. In OHT patients, P wave dispersion correlates with homocysteine plasma levels and hyperhomocysteinemia could play a role in the pathogenesis of these strokes with multiple mechanisms increasing the risk of AF. In conclusion, stroke after heart transplantation represents a complication with considerable impact not only on mortality but also on subsequent poor functional outcome. PMID:26915504

  16. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  17. In-Hospital Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Between 2.2% and 17% of all strokes have symptom onset during hospitalization in a patient originally admitted for another diagnosis or procedure. These in-hospital strokes represent a unique population with different risk factors, more mimics, and substantially worsened outcomes compared to community-onset strokes. The fact that these strokes manifest during the acute care hospitalization, in patients with higher rates of thrombolytic contraindications, creates distinct challenges for treatment. However, the best evidence suggests benefit to treating appropriately selected in-hospital ischemic strokes with thrombolysis. Evidence points toward a “quality gap” for in-hospital stroke with longer in-hospital delays to evaluation and treatment, lower rates of evaluation for etiology, and decreased adherence to consensus quality process measures of care. This quality gap for in-hospital stroke represents a focused opportunity for quality improvement. PMID:26288675

  18. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Pelicioni, Maristela C. X.; Novaes, Morgana M.; Peres, Andre S. C.; Lino de Souza, Altay A.; Minelli, Cesar; Fabio, Soraia R. C.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Santos, Antonio C.; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2016-01-01

    Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS) or functional (FS) rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel) and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1) and immediately after (P2), 1 month after (P3), and three months after (P4) the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS. PMID:26839716

  19. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  20. Growth factors in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranconi, S; Locatelli, F; Corti, S; Candelise, L; Comi, G P; Baron, P L; Strazzer, S; Bresolin, N; Bersano, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Data from pre-clinical and clinical studies provide evidence that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and other growth factors (GFs) can improve stroke outcome by reducing stroke damage through their anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and by promoting angiogenesis and neurogenesis. This review provides a critical and up-to-date literature review on CSF use in stroke. We searched for experimental and clinical studies on haemopoietic GFs such as granulocyte CSF, erythropoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial GF, stromal cell-derived factor-1α and SCF in ischemic stroke. We also considered studies on insulin-like growth factor-1 and neurotrophins. Despite promising results from animal models, the lack of data in human beings hampers efficacy assessments of GFs on stroke outcome. We provide a comprehensive and critical view of the present knowledge about GFs and stroke, and an overview of ongoing and future prospects. PMID:20015202

  1. Phytochemicals in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonki; Fann, David Yang-Wei; Seet, Raymond Chee Seong; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is the second foremost cause of mortality worldwide and a major cause of long-term disability. Due to changes in lifestyle and an aging population, the incidence of stroke continues to increase and stroke mortality predicted to exceed 12 % by the year 2030. However, the development of pharmacological treatments for stroke has failed to progress much in over 20 years since the introduction of the thrombolytic drug, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. These alarming circumstances caused many research groups to search for alternative treatments in the form of neuroprotectants. Here, we consider the potential use of phytochemicals in the treatment of stroke. Their historical use in traditional medicine and their excellent safety profile make phytochemicals attractive for the development of therapeutics in human diseases. Emerging findings suggest that some phytochemicals have the ability to target multiple pathophysiological processes involved in stroke including oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of plant sources rich in phytochemicals may reduce stroke risk, and so reinforce the possibility of developing preventative or neuroprotectant therapies for stroke. In this review, we describe results of preclinical studies that demonstrate beneficial effects of phytochemicals in experimental models relevant to stroke pathogenesis, and we consider their possible mechanisms of action. PMID:27193940

  2. Intravenous thrombolytics for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    For many decades, intravenous (IV) thrombolytics have been delivered to treat acute thrombosis. Although these medications were originally effective for coronary thrombosis, their mechanisms have proven beneficial for many other disease processes, including ischemic stroke. Treatment paradigms for acute ischemic stroke have largely followed those of cardiology. Specifically, the aim has been to recanalize the occluded artery and to restore perfusion to the brain that remains salvageable. To that end, rapid clot lysis was sought using thrombolytic medicines already proven effective in the coronary arteries. IV-thrombolysis for ischemic stroke began its widespread adoption in the late 1990s after the publication of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke study. Since that time, other promising IV-thrombolytics have been developed and tested in human trials, but as of yet, none have been proven better than a placebo. Adjunctive treatments are also being evaluated. The challenge remains balancing reperfusion and salvaging brain tissue with the potential risks of brain hemorrhage. PMID:21638138

  3. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  4. Ischemic perinatal stroke: challenge and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2008-08-01

    The second highest risk group for developing a cerebral stroke is the perinatal period, generally defined as 20 weeks of gestation through 28th postnatal day of age. In this commentary, a brief overview of ischemic perinatal strokes is presented. Ischemic perinatal stroke (IPS) occurs at a rate of 1 : 2300 to 1 : 5000 births, accounting for 30% of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Thus, IPS is the most common known cause for CP [1-3]. Although they occur frequently, much remains to be studied about perinatal strokes in general and the ischemic variety in particular. PMID:18705894

  5. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  6. An overview of antithrombotics in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Patricia A; Gaughen, John R; Kreitel, Elizabeth M; Shephard, Timothy J; Solenski, Nina J; Jensen, Mary E

    2016-06-19

    The use of antithrombotic medications is an important component of ischemic stroke treatment and prevention. This article reviews the evidence for best practices for antithrombotic use in stroke with focused discussion on the specific agents used to treat and prevent stroke. PMID:27153001

  7. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  8. Stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vivek; Ritchie, Michael M.; Stone, Laura L.; Low, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Cell-based therapies are being investigated as an adjunct to IV thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. This review summarizes the potential applications as well as challenges of intravascular cell delivery in ischemic stroke. Method: We conducted a search of Medline as well as the clinicaltrials.gov Web site for all ongoing human clinical studies using stem cells in ischemic stroke patients. Result: The pros and cons of the various donor cell types and routes of cell delivery, including intravascular delivery, in ischemic stroke are discussed. In addition, the potential challenges in translation from bench to bedside, the optimal techniques for intravascular cell delivery, and an updated comprehensive list of ongoing clinical trials in ischemic stroke are highlighted. Conclusions: Stem cells have shown a promising role in ischemic stroke, in preclinical studies as well as initial pilot studies. Further studies are needed to assess intravascular cell therapy as a potential adjunct to thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. PMID:23008400

  9. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Taurine against Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Menzie, Janet; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke exhibits a multiplicity of pathophysiological mechanisms. To address the diverse pathophysiological mechanisms observed in ischemic stroke investigators seek to find therapeutic strategies that are multifaceted in their action by either investigating multipotential compounds or by using a combination of compounds. Taurine, an endogenous amino acid, exhibits a plethora of physiological functions. It exhibits antioxidative properties, stabilizes membrane, functions as an osmoregulator, modulates ionic movements, reduces the level of pro-inflammators, regulates intracellular calcium concentration; all of which contributes to its neuroprotective effect. Data are accumulating that show the neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine against stroke pathophysiology. In this review, we describe the neuroprotective mechanisms employed by taurine against ischemic stroke and its use in clinical trial for ischemic stroke. PMID:24961429

  10. The Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F; Brott, Thomas G; Brown, Robert D; Crook, Richard JP; Frankel, Michael; Hardy, John; Merino, José G; Rich, Stephen S; Silliman, Scott; Worrall, Bradford Burke

    2003-01-01

    Background The molecular basis for the genetic risk of ischemic stroke is likely to be multigenic and influenced by environmental factors. Several small case-control studies have suggested associations between ischemic stroke and polymorphisms of genes that code for coagulation cascade proteins and platelet receptors. Our aim is to investigate potential associations between hemostatic gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke, with particular emphasis on detailed characterization of the phenotype. Methods/Design The Ischemic Stroke Genetic Study is a prospective, multicenter genetic association study in adults with recent first-ever ischemic stroke confirmed with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients are evaluated at academic medical centers in the United States and compared with sex- and age-matched controls. Stroke subtypes are determined by central blinded adjudication using standardized, validated mechanistic and syndromic classification systems. The panel of genes to be tested for polymorphisms includes β-fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein Ia, Iba, and IIb/IIIa. Immortalized cell lines are created to allow for time- and cost-efficient testing of additional candidate genes in the future. Discussion The study is designed to minimize survival bias and to allow for exploring associations between specific polymorphisms and individual subtypes of ischemic stroke. The data set will also permit the study of genetic determinants of stroke outcome. Having cell lines will permit testing of future candidate risk factor genes. PMID:12848902

  11. Chinese Herbal Products for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hung, I-Ling; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Wang, Lin-Yi; Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Kuo, Chun-En; Hu, Wen-Long; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese herbal products (CHPs) have been described in ancient medicine systems as treatments for various stroke-associated ailments. This study is aimed to investigate the prescription patterns and combinations of CHPs for ischemic stroke in Taiwan. Prescriptions of CHPs for ischemic stroke were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Every prescription with a leading diagnosis of ischemic stroke made during 2000-2010 was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were applied to the pattern of co-prescriptions. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess demographic and risk factors that are correlated with CHP use. The dataset of inpatient claims data contained information on 15,896 subjects who experienced ischemic stroke from 2000 to 2010. There was an average of 5.82 CHPs in a single prescription for subjects with ischemic stroke. Bu-yang-huan-wu-tang (BYHWT) (40.32%) was by far the most frequently prescribed formula CHP for ischemic stroke, and the most commonly used combination of two-formula-CHP was BYHWT with Shu-jin-huo-xue-tang (SJHXT) (4.40%). Dan Shen (16.50%) was the most commonly used single CHP for ischemic stroke, and the most commonly used combination of two single CHPs was Shi Chang Pua with Yuan Zhi (4.79%). We found that BYHWT and Dan Shen were the most frequently prescribed formula and single CHP for ischemic stroke, respectively. These results provide information about individualized therapy and may contribute to further pharmacologic experiments and clinical trials. PMID:26477801

  12. Angiotensinogen polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Hao, Jun-Jie; Yang, Yu-Mei; Xu, Xia-Hong; Wang, Yue; Zuo, Lian; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Si-Yi; Wang, Xuan; Li, Ying; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism was associated with ischemic stroke risk. However, the results were controversial. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. NCBI, Medline, Web of Science and Embase databases were systematically searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. There was a significant association between angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.69; 95% CI, 1.35-2.11; P < 0.001). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, we found that this polymorphism was significantly associated with ischemic stroke in Asian (OR = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.45-2.35; P < 0.001). In the age subgroup, we found that angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism could increase both early-onset ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.33-2.43; P < 0.001) and late-onset ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.39; P = 0.04). This meta-analysis suggested that angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism was associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:26550208

  13. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27126651

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Froehler, Michael T; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator remains the only US FDA-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, the very limited time window for its administration restricts its usefulness. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that, given the numerous pathways via which cerebral ischemia causes cell death, the capacity to inhibit multiple mechanisms simultaneously may provide additive or synergistic beneficial clinical effects for stroke patients. Although no clinical trials have yet investigated the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in focal cerebral ischemia, its pleiotropic neuroprotective actions, positive results in preclinical studies, as well as proven enhancement of neurologic outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, make this neuroprotective strategy highly promising. This review presents an overview of the potential role of hypothermia in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke and discusses ischemic cell death pathophysiology, neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, methodologies employed for the induction of hypothermia, results from animal models of cerebral ischemia, and finally, currently available clinical trial data. Two valuable lessons learned thus far are that first, rapid induction of hypothermia is key and is best accomplished with a combination of ice-cold saline infusion and the use of endovascular cooling devices, and second, that shivering can be overcome with aggressive anti-shivering protocols including meperidine, buspirone and surface warming. We await the results of clinical trials to determine the utility of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke. If proven efficacious, hypothermia would be a welcome complement to established reperfusion therapies for ischemic stroke patients. PMID:20397832

  15. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:25771074

  16. Endothelial progenitor cells in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Crespo, Javier; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martínez-Ramírez, Sergi; Peña, Esther; Marín, Rebeca; Dinia, Lavinia; Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Pérez-Pérez, Jesús; Querol, Luis; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Badimon, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in ischemic stroke have not been studied extensively and reported results are inconsistent. We aimed to investigate the time course, the prognostic relevance, and the variables associated with EPC counts in patients with ischemic stroke at different time points. Material and methods We studied prospectively 146 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke within the first 48 h from the onset of symptoms (baseline). We evaluated demographic data, classical vascular risk factors, treatment with thrombolysis and statins, stroke etiology, National Institute of Health and Stroke Scale score and outcome (favorable when Rankin scale score 0–2). Blood samples were collected at baseline, at day 7 after stroke (n = 121) and at 3 months (n = 92). The EPC were measured by flow cytometry. Results We included 146 patients with a mean age of 70.8 ± 12.2 years. The circulating EPC levels were higher on day 7 than at baseline or at 3 months (P = 0.045). Pretreatment with statins (odds ratio [OR] 3.11, P = 0.008) and stroke etiology (P = 0.032) were predictive of EPC counts in the baseline sample. EPC counts were not associated with stroke severity or functional outcome in all the patients. However, using multivariate analyses, a better functional outcome was found in patients with higher EPC counts in large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease etiologic subtypes. Conclusions After acute ischemic stroke, circulating EPC counts peaked at day 7. Pretreatment with statins increased the levels of EPC. In patients with large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease subtypes, higher counts were related to better outcome at 3 months. PMID:24363968

  17. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions. PMID:27090751

  18. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. PMID:25475112

  19. [Therapy of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Sobesky, J

    2009-11-01

    New diagnostic and therapeutic developments have led to an innovative approach to stroke therapy. The slogan "time is brain" emphasizes that stroke is a medical emergency comparable to myocardial infarction. The stroke unit conception is an evidence based therapy for all stroke patients and improves outcome significantly. The monitoring of vital signs and the management of stroke specific complications are highly effective. Early secondary prophylaxis reduces the risk of recurrence. The effect of CT based thrombolysis within the time window of 4,5 h has been substantiated by current data. Stroke MRI holds the promise for an improved therapy by patient stratification and by opening the time window. Interventional recanalisation, vascular interventions and hemicraniectomy complement the therapeutic options in the acute phase of stroke. PMID:19838656

  20. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Mário Augusto Cray; Gauer, Maria Fernanda; Gomes, Ricardo Zaneti; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22) and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497). The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis ≥ 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression. Results Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02), diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21) and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28). Conclusion Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy. PMID:26313728

  1. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy. PMID:21331336

  2. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  3. Errata Corrige. Orthostatic Reactivity in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period. http://dx.doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.090

    PubMed Central

    Vasileva, Danche; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta

    2015-01-01

    AIM: This study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on orthostatic reactivity in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: An active orthostatic test is used for the evaluation of the orthostatic reactions. The arterial blood pressure and heart rate were defined in the 10 minutes of supine position, before and after 1, 5 and 10 minutes of active upright position. The orthostatic autoregulation is evaluated four times - at the beginning of the study, on the 10th day, on the 1st month and three months after the start of the KT. The classification by Thulesius was used to separate the patients into two groups depending on the type of their orthostatic reactivity. RESULTS: At the beginning of the study of infringements symptomatic type orthostatic reactivity (SOR) was observed in 24 patients and hypertensive type orthostatic reactivity (HOR) was observed in the remaining 32 patients. Once applied SKTM establish improvement of orthostatic autoregulation for the groups SOR and HOR at the 10th day and the 1st month with a level of significance p <0.05. CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as an adapted exercise program at home, has significantly improved the orthostatic reactivity in patients with orthostatic dysregulation due to the ISChP.

  4. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  5. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. PMID:27430469

  6. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome. PMID:27186142

  7. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood–brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome. PMID:27186142

  8. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  9. Remote ischemic conditioning for acute ischemic stroke: dawn in the darkness.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingrui; Li, Xiangpen; Peng, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Of all strokes, 87% are ischemic. The only approved treatments for acute ischemic stroke are intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase within 4.5 h and thrombectomy within 8 h after symptom onset, which can be applied to just a few patients. During the past decades, ischemic preconditioning has been widely studied to confirm its neuroprotection against subsequent ischemia/reperfusion injury in the brain, including preconditioning in situ or in a remote organ (such as a limb) before onset of brain ischemia, the latter of which is termed as remote ischemic preconditioning. Because acute stroke is unpredicted, ischemic preconditioning is actually not suitable for clinical application. So remote ischemic conditioning performed during or after the ischemic duration of the brain was then designed to study its neuroprotection alone or in combination with alteplase in animals and patients, which is named as remote ischemic perconditioning or remote ischemic postconditioning. As expected, animal experiments and clinical trials both showed exciting results, indicating that an evolution in the treatment for acute ischemic stroke may not be far away. However, some problems or disputes still exist. This review summarizes the research progress and unresolved issues of remote ischemic conditioning (pre-, per-, and post-conditioning) in treating acute ischemic stroke, with the hope of advancing our understanding of this promising neuroprotective strategy for ischemic stroke in the near future. PMID:26812782

  10. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Kevin N; Simard, J Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. An early phase II study using magnetic resonance imaging and plasma biomarkers supports the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase II study and definitive efficacy studies are needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  11. Personalized approach to primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke represents a significant part of stroke management and health care. Although there are official guidelines concerning stroke management, new knowledge are introduced to them with a slight delay. This article provides an overview of current information on primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. It summarizes information especially in the field of cardioembolic stroke, the use of new anticoagulants and the management of carotid stenosis based on the results of recent clinical studies. The optimal approach in stroke management is to follow these recommendations, to know new strategies and to apply an individual personalized approach in our clinical decisions. PMID:24949113

  12. Green Space and Mortality Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wilker, Elissa H.; Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Spengler, John; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Residential proximity to green space has been associated with physical and mental health benefits, but whether green space is associated with post-stroke survival has not been studied. Methods Patients ≥21 years of age admitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) between 1999 and 2008 with acute ischemic stroke were identified. Demographics, presenting symptoms, medical history and imaging results were abstracted from medical records at the time of hospitalization for stroke onset. Addresses were linked to average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, distance to roadways with more than 10,000 cars/day, and US census block group. Deaths were identified through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index. Results There were 929 deaths among 1,645 patients with complete data (median follow up: 5 years). In multivariable Cox models adjusted for indicators of medical history, demographic and socioeconomic factors, the hazard ratio for patients living in locations in the highest quartile of green space compared to the lowest quartile was 0.78 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.63 to 0.97) (p-trend=0.009). This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for residential proximity to a high traffic road. Conclusions Residential proximity to green space is associated with higher survival rates after ischemic stroke in multivariable adjusted models. Further work is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for this association, and to better understand the exposure-response relationships and susceptibility factors that may contribute to higher mortality in low green space areas. PMID:24906067

  13. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta9-THC and other cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta9-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB1 receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB1 receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB1 receptor independent. Of the CB1 receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB1 receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  14. Polygenic risk of ischemic stroke is associated with cognitive ability

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Marioni, Riccardo; Campbell, Archie; Seshadri, Sudha; Worrall, Bradford B.; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Hayward, Caroline; Bastin, Mark E.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the correlation between polygenic risk of ischemic stroke (and its subtypes) and cognitive ability in 3 relatively healthy Scottish cohorts: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936), the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (LBC1921), and Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS). Methods: Polygenic risk scores for ischemic stroke were created in LBC1936 (n = 1005), LBC1921 (n = 517), and GS (n = 6,815) using genome-wide association study summary data from the METASTROKE collaboration. We investigated whether the polygenic risk scores correlate with cognitive ability in the 3 cohorts. Results: In the largest cohort, GS, polygenic risk of all ischemic stroke, small vessel disease stroke, and large vessel disease stroke, but not cardioembolic stroke, were correlated with both fluid and crystallized cognitive abilities. The highest correlation was between a polygenic risk score for all ischemic stroke and general cognitive ability (r = −0.070, p = 1.95 × 10−8). Few correlations were identified in LBC1936 and LBC1921, but a meta-analysis of all 3 cohorts supported the correlation between polygenic risk of ischemic stroke and cognitive ability. Conclusions: The findings from this study indicate that even in the absence of stroke, being at high polygenic risk of ischemic stroke is associated with lower cognitive ability. PMID:26695942

  15. Sexual dimorphism in ischemic stroke: lessons from the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Manwani, Bharti; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is emerging as a major health problem for elderly women. Women have lower stroke incidence than men until an advanced age, when the epidemiology of ischemic stroke shifts and incidence rises dramatically in women. Experimental models of rodent stroke have replicated this clinical epidemiology, with exacerbated injury in older compared with young female rodents Many of the detrimental effects of aging on ischemic stroke outcome in females can be replicated by ovariectomy, suggesting that hormones such as estrogen play a neuroprotective role. However, emerging data suggest that the molecular mechanisms leading to ischemic cell death differ in the two sexes, and these effects may be independent of circulating hormone levels. This article highlights recent clinical and experimental literature on sex differences in stroke outcomes and mechanisms. PMID:21612353

  16. Premature Cardiac Contractions and Risk of Incident Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ofoma, Uchenna; He, Fan; Shaffer, Michele L.; Naccarelli, Gerard V.; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Background The etiologies of ischemic stroke remain undetermined in 15% to 40% of patients. Apart from atrial fibrillation, other arrhythmias are less well-characterized as risk factors. Premature cardiac contractions are known to confer long-term cardiovascular risks, like myocardial infarction. Ischemic stroke as cardiovascular risk outcome remains a topic of interest. We examined the prospective relationships in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, to determine whether premature atrial (PAC) or ventricular (PVC) contractions are associated with increased risk for incident ischemic stroke. Methods and Results We analyzed 14 493 baseline stroke-free middle-aged individuals in the ARIC public-use data. The presence of PAC or PVC at baseline was assessed from 2-minute electrocardiogram. A physician-panel confirmed and classified all stroke cases. Average follow-up time was 13 years. Proportional hazards models assessed associations between premature contractions and incident stroke. PACs and PVCs were identified in 717 (4.9%) and 793 (5.5%) participants, respectively. In all, 509(3.5%) participants developed ischemic stroke. The hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) associated with PVC was 1.77 (1.30, 2.41), attenuated to 1.25 (0.91, 1.71) after adjusting for baseline stroke risk factors. The interaction between PVC and baseline hypertension was marginally significant (P=0.08). Among normotensives, having PVCs was associated with nearly 2-fold increase in the rate of incident ischemic stroke (HR 1.69; 95% CI 1.02, 2.78), adjusting for stroke risk factors. The adjusted risk of ischemic stroke associated with PACs was 1.30 (95% CI 0.92, 1.83). Conclusions Presence of PVCs may indicate an increased risk of ischemic stroke, especially in normotensives. This risk approximates risk of stroke from being black, male, or obese in normotensives from this cohort. PMID:23316293

  17. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinchun; Hu, Jinxia; Cui, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke. PMID:27069533

  18. Sensitivity of the neuroimaging techniques in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the sensitivity and effectiveness of neuroimaging techniques in 190 patients with acute ischemic stroke. The first computed tomography (CT) scan for all patients was performed within the first 12 hours of the stroke symptoms onset. For each patient, between the third and fifth day of the hospitalization, at least one more neuroimaging procedure (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging--MRI, and/or diffusion weighted imaging--DWI) was done. The CT scan in the first 12 hours of the stroke onset was positive in 32% of the patients; the highest number of the positive findings was in the patients with total anterior circulation infarct (52%). After 48 hours of the stroke onset second CT was positive in 85% (75/89), MRI in 93.5% (115/123), and DWI in 98.8% (79/80) patients. MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detection of ischemic lesion (88% vs. 72%, P=0.01), particularly in the patients with lacunar infarcts (75% vs. 50%, P=0.005). In detection of ischemic stroke 48 hours of the stroke onset the slightly higher number of strokes were detected on DWI in comparison with MRI (98.6% vs. 88.7%). According to our results, within the first 12 hours after the stroke onset, CT is reliable only for detection of considerable number of cortical ischemic strokes of the anterior cerebral circulation. After 48 hours from the stroke onset CT, MRI and DWI show high sensitivity in the detection of ischemic lesion of all clinical stroke subtypes. MRI is more sensitive in comparison with CT in detection of ischemic lesion, while DWI does not show dominance in comparison with MRI in identification of ischemic stroke after 48 hours of the symptoms onset. PMID:15628251

  19. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  20. Therapeutic hypothermia and ischemic stroke: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Rizwan A.; Pabaney, Aqueel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the US. Clinical techniques aimed at helping to reduce the morbidity associated with stroke have been studied extensively, including therapeutic hypothermia. In this study, the authors review the literature regarding the role of therapeutic hypothermia in ischemic stroke to appreciate the evolution of hypothermia technology over several decades and to critically analyze several early clinical studies to validate its use in ischemic stroke. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Search terms included “hypothermia and ischemic stroke” and “therapeutic hypothermia.” A comprehensive search of the current clinical trials using clinicaltrials.gov was conducted using the keywords “stroke and hypothermia” to evaluate early and ongoing clinical trials utilizing hypothermia in ischemic stroke. Results: A comprehensive review of the evolution of hypothermia in stroke and the current status of this treatment was performed. Clinical studies were critically analyzed to appreciate their strengths and pitfalls. Ongoing and future registered clinical studies were highlighted and analyzed compared to the reported results of previous trials. Conclusion: Although hypothermia has been used for various purposes over several decades, its efficacy in the treatment of ischemic stroke is debatable. Several trials have proven its safety and feasibility; however, more robust, randomized clinical trials with large volumes of patients are needed to fully establish its utility in the clinical setting. PMID:27313963

  1. The Paradox Role of Regulatory T Cells in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Jiang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of ischemic stroke is not completely known. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a subset of T cells, play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological process of ischemic stroke. However, there is also controversy over the role of Tregs in stroke. Hence, the function of Tregs in ischemic stroke has triggered a heated discussion recently. In this paper, we reviewed the current lines of evidence to describe the full view of Tregs in stroke. We would like to introduce the basic concepts of Tregs and then discuss their paradox function in ischemic stroke. On one side, Tregs could protect brain against ischemic injury via modulating the inflammation process. On the other side, they exaggerated the insult by causing microvascular dysfunction. They also interfered with the neurological function recovery. In addition, the reasons for this paradox role would be discussed in the review and the prospective of the clinical application of Tregs was also included. In conclusion, Tregs contributed to the outcome of ischemic stroke, while more lines of evidence are needed to understand how Tregs regulate the immune system and influence the outcome of stroke. PMID:24288462

  2. [Ischemic stroke following a scorpion sting].

    PubMed

    Elkhayari, M; Hachimi, A; Ziadi, A; Abdenasser Samkaoui, M

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion envenomation is caused by an accidental scorpion sting. In its severe form, it involves life-threatening respiratory or cardiac damage; it may also cause the neurological severity of systemic manifestations. We report the case of a young 35-year-old woman stung by an Androctonus mauretanicus scorpion, who developed impaired consciousness, hemiplegia and respiratory distress. At admission, the brain computed tomography showed a hypodense area in the right parietal region; the chest radiograph revealed a bilateral alveolar syndrome. Troponin was elevated and hemostasis disorders were present. The clinical course was remarkable: cardiogenic shock with multiple organ failure followed by death on day 3. This case illustrates a rare complication of scorpion envenomation: ischemic stroke due to an undetermined mechanism, which in addition to the cardiac and respiratory injuries, led to the serious complications and fatal outcome. PMID:23648127

  3. Oxidative stress--assassin behind the ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Hanumanthappa; Diya, Joseph B; Shashikumar, Shivaiah; Rajanikant, Golgodu K

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the second leading cause of death and disability worldwide and is associated with significant clinical and socioeconomic implications, emphasizing the need for effective therapies. Several neuroprotective strategies have failed in clinical trials because of poor knowledge of the molecular processes flanked with ischemic stroke. Therefore, uncovering the molecular processes involved in ischemic brain injury is of critical importance. Therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke remain ineffective, though rapid advances occur in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. The oxidative stress is one such high-potential phenomenon, the precise role of which needs to be understood during ischemic events. Nevertheless, the studies carried out in preclinical models of ischemic stroke have pointed to the major role of oxidative stress in exacerbating the ischemic injury. Oxidative stress leading to cell death requires generation of free radicals through multiple mechanisms, such as respiratory inhibition, Ca(2+) imbalance, excitotoxicity, reperfusion injury and inflammation. Free radicals are highly reactive to all the molecular targets: lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, modifying their chemical structure and generating oxidation-derived products. This review discusses molecular aspects of oxidative stress in ischemic stroke and catastrophes that set up as an aftermath of the trauma. PMID:23023336

  4. Clinical and morphological correlations in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Slujitoru, Anca Stefania; Enache, Andreea Lorena; Pintea, Irina Lavinia; Rolea, Elisabeta; Stocheci, Cristina Mariana; Pop, O T; Predescu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    We studied the clinical and histopathological changes in twenty-seven cases of acute ischemic stroke, aged between 65 and 75 years. All deaths occurred within 30 days after stroke. The aim of our study was to establish the clinical and histological correlations in acute ischemic stroke to detect prognostic factors. Brain lesions after acute stroke were observed in all regions. Our study describes the heterogeneity of brain injury after acute ischemic stroke with the participation of all brain components and the chronology in which these lesions develop and evolve. By histological and immunohistochemical studies, we identified neuronal, glial and vascular damage. The neurons had undergone in the area of lesion a process of necrosis, ballooning or condensation process. In the ischemic penumbra, we observed the presence of red neurons. Vascular lesions were represented by the discontinuity of capillaries, always associated with a marked perivascular edema. The following clinical and morphological correlations were established: liquefactive necrosis, astrocyte gliosis, phagocytosis phenomena are the more intense the later the death of the patient; apoptosis phenomena are the more intense the faster the death of the patient; the entire cerebral microcirculation presented microscopic modifications following the ischemic strokes, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made; the major neurological complications of the ischemic stroke - the hemorrhagic transformation phenomena, cerebral edema, were microscopically objectified, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made. PMID:23303014

  5. Dimethylarginine levels in cerebrospinal fluid of hyperacute ischemic stroke patients are associated with stroke severity.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Raf; Marescau, Bart; Possemiers, Ilse; Sheorajpanday, Rishi; De Deyn, Peter P

    2009-09-01

    We hypothesise that asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, SDMA) are released in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to ischemia-induced proteolysis and that CSF dimethylarginines are related to stroke severity. ADMA and SDMA were measured in CSF of 88 patients with ischemic stroke or TIA within 24 h after stroke onset (mean 8.6 h) and in 24 controls. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission. Outcome was evaluated by institutionalization due to stroke and the modified Rankin scale. Dimethylarginine levels were higher in patients with stroke than in TIA patients, who had higher levels than controls and correlated with the NIHSS. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that dimethylarginines were independently associated with stroke severity. The SDMA/ADMA ratio did not differ significantly between controls and stroke patients. CSF dimethylarginine levels are increased in hyperacute ischemic stroke and are associated with stroke severity. PMID:19296217

  6. Sex differences in predictors of ischemic stroke: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Alyana A; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Globally, stroke is a significant public health concern affecting more than 33 million individuals. Of growing importance are the differences between males and females in the predictors and overall risk of stroke. Given that women have a higher lifetime risk for stoke and account for more than half of all stroke deaths, sex-specific stroke risk factors merit investigation and may help target public health interventions. This review aims to discuss the current body of knowledge regarding sex-specific predictors of ischemic stroke including both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors, as well as specific pathologies known to increase stroke risk. PMID:26251609

  7. IL1RN VNTR Polymorphism in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Bradford B.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Brown, W. Mark; Rich, Stephen S.; Arepalli, Sampath; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Duckworth, Jaime; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Genetic factors influence risk for ischemic stroke and likely do so at multiple steps in the pathogenic process. Variants in genes related to inflammation contribute to risk of stroke. The purpose of this study was to confirm our earlier finding of an association between allele 2 of a variable number tandem repeat of the IL-1 receptor antagonist gene (IL1RN) and cerebrovascular disease. Methods An association study of the variable number tandem repeat genotype with ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes was performed on samples from a North American study of affected sibling pairs concordant for ischemic stroke and 2 North American cohorts of prospectively ascertained ischemic stroke cases and unrelated controls. DNA analysis was performed on cases and controls, stratified by race. Results After adjustment for age, sex, and stroke risk factors, the odds ratio for association of allele 2 and ischemic stroke was 2.80 (95% confidence interval, 1.29 to 6.11; P=0.03) for the white participants. The effect of allele 2 of IL1RN on stroke risk most closely fits a recessive genetic model (P=0.009). For the smaller sample of nonwhite participants, the results were not significant. Conclusions Allele 2 of IL1RN, present in nearly one-quarter of stroke patients, may contribute to genetic risk for ischemic stroke and confirm the previously identified association with cerebrovascular disease. These results are driven by the association in the white participants. Further exploration in a larger nonwhite sample is warranted. PMID:17332449

  8. Trans Fat, Aspirin, and Ischemic Stroke in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yaemsiri, Sirin; Sen, Souvik; Tinker, Lesley; Rosamond, Wayne; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; He, Ka

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between dietary fat intake and ischemic stroke among postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 87,025 generally healthy postmenopausal women (age 50–79 years) enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Repeated and validated dietary assessments were done using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of ischemic stroke based on quintiles of the cumulative average of fat intake. Results We documented 1,049 incident cases of ischemic stroke over 663,041 person-years of follow-up. Women in the highest quintile of trans fat intake had a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (HR 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.79, P-trend = 0.048) compared with women in the lowest quintile, while controlling for multiple covariates. The observed association was modified by aspirin use (P-interaction=0.02). The HR was 1.66 (95% CI 1.21–2.36, P-trend<0.01) among baseline non-aspirin users (n=67,288) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.60–1.48, P-trend=0.43) among aspirin users (n=19,736). No significant associations were found between intakes of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat and ischemic stroke or any ischemic stroke subtypes. Interpretation In this large cohort of postmenopausal women, higher intake of trans fat was associated with incident ischemic stroke independent of major lifestyle/dietary factors. Aspirin use may attenuate the potential adverse effect of trans fat intake on ischemic stroke. PMID:22383309

  9. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  10. Review of current and emerging therapies in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, R; Toth, G; Purdy, P D

    2009-07-01

    The statistics for stroke in the USA reads like a familiar ad slogan cited in most papers pertaining to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA. While stroke ranks third among all causes of death, behind diseases of the heart and cancer, it is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the USA.(1) Approximately 795 000 people, 87% of whom are ischemic, suffer from stroke each year in the USA.(2) That means that on average, every 40 seconds someone within the USA develops a stroke. For 2009 the combined direct and indirect cost of stroke, from hospitalization and rehabilitation to institutionalization, is estimated at $68.9 billion within the USA.(2). PMID:21994100

  11. Circadian rhythm of onset of stroke - in 50 cases of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M S; Hoque, M I; Uddin, M K; Kamol, S A; Chowdhury, R H

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. While the immediate consequence of stroke include permanent cognitive deficits, paralysis, visual impairment and sensory disturbances; stroke also results in long term dysregulation of sleep and mood, which may be equally disabling. The influence of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythm regulation, which is strongly linked to sleep and mood, may thus potentially influence long term recovery in stroke patients. Stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating that cortical and basal ganglia infarction impacts the timing of melatonin rhythms. This study was done to find out the time of onset of most of the ischemic stroke attack and to determine the outcome of ischemic stroke during hospital stay. All ischemic stroke patients admitted in Medicine wards in Comilla Medical College Hospital during the period of 1st November 2010 to 30th April 2011 included in this study. After admission, a careful history and a thorough clinical examination was carried out. Data collection was done on a preset questionnaire which involved to identify the risk factors, the time of onset of ischemic stroke, and outcome during hospital stay. All the cases were investigated. Among the 50 ischemic stroke patients, 68% were male and 32% female. Maximum age groups were 61-70 years (50%). By occupational category, maximum were retired persons (46%); 68% were hypertensive, 38% smoker and 16% had diabetes. Dyslipidemia was present in 44% patients. Most of the ischemic stroke (44%) occurred in the morning to late morning (6:01AM-12:00PM) and majority (80%) of the patients was discharged with residual neurological dysfunction. This study supports the presence of a circadian pattern in the onset of ischemic stroke, with higher risk in the morning to late morning. Most of the patients were discharged with residual neurological dysfunction. PMID:25725678

  12. The Many Roles of Statins in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Wen, Ya; Cui, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of human death. Endothelial dysfunction, thrombogenesis, inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and angiogenesis play an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and represent a target for prevention and treatment. Statins have been found to improve endothelial function, modulate thrombogenesis, attenuate inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and facilitate angiogenesis far beyond lowering cholesterol levels. Statins have also been proved to significantly decrease cardiovascular risk and to improve clinical outcome. Could statins be the new candidate agent for the prevention and therapy in ischemic stroke? In recent years, a vast expansion in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the pleiotropic effects of statins has occurred and clinical trials involving statins for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke have begun. These facts force us to revisit ischemic stroke and consider new strategies for prevention and treatment. Here, we survey the important developments in the non-lipid dependent pleiotropic effects and clinical effects of statins in ischemic stroke. PMID:25977681

  13. Effects of ischemic stroke on dynamics of cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Stanley, Eugene; Novak, Vera

    2004-03-01

    Cerebral vasoregulation involves several complex mechanisms adapting blood flow to fluctuations of systemic blood pressure (BP). Autonomic BP and metabolic vasoregulation are impaired after stroke and cerebral blood flow depends on systemic BP. To probe the mechanisms of cerebral autoregulation we study levels of nonlinear synchronization between cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV) and peripheral BP. We quantify the instantaneous phase of each signal employing analytic signal approach and Hilbert transform. As a marker of synchronization, we introduce a measure of cross-correlation between the instantaneous phase increments of the BFV and BP signals at different time lags. We have studied 12 subjects with minor chronic ischemic stroke and 11 matched normotensive controls (age<65years). BFV and BP of these subjects are continuously recorded during supine baseline, head-up tilt, hyperventilation and CO2 rebreathing. For control subjects we find significant synchronization between cerebral BFV and peripheral BP only for short time lags of up to 5-6 seconds, suggesting a rapid return to a steady cerebral blood flow after initial blood pressure perturbations. In contrast, for stroke subjects BFV/BP we find enhanced synchronization over longer time lags of up to 20 seconds, suggesting entrainment of cerebral blood flow velocity by slow vasomotor rhythms. These findings suggest that cerebral vasoregulation is impaired and cerebral blood flow follows the fluctuations of systemic BP in a synchronous manner. Our analysis shows that cerebral autoregulation is impaired in 10 out of the 12 stroke subjects, which is typically difficult to diagnose with conventional methods. Thus, our novel synchronization approach offers a new tool sensitive for evaluation of changes in the dynamics of cerebral autoregulation under stroke.

  14. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    PubMed Central

    Shaafi, Sheyda; Mahmoudi, Javad; Pashapour, Ali; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Sadigh-eteghad, Saeed; Akbari, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:25671178

  15. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  16. Association of integrin α2 gene variants with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Matarin, Mar; Brown, W Mark; Hardy, John A; Rich, Stephen S; Singleton, Andrew B; Brown, Robert D; Brott, Thomas G; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variants in the gene encoding integrin α2 (ITGA2) have been reported to be associated with an increased risk for ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in ITGA2 and risk of ischemic stroke in a collection of North American stroke cases and controls. The study included 484 cases and 263 controls. Thirteen tSNPs were genotyped. Association tests at and across each tSNP were performed, including haplotype association analysis. Secondary analyses considered stroke subtypes on the basis of Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria. We observed significant association between tSNP rs3756541 (additive model, odds ratio (OR), 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11 to 2.04; P = 0.009) and disease and a trend toward association at rs2303124 (recessive model, OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.33; P= 0.03). These associations remained significant in the haplotype analyses. The associated tSNPs did not distinguish stroke etiology after application of TOAST criteria. Our results suggest that genetic variability within ITGA2 may confer risk for ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors. These results provide additional support for a role for platelet receptor genes in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke of diverse subtypes. PMID:17534386

  17. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  18. [Ischemic stroke as reaction to an acute stressful event].

    PubMed

    Ibrahimagić, Omer C; Sinanović, Osman; Cickusić, Amra; Smajlović, Dzevdet

    2005-01-01

    The period following ischemic stroke can be considered as a reaction to a stressful event. Changes in cortisol secretion are one of the indicators of stress reaction. The aim of the study was to determine morning serum levels of cortisol in stroke patients within 48 hours and 15 days of ischemic stroke onset. Study group included 40 patients, 20 of them were females, mean age 65.3 +/- 10.3 years. The patients did not receive any corticosteroid agents or spironolactone, and did not suffer from Cushing's or Addison's syndrome. Ischemic stroke was verified by computed tomography of the brain. The fluorometric method with DELFIA Cortisol immunoassay was used to determine morning serum cortisol levels. Reference values of the measured hormone were 201-681 nmol/l. The mean level of serum cortisol within 48 hours of stroke was 560.9 +/- 318.9 nmol/l, and on day 15 it was 426.2 +/- 159.3 nmol/l, i.e. significantly lower (p < 0.02). On the first measurement, the level of serum cortisol was elevated in 32%, and on the second measurement in only 7.5% patients, which was also significantly lower (p < 0.001). It was concluded that the stress reaction in ischemic stroke patients was more pronounced within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. Judging from the morning cortisol levels, the reaction to stress was considerably less pronounced 15 days after stroke onset. PMID:15875466

  19. Hepatitis C and recurrent treatment-resistant acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tarsia, Joseph; Dunn, Casey; Aysenne, Aimee; Shah, Basil; Moore, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and thrombolysis, acute ischemic stroke has become a treatable disorder if the patient presents within the 4.5-hour time window. Typically, sporadic stroke is caused by atherosclerotic disease involving large or small cerebral arteries or secondary to a cardioembolic source often associated with atrial fibrillation. In the over-65-year age group, more rare causes of stroke, such as antiphospholipid syndromes, are unusual; such stroke etiologies are mostly seen in a younger age group (<55 years). Here we describe acute ischemic stroke in three patients >65 years with hepatitis C–associated antiphospholipid antibodies. We suggest that screening for antiphospholipid disorders in the older patient might be warranted, with potential implications for therapeutic management and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:23543984

  20. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and T max, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  1. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  2. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. PMID:25669199

  3. Epidermoid Causing Ischemic Stroke in the Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Mahore, Amit; Kulkarni, Abhijeet; Rangarajan, Vithal; Patil, Manoj; Kawale, Juhi

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors. PMID:25580320

  4. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Ibrahim, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk. PMID:26989695

  5. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke: an underexplored therapeutic area?

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated autonomic dysfunction and factors that have been associated with worse outcome, including cardiac complications, blood pressure variability changes, hyperglycemia, immune depression, sleep disordered breathing, thrombotic effects, and malignant edema. Involvement of the insular cortex has been suspected to play an important role in causing sympathovagal imbalance, but its exact role and that of other brain regions remain unclear. Although sympathetic overactivity in patients with ischemic stroke appears to be a negative prognostic factor, it remains to be seen whether therapeutic strategies that reduce sympathetic activity or increase parasympathetic activity might improve outcome. PMID:25541326

  6. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit. PMID:24739589

  7. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  8. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  9. Angiogenesis-regulating microRNAs and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ke-Jie; Hamblin, Milton; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Ischemic stroke is the dominant subtype of stroke and results from focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of major cerebral arteries. Thus, the restoration or improvement of reduced regional cerebral blood supply in a timely manner is very critical for improving stroke outcomes and post-stroke functional recovery. The recovery from ischemic stroke largely relies on appropriate restoration of blood flow via angiogenesis. Newly formed vessels would allow increased cerebral blood flow, thus increasing the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to affected brain tissue. Angiogenesis is strictly controlled by many key angiogenic factors in the central nervous system, and these molecules have been well-documented to play an important role in the development of angiogenesis in response to various pathological conditions. Promoting angiogenesis via various approaches that target angiogenic factors appears to be a useful treatment for experimental ischemic stroke. Most recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as negative regulators of gene expression in a post-transcriptional manner. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that miRs are essential determinants of vascular endothelial cell biology/angiogenesis as well as contributors to stroke pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of stroke-associated angiogenic modulators, as well as the role and molecular mechanisms of stroke-associated miRs with a focus on angiogenesis-regulating miRs. Moreover, we further discuss their potential impact on miR-based therapeutics in stroke through targeting and enhancing post-ischemic angiogenesis. PMID:26156265

  10. Potential microRNA biomarkers for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jing-Xia; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Xing-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2015-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a significant cause of high morbidity and mortality in the aging population globally. However, current therapeutic strategies for acute ischemic stroke are limited. Atherosclerotic plaque is considered an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke. To identify biomarkers for carotid atheromatous plaque, bioinformatics analysis of the gene microarray data of plaque and intact tissue from individuals was performed. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Multtest and Limma packages of R language, including 56 downregulated and 69 upregulated DEGs. Enriched microRNA (miRNA or miR) DEGs networks were generated using WebGestalt software and the STRING databases, and the miRNAs were validated using serum from acute ischemic stroke patients with reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT‑qPCR). Four confirmed differentially expressed miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑22, ‑23 and ‑125) were associated with 28 upregulated DEGs, and 7 miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑30, ‑33, ‑124, ‑181, ‑218 and ‑330) were associated with 25 downregulated DEGs. Gene ontology (GO) function suggested that the confirmed miRNA‑targeted DEGs predominantly associated with signal transduction, the circulatory system, biological adhesion, striated muscle contraction, wound healing and the immune system. The confirmed miRNA‑targeted genes identified serve as potential therapeutic targets for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26459744

  11. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain's vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca2+ level, and so forth. Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by pineal and extra pineal tissues responsible for various physiological processes like sleep and mood behaviour. Melatonin has been implicated in various neurological diseases because of its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We have previously reviewed the neuroprotective effect of melatonin in various models of brain injury like traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In this review, we have put together the various causes and consequence of stroke and protective role of melatonin in ischemic stroke. PMID:26435711

  12. Pre-ischemic exercise alleviates oxidative damage following ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xiao; Li, Wen-Bin; Ren, Shi-Qing; Zhang, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Physical exercise has been proved to be neuroprotective in clinical trials and animal experiments. However, the exact mechanism underlying this neuroprotective effect remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether pre-ischemic treadmill training could act as a form of ischemic preconditioning in a rat following ischemic stroke by reducing oxidative damage. Fifty-four rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=18 per group): Sham surgery, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) without exercise and MCAO with exercise. Subsequent to treadmill training, ischemic stroke was induced by occluding the MCA for 1.5 h, followed by reperfusion. Six rats in each group were evaluated for neurological deficits and then sacrificed by decapitation to calculate the infarct volume. The remaining rats in each group were sacrificed to detect the level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (n=6) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (n=6). The results indicated that pre-ischemic exercise training reduced brain infarct volume and neurological deficits, increased SOD activity and decreased the concentration of MDA following ischemic stroke. In conclusion, treadmill exercise training prior to MCAO/reperfusion increased the antioxidant ability and decreased the oxidative damage in the brain subsequent to ischemic stroke. PMID:25187848

  13. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  14. LIPID LEVELS AND THE RISK OF ISCHEMIC STROKE IN WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Tobias; Everett, Brendan M.; Buring, Julie E.; Kase, Carlos S.; Ridker, Paul M; Gaziano, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio, and non-HDL-C with the risk of ischemic stroke in a large cohort of apparently healthy women. Methods Prospective cohort study among 27,937 US women aged ≥45 years participating in the Women's Health Study who provided baseline blood samples. Stroke occurrence was self-reported and confirmed by medical record review. We categorized plasma lipid measurements into quintiles. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between lipids and risk of ischemic stroke. Results During 11 years of follow-up, 282 ischemic strokes occurred. All lipid levels were strongly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in age-adjusted models. The association attenuated particularly for HDL-C after adjustment for potential confounders. For the comparison of the highest to the lowest quintile, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals; P for trend across mean quintile values) of ischemic stroke were 2.27 (1.43-3.60; Ptrend<0.001) for total cholesterol; 1.74 (1.14-2.66; Ptrend=0.003) for LDL-C; 0.78 (0.52-1.17; Ptrend=0.27) for HDL-C; 1.65 (1.06-2.58; Ptrend=0.02) for total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio; and 2.45 (1.54-3.91; Ptrend<0.001) for non-HDL-C. Conclusions In this large cohort of apparently healthy women, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. PMID:17310025

  15. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason J.; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  16. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason J; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  17. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  18. Adolescent ischemic stroke associated with anabolic steroid and cannabis abuse.

    PubMed

    El Scheich, Tarik; Weber, Artur-Aron; Klee, Dirk; Schweiger, Daniel; Mayatepek, Ertan; Karenfort, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 16-year-old body builder who suffered from an acute ischemic stroke. In the urine, cannabis metabolites as well as metabolites of the oral androgenic-anabolic steroid methandrostenolone were detected, both known to be associated with stroke events. This report highlights the role of cannabis and steroid abuse that induce strokes in the absence of arteriopathy, cardioembolism or thrombophilia. Owing to new upcoming socio-behavioral aspects of late childhood and early adolescent life, this formally rare abuse of cannabis and/or anabolic steroids as well as their associations with strokes becomes more current than ever. PMID:23382306

  19. Biomarkers Associated with Ischemic Stroke in Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuisheng; Zhao, Jingfeng; Chen, Yuxiang; Lei, Minxiang

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes is an established risk factor for ischemic stroke, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. This study investigated the role of plasma and platelet microRNAs and their targeting proteins in the activation of platelets and their association with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results showed that the expressions of platelet and plasma miR-144 and miR-223 were significantly altered in T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke compared to that in healthy controls, but these changes were more significant in T2DM patients with ischemic stroke. The expressions of P2Y12 and IRS-1 as well as phosphorylation levels of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt in platelets were significantly altered in T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke. The expression of platelet miR-144 and miR-223 significantly correlated with their plasma levels, P2Y12 and IRS-1 expression, blood glucose concentration, and platelet activation rate. High glucose concentration significantly elevated P-selectin, miR-144 and P2Y12 expression and significantly reduced miR-223 and IRS-1 expression in UT-7 cells. Overexpression of miR-223 and blocking of miR-144 expression significantly normalized the effects of high glucose concentration in UT-7 cells. In conclusion, hyperglycemia may activate platelets through miR-144 and miR-223 to downregulate IRS-1 and upregulate P2Y12 expression in the platelets of T2DM patients through an IRS-1-PI3K-Akt signaling. Low platelet and plasma miR-223 expression in addition to high platelet and plasma miR-144 expression are risk factors for ischemic stroke in T2DM patients. PMID:26175178

  20. Hurdles in stroke thrombolysis: Experience from 100 consecutive ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Badachi, Sagar; Mathew, Thomas; Prabhu, Arvind; Nadig, Raghunandan; Sarma, Gosala R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute management of ischemic stroke involves thrombolysis within 4.5 h. For a successful outcome, early recognition of stroke, transportation to the hospital emergency department immediately after stroke, timely imaging, proper diagnosis, and thrombolysis within 4.5 h is of paramount importance. Aim: To analyze the obstacles for thrombolysis in acute stroke patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. A total of hundred consecutive patients of acute ischemic stroke who were not thrombolysed, but otherwise fulfilled the criteria for thrombolysis were evaluated prospectively for various factors that prevented thrombolysis. The constraints to thrombolysis were categorized into: i) Failure of patient to recognize stroke symptoms, ii) patient's awareness of thrombolysis as a treatment modality for stroke, iii) failure of patient's relative to recognize stroke, iv) failure of primary care physician to recognize stroke, v) transport delays, vi) lack of neuroimaging and thrombolysis facility, and vii) nonaffordability. Results: The biggest hurdle for early hospital presentation is failure of patients to recognize stroke (73%), followed by lack of neuroimaging facility (58%), nonaffordability (56%), failure of patient's relative to recognize stroke (38%), failure of the primary care physician to recognize stroke (21%), and transport problems (13%). Awareness of thrombolysis as a treatment modality for stroke was seen only in 2%. Conclusion: Considering the urgency of therapeutic measures in acute stroke, there is necessity and room for improvement to overcome various hurdles that prevent thrombolysis. PMID:26713013

  1. Anesthesia for Endovascular Approaches to Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Avitsian, Rafi; Machado, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the Anesthesiologist in the early stages of care for acute ischemic stroke patient undergoing endovascular treatment is essential. Anesthetic management includes the anesthetic technique (general anesthesia vs sedation), a matter of much debate and an area in need of well-designed prospective studies. The large numbers of confounding factors make the design of such studies a difficult process. A universally agreed point in the endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke is the importance of decreasing the time to revascularization. Hemodynamic and ventilatory management and implementation of neuroprotective modalities and treatment of acute procedural complications are important components of the anesthetic plan. PMID:27521194

  2. Siblings with Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): Results of a Genome-wide Scan for Stroke Loci

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Matarin, Mar; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Hardy, John; Kissela, Brett; Rich, Stephen S.; Singleton, Andrew; Hernandez, Dena; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pearce, Kerra; Keller, Margaret; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke has a strong familial component to risk. The Siblings with Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) is a genome-wide family-based analysis that included use of imputed genotypes. SWISS was conducted to examine associations between SNPs and risk of stroke and stroke subtypes within pairs. Methods SWISS enrolled 312 probands with ischemic stroke across 70 US and Canadian centers. Affected siblings were ascertained by centers and confirmed by central record review; unaffected siblings were ascertained by telephone contact. Ischemic stroke was subtyped using TOAST criteria. Genotyping was performed using an Illumina 610 quad array (probands) and an Illumina linkage V array (affected siblings). SNPs were imputed using 1000 Genomes Project data and MACH software. Family-based association analyses were conducted using the sibling-transmission disequilibrium test. Results For all pairs, the correlation of age at stroke within pairs of affected siblings was r = 0.83 (95%CI, 0.78 to 0.86; P < 2.2×10−16). The correlation did not differ substantially by subtype. The concordance of stroke subtypes among affected pairs was 33.8% (kappa = 0.13; P = 5.06×10−4) and did not differ by age at stroke in the proband. Although no SNP achieved genome-wide significance for risk of ischemic stroke, there was clustering of the most associated SNPs on chromosomes 3p (NOS1) and 6p. Conclusions Stroke subtype and age at stroke in affected sibling pairs exhibit significant clustering. No individual SNP reached genome-wide significance. However, two promising candidate loci were identified, including one that contains NOS1, though these risk loci warrant further examination in larger sample collections. PMID:21940970

  3. Risk factors and outcomes of childhood ischemic stroke in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Ying; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chou, Min-Liang; Hung, Po-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Ying; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching

    2008-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we reviewed the charts and collected clinical and radiographic data on children (age range, 1 month to 18 years) with symptoms and radiographic confirmation of ischemic stroke for the period of January 1996 to July 2006. Ninety-four children were enrolled. Eighty-eight had arterial ischemic stroke and six had sinovenous thrombosis. Twenty-nine percent of the children had seizures. Twenty-six percent had diffuse neurological signs and 76% had focal neurological signs. Risk factors included vascular disease (33%), infection (27%), metabolic disorders (18%), trauma (11%), prothrombotic states (13%), cardiac disease (10%), and mitochondrial disease (6%). Ten percent (n=9) had no identifiable cause. Twenty-two percent of the children had more than one risk factor. Anterior territory (70%) was more involved than posterior territory (18%) in arterial ischemic stroke. Unilateral infarctions were more common on the left side (51%) than on the right (24.5%). Neurological deficits were present in 45% (n=34/75) of the children; the most frequent deficit was motor impairment (24%). Seven children (9%) died in the acute stage. There were 12 children (16%) who had recurrent stroke and 8 children (8/12) who had underlying vascular disease. The vascular disease included moyamoya disease (5), CNS lupus (1) and ill-defined vasculopathy (2). The etiology pattern in Taiwan was different from that in Western countries. Vascular disease was a significant risk factor for recurrence in childhood ischemic stroke. PMID:17573220

  4. Arterial Ischemic Stroke in Children: Risk Factors and Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Numis, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is increasingly recognized as a significant cause of morbidity or mortality in children and as a financial burden for families and society. Recent studies have identified and confirmed presumptive risk factors and have identified novel associations with childhood arterial ischemic stroke. A better understanding of these risk factors for stroke in children, which differ from the atherosclerotic risk factors in adults, is the first step needed to improve strategies for stroke prevention and intervention and ultimately minimize the physical, mental and financial burden of AIS. Here, we discuss recent advances in research for selected childhood stroke risk factors, highlighting the progress made in our understanding of etiologic mechanisms and pathophysiology, and address the future directions for acute and long-term treatment strategies for pediatric stroke. PMID:24384876

  5. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  6. Minor Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yakhkind, Aleksandra; McTaggart, Ryan A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Silver, Brian; Yaghi, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    A majority of patients with ischemic stroke present with mild deficits for which aggressive management is not often pursued. Comprehensive work-up and appropriate intervention for minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) point toward better patient outcomes, lower costs, and fewer cases of disability. Imaging is a key modality to guide treatment and predict stroke recurrence. Patients with large vessel occlusions have been found to suffer worse outcomes and could benefit from intervention. Whether intravenous thrombolytic therapy decreases disability in minor stroke patients and whether acute endovascular intervention improves functional outcomes in patients with minor stroke and known large vessel occlusion remain controversial. Studies are ongoing to determine ideal antiplatelet therapy for stroke and TIA, while ongoing statin therapy, surgical management for patients with carotid stenosis, and anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation have all been proven to decrease the rate of stroke recurrence and improve outcomes. This review summarizes the current evidence and discusses the standard of care for patients with minor stroke and TIA. PMID:27375548

  7. Minor Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Yakhkind, Aleksandra; McTaggart, Ryan A; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Siket, Matthew S; Silver, Brian; Yaghi, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    A majority of patients with ischemic stroke present with mild deficits for which aggressive management is not often pursued. Comprehensive work-up and appropriate intervention for minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) point toward better patient outcomes, lower costs, and fewer cases of disability. Imaging is a key modality to guide treatment and predict stroke recurrence. Patients with large vessel occlusions have been found to suffer worse outcomes and could benefit from intervention. Whether intravenous thrombolytic therapy decreases disability in minor stroke patients and whether acute endovascular intervention improves functional outcomes in patients with minor stroke and known large vessel occlusion remain controversial. Studies are ongoing to determine ideal antiplatelet therapy for stroke and TIA, while ongoing statin therapy, surgical management for patients with carotid stenosis, and anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation have all been proven to decrease the rate of stroke recurrence and improve outcomes. This review summarizes the current evidence and discusses the standard of care for patients with minor stroke and TIA. PMID:27375548

  8. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  9. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Muthukrishnan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ahmad, F M H

    2013-10-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery. PMID:24251140

  10. Update on the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors after Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Capettini, Luciano S. A.; Savergnini, Silvia Q.; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Santos, Robson A. S.; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids are considered as key mediators in the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. In particular, they have been shown to reduce the ischemic injury after acute cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. These protective and anti-inflammatory properties on peripheral tissues and circulating inflammatory have been demonstrated to involve their binding with both selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) transmembrane receptors. On the other hands, the recent discoveries of novel different classes of cannabinoids and receptors have increased the complexity of this system in atherosclerosis. Although only preliminary data have been reported on the activities of novel cannabinoid receptors, several studies have already investigated the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in ischemic stroke. While CB1 receptor activation has been shown to directly reduce atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, controversial data have been shown on neurotransmission and neuroprotection after stroke. Given its potent anti-inflammatory activities on circulating leukocytes, the CB2 activation has been proven to produce protective effects against acute poststroke inflammation. In this paper, we will update evidence on different cannabinoid-triggered avenues to reduce inflammation and neuronal injury in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:22577257

  11. [Ischemic stroke: A rare complication of liver hydatid cyst].

    PubMed

    Ghadhoune, H; Chaari, A; Baccouche, N; Chelly, H; Bouaziz, M

    2013-10-01

    Hydatid cyst of the liver (HCL) is a widespread disease in North African countries. We report the case of a 39-year-old patient who was admitted in our intensive care unit because of anaphylactic shock due to a cracked HCL fortuitously discovered. This accident was also complicated by an ischemic stroke witch underline mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24075197

  12. Brainstem ischemic stroke after to Bothrops atrox snakebite.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Carlos A

    2016-09-15

    We report case of a 48 years old woman bitten on her right foot by a Bothrops atrox viper. As a result, she developed a severe coagulopathy which improved with application of polyvalent antivenom. Four days after bite she suffered a devastating brainstem ischemic stroke. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27527269

  13. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25749474

  14. [Development of Researches on Scalp Acupuncture for Ischemic Stroke].

    PubMed

    Tian, Liang; Wang, Jin-hai; Sun, Run-jie; Zhang, Xing-hua; Yuan, Bo; Du, Xiao-zheng

    2016-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the commonly met diseases in clinical practice nowadays. Acupuncture therapy is widly used in the treatment of sequela of ischemic stroke in China and its mechanisms have been extensively studied in recen years. In the present paper, the authors focus on the development of studies on the mechanism of scalp acupuncture therapy in the treatment of ischemic stroke. Results indicate that scalp acupuncture intervention can 1) improve cerebral blood circulation to promote regional energy metabolism, 2) up-regulate expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), etc., possibly promoting proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the focal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, 3) reduce contents of excitatory amino acid and increase level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to lower neurogenic toxicity, and relieve cerebral injury, 4) ease cerebral vascular immunoinflammatory reactions, 5) regulate blood lipid metabolism to resist cerebral free radical damage, and 6) inhibit cerebral cortical apoptosis. However, these results only revealed very limited intrinsic mechanisms of scalp acupuncture in improving ischemic stroke. Further studies using comprehensive techniques of multi-disciplines as molecular biology, electrophysiology, etc. are definitely needed. PMID:27141629

  15. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. PMID:24805069

  16. Correlation Analysis of Sleep Quality and Youth Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunqing; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Juan; Song, Bo; Fang, Hui; Xu, YuMing

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study risk factors related to ischemic stroke (IS) in youth and the influence of sleep quality on youth ischemic stroke incidence. Methods. 223 patients aged 18 to 45 years who were admitted to Puyang People's Hospital from June 2011 to February 2013 with a first-ever ischemic stroke were selected as the research cases. 158 young people with a normal physical examination were selected as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was used to analyse the correlation between sleep quality and youth IS incidence. The US National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (MRS) scores were used to assess cases' state of illness and prognosis three months after IS. Results. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the association of these risk factors with youth IS incidence, from highest to lowest, was hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking history, high homocysteine, the quality of sleep, family history of stroke, and alcoholism. Poor sleep quality ranked fifth among all risk factors and was positively correlated with poor prognosis for youth IS patients. Conclusion. The results of this study showed that sleep quality is an important factor in the pathogenesis and prognosis of youth IS. PMID:25161340

  17. Stroke and the "stroke belt" in dialysis: contribution of patient characteristics to ischemic stroke rate and its geographic variation.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Phadnis, Milind A; Rigler, Sally K; Spertus, John A; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I

    2013-12-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios for stroke. Older age, female sex, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity, unemployed status, diabetes, hypertension, history of stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation were positively associated with ischemic stroke, whereas body mass index >30 kg/m(2) was inversely associated with stroke (P<0.001 for each). After full multivariable adjustment, the three states with O/E rate ratios >1.0 were all in the South: North Carolina, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Regional efforts to increase primary prevention in the "stroke belt" or to better educate dialysis patients on the signs of stroke so that they may promptly seek care may improve stroke care and outcomes in dialysis patients. PMID:23990675

  18. Bone Fracture Pre-Ischemic Stroke Exacerbates Ischemic Cerebral Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dingquan; Zhan, Lei; Li, Zhengxi; Zhu, Wan; Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a devastating complication of bone fracture. Bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury by augmenting inflammation. We hypothesize that bone fracture shortly before ischemic stroke also exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Tibia fracture was performed 6 or 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) on C57BL/6J mice or Ccr2RFP/+Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice that have the RFP gene knocked into one allele of Ccr2 gene and GFP gene knocked into one allele of Cx3cr1 gene. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Infarct volume, the number of CD68+ cells, apoptotic neurons, bone marrow-derived macrophages (RFP+), and microgila (GFP+) in the peri-infarct region were quantified. Compared to mice subjected to pMCAO only, bone fracture 6 or 24 hours before pMCAO increased behavioral deficits, the infarct volume, and the number of CD68+ cells and apoptotic neurons in the peri-infarct area. Both bone marrow-derived macrophages (CCR2+) and microglia (CX3CR1+) increased in the peri-infarct regions of mice subjected to bone fracture before pMCAO compared to stroke-only mice. The mice subjected to bone fracture 6 hours before pMCAO had more severe injury than mice that had bone fracture 24 hours before pMCAO. Our data showed that bone fracture shortly before stroke also increases neuroinflammation and exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Our findings suggest that inhibition of neuroinflammation or management of stroke risk factors before major bone surgery would be beneficial for patients who are likely to suffer from stroke. PMID:27089041

  19. Drug repurposing for immune modulation in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Amantea, Diana; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune cells play a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage, with classic phenotypes promoting injury, and alternatively activated M2 microglia/macrophages or N2 neutrophils providing tissue remodelling and repair. Recently, a number of drugs commonly used for other indications (i.e., azithromycin, minocycline, bexarotene, rosiglitazone, metformin) was reported to provide neuroprotection in preclinical stroke models by promoting immune polarization towards non-inflammatory, protective phenotypes. Repurposing drugs with a well-established safety profile should allow a reduction in the risk of clinical trial failure that has dominated the unsuccessful development of neuroprotective drugs in stroke during the last decades. The clinical validation of the proof of concept, followed by the assessment of safety and efficacy of immune-polarizing repurposed drugs will definitively offer new opportunities for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:26657075

  20. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  1. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Gonzales, Ernie; Soetikno, Brian; Gong, Enhao; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    A major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of ischemic stroke is the lack of a tool to noninvasively or minimally invasively monitor cerebral hemodynamics longitudinally. Here, we applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to longitudinally study ischemic stroke induced brain injury in a mouse model with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). OR-PAM showed that, during MCAO, the average hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) values of feeder arteries and draining veins within the stroke core region dropped ~10% and ~34%, respectively. After reperfusion, arterial sO2 recovered back to the baseline; however, the venous sO2 increased above the baseline value by ~7%. Thereafter, venous sO2 values were close to the arterial sO2 values, suggesting eventual brain tissue infarction.

  2. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  3. Neurological outcome after arterial ischemic stroke in children

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Jafar; Ariyana, Alireza; Yaghini, Omid; Ghazavi, Mohammad Reza; Keikhah, Mojtaba; Salari, Mehri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is an important cause of disability in children. Pediatric stroke may be due to significant permanent cognitive and motor handicap in children. In this study, we evaluated long-term outcomes of stroke in pediatric patients who have been discharged with definite diagnosis of stroke in Tehran Mofid children’s Hospital and Imam Hossein children’s Hospital located in Isfahan, Iran, from 2005 to 2012. Materials and Methods: A total of 53 children with stroke were included in the study. Stroke outcomes as motor disability, seizures, and cognitive dysfunctions were assessed. Results: After a median follow-up of 4 years, 15 (29%) patients experienced full recovery. Thirty-eight (71%) patients had some degree of neurological handicap. Conclusion: Approximately 70% of children with arterial ischemic stroke suffer from long-term neurological disabilities including motor deficits, cognitive impairment, and late seizures. Stroke recurrence is the most important risk factor responsible for severe adverse neurological outcomes in pediatric stroke. PMID:27376046

  4. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, Ralph R. E. G.; Borst, Jordi; Lucas, Marit; Boers, A. M. Merel; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    Background CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up. Materials and Methods This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0). Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT) and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT) regions. False discovery ratio (FDR), defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT) were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests. Results Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml); median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml). Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%). Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289%) and 342% (IQR:249%-432%) for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43–1.79) ml/100g (P<0.01) and 1.38 (IQR:1.15–1.49) ml/100g (P<0.01) for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly. Conclusion For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core

  5. Treatment with Evasin-3 reduces atherosclerotic vulnerability for ischemic stroke, but not brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Copin, Jean-Christophe; da Silva, Rafaela F; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Capettini, Luciano; Quintao, Silvia; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Burger, Fabienne; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Schaller, Karl; Deruaz, Maud; Proudfoot, Amanda E; Dallegri, Franco; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Santos, Robson A S; Gasche, Yvan; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophilic inflammation might have a pathophysiological role in both carotid plaque rupture and ischemic stroke injury. Here, we investigated the potential benefits of the CXC chemokine-binding protein Evasin-3, which potently inhibits chemokine bioactivity and related neutrophilic inflammation in two mouse models of carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke, respectively. In the first model, the chronic treatment with Evasin-3 as compared with Vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)) was investigated in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice implanted of a ‘cast' carotid device. In the second model, acute Evasin-3 treatment (5 minutes after cerebral ischemia onset) was assessed in mice subjected to transient left middle cerebral artery occlusion. Although CXCL1 and CXCL2 were upregulated in both atherosclerotic plaques and infarcted brain, only CXCL1 was detectable in serum. In carotid atherosclerosis, treatment with Evasin-3 was associated with reduction in intraplaque neutrophil and matrix metalloproteinase-9 content and weak increase in collagen as compared with Vehicle. In ischemic stroke, treatment with Evasin-3 was associated with reduction in ischemic brain neutrophil infiltration and protective oxidants. No other effects in clinical and histological outcomes were observed. We concluded that Evasin-3 treatment was associated with reduction in neutrophilic inflammation in both mouse models. However, Evasin-3 administration after cerebral ischemia onset failed to improve poststroke outcomes. PMID:23250107

  6. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  7. Dual targeted nanocarrier for brain ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Yan; Lv, Wei; Wang, Zhongyuan; Lv, Lingyan; Wang, Baoyan; Liu, Xin; Liu, Yang; Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Xu, Qunwei; Xin, Hongliang; Gu, Zhen

    2016-07-10

    Focal cerebral ischemia, known as stroke, causes serious long-term disabilities globally. Effective therapy for cerebral ischemia demands a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the ischemia area in brain. Here, we designed a novel neuroprotectant (ZL006) loaded dual targeted nanocarrier based on liposome (T7&SHp-P-LPs/ZL006) conjugated with T7 peptide (T7) and stroke homing peptide (SHp) for penetrating BBB and targeting ischemia area, respectively. Compared with non-targeting liposomes, T7&SHp-P-LPs/ZL006 could transport across BCEC cells and significantly enhance cellular uptake and reduce cells apoptosis of excitatory amino acid stimulated PC-12 cells. However, there was no significant difference in cellular uptake between SHp-modified and plain liposomes when PC-12 cells were incubated without excitatory amino acid. Besides, ex vivo fluorescent images indicated that DiR labeled T7&SHp-P-LPs could efficiently transport across BBB and mostly accumulated in ischemic region rather than normal cerebral hemisphere of MCAO rats. Furthermore, T7&SHp-P-LPs/ZL006 could enhance the ability of in vivo anti-ischemic stroke of MCAO rats. These results demonstrated that T7&SHp-P-LPs could be used as a safe and effective dual targeted nanocarrier for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:27142584

  8. Physical exercise training and neurovascular unit in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Feng, R; Li, W B; Ren, S Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-06-20

    Physical exercise could exert a neuroprotective effect in both clinical studies and animal experiments. A series of related studies have indicated that physical exercise could reduce infarct volume, alleviate neurological deficits, decrease blood-brain barrier dysfunction, promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system and increase the survival rate after ischemic stroke. In this review, we summarized the protective effects of physical exercise on neurovascular unit (NVU), including neurons, astrocytes, pericytes and the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that exercise training could decrease the blood-brain barrier dysfunction and promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits pre- and post stroke may lead more stroke patients and people with high-risk factors to accept exercise therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:24780769

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2014-09-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  11. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    PubMed

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  12. Comparison of Performance Achievement Award Recognition With Primary Stroke Center Certification for Acute Ischemic Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Liang, Li; Smith, Eric E.; Reeves, Mathew J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital certification and recognition programs represent 2 independent but commonly used systems to distinguish hospitals, yet they have not been directly compared. This study assessed acute ischemic stroke quality of care measure conformity by hospitals receiving Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and those receiving the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines‐Stroke (GWTG‐Stroke) Performance Achievement Award (PAA) recognition. Methods and Results The patient and hospital characteristics as well as performance/quality measures for acute ischemic stroke from 1356 hospitals participating in the GWTG‐Stroke Program 2010–2012 were compared. Hospitals were classified as PAA+/PSC+ (hospitals n=410, patients n=169 302), PAA+/PSC− (n=415, n=129 454), PAA−/PSC+ (n=88, n=26 386), and PAA−/PSC− (n=443, n=75 565). A comprehensive set of stroke measures were compared with adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics. Patient characteristics were similar by PAA and PSC status but PAA−/PSC− hospitals were more likely to be smaller and nonteaching. Measure conformity was highest for PAA+/PSC+ and PAA+/PSC− hospitals, intermediate for PAA−/PSC+ hospitals, and lowest for PAA−/PSC− hospitals (all‐or‐none care measure 91.2%, 91.2%, 84.3%, and 76.9%, respectively). After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, PAA+/PSC+, PAA+/PSC−, and PAA−/PSC+ hospitals had 3.15 (95% CIs 2.86 to 3.47); 3.23 (2.93 to 3.56) and 1.72 (1.47 to 2.00), higher odds for providing all indicated stroke performance measures to patients compared with PAA−/PSC− hospitals. Conclusions While both PSC certification and GWTG‐Stroke PAA recognition identified hospitals providing higher conformity with care measures for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke, PAA recognition was a more robust identifier of hospitals with better performance. PMID:24125846

  13. Copolymer-1 Promotes Neurogenesis and Improves Functional Recovery after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  14. Copolymer-1 promotes neurogenesis and improves functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  15. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27071728

  16. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oskar; Schröder, Christoph; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Martinetz, Thomas; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task. Methods In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random Decision Forests and Convolutional Neural Networks) are evaluated and compared with each other using 37 multiparametric MRI datasets of ischemic stroke patients in the sub-acute phase in terms of their accuracy and reliability for ischemic stroke lesion segmentation. Within this context, a multi-spectral classification approach is compared against mono-spectral classification performance using only FLAIR MRI datasets and two sets of expert segmentations are used for inter-observer agreement evaluation. Results and Conclusion The results of this study reveal that high-level machine learning methods lead to significantly better segmentation results compared to the rather simple classification methods, pointing towards a difficult non-linear problem. The overall best segmentation results were achieved by a Random Decision Forest and a Convolutional Neural Networks classification approach, even outperforming all previously published results. However, none of the methods tested in this work are capable of achieving results in the range of the human observer agreement and the automatic ischemic stroke lesion segmentation remains a complicated problem that needs to be explored in more detail to improve the segmentation results. PMID:26672989

  17. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage. PMID:22867827

  18. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures☆

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Habtemariam, Solomon; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products—ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:26869821

  19. Early embolic events complicating intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ping Song; Lin, Chien Hung; Chao, Hai Lun; Chao, A Ching

    2012-11-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) is the only established thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, secondary embolism after IV rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is recognized as an uncommon complication, and the pathophysiology is unclear. We describe a 72-year-old man with acute infarction in the territory of left anterior cerebral artery who developed new infarction in the territory of right middle cerebral artery and acute peripheral arterial occlusion after IV rt-PA therapy. It suggested a central embolic source. Because the patient has paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (Af), the possible embolic sources may come from fragmentation of pre-existing intra-atrial clot. Although Af and the presence of cardiac thrombus are not contraindication for IV rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke, our case and review suggested that the administration of IV rt-PA to patients with known Af and intracardiac thrombus could represent a particular risk situation and should be carefully evaluated. PMID:22205004

  20. Effect and Safety of Rosuvastatin in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ji Hoe; Song, Dongbeom; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Kyung-Yul; Lee, Ki-Jeong; Yoo, Joonsang; Kim, Youn Nam; Lee, Byung Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The benefit of statins in acute stroke remains uncertain. Statins may prevent stroke recurrence during the acute stage of stroke via pleiotropic effects. However, statins may increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. We investigated the effect and safety of rosuvastatin in acute stroke patients. Methods This randomized, double-blind, multi-center trial compared rosuvastatin 20 mg and placebo in statin-naïve stroke patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 48 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was occurrence of new ischemic lesions on DWI at 5 or 14 days. Results This trial was stopped early after randomization of 316 patients due to slow enrollment. Among 289 patients with at least one follow-up imaging, the frequency of new ischemic lesions on DWI was not different between groups (rosuvastatin: 27/137, 19.7% vs. placebo: 36/152, 23.6%) (relative risk 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.53–1.30). Infarct volume growth at 5 days (log-transformed volume change, rosuvastatin: 0.2±1.0 mm3 vs. placebo: 0.3±1.3 mm3; P=0.784) was not different, either. However, hemorrhagic infarction or parenchymal/subarachnoid hemorrhage on gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging occurred less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (6/137, 4.4%) than the placebo group (22/152, 14.5%, P=0.007). Among 314 patients with at least one dose of study medication, progression or clinical recurrence of stroke tended to occur less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (1/155, 0.6% vs. 7/159, 4.4%, P=0.067). Adverse events did not differ between groups. Conclusions The efficacy of rosuvastatin in reducing recurrence in acute stroke was inconclusive. However, statin use was safe and reduced hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:26846760

  1. History, Evolution, and Importance of Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Yu, Amy Y X; Assis, Zarina A; Al Sultan, Abdulaziz S; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    More than 800,000 people in North America suffer a stroke each year, with ischemic stroke making up the majority of these cases. The outcomes of ischemic stroke range from complete functional and cognitive recovery to severe disability and death; outcome is strongly associated with timely reperfusion treatment. Historically, ischemic stroke has been treated with intravenous thrombolytic agents with moderate success. However, five recently published positive trials have established the efficacy of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we will discuss the history of stroke treatments moving from various intravenous thrombolytic drugs to intra-arterial thrombolysis, early mechanical thrombectomy devices, and finally modern endovascular devices. Early endovascular therapy failures, recent successes, and implications for current ischemic stroke management and future research directions are discussed. PMID:27021771

  2. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  3. Ambient air pollution and risk of ischemic stroke and TIA

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, LD; Escobar, JD; Dvonch, JT; Sanchez, BN; Majersik, JJ; Brown, DL; Smith, MA; Morgenstern, LB

    2009-01-01

    Background Data on the association between air pollution and cerebrovascular disease in the US are limited. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between short-term exposure to ambient air pollution and risk of ischemic cerebrovascular events in a US community. Methods Daily counts of ischemic strokes/TIAs (2001–2005) were obtained from the population-based Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) Project. Daily particulate matter <2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and meteorological data were obtained from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. To examine the association between PM2.5 and stroke/TIA risk, Poisson regression was used. Separate models included same day PM2.5, PM2.5 lagged 1–5 days, and an averaged lag effect. All models were adjusted for temperature, day of week and temporal trends in stroke/TIA. The effects of O3 were also investigated. Results Median PM2.5 was 7.0 μg/m3 (Inter Quartile Range (IQR): 4.8–10.0). There were borderline significant associations between same day (RR=1.03, 95% CI:0.99–1.07 for an IQR increase in PM2.5) and previous day (RR=1.03, 95% CI:1.00–1.07) PM2.5 and stroke/TIA risk. These associations were independent of O3, which demonstrated similar associations with stroke/TIA risk (same day RR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.97–1.08 and previous day RR=1.04, 95% CI: 0.99–1.09) in two pollutant models. Inference We observed associations between recent PM2.5 and O3 exposure and ischemic stroke/TIA risk even in this community with relatively low pollutant levels. This study provides data on environmental exposures and stroke risk in the US and suggests future research on ambient air pollution and stroke is warranted. PMID:18508356

  4. Imaging of occlusive thrombi in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gasparian, GG; Sanossian, N; Shiroishi, MS; Liebeskind, DS

    2015-01-01

    Thrombi, or clots, often occlude proximal segments of the cerebral arterial circulation in acute ischemic stroke. Thromboembolic occlusion or thrombi superimposed on atherosclerotic plaque are the principal focus of acute stroke therapies such as thrombolysis or thrombectomy. We review the imaging characteristics of thrombi on multimodal CT and MRI, angiography and ultrasonography, summarizing recent studies that facilitate therapeutic decision-making from these noninvasive studies. Information about the location, size and imaging characteristics can be ascertained using these techniques. Imaging findings in relation to occlusive thrombus have been correlated with clot pathology, response to therapeutic interventions, and clinical outcome. Diagnostic evaluation of occlusive thrombi on noninvasive studies now constitutes an integral component of acute stroke management. PMID:25545291

  5. Associations of functional alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 gene variants with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Ilkka; Kleber, Marcus E; Bevan, Steve; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Hernesniemi, Jussi A; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Mononen, Nina; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sinisalo, Juha; Delgado, Graciela E; Laaksonen, Reijo; Koskinen, Tuomas; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kähönen, Mika; Markus, Hugh S; März, Winfried; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) impair nitric oxide bioavailability and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) is the only enzyme capable of metabolizing both of the dimethylarginines. We hypothesized that two functional AGXT2 missense variants (rs37369, V140I; rs16899974, V498L) are associated with AF and its cardioembolic complications. Association analyses were conducted using 1,834 individulas with AF and 7,159 unaffected individuals from two coronary angiography cohorts and a cohort comprising patients undergoing clinical exercise testing. In coronary angiography patients without structural heart disease, the minor A allele of rs16899974 was associated with any AF (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.59-2.68), and with paroxysmal AF (OR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.44-2.74) and chronic AF (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.35-3.06) separately. We could not replicate the association with AF in the other two cohorts. However, the A allele of rs16899974 was nominally associated with ischemic stroke risk in the meta-analysis of WTCCC2 ischemic stroke cohorts (3,548 cases, 5,972 controls) and with earlier onset of first-ever ischemic stroke (360 cases) in the cohort of clinical exercise test patients. In conclusion, AGXT2 variations may be involved in the pathogenesis of AF and its age-related thromboembolic complications. PMID:26984639

  6. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  7. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  8. Association of selenoprotein S gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in a Chinese case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Xia; Guan, Hong-Jun; Liu, Jian-Ping; Guo, Yu-Peng; Yang, Yong; Niu, Ying-Ying; Yao, Li-Yan; Yang, Yin-Dong; Yue, Hong-Yu; Meng, Li-Li; Cui, Xin-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Wei; Gao, Jin-Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that selenoprotein S (SELS) was associated with a range of inflammatory markers, and its gene expression was influenced by a polymorphism in the promoter region. The genetic basis of the ischemic stroke has now been largely determined, so the aim of the study was to examine the role of SELS genetic variants in the ischemic stroke risk in a Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study with 239 ischemic stroke patients and 240 controls. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SELS genes were analyzed for association with the risk of ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population. No evidence of ischemic stroke association was observed with the SNP rs34713741. Interestingly, the strongest evidence showed that SELS SNP rs4965814 was associated with ischemic stroke (P < 0.05). We found a significant association with increased ischemic stroke risk in women carrying the CC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 2.43(1.03-5.75)]; a similar trend was also found in men carrying the TC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 1.81(1.06-3.08)]. SNP rs4965814 of SELS may affect the susceptibility to ischemic stroke. Understanding the inflammatory mechanisms of ischemic stroke may give new therapeutic targets to pharmacologists. PMID:25390504

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Ischemic Stroke: Progress and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Maria Ferri, Anna Lucia; Bersano, Anna; Lisini, Daniela; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Frigerio, Simona; Parati, Eugenio

    2016-05-27

    Stroke is the most common neurological cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, afflicting 15 million people every year. The numbers are expected to increase, mostly due to aging populations. One in five stroke patients dies, and one in three are left with permanent disabilities. Although some acute phase therapies such as intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) andendovascular treatment have been shown to improve ischemic stroke outcome, these therapies are available only for a small proportion of patients. The use of stem cells to replace brain cells lost during stroke is a long-term goal, and one which is difficult to achieve given that transplanted cells must integrate and restore neural pathways to regain function of damaged parts of the brain. Over the past decade the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as therapy has emerged as a particularly attractive option. MSCs are a class of multipotent, self-renewing cells that give rise to differentiated progeny when implanted into appropriate tissues. Herein, we present a review of the application of MSCs in ischemic stroke, including the source of MSCs, the route and timing of their delivery into the brain and the endpoints measured. Experimental data of transplantation of MSCs in animal stroke models suggest an improved functional recovery. The transplantation of MSCs influences a wide range of events by modulating the inflammatory environment, stimulating endogenous neurogenesis and angiogenesis and reducing the formation of glial scar, although the precise, underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. The results from early clinical trials highlight the need to optimize variables such as cell selection and route of administration in order to translate these results into safe and successful clinical applications. PMID:26898654

  10. Hemodilution increases cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Vorstrup, S.; Andersen, A.; Juhler, M.; Brun, B.; Boysen, G.

    1989-07-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow in 10 consecutive, but selected, patients with acute ischemic stroke (less than 48 hours after onset) before and after hemodilution. Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and emission tomography, and only patients with focal hypoperfusion in clinically relevant areas were included. Hemodilution was done according to the hematocrit level: for a hematocrit greater than or equal to 42%, 500 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by the same volume of dextran 40; for a hematocrit between 37% and 42%, only 250 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by 500 cc of dextran 40. Mean hematocrit was reduced by 16%, from 46 +/- 5% (SD) to 39 +/- 5% (SD) (p less than 0.001). Cerebral blood flow increased in both hemispheres by an average of 20.9% (p less than 0.001). Regional cerebral blood flow increased in the ischemic areas in all cases, on an average of 21.4 +/- 12.0% (SD) (p less than 0.001). In three patients, a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the hypoperfused areas was observed, and in six patients, the fractional cerebral blood flow increase in the hypoperfused areas was of the same magnitude as in the remainder of the brain. In the last patient, cerebral blood flow increased relatively less in the ischemic areas. Our findings show that cerebral blood flow increases in the ischemic areas after hemodilution therapy in stroke patients. The marked regional cerebral blood flow increase seen in some patients could imply an improved oxygen delivery to the ischemic tissue.

  11. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  12. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  13. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  14. Retrosternal mass: An interesting allergic reaction to intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Badi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA,) is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:24250917

  15. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  16. Ischemic penumbra in acute stroke: Demonstration by PET with fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S.; Hu, H.H.

    1994-05-01

    Ischemic penumbra (IP) in acute stroke has gained clinical interest since tissue functions may be recovered if perfusion can be reestablished. However, such therapeutic intervention is {open_quotes}blind{close_quotes} since clinical examination can not distinguish IP from developing infarction. In vivo demonstration of IP may have significance for stroke patient management. This study was a preliminary evaluation of detecting IP in vivo by F-18 fluoromisonidazole ([F-18]-FMISO), a hypoxic imaging agent. Static PET imaging was performed after IV injection of 370 MBq of [F-18]-FMISO at 20 and 120 min. Tomograms were reconstructed and evaluated visually in correlation with CT or MR scans. In acute stroke, patients (pts) were called back for the second PET study one month after the initial study. CT was used for confirming infarction. In 6 pts with acute cerebral infarction, three of them had intense [F-18]-FMISO retention in the penumbra surrounding the central, eclipse-like zone of absent radio-activity (infarction) at 2 hr in the acute state, and the penumbra disappeared in association with increased area of infarction on CT in one case in the chronic state. In five pts with chronic infarction, all had no penumbra of [F-18]-FMISO retention. In summary, our preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of using [F-18]-FMISO PET to detect ischemic penumbra in vivo.

  17. Neuroprotection in ischemic stroke: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D; Brainin, Michael; Guekht, Alla

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative and vascular disease processes are commonly found concurrently in the brains of elderly patients, highlighting the difficulty in determining which processes may be responsible for cognitive impairment. Therapeutically, it may be more sensible to assume that most patients have mixed dementia. Therefore, therapies with multimodal modes of action would be expected to confer neuronal protection. Ischemic stroke is also associated with a complex pathophysiology and a high incidence of post-stroke cognitive impairment, but evidence for the efficacy of neuroprotective treatments in humans is contradictory (mainly due to a failed translation from bench to bedside). Nevertheless, emerging drug therapies continue to undergo testing in prospective, randomized, controlled studies. Natural biologicals, such as Actovegin, or smaller biological molecules with multifaceted effects in the restorative phase of ischemia are likely candidates for efficacy testing. In addition, a number of non-pharmacological interventions, especially lifestyle interventions, are also the subject of current research and would eventually be expected to supplement the treatment and prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:25708307

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng; Tong, Wesley C.; Lu, Xiao-Xin; Peng, Hui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Stroke, also known as cerebrovascular disease, is a common and serious neurological disease, which is also the fourth leading cause of death in the United States so far. Hyperbaric medicine, as an emerging interdisciplinary subject, has been applied in the treatment of cerebral vascular diseases since the 1960s. Now it is widely used to treat a variety of clinical disorders, especially hypoxia-induced disorders. However, owing to the complex mechanisms of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, the therapeutic time window and the undefined dose as well as some common clinical side effects (such as middle ear barotrauma), the widespread promotion and application of HBO was hindered, slowing down the hyperbaric medicine development. In August 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration declared artery occlusion as one of the 13 specific indications for HBO therapy. This provides opportunities, to some extent, for the further development of hyperbaric medicine. Currently, the mechanisms of HBO therapy for ischemic stroke are still not very clear. This review focuses on the potential mechanisms of HBO therapy in acute ischemic stroke as well as the time window. PMID:25337089

  19. Profile of prothrombotic factors in Indian children with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Konanki, Ramesh; Gulati, Sheffali; Saxena, Renu; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Seith, Ashu; Kumar, Ashok; Saxena, Anita; Kabra, Madhulika; Kalra, Veena; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan

    2014-08-01

    This study was undertaken in view of paucity of data regarding the profile of prothrombotic factors in children with ischemic stroke. Sixty-four children with ischemic stroke were prospectively evaluated for prothrombotic factors over a 2 year period. The blood samples were analyzed for protein C (PC), protein S (PS), activated protein C resistance (APCR), factor V Leiden (FVL), anti-thrombin-III (AT-III), lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], lupus anticoagulant (LA), anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL) immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG, homocysteine, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) at least 3 months after the onset of stroke. At least one prothrombotic factor was identified in 45.3% children (29/64). These included hyperhomocysteinemia (11/64), PC deficiency (9/64), aCL (8/64), PS deficiency (5/64), APCR (3/64), AT-III deficiency (2/64) and LA (1/64). Multiple factors were coexistent in 17.2% (11/64). The prevalence of PC deficiency, PS deficiency and co-existence of multiple abnormalities observed were similar to the published literature. Elevated Lp(a) and APCR were less prevalent. FVL and MTHFR were not seen in any of the study children. Forty-five percent of children had at least one prothrombotic abnormality. Hyperhomocysteinemia, PC deficiency, aCL and PS deficiency were the most frequent prothrombotic abnormalities. PMID:24629397

  20. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research. PMID:25657726

  1. Novel Thrombolytics for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Logallo, Nicola; Kvistad, Christopher E; Nacu, Aliona; Thomassen, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Progress in finding a better alternative to alteplase has been slow. Tenecteplase and desmoteplase have better pharmacological profiles compared with alteplase, but definite clinical evidence of their superiority is lacking. The two major phase III studies that have tested the efficacy and safety of desmoteplase in ischemic stroke patients have shown neutral results and a promising safety profile, but the trials compared desmoteplase with placebo only in late admitted patients. Future trials should focus on testing novel thrombolytics in the early time window either as the sole acute recanalizing treatment or combined with thrombectomy. PMID:26798040

  2. [Ischemic stroke in childhood. A complication of tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Matilla Álvarez, A; García Serrano, E; González de la Huebra Labrador, T; Morales Martín, A C; Yusta Martín, G; Vaquero Roncero, L M

    2016-02-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed otorhinolaryngological procedures on children. The postoperative complications are classified into primary or intermediate, which generally appear within 24h, and as secondary or delayed, after 48 h. We present the case of an ischemic stroke after performing a tonsillectomy on a 3 year-old boy, which was diagnosed in the immediate postoperative period. Using brain echo-doppler and angio-CT, an intraluminal clot was observed in the left internal carotid artery, probably as a result of direct vessel injury during arterial ligature for hemostasis. PMID:26025286

  3. Anton's Syndrome due to Bilateral Ischemic Occipital Lobe Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Zukić, Sanela; Sinanović, Osman; Hodžić, Renata; Mujagić, Svjetlana; Smajlović, Edina

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with Anton's syndrome (i.e., visual anosognosia with confabulations), who developed bilateral occipital lobe infarct. Bilateral occipital brain damage results in blindness, and patients start to confabulate to fill in the missing sensory input. In addition, the patient occasionally becomes agitated and talks to himself, which indicates that, besides Anton's syndrome, he might have had Charles Bonnet syndrome, characterized by both visual loss and hallucinations. Anton syndrome, is not so frequent condition and is most commonly caused by ischemic stroke. In this particular case, the patient had successive bilateral occipital ischemia as a result of massive stenoses of head and neck arteries. PMID:25530893

  4. Anton's Syndrome due to Bilateral Ischemic Occipital Lobe Strokes.

    PubMed

    Zukić, Sanela; Sinanović, Osman; Zonić, Lejla; Hodžić, Renata; Mujagić, Svjetlana; Smajlović, Edina

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with Anton's syndrome (i.e., visual anosognosia with confabulations), who developed bilateral occipital lobe infarct. Bilateral occipital brain damage results in blindness, and patients start to confabulate to fill in the missing sensory input. In addition, the patient occasionally becomes agitated and talks to himself, which indicates that, besides Anton's syndrome, he might have had Charles Bonnet syndrome, characterized by both visual loss and hallucinations. Anton syndrome, is not so frequent condition and is most commonly caused by ischemic stroke. In this particular case, the patient had successive bilateral occipital ischemia as a result of massive stenoses of head and neck arteries. PMID:25530893

  5. Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blockages that lead to ischemic strokes. A hemorrhagic stroke occurs if an artery in the brain leaks ... risms) are examples of conditions that can cause hemorrhagic strokes. (Aneurysms are balloon-like bulges in an artery ...

  6. Timing of blood pressure lowering in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carcel, Cheryl; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    Whether there are any benefits without harm from early lowering of blood pressure (BP) in the setting of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been a longstanding controversy in medicine. Whilst most studies have consistently shown associations between elevated BP, particularly systolic BP, and poor outcome, some also report that very low BP (systolic <130 mmHg) and large reductions in systolic BP are associated with poor outcomes in AIS. However, despite these associations, the observed U- or J-shaped relationship between BP and outcome in these patients may not be causally related. Patients with more severe strokes may have a more prominent autonomic response and later lower BP as their condition worsens, often pre-terminally. Fortunately, substantial progress has been made in recent years with new evidence arising from well-conducted randomized trials. This review outlines new evidence and recommendations for clinical practice over BP management in AIS. PMID:26041479

  7. Ischemic Stroke in Confederation with Trivial Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shegji, Vijaykumar

    2016-01-01

    Minor head injuries in children are common, resulting in brain concussion, and these injuries mostly end up without complications. Usually head trauma results in hemorrhagic stroke. Here we present a case of ischemic stroke following a trivial head trauma. A 10-month-old girl presented with posttraumatic right sided hemiparesis with right sided facial palsy. MRI brain revealed an area of acute infarct in the left capsuloganglionic region. The child was initially managed conservatively, as the hematological parameters were normal, and was started on anticoagulant therapy. An improvement in the clinical condition was achieved in 12 hrs of treatment with gain in power and resolution of weakness in 10 days. The specific cause for hemiparesis in the child is not elicited; possibility of genetic and environmental factors can be attributable. PMID:27313936

  8. NINJ2 polymorphism is associated with ischemic stroke in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xin-hong; Li, Shu-juan; Cheng, Ping; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Xin-chun; Zhong, Guang-zhen; Hu, Wen-li; Jin, Li; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2011-09-15

    Recently, a genome-wide association study reported an association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs11833579 and rs12425791 near NINJ2 gene and ischemic stroke in Caucasians. Therefore, NINJ2 gene is an important candidate locus in the prevalence of ischemic stroke. We performed a hospital based genetic association study in Chinese Han subjects to investigate the relationship between NINJ2 gene and ischemic stroke. We genotyped 14 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNP) in 749 ischemic stroke subjects and 924 control subjects and conducted the association between these tSNPs and ischemic stroke. We detected a tSNP rs10849373 in the first intron of the NINJ2 gene significantly associated with ischemic stroke (both genotype and allelic p=0.0001). The minor A allele increased the risk of ischemic stroke with a per-allele OR of 1.37 for the additive genetic model in univariate analysis (p=0.0001). The significance remained after adjustment for the covariates of age, gender, BMI, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, hypertension, and diabetes. Therefore, we report a new genetic variant, rs10849373, located in the first intron of the NINJ2 gene, conferring risk of ischemic stroke in Chinese Han subjects. Further genetic association and functional studies are required to search the causal functional variant in linkage disequilibrium with this polymorphism. PMID:21722921

  9. Neurotoxic lipid peroxidation species formed by ischemic stroke increase injury

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Stephanie L. H.; Musiek, Erik S.; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Vidari, Giovanni; Morrow, Jason D.; Milne, Ginger J.; McLaughlin, BethAnn

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States yet no neuroprotective agents for treatment are clinically available. There is a pressing need to understand the signaling molecules which mediate ischemic cell death and identify novel neuroprotective targets. Cyclopentenone isoprostanes (IsoP), formed following free radical mediated peroxidation of arachidonic acid, are used as markers of stress but their bioactivity is poorly understood. We have recently shown that 15-A2t-Isop is a potent neurotoxin in vitro and increases the free radical burden in neurons. In this work, we demonstrate that 15-A2t-IsoP is abundantly produced in stroke infarcted human cortical tissue. Using primary neuronal cultures we found that minimally toxic exposure to 15-A2t-IsoP does not alter ATP content, but in combination with oxygen glucose deprivation resulted in a significant hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and dramatically increased neuronal cell death. In the presence of Ca2+, 15-A2t-IsoP led to a rapid induction of the permeability transition pore and release of cytochrome c. Taken with our previous work, these data support a model in which ischemia causes generation of reactive oxygen species, calcium influx, lipid peroxidation and 15-A2t-IsoP formation. These factors combine to enhance opening of the permeability transition pore leading to cell death subsequent to mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This data is the first documentation of significant 15-A2t-IsoP formation following acute ischemic stroke and suggests addition of 15-A2t-IsoP to in vitro models of ischemia may help to more fully recapitulate stroke injury. PMID:19699297

  10. Carotid Artery Stenosis with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Stenting versus Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Villwock, Mark R.; Padalino, David J.; Deshaies, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Background When a patient with carotid artery stenosis presents emergently with acute ischemic stroke, the optimum treatment plan is not clearly defined. If intervention is warranted, and open surgery is prohibitive, endovascular revascularization may be performed. The use of stents places the patient at additional risk due to their thrombogenic potential. The intent of this study was to compare outcomes following endovascular approaches (angioplasty alone vs. stent) in the setting of acute stroke. Methods We extracted a population from the National Inpatient Sample (2012) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2003–2011) composed of patients with carotid artery stenosis with infarction that were admitted nonelectively and received endovascular revascularization. Patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy or thrombolysis were excluded. Categorical variables were compared between treatment groups with Chi-squared tests. Binary logistic regression was performed to evaluate mortality and iatrogenic stroke while controlling for age, case severity, and comorbidity burden. Results About 6,333 admissions met our criteria. A majority were treated via stenting (89%, n = 5,608). The angioplasty-alone group had significantly higher mortality (9.0% vs. 3.8%, p < 0.001) and iatrogenic stroke rate (3.9% vs. 1.9%, p < 0.001) than the stent group. The adjusted odds ratios of mortality and iatrogenic stroke for patients treated with angioplasty alone were 1.953 (p < 0.001) and 1.451 (p = 0.105), respectively, in comparison to patients treated with carotid stenting. Conclusion Multivariate analysis found the risk of mortality to be elevated following angioplasty alone. This may represent selection bias, but it also may indicate that symptomatic patients with stroke suffer from severe stenosis and unstable plaques that would benefit from stent placement. These results would caution angioplasty alone as an arm of a future randomized trial involving this severely burdened patient

  11. Dynamic changes in neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following permanent ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi-hao; He, Hong-yun; Yang, Li-qiang; Zhang, Peng-yue

    2016-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following stroke remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra to provide insight into potential therapeutic targets for stroke. An adult Sprague-Dawley rat model of permanent ischemic stroke was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra post-ischemia were evaluated by western blot assay and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Levels of both LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 in the penumbra gradually increased within 5 hours post-ischemia. Thereafter, levels of both proteins declined, especially LC3-II. The cerebral infarct volume increased slowly 1–4 hours after ischemia, but subsequently increased rapidly until 5 hours after ischemia. The severity of the neurological deficit was positively correlated with infarct volume. LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 levels were high in the penumbra within 5 hours after ischemia, and after that, levels of these proteins decreased at different rates. LC3-II levels were reduced to a very low level, but cleaved caspase-3 levels remained high 72 hours after ischemia. These results indicate that there are temporal differences in the activation status of the autophagic and apoptotic pathways. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of these pathways should take into consideration their unique temporal dynamics.

  12. Ultrahigh-Field MRI in Human Ischemic Stroke – a 7 Tesla Study

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Miriam; Stengl, Katharina L.; Mutke, Matthias A.; Tovar-Martinez, Elena; Wuerfel, Jens; Endres, Matthias; Niendorf, Thoralf; Sobesky, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using field strengths up to 3 Tesla (T) has proven to be a powerful tool for stroke diagnosis. Recently, ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI at 7 T has shown relevant diagnostic benefits in imaging of neurological diseases, but its value for stroke imaging has not been investigated yet. We present the first evaluation of a clinically feasible stroke imaging protocol at 7 T. For comparison an established stroke imaging protocol was applied at 3 T. Methods In a prospective imaging study seven patients with subacute and chronic stroke were included. Imaging at 3 T was immediately followed by 7 T imaging. Both protocols included T1-weighted 3D Magnetization-Prepared Rapid-Acquired Gradient-Echo (3D-MPRAGE), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-FLAIR), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-T2-TSE), T2* weighted 2D Fast Low Angle Shot Gradient Echo (2D-HemoFLASH) and 3D Time-of-Flight angiography (3D-TOF). Results The diagnostic information relevant for clinical stroke imaging obtained at 3 T was equally available at 7 T. Higher spatial resolution at 7 T revealed more anatomical details precisely depicting ischemic lesions and periinfarct alterations. A clear benefit in anatomical resolution was also demonstrated for vessel imaging at 7 T. RF power deposition constraints induced scan time prolongation and reduced brain coverage for 2D-FLAIR, 2D-T2-TSE and 3D-TOF at 7 T versus 3 T. Conclusions The potential of 7 T MRI for human stroke imaging is shown. Our pilot study encourages a further evaluation of the diagnostic benefit of stroke imaging at 7 T in a larger study. PMID:22701525

  13. Intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical embolectomy, and intracranial stenting for hyperacute ischemic stroke in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Argetsinger, Debora S; Miller, Jeffrey W; Fletcher, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese translation of moyamoya means "puff of smoke" and refers to the angiographic appearance of dilated collateral vessels seen during chronic progressive narrowing of the intracranial supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid arteries. Despite cerebral ischemia being the most common presenting symptom, 20% to 40% of adults suffer a hemorrhagic stroke. Due to the lack of evidence and histopathologic findings, intravenous and endovascular reperfusion therapy is typically avoided. This case study presents a patient with moyamoya disease in the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke. The patient received full dose (0.9mg/kg) tissue plasminogen activator and subsequently underwent a mechanical clot extraction and Wingspan stent (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) placement. The use of these options in the setting of moyamoya disease is novel. This demonstrates that moyamoya disease may not be an absolute contraindication to revascularization in hyperacute ischemic stroke and underscores that many perceived contraindications to thrombolytic and mechanical revascularization therapies are relative. PMID:26896911

  14. Circadian variation in stroke onset: identical temporal pattern in ischemic and hemorrhagic events.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Roberto; Boari, Benedetta; Smolensky, Michael H; Salmi, Raffaella; la Cecilia, Olga; Maria Malagoni, Anna; Haus, Erhard; Manfredini, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    Stroke is the culmination of a heterogeneous group of cerebrovascular diseases that is manifested as ischemia or hemorrhage of one or more blood vessels of the brain. The occurrence of many acute cardiovascular events--such as myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, pulmonary embolism, critical limb ischemia, and aortic aneurysm rupture--exhibits prominent 24 h patterning, with a major morning peak and secondary early evening peak. The incidence of stroke exhibits the same 24 h pattern. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical double-peak 24 h pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulative balance, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important. Clinical medicine has been most concerned with the prevention of stroke in the morning, when population-based studies show it is of greatest risk during the 24 h; however, improved protection of at-risk patients against stroke in the early evening, the second most vulnerable time of cerebrovascular accidents, has received relatively little attention thus far. PMID:16076646

  15. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  16. Neuroprotective effect of osthole against acute ischemic stroke on middle cerebral ischemia occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Tao; Liu, Wenbo; Dong, Wenpeng; Qu, Yan; Jiang, Xiaofan; Ji, Xituan; Zhen, Haining; Fei, Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, has taken considerable attention because of its diverse pharmacological functions. It has been reported to be useful in the treatment of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and neuronal damage. In the present study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of osthole and its potential mechanisms against acute ischemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. The rats were pretreated with osthole 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg 30 min before MCAO. The neuroprotective effect of osthole against acute ischemic stroke was evaluated by neurological deficit score (NDS), dry-wet weight and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH), activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the level of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 after 2h of MCAO in rats were detected to investigate its anti-oxidative action and anti-inflammatory property. Pretreatment with osthole significantly increased in GSH, and decreased the volume of infarction, NDS, edema, MDA, MPO, IL-1β and IL-8 compared with rats in the MCAO group at 24h after MCAO. The study suggests the neuroprotective effect of osthole in the MCAO model of rats. The anti-oxidative action and anti-inflammatory property of osthole may contribute to a beneficial effect against stroke. PMID:20869955

  17. NEUROPROTECTION FOR ISCHEMIC STROKE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection for ischemic stroke refers to strategies, applied singly or in combination, that antagonize the injurious biochemical and molecular events that eventuate in irreversible ischemic injury. There has been a recent explosion of interest in this field, with over 1000 experimental papers and over 400 clinical articles appearing within the past 6 years. These studies, in turn, are the outgrowth of three decades of investigative work to define the multiple mechanisms and mediators of ischemic brain injury, which constitute potential targets of neuroprotection. Rigorously conducted experimental studies in animal models of brain ischemia provide incontrovertible proof-of-principle that high-grade protection of the ischemic brain is an achievable goal. Nonetheless, many agents have been brought to clinical trial without a sufficiently compelling evidence-based pre-clinical foundation. At this writing, around 160 clinical trials of neuroprotection for ischemic stroke have been initiated. Of the approximately 120 completed trials, two-thirds were smaller early-phase safety-feasibility studies. The remaining one-third were typically larger (>200 subjects) phase II or III trials, but, disappointingly, only fewer than one-half of these administered neuroprotective therapy within the 4–6 hour therapeutic window within which efficacious neuroprotection is considered to be achievable. This fact alone helps to account for the abundance of “failed” trials. This review presents a close survey of the most extensively evaluated neuroprotective agents and classes and considers both the strengths and weakness of the pre-clinical evidence as well as the results and shortcomings of the clinical trials themselves. Among the agent-classes considered are calcium channel blockers; glutamate antagonists; GABA agonists; antioxidants/radical scavengers; phospholipid precursor; nitric oxide signal-transduction down-regulator; leukocyte inhibitors; hemodilution; and a miscellany

  18. Endothelial Dysfunction and Procoagulant Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Arnon; Vaispapir, Vladimir; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Soboh, Soboh; Yehuda, Hila; Tamir, Snait

    2012-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilator function may be regarded as an index of inflammation. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity, and outcome. Our aim was to measure systemic vascular function directly (using forearm flow mediated dilatation) in patients with acute ischemic stroke and to clarify whether recent acute ischemic stroke is associated with impaired vascular function. Patients who were not eligible for thrombolytic therapy because of delayed arrival were randomly recruited to the study after signing a consent form. All 43 patients were conscious and had an acute ischemic stroke. Brain CT was performed on admission, and clinical evaluation was carried out by a neurologist on admission and four days later. Vascular responsiveness was evaluated by ABI and by endothelial function measurements on admission. Levels of P-selectin were measured during the first 24 hrs and on day 4. Forty-three patients (28 men and 15 women) and 23 healthy men (control) were enrolled in the study. Patients were older (62.4±12.5 y vs 44.2±11.6 y, p=0.001), had worse endothelial dysfunction (–4.4±7.4% vs 16.6±7.6%, p=0.001), and had a higher BMI (28±6 vs 24±5, p=0.001). No gender effect was found in endothelial function (–5.1±7.8% vs –2.5±6.6%, p=0.25) and ABI (1.0±0.26 vs 1.0±0.5, p=0.29). However, men had lower BMIs compared to women (26.8±5.8 vs 31.4±5.5, p=0.01). The neurological scale decreased from 4.9±3.4 to 3.2±3.0 on day 4 (p=0.001). In men, it was 4.8±3.8 on admission, and decreased to 3.2±3.4 on day 4 (p=0.001). In women, it was 5.0±2.7, and decreased to 3.3±2.3 on day 4 (p=0.001). P-selectin levels were high on admission (68.0±55.5 pg/ml) and increased 4 days later (102.3±72.0 pg/ml) (p=0.01). Men had higher levels on admission (79.1± 66.7 pg/ml vs 48.9± 15.4 pg/ml, p=0.02) and rose on day 4 to 113.6±82.6 pg/ml (p=0.05); in women P

  19. An Inflammatory Polymorphisms Risk Scoring System for the Differentiation of Ischemic Stroke Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, Elena; Krupinski, Jurek; Carrera, Caty; Gallego-Fabrega, Cristina; Montaner, Joan; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been associated with atherothrombotic stroke and recently with cardioembolic stroke. Different genetic risk factors have been specifically associated with the subtypes of ischemic stroke (cardioembolic, atherothrombotic, and lacunar). However, there are no studies that have generated genetic risk scores for the different subtypes of ischemic stroke using polymorphisms associated with inflammation. Methods. We have analyzed 68 polymorphisms of 30 inflammatory mediator genes in 2,685 subjects: 1,987 stroke cases and 698 controls. We generated a genetic scoring system with the most significant polymorphisms weighted by the odds ratio of every polymorphism and taken into consideration the stroke subtype. Results. Three polymorphisms, rs1205 (CRP gene), rs1800779, and rs2257073 (NOS3 gene), were associated with cardioembolic stroke (p value <0.05). The score generated was only associated with the cardioembolic stroke subtype (p value: 0.001) and was replicated in an independent cohort (p value: 0.017). The subjects with the highest score presented a cardioembolic stroke in 92.2% of the cases (p value: 0.002). Conclusion. The genetics of inflammatory markers is more closely associated with cardioembolic strokes than with atherothrombotic or lacunar strokes. The genetic risk scoring system could be useful in the prediction and differentiation of ischemic stroke; however, it might be specific to particular ischemic stroke subtypes. PMID:26355258

  20. Mean platelet volume is related with ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Buğra; Arik, Osman Z; Gözükara, Mehmet Y; Şahin, Durmuş Y; Topal, Salih; Uysal, Onur K; Elbasan, Zafer; Epçeliden, Tuncay; Çayli, Murat; Gür, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability worldwide. It is known that atrial fibrillation and left atrial enlargement contribute ischemic stroke, and mean platelet volume (MPV) increases in patients with ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. We aimed to determine whether higher MPV is associated with ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm. We evaluated 74 patients in sinus rhythm and with ischemic stroke (Group 1) and 90 age-matched and sex-matched healthy individuals as control group (Group 2). After physical and echocardiographic examination, 24-48 h Holter monitoring and complete blood counts were studied. There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex rates, and comorbidities between groups. Left atrial diameter was higher in Group 1 than Group 2 (P = 0.001), but both were in normal range. MPV was significantly higher in Group 1 (P < 0.001) and was an independent determinant [odds ratio (OR): 1.840; P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.330-2.545] of ischemic stroke with left atrial (OR: 1.138; P = 0.006; 95% CI 1.037-1.248). In conclusion, higher MPV is associated with acute ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm and without heart failure or left atrial enlargement. MPV and left atrial diameter are independent predictors of ischemic stroke in this patient population. PMID:24686100

  1. Variation in mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in relation to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ho; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor temperature has been reported to have a significant influence on the seasonal variations of stroke mortality, but few studies have investigated the effect of high temperature on the mortality of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. The main study goal was to examine the effect of temperature, particularly high temperature, on ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. We investigated the association between outdoor temperature and stroke mortality in four metropolitan cities in Korea during 1992-2007. We used time series analysis of the age-adjusted mortality rate for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke deaths by using generalized additive and generalized linear models, and estimated the percentage change of mortality rate associated with a 1°C increase of mean temperature. The temperature-responses for the hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality differed, particularly in the range of high temperature. The estimated percentage change of ischemic stroke mortality above a threshold temperature was 5.4 % (95 % CI, 3.9-6.9 %) in Seoul, 4.1 % (95 % CI, 1.6-6.6 %) in Incheon, 2.3 % (-0.2 to 5.0 %) in Daegu and 3.6 % (0.7-6.6 %) in Busan, after controlling for daily mean humidity, mean air pressure, day of the week, season, and year. Additional adjustment of air pollution concentrations in the model did not change the effects. Hemorrhagic stroke mortality risk significantly decreased with increasing temperature without a threshold in the four cities after adjusting for confounders. These findings suggest that the mortality of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes show different patterns in relation to outdoor temperature. High temperature was harmful for ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of high temperature to ischemic stroke did not differ by age or gender.

  2. Factors associated with unfavorable outcome in minor ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Toshiyuki; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Rieko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the factors that correlate with unfavorable outcomes and to develop a simple validated model for assessing risk of unfavorable outcomes in patients with minor ischemic stroke. Methods: The derivation cohort included 1,313 patients hospitalized within 72 hours after onset with an initial NIH Stroke Scale score of 0 to 3 enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. Unfavorable outcome was defined as dependency (modified Rankin Scale score of 3–5) or death at 90 days. The predictive values of factors related to unfavorable outcome were evaluated. External validation was performed in 879 patients from a single-center stroke registry. Results: In the derivation cohort, a total of 203 patients (15%) had unfavorable outcomes. On multivariable analysis, women (odds ratio [OR] 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–2.94), age ≥72 years (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.83–4.36), intra/extracranial vascular occlusive lesion (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.82–4.28), leg weakness (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.06–2.82), and extinction/inattention (OR 5.55, 95% CI 1.30–21.71) were independently associated with unfavorable outcome. Patients having both a vascular lesion and either leg weakness or extinction/inattention showed 4.63 (95% CI 2.23–9.33) times the risk of unfavorable outcome compared with those having neither. In the validation cohort, the risk was similar, at 3.77 (95% CI 1.64–8.37). Conclusions: Intra- and extracranial vascular imaging, NIH Stroke Scale items such as leg weakness and extinction/inattention, and their combination, as well as female sex and advanced age, may be useful for predicting unfavorable outcomes in patients with minor stroke. PMID:24907232

  3. Withdrawal of Antithrombotic Agents and Its Impact on Ischemic Stroke Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joseph P.; Bonomo, Jordan B.; Kissela, Brett M.; Khoury, Jane C.; Moomaw, Charles J.; Alwell, Kathleen; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Khatri, Pooja; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Antithrombotic medications (anticoagulants and antiplatelets) are often withheld in the periprocedural period and after bleeding complications to limit the risk of new or recurrent bleeding. These medications are also stopped by patients for various reasons such as cost, side effects, or unwillingness to take medication. Methods and Results Patient records from the population-based Greater Cincinnati / Northern Kentucky Stroke Study were reviewed to identify cases of ischemic stroke in 2005 and determine the temporal association of strokes with withdrawal of antithrombotic medication. Ischemic strokes and reasons for medication withdrawal were identified by study nurses for subsequent physician review. Results In 2005, 2,197 cases of ischemic stroke among residents of the region were identified via hospital discharge records. Of the 2,197 ischemic strokes, 114 (5.2%) occurred within 60 days of an antithrombotic medication withdrawal: 61 (53.5%) of these after stoppage of warfarin and the remainder after stoppage of an antiplatelet medication. Of the strokes following withdrawal, 71 (62.3%) were first-ever, and 43 (37.7%) were recurrent; 54 (47.4%) occurred after withdrawal of medication by a physician in the periprocedural period. Conclusions The withdrawal of antiplatelet and antithrombotic medications in the 60 days preceding an acute ischemic stroke was associated with 5.2% of ischemic strokes in our study population. This finding emphasizes the need for thoughtful decision making concerning antithrombotic medication use in the periprocedural period and efforts to improve patient compliance. PMID:21719769

  4. Prognostic Significance of Uric Acid Levels in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Zhi-Chao; Lu, Tao-Sheng; You, Shou-Jiang; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The importance and function of serum uric acid (UA) levels in patients with cardiovascular disease or stroke are unclear. We sought to evaluate the appropriate UA levels for stroke patients and the association between endogenous UA levels and clinical outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, particularly regarding the possible interaction between gender and UA levels with respect to AIS prognosis. We examined 303 patients who had an onset of ischemic stroke within 48 h. Of those, 101 patients received thrombolytic treatment. Serum UA (μmol/L) levels were measured the second morning after admission. Patient prognosis was evaluated 90 days after clinical onset by modified Rankin Scale. Patients were divided into four groups according to serum UA quartiles. A binary multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess clinical relevance in regard to functional outcome and endogenous UA levels. Analysis of subgroups by gender and normal glomerular filtration rate were also been done. Poor functional outcome was associated with older age, history of atrial fibrillation, or higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with higher UA levels (>380 μmol/L) or lower UA levels (≤250 μmol/L) were 2-3 times more likely to have a poor outcome (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.14-7.61; OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.02-7.58, respectively) compared to the baseline group (UA level 316-380 μmol/L). The same results were observed in thrombolyzed patients. Patients with high and low UA levels were 9-18 times more likely to having poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 316-380 μmol/L; OR 18.50, 95% CI: 2.041-167.67; OR 9.66, 95% CI 1.42-65.88, respectively). In men, patients with high UA levels were 6 times more likely to have poor outcomes compared to the baseline group (UA level: 279-334 μmol/L; OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.62-22.93). However, female patients with UA level 271-337 μmol/L were seven times more

  5. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-09-01

    Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  6. A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing Stroke Recurrence Rate in Ischemic Stroke Patients With and Without Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chun-Chuan; Liao, Chien-Chang; Sun, Mao-Feng; Su, Yi-Chang; Wen, Chi-Pang; Morisky, Donald E.; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y.; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little was known about the effects of acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving acupuncture treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of acupuncture treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without acupuncture treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with acupuncture treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84–0.91). The acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without acupuncture treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38–0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43–0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of acupuncture in preventing stroke. PMID:26426630

  7. Critical Care for Patients with Massive Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Younsuck; Choi, H. Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Malignant cerebral edema following ischemic stroke is life threatening, as it can cause inadequate blood flow and perfusion leading to irreversible tissue hypoxia and metabolic crisis. Increased intracranial pressure and brain shift can cause herniation syndrome and finally brain death. Multiple randomized clinical trials have shown that preemptive decompressive hemicraniectomy effectively reduces mortality and morbidity in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction. Another life-saving decompressive surgery is suboccipital craniectomy for patients with brainstem compression by edematous cerebellar infarction. In addition to decompressive surgery, cerebrospinal fluid drainage by ventriculostomy should be considered for patients with acute hydrocephalus following stroke. Medical treatment begins with sedation, analgesia, and general measures including ventilatory support, head elevation, maintaining a neutral neck position, and avoiding conditions associated with intracranial hypertension. Optimization of cerebral perfusion pressure and reduction of intracranial pressure should always be pursued simultaneously. Osmotherapy with mannitol is the standard treatment for intracranial hypertension, but hypertonic saline is also an effective alternative. Therapeutic hypothermia may also be considered for treatment of brain edema and intracranial hypertension, but its neuroprotective effects have not been demonstrated in stroke. Barbiturate coma therapy has been used to reduce metabolic demand, but has become less popular because of its systemic adverse effects. Furthermore, general medical care is critical because of the complex interactions between the brain and other organ systems. Some challenging aspects of critical care, including ventilator support, sedation and analgesia, and performing neurological examinations in the setting of a minimal stimulation protocol, are addressed in this review. PMID:25328873

  8. The Effects of Air Pollution on Ischemic Stroke Admission Rate.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Fakhri, Sara; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Safari, Saeed; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of air pollutants and the rate of ischemic stroke (IS) admissions to hospitals. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, stroke admissions (January-March 2012 and 2013) to an emergency department and air pollution and meteorological data were gathered. The relationship between air pollutant levels and hospital admission rates were evaluated using the generalize additive model. In all 379 patients with IS were referred to the hospital (52.5% male; mean age 68.2±13.3 years). Both transient (p<0.001) and long-term (p<0.001) rises in CO level increases the risk of IS. Increased weekly (p<0.001) and monthly (p<0.001) average O3 levels amplifies this risk, while a transient increase in NO2 (p<0.001) and SO2 (p<0.001) levels has the same effect. Long-term changes in PM10 (p<0.001) and PM2.5 (p<0.001) also increase the risk of IS. The findings showed that the level of air pollutants directly correlates with the number of stroke admissions to the emergency department. PMID:26866000

  9. Shared genetic basis for migraine and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Freilinger, Tobias; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Anttila, Verneri; Vander Heiden, Jason; Traylor, Matthew; de Vries, Boukje; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Sturm, Jonathan; Bis, Joshua C.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Rannikmae, Kristiina; Wessman, Maija; Kallela, Mikko; Kubisch, Christian; Fornage, Myriam; Meschia, James F.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sudlow, Cathie; Clarke, Robert; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Maguire, Jane; Kaprio, Jaakko; Farrall, Martin; Raitakari, Olli T.; Kurth, Tobias; Ikram, M. Arfan; Reiner, Alex P.; Longstreth, W.T.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Strachan, David P.; Sharma, Pankaj; Seshadri, Sudha; Quaye, Lydia; Cherkas, Lynn; Schürks, Markus; Rosand, Jonathan; Ligthart, Lannie; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Davey Smith, George; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Stefansson, Kari; Worrall, Bradford B.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Markus, Hugh S.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Cotsapas, Chris; Zwart, John A.; Palotie, Aarno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To quantify genetic overlap between migraine and ischemic stroke (IS) with respect to common genetic variation. Methods: We applied 4 different approaches to large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide data on migraine (23,285 cases and 95,425 controls) and IS (12,389 cases and 62,004 controls). First, we queried known genome-wide significant loci for both disorders, looking for potential overlap of signals. We then analyzed the overall shared genetic load using polygenic scores and estimated the genetic correlation between disease subtypes using data derived from these models. We further interrogated genomic regions of shared risk using analysis of covariance patterns between the 2 phenotypes using cross-phenotype spatial mapping. Results: We found substantial genetic overlap between migraine and IS using all 4 approaches. Migraine without aura (MO) showed much stronger overlap with IS and its subtypes than migraine with aura (MA). The strongest overlap existed between MO and large artery stroke (LAS; p = 6.4 × 10−28 for the LAS polygenic score in MO) and between MO and cardioembolic stroke (CE; p = 2.7 × 10−20 for the CE score in MO). Conclusions: Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and IS, with a particularly strong overlap between MO and both LAS and CE pointing towards shared mechanisms. Our observations on MA are consistent with a limited role of common genetic variants in this subtype. PMID:25934857

  10. The Effects of Air Pollution on Ischemic Stroke Admission Rate

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Fakhri, Sara; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of air pollutants and the rate of ischemic stroke (IS) admissions to hospitals. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, stroke admissions (January-March 2012 and 2013) to an emergency department and air pollution and meteorological data were gathered. The relationship between air pollutant levels and hospital admission rates were evaluated using the generalize additive model. In all 379 patients with IS were referred to the hospital (52.5% male; mean age 68.2±13.3 years). Both transient (p<0.001) and long-term (p<0.001) rises in CO level increases the risk of IS. Increased weekly (p<0.001) and monthly (p<0.001) average O3 levels amplifies this risk, while a transient increase in NO2 (p<0.001) and SO2 (p<0.001) levels has the same effect. Long-term changes in PM10 (p<0.001) and PM2.5 (p<0.001) also increase the risk of IS. The findings showed that the level of air pollutants directly correlates with the number of stroke admissions to the emergency department. PMID:26866000

  11. Serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 is decreased in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Douglas M; Rosado, Christian A; Haltigan, Emily A; Regenhardt, Robert W; Sumners, Colin; Waters, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a cardio and neuro-protective carboxypeptidase, are dynamically altered after stroke in preclinical models. We sought to characterize the previously unexplored changes in serum ACE2 activity of stroke patients and the mechanism of these changes. Serum samples were obtained from patients during acute ischemic stroke (n=39), conditions mimicking stroke (stroke-alert, n=23), or from control participants (n=20). Enzyme activity levels were analyzed by fluorometric assay and correlated with clinical variables by regression analyses. Serum ACE2 activity was significantly lower in acute ischemic stroke as compared to both control and stroke-alert patients, followed by an increase to control levels at three days. Serum ACE2 activity significantly correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke after controlling for other factors (P=0.01). Additional associations with ACE2 activity included a positive correlation with systolic blood pressure at presentation in stroke-alert (R(2)=0.24, P=0.03), while stroke levels showed no correlation (R(2)=0.01, P=0.50). ACE2 sheddase activity was unchanged between groups. These dynamic changes in serum ACE2 activity in stroke, which concur with preclinical studies, are not likely to be driven primarily by acute changes in blood pressure or sheddase activity. These findings provide new insight for developing therapies targeting this protective system in ischemic stroke. PMID:27488276

  12. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  13. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Chang, Dennis; Jenkins, Anita; Bensoussan, Alan; Kiat, Hosen

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis. PMID:27275837

  14. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Chang, Dennis; Jenkins, Anita; Bensoussan, Alan; Kiat, Hosen

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis. PMID:27275837

  15. Associations of functional alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 gene variants with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Ilkka; Kleber, Marcus E.; Bevan, Steve; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Hernesniemi, Jussi A.; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Mononen, Nina; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sinisalo, Juha; Delgado, Graciela E.; Laaksonen, Reijo; Koskinen, Tuomas; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kähönen, Mika; Markus, Hugh S.; März, Winfried; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) impair nitric oxide bioavailability and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Alanine–glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) is the only enzyme capable of metabolizing both of the dimethylarginines. We hypothesized that two functional AGXT2 missense variants (rs37369, V140I; rs16899974, V498L) are associated with AF and its cardioembolic complications. Association analyses were conducted using 1,834 individulas with AF and 7,159 unaffected individuals from two coronary angiography cohorts and a cohort comprising patients undergoing clinical exercise testing. In coronary angiography patients without structural heart disease, the minor A allele of rs16899974 was associated with any AF (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.59-2.68), and with paroxysmal AF (OR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.44–2.74) and chronic AF (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.35–3.06) separately. We could not replicate the association with AF in the other two cohorts. However, the A allele of rs16899974 was nominally associated with ischemic stroke risk in the meta-analysis of WTCCC2 ischemic stroke cohorts (3,548 cases, 5,972 controls) and with earlier onset of first-ever ischemic stroke (360 cases) in the cohort of clinical exercise test patients. In conclusion, AGXT2 variations may be involved in the pathogenesis of AF and its age-related thromboembolic complications. PMID:26984639

  16. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  17. Serum Hepcidin Levels in Childhood-Onset Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Seham F.; Akeel, Nagwa E.; Abdalhady, Mohamed A.; Elhewala, Ahmed A.; Ali, Al Shymaa A.; Amin, Ezzat K.; Sarhan, Dina T.; Almalky, Mohamed A.A.; Elhindawy, Eman M.; Salam, Mohamed M.A.; Soliman, Attia A.; Abdellatif, Sawsan H.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elsamad, Nahla A.; Hashem, Mustafa I.A.; Aziz, Khalid A.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.; Arafat, Manal S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Despite the growing evidence of iron imbalance in childhood-onset ischemic stroke, serum hepcidin level in those patients has not yet been researched. In this study, we aimed to estimate serum (hepcidin) level in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients and to investigate whether subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium, which is a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) derivative, could modulate serum hepcidin level in those patients. This was a case–control study included 60 (AIS) cases, and 100 healthy children with comparable age and gender as control group. For all subjects’ serum hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble transferrin receptor [sTfR]) levels were assessed by (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] method). Iron parameters including (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and total iron binding capacity [TIBC]) were also measured. The patients were subdivided according to treatment with an LMWH derivative into 2 groups and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and 1 week after stroke onset for all cases. We found that AIS cases had higher serum iron, ferritin, and IL6 levels compared to the control group (all P < 0.01). Serum hepcidin was significantly higher in AIS cases (median, 36[15–73]ng/mL) compared to the control group (median, 24[10–41]ng/mL; P < 0.01). On the 1st day of AIS diagnosis, serum hepcidin levels were similar in both stroke subgroups (P > 0.05). However, on the 7th day of diagnosis serum hepcidin level decreased significantly in AIS cases treated with LMWH (group 1) (median, 36 vs 21 ng/mL; P < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in serum hepcidin level in AIS cases not treated with LMWH (group 2) (P > 0.05). Serum hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and IL6 (r = 0.375, P < 0

  18. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  19. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  20. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back. PMID:23289255

  1. Diagnosis and acute management of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) can be an unrecognized cause of short- and long-term neurologic disability. Focal clonic seizure in the newborn period is the most common clinical presentation of PAIS. MRI is optimal in diagnosing PAIS; negative cranial ultrasound or CT does not rule out PAIS. Given the low rate of recurrence in combination with risk factors thought to be isolated to the maternal-fetal unit, anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment is usually not recommended. The majority of newborns with PAIS do not go on to develop epilepsy, although further research is warranted in this area. Long-term morbidity, including motor, cognitive, and behavioral disabilities, can follow PAIS, necessitating early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy initiation. PMID:25317375

  2. [The neurovascular unit in health and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Ago, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    The neurovascular unit (NVU), a minimal unit to exert neurological functions, is composed of neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, and extracellular matrix proteins forming basal membranes. The cell components interact with one another and function cooperatively under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pericytes and astrocytes participate crucially in the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the tight junction formed by endothelial cells, and regulate cerebral blood flow in response to neurological activities. The BBB actively regulate molecular import and export. The concept of the NVU is also useful for understanding pathogenesis and exploring therapeutic targets in various CNS disorders. In this review, recent research advances regarding the NVU and its components in health and ischemic stroke are summarized. PMID:27333744

  3. Elevation of troponin I in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Chin; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Yang, Fu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiac morbidities account for 20% of deaths after ischemic stroke and is the second commonest cause of death in acute stroke population. Elevation of cardiac troponin has been regarded as a prognostic biomarker of poor outcome in patients with acute stroke. Methods. This retrospective study enrolled 871 patients with acute ischemic stroke from August 2010 to March 2015. Data included vital signs, laboratory parameters collected in the emergency department, and clinical features during hospitalization. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Barthel index, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were used to assess stroke severity and outcome. Results. Elevated troponin I (TnI) > 0.01 µg/L was observed in 146 (16.8%) patients. Comparing to patients with normal TnI, patients with elevated TnI were older (median age 77.6 years vs. 73.8 years), had higher median heart rates (80 bpm vs. 78 bpm), higher median white blood cells (8.40 vs. 7.50 1,000/m3) and creatinine levels (1.40 mg/dL vs. 1.10 mg/dL), lower median hemoglobin (13.0 g/dL vs. 13.7 g/dL) and hematocrit (39% vs. 40%) levels, higher median NIHSS scores on admission (11 vs. 4) and at discharge (8 vs. 3), higher median mRS scores (4 vs3) but lower Barthel index scores (20 vs. 75) at discharge (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ≥ 76 years (OR 2.25, CI [1.59–3.18]), heart rate ≥ 82 bpm (OR 1.47, CI [1.05–2.05]), evidence of clinical deterioration (OR 9.45, CI [4.27–20.94]), NIHSS score ≥ 12 on admission (OR 19.52, CI [9.59–39.73]), and abnormal TnI (OR 1.98, CI [1.18–3.33]) were associated with poor outcome. Significant factors for in-hospital mortality included male gender (OR 3.69, CI [1.45–9.44]), evidence of clinical deterioration (OR 10.78, CI [4.59–25.33]), NIHSS score ≥ 12 on admission (OR 8.08, CI [3.04–21.48]), and elevated TnI level (OR 5.59, CI [2.36–13.27]). C-statistics revealed that abnormal TnI improved the predictive power of both poor

  4. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors: A critical review of functional MRI studies☆

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Huang, Dongfeng; O’Young, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area after treadmill training. These findings suggest that treadmill training likely improves ischemic stroke patients’ lower limb functions and gait performance and promotes stroke recovery by changing patients’ brain plasticity; meanwhile, the novel treadmill training methods can better training effects. PMID:25337096

  5. Pioglitazone for Secondary Prevention after Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: Rationale and Design of the Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Viscoli, Catherine M.; Brass, Lawrence M.; Carolei, Antonio; Conwit, Robin; Ford, Gary A.; Furie, Karen L.; Gorman, Mark; Guarino, Peter D.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lovejoy, Anne M.; Parsons, Mark W.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Ringleb, Peter; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Spence, J. David; Tanne, David; Young, Lawrence H.; Kernan, Walter N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recurrent vascular events remain a major source of morbidity and mortality after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Insulin Resistance Intervention after Stroke (IRIS) trial is evaluating an approach to secondary prevention based on the established association between insulin resistance and increased risk for ischemic vascular events. Specifically, IRIS will test the effectiveness of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug of the thiazolidinedione class, for reducing the risk for stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) among insulin resistant, non-diabetic patients with a recent ischemic stroke or TIA. Design: Eligible patients for IRIS must have had insulin resistance defined by a Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance greater than 3.0 without meeting criteria for diabetes. Within 6 months of the index stroke or TIA, patients were randomly assigned to pioglitazone (titrated from 15mg to 45mg/day) or matching placebo and followed for up to 5 years. The primary outcome is time to stroke or MI. Secondary outcomes include time to stroke alone, acute coronary syndrome, diabetes, cognitive decline and all-cause mortality. Enrollment of 3876 participants from 179 sites in seven countries was completed in January, 2013. Participant follow-up will continue until July, 2015. Summary: The IRIS Trial will determine whether treatment with pioglitazone improves cardiovascular outcomes of non-diabetic, insulin-resistant patients with stroke or TIA. Results are expected in early 2016. PMID:25458644

  6. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients. PMID:26856461

  7. Chemical Conditioning as an Approach to Ischemic Stroke Tolerance: Mitochondria as the Target

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Wu, Jinzi; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the brain can be prepared to resist or tolerate ischemic stroke injury, and mitochondrion is a major target for this tolerance. The preparation of ischemic stroke tolerance can be achieved by three major approaches: ischemic conditioning, hypoxic conditioning and chemical conditioning. In each conditioning approach, there are often two strategies that can be used to achieve the conditioning effects, namely preconditioning (Pre-C) and postconditioning (Post-C). In this review, we focus on chemical conditioning of mitochondrial proteins as targets for neuroprotection against ischemic stroke injury. Mitochondrial targets covered include complexes I, II, IV, the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP), adenine dinucleotide translocase (ANT) and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). While numerous mitochondrial proteins have not been evaluated in the context of chemical conditioning and ischemic stroke tolerance, the paradigms and approaches reviewed in this article should provide general guidelines on testing those mitochondrial components that have not been investigated. A deep understanding of mitochondria as the target of chemical conditioning for ischemic stroke tolerance should provide valuable insights into strategies for fighting ischemic stroke, a leading cause of death in the world. PMID:27005615

  8. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  9. The Relation Between GABA and L-Arginine Levels With Some Stroke Risk Factors in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Hosinian, Mohsen; Qujeq, Durdi; Ahmadi Ahangar, Alijan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in extra and intracellular neurotransmitter amino acids concentration in the early stage of acute cerebral ischemia have been reported. In this the study, serum level of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-Arginine in acute ischemic stroke patients was assessed. 60 patients with acute ischemic stroke and sixthy healthy volunteers as a control group were assessed. Serum GABA was measured with modified enzymatic method and serum L- Arginine was measured by modified Sakaguchi method. Serum GABA level in stroke cases was lower than that of the control group. There was no relationship between GABA level and age or gender. Also, no significant correlation was observed between GABA levels with ischemic stroke risk factors such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Serum L- Arginine level in patients was slightly increased in comparison with control group. There was a positive relationship between serum L- Arginine level and acute ischemic stroke risk factors. Serum GABA level was reduced in patients and had no correlation with acute ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:27478806

  10. Ischemic stroke and incidental finding of a right atrial lipoma.

    PubMed

    Censi, Stefano; Squeri, Angelo; Baldelli, Marco; Parizi, Sepideh Torabi

    2013-12-01

    A young man presented with recurrent ischemic stroke under antiplatelet therapy. A patent foramen ovale (PFO) was diagnosed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the patient was referred to our institution for percutaneous closure. An echogenic mass in the right atrium was detected during the intraprocedural TEE. The interventional team decided to perform transcatheter closure of PFO under fluoroscopy and TEE guide, without complications. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging confirmed an encapsulated and hyperintense mass located in the roof of the right atrium. The signal intensity pattern and the absence of gadolinium contrast uptake allowed a confident diagnosis of lipoma. Cardiac lipoma accounts for about 10% of primary cardiac tumors and frequently rises from the epicardial fat tissue. Echocardiographic images can remain equivocal about the nature of the mass and CMR offers a substantial contribution to a correct diagnosis. The tumor usually appears encapsulated and asymptomatic, but dyspnea, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias and, rarely, peripheral embolization have been reported. To our knowledge, this is the second case reported on paradoxical embolization associated with right atrial lipoma. Although the relationship of cardiac lipoma with stroke is not well defined, the potential proembolic significance of this lesion cannot be excluded, especially when a PFO coexists. PMID:24149062

  11. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Eri; Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein. PMID:27127459

  12. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N K; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P Suresh; Prabhakar, A T; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T V; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  13. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N. K.; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P. Suresh; Prabhakar, A. T.; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T. V.; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  14. Lipocalin-2 as an Infection-Related Biomarker to Predict Clinical Outcome in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hochmeister, Sonja; Engel, Odilo; Adzemovic, Milena Z.; Pekar, Thomas; Kendlbacher, Paul; Zeitelhofer, Manuel; Haindl, Michaela; Meisel, Andreas; Fazekas, Franz; Seifert-Held, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives From previous data in animal models of cerebral ischemia, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a protein related to neutrophil function and cellular iron homeostasis, is supposed to have a value as a biomarker in ischemic stroke patients. Therefore, we examined LCN2 expression in the ischemic brain in an animal model and measured plasma levels of LCN2 in ischemic stroke patients. Methods In the mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), LCN2 expression in the brain was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and correlated to cellular nonheme iron deposition up to 42 days after tMCAO. In human stroke patients, plasma levels of LCN2 were determined one week after ischemic stroke. In addition to established predictive parameters such as age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and thrombolytic therapy, LCN2 was included into linear logistic regression modeling to predict clinical outcome at 90 days after stroke. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of LCN2 in the mouse brain already at one day following tMCAO, and the amount of LCN2 subsequently increased with a maximum at 2 weeks after tMCAO. Accumulation of cellular nonheme iron was detectable one week post tMCAO and continued to increase. In ischemic stroke patients, higher plasma levels of LCN2 were associated with a worse clinical outcome at 90 days and with the occurrence of post-stroke infections. Conclusions LCN2 is expressed in the ischemic brain after temporary experimental ischemia and paralleled by the accumulation of cellular nonheme iron. Plasma levels of LCN2 measured in patients one week after ischemic stroke contribute to the prediction of clinical outcome at 90 days and reflect the systemic response to post-stroke infections. PMID:27152948

  15. Polymorphisms of IGFI contribute to the development of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Su Kang; Park, Hae Jeong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chun, Jinman; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Young Ock

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IFG1) is neuroprotective in animal models of focal brain ischemia and correlates with ischemic stroke (IS) outcome in the elderly. In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IFG1 gene are associated with the development and clinical features of IS in a Korean population. A total of 119 patients with IS and 289 control subjects were recruited. Stroke patients were classified into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS; <6 and ≥6) and the Modified Barthel Index (MBI; <60 and ≥60). Among the SNPs of the IFG1 gene, five SNPs were selected and analyzed by direct sequencing: rs2162679 (intron), rs2195239 (intron), rs978458 (intron), rs1520220 (intron) and rs6214 (3' untranslated region; 3'UTR). Multiple logistic regression models were conducted to analyze genetic data. SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer Pro and Helixtree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p-values. Two SNPs, rs2162679 and rs6214, were associated with the development of IS. After Bonferroni correction (p(c)), the A and G alleles of rs2162679 and rs6214 had significant differences between patients with IS and the controls [rs2162679, OR (95% CI) = 1.64 (1.17-2.31), p=0.004, p(c)=0.02; rs6214, OR (95% CI) = 1.52 (1.12-2.07), p=0.007, p(c)=0.035], respectively. However, the five selected SNPs were not related to the NIHSS and MBI scores. These results suggest that IGF1 may be associated with the development of IS. PMID:22969851

  16. Polymorphisms of IGFI contribute to the development of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HAK JAE; KIM, SU KANG; PARK, HAE JEONG; CHUNG, JOO-HO; CHUN, JINMAN; YUN, DONG HWAN; KIM, YOUNG OCK

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IFG1) is neuroprotective in animal models of focal brain ischemia and correlates with ischemic stroke (IS) outcome in the elderly. In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IFG1 gene are associated with the development and clinical features of IS in a Korean population. A total of 119 patients with IS and 289 control subjects were recruited. Stroke patients were classified into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS; <6 and ≥6) and the Modified Barthel Index (MBI; <60 and ≥60). Among the SNPs of the IFG1 gene, five SNPs were selected and analyzed by direct sequencing: rs2162679 (intron), rs2195239 (intron), rs978458 (intron), rs1520220 (intron) and rs6214 (3′ untranslated region; 3′UTR). Multiple logistic regression models were conducted to analyze genetic data. SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer Pro and Helixtree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p-values. Two SNPs, rs2162679 and rs6214, were associated with the development of IS. After Bonferroni correction (pc), the A and G alleles of rs2162679 and rs6214 had significant differences between patients with IS and the controls [rs2162679, OR (95% CI) = 1.64 (1.17–2.31), p=0.004, pc=0.02; rs6214, OR (95% CI) = 1.52 (1.12–2.07), p=0.007, pc=0.035], respectively. However, the five selected SNPs were not related to the NIHSS and MBI scores. These results suggest that IGF1 may be associated with the development of IS. PMID:22969851

  17. Sickle Cell Trait and Incident Ischemic Stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, Melissa C.; Loehr, Laura R.; Key, Nigel S.; Derebail, Vimal K.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V.; Grove, Megan L.; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Numerous case reports describe stroke in individuals with sickle cell trait (SCT) in the absence of traditional risk factors for cerebrovascular disease. To date, no prospective epidemiological studies have investigated this association. Methods A population-based sample of African Americans (N=3,497, mean age=54, female=62%) was followed from 1987–2011 in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), contributing a total of 65,371 person-years. Hazard ratios and incidence rate differences for ischemic stroke were estimated, contrasting SCT to homozygous hemoglobin A (HbAA). Models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, total cholesterol, atrial fibrillation, and coronary heart disease. Results SCT was identified in 223 (6.4%) participants. Over a median follow up of 22 years, 401 subjects experienced incident stroke (89% ischemic). Incident ischemic stroke was more frequent among those with SCT (13%) than HbAA (10%). SCT was associated with an ischemic stroke hazard ratio of 1.4 (1.0 – 2.0), and an incidence rate difference amounting to 1.9 (0.4 – 3.8) extra strokes per 1000 person-years. Conclusion We observed an increased risk of ischemic stroke in African Americans with SCT. Further investigation of the incidence and pathophysiology of stroke in SCT patients is warranted. PMID:25139879

  18. Two children with both arm ischemia and arterial ischemic stroke during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    McKasson, Marilyn J; Golomb, Meredith R

    2011-12-01

    It is rare for both limb ischemia and arterial ischemic stroke to occur in the same child during the perinatal period. Two children who appear to have had perinatal emboli to both an arm and a middle cerebral artery territory are presented here. One child required amputation of the ischemic limb below the shoulder, and the other required skin grafts to the distal ischemic fingers. Each of these children later received cerebral magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of developmental delay and was found to have what appeared to be old perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. Both children were homozygous for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene variant. Eight other children with perinatal limb ischemia and stroke were found on literature review; several also had delayed diagnosis of perinatal stroke. This report examines the approach to diagnosis and treatment in each of these and makes suggestions for the similar cases in the future. PMID:21862833

  19. Recovery of slow-5 oscillations in a longitudinal study of ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    La, C; Nair, V A; Mossahebi, P; Stamm, J; Birn, R; Meyerand, M E; Prabhakaran, V

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks in resting-state fMRI are identified by characteristics of their intrinsic low-frequency oscillations, more specifically in terms of their synchronicity. With advanced aging and in clinical populations, this synchronicity among functionally linked regions is known to decrease and become disrupted, which may be associated with observed cognitive and behavioral changes. Previous work from our group has revealed that oscillations within the slow-5 frequency range (0.01-0.027 Hz) are particularly susceptible to disruptions in aging and following a stroke. In this study, we characterized longitudinally the changes in the slow-5 oscillations in stroke patients across two different time-points. We followed a group of ischemic stroke patients (n = 20) and another group of healthy older adults (n = 14) over two visits separated by a minimum of three months (average of 9 months). For the stroke patients, one visit occurred in their subacute window (10 days to 6 months after stroke onset), the other took place in their chronic window (> 6 months after stroke). Using a mid-order group ICA method on 10-minutes eyes-closed resting-state fMRI data, we assessed the frequency distributions of a component's representative time-courses for differences in regards to slow-5 spectral power. First, our stroke patients, in their subacute stage, exhibited lower amplitude slow-5 oscillations in comparison to their healthy counterparts. Second, over time in their chronic stage, those same patients showed a recovery of those oscillations, reaching near equivalence to the healthy older adult group. Our results indicate the possibility of an eventual recovery of those initially disrupted network oscillations to a near-normal level, providing potentially a biomarker for stroke recovery of the cortical system. This finding opens new avenues in infra-slow oscillation research and could serve as a useful biomarker in future treatments aimed at recovery. PMID:27077023

  20. Recovery of slow-5 oscillations in a longitudinal study of ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    La, C.; Nair, V.A.; Mossahebi, P.; Stamm, J.; Birn, R.; Meyerand, M.E.; Prabhakaran, V.

    2016-01-01

    Functional networks in resting-state fMRI are identified by characteristics of their intrinsic low-frequency oscillations, more specifically in terms of their synchronicity. With advanced aging and in clinical populations, this synchronicity among functionally linked regions is known to decrease and become disrupted, which may be associated with observed cognitive and behavioral changes. Previous work from our group has revealed that oscillations within the slow-5 frequency range (0.01–0.027 Hz) are particularly susceptible to disruptions in aging and following a stroke. In this study, we characterized longitudinally the changes in the slow-5 oscillations in stroke patients across two different time-points. We followed a group of ischemic stroke patients (n = 20) and another group of healthy older adults (n = 14) over two visits separated by a minimum of three months (average of 9 months). For the stroke patients, one visit occurred in their subacute window (10 days to 6 months after stroke onset), the other took place in their chronic window (> 6 months after stroke). Using a mid-order group ICA method on 10-minutes eyes-closed resting-state fMRI data, we assessed the frequency distributions of a component's representative time-courses for differences in regards to slow-5 spectral power. First, our stroke patients, in their subacute stage, exhibited lower amplitude slow-5 oscillations in comparison to their healthy counterparts. Second, over time in their chronic stage, those same patients showed a recovery of those oscillations, reaching near equivalence to the healthy older adult group. Our results indicate the possibility of an eventual recovery of those initially disrupted network oscillations to a near-normal level, providing potentially a biomarker for stroke recovery of the cortical system. This finding opens new avenues in infra-slow oscillation research and could serve as a useful biomarker in future treatments aimed at recovery. PMID:27077023

  1. Dose-Response Relationship Between Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Viveca M.; Cole, John W.; Sorkin, John D.; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Malarcher, Ann M.; Giles, Wayne H.; Stern, Barney J.; Kittner, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although cigarette smoking is known to be a risk factor for ischemic stroke, there are few data on the dose-response relationship between smoking and stroke risk in a young ethnically diverse population. Methods We used data from the Stroke Prevention in Young Women Study, a population-based case-control study of risk factors for ischemic stroke in women aged 15 to 49 years to examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and ischemic stroke. Historical data, including smoking history, was obtained through standardized interviews. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using logistic regression. Cases (n=466) were women with stroke in the greater Baltimore-Washington area, and controls (n=604) were women free of a stroke history identified by random digit dialing. Results After multivariable adjustment, the OR comparing current smokers to never smokers was 2.6 (P<0.0001); no difference in stroke risk was observed between former smokers and never smokers. Adjusted OR increased with increasing number of cigarettes smoked per day (OR=2.2 for 1 to 10 cigs/d; 2.5 for 11 to 20 cigs/d; 4.3 for 21 to 39 cigs/d; 9.1 for 40 or more cigs/d). Conclusion These results suggest a strong dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and ischemic stroke risk in young women and reinforce the need for aggressive smoking cessation efforts in young adults. PMID:18703815

  2. Relation of Paraoxonase1, Arylesterase and Lipid Profile in Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mogarekar, Mukund R; Wagh, Reena V; Das, Rajkumar R; Pramanik, Sanjay S; Sonune, Sanjay M; Chawhan, Sanjay M

    2015-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an enzyme associated with High density lipoprotein (HDL) in blood and it is considered to have antioxidant and antiatherogenic properties. PON1 plays an important role in protecting HDL and especially low density lipoprotein (LDL) from oxidative modification by hydrolyzing lipid peroxides which are known to be associated with many vascular diseases including atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate and correlate serum paraoxonase (PON1) and arylesterase (ARE) activities as well as lipid profile levels in patients with ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods The study population was comprised of 50 ischemic stroke patients and 50 healthy controls. The serum PON1 and ARE activities were measured spectrophotometrically by using paraoxon and phenylacetate as substrate respectively by Eckerson method. Serum lipid was measured using routine biochemical method. Results The normality of the distribution of the parameters are assessed by Shapiro-Wilk test. Two sample t-test is applied for hypothesis testing. The serum PONI and arylesterase ARE decreased significantly in ischemic stroke patients (p<0.001). The PON1 was positively correlated with HDL. Conclusion This study strongly suggests that the estimation of HDL-C associated PON1 enzyme gives valuable information for prediction of risk of ischemic stroke due to cerebrovascular thromboembolism. The result shows that PON1 and ARE could be considered as a risk factors for ischemic stroke. PMID:26673997

  3. Ischemic stroke incidence in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (ISISCOG), Spain. A community-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alzamora, María Teresa; Sorribes, Marta; Heras, Antonio; Vila, Nicolás; Vicheto, Marisa; Forés, Rosa; Sánchez-Ojanguren, José; Sancho, Amparo; Pera, Guillem

    2008-01-01

    Background In Spain, stroke is one of the major causes of death and the main cause of severe disability in people over 65 years. We analyzed the incidence of ischemic stroke, stroke subtypes, case fatality and disability at 90 days after the event in a Spanish population. Methods A prospective community-based register of ischemic strokes was established in Santa Coloma de Gramenet (Barcelona) [116,220 inhabitants of all ages, according to the municipal census of December 31,2001], from January 1 to December 31, 2003. Standard definitions and case finding methods were used to identify all cases in all age groups. Every patient underwent a complete clinical evaluation and systematic tests including neuroimaging (CT/MRI) and vascular studies (carotid duplex ultrasound intra and extracranial and MR angiography). Results Over a one year period, 196 ischemic strokes were registered [107 men; median age = 76 years (range 39–98)], being the first event in 159 patients (81.1%) and a recurrent stroke in 37 (18.9%). After age-adjustment to the European population, the incidence of ischemic stroke per 100,000 inhabitants was 172 (95% CI, 148–196); 219 (176–261) in men and 133 (105–160) in women, with an annual incidence for first ischemic stroke of 139 (118–161); 165 (128–201) in men and 115 (89–140) in women. The incidence of stroke increased with age. Stroke subtypes (TOAST classification criteria) were lacunar in 28.8%, atherothrombotic in 18.6%, cardioembolic in 26.6% and undetermined in 26.0% of patients. At 90 days, the case-fatality was 12%, and among survivors, moderate-to-severe disability was present in 45 % at 3 months. Conclusion This prospective community-based study shows one of the lowest incidences of stroke in Europe, as well as one of the lowest case fatality and disability rates at 90 days after stroke. PMID:18371212

  4. Quality of Life after Intra-arterial Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Melissa M.; Wilder, Michael; McFadden, Molly; Majersik, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist about health-related quality of life outcomes after intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We assessed stroke-specific quality of life in stroke survivors after intra-arterial therapy. Consecutive patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke from 2005-2010 were retrospectively identified via an institutional database. Stroke-specific quality of life (using the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Score) and disability status (modified Rankin Scale) were prospectively assessed via mailed questionnaire. We analyzed quality of life scores by domain and summary score, with a summary score of ≥ 4 defined as a good outcome. Analysis of variance was used to model the effect of final recanalization status, stroke severity, and modified Rankin Scale on total quality of life score. ANOVA and Pearson's correlations were used to test the association between stroke severity/modified Rankin Scale and quality of life/time since stroke respectively. Of ninety-nine acute ischemic stroke patients, 61 responded yielding: 11 interim deaths, 7 incomplete surveys, and 43 complete surveys for analysis. Among responding survivors, overall quality of life score was 3.9 (SD 0.7); 77% of these reported good quality of life. Scores were higher in recanalized patients in 11 of 12 domains, but was significant only for mood. Although modified Rankin Scale was associated with stroke severity, quality of life was independent of both. Seventy-seven percent of acute ischemic stroke survivors who received intra-arterial therapy reported good quality of life. Furthermore, these data suggest that stroke-specific quality of life is an independent outcome from stroke severity and disability status. PMID:24813258

  5. Subtotal Gastrectomy With Billroth II Anastomosis Is Associated With a Low Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duodenal diversion can ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism. We assessed the risk of stroke after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We identified 6425 patients who received SGBIIA for PUD between 1998 and 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort; we frequency-matched them with 25,602 randomly selected controls from the PUD population who did not receive SGBIIA according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obesity. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of stroke. The incidence of stroke was lower in patients in the SGBIIA cohort than in those in the non-SGBIIA cohort (18.9 vs 22.9 per 1000 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–0.89, P < 0.001). The risk of ischemic stroke (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86, P < 0.001), rather than hemorrhagic stroke (aHR 1.00, 95% CI 0.78–1.28), was lower for the SGBIIA cohort than for the non-SGBIIA cohort according to the multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was lower in men (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86) than in women (aHR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65–0.99) and in patients aged ≥65 years (aHR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63–0.81) than in those of other age groups (≤49 years, aHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.48–1.39; 50–64 years, aHR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79–1.28). The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was also reduced in patients with comorbidities (aHR 0.84, 5% CI 0.75–0.95) rather than in those without comorbidities (aHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59–1.12). SGBIIA is associated with a low risk of ischemic stroke for PUD patients, and its protective effect is prominent in men, patients aged ≥65

  6. Does computed tomography permeability predict hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Peggy; Cobb, Allison; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use perfusion-derived permeability-surface area product maps to predict hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed our prospectively kept acute stroke database over five consecutive months for patients with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who had computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) done at arrival. Patients included in the analyses also had to have a follow-up CT. The permeability-surface area product maps (PS) was calculated for the side of the ischemia and/or infarction and for the contralateral unaffected side at the same level. The cerebral blood flow map was used to delineate the ischemic territory. Next, a region of interest was drawn at the centre of this territory on the PS parametric map. Finally, a mirror region of interest was created on the contralateral side at the same level. The relative permeability-surface area product maps (rPS) provided an internal control and was calculated as the ratio of the PS on the side of the AIS to the PS on the contralateral side. A student t-test was performed after log conversion of rPS between patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation. Log conversion was used to convert the data into normal distribution to use t-test. For the group of patients who experienced intracranial bleed, a student t-test was performed between those with only petechial hemorrhage and those with more severe parenchymal hematoma with subarachnoid haemorrhage. RESULTS: Of 84 patients with AIS and CTP at admission, only 42 patients had a follow-up CT. The rPS derived using the normal side as the internal control was significantly higher (P = 0.003) for the 15 cases of hemorrhagic transformation (1.71 + 1.64) compared to 27 cases that did not have any (1.07 + 1.30). Patients with values above the overall mean rPS of 1.3 had an increased likelihood of subsequent hemorrhagic transformation. The sensitivity of using this score to predict

  7. Apolipoprotein A1-Unique Peptide as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xu; Yu, Yue; Xu, Wenlong; Dong, Lei; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Bing; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Clinically-informative biomarkers of ischemic stroke are needed for rapid diagnosis and timely treatment. In the present study, APOA1 unique peptide (APOA1-UP), a novel peptide biomarker, was identified and quantified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using labeled reference peptide (LRP). Serum samples of 94 patients in the ischemic stroke group and 37 patients in the non-stroke group were analyzed for the levels of total APOA1-UP, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total cholesterol (TC). Median ratio of total APOA1-UP/LRP was 2.14 (interquartile range, 0.40) in the non-stroke group and 1.32 (0.44) in the ischemic stroke group (p < 0.0001). The serum level of total APOA1-UP was independently correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke by multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.0001). From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9750 and the optimal cutoff value of the serum APOA1-UP level was 1.80, which yielded a sensitivity of 90.63% and a specificity of 97.14%. The diagnostic efficiency of HDL-C was lower, with an AUC of 0.7488. Therefore, the serum level of APOA1-UP is a diagnostic biomarker candidate for ischemic stroke in the early stage. PMID:27043525

  8. The Quest for Arterial Recanalization in Acute Ischemic Stroke-The Past, Present and the Future

    PubMed Central

    L.L.Yeo, Leonard; Sharma, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the major causes of mortality and long-term disability. In the recent past, only very few treatment options were available and a considerable proportion of stroke survivors remained permanently disabled. However, over the last 2 decades rapid advances in acute stroke care have resulted in a corresponding improvement in mortality rates and functional outcomes. In this review, we describe the evolution of systemic thrombolytic agents and various interventional devices, their current status as well as some of the future prospects. We reviewed literature pertaining to acute ischemic stroke reperfusion treatment. We explored the current accepted treatment strategies to attain cerebral reperfusion via intravenous modalities and compare and contrast them within the boundaries of their clinical trials. Subsequently we reviewed the trials for interventional devices for acute ischemic stroke, categorizing them into thrombectomy devices, aspiration devices, clot disruption devices and thrombus entrapment devices. Finally we surveyed several of the alternative reperfusion strategies available. We also shed some light on the controversies surrounding the current strategies of treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Acute invasive interventional strategies continue to improve along with the noninvasive modalities. Both approaches appear promising. We conducted a comprehensive chronological review of the existing treatments as well as upcoming remedies for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23864913

  9. Apolipoprotein A1-Unique Peptide as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Yu, Yue; Xu, Wenlong; Dong, Lei; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Bing; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Clinically-informative biomarkers of ischemic stroke are needed for rapid diagnosis and timely treatment. In the present study, APOA1 unique peptide (APOA1-UP), a novel peptide biomarker, was identified and quantified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using labeled reference peptide (LRP). Serum samples of 94 patients in the ischemic stroke group and 37 patients in the non-stroke group were analyzed for the levels of total APOA1-UP, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total cholesterol (TC). Median ratio of total APOA1-UP/LRP was 2.14 (interquartile range, 0.40) in the non-stroke group and 1.32 (0.44) in the ischemic stroke group (p < 0.0001). The serum level of total APOA1-UP was independently correlated with the presence of ischemic stroke by multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.0001). From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9750 and the optimal cutoff value of the serum APOA1-UP level was 1.80, which yielded a sensitivity of 90.63% and a specificity of 97.14%. The diagnostic efficiency of HDL-C was lower, with an AUC of 0.7488. Therefore, the serum level of APOA1-UP is a diagnostic biomarker candidate for ischemic stroke in the early stage. PMID:27043525

  10. Stroke and the “Stroke Belt” in Dialysis: Contribution of Patient Characteristics to Ischemic Stroke Rate and Its Geographic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Phadnis, Milind A.; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios for stroke. Older age, female sex, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity, unemployed status, diabetes, hypertension, history of stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation were positively associated with ischemic stroke, whereas body mass index >30 kg/m2 was inversely associated with stroke (P<0.001 for each). After full multivariable adjustment, the three states with O/E rate ratios >1.0 were all in the South: North Carolina, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Regional efforts to increase primary prevention in the “stroke belt” or to better educate dialysis patients on the signs of stroke so that they may promptly seek care may improve stroke care and outcomes in dialysis patients. PMID:23990675

  11. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  12. Association of genetic variants with coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke in a longitudinal population-based genetic epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, YOSHIJI; MATSUI, KOTA; TAKEUCHI, ICHIRO; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies identified nine genes and chromosomal region 3q28 as susceptibility loci for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or chronic kidney disease by genome-wide or candidate gene association studies. As coronary artery disease (CAD) and ischemic stroke may share genetic architecture, certain genetic variants may confer susceptibility to the two diseases. The present study examined the association of 13 polymorphisms at these 10 loci with the prevalence of CAD or ischemic stroke in community-dwelling individuals, with the aim of identifying genetic variants that confer susceptibility to the two conditions. Study subjects (170 with CAD, 117 with ischemic stroke and 5,718 controls) were recruited to the Inabe Health and Longevity Study, a longitudinal genetic epidemiological study of atherosclerotic, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The subjects were recruited from individuals who visited for an annual health checkup and they were followed up each year (mean follow-up period, 5 years). Longitudinal analysis with a generalized estimating equation, and with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia and the serum concentration of creatinine, revealed that rs2074380 (G→A) and rs2074381 (A→G) of the α-kinase 1 (ALPK1) gene and rs8089 (T→G) of the thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) gene were significantly (P<2×10−16) associated with the prevalence of CAD, with the AA genotype of rs2074380 and GG genotypes of rs2074381 and rs8089 being protective against this condition. Similar analysis revealed that rs9846911 (A→G) at chromosome 3q28, rs2074381 of ALPK1, rs8089 of THBS2 and rs6046 (G→A) of the coagulation factor VII gene were significantly (P<2×10−16) associated with the prevalence of ischemic stroke, with the GG genotypes of rs9846911, rs2074381 and rs8089 and the AA genotype of rs6046 being protective against this condition. ALPK1 and THBS2 may thus be

  13. Sitagliptin After Ischemic Stroke in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Yi; Wang, Szu-Heng; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Su, Feng-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, I-Chang; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cerebrovascular safety and efficacy of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with ischemic stroke remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of sitagliptin in patients with T2DM with recent ischemic stroke. We analyzed data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between March 1, 2009, and December 31, 2011. Ischemic stroke patients were identified from individuals with T2DM. Patients who received sitagliptin were compared with those who did not to evaluate the cardiovascular safety and efficacy of sitagliptin. The primary outcome was a composite of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death. A total of 5145 type 2 diabetic patients with ischemic stroke met our inclusion criteria and were followed for up to 2.83 years (mean, 1.17 years). Overall, 1715 patients (33.3%) received sitagliptin and 3430 patients (66.7%) did not. The primary composite outcome occurred in 190 patients in the sitagliptin group (11.1%) and in 370 patients in the comparison group (10.8%) (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85–1.21). Patients treated with sitagliptin had a similar risk of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and all-cause mortality with an HR of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.78–1.16, P = 0.612), 1.07 (95% CI, 0.55–2.11, P = 0.834), and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.82–1.22, P = 0.989), respectively, compared with patients not treated with sitagliptin. Treatment with sitagliptin in type 2 diabetic patients with recent ischemic stroke was not associated with increased or decreased risks of adverse cerebrovascular outcomes. PMID:26181549

  14. Telomere Length and Ischemic Stroke in Women: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Schürks, Markus; Prescott, Jennifer; Dushkes, Rimma; De Vivo, Immaculata; Rexrode, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Telomere shortening has been implicated in cardiovascular disease. However, prospective data on the association between relative telomere length (RTL) and ischemic stroke are scarce and inconclusive. Methods We used a nested case-control design among women participating in the prospective Nurses’ Health Study. Participants provided blood samples in 1990 and were followed through 2006. Women with confirmed incident ischemic stroke were matched to controls by age, smoking, postmenopausal status, and postmenopausal hormone use. Quantitative PCR was used to determine RTL in genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of ischemic stroke associated with RTL, using RTL quartiles and as dichotomous according to the median. Results Data on RTL were available from 504 case-control pairs. Results did not suggest an association between RTL and ischemic stroke. The odds ratio for ischemic stroke was 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.52–1.32) comparing lowest to the highest RTL quartile and 0.90 (95% CI 0.65–1.24) comparing RTL below the median to RTL above the median. Associations were unchanged after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Further analyses suggested an association between RTL and fatal ischemic stroke (54 case-control pairs; lowest vs. highest quartile OR=1.99, 95%CI 0.26–14.9); however, results were statistically insignificant. Conclusion In this large nested case-control study among women RTL was not associated with ischemic stroke. In light of the varying study results in the literature on the association between telomere length and stroke additional research is warranted. PMID:23521613

  15. Polymorphism of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Affects the Clinical Phenotypes of Ischemic Stroke in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Su Kang; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chung, Seung Joon; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2293054 [Ile734Ile], rs1047735 [His902His], rs2293044 [Val1353Val], rs2682826 (3'UTR) of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke. Methods We enrolled 120 ischemic stroke patients and 314 control subjects. Ischemic stroke patients were divided into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer, and HelixTree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p-values. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to analyze genetic data. Results No SNPs of the NOS1 gene were found to be associated with ischemic stroke. However, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2293054 was associated with the NIHSS scores of ischemic stroke patients in codominant (p=0.019), dominant (p=0.007), overdominant (p=0.033), and log-additive (p=0.0048) models. Also, rs2682826 revealed a significant association in the recessive model (p=0.034). In allele frequency analysis, we also found that the T alleles of rs2293054 were associated with lower NIHSS scores (p=0.007). Respectively, rs2293054 had a significant association in the MBI scores of ischemic stroke in codominant (p=0.038), dominant (p=0.031), overdominant (p=0.045), and log-additive (p=0.04) models. Conclusion These results suggest that NOS1 may be related to the clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke in Korean population. PMID:26949676

  16. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS. We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05. The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease. PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  17. Ischemic perinatal stroke: summary of a workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K; Nelson, Karin B; Ferriero, Donna; Lynch, John Kylan

    2007-09-01

    Ischemic perinatal stroke is a disorder associated with significant long-term neurologic morbidity. With an estimated incidence of 1 in 2300 to 5000 births, stroke is more likely to occur in the perinatal period than at any time in childhood. The incidence of ischemic perinatal stroke ranks second only to that of strokes in the elderly population. Although ischemic perinatal stroke is a well-recognized disorder, many aspects remain to be studied. There is no consensus on its terminology, definition, or classification. Several risk factors have been identified, but their precise roles in causing stroke are not well understood. There are no reliable predictors of ischemic perinatal stroke on which to base prevention or treatment strategies. To review these important issues and propose a research agenda, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke convened a workshop in August 2006. This article provides a summary of the workshop. PMID:17766535

  18. Selective neuronal loss in ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jean-Claude; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Masayuki; Endres, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    As a sequel of brain ischemia, selective neuronal loss (SNL)—as opposed to pannecrosis (i.e. infarction)—is attracting growing interest, particularly because it is now detectable in vivo. In acute stroke, SNL may affect the salvaged penumbra and hamper functional recovery following reperfusion. Rodent occlusion models can generate SNL predominantly in the striatum or cortex, showing that it can affect behavior for weeks despite normal magnetic resonance imaging. In humans, SNL in the salvaged penumbra has been documented in vivo mainly using positron emission tomography and 11C-flumazenil, a neuronal tracer validated against immunohistochemistry in rodent stroke models. Cortical SNL has also been documented using this approach in chronic carotid disease in association with misery perfusion and behavioral deficits, suggesting that it can result from chronic or unstable hemodynamic compromise. Given these consequences, SNL may constitute a novel therapeutic target. Selective neuronal loss may also develop at sites remote from infarcts, representing secondary ‘exofocal' phenomena akin to degeneration, potentially related to poststroke behavioral or mood impairments again amenable to therapy. Further work should aim to better characterize the time course, behavioral consequences—including the impact on neurological recovery and contribution to vascular cognitive impairment—association with possible causal processes such as microglial activation, and preventability of SNL. PMID:24192635

  19. A Population-Based Study of 30-day Incidence of Ischemic Stroke Following Surgical Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S. Danielle; Liu, Kuan; Garg, Amit X.; Tam, Samantha; Palma, David; Thind, Amardeep; Winquist, Eric; Yoo, John; Nichols, Anthony; Fung, Kevin; Hall, Stephen; Shariff, Salimah Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke following neck dissection compared to matched patients undergoing non-head and neck surgeries. A surgical dissection of the neck is a common procedure performed for many types of cancer. Whether such dissections increase the risk of ischemic stroke is uncertain. A retrospective cohort study using data from linked administrative and registry databases (1995–2012) in the province of Ontario, Canada was performed. Patients were matched 1-to-1 on age, sex, date of surgery, and comorbidities to patients undergoing non-head and neck surgeries. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke assessed in hospitalized patients using validated database codes. A total of 14,837 patients underwent surgical neck dissection. The 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke following the dissection was 0.7%. This incidence decreased in recent years (1.1% in 1995 to 2000; 0.8% in 2001 to 2006; 0.3% in 2007 to 2012; P for trend <0.0001). The 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke in patients undergoing neck dissection is similar to matched patients undergoing thoracic surgery (0.5%, P = 0.26) and colectomy (0.5%, P = 0.1). Factors independently associated with a higher risk of stroke in 30 days following neck dissection surgery were of age ≥75 years (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–2.53), and a history of diabetes (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.02–2.49), hypertension (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.64–4.25), or prior stroke (OR 4.06, 95% CI 2.29–7.18). Less than 1% of patients undergoing surgical neck dissection will experience an ischemic stroke in the following 30 days. This incidence of stroke is similar to thoracic surgery and colectomy. PMID:26287406

  20. Adjuvant Chinese Herbal Products for Preventing Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Muo, Chih-Hsin; Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Liu, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for atrial fibrillation (AF) in Taiwan. We investigated the effect of adjuvant CHPs in preventing ischemic stroke in patients with AF. Methods Taiwanese patients in the Health Insurance Database newly diagnosed with AF during 2000–2011 were enrolled. Medication treatment with/without CHPs was administered within 7 days after the AF diagnosis. The clinical endpoint was an ischemic stroke. The Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and Student t test were used to examine differences between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and non-TCM cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess the risk for ischemic stroke between two cohorts. Results Three hundred and eleven patients underwent TCM treatment and 1715 patients did not. Compared to non-TCM users, TCM users had a lower incidence of stroke (12.59% vs. 1.93%, respectively) and lower risk of stroke [CHA2DS2-VASc score = 0–2 (hazard ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.06–0.65)]. Compared to non-TCM users, the stroke risk was significantly lower in TCM users with AF who were female or younger than 65 years, but not in males, people more than 65 years old, or people with comorbidities. Compared to TCM users, non-TCM users who received conventional treatment had a higher ischemic stroke risk. The risk for AF-related hospitalization was significantly lower in TCM users (0.64%) than in non-TCM users (38.1%). Conclusions Users of TCM with AF have a lower risk of new-onset ischemic stroke. Therefore, adjuvant CHP therapy may have a protective effect and may be used in AF patients to prevent ischemic stroke. PMID:27428543

  1. Incidence and predictors of ischemic stroke during hospitalization for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Iguchi, Moritake; Nakamura, Michikazu; Ohtani, Ryo; Yamashita, Yugo; Takagi, Daisuke; Unoki, Takashi; Ishii, Mitsuru; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Ogawa, Hisashi; Hamatani, Mio; Abe, Mitsuru; Akao, Masaharu

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Data regarding the incidence and predictors of ischemic stroke during hospitalization for HF are limited. The study population of this retrospective cohort study consisted of patients with congestive HF, consecutively admitted to our center from October 2010 to April 2014. We excluded patients complicated with acute myocardial infarction, infective endocarditis, and takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We also excluded those with dialysis or mechanical circulatory support. We investigated the incidence of ischemic stroke during hospitalization for HF. Thereafter, we divided the patients without oral anticoagulants at admission into two groups: patients with ischemic stroke and those without it, and explored the predictors of ischemic stroke. A total of 558 patients (287 without atrial fibrillation (AF), 271 with AF) were enrolled. The mean age was 76.8 ± 12.3 years, and 244 patients (44 %) were female. The mean left-ventricular ejection fraction was 47.4 %. Oral anticoagulants were prescribed in 147 patients (8 without AF, 139 with AF). During hospitalization (median length 18 days), symptomatic ischemic stroke (excluding catheter-related) occurred in 15 patients (2.7 % of the total, 8 without AF, 7 with AF). Predictors significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients without oral anticoagulants were as follows; short-term increases in blood urea nitrogen after admission (at day 3; odds ratio (per 1 md/dl): 1.06, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.11, p = 0.02, and at day 7; odds ratio: 1.03, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07, p = 0.03, respectively), and previous stroke (odds ratio; 3.33, 95 % CI 1.01-11.00, p = 0.04). The incidence of ischemic stroke during hospitalization for HF was high, even in patients without AF. Previous stroke and short-term increases in blood urea nitrogen was significantly associated with the incidence of ischemic stroke. PMID:26219729

  2. Animal models of ischemic stroke and their application in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Felix; Schuhmann, Michael K; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This review outlines the most frequently used rodent stroke models and discusses their strengths and shortcomings. Mimicking all aspects of human stroke in one animal model is not feasible because ischemic stroke in humans is a heterogeneous disorder with a complex pathophysiology. The transient or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model is one of the models that most closely simulate human ischemic stroke. Furthermore, this model is characterized by reliable and well-reproducible infarcts. Therefore, the MCAo model has been involved in the majority of studies that address pathophysiological processes or neuroprotective agents. Another model uses thromboembolic clots and thus is more convenient for investigating thrombolytic agents and pathophysiological processes after thrombolysis. However, for many reasons, preclinical stroke research has a low translational success rate. One factor might be the choice of stroke model. Whereas the therapeutic responsiveness of permanent focal stroke in humans declines significantly within 3 hours after stroke onset, the therapeutic window in animal models with prompt reperfusion is up to 12 hours, resulting in a much longer action time of the investigated agent. Another major problem of animal stroke models is that studies are mostly conducted in young animals without any comorbidity. These models differ from human stroke, which particularly affects elderly people who have various cerebrovascular risk factors. Choosing the most appropriate stroke model and optimizing the study design of preclinical trials might increase the translational potential of animal stroke models. PMID:26170628

  3. Association of dementia with death after ischemic stroke: A two-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chang-Yue; Lian, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Li-Li; Fang, Chuan-Qing; Deng, Juan; Li, Jing; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The association between dementia and the risk of death after ischemic stroke was investigated. Neurological, neuropsychological and functional assessments were evaluated in 619 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Dementia was diagnosed at admission and at three months after stroke onset. The patients were scheduled for a two-year follow-up after the index stroke. The Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to estimate the cumulative proportion of survival, and the association between dementia and risk of death after stroke. In total, 146 patients (23.6%) were diagnosed with dementia after stroke. The cumulative proportion of surviving cases was 49.3% in patients with dementia after a median follow-up of 21.2±5.6 months, and 92.5% in patients without dementia. Multivariate analysis revealed that dementia (HR, 7.21; 95% CI, 3.85–13.49) was associated with death, independent of age, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke and NIH stroke scale. In conclusion, the mortality rate is increased in stroke patients with dementia. Dementia is an important risk factor for death after stroke, independent of age, atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, and the severity of the stroke. PMID:27588095

  4. Developing drug strategies for the neuroprotective treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Arnao, Valentina; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Developing new treatment strategies for acute ischemic stroke in the last twenty years has offered some important successes, but also several failures. Most trials of neuroprotective therapies have been uniformly negative to date. Recent research has reported how excitatory amino acids act as the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, other therapeutic targets such as free radical scavenger strategies and the anti-inflammatory neuroprotective strategy have been evaluated with conflicting data in animal models and human subjects with acute ischemic stroke. Whereas promising combinations of neuroprotection and neurorecovery, such as citicoline, albumin and cerebrolysin have been tested with findings worthy of further evaluation in larger randomized clinical trials. Understanding the complexities of the ischemic cascade is essential to developing pharmacological targets for acute ischemic stroke in neuroprotective or flow restoration therapeutic strategies. PMID:26469760

  5. Ischemic stroke management in West Scotland: a chart review

    PubMed Central

    Verpillat, Patrice; Dorey, Julie; Guilhaume-Goulant, Chantal; Dabbous, Firas; Aballéa, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Little information is available about the long-term management of ischemic stroke (IS) in West Scotland. In this study we aim to describe the management of IS at onset, admission, and during follow-up among patients who survived an IS event. Methods General practitioners (GPs) (n=20) were randomly selected to recruit IS patients and extract data about patient characteristics, hospitalizations, discharge, and ambulatory care from GP databases, hospital letters, and direct contact with patients and their relatives. Descriptive analyses were conducted. Results One hundred and one patients were included, with a mean age of 65.6±13.4. About half of the patients contacted their GPs at the time of onset (45.4%). Cardiovascular history was prevalent in 29.7% of cases, and 14% of all cases were recurrences. Of the patients, 89 (88%) were hospitalized with mean length of stay (LOS) 11.8 days. Treatment was administered on average within 12.9 hours of admission and 23.6% of the admitted patients received thrombolytic treatment. During the 1-year follow-up period, 33.6% of patients were rehospitalized and the mean LOS was 15.1±29.5 days. Further, patients on average sought nursing care (10.9%), physical therapy (45.5%), occupational therapy (27.7%), speech therapy (12.9%), and professional caregivers (12%). Conclusion The health-care resource utilization of IS patients is a major driver of economic burden. PMID:27123179

  6. Force control in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2015-05-01

    Force control deficits are common dysfunctions after a stroke. This review concentrates on various force control variables associated with motor impairments and suggests new approaches to quantifying force control production and modulation. Moreover, related neurophysiological mechanisms were addressed to determine variables that affect force control capabilities. Typically, post stroke force control impairments include: (a) decreased force magnitude and asymmetrical forces between hands, (b) higher task error, (c) greater force variability, (d) increased force regularity, and (e) greater time-lag between muscular forces. Recent advances in force control analyses post stroke indicated less bimanual motor synergies and impaired low-force frequency structure. Brain imaging studies demonstrate possible neurophysiological mechanisms underlying force control impairments: (a) decreased activation in motor areas of the ipsilesional hemisphere, (b) increased activation in secondary motor areas between hemispheres, (c) cerebellum involvement, and (d) relatively greater interhemispheric inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere. Consistent with identifying neurophysiological mechanisms, analyzing bimanual motor synergies as well as low-force frequency structure will advance our understanding of post stroke force control. PMID:25704075

  7. Clopidogrel responsiveness in stroke patients on a chronic aspirin regimen.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara; Ching, Marilou; Sawyer, Robert N; Chichelli, Trevor; Li, Fan; Janicke, David; Radovic, Vladan; Mehta, Bijal; Farooq, Osman; Munschauer, Frederick E

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel (CPG) in patients sustaining acute ischemic stroke who were already receiving chronic outpatient aspirin therapy (81-325 mg/day). Platelet function was measured using 3 different "point-of-care" platelet function analyzers: the Thrombelastograph hemostasis system, the Accumetrics VerifyNow system, and the Chronolog 570VS impedance aggregometer. Platelet function was assessed before administration of a 300-mg CPG loading dose and again at 26 hours and 64 hours after this loading dose along with a 75-mg daily maintenance dose. All 3 instruments detected marked inhibition of platelet function at 26 hours and 64 hours after CPG administration. There were significant variations among the 3 instruments in monitoring antiplatelet responses to aspirin and CPG; however, these variations were eliminated when the platelet function results were corrected for baseline platelet variability. The percentage of patients who were poor responders to CPG after switching from aspirin depended on the measurement instrument used, but was higher at 26 hours after CPG administration than at 64 hours after CPG administration. Our findings indicate that poor response to antiplatelet agents in general, and to CPG in particular, is a function of the measuring instrument. The correction for baseline platelet variability results in similar levels of platelet inhibition measured by the 3 platelet function analyzers. Future studies are warranted to examine the association between ex vivo CPG-induced platelet inhibition and clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:22209644

  8. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  9. Serum C-reactive protein level as a biomarker for differentiation of ischemic from hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Roudbary, Seyed Ali; Saadat, Farshid; Forghanparast, Kambiz; Sohrabnejad, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents rank first in the frequency and importance among all neurological disease. Although a number of studies had shown increased level of the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with ischemic stroke, the association of increased hs-CRP with various type of stroke especially the assessment hs-CRP level in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke have not been investigated. In the present study, we assessed the concentration of hs-CRP in patients with documented ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the first 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Thirty-two patients with Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were evaluated at neurology department of Poursina Hospital. The presence of baseline vascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking, was determined. The blood samples were then collected and routine hematology and biochemistry tests were done. hs-CRP levels were determined using a highly sensitive immunonephelometric method. In this cross sectional study, the age of patient varied from 45-85 years (Mean 70.9 ± 9.4). Serum level of hs-CRP in Ischemic patients were 18.92 ± 11.28 and in hemorrhagic group was 2.65 ± 1.7. This relationship was statistically significant (P<0.0001). It might be concluded that hs-CRP might be considered as a usefully adjunct method for the initial diagnosis of the type of stroke. PMID:21681701

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Kirchgessner, Annette; Tepper, Deborah; Leonard, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption as a consequence of ischemic stroke. MMP-9 in particular appears to play an important role in tPA-associated hemorrhagic complications. Reactive oxygen species can enhance the effects of tPA on MMP activation through the loss of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a protein encoded in the cav-1 gene that serves as a critical determinant of BBB permeability. This review provides an overview of MMPs’ role in BBB breakdown during acute ischemic stroke. The possible role of MMPs in combination treatment of acute ischemic stroke is also examined. PMID:23565108