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Sample records for chronic kidney allograft

  1. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  2. Erythropoietin, but not the correction of anemia alone, protects from chronic kidney allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Cassis, Paola; Gallon, Lorenzo; Benigni, Ariela; Mister, Marilena; Pezzotta, Anna; Solini, Samantha; Gagliardini, Elena; Cugini, Daniela; Abbate, Mauro; Aiello, Sistiana; Rocchetta, Federica; Scudeletti, Pierangela; Perico, Norberto; Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Anemia can contribute to chronic allograft injury by limiting oxygen delivery to tissues, particularly in the tubulointerstitium. To determine mechanisms by which erythropoietin (EPO) prevents chronic allograft injury we utilized a rat model of full MHC-mismatched kidney transplantation (Wistar Furth donor and Lewis recipients) with removal of the native kidneys. EPO treatment entirely corrected post-transplant anemia. Control rats developed progressive proteinuria and graft dysfunction, tubulointerstitial damage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and glomerulosclerosis, all prevented by EPO. Normalization of post-transplant hemoglobin levels by blood transfusions, however, had no impact on chronic allograft injury, indicating that EPO-mediated graft protection went beyond the correction of anemia. Compared to syngeneic grafts, control allografts had loss of peritubular capillaries, higher tubular apoptosis, tubular and glomerular oxidative injury, and reduced expression of podocyte nephrin; all prevented by EPO treatment. The effects of EPO were associated with preservation of intragraft expression of angiogenic factors, upregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor p-Akt in tubuli, and increased expression of Bcl-2. Inhibition of p-Akt by Wortmannin partially antagonized the effect of EPO on allograft injury and tubular apoptosis, and prevented EPO-induced Bcl-2 upregulation. Thus non-erythropoietic derivatives of EPO may be useful to prevent chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:22318420

  3. Relationship between European Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in Patients with Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-SOUSA, María Angeles; TAMAYO, Eduardo; GUZMÁN-FULGENCIO, María; FERNÁNDEZ-RODRÍGUEZ, Amanda; HEREDIA-RODRIGUEZ, María; GARCÍA-ÁLVAREZ, Mónica; BERMEJO-MARTIN, Jesús F; PINEDA-TENOR, Daniel; RUIZ-GRANADO, Patricia; ALVAREZ-FUENTE, Elisa; GÓMEZ-SANCHEZ, Esther; GÓMEZ-HERRERAS, José I; RESINO, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA variants may contribute to differences in mitochondrial function, leading to an altered immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and the development of chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with kidney transplant. A retrospective observational study was carried out on 261 patients who received kidney transplant (114 had stable transplant and 147 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction). DNA samples were genotyped for 14 mtDNA polymorphisms by using Sequenom's MassARRAY platform (San Diego, CA, USA). Only European white patients within the N macro-cluster were included. Patients with haplogroups V (odds ratio (OR)=0.32; p=0.037) and J (OR=0.36; p=0.038) showed lower odds for developing CRAD than patients with haplogroup H. After adjusting for the most significant variables, haplogroups V and J tended to statistical significance (p=0.091 and p=0.067 respectively). This is a preliminary study in which mtDNA haplogroups seem to be implicated in susceptibility or protection for developing chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:25170295

  4. Increase of Th17 Cell Phenotype in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Cho, Mi-La; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the association of Th17 cell phenotype with chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). We compared the expression of Th17 cell phenotype in KTRs with chronic allograft dysfunction group (CAD, n = 52) with four control groups (long-term stable KTRs (LTS, n = 67), early stable KTRs (ES, n = 28), end stage renal disease (ESRD, n = 45), and healthy control (HC, n = 26). We also performed in vitro study using human proximal renal tubular epithelial cell line (HPRTEpiC) to evaluate the effect of IL-17 on human renal tubular epithelial cells. The CAD group showed increased percentage of Th17 cells out of CD4+ T cells and also increased proportion of IL-17 producing cells out of effector memory T cells or out of CCR4+CCR6+/CD4+ T cells compared to the LTS group and other control groups. Also, the serum level of IL-17, IL-33, and RAGE, and the expression of IL-1beta, RAGE, and HMGB1 mRNA showed an increase in the CAD group compared to the LTS group. In vitro study revealed that IL-17 increased production of IL-6 and IL-8 and up-regulated profibrotic gene expression such as ACTA-2 and CTGF in HPRTEpiC in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that IL-17 has a role in the development of renal tubular cell injury. The results of our study may suggest that increase of Th17 cell phenotype could be a marker for the chronic allograft injury; hence there is a need to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools targeting the Th17 cells pathway. PMID:26717145

  5. Application of Label-free Quantitative Peptidomics for the Identification of Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Chronic Allograft Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luis F.; Campistol, Josep M.; Alcolea, Maria P.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Sol-González, Amandaé; Cutillas, Pedro R.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of quantitative proteomics opens new opportunities in biomedical and clinical research. Although quantitative proteomics methods based on stable isotope labeling are in general preferred for biomolecular research, biomarker discovery is a case example of a biomedical problem that may be better addressed by using label-free MS techniques. As a proof of concept of this paradigm, we report the use of label-free quantitative LC-MS to profile the urinary peptidome of kidney chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD). The aim was to identify predictive biomarkers that could be used to personalize immunosuppressive therapies for kidney transplant patients. We detected (by LC-M/MS) and quantified (by LC-MS) 6000 polypeptide ions in undigested urine specimens across 39 CAD patients and 32 control individuals. Although unsupervised hierarchical clustering differentiated between the groups when including all the identified peptides, specific peptides derived from uromodulin and kininogen were found to be significantly more abundant in control than in CAD patients and correctly identified the two groups. These peptides are therefore potential biomarkers that might be used for the diagnosis of CAD. In addition, ions at m/z 645.59 and m/z 642.61 were able to differentiate between patients with different forms of CAD with specificities and sensitivities of 90% in a training set and, significantly, of ∼70% in an independent validation set of samples. Interestingly low expression of uromodulin at m/z 638.03 coupled with high expression of m/z 642.61 diagnosed CAD in virtually all cases. Multiple reaction monitoring experiments further validated the results, illustrating the power of our label-free quantitative LC-MS approach for obtaining quantitative profiles of urinary polypeptides in a rapid, comprehensive, and precise fashion and for biomarker discovery. PMID:19357086

  6. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to

  7. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  8. Association between the presence of anti-HLA antibodies with acute rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy in the first year after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toresan, R; Manfro, R C; Proença, M C C; Veronese, F J V; Salim, P H; da Silva, D M; Ribeiro, A R; Edelweiss, M I A; Pegas, K L; Jobim, L F J

    2008-04-01

    The clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies following kidney transplantation has been a recent focus of research. Patients who present anti-HLA antibodies in the posttransplantation period have shown higher incidences of acute rejection episodes (ARE) and chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-HLA antibodies during the first year after kidney transplantation and their association with the occurrence of ARE and CAN. Eighty-eight kidney transplant recipients were evaluated for the presence of IgG anti-HLA antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAT-M and LAT-1240, One Lambda Inc, Calif, United States). Protocol kidney biopsies were performed in consenting patients. ARE and CAN were diagnosed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathological criteria. Anti-HLA antibodies were observed in 20 (22.7%) patients. At 1 year follow-up, 26.1% presented ARE and 51.2% developed CAN. Nine patients (45%) with antibodies developed ARE as opposed to 20.6% without antibodies and 64.7% developed CAN as opposed to 47.8% of those without antibodies. In the histological analysis, the anti-HLA antibodies were associated with Banff IIA ARE (P = .001) and Banff grade II CAN (P = .012). Routine posttransplantation search for antibodies may identify cases at higher risk for acute and chronic rejection, and perhaps help to tailor the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:18454996

  9. The Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gandul, C; Mueller, N J; Pascual, M; Manuel, O

    2015-12-01

    Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are a significant cause of morbidity and reduced allograft and patient survival; however, the influence of infection on the development of chronic allograft dysfunction has not been completely delineated. Some viral infections appear to affect allograft function by both inducing direct tissue damage and immunologically related injury, including acute rejection. In particular, this has been observed for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in all SOT recipients and for BK virus infection in kidney transplant recipients, for community-acquired respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients, and for hepatitis C virus in liver transplant recipients. The impact of bacterial and fungal infections is less clear, but bacterial urinary tract infections and respiratory tract colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus spp appear to be correlated with higher rates of chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney and lung transplant recipients, respectively. Evidence supports the beneficial effects of the use of antiviral prophylaxis for CMV in improving allograft function and survival in SOT recipients. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prospective interventional trials assessing the potential effects of preventive and therapeutic strategies against bacterial and fungal infection for reducing or delaying the development of chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:26474168

  10. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration. PMID:19384181

  11. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  12. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  13. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  14. Infectious Triggers of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Aric L

    2016-07-01

    Survival after lung transplantation is limited in large part due to the high incidence of chronic rejection, known as chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Pulmonary infections are a frequent complication in lung transplant recipients, due both to immunosuppressive medications and constant exposure of the lung allograft to the external environment via the airways. Infection is a recognized risk factor for the development of CLAD, and both acute infection and chronic lung allograft colonization with microorganisms increase the risk for CLAD. Acute infection by community acquired respiratory viruses, and the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are increasingly recognized as important risk factors for CLAD. Colonization by the fungus Aspergillus may also augment the risk of CLAD. Fostering this transition from healthy lung to CLAD in each of these infectious episodes is the persistence of an inflammatory lung allograft environment. PMID:27221821

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  16. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  17. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  18. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Intraparenchymal pseudo-aneurysms in kidney transplant Symptoms: Asymptomatic Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous renal biopsy Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. Case Report: We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. Conclusions: Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  19. Clinical Course and Outcomes of Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Vadym; Ksenofontova, Anna; Onishchenko, Eugene; Golubova, Tatyana; Kichatyi, Sergey; Zakharova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study is provided to increase the efficiency of the treatment of kidney transplant recipients by predicting the development of the late allotransplant dysfunction. Methods. 330 patients who have lived for more than one year with functioning kidney allograft were evaluated. To predict the subsequent duration of the well-functioning of allotransplant the prognostic significance of 15 baseline clinical and sociodemographic characteristics on the results of the survey one year after transplantation was investigated. The result was considered to be positive in constructing the regression prognostication model if recipient lived more than 3 years from the time of transplantation. Results. It was established that more late start of renal allograft dysfunction after transplantation correlates with the more time it takes till complete loss of allograft function. Creatinine and hemoglobin blood concentration and the level of proteinuria one year after transplantation within created mathematical model allow predicting the loss of kidney transplant function three years after the transplantation. Patients with kidney transplant dysfunction are advised to renew the program hemodialysis upon reaching plasma creatinine concentration 0.5–0.7 mmol/L. Conclusion. Values of creatinine, hemoglobin, and proteinuria one year after transplantation can be used for subsequent prognostication of kidney transplant function. PMID:27478631

  20. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  1. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar

    2014-07-01

    Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908

  2. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy. PMID:26047788

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  4. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  5. Commercial kidney transplantation is an important risk factor in long-term kidney allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Ananth, Sailesh; Palepu, Sneha; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Transplant tourism, a form of transplant commercialization, has resulted in serious short-term adverse outcomes that explain reduced short-term kidney allograft survival. However, the nature of longer-term outcomes in commercial kidney transplant recipients is less clear. To study this further, we identified 69 Canadian commercial transplant recipients of 72 kidney allografts transplanted during 1998 to 2013 who reported to our transplant center for follow-up care. Their outcomes to 8 years post-transplant were compared with 702 domestic living donor and 827 deceased donor transplant recipients during this period using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Among many complications, notable specific events included hepatitis B or C seroconversion (7 patients), active hepatitis and/or fulminant hepatic failure (4 patients), pulmonary tuberculosis (2 patients), and a type A dissecting aortic aneurysm. Commercial transplantation was independently associated with significantly reduced death-censored kidney allograft survival (hazard ratio 3.69, 95% confidence interval 1.88-7.25) along with significantly delayed graft function and eGFR 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) or less at 3 months post-transplant. Thus, commercial transplantation represents an important risk factor for long-term kidney allograft loss. Concerted arguments and efforts using adverse recipient outcomes among the main premises are still required in order to eradicate transplant commercialization. PMID:27083285

  6. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  8. The Effect of Renin-angiotensin System Inhibitors on Kidney Allograft Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Mao, Michael A.; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Sathick, Insara J. J.; Erickson, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors in patients with chronic kidney disease, and especially in diabetic kidney disease, has been shown to provide renoprotective effects and slow progression to end-stage renal disease. However, this protective effect in kidney transplant patient populations is unclear. Aim: The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of RAS inhibitors on kidney allograft survival. Materials and Methods: A literature search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed from inception through February 2016. Studies that reported relative risks or hazard ratios comparing the risks of renal graft loss in renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors vs. controls were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results: Five studies (3 RCTs and 2 cohort studies) with 20024 kidney transplant patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled RR of allograft failure in recipients who received RAS inhibitors was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.45–1.21). When meta-analysis was limited only to RCTs, the pooled RR of allograft failure in patients using RAS inhibitors was 0.59 (95%: CI 0.20–1.69). The risk for mortality (RR: 1.13 [95% CI: 0.62–2.07]) in patients using RAS inhibitors compared to controls was not significantly reduced. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated insignificant reduced risks of renal graft loss among renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors. Future studies assessing the potential benefits of RAS inhibitors on allograft survival in specific kidney transplant patient populations are needed. PMID:27583237

  9. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  10. Chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of chronic kidney disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26030647

  11. Emerging role of B cells in chronic allograft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Robert B.; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Farris, Alton B.; Minnei, Francesca; Collins, A. Bernard; Smith, R. Neal

    2015-01-01

    B cells have many possible mechanisms by which they can affect allograft survival, including antigen presentation, cytokine production, immune regulation, and differentiation into alloantibody-producing plasma cells. This report reviews the last mechanism, which the authors regard as most critical for the long-term survival of allografts, namely, the promotion of chronic rejection by alloantibodies. Chronic humoral rejection characteristically arises late after transplantation and causes transplant glomerulopathy, multilamination of peritubular capillary basement membranes, and C4d deposition in PTCs and glomeruli. Circulating antidonor human leukocyte antigen class II antibodies are commonly detected and may precede the development of graft injury. Prognosis is poor, especially when recognized after graft dysfunction has developed. Improved detection and treatment are critically needed for this common cause of late graft loss. PMID:21116310

  12. Pretransplant Immune- and Apoptosis-Related Gene Expression Is Associated with Kidney Allograft Function

    PubMed Central

    Kamińska, Dorota; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Chudoba, Paweł; Mazanowska, Oktawia; Banasik, Mirosław; Żabinska, Marcelina; Boratyńska, Maria; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Gomółkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplant candidates present immune dysregulation, caused by chronic uremia. The aim of the study was to investigate whether pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression of immune factors affects clinical outcome of renal allograft recipients. Methods. In a prospective study, we analyzed pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression in87 renal transplant candidates with real-time PCR on custom-designed low density arrays (TaqMan). Results. Immediate posttransplant graft function (14-day GFR) was influenced negatively by TGFB1 (P = 0.039) and positively by IL-2 gene expression (P = 0.040). Pretransplant blood mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes (CASP3, FAS, and IL-18) and Th1-derived cytokine gene IFNG correlated positively with short- (6-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.027, FAS: P = 0.021, and IFNG: P = 0.029) and long-term graft function (24-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.003, FAS: P = 0.033, IL-18: P = 0.044, and IFNG: P = 0.04). Conclusion. Lowered pretransplant Th1-derived cytokine and apoptosis-related gene expressions were a hallmark of subsequent worse kidney function but not of acute rejection rate. The pretransplant IFNG and CASP3 and FAS and IL-18 genes' expression in the recipients' peripheral blood is the possible candidate for novel biomarker of short- and long-term allograft function. PMID:27382192

  13. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:24700874

  14. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. CASE REPORT We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. CONCLUSIONS Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  15. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  16. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney.

  17. Nitration and Inactivation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Chronic Rejection of Human Renal Allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan-Crow, L. A.; Crow, John P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Thompson, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Inflammatory processes in chronic rejection remain a serious clinical problem in organ transplantation. Activated cellular infiltrate produces high levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide. These reactive oxygen species interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify proteins to form 3-nitrotyrosine. We identified enhanced immunostaining for nitrotyrosine localized to tubular epithelium of chronically rejected human renal allografts. Western blot analysis of rejected tissue demonstrated that tyrosine nitration was restricted to a few specific polypeptides. Immunoprecipitation and amino acid sequencing techniques identified manganese superoxide dismutase, the major antioxidant enzyme in mitochondria, as one of the targets of tyrosine nitration. Total manganese superoxide dismutase protein was increased in rejected kidney, particularly in the tubular epithelium; however, enzymatic activity was significantly decreased. Exposure of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent (IC50 = 10 μ M) decrease in enzymatic activity and concomitant increase in tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for peroxynitrite during development and progression of chronic rejection in human renal allografts. In addition, inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite may represent a general mechanism that progressively increases the production of peroxynitrite, leading to irreversible oxidative injury to mitochondria.

  18. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  19. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  20. Sequential cytokine dynamics in chronic rejection of rat renal allografts: roles for cytokines RANTES and MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K C; Azuma, H; Tilney, N L

    1995-01-01

    Chronic rejection, the most important cause of long-term graft failure, is thought to result from both alloantigen-dependent and -independent factors. To examine these influences, cytokine dynamics were assessed by semiquantitative competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR and by immunohistology in an established rat model of chronic rejection lf renal allografts. Isograft controls develop morphologic and immunohistologic changes that are similar to renal allograft changes, although quantitatively less intense and at a delayed speed; these are thought to occur secondary to antigen-independent events. Sequential cytokine expression was determined throughout the process. During an early reversible allograft rejection episode, both T-cell associated [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-2 receptor, IL-4, and interferon gamma] and macrophage (IL-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6) products were up-regulated despite transient immunosuppression. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) peaked at 2 weeks; intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) was maximally expressed at 6 weeks. Macrophage products such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) increased dramatically (to 10 times), presaging intense peak macrophage infiltration at 16 weeks. In contrast, in isografts, ICAM-1 peaked at 24 weeks. MCP-1 was maximally expressed at 52 weeks, commensurate with a progressive increase in infiltrating macrophages. Cytokine expression in the spleen of allograft and isograft recipients was insignificant. We conclude that chronic rejection of kidney allografts in rats is predominantly a local macrophage-dependent event with intense up-regulation of macrophage products such as MCP-1, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The cytokine expression in isografts emphasizes the contribution of antigen-independent events. The dynamics of RANTES expression between early and late phases of chronic rejection suggest a key role in mediating the events of the

  1. A Novel Therapy to Attenuate Acute Kidney Injury and Ischemic Allograft Damage after Allogenic Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gueler, Faikah; Shushakova, Nelli; Mengel, Michael; Hueper, Katja; Chen, Rongjun; Liu, Xiaokun; Park, Joon-Keun; Haller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion contributes to the initial damage to allografts after kidney transplantation (ktx). In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tetrapeptide EA-230 (AQGV), might improve survival and attenuate loss of kidney function in a mouse model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. IRI was induced in male C57Bl/6N mice by transient bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 35 min. Treatment with EA-230 (20–50mg/kg twice daily i.p. for four consecutive days) was initiated 24 hours after IRI when acute kidney injury (AKI) was already established. The treatment resulted in markedly improved survival in a dose dependent manner. Acute tubular injury two days after IRI was diminished and tubular epithelial cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by EA-230 treatment. Furthermore, CTGF up-regulation, a marker of post-ischemic fibrosis, at four weeks after IRI was significantly less in EA-230 treated renal tissue. To learn more about these effects, we measured renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 28 hours after IRI. EA-230 improved both GFR and RBF significantly. Next, EA-230 treatment was tested in a model of ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. The recipients were treated with EA-230 (50 mg/kg) twice daily i.p. which improved renal function and allograft survival by attenuating ischemic allograft damage. In conclusion, EA-230 is a novel and promising therapeutic agent for treating acute kidney injury and preventing IRI-induced post-transplant ischemic allograft injury. Its beneficial effect is associated with improved renal perfusion after IRI and enhanced regeneration of tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25617900

  2. Frequency of HLA-G exon 8 polymorphisms and kidney allograft outcome in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Aghdaie, Mahdokht H; Azarpira, Negar; Kazemi, Kurosh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Darai, Masumeh; Malekhoseini, Seid Ali

    2011-06-01

    The 14-bp polymorphism in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene is associated with HLA-G mRNA stability and the patterns of alternative isoform splicing and may influence the functionality of the HLA-G molecule. HLA-G expression was related to allograft acceptance and fewer episodes of acute rejection during heart, kidney and liver-kidney transplantation. In order to determine a possible correlation between the 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and kidney allograft outcome in our population, genomic DNA was isolated from 144 patients who had received isolated kidney allografts. The recipients was divided into two groups, grafts presenting features of rejection group and a non-rejection group, and compared them with a control group of 100 healthy subjects. There was no significant difference in allelic frequencies of 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism between normal controls and kidney transplant patients. No significant difference was found between the RG and the NRG regarding the 14-bp genotypes and alleles. Therefore, additional studies with more sample size from other populations with analysis of other HLA-G polymorphisms are necessary to define this polymorphism as a valuable clinical marker. PMID:21107725

  3. Timing of Pregnancy After Kidney Transplantation and Risk of Allograft Failure.

    PubMed

    Rose, C; Gill, J; Zalunardo, N; Johnston, O; Mehrotra, A; Gill, J S

    2016-08-01

    The optimal timing of pregnancy after kidney transplantation remains uncertain. We determined the risk of allograft failure among women who became pregnant within the first 3 posttransplant years. Among 21 814 women aged 15-45 years who received a first kidney-only transplant between 1990 and 2010 captured in the United States Renal Data System, n = 729 pregnancies were identified using Medicare claims. The probability of allograft failure from any cause including death (ACGL) at 1, 3, and 5 years after pregnancy was 9.6%, 25.9%, and 36.6%. In multivariate analyses, pregnancy in the first posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of ACGL (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00, 1.40) and death censored graft loss (DCGL) (HR:1.25; 95% CI 1.04, 1.50), while pregnancy in the second posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of DCGL (HR: 1.26; 95% CI 1.06, 1.50). Pregnancy in the third posttransplant year was not associated with an increased risk of ACGL or DCGL. These findings demonstrate a higher incidence of allograft failure after pregnancy than previously reported and that the increased risk of allograft failure extends to pregnancies in the second posttransplant year. PMID:26946063

  4. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  5. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  6. Urinary cell mRNA profiles predictive of human kidney allograft status.

    PubMed

    Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay K; Schwartz, Joseph E; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2014-03-01

    Kidney allograft status is currently characterized using the invasive percutaneous needle core biopsy procedure. The procedure has become safer over the years, but challenges and complications still exist including sampling error, interobserver variability, bleeding, arteriovenous fistula, graft loss, and even death. Because the most common type of acute rejection is distinguished by inflammatory cells exiting the intravascular compartment and gaining access to the renal tubular space, we reasoned that a kidney allograft may function as an in vivo flow cytometer and sort cells involved in rejection into urine. To test this idea, we developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for absolute quantification of mRNA and pre-amplification protocols to overcome the low RNA yield from urine. Here, we review our single center urinary cell mRNA profiling studies that led to the multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT-04) study and the discovery and validation of a 3-gene signature of 18S rRNA-normalized measures of CD3ε mRNA and IP-10 mRNA and 18S rRNA that is diagnostic and predictive of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft. We also review our development of a 4-gene signature of mRNAs for vimentin, NKCC2, E-cadherin, and 18S rRNA diagnostic of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA). PMID:24517436

  7. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bourier, Felix; Kühne, Louisa; Banas, Miriam C.; Rümmele, Petra; Wurm, Simone; Banas, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation. Results Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median) was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival. Conclusion The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis

  8. [Chronic kidney disease and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities of mineral metabolism develop with decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is called as a CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The standard approach for management of CKD-MBD is to keep serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone in the reference range by dietary intervention and medications. It has been recently pointed out that starting the treatment from early CKD is important for suppressing CKD-MBD. PMID:26923973

  9. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  10. Campath, calcineurin inhibitor reduction and chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) study: background, rationale, and study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for patients with end-stage renal failure, but uncertainty remains about the best immunosuppression strategy. Long-term graft survival has not improved substantially, and one possible explanation is calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) nephrotoxicity. CNI exposure could be minimized by using more potent induction therapy or alternative maintenance therapy to remove CNIs completely. However, the safety and efficacy of such strategies are unknown. Methods/Design The Campath, Calcineurin inhibitor reduction and Chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) Study is a multicentre, open-label, randomized controlled trial with 852 participants which is addressing two important questions in kidney transplantation. The first question is whether a Campath (alemtuzumab)-based induction therapy strategy is superior to basiliximab-based therapy, and the second is whether, from 6 months after transplantation, a sirolimus-based maintenance therapy strategy is superior to tacrolimus-based therapy. Recruitment is complete, and follow-up will continue for around 5 years post-transplant. The primary endpoint for the induction therapy comparison is biopsy-proven acute rejection by 6 months, and the primary endpoint for the maintenance therapy comparison is change in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline to 2 years after transplantation. The study is sponsored by the University of Oxford and endorsed by the British Transplantation Society, and 18 centers for adult kidney transplant are participating. Discussion Late graft failure is a major issue for kidney-transplant recipients. If our hypothesis that minimizing CNI exposure with Campath-based induction therapy and/or an elective conversion to sirolimus-based maintenance therapy can improve long-term graft function and survival is correct, then patients should experience better graft function for longer. A positive outcome could change clinical practice in kidney transplantation. Trial

  11. Sterile leukocyturia is associated with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in kidney allograft protocol biopsies.

    PubMed

    Coelho, S; Ortíz, F; Gelpi, R; Koskinen, P; Porta, N; Bestard, O; Melilli, E; Taco, O; Torras, J; Honkanen, E; Grinyó, J M; Cruzado, J M

    2014-04-01

    Kidney allograft interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is associated with a poorer renal function and outcome. In the current clinical practice, an early diagnosis can only be provided by invasive tests. We aimed to investigate the association of sterile leukocyturia with Banff criteria histological findings in kidney allograft protocol biopsies. We studied 348 allograft biopsies from two different European countries performed at 8.5 + 3.5 months after transplantation. In these cases, the presence of sterile leukocyturia (Leuc+, n = 70) or no leukocyturia (Leuc-, n = 278) was analyzed and related to Banff elementary lesions. Only IF/TA was significantly different between Leuc+ and Leuc- groups. IF/TA was present in 85.7% of Leuc+ and 27.7% of Leuc- patients (p < 0.001). IF/TA patients had higher serum creatinine and presence of proteinuria (p < 0.05). Independent predictors of IF/TA were donor age, donor male sex, serum creatinine and Leuc+ (hazard ratio 18.2; 95% confidence interval, 8.1-40.7). The positive predictive value of leukocyturia for predicting IF/TA was 85.7% whereas the negative predictive value was 72.3%. These studies suggest that leukocyturia is a noninvasive and low-cost test to identify IF/TA. An early diagnosis may allow timely interventional measures directed to minimize its impact and improve graft outcome. PMID:24517324

  12. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  13. Case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in kidney allograft: Conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tienza, Antonio; Hevia, Mateo; Merino, Imanol; Velis, Jose Maria; Algarra, Ruben; Pascual, Juan Ignacio; Zudaire, Juan Javier; Robles, Jose Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an acute necrotizing infection with gas in the kidney and perinephric space that carries a bad prognosis. Apart from its predisposing clinical entities, diabetes mellitus and immune-incompetence are quite common in patients with this infection. We report a case of a 53-year-old kidney transplant recipient diabetic male, suffering from recurrent fever, abdominal pain and nausea episodes. Immediate broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered and percutaneous drainage was performed after the diagnosis. The bacteria involved were Stahpylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. After 4 weeks of antibiotic treatment and abscesses drainage, the case was resolved. Consecutives urine cultures and ultrasonographies confirm the complete resolution of the disease. We discuss the predisposing factors, clinical presentation and management. PMID:24839494

  14. CD14+CD16+ and CD14+CD163+ monocyte subpopulations in kidney allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes represent a heterogeneous population of cells subdivided according to the expression level of membrane antigens. A pro-inflammatory (intermediate/nonclassical) subpopulation of monocytes is defined by expression of CD16. CD163 seems to be characteristically preferentially expressed by immunosuppressive monocytes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the distribution of monocyte subpopulations in 71 patients with kidney allograft transplantation. Results The phenotype was evaluated by flow cytometry in defined time points. The proportions of peripheral CD14+CD16+ monocytes were downregulated immediately after the kidney transplantation and basiliximab treatment partially attenuated this trend. The transient downregulation of the CD14+CD16+ subpopulation was adjusted to basal values in two months. The proportions of CD14+CD163+ monocytes were transiently upregulated early after the kidney transplantation and remained higher during the first month in most patients. In ATG treated patients, the expansion of CD14+CD163+ monocytes was delayed but their upregulation lasted longer. In vitro data showed the direct effect of ATG and methylprednisolone on expression of CD16 and CD163 molecules while basiliximab did not affect the phenotype of cultured monocytes. Conclusions We assume from our data that kidney allograft transplantation is associated with modulation of monocyte subpopulations (CD14+CD16+ and CD14+CD163+) partially affected by an immunosuppressive regime used. PMID:24499053

  15. Prolonged cold ischemia accelerates cellular and humoral chronic rejection in a rat model of kidney allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Solini, Samantha; Aiello, Sistiana; Cassis, Paola; Scudeletti, Pierangela; Azzollini, Nadia; Mister, Marilena; Rocchetta, Federica; Abbate, Mauro; Pereira, Rafael Luiz; Noris, Marina

    2012-03-01

    One of the leading causes of long-term kidney graft loss is chronic allograft injury (CAI), a pathological process triggered by alloantigen-dependent and alloantigen-independent factors. Alloantigen-independent factors, such as cold ischemia (CI) may amplify the recipient immune response against the graft. We investigated the impact of prolonged cold ischemia and the subsequent delayed graft function on CAI in a fully MHC-mismatched rat model of kidney allotransplantation. Prolonged CI was associated with anticipation of proteinuria onset and graft function deterioration (ischemia: 90d; no ischemia: 150d), more severe tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and glomerulosclerosis, and increased mortality rate (180d survival, ischemia: 0%; no ischemia: 67%). In ischemic allografts, T and B cells were detected very early and were organized in inflammatory clusters. Higher expression of BAFF-R and TACI within the ischemic allografts indicates that B cells are mature and activated. As a consequence of B cell activity, anti-donor antibodies, glomerular C4d and IgG deposition, important features of chronic humoral rejection, appeared earlier in ischemic than in non-ischemic allograft recipients. Thus, prolonged CI time plays a main role in CAI development by triggering acceleration of cellular and humoral reactions of chronic rejection. Limiting CI time should be considered as a main target in kidney transplantation. PMID:22239163

  16. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  17. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  18. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  19. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  20. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  1. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage. PMID:10080402

  2. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography to Evaluate Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats and Correlations between Time-Intensity Curve Parameters and Allograft Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Zexing; Xu, Yue; Zeng, Song; Zhang, Zijian; Xue, Wenrui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-07-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed changes in the hemodynamic characteristics of renal allografts at different stages in a rat chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) model as well as the relationship between hemodynamic parameters and renal allograft fibrosis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The experimental group used a CAN rat model (n = 30), and the control group used an orthotopic syngeneic renal transplant model (n = 30). After surgery, creatinine clearance rates were regularly monitored every 2 wk. The checking times were set at 4, 12 and 24 wk after surgery, which represent early, middle and late stage of CAN, respectively. At different stages of CAN, eight rats from each group were randomly selected for CEUS examination. Time-intensity curve (TIC) parameters, including rise time, peak intensity, mean transit time, area under the curve, wash-in slope, time-to-peak and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression; Vimentin expression; and chronic allograft damage index scores were evaluated by linear correlation analysis. Before the creatinine clearance rate showed significant abnormalities, the renal allografts in the experimental group had already presented pathologic changes associated with CAN. In the early stage after surgery, compared to the TIC curve of the control group, the experimental group showed increased rise time, mean transit time, area under the curve and time-to-peak, and decreased wash-in slope (p < 0.05). Chronic allograft damage index scores and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin proteins in renal allografts were correlated with TIC parameters (p < 0.05). Compared to creatinine clearance rate, CEUS can detect CAN at earlier stages. The correlations between TIC-related parameters and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin in renal allografts indicate that CEUS is a feasible way to assess the degree of renal allograft fibrosis quantitatively. PMID:27056611

  3. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Nowocin, A K; Meader, L; Edwards, L A; Smith, R A; Wong, W

    2016-04-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab')2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I-A(k) conjugated with the plant-derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti-I-A(k) gelonin immunotoxin depletes I-A(k) expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3(+) cells within donor grafts, diminished donor-specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor-type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient-orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  4. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, K.; Nowocin, A. K.; Meader, L.; Edwards, L. A.; Smith, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II+ cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab′)2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I‐Ak conjugated with the plant‐derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti–I‐Ak gelonin immunotoxin depletes I‐Ak expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3+ cells within donor grafts, diminished donor‐specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor‐type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient‐orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  5. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  6. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J G; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, H Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J E; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2010-05-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney disease (P = 5.0 x 10(-5) and P = 3.6 x 10(-4), respectively). Our findings provide insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:20383145

  7. Subclinical Rejection Phenotypes at 1 Year Post-Transplant and Outcome of Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Vernerey, Dewi; Tinel, Claire; Aubert, Olivier; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Rabant, Marion; Verine, Jérôme; Nochy, Dominique; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Martinez, Frank; Glotz, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Kidney allograft rejection can occur in clinically stable patients, but long-term significance is unknown. We determined whether early recognition of subclinical rejection has long-term consequences for kidney allograft survival in an observational prospective cohort study of 1307 consecutive nonselected patients who underwent ABO-compatible, complement-dependent cytotoxicity-negative crossmatch kidney transplantation in Paris (2000-2010). Participants underwent prospective screening biopsies at 1 year post-transplant, with concurrent evaluations of graft complement deposition and circulating anti-HLA antibodies. The main analysis included 1001 patients. Three distinct groups of patients were identified at the 1-year screening: 727 (73%) patients without rejection, 132 (13%) patients with subclinical T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), and 142 (14%) patients with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Patients with subclinical ABMR had the poorest graft survival at 8 years post-transplant (56%) compared with subclinical TCMR (88%) and nonrejection (90%) groups (P<0.001). In a multivariate Cox model, subclinical ABMR at 1 year was independently associated with a 3.5-fold increase in graft loss (95% confidence interval, 2.1 to 5.7) along with eGFR and proteinuria (P<0.001). Subclinical ABMR was associated with more rapid progression to transplant glomerulopathy. Of patients with subclinical TCMR at 1 year, only those who further developed de novo donor-specific antibodies and transplant glomerulopathy showed higher risk of graft loss compared with patients without rejection. Our findings suggest that subclinical TCMR and subclinical ABMR have distinct effects on long-term graft loss. Subclinical ABMR detected at the 1-year screening biopsy carries a prognostic value independent of initial donor-specific antibody status, previous immunologic events, current eGFR, and proteinuria. PMID:25556173

  8. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. RESULTS After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  9. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Material/Methods Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. Results After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. Conclusions Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  10. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  11. Urine Free Light Chains as a Novel Biomarker of Acute Kidney Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rubin; Li, Min; Chouhan, Kanwaljit K.; Simon, Eric E.; Hamm, L. Lee; Batuman, Vecihil

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated urine free light chains (FLC) as a potential biomarker for acute kidney allograft injury (AKAI). Methods Urine κ and λ FLC were compared with urine β-2 microglobulin (β2-M), RBP, KIM-1, NGAL and microalbuminuria (MAB) in biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (AR) and ATN. Healthy volunteers (Normal) and transplant recipients with normal allograft function (Control) were used as references. Results Compared to Control or Normal group (N=15), urine FLC, MAB and RBP were higher in ATN (N=29) and AR (N=41) groups (p<0.05). There was no difference in KIM-1, NGAL or β2-M between 4 groups. In AR group, urine κFLC demonstrated the highest predictive value with sensitivity of 95.12% and specificity of 87.5% (p<0.0001). Urine κFLC also performed best with a sensitivity of 96.55% and specificity of 93.33% (p<0.0001) in ATN group. The AUC by ROC analysis is greatest in urine RBP (100%) and FLC (99%), and lowest in KIM-1 (53.5%), then NGAL (71.5%) in AR group. The AUC is also greatest in urine FLC (100%) and RBP (99%), and lowest in urine KIM-1 (55.6%) and NGAL (69.9%) in ATN group. Conclusions Urine FLC appears sensitive for both AR and ATN, and it may be a novel AKAI biomarker. PMID:24304377

  12. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  13. [Troponins and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Bellasi, Antonio; Cozzolino, Mario; De Pascalis, Antonio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis was recognized since 19th century as clinical entity with bad outcomes; only in 1912 it was reported that acute myocardial infarction had to been distinguished from angina pectoris. First diagnostic test was electrocardiogram, while white blood cells count and erythrocytes sedimentation rate were the only available laboratory tests. Late in the 60s and 70s glutammic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyravate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were added to biomarkers pool to provide a diagnosis of myocardial infarction related to myocardial cells injury. Only in 1987 assays for cardiac troponin were developed to assess structural damage of myocardial cells and in 2010 high sensibility troponins first dosage kits became available. It is well known that the population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than the general population. The use and interpretation of high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays have been particularly challenging in these patients with the majority having elevated levels at baseline. Aim of this review is to evaluate hs-cTn in patients with CKD for the diagnosis of AMI and for the prognostic significance of elevated levels in CKD patients without AMI. PMID:26252257

  14. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  15. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  16. Chronic kidney disease - pediatric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Janchevska, Aleksandra; Emini, Nora; Sahpazova, Emilija; Gucev, Zoran; Polenakovic, Momir

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the progression of chronic kidney disease is an important issue for every pediatric nephrologist and pediatrician in order to implement appropriate measures to prevent wasting of renal function and the final consequence - end stage renal disease with the need for the dialysis and transplantation. Therefore it is important to know, treat or ameliorate the standard risk factors such as hypertension, proteinuria, anemia, hyperparathyroidism etc. In this review devoted to the World Kidney Day 2016 we will pay attention to the low birth parameters, obesity, hyperuricemia and smoking which emerged as particularly important risk factors for children and adolescent with chronic kidney disease. PMID:27442412

  17. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD. PMID:26598845

  18. Kidney Allograft Stone after Kidney Transplantation and its Association with Graft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee-Zavareh, M. S.; Ajudani, R.; Ramezani Binabaj, M.; Heydari, F.; Einollahi, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is said that renal transplantation lithiasis is rare. However, literature has some different frequencies in this field and most of the studies related to this issue are case reports. Also the exact effect of this complication on the graft survival rate is not clear. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of nephrolithiasis among kidney transplant recipients and evaluate its association with the graft survival. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study to determine the prevalence of renal stone among 574 kidney transplant patients aged ≥18 years who had undergone renal transplantation in Baqiyatallah Transplant Center between 1990 and 2010. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the effect of renal stone on the graft survival. Results: The mean±SD follow-up time was 55±53 months. Kidney stones were diagnosed in 31 (4.4%) of all 574 kidney transplants studied. Cox regression analysis revealed that nephrolithiasis after transplantation had no significant effects on the survival of the transplanted kidney (OR 1.04, CI: 0.708–1.54). Conclusion: For the first time, we showed that nephrolithiasis in recipients does not have a significant effect on the transplant survival. PMID:26306157

  19. Monocytic Tissue Transglutaminase in a Rat Model for Reversible Acute Rejection and Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Padberg, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major risk factor for chronic allograft injury (CAI). Blood leukocytes interacting with allograft endothelial cells during acute rejection were suggested to contribute to the still enigmatic pathogenesis of CAI. We hypothesize that tissue transglutaminase (Tgm2), a multifunctional protein and established marker of M2 macrophages, is involved in acute and chronic graft rejection. We focus on leukocytes accumulating in blood vessels of rat renal allografts (Fischer-344 to Lewis), an established model for reversible acute rejection and CAI. Monocytes in graft blood vessels overexpress Tgm2 when acute rejection peaks on day 9 after transplantation. Concomitantly, caspase-3 is activated, suggesting that Tgm2 expression is linked to apoptosis. After resolution of acute rejection on day 42, leukocytic Tgm2 levels are lower and activated caspase-3 does not differ among isografts and allografts. Cystamine was applied for 4 weeks after transplantation to inhibit extracellular transglutaminase activity, which did, however, not reduce CAI in the long run. In conclusion, this is the first report on Tgm2 expression by monocytes in vivo. Tgm2 may be involved in leukocytic apoptosis and thus in reversion of acute rejection. However, our data do not support a role of extracellular transglutaminase activity as a factor triggering CAI during self-limiting acute rejection. PMID:26063971

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines What You Need to Know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ... n n n Notes: For more information National Kidney Disease Education Program 1-866-4 KIDNEY (1-866- ...

  1. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to calcineurin inhibitors. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy with declining glomerular filtration rate (GFR), defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m(2)/min, steadily increasing serum creatinine and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kg bodyweight (BW), followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. Calcineurin inhibitors were reduced to 50% at the start of sirolimus and discontinued at median 7 days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five out of eight patients (p = 0.026), and only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean serum creatinine improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, or on time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, and serum lipids increased transiently. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy-proven chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:16712606

  2. Common Iliac Artery Thrombosis following Pelvic Surgery Resulting in Kidney Allograft Failure Successfully Treated by Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty with Balloon-Expandable Covered Stent

    PubMed Central

    Golla, Maheswara S.; Acharjee, Subasit; Jaber, Bertrand L.; Garcia, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who developed acute kidney allograft failure due to thrombotic occlusion of the common iliac artery after hysterectomy requiring emergent allograft rescue. She underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with endovascular balloon expandable covered stent graft placement in the right common iliac artery. Although there are a handful of case reports of acute limb ischemia secondary to acute common iliac artery thrombosis, this is the first case reported in the literature resulting in successful kidney allograft rescue following pelvic surgery. PMID:26355669

  3. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) mice were transplanted with complete MHC-mismatched A/J kidney grafts, and intragraft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5(-/-) and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35, whereas 65% of allografts in wild-type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts. PMID:27165816

  4. A single center's approach to discriminating donor versus host origin of renal neoplasia in the allograft kidney.

    PubMed

    Robin, Adam J; Cohen, Eric P; Chongkrairatanakul, Tepsiri; Saad, Ehad; Mackinnon, A Craig

    2016-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the allograft of kidney transplant recipient (KTR) patients is rare and may represent a de novo process arising from the transplanted organ or metastasis from a clinically undetectable host primary. Determination of host versus donor origin is important for staging and management. We report our experience utilizing Penta-C (PC) and Penta-D (PD) short-tandem repeat (STR) microsatellite analysis to discriminate between host and donor origin of RCC identified in renal allografts. We identified 5 KTR patients with RCC in the allograft kidney. The PC and PD microsatellite analysis was applied to tumor, host, and donor formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections and/or fresh blood leukocytes to identify the origin of the neoplastic cells. The PC and PD microsatellite alleles were robustly amplified in all samples. Each case showed one or more informative alleles indicating that the neoplastic cells originate from donor tissue. Allele frequency data indicate that by using both PC and PD markers, we will be able to discriminate between host and donor cell of origin in over 99% of cases. The PC and PD microsatellite analysis is a convenient, robust, and efficient strategy to determine donor versus host origin or RCC in transplant kidney specimens. PMID:27402221

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  6. Molecular pathways of chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Bienaimé, Frank; Canaud, Guillaume; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Terzi, Fabiola

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive loss of functional nephrons. This loss means that the remaining nephrons are put under stress and are forced to adapt in order to maintain kidney function. Over the time, the strains imposed by these adaptations result in a vicious circle in which the loss of damaged nephrons results in the damage of the so far healthy nephrons. Hence, the rate of chronic kidney disease progression depends on the ability of the remaining nephrons to cope with stress. This article reviews the molecular pathways involved in the compensation and deterioration process after nephron reduction. In particular, we examine the role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)/serine-threonine protein kinase AKT, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and unfolded protein response pathways, as well as the pleiotropic function of Lipocalin 2. We also discuss the dual role played by some of these pathways in acute and chronic kidney disease. Finally, the relevance of these experimental finding to human chronic kidney disease is discussed. PMID:26972095

  7. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctly advise them. Moreover, in a more interconnected and globalized society, in which more and more Muslim patients live in the Western countries, this topic is of high interest also for the general practitioner. For this purpose, we carried out a systematic review, including also articles written in Arabic, Turkish, and Persian languages. Our main findings are that: recipients of kidney allograft can safely fast during Ramadan;evidences for safety in patients with nephrolithiasis and CKD are instead mixed and controversial. On the other hand,most studies have been carried out during Ramadan falling in cold seasons, and there is scarce information about Ramadan fasting in hot seasons. For these reasons, the findings may be not generalizable and therefore cautions should be taken and applied; the physicians should carefully monitor their patients during the fasting period with an adequate follow-up, in order to avoid any injurious effect. PMID:25364369

  8. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  9. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    MedlinePlus

    ... online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does it Mean for Me? Page Content ... My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  11. Tuberculosis-associated chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jobson Lopes; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) account for approximately 15-20% of TB cases in immunocompetent patients. The genitourinary system is the third most commonly affected site. We report the case of a 20-year-old man admitted with fever, chills, dry cough, right flank pain, and oliguria who developed renal function loss. The pyelogram evidenced silence of the right kidney, and the abdominal and pelvic magnetic resonance showed significant dilation of the right pyelocaliceal system and proximal ureter. Biopsies of renal cortex and retroperitoneal lymph nodes showed caseous granuloma consistent with TB. Treatment was started with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and the patient presented a favorable outcome but with non-dialytic chronic kidney disease. This case illustrates a case of chronic kidney disease secondary to TB in a young, otherwise healthy man. PMID:21633015

  12. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  13. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  14. Associations of Perfusate Biomarkers and Pump Parameters With Delayed Graft Function and Deceased Donor Kidney Allograft Function.

    PubMed

    Parikh, C R; Hall, I E; Bhangoo, R S; Ficek, J; Abt, P L; Thiessen-Philbrook, H; Lin, H; Bimali, M; Murray, P T; Rao, V; Schröppel, B; Doshi, M D; Weng, F L; Reese, P P

    2016-05-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) is increasingly used in deceased donor kidney transplantation, but controversy exists regarding the value of perfusion biomarkers and pump parameters for assessing organ quality. We prospectively determined associations between perfusate biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL], kidney injury molecule 1, IL-18 and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein [L-FABP]) and pump parameters (resistance and flow) with outcomes of delayed graft function (DGF) and 6-mo estimated GFR (eGFR). DGF occurred in 230 of 671 (34%) recipients. Only 1-h flow was inversely associated with DGF. Higher NGAL or L-FABP concentrations and increased resistance were inversely associated with 6-mo eGFR, whereas higher flow was associated with higher adjusted 6-mo eGFR. Discarded kidneys had consistently higher median resistance and lower median flow than transplanted kidneys, but median perfusate biomarker concentrations were either lower or not significantly different in discarded compared with transplanted kidneys. Notably, most recipients of transplanted kidneys with isolated "undesirable" biomarker levels or HMP parameters experienced acceptable 6-mo allograft function, suggesting these characteristics should not be used in isolation for discard decisions. Additional studies must confirm the utility of combining HMP measurements with other characteristics to assess kidney quality. PMID:26695524

  15. Non-immunologic predictors of chronic renal allograft failure: data from the United Network of Organ Sharing.

    PubMed

    Chertow, G M; Brenner, B M; Mackenzie, H S; Milford, E L

    1995-12-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience suggest that non-immunologic factors are important predictors of long-term renal allograft survival. It has been suggested that chronic allograft failure may in some cases by mediated by non-immunologic factors implicated in the pathobiology of other forms of progressive renal disease. Donor age, sex, and race may influence the "dose" of nephrons delivered in cadaveric renal transplantation. The United Network of Organ Sharing 1994 Public Use Data Tape was used to evaluate these and other risk factors in more than 31,000 recipients of cadaver allografts followed between 1987 and 1992. Female sex and African American race of the donor were important predictors of allograft failure. There was a markedly increased risk of allograft failure at both extremes of donor age. Recipients of large body size had accelerated graft loss. Stratified analyses suggested an interaction between donor and recipient race; nevertheless, all non-immunologic factors examined expressed independent associations with allograft survival. In sum, antigen-independent factors appear to be important determinants of allograft performance. Additional multivariable analyses are required to assess the relative importance of these factors compared with other known immunologic factors, such as HLA antigen mismatch. These findings may have important biomedical and health care policy implications. PMID:8587283

  16. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  17. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Jha, V

    2015-05-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  18. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  19. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'. PMID:27334146

  20. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  1. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  2. Vitamin D in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yahn-Yir

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in both the pediatric and adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. CKD is characterized by dysregulation of vitamin D and mineral metabolism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism and its management puts patients with CKD at increased cardiovascular risk. Emergence of experimental and some clinical data suggesting beneficial effects of vitamin D on proteinuria, blood pressure, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes has pushed it to the center stage of CKD research. Pediatric data on vitamin D dysregulation and its consequences are still in its infancy. Ongoing prospective studies such as Chronic Kidney disease in Children (CKiD) and the Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Children with CKD (4 C) should help to delineate the evolution of disturbances in mineral metabolism and its adverse effects on growth, CKD progression and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22544696

  3. [Chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic kidney chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is a serious complication which can evolve into severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), or even end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It impacts on the patient's quality of life and that of their family and significantly increases the cost of care. The development and progression of chronic kidney disease is prevented by strictly controlling blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risk factors as well as monitoring the markers of kidney disease. In the case of CKD, treatment may need to be adapted. PMID:26036123

  4. Intestinal Microbiota-Kidney Cross Talk in Acute Kidney Injury and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sanjeev; Martina-Lingua, Maria N.; Bandapalle, Samatha; Pluznick, Jennifer; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Rabb, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) involves multiple and overlapping immunological, biochemical, and hemodynamic mechanisms that modulate the effects of both the initial insult and the subsequent repair. Limited but recent experimental data have revealed that the intestinal microbiota significantly affects outcomes in AKI. Additional evidence shows significant changes in the intestinal microbiota in chronic kidney disease patients and in experimental AKI. In this minireview, we discuss the current status of the effect of intestinal microbiota on kidney diseases, the immunomodulatory effects of intestinal microbiota, and the potential mechanisms by which microbiota can modify kidney diseases and vice versa. We also propose future studies to clarify the role of intestinal microbiota in kidney diseases and to explore how the modification of gut microbiota may be a potential therapeutic tool. PMID:25343838

  5. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90 mm Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  6. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  7. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  8. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

  9. Phosphorus: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    Phosphorus Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program What Is Phosphorus? Phosphorus is a mineral that helps keep your bones healthy. It also helps ...

  10. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  11. Role of autophagy in chronic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a common pathway of various glomerular diseases, which carries great morbidity and mortality to people. CKD is characterized by progressive kidney fibrosis and remodeling. CKD is also associated with the depletion of glomerular and tubular cells. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. It plays an important role in both normal and disease states, including immunity, inflammation, and adaptation to stress. Evidence has indicated that impaired autophagic activity is involved in the development of CKD. Here, we review the progress in our understanding of the role of autophagy in the development and progression of CKD. Targeting the autophagic signaling pathways may be a therapeutic strategy for CKD. PMID:26885176

  12. Mechanisms of progression of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in all age groups, including children. Regardless of the underlying cause, CKD is characterized by progressive scarring that ultimately affects all structures of the kidney. The relentless progression of CKD is postulated to result from a self-perpetuating vicious cycle of fibrosis activated after initial injury. We will review possible mechanisms of progressive renal damage, including systemic and glomerular hypertension, various cytokines and growth factors, with special emphasis on the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), podocyte loss, dyslipidemia and proteinuria. We will also discuss possible specific mechanisms of tubulointerstitial fibrosis that are not dependent on glomerulosclerosis, and possible underlying predispositions for CKD, such as genetic factors and low nephron number. PMID:17647026

  13. Arterial disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Chue, Colin D; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N

    2013-03-01

    End stage renal disease is associated with a very high risk of premature cardiovascular death and morbidity. Early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with an increased frequency of cardiovascular events and is a common but poorly recognised and undertreated risk factor. Cardiovascular disease in CKD can be attributed to two distinct but overlapping pathological processes, namely atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. While the risk of athero-thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction is elevated, arteriosclerosis is the predominant pathophysiological process involving fibrosis and thickening of the medial arterial layer. This results in increased arterial stiffness causing left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis and the exposure of vulnerable vascular beds such as the brain and kidney to high pressure fluctuations causing small vessel disease. These pathophysiological features are manifest by a high risk of lethal arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent work has highlighted the importance of aldosterone and disordered bone mineral metabolism. PMID:23118349

  14. Outcome of Kidney Allografts in Recipients With a Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Özdemir-van Brunschot, Denise M D; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; van Hamersvelt, Henk W; Warlé, Michiel C

    2016-09-01

    Two patients, who were on hemodialysis over a femoral arteriovenous fistula, were transplanted in our center. Despite adequate blood pressure, perfusion of the renal allograft remained poor after completion of the vascular anastomoses. Ligation of the femoral arteriovenous fistula (1.6 L/min) led to adequate perfusion. Initial graft function was good. Although it remains unclear whether ischemia of a renal allograft is caused by venous hypertension or vascular steal due to a femoral arteriovenous fistula, it might be necessary to ligate a femoral arteriovenous fistula to obtain adequate graft perfusion. PMID:27313989

  15. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. PMID:26093993

  16. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  17. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  18. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  19. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  20. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  1. Kidney Allograft Telomere Length Is Not Associated with Sex, Recipient Comorbid Conditions, Post-Transplant Infections, or CMV Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kłoda, Karolina; Domański, Leszek; Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Drozd, Arleta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immunosenescence is closely linked to chromosome telomere erosion and telomerase activity alterations. The aim of this study was to analyze the associations of relative telomere length (RTL) of a graft with sex, comorbid conditions, post-transplant infections, and CMV reactivation among transplanted kidney recipients. Additionally, the associations of donor and recipient hTERT, BICD1 genes and chromosome 18 polymorphisms with post-transplant infections were analyzed, including the analysis of donor-recipient genotype pairs. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study enrolled 119 white Polish kidney allograft recipients (64M/55F, mean age 47.3±14.0). The RTL was assessed by modification of a method developed by Cawthon, using a qPCR system. To identify genotypes of the studied polymorphisms, real-time PCR was performed. RESULTS There were no significant associations between graft RTL and sex of donor and recipient, comorbid DM and AH, as well as post-transplant infections and CMV reactivation. There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of hTERT, BICD1 genes and chromosome 18 graft and recipient polymorphisms genotypes between individuals with post-transplant infection and those without infection. The rs2735940 CX-TT hTERT gene donor-recipient genotypes combination was associated with higher risk of post-transplant infection on the border of statistical significance (OR=4.632, 95%CI (0.853-25.14); p=0.067). CONCLUSIONS Assessment of kidney allograft RTL does not show its association with sex, DM, AH, post-transplant infection, or CMV reactivation in the recipients, suggesting that other factors, probably directly related to the transplantation procedure, have a greater effect on telomere length. PMID:27350315

  2. Functional and histological improvement after everolimus rescue of chronic allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kai Ming; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Luk, Cathy Choi-Wan; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Leung, Chi Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the strategy of mTOR inhibitors with calcineurin inhibitor minimization in renal transplant recipients with known chronic allograft dysfunction. Methods In this open-label, single-arm study, renal transplant patients were recruited after biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction in the absence of acute rejection episode within 2 months, with proteinuria <0.8 g/day, and serum creatinine <220 μmol/L or estimated glomerular filtration rate >40 mL/min/1.73 m2. They were converted to everolimus (aiming for trough everolimus level 3–8 ng/mL) with cyclosporine minimization, to assess the effect on renal function, rate of glomerular filtration rate decline, and longitudinal transplant biopsy at 12 months. Results Seventeen Chinese patients (median transplant duration, 4.2 years) were recruited; no patients discontinued study medication. The mean slope of the glomerular filtration rate over time was −4.31±6.65 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the year before everolimus, as compared with 1.29±5.84 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the 12 months of everolimus therapy, a difference of 5.61 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–10.8) favoring everolimus therapy (P=0.036). Serial renal biopsy histology showed significant decrease of tubular atrophy (15.7%±11.3% versus 7.1%±7.3%, P=0.005) and interstitial fibrosis (14.8%±11.5% versus 7.2%±8.2%, P=0.013). Intrarenal expression of TGF-β1 mRNA showed a nonsignificant decrease after everolimus treatment. Conclusion In renal transplant recipients with biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction, we found a significant beneficial effect of everolimus rescue therapy and calcineurin inhibitor minimization strategy on the improvement of glomerular filtration rate decline rate. In secondary analysis, everolimus was shown to slow down the disease progression by reducing the tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scoring. PMID:26056462

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  4. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guilan; Ali, Reza; Shuldberg, Mark M.; Bastani, Bahar; Brink, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), defined as the presence of hematopoietic elements outside of the medullary cavity of bone, has been reported in patients with various hematopoietic neoplasms including myelofibrosis. EMH commonly occurs in the liver and spleen (resulting in hepatosplenomegaly) and uncommonly involves the kidney. EMH involving the allograft kidney has not been reported in English literature. Herein, we report the first case of EMH in allograft kidney in a patient with myelofibrosis. The clinical and pathological findings are described. Through comparison of the medullary neoplastic infiltrate with the renal allograft infiltrate, we postulate the neoplastic nature of the infiltrate in the allograft kidney. PMID:26120442

  5. Early subclinical inflammation correlates with outcomes in positive crossmatch kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Dean, Patrick G; Park, Walter D; Cornell, Lynn D; Schinstock, Carrie A; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between early subclinical findings (10- and 90-day histology and gene expression data) and late outcomes (transplant glomerulopathy and graft loss) in positive crossmatch kidney transplants (+XMKTx). We compared 34 +XMKTx (19 receiving eculizumab and 15 receiving standard of care without eculizumab) to 13 -XMKTx (between August 2001 and August 2011). At 10 days, light microscopy identified subclinical inflammation in only 18% of +XMKTx, while intragraft gene expression identified inflammation in 79% (gene sets for activated macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells or T cells). Inflammation persisted at 90 days and was associated with the development of transplant glomerulopathy by 2 years and graft loss. In contrast, endothelial cell (EC) changes present at 90 days by either electron microscopy or gene expression were not associated with transplant glomerulopathy or graft loss in this cohort. Eculizumab treatment did not appear to alter inflammation or EC changes. Therefore, intragraft inflammation might be an appropriate surrogate marker of progression and also a target of therapy to prevent chronic antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27225518

  6. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  7. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  8. [Treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome caused by complex and interrelated causes. The early markers of this syndrome are often present even before the blood pressure (BP) elevation; therefore, SAH cannot only be classified by the BP elevation threshold, which sometimes is discreet. Its progression is strongly associated with structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities, which lead to end-organ damage (heart, kidney, brain, blood vessels and other organs), and cause premature morbidity and death. In this sense, the BP is only a biomarker of this cardiovascular syndrome, which is why it is more useful to consider individual BP patterns of the ill patient rather than a single BP threshold. The study and treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has made some progresses, especially in patients requiring dialysis. The use of non-invasive technology to register the BP has reconfigured health care of patients in regards to the diagnosis, circadian pattern, clinical surveillance, pharmacological prescription, prognosis, and risk of cardiovascular events (as well as mortality). The opportunity in the diagnosis and treatment means a delay in the onset of complications and, also, of dialysis. The blockade of the renin-aldotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a regular monitoring of the dry weight of the population in dialysis, and non-pharmacological interventions to modify lifestyle are the maneuvers with greater impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients. PMID:27284847

  9. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  10. Genetic Considerations in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Lyndsay A; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is an irreversible process that, in some cases, may lead to end-stage renal disease. The majority of children with CKD have a congenital disorder of the kidney or urological tract arising from birth. There is strong evidence for both a genetic and epigenetic component to progression of CKD. Utilization of gene-mapping strategies, ranging from genome-wide association studies to single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis, serves to identify potential genetic variants that may lend to disease variation. Genome-wide association studies evaluating population-based data have identified different loci associated with CKD progression. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on an individual level suggests that secondary systemic sequelae of CKD are closely related to dysfunction of the cardiovascular-inflammatory axis and may lead to advanced cardiovascular disease through abnormal vascular calcification and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Similarly, genetic variants affecting cytokine control, fibrosis, and parenchymal development may modulate CKD through development and acceleration of renal interstitial fibrosis. Epigenetic studies evaluate modification of the genome through DNA methylation, histone modification, or RNA interference, which may be directly influenced by external or environmental factors directing genomic expression. Lastly, improved understanding of the genetic and epigenetic contribution to CKD progression may allow providers to identify a population at accelerated risk for disease progression and apply novel therapies targeted at the genetic mechanism of disease. PMID:27617141

  11. Effect of tolerance versus chronic immunosuppression protocols on the quality of life of kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Spencer, Philip J.; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran; Crisalli, Kerry A.; Chang, David C.; Markmann, James F.; Elias, Nahel; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Sachs, David H.; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney transplant patients on tolerance protocols avoid the morbidity associated with the use of conventional chronic immunosuppressive regimens. However, the impact of tolerance versus conventional regimens on the quality of life (QOL) of kidney transplant patients is unknown. METHODS Five patients who achieved long-term immunosuppression-free renal allograft survival after combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation (tolerant group) were compared with thirty-two comparable kidney transplant recipients on conventional immunosuppression (conventional group). QOL was compared with 16 conventional recipients using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL SF-36) and the Modified Transplant Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress Scale (MTSOSD-59R). RESULTS Patients in the tolerant group required significantly less treatment after transplant for hypertension and no medications for diabetes (P < 0.01). There was no incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, or malignancies in the tolerant group, while these were observed in 12.5%, 40.6%, and 11.8% of the conventional group, respectively. Tolerant patients experienced better overall health (P < 0.01) and scored higher on kidney transplant-targeted scales and healthy survey scales than patients in the conventional group according to the KDQOL SF-36 (P < 0.05). Tolerant patients were less likely to experience depression, dyspnea, excessive appetite/thirst, flatulence, hearing loss, itching, joint pain, lack of energy, muscle cramps, and lack of libido than conventional patients according to the MTSOSD-59R (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Kidney transplant recipients who achieved tolerance experience significantly fewer incidences of complications, improved QOL, and fewer comorbid symptoms compared with patients on conventional immunosuppression. These results support the expanded use of tolerance protocols in kidney transplantation. PMID:27336062

  12. Chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism: epidemiology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Keattiyoat; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An estimated 13% of Americans have kidney disease. We sought to describe the association of kidney disease with risk of venous thromboembolism and discuss possible mechanisms explaining this association. Recent findings All severities of kidney disease appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. In the general population the risk associated with mild to moderate kidney disease is 1.3–2-fold increased, and present even for microalbuminuria, although stage 1 chronic kidney disease itself has not been studied. End-stage renal disease is also associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk, compared to the general population. Although data are limited, risk increases after kidney transplant and with nephrotic syndrome as well. Summary Rates of kidney disease are increasing rapidly in the population and kidney disease is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. An improved understanding of mechanisms linking kidney disease with venous thromboembolism will allow further study of best prevention efforts. PMID:19561505

  13. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  14. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  15. Molecular characterization and sequence analysis of polyomavirus strains isolated from needle biopsy specimens of kidney allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Boldorini, R; Omodeo-Zorini, E; Suno, A; Benigni, E; Nebuloni, M; Garino, E; Fortunato, M; Monga, G; Mazzucco, G

    2001-10-01

    We retrospectively examined 29 renal allograft biopsy specimens from 42 kidney transplant recipients by means of molecular biologic techniques (nested polymerase chain reaction), immunohistochemical analysis (anti-SV40 antibody), and histologic examination to evaluate the presence of polyomaviruses (PVs), viral genotypes, genomic mutations, and their pathologic significance. PV genomes were found in six cases (21%); restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis characterized 4 as JC virus (JCV) and 2 as BK virus (BKV). The latter also were positively stained immunohistochemically and showed histologically typical intranuclear viral inclusions; JCV cases were negative. DNA sequence analysis revealed only minor changes in the 4 JCV cases (3 archetypes and 1 JCV type 3, not associated with a known pathogenic genotype) but identified 2 specific variants in the BKV isolates (AS and WW strains). Given the different histologic findings (mixed inflammatory infiltration in the AS and no inflammation in the WW strain), we speculate that different BKV strains may cause differential damage in transplanted kidneys. Finally, the negative histologic and immunohistochemical JCV results, as well as the absence of viral mutations, indicate that JCV renal infection is latent in transplant recipients. PMID:11601133

  16. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results Statistically significant correlation between the estimated creatinine clearance values and the average of the calculated values of kidney volume was found (p<0.01). Average value of the kidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. PMID:27452323

  17. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  18. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for answers to your questions about kidney function, dialysis, keeping a job, Medicare, exercise, and more. With ... touch of the sugar". About 44% of new dialysis patients have diabetes. What you can do: Kidney ...

  19. Serum tumor markers in chronic kidney disease: as clinical tool in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is singled out as the biggest cause of death in the world, predicted to reach 13.1 million cancer-related deaths by the year 2030. Although there are no specific tumor markers used in cancer screening, some markers can be used to assist in making a diagnosis and determining a prognosis. They can be used to follow in cases where the diagnosis is cancer through monitoring of the disease recurrence and/or evaluating the response to therapy. These markers are not specific as the number increases in multiple cases of cancer. Some markers are positive in a single type of cancer; others are detectable in more than one type. An ideal tumor marker should be highly sensitive, specific, and reliable with high prognostic value. Other characteristics of an ideal tumor marker are organ specificity and correlation of it with tumor stages. However, none of the tumor markers reported to date has all these characteristics. Influence of different stages of chronic kidney function on serum tumor markers is variable. Furthermore, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation affect on tumor markers differently. Sometimes, no study has been found in the literature review. Combined serum tumor markers may also be valuable. This literature review points the role of serum tumor markers in screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of cancer patients in chronic kidney disease patients and renal allograft recipients. In addition, impact of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation on different serum tumor markers is briefly explored. PMID:26907957

  20. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  1. Recurrent Light Chain Proximal Tubulopathy in a Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Angioi, Andrea; Amer, Hatem; Fervenza, Fernando C; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2016-09-01

    We describe a rare case of light chain proximal tubulopathy developing in a kidney transplant 12 months following transplantation. The patient was known to have a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) for more than 15 years. A kidney biopsy done to determine the cause of decline in kidney transplant function showed light chain proximal tubulopathy characterized by numerous eosinophilic and fuchsinophilic granules in proximal tubular epithelial cells, which stained for κ light chains on pronase-based immunofluorescence studies. Electron microscopy confirmed the diagnosis and showed numerous amorphous and geometrically shaped inclusions in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Evaluation of free light chains revealed markedly elevated κ light chains and bone marrow biopsy showed 5% to 10% κ light chain-restricted plasma cells. Retrospective evaluation of the native kidney biopsy performed 15 years earlier also showed numerous fuchsinophilic granules in proximal tubules that stained brightly for κ light chains on pronase-based immunofluorescence studies. The patient was treated with a regimen of bortezomib and dexamethasone with good partial hematologic response and improvement of kidney function. To summarize, we describe a case of recurrent light chain proximal tubulopathy in the transplant, which is an unusual but important cause of decreased kidney function in the setting of a monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:27321964

  2. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  3. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2009-03-01

    Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

  4. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

  5. Contextual Poverty, Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) outcomes. One of the strongest factors that impacts nutrition is socioeconomic status as evidenced by the large body of epidemiologic data showing that income and education are directly associated with diet quality. Apart from individual-level markers of socioeconomic status such as income and education, contextual factors such as availability of and transportation to food outlets that provide healthy food options and the density of fast food restaurants within particular regions markedly impact the ability of individuals to comply with nutrition recommendations. This is particularly true for nutrition guidelines most specific to individuals with CKD such as the consumption of protein, saturated fat, sodium and phosphorus, all of which have been shown to impact CKD health and are influenced by the availability of healthy food options within individual neighborhood food environments. Because of the strong association of contextual poverty with the diet quality, any serious attempt to improve the diet of CKD patients must include a discussion of the environmental barriers that each individual faces in trying to access healthy foods and health care providers should take account of these barriers when tailoring specific recommendations. PMID:25573510

  6. [Chronic kidney disease: therapy and care].

    PubMed

    Noel, Natacha; Gaha, Khaled; Rieu, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. It is therefore important to slow its progression and to treat its complications. Regardless of the causal nephropathy, arterial hypertension and proteinuria are the major progression factors of CKD. Thus, optimal control of blood pressure, reduction of proteinuria by using rennin angiotension system inhibitors can slow the progression of CKD. This effect can be enhanced by reducing sodium intake. The recent recommendations suggest that blood pressure should not be higher than 130/80 mmHg and proteinuria should not exceed 0,5 g/day. The consequences of advanced stages of the CKD have to be diagnosed and treated early: anemia, abnormal bone metabolism, hyperkalemia, fluid overload, metabolic acidosis... A particular emphasis has to be given to cardiovascular complications and risk factors. Monitoring data are well defined by the actual recommandations. Nephrologist can provide a set of recommended intervention to the primary care physician. The most accepted criterion of initiation of dialysis, in absence of clinic uremic manifestation is a glomerular filtration rate lower than 7 ml/min/1,73m2. Psychological and medical preparation of the patient to dialysis is essential. The possibility of renal transplantation should be evaluated during the following of patient with CKD PMID:22335066

  7. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90 mmHg in the general population and 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  8. The Chronic Kidney Disease - Colonic Axis.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has long been known to cause significant gastrointestinal and colonic pathology. Recent advances in understanding of the role of colonic bacterial microbiome and its function and composition in health and disease have revealed previously unappreciated effects of CKD-associated colonic pathology on the development of uremic complications. CKD can result in profound changes in the microbiome composition and biosynthetic pattern, and the structure and function of the colon. Increases in bacteria that produce urease, uricase, p-cresol- and indole-forming enzymes and the depletion of bacteria that possess short chain fatty acid forming enzymes have been described in human and animal models. Disruption of the colonic epithelial tight junction in different animal models of CKD has been reported and is largely due to the conversion of luminal urea to ammonia by urease possessing bacteria. Together, these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by allowing the translocation of endotoxin and microbial fragments into the circulation. Additionally, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, P-cresol sulfate. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the colonic microbiome and the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and their role in the pathogenesis the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. PMID:25855516

  9. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  10. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  11. Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158020.html Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds ... affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study ...

  12. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  13. The PROCARE consortium: toward an improved allocation strategy for kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Otten, H G; Joosten, I; Allebes, W A; van der Meer, A; Hilbrands, L B; Baas, M; Spierings, E; Hack, C E; van Reekum, F; van Zuilen, A D; Verhaar, M C; Bots, M L; Seelen, M A J; Sanders, J S F; Hepkema, B G; Lambeck, A J; Bungener, L B; Roozendaal, C; Tilanus, M G J; Vanderlocht, J; Voorter, C E; Wieten, L; van Duijnhoven, E; Gelens, M; Christiaans, M; van Ittersum, F; Nurmohamed, A; Lardy, N M; Swelsen, W T; van Donselaar-van der Pant, K A M I; van der Weerd, N C; Ten Berge, I J M; Bemelman, F J; Hoitsma, A J; de Fijter, J W; Betjes, M G H; Roelen, D L; Claas, F H J

    2014-10-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment option for patients with end-stage renal failure. At present, approximately 800 Dutch patients are registered on the active waiting list of Eurotransplant. The waiting time in the Netherlands for a kidney from a deceased donor is on average between 3 and 4 years. During this period, patients are fully dependent on dialysis, which replaces only partly the renal function, whereas the quality of life is limited. Mortality among patients on the waiting list is high. In order to increase the number of kidney donors, several initiatives have been undertaken by the Dutch Kidney Foundation including national calls for donor registration and providing information on organ donation and kidney transplantation. The aim of the national PROCARE consortium is to develop improved matching algorithms that will lead to a prolonged survival of transplanted donor kidneys and a reduced HLA immunization. The latter will positively affect the waiting time for a retransplantation. The present algorithm for allocation is among others based on matching for HLA antigens, which were originally defined by antibodies using serological typing techniques. However, several studies suggest that this algorithm needs adaptation and that other immune parameters which are currently not included may assist in improving graft survival rates. We will employ a multicenter-based evaluation on 5429 patients transplanted between 1995 and 2005 in the Netherlands. The association between key clinical endpoints and selected laboratory defined parameters will be examined, including Luminex-defined HLA antibody specificities, T and B cell epitopes recognized on the mismatched HLA antigens, non-HLA antibodies, and also polymorphisms in complement and Fc receptors functionally associated with effector functions of anti-graft antibodies. From these data, key parameters determining the success of kidney transplantation will be identified which will lead to the

  14. OCCUPATIONAL SILICA EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Vupputuri, Suma; Parks, Christine G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Hogan, Susan L.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Occupational exposure to silica may be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most studies have been conducted in occupational cohorts with high levels of exposure but small numbers of cases. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of occupational silica exposure and CKD. Methods Cases were hospital patients with newly diagnosed CKD and community controls were selected using random digit dialing and frequency matched by age, gender, race and proximity to the hospital. Silica exposure estimates were assigned by industrial hygiene review of lifetime job history data and weighted for certainty and intensity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for CKD conditioned on demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (range, 30-83 years), 56% were male and 54% were white. Any silica exposure (compared to none) was associated with a 40% increased risk of CKD (OR=1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 1.89) in a multivariable adjusted model. The mean cumulative duration of silica exposure was significantly higher in exposed cases than in exposed controls (33.4 vs. 24.8 years, respectively). Overall, compared to non-exposed participants, the ORs (95% CI) for those below and above the median duration of silica exposure were 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.86) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.71), respectively. Conclusions We found a positive relationship between occupational silica exposure and CKD. A dose-response trend of increasing CKD risk with increasing duration of silica exposure was observed and was particularly strong among non-whites. PMID:22032652

  15. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined. PMID:23756992

  16. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 212–889–2210 Fax: 212–689–9261 Internet: www.kidney.org A Healthy Food Guide for ... Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000 Chicago, IL 60606–6995 Internet: www.eatright.org Your Kidney Test Results Solving ...

  17. Successful three-way kidney paired donation with cross-country live donor allograft transport.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, R A; Katznelson, S; Bry, W I; Zachary, A A; Houp, J; Hiller, J M; Shridharani, S; John, D; Singer, A L; Segev, D L

    2008-10-01

    Providing transplantation opportunities for patients with incompatible live donors through kidney paired donation (KPD) is seen as one of the important strategies for easing the crisis in organ availability. It has been estimated that an additional 1000-2000 transplants per year could be accomplished if a national KPD program were implemented in the United States. While most of these transplants could be arranged within the participants' local or regional area, patients with hard-to-match blood types or broad HLA sensitization would benefit from matching across larger geographic areas. In this case, either patients or organs would need to travel in order to obtain maximum benefit from a national program. In this study, we describe how a triple KPD enabled a highly sensitized patient (PRA 96%) to receive a well-matched kidney from a live donor on the opposite coast. The kidney was removed in San Francisco and transported to Baltimore where it was reperfused 8 h later. The patient had prompt function and 1 year later has a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/dl. This case provides a blueprint for solving some of the complexities that are inherent in the implementation of a national KPD program in a large country like the United States. PMID:18828774

  18. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching.

    PubMed

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  19. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  20. Genetic or Pharmaceutical Blockade of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase P110δ Prevents Chronic Rejection of Heart Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Marlene L.; McCormack, Ann M.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the major cause of long-term heart allograft failure, characterized by tissue infiltration by recipient T cells with indirect allospecificity. Phosphoinositol-3-kinase p110δ is a key mediator of T cell receptor signaling, regulating both T cell activation and migration of primed T cells to non-lymphoid antigen-rich tissue. We investigated the effect of genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of PI3K p110δ on the development of chronic allograft rejection in a murine model in which HY-mismatched male hearts were transplanted into female recipients. We show that suppression of p110δ activity significantly attenuates the development of chronic rejection of heart grafts in the absence of any additional immunosuppressive treatment by impairing the localization of antigen-specific T cells to the grafts, while not inducing specific T cell tolerance. p110δ pharmacologic inactivation is effective when initiated after transplantation. Targeting p110δ activity might be a viable strategy for the treatment of heart chronic rejection in humans. PMID:22479345

  1. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  2. Gut microbiota and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifactorial phenotype that in chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse patient outcomes. Recently, alterations in gut microbiota composition and intestinal barrier have been associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD patients. Vanholder and Glorieux recently critically reviewed [Clin Kidney J (2015) 8 (2): 168-179] the current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in the production of uraemic toxins and the therapeutic implications. Where do we stand now? The basic mechanisms of the gut-kidney crosstalk must still be clarified. In addition, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic strategies to modulate the gut microbiota in order to decrease uraemic toxin production and inflammation in chronic kidney disease should be evaluated. Finally, an impact of such strategies on hard outcomes should be demonstrated before incorporation into routine clinical practice. PMID:26034597

  3. Fatigue in chronic kidney disease: Definition, assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zalai, Dora; Bohra, Miqdad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue--an overwhelming subjective feeling of mental or physical exhaustion--impacts patients' everyday functioning and quality of life, delays recovery after hemodialysis, and increases mortality. There are a number of factors that may perpetuate clinically significant fatigue among individuals with chronic kidney disease, including sleep disorders, depression, sedentary lifestyle, anemia, and chronic inflammation. Some of these factors (i.e., anemia and inflammation) are in the forefront of clinical attention, whereas the other contributing factors often remain unrecognized. This article provides a pragmatic overview of the definition, assessment, maintaining factors, and management of fatigue in chronic kidney disease. Given that chronic fatigue is a major determinant of patients' quality of life, nurses can bring about a fundamental improvement in patients' well-being if they recognize the most common fatigue-perpetuating factors and facilitate fatigue management interventions. PMID:27215061

  4. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  6. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. PMID:26300515

  7. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  8. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  9. High Water Intake and Progression of Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon; Ha, Sung Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Impact of water intake on the courses of chronic kidney and urinary tract diseases, such as urolithiasis, urinary tract infections, chronic kidney diseases (CKD), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases and bladder cancer, has recently been studied. It still remains controversial whether increased water intake slows the progression of CKD or not. However, high water intake suppresses plasma levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is expected to be beneficial for the preservation of the kidney function. Previous studies suggest that water intake suppresses plasma levels of AVP, and high levels of AVP have been suggested to play deleterious roles in animal models of kidney disease. Moreover, recent epidemic of CKD of unknown origin, which was supposed to be related to the insufficient water intake and chronic volume depletion, has been reported in Central America, further suggesting that the suppression of AVP by sustained water intake might be beneficial in this CKD population. Indeed, the data from recent studies were consistent with the view that high water intake is associated with slower progression of CKD. However, contradictory findings also exist. The intriguing effects of increased urine volume in preserving the glomerular filtration rate in human patients with CKD require more large and well-designed randomized prospective clinical trials. PMID:26848303

  10. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases. PMID:27442377

  11. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  12. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  13. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  14. Excellent long term patient and renal allograft survival after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: Experience of one center

    PubMed Central

    Melexopoulou, Christina; Marinaki, Smaragdi; Liapis, George; Skalioti, Chrysanthi; Gavalaki, Maria; Zavos, George; Boletis, John N

    2015-01-01

    % vs 92%, P = ns). The mean serum creatinine and the estimated glomerular filtration rate by the modification of diet in renal disease formula at 1, 3, 5 and 8 years did not differ significantly between ABOi and ABOc group. None of the patients in the ABOi group developed acute or chronic antibody-mediated rejection evidenced by histological signs. Four patients (13.3%) in the ABOi group and 3 (10%) in the ABOc group experienced acute cellular rejection, which was treated successfully in all cases. Bacterial and viral infections were also similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: ABOi kidney transplantation is a safe and effective alternative that enables kidney transplantation in countries with unacceptably long deceased-donor waiting lists. PMID:26722661

  15. Abnormal Localization of STK17A in Bile Canaliculi in Liver Allografts: An Early Sign of Chronic Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Aini, Wulamujiang; Tamaki, Keiji; Haga, Hironori; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya

    2015-01-01

    The biological significance of STK17A, a serine/threonine kinase, in the liver is not known. We analyzed STK17A expression in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Accordingly, we investigated whether STK17A could help in identifying earlier changes during the evolution of chronic rejection (CR) after liver transplantation. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to analyze STK17A expression in HepG2 cells. Antibody microarray was performed using human liver samples from CR and healthy donors. Immunohistochemistry was used to verify the clinical utility of STK17A on sequential biopsies for the subsequent development of CR. A novel short isoform of STK17A was found in HepG2 cells. STK17A was localized in the nuclei and bile canaliculi in HepG2 cells and human livers. Microarray of STK17A revealed its decrease in failed liver allografts by CR. During the evolution of CR, the staining pattern of bile canalicular STK17A gradually changed from diffuse linear to focal intermittent. The focal intermittent staining pattern was observed before the definite diagnosis of CR. In conclusion, the present study was the first to find localization of STK17A in normal bile canaliculi. Abnormal expression and localization of STK17A were associated with CR of liver allografts since the early stage of the rejection process. PMID:26305096

  16. Impact of cytokine expression in the pre-implanted donor lung on the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction subtypes.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takahashi, H; Kaneda, H; Binnie, M; Azad, S; Sato, M; Waddell, T K; Cypel, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-12-01

    The long-term success of lung transplantation continues to be challenged by the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cytokine expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs and the posttransplant development of CLAD and its subtypes, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS). Of 109 patients who underwent bilateral lung or heart-lung transplantation and survived for more than 3 months, 50 BOS, 21 RAS and 38 patients with No CLAD were identified by pulmonary function test results. Using donor lung tissue biopsies sampled from each patient, expression levels of IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA were measured. IL-6 expression levels were significantly higher in pre-implanted lungs of patients that ultimately developed BOS compared to RAS and No CLAD (p = 0.025 and 0.011, respectively). Cox regression analysis demonstrated an association between high IL-6 expression levels and BOS development (hazard ratio = 4.98; 95% confidence interval = 2.42-10.2, p < 0.001). In conclusion, high IL-6 mRNA expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs were associated with the development of BOS, not RAS. This association further supports the contention that early graft injury impacts on both late graft function and early graft function. PMID:24164971

  17. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø <9 cm), unstructured, amorphous, with acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD. PMID:23229668

  18. A new Internet resource for chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ormandy, P; Vlaminck, H; Harrington, M; Forest, M; Visser, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portal in the World Wide Web (WWW), which captures and locates quality information for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It examines the problems patients face when accessing and understanding information gleaned from Web sites and describes an idea from a Research Board Member to facilitate patient access to quality information. The idea germinated into the development of a patient specific Web site, providing one stop access and links to appropriate CKD information, assessed by patients and health professionals. Collaboration between the EDTNA/ERCA Research Board and CEAPIR the European Federation of Kidney Patients has enhanced the project. PMID:16700172

  19. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    PubMed

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 body surface area) based on a single serum creatinine measurement was 0%-67% men and 0%-57% women. Prevalence was generally higher in male farmworkers aged 20-50 years, and varied by community economic activity and altitude. Cause was unknown in 57.4%-66.7% of patients. The dominant histopathological diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis. Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors. PMID:24878644

  20. Cadmium, diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Joshua R. Prozialeck, Walter C.

    2009-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between exposure to the environmental pollutant cadmium (Cd) and the incidence and severity of diabetes. In this review, we examine the literature suggesting a relationship between Cd exposure, elevated blood glucose levels, and the development of diabetes. In addition we review human and animal studies indicating that Cd potentiates or exacerbates diabetic nephropathy. We also review the various possible cellular mechanisms by which Cd may alter blood glucose levels. In addition, we present some novel findings from our own laboratories showing that Cd elevates fasting blood glucose levels in an animal model of subchronic Cd exposure before overt signs of renal dysfunction are evident. These studies also show that Cd reduces insulin levels and has direct cytotoxic effects on the pancreas. Together, these findings indicate that Cd may be a factor in the development of some types of diabetes and they raise the possibility that Cd and diabetes-related hyperglycemia may act synergistically to damage the kidney.

  1. Dehydrated Amniotic Membrane Allograft for Treatment of Chronic Leg Ulcers in Patients With Multiple Comorbidities: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and/or tissue-based products (CTPs) are emerging treatment options for chronic non-healing wounds. Dehydrated amniotic membrane allograft (DAMA) was used in 7 patients whose wounds had not responded adequately to standard and adjuvant therapies; four VLUs, 2 surgical wounds, and 1 DFU. Patients had multiple comorbidities, including 2 with autoimmune disorders (CREST syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus). Patients received 3–8 applications of DAMA at weekly to biweekly intervals (average, 5.4 applications). Complete wound healing was observed in 6 of 7 patients during study period, with an average time to closure of 7.9 weeks. Closure was achieved in 3 of 7 patients after 3 DAMA applications. In the patient with CREST syndrome who did not completely close, DAMA reduced the area and volume by nearly 50% and later went on to closure. These cases suggest that DAMA is a viable option for recalcitrant DFUs, VLUs, and surgical wounds. PMID:27104144

  2. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  3. Long-term risk of chronic kidney disease in unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Omer; Chandar, Jayanthi; Rodriguez, Maria M; Abitbol, Carolyn L; Seeherunvong, Wacharee; Freundlich, Michael; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2011-04-01

    The clinical spectrum of renal dysplasia includes the non-functioning multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK). We report our experience of the outcome of unilateral MCDK and its contralateral kidney in 101 children with the diagnosis of MCDK from 1985 to 2009. Data collected included urine protein/creatinine ratio, estimated GFR (eGFR), blood pressure, surgical intervention, renal length and abnormalities of the contralateral kidney, and the involution rate. There was a predominance of left-sided MCDK. Diagnosis was made prenatally in 86.7%. Contralateral abnormalities included vesicoureteral reflux (16.8%), UPJ obstruction (4.1%), and megaureter (2.4%). Complete involution of MCDK occurred within 5 years in 60%. Compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral kidney to >97% occurred in 74.1%. Nephrectomy was performed in 19.8%. There was an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥ 2, and hypertension in those with contralateral abnormalities (p<0.0001; p<0.001 respectively). In those without contralateral abnormalities, hyperfiltration with mean eGFR of 149 ± 13 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was seen in 32% and proteinuria in 9.8%. There was a significantly inverse relationship between proteinuria and eGFR (p<0.0001). In conclusion, children with contralateral abnormalities are at risk for developing decreased kidney function, whereas a substantial number of patients with no obvious contralateral abnormalities have markers of renal injury. Therefore, systematic follow-up of all patients is recommended. PMID:21240528

  4. Sexual dysfunction in men and women with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. PMID:12616463

  5. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  6. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  7. The central nervous system in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Debbie S; Duquette, Peter J; Icard, Phil F; Hooper, Stephen R

    2007-10-01

    Neurodevelopmental deficits in pediatric and adult survivors of childhood onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been documented for many years. This paper reviews the available literature on central nervous system involvement incurred in childhood CKD. The studies reviewed include recent work in neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and neuropsychology, along with commentary on school functioning and long-term outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for monitoring the neurodevelopmental status and pursuing appropriate early interventions for children with CKD. PMID:17072652

  8. Dietary Sodium in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Julie A.; Cavanaugh, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake. PMID:20557489

  9. High Serum Level of β2-Microglobulin in Late Posttransplant Period Predicts Subsequent Decline in Kidney Allograft Function: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Trailin, Andriy V.; Pleten, Marina V.; Ostapenko, Tatiana I.; Iefimenko, Nadiia F.; Nikonenko, Olexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Identification of patients at risk for kidney allograft (KAG) failure beyond the first posttransplant year is an unmet need. We aimed to determine whether serum beta-2-microglobulin (β2MG) in the late posttransplant period could predict a decline in KAG function. Methods. We assessed a value of single measurement of serum β2MG at one to seventeen years after transplantation in predicting the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the decline in eGFR over a period of two years in 79 recipients of KAG. Results. At baseline serum β2MG concentration was higher (P = 0.011) in patients with allograft dysfunction: 8.67 ± 2.48 µg/mL versus those with satisfactory graft function: 6.67 ± 2.13 µg/mL. Higher β2MG independently predicted the lower eGFR, the drop in eGFR by ≥25% after one and two years, and the value of negative eGFR slope. When combined with proteinuria and acute rejection, serum β2MG had excellent power in predicting certain drop in eGFR after one year (AUC = 0.910). In conjunction with posttransplant time serum β2MG had good accuracy in predicting certain eGFR drop after two years (AUC = 0.821). Conclusions. Elevated serum β2MG in the late posttransplant period is useful in identifying patients at risk for rapid loss of graft function. PMID:26633915

  10. Development of cytotoxic antibodies following renal allograft transplantation is associated with reduced graft survival due to chronic vascular rejection.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A; Younie, M E; Parsons, J E; Klouda, P T

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively followed 64 patients who had had no cytotoxic antibodies prior to first cadaveric renal allograft transplantation for post-transplant antibodies. During a mean follow-up period of 62 months (range 45-92) cytotoxic antibodies developed in 36 patients (56%). Sixteen grafts were lost due to chronic vascular rejection in the group of patients who developed antibodies compared to two in those who remained antibody negative, P < 0.01. Renal function was worse in the antibody-positive group, median serum creatinine 215 mumol/l (131-256) (interquartile range) versus 111 mumol/l (98-127) in the antibody-negative group, P = 0.002, and creatinine clearance 39 ml/min (25-55) versus 90 ml/min (55-104), P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in immunosuppressive protocol, HLA-mismatching, blood transfusion history, the number of acute rejection episodes, mean arterial blood pressure, or proteinuria between the groups. The presence of cytotoxic antibodies predated the classical manifestations of chronic vascular rejection. This suggests that humoral mechanisms may play a role in the development of chronic vascular rejection. PMID:7816298

  11. Adenovirus-mediated HIF-1α gene transfer promotes repair of mouse airway allograft microvasculature and attenuates chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinguo; Khan, Mohammad A; Tian, Wen; Beilke, Joshua; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kosek, Jon; Yoder, Mervin C; Semenza, Gregg L; Nicolls, Mark R

    2011-06-01

    Chronic rejection, manifested as small airway fibrosis (obliterative bronchiolitis [OB]), is the main obstacle to long-term survival in lung transplantation. Recent studies demonstrate that the airways involved in a lung transplant are relatively hypoxic at baseline and that OB pathogenesis may be linked to ischemia induced by a transient loss of airway microvasculature. Here, we show that HIF-1α mediates airway microvascular repair in a model of orthotopic tracheal transplantation. Grafts with a conditional knockout of Hif1a demonstrated diminished recruitment of recipient-derived Tie2⁺ angiogenic cells to the allograft, impaired repair of damaged microvasculature, accelerated loss of microvascular perfusion, and hastened denudation of epithelial cells. In contrast, graft HIF-1α overexpression induced via an adenoviral vector prolonged airway microvascular perfusion, preserved epithelial integrity, extended the time window for the graft to be rescued from chronic rejection, and attenuated airway fibrotic remodeling. HIF-1α overexpression induced the expression of proangiogenic factors such as Sdf1, Plgf, and Vegf, and promoted the recruitment of vasoreparative Tie2⁺ cells. This study demonstrates that a therapy that enhances vascular integrity during acute rejection may promote graft health and prevent chronic rejection. PMID:21606594

  12. Intensive Blood-Pressure Control in Hypertensive Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Lawrence J.; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Agodoa, Lawrence Y.; Astor, Brad C.; Bakris, George L.; Cleveland, William H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Faulkner, Marquetta L.; Gabbai, Francis B.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Hebert, Lee A.; Jamerson, Kenneth A.; Kopple, Joel D.; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Lea, Janice P.; Lewis, Julia B.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Massry, Shaul G.; Miller, Edgar R.; Norris, Keith; Phillips, Robert A.; Pogue, Velvie A.; Randall, Otelio S.; Rostand, Stephen G.; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J.; Toto, Robert D.; Wang, Xuelei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In observational studies, the relationship between blood pressure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is direct and progressive. The burden of hypertension-related chronic kidney disease and ESRD is especially high among black patients. Yet few trials have tested whether intensive blood-pressure control retards the progression of chronic kidney disease among black patients. METHODS We randomly assigned 1094 black patients with hypertensive chronic kidney disease to receive either intensive or standard blood-pressure control. After completing the trial phase, patients were invited to enroll in a cohort phase in which the blood-pressure target was less than 130/80 mm Hg. The primary clinical outcome in the cohort phase was the progression of chronic kidney disease, which was defined as a doubling of the serum creatinine level, a diagnosis of ESRD, or death. Follow-up ranged from 8.8 to 12.2 years. RESULTS During the trial phase, the mean blood pressure was 130/78 mm Hg in the intensive-control group and 141/86 mm Hg in the standard-control group. During the cohort phase, corresponding mean blood pressures were 131/78 mm Hg and 134/78 mm Hg. In both phases, there was no significant between-group difference in the risk of the primary outcome (hazard ratio in the intensive-control group, 0.91; P = 0.27). However, the effects differed according to the baseline level of proteinuria (P = 0.02 for interaction), with a potential benefit in patients with a protein-to-creatinine ratio of more than 0.22 (hazard ratio, 0.73; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In overall analyses, intensive blood-pressure control had no effect on kidney disease progression. However, there may be differential effects of intensive blood-pressure control in patients with and those without baseline proteinuria. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and others.) PMID:20818902

  13. Amniotic membrane is a potential regenerative option for chronic non-healing wounds: a report of five cases receiving dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft.

    PubMed

    Mrugala, Andrew; Sui, Audrey; Plummer, Malgorzata; Altman, Igor; Papineau, Elaine; Frandsen, Devn; Hill, Danielle; Ennis, William J

    2016-08-01

    A case series of five patients with a total of six chronic non-healing wounds (>30 day duration) were non-randomly selected to evaluate the performance, safety and handling properties of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, an amniotic membrane scaffolding product. The patients had lower extremity wounds that had previously failed standard of care within a university outpatient/inpatient wound healing programme. Five wounds treated with dehydrated amnion/chorion membrane allograft showed a mean 43% area reduction from baseline (51% median) at 3 weeks into treatment and completely healed with a 64-day median time to closure (SD ±27·6 days). One wound worsened at 3 weeks and was found to have a complete central vein obstruction that was treated with long-term mild compression but still eventually healed at 6 months. Removing this outlier, the four responding wounds had a 72% mean and 69% median change in area from baseline, at the 3 week point. All five patients received only one application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, and there were no adverse events. The product was easy to use, administer and handle. In summary, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft appears to be a safe, effective and easy to use therapy for chronic non-healing wounds. This study describes the details of these clinical cases and provides an overview of the current evidence on the use of amniotic tissue in clinical practice. PMID:25974156

  14. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  15. How to Read a Food Label: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Read a Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program If you have CKD, you may ... 4 KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  16. Chimeric Allografts Induced by Short-Term Treatment With Stem Cell-Mobilizing Agents Result in Long-Term Kidney Transplant Survival Without Immunosuppression: A Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Okabayashi, T; Cameron, A M; Wang, Y; Hisada, M; Li, J; Raccusen, L C; Zheng, Q; Montgomery, R A; Williams, G M; Sun, Z

    2016-07-01

    Transplant tolerance allowing the elimination of lifelong immunosuppression has been the goal of research for 60 years. The induction of mixed chimerism has shown promise and has been extended successfully to large animals and to the clinic; however, it remains cumbersome and requires heavy early immunosuppression. In this study, we reported that four injections of AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, plus eight injections of low-dose FK506 (0.05 mg/kg per day) in the first week after kidney transplantation extended survival, but death from renal failure occurred at 30-90 days. Repeating the same course of AMD3100 and FK506 at 1, 2 and 3 mo after transplant resulted in 92% allograft acceptance (n = 12) at 7 mo, normal kidney function and histology with no further treatment. Transplant acceptance was associated with the influx of host stem cells, resulting in a hybrid kidney and a modulated host immune response. Confirmation of these results could initiate a paradigm shift in posttransplant therapy. PMID:26749344

  17. Allograft dysfunction in a patient with an odd-looking kidney: case of renal lipomatosis and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Maria Aurora; Chua, Elizabeth; Thomas, Beje; Savage, Stephen J.; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2012-01-01

    Renal lipomatosis was diagnosed in a kidney transplant recipient who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) several years after transplantation. The patient had an odd-looking kidney transplant on ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan, showing a medullary mass with resultant compression of the surrounding renal parenchyma. A biopsy of the renal medulla confirmed fatty infiltration of the renal parenchyma. The patient underwent percutaneous nephrostomy and AKI resolved with relief of the obstruction. Renal lipomatosis is a rare condition that should be differentiated from other neoplasms of the kidney. When it occurs in a functioning transplant kidney, the treatment approach proves to be very challenging. PMID:25874099

  18. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-08-01

    CAN is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to CNIs. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric CAN with declining GFR, defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m2/min, steadily increasing SCr and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kgBW, followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. CNIs were reduced to 50% at start of sirolimus and discontinued at median seven days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m2/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five of eight patients (p = 0.026), only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean SCr improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, nor time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, serum lipids transiently increased. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from CNIs to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy proven CAN. PMID:16856992

  19. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD. PMID:22960848

  20. Protective function of pirfenidone and everolimus on the development of chronic allograft rejection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Heigel, E; Pfaehler, S; Haneya, A; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W; Lehle, K

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival of lung allografts is limited by chronic rejection (CR). Oxidative stress (OxS) plays a central role in the development of CR. We investigated the influence of pirfenidone (alone or in combination with everolimus) on OxS and CR. A rat model of left lung allo-transplantation (F344-to-WKY) was used to evaluate the effects of pirfenidone alone [0,85% in chow from postoperative day (POD) -3 to 20/60] and in combination with everolimus [2,5 mg/kg bw daily from POD 7 to 20/60]. Allografts of non-treated animals, everolimus treated animals and right, non-transplanted lungs were used as references. Immunohistology of myeloperoxidase (MPO), haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), iron and platelet-derived-growth-factor-receptor-alpha (PDGFR-a) were performed. On POD 20, all groups showed severe acute rejection (ISHLT A3-4/B1R-B2R). Groups treated with pirfenidone showed a lower interstitial inflammatory infiltration and a lower participation of highly fibrotic degenerated vessels (ISHLT-D2R). In the long term follow up (POD 60), pirfenidone alone significantly reduced chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), interstitial fibrosis (IF; p≤0.05), content of collagen (p≤0.05), expression of PDGFR-a (p≤0.05) and the deposition of iron (p≤0.05). All groups treated with pirfenidone showed a high expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1 (p≤0.05). The additional application of everolimus resulted in a significant decrease of chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), vasculopathy (ISHLT; p≤0.05) and IF (p≤0.05). In conclusion, early application of pirfenidone inhibited the progression of CR by its anti-fibrotic and anti-oxidative properties. The additional application of an m-TOR-inhibitor increased the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone which resulted in a reduction of CR after experimental LTx. PMID:26707547

  1. Influence of chronic kidney disease on cardiac structure and function.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Coresh, Josef

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the presence of kidney dysfunction and/or damage, is a worldwide public health issue. Although CKD is independently associated with various subtypes of cardiovascular diseases, a recent international collaborative meta-analysis demonstrates that CKD is particularly strongly associated with heart failure, suggesting its critical impact on cardiac structure and function. Although numerous studies have investigated the association of CKD and cardiac structure and function, these studies substantially vary regarding source populations and methodology (e.g., measures of CKD and/or parameters of cardiac structure and function), making it difficult to reach universal conclusions. Nevertheless, in this review, we comprehensively examine relevant studies, discuss potential mechanisms linking CKD to alteration of cardiac structure and function, and demonstrate clinical implications as well as potential future research directions. We exclusively focus on studies investigating both CKD measures, kidney function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine clearance, or levels of filtration markers), and kidney damage represented by albuminuria, since current international clinical guidelines of CKD recommend staging CKD and assessing its clinical risk based on both GFR and albuminuria. PMID:26194332

  2. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Egan, Brent M

    2014-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing in incidence and lead to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The relationship between these two entities is complex. Individual components of the MetS are known risk factors for incident kidney disease, but it is not clear how the clustering of these components is linked to the development and progression of kidney disease. Cross-sectional studies show an association of the MetS and prevalent CKD; however, one cannot draw conclusions as to which came first – the MetS or the kidney disease. Observational studies suggest a relationship between MetS and incident CKD, but they also demonstrate the development of MetS in patients with established CKD. These observations suggest a bidirectional relationship. A better understanding of the relationship between components of the MetS and whether and how these components contribute to progression of CKD and incident cardiovascular disease could inform more effective prevention strategies. PMID:25258547

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  4. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression. PMID:26490952

  5. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  6. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J.; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent a high-risk group for thrombosis both in the cardiovascular territory and also in the venous circulation. At the same time, abnormalities in the platelet membranes put them at risk of bleeding which is significantly more than other patients with chronic diseases. Anticoagulation may be ideal to prevent the former, but the co-existing bleeding risk and also that the commonly used drugs for inhibiting coagulation are eliminated by renal pathways pose additional problems. In this review, we try to explain the complex thrombotic-haemorrhagic state of chronic kidney disease patients, and practical considerations for the management of anticoagulation in them with a focus on heparins. PMID:25878775

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease toward kidney donation in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bello, Babawale T; Raji, Yemi R

    2016-01-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, kidney transplant programs are dependent on the willingness of relatives of patients with kidney failure to donate kidneys. This study assessed the attitudes of relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) toward kidney donation. This was a cross-sectional survey of relatives of patients with CKD attending the nephrology service of our hospital. The respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge and beliefs about kidney transplantation, as well as their willingness to donate a kidney, were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 161 respondents who returned completed questionnaires; the mean age of the respondents was 34.8±12.6 years and 52.2% of them were female. About 85.1% of the respondents were aware that kidney transplantation was a treatment option for end-stage renal failure, while 70% of them believed that kidney transplantation resulted in an improvement in the quality of life of these patients. However, 25.5% of the respondents believed that kidney donors were at risk of developing kidney failure in the future. Overall, 77.6% of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney, especially if the affected individual was their offspring. The majority of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a relative with CKD. PMID:26787577

  8. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy: Maternal and fetal outcomes and progression of kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Penny; Callaway, Leonie K; Barrett, Helen L; Fagermo, Narelle; Lust, Karin; Shakhovskoy, Rebekah E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of Australian data regarding renal disease in pregnancy. We undertook a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary institution to examine the impact of renal disease on pregnancy outcomes and the effect of pregnancy on disease progression. Methods A total of 55 pregnancies of patients with renal disease admitted from 2003 to 2010 to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital were analysed. Pre-conception variables, fetal/delivery and maternal outcomes were analysed in this group and in a control group of women with normal kidney function pre-pregnancy. Results Of the 55 pregnancies, 71% experienced pre-term delivery, 38% had intra-uterine growth restriction and 62% required caesarean section. Of all, 60% of neonates required neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and six perinatal deaths occurred. Of all, 67% of women suffered preeclampsia, 47% anaemia and 3 patients required dialysis in pregnancy. Postpartum deterioration of renal function occurred in patients with pre-conception chronic kidney disease stage 3–5. Conclusions Chronic kidney disease of all stages is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In a tertiary institution however, there is a high rate of successful pregnancy (84%).

  9. Chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fabian, J; Katz, I; Gerntholtz, T; Goetsch, S; Naicker, S

    2007-06-01

    -uninfected transplant recipients. However, high rates of acute and chronic rejection have been observed among HIV-infected kidney transplant recipients. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) published guidelines in 2005, recommending that all individuals be assessed for kidney disease at the time of diagnosis of HIV infection with a screening urinalysis for proteinuria and a calculated estimate of renal function. Therefore any patient with persistent proteinuria, persistent haematuria or glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) should be referred to an institution where a specialist can evaluate this patient for further investigations. An integrated plan to reduce the progression to kidney failure together with lifestyle measures, focusing also on high risk groups with effective management at all levels of chronic kidney disease remains essential. PMID:17625482

  10. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described. PMID:27455803

  11. Anemia of chronic kidney disease: when normalcy becomes undesirable.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, Sevag G; Nurko, Saul

    2008-05-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease and renal failure, hemoglobin levels have been rising in parallel with more intensive use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). However, several recent studies indicate that raising hemoglobin to normal levels with ESAs can be too much of a good thing. Compared with partial correction, normalization of hemoglobin did not improve outcome, and it may have led to more frequent adverse events. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now recommends a hemoglobin goal in the range of 10 to 12 g/dL. PMID:18556877

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  13. Chronic kidney disease in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Stanifer, John W; Muiru, Anthony; Jafar, Tazeen H; Patel, Uptal D

    2016-06-01

    Most of the global burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). As a result of rapid urbanization in LMICs, a growing number of populations are exposed to numerous environmental toxins, high infectious disease burdens and increasing rates of noncommunicable diseases. For CKD, this portends a high prevalence related to numerous etiologies, and it presents unique challenges. A better understanding of the epidemiology of CKD in LMICs is urgently needed, but this must be coupled with strong public advocacy and broad, collaborative public health efforts that address environmental, communicable, and non-communicable risk factors. PMID:27217391

  14. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  15. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  16. Why do young people with chronic kidney disease die early?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shankar; Bogle, Richard; Banerjee, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease poses the greatest risk of premature death seen among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Up to 50% of mortality risk in the dialysis population is attributable to cardiovascular disease and the largest relative excess mortality is observed in younger patients. In early CKD, occlusive thrombotic coronary disease is common, but those who survive to reach end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis are more prone to sudden death attributable mostly to sudden arrhythmic events and heart failure related to left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary vascular calcification and electrolyte disturbances. In this review, we discuss the basis of the interaction of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease with various pathological processes such as endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, low grade chronic inflammation, neurohormonal changes and vascular calcification and stiffness which account for the structural and functional cardiac changes that predispose to excess morbidity and mortality in young people with CKD. PMID:25374808

  17. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated with poor outcomes in children with CKD. The exact mechanisms leading to these unfavorable conditions are not fully elucidated and are most likely multifactorial. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of nutrition disorders and inflammation and their impact on clinical outcomes in children with CKD. PMID:27152263

  18. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated with poor outcomes in children with CKD. The exact mechanisms leading to these unfavorable conditions are not fully elucidated and are most likely multifactorial. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of nutrition disorders and inflammation and their impact on clinical outcomes in children with CKD. PMID:27152263

  19. Anti-HLA sensitization after kidney allograft nephrectomy: changes one year post-surgery and beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Matignon, Marie; Leibler, Claire; Moranne, Olivier; Salomon, Laurent; Charron, Dominique; Lang, Philippe; Jacquelinet, Christian; Suberbielle, Caroline; Grimbert, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of anti-HLA sensitization at the time of and following allograft nephrectomy may help clinicians to define better both the indications for nephrectomy and preventive therapeutic strategies. We carried out a retrospective analysis of anti-HLA antibodies in 63 clinically indicated nephrectomies (baseline and three and 12 months after) according to the time elapsed since transplantation (six months) and clinical background. An intervention study included 10 patients without donor-specific antibodies (DSA) at the time of nephrectomy treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (1.5 g/kg). Early nephrectomies were performed in 15 patients (24%). Among the late nephrectomies, 14 patients (22%) were asymptomatic and 34 (54%) had graft intolerance syndrome (GIS). At baseline, anti-HLA sensitization was significantly lower in the early and late asymptomatic groups than in the GIS group, but increased considerably within the three months following surgery. In the group of 10 patients treated with IVIG, only the number of class I non-DSA increased in the three months after surgery, whereas in the control group (N = 13), all anti-HLA variables increased significantly. All patients undergoing a clinically indicated allograft nephrectomy become highly sensitized within the 12 months after surgery. In patients without DSA before nephrectomy, high doses of IVIG may prevent anti-HLA sensitization. PMID:27140447

  20. Aggressive blood pressure control for chronic kidney disease unmasks moyamoya!

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. Keefe; Halabi, Carmen M.; Siefken, Philp; Karmarkar, Swati; Leonard, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive crises in children or adolescents are rare, but chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for occurrence. Vesicoureteral reflux nephropathy is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and is associated with hypertension. Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to delay progression of CKD and treatment is targeted for the 50th percentile for height when compared with a target below the 90th percentile for the general pediatric hypertensive patient. We present a case of an adolescent presenting with seizures and renal failure due to a hypertensive crisis. Hypertension was thought to be secondary to CKD as she had scarred echogenic kidneys due to known reflux nephropathy. However, aggressive BP treatment improved kidney function which is inconsistent with CKD from reflux nephropathy. Secondly, aggressive BP control caused transient neurological symptoms. Further imaging identified moyamoya disease. We present this case to highlight the consideration of moyamoya as a diagnosis in the setting of renal failure and hypertensive crisis. PMID:26064513

  1. Risk Factors for Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Amy; Wong, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review Provides an overview of the identified risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression emphasizing the pediatric population. Recent findings Over the past ten years, there have been significant changes to our understanding and study of pre-terminal kidney failure. Recent refinements in the measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR estimating equations are important tools for identification and association of risk factors for CKD progression in children. In pediatric CKD, lower level of kidney function at presentation, higher levels of proteinuria, and hypertension are known markers for a more rapid decline in GFR. Anemia and other reported risk factors from the pre-genomic era have need for further study and validation. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic loci which have provided novel genetic risk factors for CKD progression. Summary With cohort studies of children with CKD becoming mature, they have started to yield important refinements to the assessment of CKD progression. While many of the traditional risk factors for renal progression will certainly be assessed, such cohorts will be important for evaluating novel risk factors identified by genome-wide studies. PMID:20090523

  2. High burden and unmet patient needs in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Braun, LeeAnn; Sood, Vipan; Hogue, Susan; Lieberman, Bonnie; Copley-Merriman, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex debilitating condition affecting more than 70 million people worldwide. With the increased prevalence in risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in an aging population, CKD prevalence is also expected to increase. Increased awareness and understanding of the overall CKD burden by health care teams (patients, clinicians, and payers) is warranted so that overall care and treatment management may improve. This review of the burden of CKD summarizes available evidence of the clinical, humanistic, and economic burden of CKD and the current unmet need for new treatments and serves as a resource on the overall burden. Across countries, CKD prevalence varies considerably and is dependent upon patient characteristics. The prevalence of risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and congestive heart failure is noticeably higher in patients with lower estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) and results in highly complex CKD patient populations. As CKD severity worsens, there is a subsequent decline in patient health-related quality of life and an increased use of health care resources as well as burgeoning costs. With current treatment, nearly half of patients progress to unfavorable renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Although curative treatment that will arrest kidney deterioration is desired, innovative agents under investigation for CKD to slow kidney deterioration, such as atrasentan, bardoxolone methyl, and spherical carbon adsorbent, may offer patients healthier and more productive lives. PMID:23293534

  3. Update on the Current Status of Kidney Transplantation for Chronic Kidney Disease in Animals.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is a novel treatment option for cats suffering from chronic renal failure or acute irreversible renal injury. Improvement in quality of life as well as survival times of cats that have undergone transplantation has helped the technique to gain acceptance as a viable treatment option for this fatal disease. This article reviews information regarding the optimal time for intervention, congenital and acquired conditions that have been successfully treated with transplantation, recipient and donor screening, immunosuppressive therapy, recent advances in anesthetic and surgical management, postoperative monitoring and long-term management, and troubleshooting perioperative and long-term complications. PMID:27593577

  4. BEYOND GENETICS: EPIGENETIC CODE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Rama S.; Herman, James G.; McCaffrey, Timothy; Raj, Dominic SC

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a heritable change in the pattern of gene expression that is mediated by a mechanism specifically not due to alterations in the primary nucleotide sequence. Well known epigenetic mechanisms encompass DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling (histone modifications) and RNA interference. Functionally, epigenetics provides an extra layer of transcriptional control and plays a crucial role in normal physiological development, as well as in pathological conditions. Aberrant DNA methylation is implicated in immune dysfunction, inflammation and insulin resistance. Epigenetic changes may be responsible for “metabolic memory” and development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. MicroRNAs are critical in the maintenance of glomerular homeostasis and hence RNA interference may be important in the progression of renal disease. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic modifications orchestrate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and eventually fibrosis of the renal tissue. Oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperhomocysteinemia and uremic toxins could induce epimutations in chronic kidney disease. Epigenetic alterations are associated with inflammation and cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. Reversible nature of the epigenetic changes gives an unique opportunity to halt or even reverse the disease process through targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:20881938

  5. Vitamin D for health and in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D is taken for granted and is not appreciated for its importance in overall health and well-being. Vitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin, is appreciated as being important for the prevention of rickets in children. It is now recognized that vitamin D is important for not only the growing skeleton, but for the maintenance of a healthy musculoskeletal system throughout life. Vitamin D deficiency in adults precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis and causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia. The revelation that vitamin D is biologically inactive and requires sequential hydroxylations in the liver and kidney to form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D helps explain why patients with renal failure are often resistant to vitamin D and suffer from secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. In addition to its role in maintaining calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D is now being recognized as important for maintaining maximum muscle strength and for the prevention of many chronic diseases, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, cardiovascular heart disease, and many common cancers. Vitamin D status is best determined by the measurement of circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Vigilance for maintaining a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of at least 20 ng/ml and preferably 30-50 ng/ml has important benefits for both healthy children and adults, as well as children and adults suffering from chronic kidney disease. PMID:16076348

  6. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Pazarín-Villaseñor, Leonardo; Yanowsky-Escatell, Francisco Gerardo; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60-89 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  7. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  8. Palliative care for patients with advance chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The fastest expanding group receiving dialysis has been the elderly. However, for those patients who are very elderly with co-morbidity, dialysis may not offer a survival advantage. Therefore, active conservative management is a growing service offered by many renal units in the UK and focuses on non-dialytic correction of fluid and electrolyes, management of renal anaemia, and assessment and management of symptoms. The five-year survival of a patient over 75 years of age starting dialysis is 20% and if a patient is over 75 years, has co-morbidity, or a poor performance status, dialysis may not offer any survival advantage. Whether a patient is managed by dialysis or by conservative management the symptom burden suffered is high. These symptoms are under-recognised and often managed poorly because of increased drug toxicity in renal failure. This complex group of patients require close working between renal, palliative care, medicine for the elderly, and community teams, to allow best quality of life and end of life care. This review describes some of the challenges in providing Advanced Care Planning for dialysis and conservatively managed patients, highlights the symptom burden of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, and offers guidance in how to manage the symptoms effectively. PMID:25318401

  9. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients. PMID:26479287

  10. Homoarginine and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Kollerits, Barbara; Meinitzer, Andreas; März, Winfried; Ritz, Eberhard; König, Paul; Neyer, Ulrich; Pilz, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Kronenberg, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Background Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54–5.19) using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. Results Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min), 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60–90 ml/min), 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30–60 ml/min) and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min), respectively (p = 0.002). The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L) of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005). This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11–2.20, p = 0.01), and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98–1.98, p = 0.06). Conclusions Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  11. Rat Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Prevents Accelerated Chronic Rejection in CMV-Naïve Recipients of Infected Donor Allograft Hearts.

    PubMed

    Streblow, D N; Hwee, Y K; Kreklywich, C N; Andoh, T; Denton, M; Smith, P; Hart, E; Broekel, R; Pallett, C; Rogers, K; Streblow, A D; Chuop, M; Perry, A; Slifka, M; Messaoudi, I; Orloff, S L

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus accelerates transplant vascular sclerosis (TVS) and chronic rejection (CR) in solid organ transplants; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. We determined the efficacy of a CMV vaccine in preventing CMV-accelerated rat cardiac allograft rejection in naïve recipients of CMV+ donor hearts. F344 donor rats were infected with RCMV 5 days prior to heterotopic cardiac transplantation into CMV-naïve or H2 O2 -inactivated RCMV-vaccinated Lewis recipients. Recipients of RCMV-infected donor hearts rejected at POD59, whereas vaccinated recipients exhibited a significantly prolonged time to rejection-POD97, similar to recipients of uninfected donor hearts (POD108). Although all of the donor hearts were preinfected, the vaccinated recipients had lower graft and PBMC viral loads at POD 7 compared to unvaccinated controls. Adoptive T cell and passive antibody transfers from vaccinated Lewis rats into naïve recipients demonstrate that both T-cell and B-cell arms of the adaptive immune response provide protection against CMV-accelerated rejection. Similar findings were obtained when testing three different adjuvants in passive transfer experiments. We have determined that the timing of the vaccine prior to transplantation and the specific adjuvant play critical roles in mediating anti-viral responses and promoting graft survival. CMV vaccination prior to transplantation may effectively increase graft survival. PMID:25766876

  12. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  13. Chronic kidney disease in children and adolescents in Brunei Darussalam

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi Ying; Naing, Lin; Han, Aye; Khalil, Muhammad Abdul Mabood; Chong, Vui Heng; Tan, Jackson

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine epidemiology of Bruneian paediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and factors that affect growth and progression of disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study conducted on all children below 18 years old who were diagnosed with CKD over a ten year period (2004 to 2013). The reference population was all children (< 18 years old) suffering from CKD and attending the tertiary paediatric nephrology clinic in Brunei Darussalam. Demographic (current age, age of diagnosis, gender, ethnicity), anthropometric (weight and height), diagnosis, laboratory data (serum creatinine and haemoglobin, urinalysis) and blood pressure were extracted from the patients’ clinical case notes and recorded using a data collection form. RESULTS: The study revealed a high national prevalence [736 per million child population (pmcp)] and incidence (91 pcmp) of CKD. If CKD was defined at Stage 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, the associated prevalence figures were 736, 132, 83, 50 and 33 pmcp. Glomerulonephritis accounted for 69% of all prevalent cases, followed by congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (20%) and tubulointerstitial diseases (8%). Minimal change disease being the most common histological diagnosis. The median age of diagnosis was 4.5 years, with congenital disease patients experiencing an earlier onset of diagnosis. A large proportion of patients were below the 5% percentile for height and weight. Non-glomerular diseases, adolescent and female patients were significantly associated with poor growth, but not glomerular filtration rate, age of diagnosis or steroid usage. CONCLUSION: Brunei has a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the paediatric population with glomerulonephritis being the most common disease. PMID:26981447

  14. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-03-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induced Airway Epithelial Injury Drives Fibroblast Activation: A Mechanism in Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, L A; Suwara, M I; Carnell, S C; Green, N J; Mahida, R; Dixon, D; Gillespie, C S; Cartwright, T N; Horabin, J; Walker, A; Olin, E; Rangar, M; Gardner, A; Mann, J; Corris, P A; Mann, D A; Fisher, A J

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial infections after lung transplantation cause airway epithelial injury and are associated with an increased risk of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The damaged epithelium is a source of alarmins that activate the innate immune system, yet their ability to activate fibroblasts in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome has not been evaluated. Two epithelial alarmins were measured longitudinally in bronchoalveolar lavages from lung transplant recipients who developed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and were compared to stable controls. In addition, conditioned media from human airway epithelial cells infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was applied to lung fibroblasts and inflammatory responses were determined. Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage of lung transplant recipients growing P. aeruginosa (11.5 [5.4-21.8] vs. 2.8 [0.9-9.4] pg/mL, p < 0.01) and was significantly elevated within 3 months of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (8.3 [1.4-25.1] vs. 3.6 [0.6-17.1] pg/mL, p < 0.01), whereas high mobility group protein B1 remained unchanged. IL-1α positively correlated with elevated bronchoalveolar lavage IL-8 levels (r(2)  = 0.6095, p < 0.0001) and neutrophil percentage (r(2)  = 0.25, p = 0.01). Conditioned media from P. aeruginosa infected epithelial cells induced a potent pro-inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts via an IL-1α/IL-1R-dependent signaling pathway. In conclusion, we propose that IL-1α may be a novel therapeutic target to limit Pseudomonas associated allograft injury after lung transplantation. PMID:26714197

  16. Pretransplant CD4 Count Influences Immune Reconstitution and Risk of Infectious Complications in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Kidney Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J F; Rosa, R; Lorio, M A; Morris, M I; Abbo, L M; Simkins, J; Guerra, G; Roth, D; Kupin, W L; Mattiazzi, A; Ciancio, G; Chen, L J; Burke, G W; Goldstein, M J; Ruiz, P; Camargo, J F

    2016-08-01

    In current practice, human immunodeficiency virus-infected (HIV(+) ) candidates with CD4 >200 cells/mm(3) are eligible for kidney transplantation; however, the optimal pretransplant CD4 count above this threshold remains to be defined. We evaluated clinical outcomes in patients with baseline CD4 >350 and <350 cells/mm(3) among 38 anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)-treated HIV-negative to HIV(+) kidney transplants performed at our center between 2006 and 2013. Median follow-up was 2.6 years. Rates of acute rejection and patient and graft survival were not different between groups. Occurrence of severe CD4 lymphopenia (<200 cells/mm(3) ), however, was more common among patients with a baseline CD4 count 200-349 cells/mm(3) compared with those transplanted at higher counts (75% vs. 30% at 4 weeks [p = 0.04] and 71% vs. 5% at 52 weeks [p = 0.001], respectively, after transplant). After adjusting for age, baseline CD4 count of 200-349 cells/mm(3) was an independent predictor of severe CD4 lymphopenia at 4 weeks (relative risk [RR] 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.1) and 52 weeks (RR 14.3; 95% CI 2-100.4) after transplant. Patients with CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) at 4 weeks had higher probability of serious infections during first 6 months after transplant (19% vs. 50%; log-rank p = 0.05). These findings suggest that ATG must be used with caution in HIV(+) kidney allograft recipients with a pretransplant CD4 count <350 cells/mm(3) . PMID:26953224

  17. Multiple New Loci Associated with Kidney Function and Chronic Kidney Disease: The CKDGen consortium

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Böger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Glazer, Nicole L.; Parsa, Afshin; Gao, Xiaoyi; Yang, Qiong; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Li, Man; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Isaacs, Aaron; Ketkar, Shamika; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Paré, Guillaume; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Zeller, Tanja; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Tönjes, Anke; Hayward, Caroline; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore; Harris, Tamara B.; Rapmersaud, Evadnie; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Struchalin, Maksim; Cavalieri, Margherita; Singleton, Andrew; Giallauria, Francesco; Metter, Jeffery; de Boer, Ian; Haritunians, Talin; Lumley, Thomas; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Oostra, Ben A.; Feitosa, Mary; Province, Michael; Levy, Daniel; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Wilde, Sandra; Muenzel, Thomas F.; Leak, Tennille S; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Meisinger, Christa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Koenig, Wolfgang; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Minelli, Cosetta; Hu, Frank B.; Johansson, Åsa; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Imboden, Medea; Nitsch, Dorothea; Brandstätter, Anita; Kollerits, Barbara; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Mägi, Reedik; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; Boban, Mladen; Campbell, Susan; Endlich, Karlhans; Völzke, Henry; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Badola, Sunita; Parker, Alexander N.; Ridker, Paul M.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Franke, Andre; Rochat, Thierry; Paulweber, Bernhard; Prokopenko, Inga; Wang, Wei; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Shlipak, Michael G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Hastie, Nick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H.; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem, and recent genetic studies have identified common CKD susceptibility variants. The CKDGen consortium performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 67,093 Caucasian individuals from 20 population-based studies to identify new susceptibility loci for reduced renal function, estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea <60 ml/min/1.73m2; n = 5,807 CKD cases). Follow-up of the 23 genome-wide significant loci (p<5×10−8) in 22,982 replication samples identified 13 novel loci for renal function and CKD (in or near LASS2, GCKR, ALMS1, TFDP2, DAB2, SLC34A1, VEGFA, PRKAG2, PIP5K1B, ATXN2, DACH1, UBE2Q2, and SLC7A9) and 7 creatinine production and secretion loci (CPS1, SLC22A2, TMEM60, WDR37, SLC6A13, WDR72, BCAS3). These results further our understanding of biologic mechanisms of kidney function by identifying loci potentially influencing nephrogenesis, podocyte function, angiogenesis, solute transport, and metabolic functions of the kidney. PMID:20383146

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease Screening Methods and Its Implication for Malaysia: An in Depth Review

    PubMed Central

    Almualm, Yasmin; Huri, Hasniza Zaman

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred. Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia. Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR < 60ml/min/1.73m2, showed less bias and improved precision at GFR>60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been

  19. Soluble CD59 is a Novel Biomarker for the Prediction of Obstructive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Budding, Kevin; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Kardol-Hoefnagel, Tineke; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M; Luijk, Bart D; Oudijk, Erik-Jan D; van Kessel, Diana A; Grutters, Jan C; Hack, C Erik; Otten, Henderikus G

    2016-01-01

    CD59 is a complement regulatory protein that inhibits membrane attack complex formation. A soluble form of CD59 (sCD59) is present in various body fluids and is associated with cellular damage after acute myocardial infarction. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the final treatment for end-stage lung diseases, however overall survival is hampered by chronic lung allograft dysfunction development, which presents itself obstructively as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). We hypothesized that, due to cellular damage and activation during chronic inflammation, sCD59 serum levels can be used as biomarker preceding BOS development. We analyzed sCD59 serum concentrations in 90 LTx patients, of whom 20 developed BOS. We observed that BOS patients exhibited higher sCD59 serum concentrations at the time of diagnosis compared to clinically matched non-BOS patients (p = 0.018). Furthermore, sCD59 titers were elevated at 6 months post-LTx (p = 0.0020), when patients had no BOS-related symptoms. Survival-analysis showed that LTx patients with sCD59 titers ≥400 pg/ml 6 months post-LTx have a significant (p < 0.0001) lower chance of BOS-free survival than patients with titers ≤400 pg/ml, 32% vs. 80% respectively, which was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 6.2, p < 0.0001). We propose that circulating sCD59 levels constitute a novel biomarker to identify patients at risk for BOS following LTx. PMID:27215188

  20. Soluble CD59 is a Novel Biomarker for the Prediction of Obstructive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Budding, Kevin; van de Graaf, Eduard. A.; Kardol-Hoefnagel, Tineke; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M.; Luijk, Bart D.; Oudijk, Erik-Jan D.; van Kessel, Diana A.; Grutters, Jan C.; Hack, C. Erik; Otten, Henderikus G.

    2016-01-01

    CD59 is a complement regulatory protein that inhibits membrane attack complex formation. A soluble form of CD59 (sCD59) is present in various body fluids and is associated with cellular damage after acute myocardial infarction. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the final treatment for end-stage lung diseases, however overall survival is hampered by chronic lung allograft dysfunction development, which presents itself obstructively as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). We hypothesized that, due to cellular damage and activation during chronic inflammation, sCD59 serum levels can be used as biomarker preceding BOS development. We analyzed sCD59 serum concentrations in 90 LTx patients, of whom 20 developed BOS. We observed that BOS patients exhibited higher sCD59 serum concentrations at the time of diagnosis compared to clinically matched non-BOS patients (p = 0.018). Furthermore, sCD59 titers were elevated at 6 months post-LTx (p = 0.0020), when patients had no BOS-related symptoms. Survival-analysis showed that LTx patients with sCD59 titers ≥400 pg/ml 6 months post-LTx have a significant (p < 0.0001) lower chance of BOS-free survival than patients with titers ≤400 pg/ml, 32% vs. 80% respectively, which was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 6.2, p < 0.0001). We propose that circulating sCD59 levels constitute a novel biomarker to identify patients at risk for BOS following LTx. PMID:27215188

  1. Interactions between cytokines, congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1-5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  2. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  3. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Otovic, Natasa Eftimovska; Taneva, Borjanka

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) became a new epidemic of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the leading causes of end-stage renal failure as a result of the diabetes epidemic worldwide. AIM: The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of CKD in the Republic of Macedonia and its association with diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a part of a study conducted in 2006 in terms of screening for early detection of kidney disease. It was a cross-sectional study based on a random sample of patients aged > 20, consecutively consulting their primary physician for any cause. Fifty physicians throughout the country were included in the study. A total of 2637 patients have been analyzed based on integrity data. GFR was estimated using corrected values of serum creatinine and calculating kidney function by the Cockroft & Gault formula, adjusted for body surface using the Gehan & George formula. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min were considered as having CKD. Blood pressure, body weight, height, serum creatinine, glucose, hemoglobin, hematocrit, urinalysis and medical history for presence of cardiovascular diseases or diabetes were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects was 45.97 ± 16.55 SD and 17.97% were older than 60. Regarding gender, 44.14% were males. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Subjects with CKD (eGFR less than 60 ml/min) were 7.53% of the total. Subjects aged 60 or above, had 20 times higher risk of having CKD (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Out of the total group of subjects, 13.9% had diabetes mellitus and they had 3.13 times higher risk of having CKD stage 3-5 (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) when compared to non-diabetics. The results showed that diabetes was significantly more associated with lower eGFR (less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) in younger subjects (age less than 60) compared to older ones (odds ratio 3

  4. In experimental chronic kidney disease or cancer, parathyroid hormone is a novel mediator of cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Mitch, William E

    2016-05-01

    Hyperparathyroidism plays a central role in the disordered bone mineral metabolism of chronic kidney disease, and has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in that setting. A recent study suggests a novel role for parathyroid hormone and its receptor in muscle wasting and cachexia occurring in advanced chronic kidney disease. PMID:27083271

  5. Polyoma (BK) virus associated urothelial carcinoma originating within a renal allograft five years following resolution of polyoma virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Steven P; Myers-Gurevitch, Patricia M; Chu, Stacy; Robinson, Brian D; Dadhania, Darshana; Seshan, Surya V

    2016-03-01

    A direct role for BK polyomavirus infection in malignant tumors of renal allografts and urinary tract is emerging. Case reports suggest a link between BK virus (BKV) reactivation and development of malignancy in renal allograft recipients. Herein we describe the first case of BKV positive invasive urothelial carcinoma within the renal allograft, presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss 5 years following resolution of BK viremia/nephropathy (BKVN). Unique to our case was the remote history of BK viremia/BKVN, rising titer of anti-HLA antibody and presence of renal limited urothelial carcinoma with microinvasion of malignant cells staining positive for SV40 large T antigen (T-Ag). These findings suggest that persistence of subclinical BKV infection within the renal allograft may play a role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. Patients with history of BKVN may be at risk for kidney and urinary tract malignancy despite resolution of BK viremia/BKVN. PMID:26709521

  6. The risk of allograft failure and the survival benefit of kidney transplantation are complicated by delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jagbir; Dong, Jianghu; Rose, Caren; Gill, John S

    2016-06-01

    Concern about the long-term impact of delayed graft function (DGF) may limit the use of high-risk organs for kidney transplantation. To understand this better, we analyzed 29,598 mate kidney transplants from the same deceased donor where only 1 transplant developed DGF. The DGF associated risk of graft failure was greatest in the first posttransplant year, and in patients with concomitant acute rejection (hazard ratio: 8.22, 95% confidence interval: 4.76-14.21). In contrast, the DGF-associated risk of graft failure after the first posttransplant year in patients without acute rejection was far lower (hazard ratio: 1.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.29). In subsequent analysis, recipients of transplants complicated by DGF still derived a survival benefit when compared with patients who received treatment with dialysis irrespective of donor quality as measured by the Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI). The difference in the time required to derive a survival benefit was longer in transplants with DGF than in transplants without DGF, and this difference was greatest in recipients of lower quality kidneys (difference: 250-279 days for KDPI 20%-60% vs. 809 days for the KDPI over 80%). Thus, the association of DGF with graft failure is primarily limited to the first posttransplant year. Transplants complicated by DGF provide a survival benefit compared to treatment with dialysis, but the survival benefit is lower in kidney transplants with lower KDPI. This information may increase acceptance of kidneys at high risk for DGF and inform strategies to minimize the risk of death in the setting of DGF. PMID:27165823

  7. Prevalence of risk factors of chronic kidney disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M S; Dutta, P K; Islam, M N; Hasan, M J; Mondol, G

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emergent public health burden. Its prevalence varies country to country, even in different professional and social groups in the same country. In Bangladesh there is no reported nationwide survey but there are some reports of survey in disadvantageous and advantageous population. In this study 125 CKD patients (cases) and 125 age and sex matched healthy subjects (control) in Mymensingh Medical College, a tertiary hospital of Bangladesh were compared for the presence of non-modifiable [age, sex, family history of hypertension (HTN), Cardiovascular disease (CVD), family history of kidney disease and Socioeconomic condition] and modifiable [HTN, Diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking habit, and obesity] risk factors. The mean age of control was 43.5 ± 6.3 years and the mean age of CKD cases was 44.7 ± 12.7 years. Out of 125 patients of CKD, males were 96 in number (76.8%) and females were 29 in numbers (23.2%). Most of the patients (52.8%) were in poor socioeconomic status while most of controls were from middle class (68.8%). Most of the participants were in stage-3 CKD [67.2%, creatinine clearance (Ccr):36.74 ± 13.61 ml/min]. Glomerulonephritis was the dominant cause of CKD (67.2%) followed by diabetes (24%), hypertension (4.8%) and others (4%). 72.8% of CKD patients were smokers. Among CKD, 86.4% participants had hypertension and 26.4% had diabetes. The difference of hypertension, diabetes and Body mass index (BMI) between case and control group is statistically significant (p<0.001). No statistically significant difference was found with risk factor like family history of kidney diseases. This emphasizes risk factor identification in general population to early diagnose CKD. PMID:23134905

  8. Management of hyperglycemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Aires Neto, Patrícia; Gomes, Henrique Vieira; Campos, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes currently accounts for approximately 45% of cases of end-stage renal failure in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Several observational studies have identified a positive correlation between measures of glycemic control and cardiovascular and microvascular benefits. Several randomized prospective studies have been conducted to quantify the impact of strict glycemic control on morbidity and mortality. These studies have consistently demonstrated an association between strict glycemic control and a reduction in microvascular events, but these results contrast with the lack of consistent results regarding macrovascular events. Treating diabetes has always been challenging. This challenge is increased in chronic kidney disease, due to changes in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin and most oral antidiabetic agents. The available pharmacotherapeutic arsenal for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus currently involves approximately 6 different pharmacological classes of oral antidiabetic agents and different modalities of insulin therapy. PMID:23807643

  9. Erectile dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Varouktsi, Anna; Lazaridis, Antonios; Boutari, Chrysoula; Doumas, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is encountered in millions of people worldwide, with continuously rising incidence during the past decades, affecting their quality of life despite the increase of life expectancy in these patients. Disturbance of sexual function is common among men with CKD, as both conditions share common pathophysiological causes, such as vascular or hormonal abnormalities and are both affected by similar coexisting comorbid conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The estimated prevalence of erectile dysfunction reaches 70% in end stage renal disease patients. Nevertheless, sexual dysfunction remains under-recognized and under-treated in a high proportion of these patients, a fact which should raise awareness among clinicians. A multifactorial approach in management and treatment is undoubtedly required in order to improve patients’ quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26167462

  10. Hyperphosphatemia Management in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Ahmed M; Kowalski, Stefan R

    2016-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is a potentially life altering condition that can lead to cardiovascular calcification, metabolic bone disease (renal osteodystrophy) and the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). It is also associated with increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and mortality rates. To effectively manage hyperphosphatemia in CKD patients it is important to not only consider pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options but also to understand the underlying physiologic pathways involved in phosphorus homoeostasis. This review will therefore provide both a background into phosphorus homoeostasis and the management of hyperphosphatemia in CKD patients. In addition, it will cover some of the most important reasons for failure to control hyperphosphatemia with emphasis on the effect of the gastric pH on phosphate binders efficiency. PMID:27330380

  11. Glomerular pathology and the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lemley, Kevin V

    2016-06-01

    Structural studies of the glomerulus, largely undertaken in animal models, have informed our understanding of the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) for decades. A fundamental tenet of that understanding is that a loss of podocytes underlies progression in many or most cases of progressive CKD. Recent attempts have been made to reconcile earlier findings from glomerular physiology (the primacy of glomerular capillary hypertension in causation of secondary glomerular sclerosis) with structural findings and have suggested a more detailed model of the mechanisms underlying podocyte detachment as viable cells. A new appreciation of the main locus of mechanical challenges to the podocyte (in the filtration slit) may both explain the renoprotective action of some current therapies and help to suggest novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27122538

  12. Prophylactic vaccinations in chronic kidney disease: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E

    2015-01-01

    In this review, recent data on results concerning prophylactic vaccinations against hepatitis B virus, influenza viruses, and pneumococci are presented. Effects of active immunization in chronic kidney disease depend on category of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The lower GFR category the better results of response to vaccination. Abnormalities in toll-like receptors and down-regulation of B-cell activating factor receptor in transitional B cells were recently included into uremia-associated deficits in immunocompetence. Development of novel, more potent vaccines containing toll-like receptor agonists as adjuvants may help to achieve more effective immunization against hepatitis B virus in immunocompromised patients. Experimental studies announce further vaccine adjuvants. A vaccine against hepatitis C virus is not available yet, but promising results were already obtained in the experimental and preliminary clinical studies. Prophylactic vaccinations against influenza viruses and pneumococci become increasingly popular in dialysis facilities due to their proved benefits. PMID:25911956

  13. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian. PMID:24070587

  14. Bone loss in chronic kidney disease: Quantity or quality?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cai-Mei; Zheng, Jin-Quan; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lu, Chien-Lin; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Yung-Ho, Hsu; Wu, Mei-Yi; Chiu, I-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients experience bone loss and fracture because of a specific CKD-related systemic disorder known as CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The bone turnover, mineralization, and volume (TMV) system describes the morphological bone lesions in renal osteodystrophy related to CKD-MBD. Bone turnover and bone volume are defined as high, normal, or low, and bone mineralization is classified as normal or abnormal. All types of bone histology related to TMV are responsible for both bone quantity and bone quality losses in CKD patients. This review focuses on current bone quantity and bone quality losses in CKD patients and finally discusses potential therapeutic measures. PMID:27049042

  15. Diets for patients with chronic kidney disease, should we reconsider?

    PubMed

    Mitch, William E; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we revisit how dietary factors could affect the treatment of patients with complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), bringing to the attention of the reader the most recent developments in the field. We will briefly discuss five CKD-induced complications that are substantially improved by dietary manipulation: 1) metabolic acidosis and the progression of CKD; 2) improving the diet to take advantage of the benefits of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) on slowing the progression of CKD; 3) the diet and mineral bone disorders in CKD; 4) the safety of nutritional methods utilizing dietary protein restriction; and 5) evidence that new strategies can treat the loss of lean body mass that is commonly present in patients with CKD. PMID:27401192

  16. A distributed approach to alarm management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Estudillo-Valderrama, Miguel A; Talaminos-Barroso, Alejandro; Roa, Laura M; Naranjo-Hernández, David; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Aresté-Fosalba, Nuria; Milán-Martín, José A

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the feasibility study of using a distributed approach for the management of alarms from chronic kidney disease patients. In a first place, the key issues regarding alarm definition, classification, and prioritization according to available normalization efforts are analyzed for the main scenarios addressed in hemodialysis. Then, the middleware proposed for alarm management is described, which follows the publish/subscribe pattern, and supports the Object Management Group data distribution service (DDS) standard. This standard facilitates the real-time monitoring of the exchanged information, as well as the scalability and interoperability of the solution developed regarding the different stakeholders and resources involved. Finally, the results section shows, through the proof of concept studied, the viability of DDS for the activation of emergency protocols in terms of alarm prioritization and personalization, as well as some remarks about security, privacy, and real-time communication performance. PMID:25014977

  17. Chronic active thrombotic microangiopathy in native and transplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping L; Prichard, Jeffery W; Lin, Fan; Shultz, Michael F; Malek, Sayeed K; Shaw, John H; Hartle, James E

    2006-01-01

    We report 2 complicated cases of thrombotic microangiopathy with chronic features and active components. The first case was a 36-yr-old woman with positive anti-DNA antibody and possible lupus cerebritis, who developed thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to a series of syndromes, including preeclampsia and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed no evidence of lupus nephritis and her renal function returned to normal 1 week after the biopsy. The second case was a 46-yr-old man who developed thrombotic microangiopathy of unknown etiology, which led to end-stage renal disease within 6 mo. The patient received a living related-donor transplant, but thrombotic microangiopathy recurred in the donor kidney only 40 days after the renal transplantation. PMID:16951274

  18. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  19. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  20. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Poulianiti, Konstantina P; Kaltsatou, Antonia; Mitrou, Georgia I; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Maridaki, Maria; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K; Karatzaferi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  1. [Self-Management in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chou-Ping; Lu, Yung-Chuan; Hung, Shih-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients typically self-manage their disease-care program. Self-management requires the investment of considerable time and energy in health management and in following the multifaceted CKD treatment regimen. CKD, a progressive disease, is classified into five stages that correspond to the five stages of decline in kidney function, as measured using the glomerular filtration rate (GRF). Each of these stages requires that a patient modify his / her lifestyle and shoulder the responsibility for day-to-day health management tasks. Key to promoting self-management is the partnership and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients. Tasks in this partnership include patient assessment and communication, regimen adherence, emotional management, negotiation of care plans, and the enhancement of self-efficacy, with the aims of creating positive changes in behavior, promoting correct symptoms interpretation and reporting, and promoting the appropriate use of resources. Nurses may help patients maneuver this initially frightening and sometimes difficult terrain with strategies that are tailored to each CKD stage. PMID:27026551

  2. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  3. Atherosclerosis in chronic kidney disease: the role of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Valentina; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and loss of renal parenchyma accelerates atherosclerosis in animal models. Macrophages are central to atherogenesis because they regulate cholesterol traffic and inflammation in the arterial wall. CKD influences macrophage behavior at multiple levels, rendering them proatherogenic. Even at normal creatinine levels, macrophages from uninephrectomized Apoe−/− mice are enriched in cholesterol owing to downregulation of cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 levels and activation of nuclear factor κB, which leads to impaired cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, treatment with an angiotensin-II-receptor blocker (ARB) improves these effects. Moreover, atherosclerotic aortas from Apoe−/− mice transplanted into renal-ablated normocholesterolemic recipients show plaque progression and increased macrophage content instead of the substantial regression seen in recipient mice with intact kidneys. ARBs reduce atherosclerosis development in mice with partial renal ablation. These results, combined with the clinical benefits of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and ARBs in patients with CKD, suggest an important role for the angiotensin system in the enhanced susceptibility to atherosclerosis seen across the spectrum of CKD. The role of macrophages could explain why these therapies may be effective in end-stage renal disease, one of the few conditions in which statins show no clinical benefit. PMID:21102540

  4. HDL abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-01-01

    Normal HDL activity confers cardiovascular and overall protection by mediating reverse cholesterol transport and through its potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antithrombotic functions. Serum lipid profile, as well as various aspects of HDL metabolism, structure, and function can be profoundly altered in patients with nephrotic range proteinuria or chronic kidney disease (CKD). These abnormalities can, in turn, contribute to the progression of cardiovascular complications and various other comorbidities, such as foam cell formation, atherosclerosis, and/or glomerulosclerosis, in affected patients. The presence and severity of proteinuria and renal insufficiency, as well as dietary and drug regimens, pre-existing genetic disorders of lipid metabolism, and renal replacement therapies (including haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplantation) determine the natural history of lipid disorders in patients with kidney disease. Despite the adverse effects associated with dysregulated reverse cholesterol transport and advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, safe and effective therapeutic interventions are currently lacking. This Review provides an overview of HDL metabolism under normal conditions, and discusses the features, mechanisms, and consequences of HDL abnormalities in patients with nephrotic syndrome or advanced CKD. PMID:26568191

  5. Modulation of stroke risk in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Julia; Sims, Don; Ferro, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and the leading cause of neurological disability worldwide, with huge economic costs and tragic human consequences. Both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease are associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke. However, to date this has generated far less interest compared with the better-recognized links between cardiac and renal disease. Common risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking and atrial fibrillation, are shared with the general population but are more prevalent in renal patients. In addition, factors unique to these patients, such as disorders of mineral and bone metabolism, anaemia and its treatments as well as the process of dialysis itself, are all also postulated to further increase the risk of stroke. In the general population, advances in medical therapies mean that effective primary and secondary prevention therapies are available for many patients. The development of specialist stroke clinics and acute stroke units has also improved outcomes after a stroke. Emerging therapies such as thrombolysis and thrombectomy are showing increasingly beneficial results. However, patients with CKD and on dialysis have different risk profiles that must be taken into account when considering the potential benefits and risks of these treatments. Unfortunately, these patients are either not recruited or formally excluded from major clinical trials. There is still much work to be done to harness effective stroke treatments with an acceptable safety profile for patients with CKD and those on dialysis. PMID:26798458

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  7. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  8. Genomic imbalances in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Fasel, David A.; Levy, Brynn; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Wuttke, Matthias; Abraham, Alison G.; Kaskel, Frederick; Köttgen, Anna; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Wong, Craig S.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. There is frequent uncertainty in the identification of specific etiologies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recent studies indicate that chromosomal microarrays can identify rare genomic imbalances that can clarify the etiology of neurodevelopmental and cardiac disorders in children; however, the contribution of unsuspected genomic imbalance to the incidence of pediatric CKD is unknown. METHODS. We performed chromosomal microarrays to detect genomic imbalances in children enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study, a longitudinal prospective multiethnic observational study of North American children with mild to moderate CKD. Patients with clinically detectable syndromic disease were excluded from evaluation. We compared 419 unrelated children enrolled in CKiD to multiethnic cohorts of 21,575 children and adults that had undergone microarray genotyping for studies unrelated to CKD. RESULTS. We identified diagnostic copy number disorders in 31 children with CKD (7.4% of the cohort). We detected 10 known pathogenic genomic disorders, including the 17q12 deletion HNF1 homeobox B (HNF1B) and triple X syndromes in 19 of 419 unrelated CKiD cases as compared with 98 of 21,575 control individuals (OR 10.8, P = 6.1 × 10–20). In an additional 12 CKiD cases, we identified 12 likely pathogenic genomic imbalances that would be considered reportable in a clinical setting. These genomic imbalances were evenly distributed among patients diagnosed with congenital and noncongenital forms of CKD. In the vast majority of these cases, the genomic lesion was unsuspected based on the clinical assessment and either reclassified the disease or provided information that might have triggered additional clinical care, such as evaluation for metabolic or neuropsychiatric disease. CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of children with CKD have an unsuspected genomic imbalance, suggesting genomic disorders as a risk factor for

  9. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  10. The Role of the Gut Microbiome on Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Maia, B; Simões-Silva, L; Pestana, M; Araujo, R; Soares-Silva, I J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is estimated to affect nearly 500 million people worldwide and cardiovascular (CV) disease is a major cause of death in this population. However, therapeutic interventions targeting traditional CV risks are not effective at lowering the incidence of CV events or at delaying the progression of the disease in CKD patients. In recent years, disturbances of normal gut microbiome were recognized in the pathogenesis of diverse chronic diseases. Gut dysbiosis is being unraveled in CKD and pointed as a nontraditional risk factor for CV risk and CKD progression. The most often reported changes in gut microbiome in CKD are related to the lower levels of Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillaceae and to higher levels of Enterobacteriaceae. Although metagenomics brought us an amplified vision on the microbial world that inhabits the human host, it still lacks the sensitivity to characterize the microbiome up to species level, not revealing alterations that occur within specific genus. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art concerning gut dysbiosis in CKD and its role in pathophysiological mechanisms in CKD, particularly in relation with CV risk. Also, the strategies towards prevention and treatment of gut dysbiosis in CKD progression will be discussed. PMID:27565581

  11. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages. Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I. Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = −0.76, BUN: r = −0.72, and cystatin C: r = −0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603–0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746–0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P

  12. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages.Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I.Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = -0.76, BUN: r = -0.72, and cystatin C: r = -0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603-0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746-0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P = 0.811, and e

  13. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26290296

  14. Chronic kidney disease hotspots in developing countries in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Varughese, Santosh; Thandavan, Thiagarajan; Iyengar, Arpana; Fernando, Edwin; Naqvi, S A Jaffar; Sheriff, Rezvi; Ur-Rashid, Harun; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Kafle, Rishi Kumar

    2016-02-01

    In many developing countries in the South Asian region, screening for chronic diseases in the community has shown a widely varying prevalence. However, certain geographical regions have shown a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology. This predominantly affects the young and middle-aged population with a lower socioeconomic status. Here, we describe the hotspots of CKD of undiagnosed etiology in South Asian countries including the North, Central and Eastern provinces of Sri Lanka and the coastal region of the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. Screening of these populations has revealed cases of CKD in various stages. Race has also been shown to be a factor, with a much lower prevalence of CKD in whites compared to Asians, which could be related to the known influence of ethnicity on CKD development as well as environmental factors. The difference between developed and developing nations is most stark in the realm of healthcare, which translates into CKD hotspots in many regions of South Asian countries. Additionally, the burden of CKD stage G5 remains unknown due to the lack of registry reports, poor access to healthcare and lack of an organized chronic disease management program. The population receiving various forms of renal replacement therapy has dramatically increased in the last decade due to better access to point of care, despite the disproportionate increase in nephrology manpower. In this article we will discuss the nephrology care provided in various countries in South Asia, including India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. PMID:26798474

  15. Chronic kidney disease hotspots in developing countries in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Georgi; Varughese, Santosh; Thandavan, Thiagarajan; Iyengar, Arpana; Fernando, Edwin; Naqvi, S. A. Jaffar; Sheriff, Rezvi; Ur-Rashid, Harun; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Kafle, Rishi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In many developing countries in the South Asian region, screening for chronic diseases in the community has shown a widely varying prevalence. However, certain geographical regions have shown a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology. This predominantly affects the young and middle-aged population with a lower socioeconomic status. Here, we describe the hotspots of CKD of undiagnosed etiology in South Asian countries including the North, Central and Eastern provinces of Sri Lanka and the coastal region of the state of Andhra Pradesh in India. Screening of these populations has revealed cases of CKD in various stages. Race has also been shown to be a factor, with a much lower prevalence of CKD in whites compared to Asians, which could be related to the known influence of ethnicity on CKD development as well as environmental factors. The difference between developed and developing nations is most stark in the realm of healthcare, which translates into CKD hotspots in many regions of South Asian countries. Additionally, the burden of CKD stage G5 remains unknown due to the lack of registry reports, poor access to healthcare and lack of an organized chronic disease management program. The population receiving various forms of renal replacement therapy has dramatically increased in the last decade due to better access to point of care, despite the disproportionate increase in nephrology manpower. In this article we will discuss the nephrology care provided in various countries in South Asia, including India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. PMID:26798474

  16. Role of defensins in the pathogenesis of chronic lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Banan, Babak; Deepti, Saini; Nataraju, Angaswamy; Hachem, Ramsey; Trulock, Elbert; Alexander, Patterson G.; Thalachallour, Mohanakumar

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rejection predominantly manifested as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), still remains a major problem affecting long-term outcomes in human lung transplantation (LTx). Donor specific antibodies (DSA) and infiltration of neutrophils in the graft have been associated with the development of BOS. This study determines the role of defensins, produced by neutrophils, and its interaction with α-1-antitrypsin (AAT) towards induction of airway inflammation and fibrosis which are characteristic hallmarks of BOS. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum from LTx recipients, BOS+ (n=28), BOS-(n=26) and normal healthy controls (n=24) were analyzed. Our results show that BOS+ LTx recipients had higher α-defensins (HNP1-3) and β-defensin2 HBD2 concentration in BAL and serum compared to BOS-DSA-recipients and normal controls (p=0.03). BOS+ patients had significantly lower serum AAT along with higher circulating concentration of HNP-AAT complexes in BAL (p=0.05). Stimulation of primary small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) with HNPs induced expression of HBD2, adhesion molecules (ICAM and VCAM), cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, IL-13, IL-8 and MCP-1) and growth-factor (VEGF and EGF). In contrast, anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 expression decreased 2 fold (p=0.002). HNPs mediated SAEC activation was completely abrogated by AAT. In conclusion, our results demonstrates that neutrophil secretory product, α-defensins, stimulate β-defensin production by SAECs causing upregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic signaling molecules. Hence, chronic stimulation of airway epithelial cells by defensins can lead to inflammation and fibrosis the central events in the development of BOS following LTx. PMID:24380698

  17. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby's health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal-fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  18. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  19. Children and Adolescents with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population at Risk for More Than Just Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of children and adolescents with chronic health conditions is a multifactorial concept that combines a child's perception and adaptation to physical, social, emotional, and school environments regardless of particular medical diagnosis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience non-kidney specific co-morbidities, including depression, body image alterations, and sleep disturbance, that impair their daily lives. This article reviews the pediatric nephrology literature to highlight the evidence identifying these riskr to HRQOL and suggesting ways in which nurses in both nephrology and primary care are poised to identify and modify these risk factors. PMID:27025152

  20. Associations Between Hyperuricemia and Chronic Kidney Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prasad Sah, Om Shankar; Qing, Yu Xue

    2015-01-01

    Context: In human beings, uric acid is the poorly soluble circulating end product of the purine nucleotide metabolism. A reduction in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) contributes to hyperuricemia, which is frequently observed in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evidence Acquisition: Hyperuricemia is defined as a serum uric acid level > 7.0 mg/dL in males and > 6.0 mg/dL in females, while CKD is defined as kidney damage or a GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 for 3 months or more, irrespective of the cause. Hyperuricemia is common in CKD and may occur because of decreased excretion, increased production, or a combination of both mechanisms. Results: The causes for hyperuricemia in overproducers may be either exogenous or endogenous. CKD has become a global public health problem because of its high prevalence and the accompanying increase in the risk of end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. The most common risk factors for CKD are obesity and the metabolic syndrome, which is strongly associated with hyperuricemia probably as a consequence of insulin resistance and the effects of insulin to reduce the urinary urate excretion. For recurring bouts of hyperuricemia or gout, patients should have a blood test and joint fluid test to determine whether the medication taken is effective. Interventional studies are a useful clinical research tool in clarifying the role of hyperuricemia in CKD. Conclusions: Although many evidence-based studies have suggested that uric acid itself may harm patients with CKD by increasing inflammation and CKD progression, the issue is still a matter of controversy. Special attention should be paid to specific contraindications to certain drugs and the possibility of infectious arthritis. PMID:26290849

  1. Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-12-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF <2%) with SCr effects between 0.085 and 0.129 standard deviations. These rare variants have a larger effect on SCr than previously reported common variants, explaining 0.5% of the variability of SCr in Icelanders in addition to the 1% already accounted for. We tested the five variants associating with SCr for association with CKD in an Icelandic sample of 15 594 cases and 291 428 controls. Three of the variants also associated with CKD. These variants may either affect kidney function or creatinine synthesis and excretion. Of note were four mutations in SLC6A19 that associate with reduced SCr, three of which have been shown to cause Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

  2. Leiomyoma in a Renal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Jun; Siriwardana, Amila Rohan; Symons, James Lawrence Penn; O'Neill, Gordon Francis; Qiu, Min Ru; Furlong, Timothy John

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumours that are rarely found in the kidney. There is one report of a leiomyoma in a kidney transplant in a paediatric recipient. Here, we report an adult renal transplant recipient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive leiomyoma in his allograft 15 years after transplantation. The patient was converted to everolimus for posttransplant immunosuppression management and there was no sign of progression over a year. PMID:27195169

  3. Leiomyoma in a Renal Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Jun; Siriwardana, Amila Rohan; Symons, James Lawrence Penn; O'Neill, Gordon Francis; Qiu, Min Ru; Furlong, Timothy John

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumours that are rarely found in the kidney. There is one report of a leiomyoma in a kidney transplant in a paediatric recipient. Here, we report an adult renal transplant recipient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive leiomyoma in his allograft 15 years after transplantation. The patient was converted to everolimus for posttransplant immunosuppression management and there was no sign of progression over a year. PMID:27195169

  4. Vascularized composite allotransplantation: current standards and novel approaches to prevent acute rejection and chronic allograft deterioration.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Seyda, Midas; Bueno, Ericka M; Aycart, Mario A; Alhefzi, Muayyad; ElKhal, Abdallah; Pomahac, Bohdan; Tullius, Stefan G

    2016-06-01

    The advent of more potent immunosuppressants led to the first successful human upper extremity transplantation in 1998. At this time, >100 upper extremity transplants, 30 face transplants, and a variety of other vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) procedures have been performed around the world. VCA recipients present unique challenges for transplantation. The incidence of acute rejection exceeds 80% in hand and face transplantation and is well documented, whereas reports about antibody-mediated rejection and chronic rejection remain scarce. Immunosuppression protocols commonly used at US centers are derived from solid organ transplantation protocols. Novel approaches to minimize rejections in VCA may include improved HLA matching and considerations toward cytomegalovirus infection status. New graft preservation techniques may decrease immunogenicity prior to transplant. Novel monitoring methods such as valid biomarkers, ultrasound biomicroscopy, and sentinel flaps may enable earlier diagnosis of rejection. Cell-based therapies are being explored to achieve immunosuppressive regimen minimization or even tolerance induction. The efficacy of local immunosuppression in clinical VCA remains controversial. In conclusion, although immunosuppressive strategies adapted from SOT have demonstrated good midterm results, focusing on the unique features of VCA grafts may enable additional, more specific treatment strategies in the future and improved long-term graft outcomes. PMID:26265179

  5. Characteristics of Circulating Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies and Acute Rejection in the Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Kannabhiran, Dinesh; Lee, John; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Friedlander, Rex; Aull, Meredith; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Campbell, Sean; Epstein, David; Seshan, Surya V.; Kapur, Sandip; Sharma, Vijay K.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Dadhania, Darshana

    2016-01-01

    Background Characteristics of pretransplant antibodies directed at donor HLA (DSA) associated with adverse outcomes in kidney transplant recipients are being elucidated but uncertainties exist. Methods Prospectively screening of pretransplant sera from 543 kidney recipients using single antigen bead assays identified 154 recipients with DSA and 389 without. We investigated the association of DSA features to acute rejection (AR) and graft failure. Results One-year AR incidence was higher in DSA positive group (P<0.001), primarily due to antibody mediated rejection (AMR, 13% vs. 1.8%, P<0.001) and not T-cell mediated rejection (ACR, 5% vs.6%, P=0.65). Risk of AMR increased progressively with a rise in DSA MFI-Sum (P<0.0001). Both DSA MFI-Sum ≥6000 (OR=18; 95%CI, 7.0 to 47; P<0.001) and DSA specificity, presence of DSA against both HLA class I and II (OR=39; 95%CI, 14 to 106; P<0.0001), predicted one-year AMR, independent of other covariates. In a combined model, DSA specificity predicted AMR, independent of DSA MFI-Sum. In multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, the covariate-adjusted hazard ratio for graft failure was 2.03 (95%CI, 1.05 to 3.92; P=0.04) for DSA MFI-Sum≥6000 and 2.23 (95% CI, 1.04 to 4.80; P=0.04) for class I and II DSA. Prediction of graft loss was not independent of AMR. Conclusions Our study supports the hypothesis that characterization of pretransplant DSA, specifically presence of DSA against both HLA class I and II and the strength, as quantified by DSA MFI-Sum, is useful to estimate AMR and graft failure risk in kidney graft recipients. Elevated risk of graft failure is attributable to increased risk of AMR. PMID:25629531

  6. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: a position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Levey, Andrew S; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Levin, Adeera; Coresh, Josef; Rossert, Jerome; De Zeeuw, Dick; Hostetter, Thomas H; Lameire, Norbert; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2005-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) conducted a survey and sponsored a controversies conference to (1) provide a clear understanding to both the nephrology and nonnephrology communities of the evidence base for the definition and classification recommended by Kidney Disease Quality Outcome Initiative (K/DOQI), (2) develop global consensus for the adoption of a simple definition and classification system, and (3) identify a collaborative research agenda and plan that would improve the evidence base and facilitate implementation of the definition and classification of CKD. The K/DOQI definition and classification were accepted, with clarifications. CKD is defined as kidney damage or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for 3 months or more, irrespective of cause. Kidney damage in many kidney diseases can be ascertained by the presence of albuminuria, defined as albumin-to-creatinine ratio >30 mg/g in two of three spot urine specimens. GFR can be estimated from calibrated serum creatinine and estimating equations, such as the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation or the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Kidney disease severity is classified into five stages according to the level of GFR. Kidney disease treatment by dialysis and transplantation should be noted. Simple, uniform classifications of CKD by cause and by risks for kidney disease progression and CVD should be developed. PMID:15882252

  7. Prognostic significance of urinary NGAL in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Munna Lal; Sachan, Rekha; Misra, Ravi; Kamal, Ritul; Shyam, Radhey; Sachan, Pushpalata

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Recently urinary NGAL (uNGAL) has been proven to be a useful (potentially ideal) biomarker for early detection of CKD. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of uNGAL with severity of renal impairment in CKD and to evaluate its prognostic value in these subjects. Methods This was a prospective study carried out over a period of 24 months in subjects with CKD due to primary chronic glomerulonephritis. New cases of CKD stage II, III, IV aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled as per KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines 2012. A total of 90 subjects completed the study up to the end-point. The primary follow-up end-point was 18 months, or decreased glomerular filtration rate of less than 15 mL/min. Secondary follow-up end-point was the number of subjects who expired during this period. Results Multiple regression model of estimated glomerular filtration rate showed significant associations with log uNGAL (β=0.38, P<0.001), Ca×PO4 (β=0.60, P<0.001), hemoglobin (β=0.37, P<0.001), urine protein (β=0.34, P<0.001), serum albumin (β=0.48, P<0.001), and systolic blood pressure (β=0.76, P<0.001). Receiver operator curve for uNGAL considering the progression of CKD showed area under the curve for uNGAL was 0.878 (95% confidence interval: 0.68–0.96). Cut-off value for uNGAL was log 3.5 unit with a sensitivity of 93.08% and specificity of 71.43% for predicting the progression of CKD. Kaplan–Meier survival curve showed that patients with log uNGAL levels <3.51 unit had a survival rate of 71.4% while patients with NGAL level >3.51 unit had a renal survival rate of 14.7%. Conclusion Our study result showed that uNGAL has a positive correlation with disease severity which signifies the prognostic importance of uNGAL in CKD. PMID:26508883

  8. Use of Herbal Supplements in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... herbal supplements that act like a diuretic or "water pill" may cause "kidney irritation" or damage. These include bucha leaves and juniper berries. Uva Ursi and ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  9. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... two treatment options are available — dialysis and transplant. Dialysis Nearly all kids with end-stage kidney disease ... a living related donor can't be found, dialysis may be required until a donor kidney becomes ...

  10. Chronic kidney disease in homeless persons in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Gutiérrez-Padilla, Alfonso J; Renoirte-Lopez, Karina; Mendoza-Garcia, Martha; Oseguera-Vizcaino, Ma C; Perez-Gomez, Hector R; Marquez-Amezcua, J Mario; Tonelli, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among the homeless in Mexico. The role of substance abuse, alcoholism, and homelessness in CKD has not been properly evaluated. We screened 260 homeless individuals in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, for the presence of CKD and its risk factors, and compared their characteristics with those from a separate cohort of poor Jalisco residents and with a survey of the general Mexican population. CKD was more prevalent among the homeless than among the poor Jalisco population (22% vs. 15.8%, P=0.0001); 16.5% had stage 3, 4.3% stage 4, and 1.2% stage 5. All were unaware of having CKD. Only 5.8% knew they had diabetes, but 19% had fasting blood sugar >126 mg/dl; 3.5% knew they were hypertensive but 31% had systolic blood pressure ⩾140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure ⩾90 mm Hg. Alcoholism was less common than in the poor Jalisco population (23.5% vs. 32.3%, P=0.002), but tobacco smoking (34.6% vs. 21.5%, P=0.0001) and substance abuse (18% vs. 1.1%, P=0.0001) were more prevalent among the homeless. Likewise, chronic viral infections such as HIV (4.5% vs. 0.3%, P=0.0001) and HCV (7.7% vs. 1.4%, P=0.0001) were also significantly higher among the homeless than in the general population. In conclusion, CKD and its risk factors are highly prevalent among the homeless individuals in Jalisco, Mexico. Lack of awareness of having diabetes and hypertension is highly common, as is substance abuse. Programs aiming to prevent CKD and its risk factors in Mexico should specifically target this high-risk population. PMID:25018992

  11. Chronic kidney disease in homeless persons in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Gutiérrez-Padilla, Alfonso J; Renoirte-Lopez, Karina; Mendoza-Garcia, Martha; Oseguera-Vizcaino, Ma C; Perez-Gomez, Hector R; Marquez-Amezcua, J Mario; Tonelli, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among the homeless in Mexico. The role of substance abuse, alcoholism, and homelessness in CKD has not been properly evaluated. We screened 260 homeless individuals in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, for the presence of CKD and its risk factors, and compared their characteristics with those from a separate cohort of poor Jalisco residents and with a survey of the general Mexican population. CKD was more prevalent among the homeless than among the poor Jalisco population (22% vs. 15.8%, P=0.0001); 16.5% had stage 3, 4.3% stage 4, and 1.2% stage 5. All were unaware of having CKD. Only 5.8% knew they had diabetes, but 19% had fasting blood sugar >126 mg/dl; 3.5% knew they were hypertensive but 31% had systolic blood pressure ⩾140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure ⩾90 mm Hg. Alcoholism was less common than in the poor Jalisco population (23.5% vs. 32.3%, P=0.002), but tobacco smoking (34.6% vs. 21.5%, P=0.0001) and substance abuse (18% vs. 1.1%, P=0.0001) were more prevalent among the homeless. Likewise, chronic viral infections such as HIV (4.5% vs. 0.3%, P=0.0001) and HCV (7.7% vs. 1.4%, P=0.0001) were also significantly higher among the homeless than in the general population. In conclusion, CKD and its risk factors are highly prevalent among the homeless individuals in Jalisco, Mexico. Lack of awareness of having diabetes and hypertension is highly common, as is substance abuse. Programs aiming to prevent CKD and its risk factors in Mexico should specifically target this high-risk population. PMID:25018992

  12. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: Pathogenesis and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification (VC) is one of the independent risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality in both the general population and CKD patients. Earlier evidence revealed substantially higher prevalence of VC in young adults on chronic hemodialysis compared to the general population in the same age range, indicating the influence of CKD-related risk factors on the development of VC. Pathogenesis of VC involves an active, highly organized cellular transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to bone forming cells evidenced by the presence of bone matrix proteins in the calcified arterial wall. VC occurs in both the intima and the media of arterial wall with medial calcification being more prevalent in CKD. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risks, risk factors specific to CKD such as phosphate retention, excess of calcium, history of dialysis, active vitamin D therapy in high doses and deficiency of calcification inhibitors play important roles in promoting the development of VC. Non-contrast multi-slice computed tomography has often been used to detect coronary artery calcification. Simple plain radiographs of the lateral lumbar spine and pelvis can also detect VC in the abdominal aorta and femoral and iliac arteries. Currently, there is no specific therapy to reverse VC. Reduction of calcium load, lowering phosphate retention using non-calcium containing phosphate binders, and moderate doses of active vitamin D may attenuate progression. Parenteral sodium thiosulfate has also been shown to delay VC progression. PMID:24175241

  13. Risk of sudden cardiac death in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Banerjee, Debasish; Malik, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The review discusses the epidemiology and the possible underlying mechanisms of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and highlights the unmet clinical need for noninvasive risk stratification strategies in these patients. Although renal dysfunction shares common risk factors and often coexists with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, the presence of renal impairment increases the risk of arrhythmic complications to an extent that cannot be explained by the severity of the atherosclerotic process. Renal impairment is an independent risk factor for SCD from the early stages of CKD; the risk increases as renal function declines and reaches very high levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. Autonomic imbalance, uremic cardiomyopathy, and electrolyte disturbances likely play a role in increasing the arrhythmic risk and can be potential targets for treatment. Cardioverter defibrillator treatment could be offered as lifesaving treatment in selected patients, although selection strategies for this treatment mode are presently problematic in dialyzed patients. The review also examines the current experience with risk stratification tools in renal patients and suggests that noninvasive electrophysiological testing during dialysis may be of clinical value as it provides the necessary standardized environment for reproducible measurements for risk stratification purposes. PMID:24256575

  14. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL. PMID:26482250

  15. Factors Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Washington, Tiffany; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Browne, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affected 26 million U.S. adults. Many end-stage CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis experience self-management challenges. However, factors associated with CKD self-management are under-identified. This article describes a mixed-methods study to identify factors associated with self-management in end-stage CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 107 patients age 50 and older were interviewed. Overall, participants had low mean scores for exercise (2.46), communication with physicians (2.50), and cognitive symptom management (0.89) and were adherent for greater than 11 days in a 2-week period with fluid (11.86) and diet (11.65) regimens. There were statistically significant age group differences in the self-management behavior of fluid adherence (p < .05) and communication with physicians (p = .05). None of the respondents discussed communicating with their physicians or cognitive symptom management, yet 90% and 77% of the respondents reported engaging in these behaviors, respectively. The findings from this study support the need for public health social work interventions aimed at increasing self-management behaviors in end-stage CKD patients. PMID:26799496

  16. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  17. Mechanisms and treatment of extraosseous calcification in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ketteler, Markus; Rothe, Hansjörg; Krüger, Thilo; Biggar, Patrick H; Schlieper, Georg

    2011-09-01

    Strong and unidirectional associations exist between the severity of cardiovascular calcifications and mortality in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. In the past 10 years, a wealth of experimental and clinical information has been published on the key pathophysiological events that contribute to the development and progression of vascular and soft-tissue calcifications. These processes involve a sensitive balance of calcification inhibition, induction and removal. The traditional view of regarding secondary hyperparathyroidism and elevated calcium × phosphate product as the pivotal risk factors for calcification has been challenged by data demonstrating a role for other, more subtle and complex pathomechanisms. These mechanisms include the loss of endogenous calcification inhibitors, deficient clearance of calcified debris, effects of vitamin K and vitamin D, and the action of calcification inducers as in osteogenic transdifferentiation. In this Review, we describe our current knowledge of the factors involved in the passive and active regulation of extraosseous calcification processes, with an assessment of their importance as targets for future diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21769106

  18. Depression and its associated factors in pediatric chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoep, Ann Vander; Weiss, Noel S.; Smith, Jodi; Flynn, Joseph T.; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies on the occurrence of depression in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been conducted and none have identified associated clinical and demographic factors. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which we administered the Child Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2) to 44 patients aged 9–18 years with CKD stages III–V. Criteria for depression were CDI-2 scores of ≥65 or an established diagnosis of depression recorded in the medical chart. Relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to determine associations between patient characteristics and depression status. Results Of the 44 patients enrolled in the study, 13 (30 %) met our criteria for depression, representing 18 % of patients aged <13 years and 34 % of those aged ≥13 years. Although not reaching statistical significance, the adjusted risk of depression was lower for patients with CKD duration of ≤3 years than for those with longer CKD duration (RR 0.19, 95 % CI 0.02, 1.53), and for those with CKD stage IV (RR 0.23, 95 % CI 0.05, 1.09) and CKD stage V (RR 0.13, 95 % CI 0.01, 1.07) compared to those with CKD stage III. Conclusions Our results indicate that depression is common in children with CKD, particularly for those with longstanding renal disease and at CKD stage III. PMID:23700174

  19. Pleiotropic effects of vitamin D in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Chih; Wu, Chia-Chao; Hung, Yao-Min; Liao, Min-Tser; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Yeh, Kun-Chieh

    2016-01-30

    Low 25(OH)D levels are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and are implicated in all-cause mortality and morbidity risks. Furthermore, the progression of CKD is accompanied by a gradual decline in 25(OH)D production. Vitamin D deficiency in CKD causes skeletal disorders, such as osteoblast or osteoclast cell defects, bone turnover imbalance, and deterioration of bone quality, and nonskeletal disorders, such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, immune dysfunction, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and anemia. Extra-renal organs possess the enzymatic machinery for converting 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2D, which may play considerable biological roles beyond the traditional roles of vitamin D. Pharmacological 1,25(OH)2D dose causes hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia as well as adynamic bone disorder, which intensifies vascular calcification. Conversely, native vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, which may play a role in managing bone and cardio-renal health and ultimately reducing mortality in CKD patients. Nevertheless, the combination of native vitamin D and active vitamin D can enhance therapy benefits of secondary hyperparathyroidism because of extra-renal 1α-hydroxylase activity in parathyroid gland. This article emphasizes the role of native vitamin D replacements in CKD, reviews vitamin D biology, and summarizes the present literature regarding native vitamin D replacement in the CKD population. PMID:26656443

  20. Evaluating bone quality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Bone of normal quality and quantity can successfully endure physiologically imposed mechanical loads. Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) adversely affects bone quality through alterations in bone turnover and mineralization, whereas bone quantity is affected through changes in bone volume. Changes in bone quality can be associated with altered bone material, structure, or microdamage, which can result in an elevated rate of fracture in patients with CKD–MBD. Fractures cannot always be explained by reduced bone quantity and, therefore, bone quality should be assessed with a variety of techniques from the macro-organ level to the nanoscale level. In this Review, we demonstrate the importance of evaluating bone from multiple perspectives and hierarchical levels to understand CKD–MBD-related abnormalities in bone quality. Understanding the relationships between variations in material, structure, microdamage, and mechanical properties of bone in patients with CKD–MBD should aid in the development of new modalities to prevent, or treat, these abnormalities. PMID:24100399

  1. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD. PMID:25210423

  2. The case for disease management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Randolph A; Scott, Susan; Mattern, William D; Mohini, Ravinder; Nissenson, Allen R

    2006-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing epidemic in the United States and worldwide, with nearly two thirds of CKD patients also having diabetes, hypertension, or both. Morbidity and mortality among patients with CKD are high, as are the costs associated with care, which is highly fragmented. Disease management (DM) programs are designed to coordinate the delivery of care to patients, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce costs along the continuum of care. The goals of DM programs in CKD patients are to fill the gaps in current care by focusing on four key areas: (1) slowing the progression of CKD, (2) identifying and managing the complications of CKD, (3) identifying and managing associated comorbid conditions, and (4) smoothing the transition to renal replacement therapy (RRT). To be successful, this approach requires multidisciplinary collaboration among physicians (eg, primary care physicians, endocrinologists, cardiologists, nephrologists, surgeons) and participating caregivers including nurses, dieticians, social workers, and pharmacists. Patient identification, limited reimbursement, late patient referral, and lack of primary care physician and nephrologist knowledge about the importance and details of CKD management are all barriers that must be overcome for such programs to be successfully implemented. Considering the magnitude of the opportunity, DM applied to CKD is a promising approach to the care of this vulnerable population. PMID:16620194

  3. Early chronic kidney disease: diagnosis, management and models of care.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Olivier J; O'Donoghue, Donal J; Ritchie, James; Kanavos, Panos G; Narva, Andrew S

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is prevalent in many countries, and the costs associated with the care of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are estimated to exceed US$1 trillion globally. The clinical and economic rationale for the design of timely and appropriate health system responses to limit the progression of CKD to ESRD is clear. Clinical care might improve if early-stage CKD with risk of progression to ESRD is differentiated from early-stage CKD that is unlikely to advance. The diagnostic tests that are currently used for CKD exhibit key limitations; therefore, additional research is required to increase awareness of the risk factors for CKD progression. Systems modelling can be used to evaluate the impact of different care models on CKD outcomes and costs. The US Indian Health Service has demonstrated that an integrated, system-wide approach can produce notable benefits on cardiovascular and renal health outcomes. Economic and clinical improvements might, therefore, be possible if CKD is reconceptualized as a part of primary care. This Review discusses which early CKD interventions are appropriate, the optimum time to provide clinical care, and the most suitable model of care to adopt. PMID:26055354

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease Impairs Bone Defect Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiqing; Kang, Ning; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Dong, Yuliang; Zhou, Liyan; Lin, Yunfeng; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a risk for bone health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CKD on bone defect repair in rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal renal ablation, and serum levels of BUN and PTH were significantly elevated four weeks after the second renal surgery. Calvarial defects of 5-mm diameter were created and implanted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Micro-CT and histological analyses consistently revealed a decreased newly regenerated bone volume for CKD rats after 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, 1.4-mm-diameter cortical bone defects were established in the distal end of femora and filled with gelatin sponge. CKD rats exhibited significantly lower values of regenerated bone and bone mineral density (BMD) within the cortical gap after 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, histomorphometric analysis showed an increase in both osteoblast number (N.Ob/B.Pm) and osteoclast number (N.Oc/B.Pm) in CKD groups due to hyperparathyroidism. Notably, collagen maturation was delayed in CKD rats as verified by Masson’s Trichrome staining. These data indicate that declined renal function negatively affects bone regeneration in both calvarial and femoral defects. PMID:26955758

  5. Mechanisms of muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan H; Mitch, William E

    2014-09-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), loss of cellular proteins increases the risks of morbidity and mortality. Persistence of muscle protein catabolism in CKD results in striking losses of muscle proteins as whole-body protein turnover is great; even small but persistent imbalances between protein synthesis and degradation cause substantial protein loss. No reliable methods to prevent CKD-induced muscle wasting currently exist, but mechanisms that control cellular protein turnover have been identified, suggesting that therapeutic strategies will be developed to suppress or block protein loss. Catabolic pathways that cause protein wasting include activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), caspase-3, lysosomes and myostatin (a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth). These pathways can be initiated by complications associated with CKD, such as metabolic acidosis, defective insulin signalling, inflammation, increased angiotensin II levels, abnormal appetite regulation and impaired microRNA responses. Inflammation stimulates cellular signalling pathways that activate myostatin, which accelerates UPS-mediated catabolism. Blocking this pathway can prevent loss of muscle proteins. Myostatin inhibition could yield new therapeutic directions for blocking muscle protein wasting in CKD or disorders associated with its complications. PMID:24981816

  6. Clinical value of natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Santos-Araújo, Carla; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    According to several lines of evidence, natriuretic peptides (NP) are the main components of a cardiac-renal axis that operate in clinical conditions of decreased cardiac hemodynamic tolerance to regulate sodium homeostasis, blood pressure and vascular function. Even though it is reasonable to assume that NP may exert a relevant role in the adaptive response to renal mass ablation, evidence gathered so far suggest that this contribution is probably complex and dependent on the type and degree of the functional mass loss. In the last years NP have been increasingly used to diagnose, monitor treatment and define the prognosis of several cardiovascular (CV) diseases. However, in many clinical settings, like chronic kidney disease (CKD), the predictive value of these biomarkers has been questioned. In fact, it is now well established that renal function significantly affects the plasmatic levels of NP and that renal failure is the clinical condition associated with the highest plasmatic levels of these peptides. The complexity of the relation between NP plasmatic levels and CV and renal functions has obvious consequences, as it may limit the predictive value of NP in CV assessment of CKD patients and be a demanding exercise for clinicians involved in the daily management of these patients. This review describes the role of NP in the regulatory response to renal function loss and addresses the main factors involved in the clinical valorization of the peptides in the context of significant renal failure. PMID:26299165

  7. [DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY AS A CAUSE OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Kos, Ivan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage chronic kidney disease in most developed countries. Hyperglycemia, hypertension and genetic predisposition are the main risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Elevated serum lipids, smoking habits, and the amount and origin of dietary protein also seem to play a role as risk factors. Clinical picture includes a progressive increase in albuminuria, decline in glomerular filtration, hypertension, and a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening for albuminuria should be performed yearly, starting 5 years after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes or earlier in the presence of adolescence or poor metabolic control. In patients with type 2 diabetes, screening should be performed at diagnosis and yearly thereafter. Patients with albuminuria should undergo evaluation regarding the presence of associated comorbidities, especially retinopathy and macrovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control (HbA1c < 7%), treating hypertension (target blood pressure < 140/85 mm Hg), using drugs with blockade effect on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, treating dyslipidemia and anemia are effective strategies for preventing the development of albuminuria, delaying the progression to more advanced stages of nephropathy and reducing cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26285470

  8. [Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Poskurica, Mileta; Petrović, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60%) among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF), and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD) and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF). Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP) are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°). In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable. PMID:25731010

  9. Insulin Resistance and Muscle Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common finding in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is manifested by mild fasting hyperglycemia and abnormal glucose tolerance testing. Circulating levels of glucocorticoids are high. In muscle, changes in the insulin signaling pathway occur. An increase in the regulatory p85 subunit of Class I phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase enzyme leads to decreased activation of the downstream effector protein kinase B (Akt). Mechanisms promoting muscle proteolysis and atrophy are unleashed. The link of Akt to the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, a major degradation pathway in muscle, is discussed. Another factor associated with insulin resistance in CKD is angiotensin II (Ang II) which appears to induce its intracellular effects through inflammatory cytokines or reactive oxygen species. Skeletal muscle ATP is depleted and the ability of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to replenish energy stores is blocked. How this can be reversed is discussed. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are elevated in CKD and impair insulin signaling at the level of IRS-1. With exercise, IL-6 levels are reduced; glucose uptake and utilization are increased. For patients with CKD, exercise may improve insulin signaling and build up muscle. Treatment strategies for preventing muscle atrophy are discussed. PMID:23431467

  10. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  11. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  12. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future. PMID:27197109

  13. The challenge of controlling phosphorus in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Martin, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenesis and management of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders (CKD-MBD) has experienced major changes, but the control of serum phosphorus at all stages of CKD still seems to be a key factor to improve clinical outcomes. High serum phosphorus is the most important uremia-related, non-traditional risk factor associated with vascular calcification in CKD patients and in the general population. Phosphorus may also be one of the key elements linking vascular calcification with low bone turnover. The main hormones and factors that contribute to the kidney regulation of phosphorus and calcium include parathyroid hormone, FGF-23, klotho and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). Serum phosphorus did not start rising until CKD 3b in contrast with the earlier changes observed with fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Despite FGF-23 and PTH having synergic effects regarding phosphorus removal, they have opposite effects on 1,25(OH)2D3. At the same stages of CKD in which phosphorus retention appears to occur, calcium retention also occurs. As phosphorus accumulation is associated with poor outcomes, an important question without a clear answer is at which level-range should serum phosphorus be maintained at different stages of CKD to improve clinical outcomes. There are four main strategies to manage phosphate homeostasis; phosphorus dietary intake, administration of phosphate binder agents, effective control of hyperparathyroidism and to ensure in the CKD 5D setting, an adequate scheme of dialysis. Despite all the available strategies, and the introduction of new phosphate binder agents in the market, controlling serum phosphorus remains challenging, and hyperphosphatemia continues to be extremely common in CKD 5 patients. Furthermore, despite phosphate binding agents having proved to be effective in reducing serum phosphorus, their ultimate effects on clinical outcomes remain controversial. Thus, we still

  14. Recent advances in renal interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation has been an important means for the treatment of patients with end stage of renal disease, the long-term survival rate of the renal allograft remains a challenge. The cause of late renal allograft loss, once known as chronic allograft nephropathy, has been renamed “interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy” (IF/TA) to reflect the histologic pattern seen on biopsy. The mechanisms leading to IF/TA in the transplanted kidney include inflammation, activation of renal fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Identifying the mediators and factors that trigger IF/TA may be useful in early diagnosis and development of novel therapeutic strategies for improving long-term renal allograft survival and patient outcomes. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of IF/TA from three aspects: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:25285155

  15. Short Stature in Chronic Kidney Disease Treated with Growth Hormone and an Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mendley, Susan R.; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Counts, Debra R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an alternative strategy for management of severe growth failure in a 14-year-old child who presented with advanced chronic kidney disease close to puberty. The patient was initially treated with growth hormone for a year until kidney transplantation, followed immediately by a year-long course of an aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, to prevent epiphyseal fusion and prolong the period of linear growth. Outcome was excellent, with successful transplant and anticipated complete correction of height deficit. This strategy may be appropriate for children with chronic kidney disease and short stature who are in puberty. PMID:26101681

  16. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodriguez García, Minerva; Gómez Alonso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone formation and bone resorption, and less new bone is formed to replace bone losses. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization as "a disease characterized by low bone mineral density and micro architectural deterioration leading to low bone strength and increased risk of fractures." In the general population, there is a good correlation between dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements and bone fractures, but this is not the case with CKD patients. Despite the fact that we have a great number of active antiosteoporotic drugs, the experience in CKD patients is limited. Adynamic bone is suspected based on biochemical parameters, mainly parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone alkaline phosphatase, but it needs to be proven using a bone biopsy, where a low or zero bone formation rate and a reduction or absence of osteoblasts and osteoclasts should be found. The clinical management of adynamic bone has important limitations and currently does not allow taking many active measures. Treatment is mainly based on the prevention of risk factors known to induce PTH oversuppression, such as aluminium and calcium load and very high doses of vitamin D receptor activators. Due to the limitations in the treatment of both conditions, prevention plays a key role in the management of these disorders. PMID:23023723

  17. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  18. Deep vein thrombosis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Daneschvar, H Leon; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Piazza, Gregory; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2008-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a poorly understood complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The objective of our analysis was to profile DVT patients with and without CKD. We defined CKD as patients requiring dialysis or patients having nephrotic syndrome. We compared 268 patients with CKD (184 patients with dialysis-dependent renal disease and 84 with nephrotic syndrome) to 4,307 patients with preserved renal function from a prospective United States multicenter deep venous thrombosis (DVT) registry. Compared with non-CKD patients, CKD patients with DVT were younger (median age 62 vs. 69 years, p < 0.0001), more often African-American (p < 0.0001), and more often Hispanic (p = 0.0003). CKD patients underwent surgery more frequently in the three months prior to developing DVT (48.9% vs. 39.0%, p = 0.001) and more often had concomitant congestive heart failure (20.9% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.005). CKD patients suffered upper extremity DVT more frequently (30.0% vs. 10.8%, p < 0.0001). Patients with CKD presented less often with typical DVT symptoms of extremity discomfort (42.9% vs. 52.4%, p = 0.003) and difficulty ambulating (5.4% vs. 10.1%, p = 0.01). Prophylaxis rates prior to DVT were similarly low in CKD and non-CKD patients (44.2% vs. 38.0%, p = 0.06). Future studies of DVT in CKD patients should explore novel strategies for improving prophylaxis utilization and the detection of DVT in this special population. PMID:18521505

  19. Smoking and Chronic Kidney Disease in Healthy Populations

    PubMed Central

    Noborisaka, Yuka

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review is to explore the link between smoking and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in generally healthy populations without pre-existing renal dysfunction such as diabetic nephropathy. Twenty-eight epidemiological studies concerning the renal effects of smoking in the general population were collected from the MEDLINE database and were reviewed for indications of proteinuria and/or the decline of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and evaluated on the level of evidence and the quality of the study. Sixteen of the 28 studies were cross-sectional in design. Most articles had some weakness in scope, such as the 6 articles which did not fully exclude DM patients from the subjects, the 4 that did not consider the effects of ex-smoking, and the 3 that focused on only a small number of subjects. From these cases, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions. However, proteinuria or microalbuminuria was persistently high in current smokers; as much as 5-8% or 8-15% respectively, which was up to 2 to 3-times the rate of lifelong non-smokers. On the other hand, only 5 studies broader in scope detected any decline of GFR in smokers, while 9 other studies suggested a higher GFR in smokers than in non-smokers. Two good quality studies showed an even a significantly lower risk of a decreased GFR in smokers. These paradoxical CKD markers in smokers, i.e., a higher appearance of proteinuria with a higher GFR, could be a focus for further studies to reveal the underlying reasons for smoking-induced CKD. Workplaces may be an excellent place to study this subject since the long-term changes in renal function of smokers can be observed by collecting data in the annual health check-ups mandated at places of employment. PMID:23577327

  20. Nitric oxide status in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Y S; Kiranmayi, V S; Bitla, A R; Krishna, G S; Rao, P V L N Srinivasa; Sivakumar, V

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular (CVD) morbidity and mortality, mainly due to atherosclerosis. Decreased production or reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) can result in endothelial dysfunction (ED). Multiple mechanisms are known to cause a state of NO deficiency in patients with CKD. Patients in various stages of CKD grouped as group-1 (CKD stage 1 and 2), group-2 (CKD stage 3 and 4), group-3 (CKD stage 5) and healthy controls were included in the study. Each group of patients and controls comprised 25 subjects. Plasma nitrites, L-arginine, asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) and citrulline were measured in all the subjects. Patients in all stages of CKD had lower NO and higher ADMA levels compared to controls. Further, group-2 and group-3 patients had lower levels of NO and higher levels of ADMA than group-1 patients. L-arginine levels showed no difference between patients and controls. However, group-3 patients had lower L-arginine levels compared to group-1 patients. Citrulline levels were decreased in group-3 patients. NO production was decreased in patients in all stages of CKD. The decrease could be due to decreased availability of the substrate, L-arginine or due to an increased ADMA, a potent inhibitor of endothelial NO synthase. Therapeutic interventions directed towards improvement of NO production in addition to management of other CVD risk factors may prevent development of ED and facilitate proper management of CKD patients who are at increased risk for CVD. PMID:26628794

  1. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality. PMID:26873550

  2. Salivary Alterations in Rats with Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ana Carolina; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; de Souza, Douglas Nesadal; Nogueira, Fernando Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze changes in saliva composition and salivary secretion process of rats with chronic kidney disease induced by 5/6 nephrectomy to set the foundation for salivary studies related to CKD. Methods CKD was induced in Wistar rats via 5/6 nephrectomy. Blood and saliva samples were collected from Control, Sham and CKD groups at 8 and 12 weeks after the surgery. Salivation was stimulated via intraperitoneal injections of pilocarpine (1.0 mg/Kg body weight) or isoproterenol (5.0 mg/Kg body weight). Saliva was collected and immediately stored at -80°C until analysis. The salivary flow rate, total protein, amylase and peroxidase activities, and urea concentrations were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations were observed in the CKD groups. Amylase activity was significantly reduced in response to both stimuli in the CKD groups at 8 weeks and increased in the CKD groups at 12 weeks in response to isoproterenol stimulus. The peroxidase activities of the CKD groups were significantly reduced in response to isoproterenol stimulation and were increased at 12 weeks in response to pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary urea was significantly increased in the CKD groups at 8 weeks in response to the isoproterenol stimuli and at 12 weeks in response to both salivary agonists. Conclusions The pattern of alterations observed in this experimental model is similar to those observed in patients and clearly demonstrates the viability of 5/6 nephrectomy as an experimental model in future studies to understand the alterations in salivary compositions and in salivary glands that are elicited by CKD. PMID:26859883

  3. Physical Activity and Hemodynamic Reactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Light, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an elevated cardiovascular risk. This study was designed to understand better the presence and strength of the relationship between physical activity and BP and to explore determinants of hemodynamic reactivity. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Twenty-four patients with CKD (mean age 69.5 yr; 3.1 antihypertensive drugs; estimated GFR 47 ml/min per 1.73 m2, albumin/creatinine ratio 403 mg/g) were studied on three occasions during a 6-wk period with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and simultaneous activity monitoring with wrist actigraphy. Results: Nondippers were found have a greater level of sleep activity compared with dippers, although the awake activity level was similar (7.06 versus 6.73) between groups (P = 0.042 for interaction). In 3587 BP activity pairs, hemodynamic reactivity was variable between individuals (systolic BP reactivity 1.06 [SD 10.50]; diastolic BP reactivity 0.89 [SD 7.80] heart rate reactivity 1.18 [SD 11.00]); those who were more sedentary had a greater increment in systolic BP compared with those who were less sedentary. Antihypertensive drugs blunted hemodynamic reactivity. Hemodynamic reactivity was greatest between 12 a.m. and 8 a.m., making this a vulnerable period for cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Greater hemodynamic reactivity in sedentary people with CKD offers a possible and thus far unrecognized mechanism of cardiovascular damage. Besides reducing BP, antihypertensive drugs reduce hemodynamic reactivity, which offers another plausible mechanism of cardiovascular protection with their use. PMID:18922983

  4. Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexander; Otto, James; Whittle, John; Stephens, Robert C M; Martin, Daniel S; Prowle, John R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reduced exercise capacity is well documented in end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), preceded by changes in cardiac morphology in CKD stage 3. However, it is unknown whether subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction occurs in CKD stage 3 independently of heart failure. Methods Prospective observational cross-sectional study of exercise capacity assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 993 preoperative patients. Primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Anaerobic threshold (AT), oxygen pulse and exercise-evoked measures of autonomic function were analysed, controlling for CKD stage 3, age, gender, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Results CKD stage 3 was present in 93/993 (9.97%) patients. Diabetes mellitus (RR 2.49 (95% CI 1.59 to 3.89); p<0.001), and hypertension (RR 3.20 (95% CI 2.04 to 5.03); p<0.001)) were more common in CKD stage 3. Cardiac failure (RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.30 to 2.24); p=0.70) and ischaemic heart disease (RR 1.40 (95% CI 0.97 to 2.02); p=0.09) were not more common in CKD stage 3. Patients with CKD stage 3 had lower predicted VO2peak (mean difference: 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%); p=0.02), lower peak heart rate (mean difference:9 bpm (95% CI 3 to 14); p=0.03)), lower AT (mean difference: 1.1 mL/min/kg (95% CI 0.4 to 1.7); p<0.001) and impaired heart rate recovery (mean difference: 4 bpm (95% CI 1 to 7); p<0.001)). Conclusions Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in CKD stage 3 is common. This study suggests that maladaptive cardiovascular/autonomic dysfunction may be established in CKD stage 3, preceding pathophysiology reported in end-stage CKD. PMID:27127638

  5. Impaired postprandial lipemic response in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Satlin, Lisa M; Zalsos-Johnson, Jeanna; Cremers, Serge; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2016-07-01

    Dyslipidemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is usually characterized by hypertriglyceridemia. Here we studied postprandial lipemia in children and young adults to determine whether an increasing degree of CKD results in a proportional increase in triglyceride and chylomicron concentration. Secondary goals were to determine whether subnephrotic proteinuria, apolipoprotein (apo)C-III and insulin resistance modify the CKD effect. Eighteen fasting participants (mean age of 15 years, mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 50 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) underwent a postprandial challenge with a high fat milkshake. Triglycerides, apoB-48, insulin, and other markers were measured before and 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours afterward. Response was assessed by the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides and of apoB-48. The primary hypothesis was tested by correlation to estimated GFR. Significantly, for every 10 ml/min/1.73 m(2) lower estimated GFR, the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides was 17% greater while that of apoB-48 was 16% greater. Univariate analyses also showed that the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides and apoB-48 were significantly associated with subnephrotic proteinuria, apoC-III, and insulin resistance. In multivariate analysis, CKD and insulin resistance were independently associated with increased area under the curve and were each linked to increased levels of apoC-III. Thus, postprandial triglyceride and chylomicron plasma excursions are increased in direct proportion to the degree of CKD. Independent effects are associated with subclinical insulin resistance and increased apoC-III is linked to both CKD and insulin resistance. PMID:27162092

  6. Nutritional assessment in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Mantan, Mukta; Sethi, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Growth failure is a major problem in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the onset of the condition in infancy is more likely to have an adverse impact on growth than its development in later childhood. This study was aimed to assess nutritional intake and anthropometry of children presenting with CKD in a developing country. In this cross-sectional observational study, children (1-18 years) with CKD visiting the outpatient services were enrolled. The age of onset, cause of CKD, and anthropometry were recorded. Dietary intakes from three 24 h dietary recall (2 mid-week and 1 weekend day) were recorded. A blood sample was taken from all subjects for biochemical parameters. A total of 45 children (forty males and five females) with CKD underwent nutritional assessment. The median age at assessment was 108 months (13-167). Twenty-seven (60%) subjects had CKD stage 1, 2, or 3 while the remaining 40% had CKD stage 4 or 5. Of the 45 children, 27 (60%) had moderate to severe malnutrition at assessment. The mean weight and height (standard deviation scores) were -2.77 ± 2.07 and -2.30 ± 1.38, respectively. The prevalence of growth retardation was much higher in late stages of CKD; the difference was statistically significant (P <0.01). The mean caloric deficit from recommended daily allowance was -40.33% for calories, +6.2% for proteins, and -10.51% for fats. The diet was highly deficient in iron (mean 48.9% deficit); deficient in calcium (mean -22.2%) and had excess phosphates (mean 18.3%). There was a progressive decrease in intake of nutrients in advanced stages of CKD. There was a high prevalence of malnutrition (60%) in children with CKD, especially in higher stages of CKD. An appropriate dietary assessment and nutritional counseling should be planned for all patients with CKD to prevent complications associated with malnutrition and anemia. PMID:27424690

  7. Incident chronic kidney disease: trends in management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Robert M.; Chang, Alex R.; Wood, Kenneth E.; Coresh, Josef; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Grams, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Background Management trends in early chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their associations with clinical outcomes have not previously been reported. Methods We evaluated incident (Stage G3A) CKD patients from an integrated health care system in 2004–06, 2007–09 and 2010–12 to determine adjusted trends in screening (urinary protein quantification), treatment [prescription for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), and statin] and nephrology referral. For the same time periods, adjusted rates for mortality, progression to Stage G4 CKD and hospitalization for myocardial infarction or heart failure were calculated and compared across time periods. Results There were 728, 788 and 956 patients with incident CKD in 2004–06, 2007–09 and 2010–12, respectively. Adjusted rates of proteinuria quantification (31, 39 and 51 screens/100 person-years), statin prescription (53, 63 and 64 prescriptions/100 person-years) and nephrology referral (2, 3 and 5 referrals/100 person-years) all increased over time (P for trend <0.001 in all cases). ACEI/ARB prescription rates did not change (88, 83 and 80 prescriptions/100 person-years, P = 0.68). Adjusted death rates (7, 5 and 6 deaths/100 person-years), CKD progression (9, 10 and 7 progressors/100 person-years) and cardiovascular hospitalization (10, 8 and 9 hospitalizations per 100/person-years) did not change (P for trend >0.4 in all cases). Conclusion In this integrated health care system, management of incident CKD over the past decade has intensified. PMID:27274830

  8. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  9. Symmetric Dimethylarginine: Improving the Diagnosis and Staging of Chronic Kidney Disease in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Relford, Roberta; Robertson, Jane; Clements, Celeste

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common condition in cats and dogs, traditionally diagnosed after substantial loss of kidney function when serum creatinine concentrations increase. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) is a sensitive circulating kidney biomarker whose concentrations increase earlier than creatinine as glomerular filtration rate decreases. Unlike creatinine SDMA is unaffected by lean body mass. The IDEXX SDMA test introduces a clinically relevant and reliable tool for the diagnosis and management of kidney disease. SDMA has been provisionally incorporated into the International Renal Interest Society guidelines for CKD to aid staging and targeted treatment of early and advanced disease. PMID:27499007

  10. [Parenteral iron therapy in chronic kidney disease or chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Eisenga, Michele F; Diepenbroek, Adry; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bakker, Stephan J L; van der Meer, Peter; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anaemia occur frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or chronic heart failure (CHF) and are associated with lower quality of life and higher mortality. Treating anaemia with erythropoietic growth factors produces no improvement. In recent years, the focus has therefore shifted to correction of iron deficiency. Chronic inflammation in CKD increases the production of hepcidin, which blocks iron absorption from the intestine and leads to less efficient re-use of iron from the macrophages. In absolute iron deficiency the body's iron stores are depleted, whereas in functional iron deficiency the supply of iron is not sufficient to meet demand from the bone marrow. Normal or high ferritin levels do not exclude iron deficiency at tissue level. The iron saturation fraction is a more useful indicator. Parenteral iron therapy ameliorates in CHF the symptoms of iron deficiency, irrespective of the effect on haemoglobin levels. The long-term effects of intravenous iron on mortality and morbidity are still unknown. PMID:26374719

  11. [Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease and strategies to counteract chronic diseases in Italy].

    PubMed

    Mastrilli, Valeria; D'Elia, Roberto; Galeone, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is placed in the more general context of prevention of major chronic Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases and tumors that are the main problem for public health worldwide. Any health policy strategy aimed to the prevention of NCDs has to provide knowledge of health and socioeconomic status of the population, to reduce the level of exposure to risk factors and to adapt health services to the request for assistance. To this purpose, population monitoring systems have been implemented in the last years. The NCDs share some risk factors that are related, in large part, to unhealthy individual behaviours: smoking, alcohol abuse, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. NCDs prevention has to be understood as the set of all actions, sanitary and not, aiming to prevent or delay the onset of diseases or their complications. Preventive measures should, therefore, involve not only the health sector but also all the actors that can help to prevent that disease. As for the Prevention of CKD, the Ministry of Health has established a working table, which handled the Drafting of the "Position paper for the CKD", approved in the State-Regions Conference on august 8th 2014. The document draws a national strategy to combat this disease through primary prevention, early diagnosis and the establishment of diagnostic - therapeutic pathways (DTP). PMID:27545630

  12. [Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons].

    PubMed

    Marchewka, Zofia; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Knysz, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons. PMID:26671927

  13. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  14. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  15. A new nursing model for the care of patients with chronic kidney disease: the UNC Kidney Center Nephrology Nursing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Neyhart, Clara D; McCoy, Lynn; Rodegast, Beverly; Gilet, Constance A; Roberts, Cynthia; Downes, Kelley

    2010-01-01

    Nurses at the University of North Carolina Kidney Center at Chapel Hill have developed a systematic approach to the care of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is an organized nephrology nursing structure that manages efficiency of patient flow and provides patient education throughout the continuum of CKD to improve patient outcomes. Patients are guided through a nurse-directed system at all points of care. The authors have created this structure using a continuous quality improvement (CQI) model to identify barriers to effective and efficient patient care, and then develop strategies to address the barriers. This article describes the development and implementation of the UNC Kidney Center Nephrology Nurse Initiative. This model of care highlights roles for nephrology nurses that are challenging, interesting, and valuable in creating an environment for efficient and high-quality care of patients with CKD. PMID:20462072

  16. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part II. Acquired cystic disease of the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonic examination of the kidney was performed on 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) was detected in 107 of 529 kidneys (20.2%). This paper presents an analysis of ultrasonotomograms of ACDK. Ultrasonic measurement of the size of ACDK was 72.5 +/- 15.2 mm in length and 41.7 +/- 9.8 mm in thickness. The size of ACDK was significantly greater than that of contracted kidneys by ultrasonographic diagnosis. With regard to sex distinction the length and thickness of ACDK were significantly greater in males than in females. As for laboratory data, patients with ACDK showed significantly higher values of red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum creatinine concentration compared with contracted kidneys. Prolongation of the dialysis peirod increased the incidence of ACDK. The size of ACDK showed a tendency to increase with duration of dialysis. However, no correlation was noted statistically between the incidence of ACDK and duration of dialysis and between the size of ACDK and duration of dialysis. There was a significantly lower incidence of ACDK in patients with diabetic nephropathy than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. A sonographic feature of ACDK is irregularity of the renal contour because of cystic transformation. Renal imaging, identification of the corticomedullary border, identification of the central echoes and increased parenchymal echogenicity were similar to other dialyzed kidneys. The main complications of ACDK are hemorrhage and tumor formation. We observed two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. The incidence of complications of ACDK was 5.1 per cent. We believe that patients with ACDK should be watched carefully by regular ultrasonic examination for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232409

  17. Mild systemic thermal therapy ameliorates renal dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Takashige; Hayata, Manabu; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Izumi, Yuichiro; Iiyama, Junichi; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Thermal therapy has become a nonpharmacological therapy in clinical settings, especially for cardiovascular diseases. However, the practical role of thermal therapy on chronic kidney disease remains elusive. We performed the present study to investigate whether a modified thermal protocol, repeated mild thermal stimulation (MTS), could affect renal damages in chronic kidney disease using a mouse renal ablation model. Mice were subjected to MTS or room temperature (RT) treatment once daily for 4 wk after subtotal nephrectomy (Nx) or sham operation (Sh). We revealed that MTS alleviated renal impairment as indicated by serum creatinine and albuminuria in Nx groups. In addition, the Nx + MTS group showed attenuated tubular histological changes and reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion approximately by half compared with the Nx + RT group. Increased apoptotic signaling, such as TUNEL-positive cell count and cleavage of caspase 3, as well as enhanced oxidative stress were significantly reduced in the Nx + MTS group compared with the Nx + RT group. These changes were accompanied with the restoration of kidney Mn-SOD levels by MTS. Heat shock protein 27, a key molecular chaperone, was phosphorylated by MTS only in Nx kidneys rather than in Sh kidneys. MTS also tended to increase the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt in Nx kidneys, possibly associated with the activation of heat shock protein 27. Taken together, these results suggest that modified MTS can protect against renal injury in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease. PMID:27029428

  18. Interrelationship of Multiple Endothelial Dysfunction Biomarkers with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Hamm, L Lee; Mohler, Emile R; Hudaihed, Alhakam; Arora, Robin; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Liu, Yanxi; Browne, Grace; Mills, Katherine T; Kleinpeter, Myra A; Simon, Eric E; Rifai, Nader; Klag, Michael J; He, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The interrelationship of multiple endothelial biomarkers and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been well studied. We measured asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), L-arginine, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), von Willebrand factor (vWF), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NID) in 201 patients with CKD and 201 community-based controls without CKD. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the interrelationship of endothelial biomarkers with CKD. The multivariable-adjusted medians (interquartile ranges) were 0.54 (0.40, 0.75) in patients with CKD vs. 0.25 (0.22, 0.27) μmol /L in controls without CKD (p<0.0001 for group difference) for ADMA; 67.0 (49.6, 86.7) vs. 31.0 (27.7, 34.2) μmol/L (p<0.0001) for L-arginine; 230.0 (171.6, 278.6) vs. 223.9 (178.0, 270.6) ng/mL (p=0.55) for sICAM-1; 981.7 (782.6, 1216.8) vs. 633.2 (507.8, 764.3) ng/mL (p<0.0001) for sVCAM-1; 47.9 (35.0, 62.5) vs. 37.0 (28.9, 48.0) ng/mL (p=0.01) for sE-selectin; 1320 (1044, 1664) vs. 1083 (756, 1359) mU/mL (p=0.008) for vWF; 5.74 (3.29, 8.72) vs. 8.80 (6.50, 11.39)% (p=0.01) for FMD; and 15.2 (13.5, 16.9) vs. 19.1 (17.2, 21.0)% (p=0.0002) for NID, respectively. In addition, the severity of CKD was positively associated with ADMA, L-arginine, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and vWF and inversely associated with FMD and NID. Furthermore, FMD and NID were significantly and inversely correlated with ADMA, L-arginine, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and vWF. In conclusion, these data indicate that multiple dysfunctions of the endothelium were present among patients with CKD. Interventional studies are warranted to test the effects of treatment of endothelial dysfunction on CKD. PMID:26132137

  19. Measurement of the intestinal permeability in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Matty L; Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate methods measuring the intestinal per-meability in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and clarify whether there is an increased intestinal permeability in CKD. METHODS: We reviewed the literature in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) protocol and performed a systematic literature search through MEDline and EMBASE. All controlled trials and cohort studies using non-invasive methods to assess intestinal permeability in CKD patients were included. Excluded were: Conference abstracts and studies including patients younger than 18 years or animals. From the included studies we summarized the used methods and their advantages and disadvantages. For the comparison of their results we divided the included studies in two categories based on their included patient population, either assessing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients or in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Results were graphically displayed in two plots, one comparing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients to healthy controls and one comparing the intestinal permeability in ESRD patients to healthy controls. RESULTS: From the 480 identified reports, 15 met our inclusion criteria. Methods that were used to assess the intestinal permeability varied from markers measured in plasma to methods based on calculating the urinary excretion of an orally administered test substance. None of the applied methods has been validated in CKD patients and the influence of decreased renal function on the different methods remains unclear to a certain extent. Methods that seem the least likely to be influenced by decreased renal function are the quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial DNA in blood and D-lactate. Considering the results published by the included studies; the studies including patients with mild to moderate CKD conducted conflicting results. Some studies did report an increase in intestinal

  20. A Meta-Analysis on Prehypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Xia, Peng; Xu, Lubin; Wang, Yang; Chen, Limeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that there is an association between prehypertension and an increased risk of end-stage renal disease. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the relationship between prehypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This meta-analysis aimed to demonstrate the association between prehypertension and the incidence of CKD and identify the impacts of gender and ethnic differences. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library (from inception through March 2016) and article reference lists were searched for relevant studies regarding blood pressure and CKD. Blood pressure (BP) measurements were classified as follows: optimal BP (less than 120/80 mmHg), prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mmHg) and hypertension (over 140/90 mmHg). CKD was defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or proteinuria. Two investigators independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of studies enrolled in this meta-analysis using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). We performed the meta-analysis using Stata/SE 12.0 (StataCorp LP). The random-effect models were used in the heterogeneous analyses. Results After retrieving data from 4,537 potentially relevant articles, we identified 7 cohort studies including 261,264 subjects, according to the predefined selection criteria. Five studies were conducted in Mongolians from East Asia, and the other two studies were performed in Indo-Europeans from Austria and Iran. The participants ranged in age from 20 to 89 years, and the proportion of females ranged from 27.2% to 63.8%. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 11 years. Compared with the optimal BP values, prehypertension showed an increased risk of CKD (pooled RR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.13–1.44; P = 0.000; I2 = 77.9%). In the sex-stratified analysis, we found a similar trend in women (pooled RR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01–1.63; P = 0.039; I2 = 76.1%) but not in men. This effect was observed only in Mongolians from East

  1. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the elderly -- a geriatrician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Munikrishnappa, Devaraj

    2007-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent among many different populations all over the world, including the US and Europe. Its multitude of complications with devastating outcomes leads to a significantly higher risk for cardio-vascular and all-cause mortality in an individual. However, it is clear now that early detection of CKD might not only delay some of the complications but also prevent them. Therefore, various important public health organizations all over the world have turned their focus and attention to CKD and its risk factors, early detection and early intervention. Nevertheless, the general goals in preventing the increase in CKD and its complications are far from being completely achieved. Why is this so? What is the magnitude and complexity of the problem? How is it affecting the population - are there differences in its affection by age, gender or frail elderly versus the robust? Are we modifying the risk factors appropriately and aggressively? Are there subtle differences in managing the risk factors in those on dialysis versus the non-dialysis CKD patients? Is it important to treat anaemia of CKD aggressively, will it make a difference in the disease progression, its complications or to quality of life? What do these unfortunate individuals commonly succumb to? What do we advise patients who refuse dialysis or those who desire dialysis or transplant? Are there useful non-dialytic treatment recommendations for those who refuse dialysis? What is the role of the physicians caring for the elderly with CKD? When should the primary care givers refer a CKD patient to a nephrologist? The key to eventually controlling incident and prevalent CKD and improve quality of life of affected individuals, lies in not only knowing these and many other vital aspects, but also in applying such knowledge compulsively in day-to-day practice by each and every one us. As CKD is increasingly a disease of the elderly with men being affected more, this

  2. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... slices of meat and adding lettuce, cucumber slices, apple slices, and other garnishes. The following table lists ... spinach Cooked broccoli Beans (baked, kidney, lima, pinto) Apples and apple juice Cranberries and cranberry juice Canned ...

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your kidneys. Common NSAIDs include ibuprofen and naproxen. Ask your pharmacist or provider if the OTC ... with the common cold, or flu: ■ headache ■ fever ■ sinus pressure ■ nasal congestion ■ minor body aches and pains ...

  4. The relationships of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Ping; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hang, Liang-Wen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Lin, Jen-Jyn; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension, blood pressure variation, and resistant hypertension have close relations to sleep apnea, which lead to target organ damage, including the kidney. The complex relationships between sleep apnea and blood pressure cause their interactions with chronic kidney disease ambiguous. The aim of the study was to elucidate the separate and joint effects of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease. A cross-sectional study was done to see the associations of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension with chronic kidney disease in 998 subjects underwent overnight polysomnography without device-therapy or surgery for their sleep-disordered breathing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the severity of SA, hypertension stage, resistant hypertension, and their joint effects on CKD. The multivariable relative odds (95% CI) of chronic kidney disease for the aged (age ≥65 years), severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension were 3.96 (2.57-6.09) (P < 0.001), 2.28 (1.13-4.58) (P < 0.05), 3.55 (1.70-7.42) (P < 0.001), and 9.42 (4.22-21.02) (P < 0.001), respectively. In subgroups analysis, the multivariable relative odds ratio of chronic kidney disease was highest in patients with both resistant hypertension and severe sleep apnea [13.42 (4.74-38.03)] (P < 0.001). Severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Patients with both severe sleep apnea and resistant hypertension have the highest risks. PMID:27281098

  5. The relationships of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Ping; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hang, Liang-Wen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Lin, Jen-Jyn; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsai, Jeffrey J.P.; Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension, blood pressure variation, and resistant hypertension have close relations to sleep apnea, which lead to target organ damage, including the kidney. The complex relationships between sleep apnea and blood pressure cause their interactions with chronic kidney disease ambiguous. The aim of the study was to elucidate the separate and joint effects of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease. A cross-sectional study was done to see the associations of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension with chronic kidney disease in 998 subjects underwent overnight polysomnography without device-therapy or surgery for their sleep-disordered breathing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the severity of SA, hypertension stage, resistant hypertension, and their joint effects on CKD. The multivariable relative odds (95% CI) of chronic kidney disease for the aged (age ≥65 years), severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension were 3.96 (2.57–6.09) (P < 0.001), 2.28 (1.13–4.58) (P < 0.05), 3.55 (1.70–7.42) (P < 0.001), and 9.42 (4.22–21.02) (P < 0.001), respectively. In subgroups analysis, the multivariable relative odds ratio of chronic kidney disease was highest in patients with both resistant hypertension and severe sleep apnea [13.42 (4.74–38.03)] (P < 0.001). Severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Patients with both severe sleep apnea and resistant hypertension have the highest risks. PMID:27281098

  6. Reduction of cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Murray

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and morbidity in people with chronic kidney disease, but there are few evidence-based treatments for reducing cardiovascular events in these patients. The failure of novel drug candidates to delay progression to end-stage renal disease and limit or abrogate cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has led to increased interest in a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist-based treatment model to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Aldosterone concentrations and MR signalling are associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular injury and the incidence of sudden death, and MR blockade decreases the risk of cardiovascular events and sudden death in patients with reduced glomerular filtration rate. Since evidence from clinical trials shows that treatment with MR antagonists confers a morbidity and mortality advantage for patients with cardiovascular disorders, similar benefits might also accrue in patients with chronic kidney disease. Large prospective trials are urgently needed to answer this question. In this Review, I argue that despite differences in the pathophysiology and clinical features of cardiovascular disease in patients with and without chronic kidney disease, MR antagonists could provide cardiovascular benefit in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26429402

  7. Management of acute and post-operative pain in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Malvinder S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common and patients with many co-morbid conditions frequently have to undergo surgical procedures and, therefore, require effective pain management. The pharmacokinetics of various analgesic agents are not well studied in patients with chronic kidney disease and the risk of accumulation of the main drug or their metabolites, resulting in serious adverse events, is a common scenario on medical and surgical wards. It is common for these patients to be cared for by 'non-nephrologists' who often prescribe the standard dose of the commonly used analgesics, without taking into consideration the patient's kidney function. It is important to recognize the problems and complications associated with the use of standard doses of analgesics, and highlight the importance of adjusting analgesic dosage based on kidney function to avoid complications while still providing adequate pain relief. PMID:24358847

  8. Maremar, prevalence of chronic kidney disease, how to avoid over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis.

    PubMed

    De Broe, Marc E; Gharbi, Mohammed Benghanem; Elseviers, Monique

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is considered as a major public health problem. Recent studies mention a prevalence rate between 8%-12%. Several editorials, comments, short reviews described the weaknesses (lack of confirmation of proteinuria, and of chronicity of decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate) of a substantial number of studies and the irrational of using a single arbitrary set point, i.e. diagnosis of chronic kidney disease whenever the estimated glomerular filtration rate is less than 60mL/min/1.73m(2). Maremar (Maladies rénales chroniques au Maroc) is a prevalence study of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes and obesity in a randomized, representative, high response rate (85%), sample of the adult population of Morocco, strictly applying the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Compared to the vast majority of the available studies, Maremar has a low prevalence of chronic kidney disease (2.9% adjusted to the actual adult population of Morocco). The population pyramid, and particularly the confirmation of proteinuria and "chronicity" of the decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate are the main reasons for this low prevalence of chronic kidney disease. The choice of arbitrary single threshold of estimated glomerular filtration rate for classifying stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease inevitably leads to "over-diagnosis" (false positives) of the disease in the elderly, particularly those without proteinuria, hematuria or hypertension, and to "under-diagnosed" (false negatives) in younger individuals with an estimated glomerular filtration rate above 60mL/min/1.73m(2) and below the 3rd percentile of their age/gender category. There is an urgent need for quality studies using in a correct way the recent KDIGO guidelines when investigating the prevalence of chronic kidney disease, in order to avoid a 50 to 100% overestimation of a disease state with potential dramatic consequences. The combination of the general population

  9. Diabetes Mellitus in the Transplanted Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Peev, Vasil; Reiser, Jochen; Alachkar, Nada

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. New onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT) has been described in approximately 30% of non-diabetic kidney-transplant recipients many years post transplantation. DM in patients with kidney transplantation constitutes a major comorbidity, and has significant impact on the patients and allografts’ outcome. In addition to the major comorbidity and mortality that result from cardiovascular and other DM complications, long standing DM after kidney-transplant has significant pathological injury to the allograft, which results in lowering the allografts and the patients’ survivals. In spite of the cumulative body of data on diabetic nephropathy (DN) in the native kidney, there has been very limited data on the DN in the transplanted kidney. In this review, we will shed the light on the risk factors that lead to the development of NODAT. We will also describe the impact of DM on the transplanted kidney, and the outcome of kidney-transplant recipients with NODAT. Additionally, we will present the most acceptable data on management of NODAT. PMID:25221544

  10. A Fatal Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome in a Patient With Chronic kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ting-ting; Yang, Qing; Yu, Mei-hong; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome is a rare but fatal disease, which occurs commonly in immunocompromised patients. Strongyloidiasis among patients with chronic kidney disease is rarely reported. A 55-year-old Chinese male presented to hospital with diarrhea and abdominal pain. He developed acute respiratory failure and progressed to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage owing to disseminated strongyloidiasis immediately. The bronchoalveolar lavage revealed filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. This patient was diagnosed with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome. Although albendazole, mechanical ventilator support, fluid resuscitation, vasopressor support, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hydrocortisone, and broadspectrum antimicrobials were actively used, the patient eventually died. Similar cases in patients with chronic kidney disease in the literature are also reviewed. Through literature review, we recommend that strongyloidiasis should be routinely investigated in patients with chronic kidney disease who will undergo immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27175679

  11. Management of glycemia in diabetic patients with stage IV and V chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Roche-Recinos, Andrea; Charlap, Esti; Markell, Mariana

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is a leading cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide. Data suggest that prevention of progression to end-stage may lie in excellent blood glucose control; however, as kidney disease progresses, the risk of hypoglycemia increases, due to unpredictable insulin kinetics and altered pharmacokinetics of hypoglycemic agents. In addition, whole classes of hypoglycemic agents become contraindicated and regimens must be adjusted for declining kidney function. There is no consensus regarding the best therapy for the patient with advanced chronic kidney disease. In the best of circumstances, the care of these patients will involve intensive monitoring, with the input of a team of health care providers creating a coordinated care plan, including dietary advice and a drug regimen tailored to the specific issues faced by the individual patient. An open dialogue is necessary at all times, as patients may become frustrated and attempt self-treatment using over the counter alternatives. PMID:25772643

  12. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and chronic kidney disease in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kiffel, Jeremy; Rahimzada, Yael; Trachtman, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common forms of acquired glomerular disease leading to end-stage kidney disease. Its incidence is rising around the world. There is no proven therapy for those patients who do not respond to corticosteroids and it can recur in 20% to 25% of patients who receive a kidney transplant. The disease can be primary, or it can be secondary to various conditions including vesicoureteral reflux, obesity, medications, and infections. Recent advances have demonstrated the important role of genetic mutations in podocyte proteins as a cause of FSGS. There is an urgent need for randomized clinical trials to develop safe and effective therapy for FSGS that occurs in the native or transplanted kidney. PMID:21896374

  13. FOCAL SEGMENTAL GLOMERULOSCLEROSIS AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISASE IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kiffel, Jeremy; Rahimzada, Yael; Trachtman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common forms of acquired glomerular disease leading to end stage kidney disease (ESKD). Its incidence is rising around the world. There is no proven therapy for those patients who do not respond to corticosteroids and it can recur in 20–25% of patients who receive a kidney transplant. The disease can be primary or secondary to various conditions including vesicoureteral reflux, obesity, medications, and infections. Recent advances have demonstrated the important role of genetic mutations in podocyte proteins as a cause of FSGS. There is an urgent need for randomized clinical trials to develop safe and effective therapy for FSGS that occurs in the native or transplanted kidney. PMID:21896374

  14. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: Contested discourses of ageing

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jason; Smith, Glenn; Higgs, Paul; Burns, Aine; Hopkins, Katherine; Jones, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease stage 5 is a global health challenge in the context of population ageing across the world. The range of treatment options available to patients at all ages has increased and includes transplantation and dialysis. However, these options are often seen as inappropriate for older frailer patients who are now offered the option of conservative kidney management, which is presented as a non-invasive alternative to dialysis, involving symptom management and addressing psychosocial needs. In this study, we conducted qualitative interviews with 26 close persons caring for someone with chronic kidney disease stage 5 in the United Kingdom to investigate how conservative kidney management interacted with implicit ideas of ageing, in both the experience of conservative kidney management and the understanding of the prognosis and future care of the kidney disease. Our findings highlighted participant confusion about the nature of conservative kidney management, which stems from an initial lack of clarity about how conservative kidney management differed from conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease stage 5. In particular, some respondents were not aware of the implicit palliative nature of the intervention or indeed the inevitable end-of-life issues. Although these findings can be situated within the context of communication failure, we would further argue that they also bring to the surface tensions in the discourses surrounding ageing and old age, drawing on the use of a ‘natural’ and a ‘normal’ paradigm of ageing. In the context of chronic kidney disease stage 5, more patients are being dialysed at older ages, but conservative kidney management is being advanced as a better option than dialysis in terms of quality of life and experience. However, in doing so, conservative kidney management implicitly draws on a notion of older age that echoes natural ageing rather than advocate a more interventionist approach. The role of discourses

  15. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: contested discourses of ageing.

    PubMed

    Low, Joe; Myers, Jason; Smith, Glenn; Higgs, Paul; Burns, Aine; Hopkins, Katherine; Jones, Louise

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease stage 5 is a global health challenge in the context of population ageing across the world. The range of treatment options available to patients at all ages has increased and includes transplantation and dialysis. However, these options are often seen as inappropriate for older frailer patients who are now offered the option of conservative kidney management, which is presented as a non-invasive alternative to dialysis, involving symptom management and addressing psychosocial needs. In this study, we conducted qualitative interviews with 26 close persons caring for someone with chronic kidney disease stage 5 in the United Kingdom to investigate how conservative kidney management interacted with implicit ideas of ageing, in both the experience of conservative kidney management and the understanding of the prognosis and future care of the kidney disease. Our findings highlighted participant confusion about the nature of conservative kidney management, which stems from an initial lack of clarity about how conservative kidney management differed from conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease stage 5. In particular, some respondents were not aware of the implicit palliative nature of the intervention or indeed the inevitable end-of-life issues. Although these findings can be situated within the context of communication failure, we would further argue that they also bring to the surface tensions in the discourses surrounding ageing and old age, drawing on the use of a 'natural' and a 'normal' paradigm of ageing. In the context of chronic kidney disease stage 5, more patients are being dialysed at older ages, but conservative kidney management is being advanced as a better option than dialysis in terms of quality of life and experience. However, in doing so, conservative kidney management implicitly draws on a notion of older age that echoes natural ageing rather than advocate a more interventionist approach. The role of discourses of ageing

  16. [Novel treatments for hepatitis C virus infection in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has been accumulated showing a negative impact of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on survival in patients with chronic kidney disease. Moreover, it appears that anti-HCV positive status has been associated with an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease in the adult general population. These reports have emphasized the need for safe and effective therapies for hepatitis C virus infection in the chronic kidney disease population. Treatment of HCV has made considerable progress with the approval of interferon-free, direct-acting antiviral drug-based combination therapies among patients with intact kidneys; but a paucity of information exists regarding chronic kidney disease patients. The first published report on the antiviral treatment of hepatitis C among patients with chronic kidney disease (stage 4-5) and HCV genotype 1 concerns the combination of grazoprevir (NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and elbasvir (NS5A inhibitor); excellent safety and efficacy (sustained viral response, 94.3% 115/122) have been reached. In another study, the 3-D regimen (ombitasvir/ paritaprevir/ ritonavir/ dasabuvir with or without ribavirin) has been administered to CKD (stage 4-5) patients with genotype 1 (n=20); the rate of sustained viral response was excellent (90%, 18/20) and no patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events. Preliminary data on the combined treatment of sofosbuvir (NS5B inhibitor) and simeprevir (NS3/4A inhibitor) has given a viral response of 89% (34/38), but the size of the study group (n=38 patients with end-stage renal disease) was small. Thus, the evidence in the medical literature concerning use of DAAs in CKD population is encouraging even if it has a preliminary nature. Also, several points need to be addressed regarding the use of DAAs in CKD population including their impact on survival, costs, and drug-drug interactions. PMID:27545640

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chern-Horng; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Lin, Ja-Liang; Liu, Maw-Sen; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate outcomes of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: Four hundred and forty patients referred between 2000 and 2002 for management of HCCs were categorized according to their CKD stage, i.e., estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) > 90 (stage 1), 60-90 (stage 2), 30-60 (stage 3), 15-30 (stage 4), and < 15 (stage 5) mL/min per 1.73 m2, respectively. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and mortality rates and cause of mortality were analyzed. The mortality data were examined with Kaplan-meier method and the significance was tested using a log-rank test. An initial univariate Cox regression analysis was performed to compare the frequency of possible risk factors associated with mortality. To control for possible confounding factors, a multivariate Cox regression analysis (stepwise backward approach) was performed to analyze those factors that were significant in univariate models (P < 0.05) and met the assumptions of a proportional hazard model. RESULTS: Most HCC patients with CKD were elderly, with mean age of diagnosis of 60.6 ± 11.9 years, and mostly male (74.8%). Hepatitis B, C and B and C co-infection virus were positive in 61.6%, 45.7% and 14.1% of the patients, respectively. It was found that patients with stages 4 and 5 CKD were not only older (P = 0.001), but also had higher hepatitis C virus carrier rate (P = 0.001), lower serum albumin level (P = 0.001), lower platelet count (P = 0.037), longer prothrombin time (P = 0.001) as well as higher proportions of advanced cirrhosis (P = 0.002) and HCCs (P = 0.001) than patients with stages 1 and 2 CKD. At the end of analysis, 162 (36.9%) patients had died. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with stages 4 and 5 CKD suffered lower cumulative survival than stages 1 and 2 CKD (log-rank test, χ2 = 11.764, P = 0.003). In a multivariate Cox-regression model, it was confirmed that CKD stage [odds ratio (OR) = 1.988, 95

  18. Combined use of myeloid-related protein 8/14 and procalcitonin as diagnostic markers for acute allograft rejection in kidney transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da-Yeon; Park, Jae Berm; Lee, Eun-Na; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Joh, Jae-Won; Kwon, Choon Hyuck; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Sung-Joo

    2008-02-01

    The myeloid-related proteins 8 and 14 exist as a dimeric complex (MRP 8/14) and serve as early and highly specific markers for inflammatory processes, such as allograft rejection and non-viral (bacterial or fungal) infections. An elevated procalcitonin (PCT) concentration in serum also serves as a diagnostic indicator of non-viral infection. Therefore, by measuring both MRP 8/14 and PCT serum concentrations, one may be able to distinguish between acute allograft rejection and non-viral infections in non-rejection transplant recipients. Here, we investigated whether MRP 8/14 and PCT can function as prognostic (Study I) or diagnostic (Study II) markers for allograft rejection in renal transplant recipients. In Study I, the serum concentrations of MRP 8/14 and PCT during the first 2 weeks after transplantation did not differ between patients who did and did not suffer organ rejection within 1 year post-transplantation; these findings suggest that the MRP 8/14 and PCT parameters are not valid prognostic markers. However, in Study II, patients with acute rejection or non-rejection/non-viral infection groups displayed a significant increase in serum MRP 8/14 concentration, and non-rejection patients with non-viral infections only had elevation in the PCT serum concentrations. These results indicate that the combined use of MRP 8/14 and PCT serum concentrations can allow one to distinguish between allograft rejection and other inflammatory processes, such as infection. PMID:18158120

  19. Transduction of interleukin-10 through renal artery attenuates vascular neointimal proliferation and infiltration of immune cells in rat renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingxin; Li, Xueyi; Meng, Dan; Liang, Qiujuan; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Li; Wang, Rui; Xiang, Meng; Chen, Sifeng

    2016-08-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal failure. Although acute rejection is not a major issue anymore, chronic rejection, especially vascular rejection, is still a major factor that might lead to allograft dysfunction on the long term. The role of the local immune-regulating cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in chronic renal allograft is unclear. Many clinical observations showed that local IL-10 level was negatively related to kidney allograft function. It is unknown this negative relationship was the result of immunostimulatory property or insufficient immunosuppression property of local IL-10. We performed ex vivo transduction before transplantation through artery of the renal allograft using adeno-associated viral vectors carrying IL-10 gene. Twelve weeks after transplantation, we found intrarenal IL-10 gene transduction significantly inhibited arterial neointimal proliferation, the number of occluded intrarenal artery, interstitial fibrosis, peritubular capillary congestion and glomerular inflammation in renal allografts compared to control allografts receiving PBS or vectors carrying YFP. IL-10 transduction increased serum IL-10 level at 4 weeks but not at 8 and 12 weeks. Renal IL-10 level increased while serum creatinine decreased significantly in IL-10 group at 12 weeks compared to PBS or YFP controls. Immunohistochemical staining showed unchanged total T cells (CD3) and B cells (CD45R/B220), decreased cytotoxic T cells (CD8), macrophages (CD68) and increased CD4+ and FoxP3+ cells in IL-10 group. In summary, intrarenal IL-10 inhibited the allograft rejection while modulated immune response. PMID:27317647

  20. Plasma levels of microRNA in chronic kidney disease: patterns in acute and chronic exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H; Ledeganck, Kristien J; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Jürgens, Angelika; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Fransen, Erik; Adams, Volker; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Verpooten, Gert A; Vrints, Christiaan J; Couttenye, Marie M; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2015-12-15

    Exercise training is an effective way to improve exercise capacity in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the underlying mechanisms are only partly understood. In healthy subjects (HS), microRNA (miRNA or miR) are dynamically regulated following exercise and have, therefore, been suggested as regulators of cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. However, these effects were not studied in CKD before. The effect of acute exercise (i.e., an acute exercise bout) was assessed in 32 patients with CKD and 12 age- and sex-matched HS (study 1). miRNA expression in response to chronic exercise (i.e., a 3-mo exercise training program) was evaluated in 40 CKD patients (study 2). In a subgroup of study 2, the acute-exercise induced effect was evaluated at baseline and at follow-up. Plasma levels of a preselected panel miRNA, involved in exercise adaptation processes such as angiogenesis (miR-126, miR-210), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), hypoxia/ischemia (miR-21, miR-210), and progenitor cells (miR-150), were quantified by RT-PCR. Additionally, seven miRNA involved in similar biological processes were quantified in the subgroup of study 2. Baseline, studied miRNA were comparable in CKD and HS. Following acute exercise, miR-150 levels increased in both CKD (fold change 2.12 ± 0.39, P = 0.002; and HS: fold change 2.41 ± 0.48 P = 0.018, P for interaction > 0.05). miR-146a acutely decreased in CKD (fold change 0.92 ± 0.13, P = 0.024), whereas it remained unchanged in HS. Levels of miR-21, miR-126, and miR-210 remained unaltered. Chronic exercise did not elicit a significant change in the studied miRNA levels. However, an acute exercise-induced decrease in miR-210 was observed in CKD patients, only after training (fold change 0.76 ± 0.15). The differential expression in circulating miRNA in response to acute and chronic exercise may point toward a physiological role in cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, also in CKD. PMID:26475583

  1. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in diabetic adult out-patients in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mpondo, Bonaventura C T; Neilson, Eric; Ernest, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of patients with Diabetes Mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa, the magnitude of chronic kidney disease among diabetics has not been well established. A study done by Janmohamed et al. found chronic kidney disease in 83.7 % of diabetics which is relatively higher than the prevalence reported elsewhere. However this study was conducted in schistosoma endemic area along the shores of Lake Victoria. Schistosomiasis has been reported to cause a range of renal diseases. Interpretation of these findings should therefore take into account the possibility of schistosomiasis as a possible confounder. PMID:27391318

  2. What every doctor should know about drug safety in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Maria; Martina, Valentina; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Drug safety is a very relevant issue when dealing with patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who need vascular access procedures and interventions. Drug dosage adjustments are needed for patients with acute or chronic kidney disease. In CKD patients, the estimated glomerular filtration rate is used to guide dose adjustments. Determining the influence of renal replacement therapies on drug dosage adjustment is also very important. Safety issues for the following drugs used for situations related to vascular access are reported: anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, antibiotics, antimicrobials for catheter lock therapy, thrombolytics, local anesthetics, and painkillers. General principles of the interactions of drugs in CKD are also reported. PMID:25676290

  3. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1–800–622–9010 or 212–889–2210 Internet: www.kidney.org Facts About the DASH Eating ... 301–592–8563 Email: nhlbiinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Internet: www.nhlbi.nih.gov A Healthy Food Guide ...

  4. Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child is on a fluid-restricted diet, water may be one of the things he or she would like to have most, so reserve part of the day's fluid intake for a couple of swallows after medicine ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  6. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  7. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  8. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    PubMed

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection. PMID:27142134

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease Influences Multiple Systems: Describing the Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Kidney Damage, and Concomitant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Patrick S.; Scanlan, Aaron T.; Dalbo, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation promote renal injury via damage to molecular components of the kidney. Unfortunately, relationships between inflammation and oxidative stress are cyclical in that the inflammatory processes that exist to repair radical-mediated damage may be a source of additional free radicals, resulting in further damage to renal tissue. Oxidative stress and inflammation also have the ability to become systemic, serving to injure tissues distal to the site of original insult. This review describes select mediators in the exacerbatory relationship between oxidative stress, inflammation, and CKD. This review also discusses oxidative stress, inflammation, and CKD as they pertain to the development and progression of common CKD-associated comorbidities. Lastly, the utility of several widely accessible and cost-effective lifestyle interventions and their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation are discussed and recommendations for future research are provided. PMID:25861414

  10. Preserved saphenous vein allografts for vascular access.

    PubMed

    Piccone, V A; Sika, J; Ahmed, N; LeVeen, H H; DiScala, V

    1978-09-01

    Preserved venous allografts were used as an alternate access procedure in 70 patients receiving dialysis during a three year period. The clinical experience with allograft fistulas revealed an extremely high initial patency rate; absence of infection postoperatively and during three years of dialysis; suitability for dialysis a week after implantation, thus greatly obviating the need for Silastic shunts; a low long term thrombosis rate and the weakly antigenic allograft veins produced no accelerated rejection of subsequently transplanted kidneys. Surviving patients average 172 dialysis treatments per allograft. Allograft fistulas constituted 45 per cent of the last 100 vascular procedures, an indication of the extent of usage. Microscopic examination of grafts retrieved from patients who died during the late follow-up period demonstrated that structural components of the wall of the vein were still identifiable. Allograft venous fistulas offer dependable, safe vascular access, especially in the infection prone patient with diabetes who is receiving dialysis treatment. The clinical results of allograft fistulas suggests a major role for this technique in vascular access operations. PMID:684591

  11. Renal expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in patients with chronic kidney disease: a clinicopathologic study from nephrectomized kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Tung-Wei, Hung; Jia-Hung, Liou; Kun-Tu, Yeh; Jen-Pi, Tsai; Sheng-Wen, Wu; Hui-Chun, Tai; Wei-Tse, Kao; Shu-Hui, Lin; Ya-Wen, Cheng; Horng-Rong, Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of renal interstitial fibrosis. However, the relationship of HIF-1α expression intensity in human renal tissue with the degree of renal function or renal fibrosis has not been investigated. We therefore, undertook this study to assess the relationship between HIF-1α expression and degree of renal impairment and renal fibrosis using renal tissue from nephrectomized kidneys from patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 70 patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral nephrectomy because of renal cell carcinoma, urothelial cell carcinoma, or renal abscess. Immunohistochemical analysis of HIF-1α expression in non-tumourous or non-abscess renal parenchyma was performed. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n=37) with low intensity HIF-1α expression and group 2 (n=33) with high intensity HIF-1α expression. Results: The intensity of renal HIF-1α expression was significantly associated with serum creatinine level (P=0.005), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P=0.02), fibrosis score of the interstitium (P=0.004) and glomerular sclerosis (P=0.013). A high intensity of HIF-1α expression tended to be associated with lower serum creatinine, higher estimated glomerular filtration rate, low interstitial fibrosis score and low glomerular sclerosis. In addition, multivariate analysis by step-wise logistic regression demonstrated that interstitial fibrosis was the only independent factor associated with the intensity of renal HIF-1α expression (OR 4.107, CI 1.535-11.313, P=0.005). Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrated a correlation between intensity of HIF-1α expression and degree of renal interstitial fibrosis. The association demonstrated an elevated HIF-1α expression in less severe kidney disease. The intensity of HIF-1α renal expression plays a role in the pathogenesis of

  12. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients. PMID:27332476

  13. Challenges for nephrology nurses in the management of children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Deborah; Macdonald, Dina; Kolnacki, Ken; Simek, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    An important treatment goal for pediatric nephrology caregivers is the optimization of a child's capacity for normal growth and development. However, the physiologic and metabolic derangements associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) significantly alter these processes, creating important challenges in the care of affected children. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines support early recognition and treatment of CKD-related complications to improve growth and development and, ultimately, quality of life for children with this chronic condition. PMID:15303424

  14. [Chronic kidney diseases do not always pass unnoticed].

    PubMed

    Alves, Cyrielle; Pruijma, Menno; Rotman, Samuel; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-02-24

    Kidney diseases are frequent, but most of the time, they develop unnoticed. This paucity of symptoms may lead to delayed diagnosis with important consequences on their outcome. Nevertheless, specific systemic signs such as skin lesions, joint pain or electrolytes disturbances may sometimes alert the clinician and direct the diagnosis to an underlying nephropathy. A high awareness of clinicians is warranted to recognize these red flags and diagnose these diseases early, as illustrated by two clinical cases discussed in this article. PMID:27039602

  15. Chronic diarrhea due to duodenal candidiasis in a patient with a history of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Majalan, Nader; Moghaddasi, Sarasadat; Qane, Mohammad Davud; Shefaie, Farzane; Masoumi Dehshiri, Roghayyeh; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kassem; Baghbanian, Mahmoud

    2014-11-01

    Candida infection in the small intestine is uncommon. We report an unusual case of duodenal candidiasis that presented as chronic diarrhea in a patient who had previously undergone kidney transplantation. A 60-year-old man presented with profuse watery diarrhea that had lasted 6 months 13 years after kidney transplantation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy results indicated candidiasis within the esophagus and duodenum. Biopsy results revealed active duodenitis with hyphal and yeast forms of Candida overlying the duodenal epithelium in periodic acid Schiff staining. The patient was successfully treated with fluconazole. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient had no complaint of diarrhea. Duodenal candidiasis may be the result of chronic diarrhea in patients with a history of kidney transplantation. PMID:25362226

  16. Neurodevelopmental Status and Adaptive Behaviors in Preschool Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duquette, Peter J.; Hooper, Stephen R.; Icard, Phil F.; Hower, Sarah J.; Mamak, Eva G.; Wetherington, Crista E.; Gipson, Debbie S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the early neurodevelopmental function of infants and preschool children who have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fifteen patients with CKD are compared to a healthy control group using the "Mullen Scales of Early Learning" (MSEL) and the "Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale" (VABS). Multivariate analysis reveals significant…

  17. Cytomegalovirus Seropositivity Is Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Nicola C.; Pankhurst, Tanya; Harper, Lorraine; Steeds, Richard P.; Lauder, Sarah; Townend, Jonathan N.; Moss, Paul; Ferro, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased cardiovascular risk that is not fully explained by traditional risk factors but appears to be related to increased arterial stiffness. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with increased cardiovascular risk although the mechanisms for this are unknown. We examined whether CMV seropositivity was associated with increased arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease. Methodology and Principal Findings In 215 non-diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease, CMV seropositivity was determined using an anti-CMV IgG ELISA. Pulse wave velocity was measured and aortic distensibility assessed in the ascending, proximal descending and distal descending thoracic aorta. Patients seropositive for CMV had a higher pulse wave velocity and lower aortic distensibility at all 3 levels. These differences (except for ascending aortic distensibility) persisted in a subcohort matched for age, gender and renal function, and when the whole cohort was divided into quartiles of age. In multivariable analyses, CMV seropositivity was an independent determinant of pulse wave velocity and proximal and distal descending aortic distensibility. Conclusions In patients with chronic kidney disease, CMV seropositivity is associated with increased arterial stiffness and decreased distensibility of the proximal descending and distal aorta. These findings suggest that further research is required to examine CMV as a possible cause of arterial disease and increased cardiovascular risk in patients with CKD and may be relevant more widely for CMV seropositive patients with normal renal function. PMID:23451030

  18. Association of anemia and erythropoiesis stimulating agents with inflammatory biomarkers in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Keithi-Reddy, Sai Ram; Addabbo, Francesco; Patel, Tejas V; Mittal, Bharati V; Goligorsky, Michael S; Singh, Ajay K

    2008-09-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important predictors of cardiovascular mortality especially in patients with chronic kidney disease. Here we explored the relationship of anemia and epoetin treatment to inflammatory cytokine levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. One hundred non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease over 18 years of age were evenly split into anemic and non-anemic cohorts. Of the 50 anemic patients, 23 were receiving erythropoiesis stimulating agents treatments. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were found to be significantly higher and serum albumin was significantly lower with trends towards higher interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in anemic compared to non-anemic patients. Further analysis by multiple logistic regression found that anemic patients treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents had significantly higher odds for the upper two quartiles for IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha compared to non-anemic patients. Our study found that the anemia of chronic kidney disease was associated with up regulation of TNF-alpha, and possibly IL-6 and IL-8 along with increased levels of these proinflammatory cytokines in patients treated with epoetin. PMID:18547996

  19. [Surrogate end points for clinical trials on chronic kidney disease and research of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiang-rong; Wang, Li; Dai, Xi-wen

    2008-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a kind of disease with the condition always worsening over time passing through a sequence of stages, and the evaluation on its clinical treatment is mainly by observing the speed of renal function deteriorating and the time of terminal renal failure occurrence. In order to conduct the trial go on wheels, the authors proposed that the "surrogate end points (SEP)" should be introduced. It is the biologic mark for substitute the clinical terminal point (event), formed depending upon the scientific evidences of epidemiology, pathophysiology, drug-therapy and other scientific evidence, which could be used for predicting the efficacy or damage of a certain measure, present or absent. This article aimed to explain the definition of SEP and to discuss the usable SEP for clinical trial on chronic kidney disease, such as proteinuria, declination of glomerular filtration rate and its slope coefficient as well as the time of terminal occurrence. Moreover, through analyzing the existent problems in clinical researches concerning TCM treatment of chronic kidney disease, the authors suggested that some improvements, chiefly the utilization of SEP for efficacy evaluation, are necessary in the clinical observation methodologies for chronic kidney disease. PMID:18928108

  20. Serum Paraoxonase Levels are Correlated with Impaired Aortic Functions in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Efe, Tolga H; Ertem, Ahmet G; Altunoglu, Alpaslan; Koseoglu, Cemal; Erayman, Ali; Bilgin, Murat; Kurmuş, Özge; Aslan, Turgay; Bilge, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background The correlation between aortic functions and paraoxonase levels has been previously demonstrated by several earlier studies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between serum paraoxonase levels and aortic functions among patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Our study enrolled 46 chronic kidney disease patients and 45 healthy controls. From these patients, serum cholesterol, creatinine, hemoglobin, and paraoxonase-1 levels were analyzed. Results Paraoxonase-1 levels were significantly lower in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to the controls (p < 0.001). Additionally, the extent of aortic stiffness index (%) was significantly higher in chronic kidney disease patients, but aortic strain and aortic distensibility were significantly higher in healthy controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). We further found that paraoxonase-1 levels were correlated with aortic stiffness index, aortic strain, and aortic distensibility (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that serum paraoxonase-1 levels were significantly correlated with impaired aortic functions. The results of this study highlight the impact of serum paraoxonase-1 activity on atherosclerosis and cardiovascular adverse events. PMID:27122934

  1. Role of Adipose Tissue in Determining Muscle Mass in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition is a powerful predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its etiology is unclear. We hypothesized that the adipocyte-derived proteins leptin and adiponectin, inflammation (as measured by C-reactive protein, CRP), and insulin resistance (as measured by ho...

  2. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  3. Vitamins K and D status in patients with stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Objectives: Vitamin K, vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins and vitamin D may be involved in the regulation of calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design, setting, participants and measurements: Vitamin K and D status was measured as dietary intake, plasma phylloquinone, se...

  4. Phylloquinone and vitamin D status: associations with incident chronic kidney disease in the Framingham Offspring Cohort

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and CKD and vascular disease are etiologically linked. Evidence suggests deficiencies of vitamins D and K may adversely affect the cardiovascular system, but data from longitudinal studies are lacking. W...

  5. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary findings from the MDRD study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. In the general population, physical activity is associated with reduced mortality. We examined physical activity status in CKD patients and its relation to all-cause mortality. The Modified...

  6. Obesity-Related Chronic Kidney Disease—The Role of Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Peter; Davies, Matthew; Choy, Suet-Wan; Cook, Natasha; Power, David

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The mechanisms linking obesity and CKD include systemic changes such as high blood pressure and hyperglycemia, and intrarenal effects relating to lipid accumulation. Normal lipid metabolism is integral to renal physiology and disturbances of renal lipid and energy metabolism are increasingly being linked with kidney disease. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) are important regulators of fatty acid oxidation, which is frequently abnormal in the kidney with CKD. A high fat diet reduces renal AMPK activity, thereby contributing to reduced fatty acid oxidation and energy imbalance, and treatments to activate AMPK are beneficial in animal models of obesity-related CKD. Studies have found that the specific cell types affected by excessive lipid accumulation are proximal tubular cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells. Targeting disturbances of renal energy metabolism is a promising approach to addressing the current epidemic of obesity-related kidney disease. PMID:26690487

  7. New treatment for hepatitis C in chronic kidney disease, dialysis, and transplant.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Martin, Paul; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2016-05-01

    The evidence that chronic hepatitis C plays a detrimental role in survival among patients on maintenance dialysis or renal transplant recipients promotes the antiviral treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among chronic kidney disease patients. Also, it seems that HCV infection is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease in the adult general population. Interferon-based regimens have provided limited efficacy and safety among chronic kidney disease patients, whereas the advent of the new direct-acting antivirals for the treatment of hepatitis C (launched over the past 5 years) has given the opportunity to reach sustained virologic response rates of 90% for many patient groups. Unfortunately, poor information exists regarding the antiviral treatment of hepatitis C in the chronic kidney disease population. The first published data on the treatment of hepatitis C among patients with chronic kidney disease (stage 4-5) and HCV genotype 1 regard the grazoprevir (NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and elbasvir (NS5A inhibitor) combination; excellent efficacy (sustained viral response, 94.3%; 115/122) and safety have been achieved. Preliminary evidence on the combined treatment of sofosbuvir (NS5B inhibitor) and simeprevir (NS3/4A inhibitor) has given a viral response of 89%, but the size of the study group (n = 38 patients with end-stage renal disease) was small. Some phase 2 and 3 clinical trials based on other antiviral combinations (3D regimen, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir, or other sofosbuvir-containing approaches) are ongoing. Thus, the antiviral regimens based on direct-acting antivirals promise to play a pivotal role in the eradication of hepatitis C among kidney disease patients. Direct-acting antivirals are very expensive; in an era of cost containment this is a crucial point either in developed and developing countries. Adverse drug reactions resulting from concomitantly administered medications are another ongoing concern for patients

  8. An overview of advance care planning for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease: The basics.

    PubMed

    Wasylynuk, Betty Ann; Davison, Sara N

    2016-01-01

    As the number of Canadians living with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) continues to grow, even higher numbers are living with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many of these people will eventually require renal replacement therapy (RRT), either dialysis or transplantation. More than 50% of patients starting RRT today are aged 65 or older, with the fastest growing group being patients 75 years and older. Despite advances to dialysis technology and dialysis care, the mortality rates remain high and dialysis patients' end-of-life care may not align with their preferences or values. Advance care planning (ACP) is an essential component of quality comprehensive kidney care. Kidney care teams develop strong relationships with their patients and are well positioned to integrate ACP into routine kidney care. This article defines ACP, outlines the essential components of ACP, and discusses the benefits, challenges, and special considerations of ACP. By enhancing the kidney care team's understanding of ACP, this article aims to assist in integrating ACP into routine kidney care for patients with advanced CKD. PMID:27215058

  9. Structural Equation Modeling Highlights the Potential of Kim-1 as a Biomarker for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Lesley; Akintola, Adebayo; Chen, Gang; Catania, Jeffrey M.; Vaidya, Vishal; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Trzeciakowski, Jerome; Parrish, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem, and despite continued research in the field, there is still a need to identify both biomarkers of risk and progression, as well as potential therapeutic targets. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a family of statistical techniques that has been utilized in the fields of sociology and psychology for many years; however, its utilization in the biological sciences is relatively novel. SEM's ability to investigate complex relationships in an efficient, single model could be utilized to understand the progression of CKD, as well as to develop a predictive model to assess kidney status in the patient. Methods Fischer 344 rats were fed either an ad libitum diet or a calorically restricted diet, and a time-course study of kidney structure and function was performed. EQS, a SEM software package, was utilized to generate five CKD models of the Fisher 344 rat and identify relationships between measured variables and estimates of kidney damage and kidney function. Results All models identified strong relationships between a biomarker for CKD, kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) and kidney damage, in the Fischer 344 rat CKD model. Models also indicate a strong relationship between age and renal damage and dysfunction. Conclusion SEM can be used to model CKD and could be useful to examine biomarkers in CKD patients. PMID:22269876

  10. Sodium and Volume Disorders in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sana; Floris, Matteo; Pani, Antonello; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2016-07-01

    The kidney has a remarkable ability to modulate sodium and water excretion to maintain homeostasis despite a widely varying dietary intake. However, as glomerular filtration rate falls to less than 30 mL/min, this ability can be compromised leading to an increased risk for disorders of serum sodium and extracellular volume. In all cases, these disorders are associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality. Management strategies to both prevent and treat these conditions are available but requiring special attention to the unique circumstance of advanced CKD to maximize therapeutic response and prevent complications. PMID:27324677

  11. [Geriatric patients with chronic kidney insufficiency: which antalgia?].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, M; Hemett, O M; Descombes, E; Blondel, N; Hayoz, D

    2014-04-01

    Pain is a leading cause of office visits. In the geriatric population, it is known that the prevalence of renal failure increases exponentially with age, modifing the elimination of drugs and of their metabolites. What analgesia should be offered to these patients? The holy grail would be a medication without renal elimination, without toxic metabolites and without nephrotoxicity. Based on the literature we try to propose a specific approach to analgesia in older patients with kidney insufficiency, in order to help practitioners to better prescribe for this group of patients. PMID:24791426

  12. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  13. Retinal microvascular caliber and chronic kidney disease in an Asian population.

    PubMed

    Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Shankar, Anoop; Koh, David; Chia, Kee Seng; Saw, Seang Mei; Lim, Su Chi; Tai, E Shyong; Wong, Tien Yin

    2009-03-01

    Retinal arteriolar narrowing is a marker of microvascular damage from elevated blood pressure. Between August 2004 and June 2006, the authors examined the association between retinal vascular diameter and chronic kidney disease in a population-based cohort of 3,280 community-dwelling adults of Malay ethnicity aged 40-80 years living in Singapore. Chronic kidney disease was defined as 1) an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of <60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) from serum creatinine or 2) the presence of micro/macroalbuminuria defined as urinary albumin:creatinine ratios of > or = 17 mg/g for men and > or = 25 mg/g for women. Retinal arteriolar and venular diameters were measured and summarized as central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and central retinal venular equivalent (CRVE). Individuals with reduced CRAE were more likely to have chronic kidney disease than those with increased CRAE. After controlling for age, gender, education, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, and total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, the authors found the odds ratio comparing the smallest with the largest CRAE quartile to be 1.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.96; P(trend) = 0.02) for eGFR of <60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) and 1.80 (95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.91; P(trend) = 0.01) for micro/macroalbuminuria. Retinopathy was also found to be positively associated with both eGFR and micro/macroalbuminuria. Retinal venular diameter was not associated with chronic kidney disease. These data suggest that retinal arteriolar narrowing is associated with chronic kidney disease, independent of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:19092170

  14. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Korea: the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a leading public health problem related to poor quality of life and premature death. As a resource for evidence-informed health policy-making, we evaluated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease using the data of non-institutionalized adults aged ≥ 20 years (n = 15,319) from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2011–2013. Chronic kidney disease was defined as a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 using the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equation. The total prevalence estimate of chronic kidney disease for adults aged ≥ 20 years in Korea was 8.2%. By disease stage, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was as follows: stage 1, 3.0%; stage 2, 2.7%; stage 3a, 1.9%; stage 3b, 0.4%; and stages 4–5, 0.2%. When grouped into three risk categories according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, the proportions for the moderately increased risk, high risk, and very high risk categories were 6.5%, 1.2%, and 0.5%, respectively. Factors including older age, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, body mass indexes of ≥ 25 kg/m2 and < 18.5 kg/m2, and rural residential area were independently associated with chronic kidney disease. Based on this comprehensive analysis, evidence-based screening strategies for chronic kidney disease in the Korean population should be developed to optimize prevention and early intervention of chronic kidney disease and its associated risk factors. PMID:27247501

  15. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. PMID:27080620

  16. Identification of biomarkers for development of end-stage kidney disease in chronic kidney disease by metabolomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomonori; Yasuda, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    A critical issue in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is to prevent patients from the progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), however, there is only limited number of biomarkers for the discrimination of the high-risk CKD patients. We aimed to identify the metabolites which possess the ability to predict the earlier kidney deterioration. We performed capillary electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (CE-MS)-based metabolic profiling in a prospective cohort, which consisted of referred 112 CKD patients with median follow-up period of 4.4 years. The association between the levels of candidate metabolites and the outcomes (progression to ESKD alone or in combination with death before ESKD) were assessed by multivariate Cox proportional hazard models after adjusting for the baseline covariates. A total of 218 metabolites were detected in the plasma of CKD patients. We identified 16 metabolites which have predictive values for the composite outcome: The risk for composite outcome was elevated from 2.0- to 8.0-fold in those with higher levels of 16 plasma metabolites. Our results suggest that the measurement of these metabolites may facilitate CKD management by predicting the risk of progression to ESKD. PMID:27188985

  17. Identification of biomarkers for development of end-stage kidney disease in chronic kidney disease by metabolomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomonori; Yasuda, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    A critical issue in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is to prevent patients from the progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), however, there is only limited number of biomarkers for the discrimination of the high-risk CKD patients. We aimed to identify the metabolites which possess the ability to predict the earlier kidney deterioration. We performed capillary electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (CE-MS)-based metabolic profiling in a prospective cohort, which consisted of referred 112 CKD patients with median follow-up period of 4.4 years. The association between the levels of candidate metabolites and the outcomes (progression to ESKD alone or in combination with death before ESKD) were assessed by multivariate Cox proportional hazard models after adjusting for the baseline covariates. A total of 218 metabolites were detected in the plasma of CKD patients. We identified 16 metabolites which have predictive values for the composite outcome: The risk for composite outcome was elevated from 2.0- to 8.0-fold in those with higher levels of 16 plasma metabolites. Our results suggest that the measurement of these metabolites may facilitate CKD management by predicting the risk of progression to ESKD. PMID:27188985

  18. High prevalence of and potential mechanisms for chronic kidney disease in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Mami, Iadh; Schmitt, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; François, Arnaud; Rabant, Marion; Nochy, Dominique; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Xu-Dubois, Yichum; Thervet, Eric; Puy, Hervé; Karras, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder of the synthesis of heme caused by a deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), leading to the overproduction of the porphyrin precursors δ-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biological characteristics, the renal pathology, and the cellular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP. A total of 415 patients with HMBS deficiency followed up in the French Porphyria Center were enrolled in 2003 in a population-based study. A follow-up study was conducted in 2013, assessing patients for clinical, biological, and histological parameters. In vitro models were used to determine whether porphyrin precursors promote tubular and endothelial cytotoxicity. Chronic kidney disease occurred in up to 59% of the symptomatic AIP patients, with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate of ~1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) annually. Proteinuria was absent in the vast majority of the cases. The renal pathology was a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, associated with a fibrous intimal hyperplasia and focal cortical atrophy. Our experimental data provide evidence that porphyrin precursors promote endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and epithelial phenotypic changes in proximal tubular cells. In conclusion, the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP should be considered in cases of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy and/or focal cortical atrophy with severe proliferative arteriosclerosis. PMID:25830761

  19. Use of procalcitonin in patients with various degrees of chronic kidney disease including renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Turner, R Mackenzie

    2014-12-15

    Procalcitonin (PCT) has been shown to be a useful surrogate marker in identifying patients with various bacterial infections. PCT has been studied as a diagnostic marker in differentiating bacterial pneumonia from other respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations or viral pneumonia. Differentiating bacterial from nonbacterial pneumonia using PCT has shown to reduce antibiotic usage, length of stay, and antibiotic-related adverse effects. PCT has also been studied in patients with sepsis in an effort to reduce unnecessary antibiotic usage and decrease the length of antibiotic therapy. This article focuses on the use of PCT in patients with various degrees of chronic kidney disease in addition to various forms of dialysis, as chronic kidney disease may alter baseline levels of PCT and thus result in inappropriate use of PCT in this population. PMID:25228701

  20. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Gevers, Tom J.G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Drenth, J.P.H.; de Fijter, J.W.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Peters, D.J.M.; Wetzels, J.; Zietse, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4–6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. PMID:25165181

  1. How to advocate for the inclusion of chronic kidney disease in a national noncommunicable chronic disease program.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Marcello; Agarwal, Sanjay; Cass, Alan; Garcia Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivek; Naicker, Sarala; Wang, HaiYan; Yang, Chih-Wei; O'Donoghue, Donal

    2014-06-01

    Many countries are developing or refining national strategies for noncommunicable chronic disease (NCD) prevention and control. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a cause and consequence of other NCDs; CKD acts as a risk multiplier for all four key NCDs as specified by the World Health Organization; CKD is associated with high health-care costs; CKD is readily identifiable; and treatment of CKD is cost-effective and improves outcomes. These observations argue in favor of including CKD in national NCD programs. The purpose of this article is to outline key steps in advocating for the inclusion of CKD in national NCD strategies. PMID:23407433

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease, Obesity, and Hypertension: The Role of Leptin and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Tesauro, M.; Mascali, A.; Franzese, O.; Cipriani, S.; Cardillo, C.; Di Daniele, N.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem and characterized by a progressive loss in renal function over a period of months or years as defined by structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney. Several elements contribute to determine a progression of the kidney injury, inducing a worsening of renal damage and accelerating the decline of renal function: obesity and hypertension are two known factors of kidney progression. Remarkable improvements have been recently achieved in the study of the endocrine features of the adipose tissue and have been able to produce hormone-like peptides named adipokines or adipocytokines. Among these adipocytokines, which represent a link between obesity, hypertension, and chronic nephropathy, leptins and adiponectin appear to play an important role. Leptin not only is a prohypertension element (renal progression factor) through the activation sympathetic nervous, but also is able to induce prosclerotic effects directly on the kidney. In contrast, a decline of adiponectin levels has been shown to be related to a picture of hypertension: an endothelial dysfunction has been described as the main pathogenic mechanism responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:23320148

  3. A best practice position statement on pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: the Italian Study Group on Kidney and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Castellino, Santina; Gernone, Giuseppe; Santoro, Domenico; Moroni, Gabriella; Giannattasio, Michele; Gregorini, Gina; Giacchino, Franca; Attini, Rossella; Loi, Valentina; Limardo, Monica; Gammaro, Linda; Todros, Tullia; Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Pregnancy is increasingly undertaken in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and, conversely, CKD is increasingly diagnosed in pregnancy: up to 3 % of pregnancies are estimated to be complicated by CKD. The heterogeneity of CKD (accounting for stage, hypertension and proteinuria) and the rarity of several kidney diseases make risk assessment difficult and therapeutic strategies are often based upon scattered experiences and small series. In this setting, the aim of this position statement of the Kidney and Pregnancy Study Group of the Italian Society of Nephrology is to review the literature, and discuss the experience in the clinical management of CKD in pregnancy. CKD is associated with an increased risk for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes since its early stage, also in the absence of hypertension and proteinuria, thus supporting the need for a multidisciplinary follow-up in all CKD patients. CKD stage, hypertension and proteinuria are interrelated, but they are also independent risk factors for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes. Among the different kidney diseases, patients with glomerulonephritis and immunologic diseases are at higher risk of developing or increasing proteinuria and hypertension, a picture often difficult to differentiate from preeclampsia. The risk is higher in active immunologic diseases, and in those cases that are detected or flare up during pregnancy. Referral to tertiary care centres for multidisciplinary follow-up and tailored approaches are warranted. The risk of maternal death is, almost exclusively, reported in systemic lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, which share with diabetic nephropathy an increased risk for perinatal death of the babies. Conversely, patients with kidney malformation, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, stone disease, and previous upper urinary tract infections are at higher risk for urinary tract infections, in turn associated with prematurity. No risk for malformations other than those

  4. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) México and comparison with KEEP US.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Gregorio T; García-García, Guillermo; Villa, Antonio R; Rubilar, Ximena; Olvera, Nadia; Ferreira, Evangelina; Virgen, Margarita; Gutiérrez-Padilla, José Alfonso; Plascencia-Alonso, Melissa; Mendoza-García, Martha; Plascencia-Pérez, Salvador

    2010-03-01

    The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) is a free community screening program aimed at early detection of kidney disease among high-risk individuals. A pilot phase of KEEP México began in 2008 in México City and Jalisco State. Adults with diabetes, hypertension, or family history of diabetes, hypertension, or chronic kidney disease (CKD) were invited to participate through advertising campaigns. All participants completed a questionnaire. Blood pressure, weight, and height were measured; blood and urine tests included albuminuria and serum creatinine to estimate glomerular filtration rate using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation. Mean age of KEEP México City and KEEP Jalisco participants was 46 and 53 years, respectively; >70% were women. CKD prevalence was 22% in KEEP México City and 33% in KEEP Jalisco, not significantly different from reported KEEP US prevalence of 26%. CKD stages 1 and 2 were more frequent in KEEP México and stage 3 in KEEP US. In KEEP México City, CKD prevalence was higher than the overall prevalence among participants with diabetes (38%) or diabetes and hypertension (42%). Most KEEP México participants were unaware of the CKD diagnosis, despite that 71% in KEEP México City had seen a doctor in the previous year. CKD is highly prevalent, underdiagnosed, and underrecognized among high-risk individuals in México. KEEP is an effective screening program that can successfully be adapted for use in México. PMID:20186176

  5. [Efficacy and safety of selective estrogen receptor modulators in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators(SERMs)have beneficial effects on the improvement of bone mineral density of the spine and hip, and decrease the vertebral fracture in postmenopausal women. Similar to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, including dialysis patients, however, SERMs cannot decrease the risk of hip fracture, which is extremely high in Japanese dialysis patients. One of the most important disadvantages of SERMs is an increase in the risk of venous thromboembolic events and fatal stroke in high-risk groups of the Framingham Stroke Risk Score. On the other hand, SERMs may be used in unique osteoporosis drugs for reducing the incidence and progression of breast cancer. Moreover, SERMs attenuate oxidative stress and may lessen the deterioration of kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease. The evidences for the efficacy and safety of SERMs in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease are insufficient, and knowledge concerning the selection and indication of osteoporosis drugs for those patients need to be developed. PMID:27561348

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Chronic Kidney Transplant Rejection via Large-Scale Proteogenomic Analysis of Tissue Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Nakorchevsky, Aleksey; Hewel, Johannes A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Mondala, Tony S.; Campbell, Daniel; Head, Steve R.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The most common cause of kidney transplant failure is the poorly characterized histopathologic entity interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). There are no known unifying mechanisms, no effective therapy, and no proven preventive strategies. Possible mechanisms include chronic immune rejection, inflammation, drug toxicity, and chronic kidney injury from secondary factors. To gain further mechanistic insight, we conducted a large-scale proteogenomic study of kidney transplant biopsies with IFTA of varying severity. We acquired proteomic data using tandem mass spectrometry with subsequent quantification, analysis of differential protein expression, validation, and functional annotations to known molecular networks. We performed genome-wide expression profiling in parallel. More than 1400 proteins with unique expression profiles traced the progression from normal transplant biopsies to biopsies with mild to moderate and severe disease. Multiple sets of proteins were mapped to different functional pathways, many increasing with histologic severity, including immune responses, inflammatory cell activation, and apoptosis consistent with the chronic rejection hypothesis. Two examples include the extensive population of the alternative rather than the classical complement pathway, previously not appreciated for IFTA, and a comprehensive control network for the actin cytoskeleton and cell signaling of the acute-phase response. In summary, this proteomic effort using kidney tissue contributes mechanistic insight into several biologic processes associated with IFTA. PMID:20093355

  7. Expression of human beta-defensins 1 and 2 in kidneys with chronic bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jan; Retz, Margitta; Harder, Jürgen; Krams, Matthias; Kellner, Udo; Hartmann, Julia; Hohgräwe, Kerstin; Raffenberg, Uta; Gerber, Martin; Loch, Tillmann; Weichert-Jacobsen, Klaus; Stöckle, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Background Constitutive expression and localization of antimicrobial human β-defensin-1 (HBD-1) in human kidneys as a potential mechanism of antimicrobial defense has been previously reported. Inducible expression of human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) has been described in various epithelial organs but not for the urogenital tract. Methods We investigated the gene- and protein expression of HBD-1 and HBD-2 by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry in 15 normal human kidney samples and 15 renal tissues with chronic bacterial infection. Additionally, cell culture experiments were performed to study HBD gene expression by real-time RT-PCR in response to inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β as well as lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria. Results Constitutive HBD-1 gene- and protein expression was detected in normal renal tissue and kidneys with chronic infection. As a novel finding, inducible HBD-2 gene- and protein expression was demonstrated in tubulus epithelia with chronic infection but not in normal renal tissue. In pyelonephritic kidneys HBD-1 and HBD-2 expression showed a similar pattern of localizaton in distal tubules, loops of Henle and in collecting ducts of the kidney. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR of kidney derived cell lines stimulated with inflammatory agents TNF-α, IL-1β and LPS revealed a strong increase in relative HBD-2 transcription level and also a slight increase in relative HBD-1 transcription level. Conclusions Upregulated HBD-2 expression in renal tubulus epithelium indicates a role of a wider range of human defensins for antimicrobial host defense in the urogenital tract than previously recognized. PMID:12238953

  8. An effective approach to chronic kidney disease in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Mohammed Rafique; Meyers, Anthony M; Gottlich, Errol; Naicker, Sarala

    2016-02-01

    Very few patients with end-stage kidney disease in South Africa receive renal replacement treatment (RRT), despite the rapidly growing demand, because of resource constraints. Nephrologists who agonise daily about who to treat and who not to, and have been doing so since the inception of dialysis in this country, welcomed the opportunity to interact with the National Department of Health at a recent summit of stakeholders. The major challenges were identified and recommendations for short- to long-term solutions were made. While the renal community can still improve efficiencies, it is clear that much of the responsibility for improving access to RRT and reducing inequities must be borne by the national government. The summit marks the first step in a process that we hope will ultimately culminate in universal access to RRT for all South Africans. PMID:26821893

  9. Update on Medical Management of Clinical Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulation of normal kidney functions in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to several pathophysiologic abnormalities that have the potential to significantly clinically affect the CKD patient. This article discusses the clinical impact of hypertension, hypokalemia, anemia, dysrexia, nausea/vomiting, and constipation in the CKD patient and therapies for these conditions. These clinical manifestations of disease may not occur in every patient and may also develop later during the progression of disease. Therefore, monitoring for, identifying, and addressing these factors is considered an important part of the medical management of CKD. PMID:27593576

  10. Novel therapeutic approaches for chronic kidney disease due to glomerular disorders.

    PubMed

    Del Nogal-Avila, Maria; Donoro-Blazquez, Hector; Saha, Manish K; Marshall, Caroline B; Clement, Lionel C; Macé, Camille E A; Chugh, Sumant S

    2016-07-01

    Improved understanding of glomerular disease mechanisms over the past decade has led to the emergence of new and targeted therapeutic strategies for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most promising among these are the administration of recombinant mutated human angiopoietin-like 4, sialic acid-related sugars that induce sialylation in vivo, compounds related to Bis-T-23, and immune depletion of the soluble urokinase receptor from the circulation. Taking these therapeutic strategies into clinical trials will be the first step away from repurposed and relatively toxic drugs currently used for treating kidney disease. PMID:27147672

  11. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 gene polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to adverse long-term allograft outcomes in non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Jieh; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lian, Jong-Da; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Although the genetic polymorphism of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 (SDF-1) is associated with higher mortality of liver allograft recipients, the role of SDF-1 in the modulation of renal allograft outcomes is unclear. Between March 2000 and January 2008, we recruited 252 non-diabetic renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Baseline characteristics and blood chemistry were recorded. Genomic DNA extraction with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was utilized to analyze the genetic polymorphisms of SDF-1 (rs1801157). The influence of SDF-1 on an adverse renal allograft outcome, defined as either a doubling of serum creatinine, graft failure, or patient death was evaluated. Sixteen patients with the SDF-1 AA/AG genotype and nine with the SDF-1 GG genotype reached an adverse outcome. According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients carrying the SDF-1 AA/AG genotype or A allele showed a significantly higher risk of reaching an adverse outcome than those carrying the SDF-1 GG genotype or G allele (p=0.041; p=0.0051, respectively; log rank test). Stepwise multivariate Cox proportional regression analysis revealed that patients carrying the SDF-1 AA/AG genotype and A allele had a 2.742-fold (95% CI. 1.106-6.799, p=0.03) and 2.306-fold (95% CI. 1.254-4.24, p=0.008) risk of experiencing an adverse outcome. The SDF-1 AA/AG genotype and A allele have a detrimental impact on the long-term outcome of RTRs. PMID:25029540

  12. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Susceptibility to Adverse Long-Term Allograft Outcomes in Non-Diabetic Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chung-Jieh; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lian, Jong-Da; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Although the genetic polymorphism of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 (SDF-1) is associated with higher mortality of liver allograft recipients, the role of SDF-1 in the modulation of renal allograft outcomes is unclear. Between March 2000 and January 2008, we recruited 252 non-diabetic renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Baseline characteristics and blood chemistry were recorded. Genomic DNA extraction with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was utilized to analyze the genetic polymorphisms of SDF-1 (rs1801157). The influence of SDF-1 on an adverse renal allograft outcome, defined as either a doubling of serum creatinine, graft failure, or patient death was evaluated. Sixteen patients with the SDF-1 AA/AG genotype and nine with the SDF-1 GG genotype reached an adverse outcome. According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients carrying the SDF-1 AA/AG genotype or A allele showed a significantly higher risk of reaching an adverse outcome than those carrying the SDF-1 GG genotype or G allele (p = 0.041; p = 0.0051, respectively; log rank test). Stepwise multivariate Cox proportional regression analysis revealed that patients carrying the SDF-1 AA/AG genotype and A allele had a 2.742-fold (95% CI. 1.106–6.799, p = 0.03) and 2.306-fold (95% CI. 1.254–4.24, p = 0.008) risk of experiencing an adverse outcome. The SDF-1 AA/AG genotype and A allele have a detrimental impact on the long-term outcome of RTRs. PMID:25029540

  13. High dietary fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Raj Krishnamurthy, Vidya M.; Wei, Guo; Baird, Bradley C.; Murtaugh, Maureen; Chonchol, Michel B.; Raphael, Kalani L.; Greene, Tom; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is considered an inflammatory state and a high fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation in the general population. Here, we determined whether fiber intake is associated with decreased inflammation and mortality in chronic kidney disease, and whether kidney disease modifies the associations of fiber intake with inflammation and mortality. To do this, we analyzed data from 14,543 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2) was 5.8%. For each 10-g/day increase in total fiber intake, the odds of elevated serum C-reactive protein levels were decreased by 11% and 38% in those without and with kidney disease, respectively. Dietary total fiber intake was not significantly associated with mortality in those without but was inversely related to mortality in those with kidney disease. The relationship of total fiber with inflammation and mortality differed significantly in those with and without kidney disease. Thus, high dietary total fiber intake is associated with lower risk of inflammation and mortality in kidney disease and these associations are stronger in magnitude in those with kidney disease. Interventional trials are needed to establish the effects of fiber intake on inflammation and mortality in kidney disease. PMID:22012132

  14. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients Attending a Specialist Diabetes Clinic in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, TS; Tulloch-Reid, MK; Younger-Coleman, NO; Wright-Pascoe, RA; Boyne, MS; Soyibo, AK; Wilks, RJ

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients attending the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic and to determine the proportion of patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients attending the UHWI Diabetes Clinic between 2009 and 2010. Trained nurses administered a questionnaire, reviewed dockets, and performed urinalyses. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Albuminuria was assessed using urine test strips for protein and microalbumin. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2 or albuminuria ≥ 30 mg/g creatinine. Risk of adverse outcome (all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and kidney failure) was determined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) 2012 prognosis grid. Results: Participants included 100 women and 32 men (mean age, 55.4 ± 12.9 years, mean duration of diabetes, 16.7 ± 11.7 years). Twenty-two per cent of participants had eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Moderate albuminuria (30–300 mg/g) was present in 20.5% of participants and severe albuminuria (> 300 mg/g) in 62.1%. Overall prevalence of CKD was 86.3% (95% CI 80.4%, 92.2%). Based on KDIGO risk categories, 50.8% were at high risk and 17.4% at very high risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion: Most patients at the UHWI Diabetes Clinic had CKD and were at high or very high risk of adverse outcomes. Further studies to determine the burden of CKD in other clinical settings and to identify the best strategies for preventing adverse outcomes in developing countries need to be conducted. PMID:26426170

  15. Use of local allograft irradiation following renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Delmonico, F.L.; Nelson, P.W.; Shipley, W.U.; Cosimi, A.B.

    1984-07-01

    Over a 10 year period, 67 recipients of 71 renal allografts received graft irradiation following the diagnosis of rejection. The majority of kidneys were treated with a total dose of 600 rad, 150 rad per fraction, in 4 daily fractions. Fifty-three kidneys were irradiated following the failure of standard systemic immunosuppression and maximally tolerated antirejection measures to reverse an episode of acute rejection. Twenty-two (42%) of these allografts were noted to have stable (i.e. no deterioration) or improved function 1 month following the treatment with irradiation. Eleven (21%) of these allografts maintained function 1 year following transplantation. Biopsies were obtained of 41 allografts. Of the 24 renal allografts with predominantly cellular rejection, 10 (42%) had the process reversed or stabilized at 1 month following irradiation. Five (21%) of these allografts were functioning at 1 year following irradiation. Rejection was reversed or stabilized in 6 of 17 (35%) allografts at 1 month when the histologic features of renal biopsy suggested predominantly vascular rejection. Local graft irradiation has helped maintain a limited number of allografts in patients whose rejection has failed to respond to systemic immunosuppression. Irradiation may also benefit patients with ongoing rejection in whom further systemic immunosuppression is contra-indicated.

  16. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  17. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  18. Social support of adults and elderly with chronic kidney disease on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Simone Márcia; Braido, Natalia Fernanda; Ottaviani, Ana Carolina; Gesualdo, Gabriela Dutra; Zazzetta, Marisa Silvana; Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the instrumental and emotional social support of patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study. The sample was sized for convenience and included 103 participants under treatment in a Renal Replacement Therapy Unit. Data were collected through individual interviews, using the Social Support Scale. Results: the mean scores of the emotional and instrumental social support were 3.92 (± 0.78) and 3.81 (± 0.69) respectively, an indication of good support received. The most frequent sources of instrumental and emotional social support mentioned by participants were partners, spouse, companion or boyfriend and friends. Conclusion: patients with chronic kidney disease have high social support, both instrumental and emotional, and the main support comes from the family. PMID:27508920

  19. Albuminuria and chronic kidney disease in association with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem because it is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. The metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and dyslipidemia, is also an increasingly common disorder and a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A close association has been found between the metabolic syndrome and the risk for developing renal impairment, clinically expressed in the form of microalbuminuria or chronic kidney disease. Several potential mechanisms, including insulin resistance, renal atherosclerosis, and inflammation, induce the deterioration of renal function. Despite the close association between the metabolic syndrome and renal impairment, it is still unclear whether and to what extent treating the metabolic syndrome will prevent renal impairment. A clinical trial is needed to clarify whether the effect of preventing and treating metabolic syndrome components will result in improved renal prognosis. PMID:17684460

  20. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rysz-Górzyńska, Magdalena; Banach, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  1. Chronic renal failure in a patient with Sotos syndrome due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cefle, K; Yildiz, A; Palanduz, S; Ozturk, S; Ozbey, N; Kylyçaslan, I; Colakoglu, S; Balci, C

    2002-05-01

    Sotos syndrome is characterised by accelerated growth, acromegalic appearance, mental retardation and social maladjustment. Most cases are sporadic, but familial cases have also been reported. We report a case of Sotos syndrome presenting with chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Ultrasonographic examination of the patient, his father and other family members revealed polycystic kidneys. Renal failure was present only in the Sotos case, who also had considerably larger cysts than other family members. We suggest that the underlying mechanism responsible from the somatic overgrowth in Sotos syndrome may also be linked with the development of larger cysts and earlier onset of renal failure in ADPKD. Although Sotos syndrome has been associated with urological abnormalities, chronic renal failure is very rare. To our knowledge, Sotos syndrome associated with ADPKD has not been reported before. PMID:12074220

  2. Chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology and ground-water ionicity: study based on Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Dharma-Wardana, M W C; Amarasiri, Sarath L; Dharmawardene, Nande; Panabokke, C R

    2015-04-01

    High incidence of chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDU) in Sri Lanka is shown to correlate with the presence of irrigation works and rivers that bring-in 'nonpoint source' fertilizer runoff from intensely agricultural regions. We review previous attempts to link CKDU with As, Cd and other standard toxins. Those studies (e.g. the WHO-sponsored study), while providing a wealth of data, are inconclusive in regard to aetiology. Here, we present new proposals based on increased ionicity of drinking water due to fertilizer runoff into the river system, redox processes in the soil and features of 'tank'-cascades and aquifers. The consequent chronic exposure to high ionicity in drinking water is proposed to debilitate the kidney via a Hofmeister-type (i.e. protein-denaturing) mechanism. PMID:25119535

  3. Protein biomarkers associated with acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perco, P; Pleban, C; Kainz, A; Lukas, A; Mayer, G; Mayer, B; Oberbauer, R

    2006-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD) are currently categorized according to serum creatinine concentrations. Serum creatinine, however, has shortcomings because of its low predictive values. The need for novel markers for the early diagnosis and prognosis of renal diseases is imminent, particularly for markers reflecting intrinsic organ injury in stages when glomerular filtration is not impaired. This review summarizes protein markers discussed in the context of ARF as well as CKD, and provides an overview on currently available discovery results following 'omics' techniques. The identified set of candidate marker proteins is discussed in their cellular and functional context. The systematic review of proteomics and genomics studies revealed 56 genes to be associated with acute or chronic kidney disease. Context analysis, i.e. correlation of biological processes and molecular functions of reported kidney markers, revealed that 15 genes on the candidate list were assigned to the most significant ontology groups: immunity and defence. Other significantly enriched groups were cell communication (14 genes), signal transduction (22 genes) and apoptosis (seven genes). Among 24 candidate protein markers, nine proteins were also identified by gene expression studies. Next generation candidate marker proteins with improved diagnostic and prognostic values for kidney diseases will be derived from whole genome scans and protemics approaches. Prospective validation still remains elusive for all proposed candidates. PMID:17032342

  4. Effects of intensive blood pressure lowering on the progression of chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jicheng; Ehteshami, Parya; Sarnak, Mark J.; Tighiouart, Hocine; Jun, Min; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Foote, Celine; Rodgers, Anthony; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan; Strippoli, Giovanni F.M.; Perkovic, Vlado

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent guidelines suggest lowering the target blood pressure for patients with chronic kidney disease, although the strength of evidence for this suggestion has been uncertain. We sought to assess the renal and cardiovascular effects of intensive blood pressure lowering in people with chronic kidney disease. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all relevant reports published between 1950 and July 2011 identified in a search of MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library. We included randomized trials that assigned patients with chronic kidney disease to different target blood pressure levels and reported kidney failure or cardiovascular events. Two reviewers independently identified relevant articles and extracted data. Results: We identified 11 trials providing information on 9287 patients with chronic kidney disease and 1264 kidney failure events (defined as either a composite of doubling of serum creatinine level and 50% decline in glomerular filtration rate, or end-stage kidney disease). Compared with standard regimens, a more intensive blood pressure–lowering strategy reduced the risk of the composite outcome (hazard ratio [HR] 0.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68–0.98) and end-stage kidney disease (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.67–0.93). Subgroup analysis showed effect modification by baseline proteinuria (p = 0.006) and markers of trial quality. Intensive blood pressure lowering reduced the risk of kidney failure (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.86), but not in patients without proteinuria at baseline (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.67–1.87). There was no clear effect on the risk of cardiovascular events or death. Interpretation: Intensive blood pressure lowering appears to provide protection against kidney failure events in patients with chronic kidney disease, particularly among those with proteinuria. More data are required to determine the effects of such a strategy among patients without proteinuria. PMID:23798459

  5. Utilization of Feeding Tubes in the Management of Feline Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sheri

    2016-11-01

    Esophagostomy feeding tubes are useful, and in many cases essential, for the comprehensive management of cats with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). They should be considered a lifelong therapeutic appliance to facilitate the global management of cats with CKD thus providing improved therapeutic efficacy and quality-of-life. Esophagostomy tubes facilitate the maintenance of adequate hydration and increase owner compliance by facilitating the administration of medications. Finally, feeding tubes provide a means to deliver a stage-appropriate dietary prescription for cats with CKD and maintain an adequate nutritional plane in a patient that otherwise would be subject to chronic wasting. PMID:27499006

  6. AT1 receptor antagonism before ischemia prevents the transition of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, Roxana; Benítez, Kenia; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Gómez, Arturo; Aguilar-León, Diana; Rangel-Santiago, Jesús F; Huerta, Sara; Gamba, Gerardo; Uribe, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A

    2016-02-01

    Despite clinical recovery of patients from an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI), progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) is possible on long-term follow-up. However, mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Here, we determine whether activation of angiotensin-II type 1 receptors during AKI triggers maladaptive mechanisms that lead to CKD. Nine months after AKI, male Wistar rats develop CKD characterized by renal dysfunction, proteinuria, renal hypertrophy, glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Renal injury was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation, α-smooth muscle actin expression, and activation of transforming growth factor β; the latter mainly found in epithelial cells. Although administration of losartan prior to the initial ischemic insult did not prevent or reduce AKI severity, it effectively prevented eventual CKD. Three days after AKI, renal dysfunction, tubular structural injury, and elevation of urinary biomarkers were present. While the losartan group had similar early renal injury, renal perfusion was completely restored as early as day 3 postischemia. Further, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression and an early activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α, a transcription factor that regulates expression of many genes that help reduce renal injury. Thus, AT1 receptor antagonism prior to ischemia prevented AKI to CKD transition by improving early renal blood flow recovery, lesser inflammation, and increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α activity. PMID:26509589

  7. Does hypokalemia contribute to acute kidney injury in chronic laxative abuse?

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Young; Yoon, Hyaejin; Yi, Joo-Hark; Jung, Woon-Yong; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2015-06-01

    Prolonged hypokalemia from chronic laxative abuse is recognized as the cause of chronic tubulointerstitial disease, known as "hypokalemic nephropathy," but it is not clear whether it contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI). A 42-year-old woman with a history of chronic kidney disease as a result of chronic laxative abuse from a purging type of anorexia nervosa (AN-P), developed an anuric AKI requiring hemodialysis and a mild AKI 2 months later. Both episodes of AKI involved severe to moderate hypokalemia (1.2 and 2.7 mmol/L, respectively), volume depletion, and mild rhabdomyolysis. The histologic findings of the first AKI revealed the remnants of acute tubular necrosis with advanced chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and ischemic glomerular injury. Along with these observations, the intertwined relationship among precipitants of recurrent AKI in AN-P is discussed, and then we postulate a contributory role of hypokalemia involved in the pathophysiology of the renal ischemia-induced AKI. PMID:26484031

  8. Does hypokalemia contribute to acute kidney injury in chronic laxative abuse?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Yoon, Hyaejin; Yi, Joo-Hark; Jung, Woon-Yong; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hypokalemia from chronic laxative abuse is recognized as the cause of chronic tubulointerstitial disease, known as “hypokalemic nephropathy,” but it is not clear whether it contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI). A 42-year-old woman with a history of chronic kidney disease as a result of chronic laxative abuse from a purging type of anorexia nervosa (AN-P), developed an anuric AKI requiring hemodialysis and a mild AKI 2 months later. Both episodes of AKI involved severe to moderate hypokalemia (1.2 and 2.7 mmol/L, respectively), volume depletion, and mild rhabdomyolysis. The histologic findings of the first AKI revealed the remnants of acute tubular necrosis with advanced chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and ischemic glomerular injury. Along with these observations, the intertwined relationship among precipitants of recurrent AKI in AN-P is discussed, and then we postulate a contributory role of hypokalemia involved in the pathophysiology of the renal ischemia-induced AKI. PMID:26484031

  9. Association between urinary sodium, creatinine, albumin, and long-term survival in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Traynor, Jamie P; Taylor, Alison H; Freel, E Marie; Fox, Jonathan G; Jardine, Alan G; Mark, Patrick B

    2014-07-01

    Dietary sodium intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular risk in the general population. In patients with chronic kidney disease, sodium intake has been associated with progressive renal disease, but not independently of proteinuria. We studied the relationship between urinary sodium (UNa) excretion and UNa to creatinine ratio and mortality or requirement for renal replacement therapy in chronic kidney disease. Adult patients attending a renal clinic who had ≥1 24-hour UNa measurement were identified. Twenty-four-hour UNa measures were collected and UNa to creatinine ratio calculated. Time to renal replacement therapy or death was recorded. Four hundred twenty-three patients were identified with mean estimated glomerular filtration rate of 48 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Ninety patients required renal replacement therapy and 102 patients died. Mean slope decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate was -2.8 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. Median follow-up was 8.5 years. Patients who died or required renal replacement therapy had significantly higher UNa excretion and UNa to creatinine ratio, but the association with these parameters and poor outcome was not independent of renal function, age, and albuminuria. When stratified by albuminuria, UNa to creatinine ratio was a significant cumulative additional risk for mortality, even in patients with low-level albuminuria. There was no association between low UNa and risk, as observed in some studies. This study demonstrates an association between UNa excretion and mortality in chronic kidney disease, with a cumulative relationship between sodium excretion, albuminuria, and reduced survival. These data support reducing dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease, but additional study is required to determine the target sodium intake. PMID:24732890

  10. Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder: Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and management.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects 23 million Americans and is associated with many complications, one of the most complex of which is mineral and bone disorder. Pathophysiologic mechanisms begin to occur early in CKD but when the glomerular filtration rate declines to <50% of normal, biochemical and bone matrix abnormalities, which vary and are multifactorial, begin to be clinically apparent. Mainstays of treatment remain management of hyperphosphatemia and prevention or treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27272731

  11. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration. PMID:27083279

  12. Principles of exercising in patients with chronic kidney disease, on dialysis and for kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, I; Krause, R

    2004-05-01

    Independent of the course of kidney disease, physical fitness decreases continuously with the progression of CRF. The reduced physical fitness of patients with CKD is characterized by the following: reduced flexibility, coordination disturbances, decreased muscular strength and endurance. Often CKD patients suffer from depression and loss of self-confidence. Thus, the goals are to improve the principal components of motor fitness, conditioning gymnastics, different forms of endurance training, breathing and relaxation exercises, and body experience. The training starts with an initial phase followed by a build-up phase and a maintenance phase. Each phase consists of a warm-up, the main phase, and a cool-down phase. The Borg's RPE-scale is recommended for controlling the training. Because of their specific treatment modalities, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients as well as transplantation patients should seek individual prescriptions. Large experience exists in out-center training programs in dialysis and transplantation patients. The importance of physical fitness to the somatic and psychosocial well-being is well-documented. It is therefore recommended to exercise continuously on an individual basis in order to counteract the reduction of physical fitness due to CKD. Each patient should feel encouraged to participate in an exercise training adjusted to the individual capacity. PMID:15233243

  13. Retroperitoneal haematoma associated with enoxaparin use in an elderly woman with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Triscott, Jean; Mercer, Susan; Tian, Peter George Jaminal; Dobbs, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with chronic kidney disease was on enoxaparin (1 mg/kg subcutaneously two times a day) for 4 months to manage pulmonary embolism. While admitted for diagnostic evaluation of frequent falls, transient ischaemic attacks and pain management, she developed vomiting, diarrhoea, melena and hypotension. Her estimated glomerular filtration rate decreased from an admission value of 34 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 13 mL/min/1.73 m2. CT scan showed retroperitoneal haematoma. She was placed in intensive care and stabilised with aggressive fluid replacement, blood transfusion, and discontinuation of enoxaparin and concomitant aspirin. We attribute this major bleeding to enoxaparin use in an elderly woman with chronic kidney disease and concomitant aspirin intake. We will review reported cases of enoxaparin-associated retroperitoneal haematoma. We suggest that enoxaparin be used with caution in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease, and stress that treatment monitoring and reversal may not be readily available. PMID:26438680

  14. [Importance of selenium homeostasis in chronic and end-stage kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István

    2013-10-13

    Selenium is an essential trace element for the human body with a significant antioxidant effect. Selenium deficiency and excess are both detrimental for proper functioning of the human body. The possible association between selenium deficiency and acute or chronic renal disease, along with their complications has been less intensively investigated, however, there are firm data showing that selenium deficiency and renal failure increase the risk of both coronary artery disease and total mortality. Further studies revealed that selenium deficiency increases the risk of death due to infection in patients treated with hemodialysis through dysfunction of the immune system. However, there are no data whether the imbalance of selenium metabolism, especially selenium deficiency, could cause chronic kidney disease or renal failure. As far as results of selenium measurements, there is convincing evidence that protein loss and renal replacement treatment reduce serum selenium levels. Despite some contradictory results obtained from various studies regarding selenium deficiency in chronic kidney diseases, it seems that selenium supplementation may be beneficial in many patients with severe or end-stage kidney disease including those treated with dialysis. PMID:24095914

  15. Chiral amino acid metabolomics for novel biomarker screening in the prognosis of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomonori; Hamase, Kenji; Miyoshi, Yurika; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Yasuda, Keiko; Mita, Masashi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids, the enantiomers of L-amino acids, are increasingly recognized as novel biomarkers. Although the amounts of D-amino acids are usually very trace in human, some of them have sporadically been detected in blood from patients with kidney diseases. This study examined whether multiple chiral amino acids would be associated with kidney functions, comorbidities, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by enantioselective analyses of all chiral amino acids with a micro-two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatograph (2D-HPLC)-based analytical platform. 16 out of 21 D-amino acids were detected in plasma from 108 CKD patients in a longitudinal cohort. The levels of D-Ser, D-Pro, and D-Asn were strongly associated with kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration ratio), the levels of D-Ala and D-Pro were associated with age, and the level of D-Asp and D-Pro were associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. D-Ser and D-Asn were significantly associated with the progression of CKD in mutually-adjusted Cox regression analyses; the risk of composite end point (developing to ESKD or death before ESKD) was elevated from 2.7- to 3.8-fold in those with higher levels of plasma D-Ser and D-Asn. These findings identified chiral amino acids as potential biomarkers in kidney diseases. PMID:27188851

  16. Chiral amino acid metabolomics for novel biomarker screening in the prognosis of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomonori; Hamase, Kenji; Miyoshi, Yurika; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Yasuda, Keiko; Mita, Masashi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids, the enantiomers of L-amino acids, are increasingly recognized as novel biomarkers. Although the amounts of D-amino acids are usually very trace in human, some of them have sporadically been detected in blood from patients with kidney diseases. This study examined whether multiple chiral amino acids would be associated with kidney functions, comorbidities, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by enantioselective analyses of all chiral amino acids with a micro-two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatograph (2D-HPLC)-based analytical platform. 16 out of 21 D-amino acids were detected in plasma from 108 CKD patients in a longitudinal cohort. The levels of D-Ser, D-Pro, and D-Asn were strongly associated with kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration ratio), the levels of D-Ala and D-Pro were associated with age, and the level of D-Asp and D-Pro were associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus. D-Ser and D-Asn were significantly associated with the progression of CKD in mutually-adjusted Cox regression analyses; the risk of composite end point (developing to ESKD or death before ESKD) was elevated from 2.7- to 3.8-fold in those with higher levels of plasma D-Ser and D-Asn. These findings identified chiral amino acids as potential biomarkers in kidney diseases. PMID:27188851

  17. Chronic trimethyltin chloride exposure and the development of kidney stones in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xuefeng; Wu, Xin; Sui, Gang; Gong, Zhihong; Yawson, Emmanuel; Wu, Banghua; Lai, Guanchao; Ruan, Xiaolin; Gao, Hongbin; Zhou, Feng; Su, Bing; Olson, James R.; Tang, Xiaojiang

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that occupational exposure to trimethyltin (TMT) is a risk factor for developing kidney stones. To further examine the association between TMT exposure and the formation of kidney stones, we conducted a 180-day animal study and exposed the randomly grouped Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats to TMT in the drinking water at doses of 0, 8.2, 32.8 and 131.3 μg kg−1 day−1. Transient behavioral changes were observed in the high-dose group during the first 2weeks of exposure. TMT exposure led to a significant dose-dependent inhibition of renal H+/K+-ATPase and an increase in urinary pH. In comparison to no kidney stones being identified in the control and the lowest dose group, 1 rat in the 32.8 μg kg−1 day−1 dose group and 3 out of 9 rats in the 131.3 μg kg−1 day−1 dose group were found to have stones in the kidney/urinary tract. Pathological analysis showed that more wide spread calcium disposition was observed in kidneys of rats with TMT exposure compared with the rats in the control group. However, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis found that the kidney stones were mainly composed of struvite with the formula: NH4MgPO4 6H2O, while calcium-containing components were also detected. Together, this study further demonstrates through animal studies that chronic exposure to a relatively low level of TMT induces nephrotoxicity and increases the risk for developing kidney stones. PMID:25224689

  18. Changes in Pre- and Post-Exercise Gene Expression among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Dawn K.; Campbell, Latoya E.; Weil, Jennifer; Kaplan, Bruce; Clarkson, Marie; Finlayson, Jean; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Chakkera, Harini A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Decreased insulin sensitivity blunts the normal increase in gene expression from skeletal muscle after exercise. In addition, chronic inflammation decreases insulin sensitivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an inflammatory state. How CKD and, subsequently, kidney transplantation affects skeletal muscle gene expression after exercise are unknown. Methods Study cohort: non-diabetic male/female 4/1, age 52±2 years, with end-stage CKD who underwent successful kidney transplantation. The following were measured both pre-transplant and post-transplant and compared to normals: Inflammatory markers, euglycemic insulin clamp studies determine insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle biopsies performed before and within 30 minutes after an acute exercise protocol. Microarray analyses were performed on the skeletal muscle using the 4x44K Whole Human Genome Microarrays. Since nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in T cell activation and calcineurin inhibitors are mainstay immunosuppression, calcineurin/NFAT pathway gene expression was compared at rest and after exercise. Log transformation was performed to prevent skewing of data and regression analyses comparing measures pre- and post-transplant performed. Result Markers of inflammation significantly improved post-transplantation. Insulin infusion raised glucose disposal slightly lower post-transplant compared to pre-transplant, but not significantly, thus concluding differences in insulin sensitivity were similar. The overall pattern of gene expression in response to exercise was reduced both pre-and post-transplant compared to healthy volunteers. Although significant changes were observed among NFAT/Calcineurin gene at rest and after exercise in normal cohort, there were no significant differences comparing NFAT/calcineurin pathway gene expression pre- and post-transplant. Conclusions Despite an improvement in serum inflammatory markers, no significant differences in glucose

  19. [Radiographic manifestations in teeth and jaws in chronic kidney insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Bedani, P L; Romano, C

    1996-10-01

    Forty-five patients affected with chronic renal failure (29 men and 16 women; mean age: 47.8 years), treated with hemodialysis for 4 to 245 months (mean: 66.9 months) were examined with panoramic and skeletal radiographs-the latter of the skull, hands, shoulders and clavicles, pelvis and spine. The control group (45 subjects with no renal diseases) was examined only with panoramic radiography. Dental and skeletal radio-graphs were given an 0-6 score and then compared to assess a possible relationship between skeletal and dental changes at radiography. Twenty-six dialysis patients (57.7%) had radiographic abnormalities in the maxillary bones-i.e., osteoporosis (100% of patients), focal osteosclerosis adjacent to the roots (11.5%), lamina dura reduction or loss (26.9%), calcifications of soft tissues or salivary glands (15.3%) and brown tumors (7.6%). In the teeth of dialysis patients, the dental pulp chamber was narrowed in 11.1% and hypercementosis of the roots was observed in 4.5%. Radiographic abnormalities in the hand, shoulder and pelvis were depicted in 51.1% of dialysis patients-in 86.9% of them with maxillary lesions. In the control group, 15.5% had mandibular bone lesions-i.e., osteopenia, cortex reduction at the mandibular angles and cyst-like lesions -but the evidence of caries and periodontal disease did not differ from that in the dialysis group. The diagnosis and follow-up of dialysis patients are currently made with serum biochemistry, radiography and histology. The purpose of skeletal radiology is to monitor the progression or regression of musculoskeletal abnormalities. Panoramic radiography might be useful in monitoring renal osteodystrophy, especially to assess the response to therapy-i.e., parathyroidectomy, calcium or vitamin-D therapy and renal transplant. PMID:9045243

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Often Unrecognized among Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: The REGARDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, William M.; Newsome, Britt B.; McClure, Leslie A.; Cushman, Mary; Howard, George; Audhya, Paul; Abramson, Jerome L.; Warnock, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with kidney disease are at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and CHD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Awareness of CKD may potentially influence diagnostic decisions, life-style changes and pharmacologic interventions targeted at modifiable CHD risk factors. We describe here the degree to which persons with CHD are aware of their CKD. Methods The Reasons for Geographical and Racial Difference in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study, a population-based sample of US residents aged 45 and older. We included in our analyses 28,112 REGARDS participants recruited as of June 2007. We estimated GFR (eGFR) using the MDRD equation, defined CKD as a GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and ascertained awareness of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease through self-report. We used the odds ratio to compare the association between awareness of kidney disease, as measured by GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, among individuals with and without self-reported CHD by both the presence of CKD and the severity of impaired kidney function. Results Coronary heart disease was reported by 3,803 (14.1%) of subjects, and 11.3% of subjects had CKD by eGFR. Among all individuals with a GFR <60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2, 9.6% reported having been told by a physician that they had kidney disease. Among those with CHD and CKD, 5.0% were aware of their CKD compared to 2.0% in those without CHD [OR (95% CI) = 2.57 (2.08, 3.28)]. This difference persisted after controlling for the level of kidney function [aOR (95% CI) = 1.87 (1.43, 2.41)]. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of CKD and a low prevalence of awareness of kidney disease among older adults in the US population with or without coronary heart disease. These findings support recent recommendations that patients with cardiovascular disease be systematically screened for and educated about CKD. PMID:18663284

  1. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, Vincent A.; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D.; De Grauw, Wim J.C.; Vervoort, Gerald M.M.; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C.J.; Braspenning, Jozé C.C.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Aim To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Design and setting Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). Method CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Results Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Conclusion Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Key pointsQuality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved.In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal

  2. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part I. Ultrasonic measurement of renal size and analysis of renal ultrasonotomograms].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonograms of 546 kidneys were obtained in 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Dialysed kidneys could be detected in 529 of the 546 kidneys (96.9%) by ultrasonic examination. The ultrasonic diagnoses on dialysed kidneys were contracted kidney in 313 kidneys (59.2%) and acquired cystic disease of the kidney in 107 kidneys (20.2%). Ultrasonic measurement of the size of kidney (length and thickness) revealed that the kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure were much smaller than normal ones. But the kidneys in patients undergoing dialysis for more than 8 years gradually increased in size with incidence of acquired renal cysts. The kidneys in patients with diabetic nephropathy were greater in length and thickness than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. Sonographic features of dialysed kidneys were unclear renal imaging, unidentified central echoes, cortico-medulla + border and increased parenchymal echogenicity. Irregularity of the renal contour had a tendency to increase in number with incidence of cysts in long-term dialysis patients. The ultrasonograms of the kidneys with diabetic nephropathy showed fewer changes than normal ones. No major complication of the kidney was detected in the present study. However, two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. We believe that regular screening of the kidneys by ultrasonic examination is mandatory in patients on chronic dialysis for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232408

  3. Inflammatory Cytokines, Endothelial Function, and Chronic Allograft Vasculopathy in Children: An Investigation of the Donor and Recipient Vasculature After Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fenton, M; Simmonds, J; Shah, V; Brogan, P; Klein, N; Deanfield, J; Burch, M

    2016-05-01

    Chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV) limits the lifespan of pediatric heart transplant recipients. We investigated blood markers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and damage to both the native and transplanted vasculature in children after heart transplantation. Serum samples were taken from pediatric heart transplant recipients for markers of inflammation and endothelial activation. The systemic vasculature was investigated using brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation and carotid artery intima-medial hyperplasia. CAV was investigated using intravascular ultrasound. Mean intima-media thickness (mIMT) > 0.5 mm was used to define significant CAV. Forty-eight children (25 male) aged 8-18 years were enrolled in the study. Patients were a median (interquartile range) 4.1 (2.2-8.7) years after transplant. Patients had increased levels of circulating IL6 (3.86 [2.84-4.95] vs. 1.66 [1.22-2.63] p < 0.0001), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (539 [451-621] vs. 402 [342-487] p < 0.001), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 305 (247-346) vs. 256 (224-294) p = 0.002 and thrombomodulin (7.1 [5.5-8.1] vs. 3.57 [3.03-4.71] p < 0.0001) and decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, E selectin, and P selectin, compared with controls. The systemic vasculature was unaffected. Patients with severe CAV had raised serum von Willebrand factor and decreased serum thrombomodulin. Posttransplant thrombomodulin levels are elevated after transplant but significantly lower in those with mIMT > 0.5 mm. This suggests that subclinical inflammation is present and that natural anticoagulant/thrombomodulin activity is important after transplant. PMID:26614396

  4. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21633409

  5. Geographic information systems and chronic kidney disease: racial disparities, rural residence and forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rudolph A.; Hotchkiss, John R.; O’Hare, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of health and health care provision in the United States vary substantially across regions, and there is substantial regional heterogeneity in population density, age distribution, disease prevalence, race and ethnicity, poverty and the ability to access care. Geocoding and geographic information systems (GIS) are important tools to link patient or population location to information regarding these characteristics. In this review, we provide an overview of basic GIS concepts and provide examples to illustrate how GIS techniques have been applied to the study of kidney disease, and in particular to understanding the interplay between race, poverty, rural residence and the planning of renal services for this population. The interplay of socioeconomic status and renal disease outcomes remains an important area for investigation and recent publications have explored this relationship utilizing GIS techniques to incorporate measures of socioeconomic status and racial composition of neighborhoods. In addition, there are many potential challenges in providing care to rural patients with chronic kidney disease including long travel times and sparse renal services such as transplant and dialysis centers. Geospatially fluent analytic approaches can also inform system level analyses of health care systems and these approaches can be applied to identify an optimal distribution of dialysis facilities. GIS analysis could help untangle the complex interplay between geography, socioeconomic status, and racial disparities in chronic kidney disease, and could inform policy decisions and resource allocation as the population ages and the prevalence of renal disease increases. PMID:23065915

  6. Histomorphometry of feline chronic kidney disease and correlation with markers of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Elliott, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in geriatric cats, but most cases have nonspecific renal lesions, and few studies have correlated these lesions with clinicopathological markers of renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions best correlated with renal function and likely mediators of disease progression in cats with chronic kidney disease. Cats were recruited through 2 first-opinion practices between 1992 and 2010. When postmortem examinations were authorized, renal tissues were preserved in formalin. Sections were evaluated by a pathologist masked to all clinicopathological data. They were scored semiquantitatively for the severity of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. Glomerular volume was measured using image analysis; the percentage of glomeruli that were obsolescent was recorded. Sections were assessed for hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis and tubular mineralization. Kidneys from 80 cats with plasma biochemical data from the last 2 months of life were included in the study. Multivariable linear regression (P < .05) was used to assess the association of lesions with clinicopathological data obtained close to death. Interstitial fibrosis was the lesion best correlated with the severity of azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and anemia. Proteinuria was associated with interstitial fibrosis and glomerular hypertrophy, whereas higher time-averaged systolic blood pressure was associated with glomerulosclerosis and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis. PMID:22773469

  7. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders. PMID:24152019

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  9. Effects of chronic kidney disease and uremia on hepatic drug metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Catherine K; Shen, Danny D; Thummel, Kenneth E; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of non-renally cleared drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease is often unpredictable. Some of this variability may be due to alterations in the expression and activity of extra renal drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, primarily localized in the liver and intestine. Studies conducted in rodent models of renal failure have shown decreased mRNA and protein expression of many members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) gene family and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) gene families of drug transporters. Uremic toxins interfere with transcriptional activation, cause downregulation of gene expression mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, and directly inhibit the activity of the cytochrome P450s and drug transporters. While much has been learned about the effects of kidney disease on non-renal drug disposition, important questions remain regarding the mechanisms of these effects, as well as the interplay between drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in the uremic milieu. In this review, we have highlighted the existing gaps in our knowledge and understanding of the impact of chronic kidney disease on non-renal drug clearance, and identified areas of opportunity for future research. PMID:24132209

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease in adults: Part II. Glomerular filtration rate, proteinuria, and other markers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Cynda Ann; Levey, Andrew S; Coresh, Josef; Levin, Adeera; Lau, Joseph; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2004-09-15

    The Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative of the National Kidney Foundation published clinical practice guidelines on chronic kidney disease in February 2002. Of the 15 guidelines, the first six are of greatest relevance to family physicians. Part II of this two-part review covers guidelines 4, 5, and 6. Glomerular filtration rate is the best overall indicator of kidney function. It is superior to the serum creatinine level, which varies with age, sex, and race and often does not reflect kidney function accurately. The glomerular filtration rate can be estimated using prediction equations that take into account the serum creatinine level and some or all of specific variables (age, sex, race, body size). In many patients, estimates of the glomerular filtration rate can replace 24-hour urine collections for creatinine clearance measurements. Urine dipsticks generally are acceptable for detecting proteinuria. To quantify proteinuria, the ratio of protein or albumin to creatinine in an untimed (spot) urine sample is an accurate alternative to measurement of protein excretion in a 24-hour urine collection. Patients with persistent proteinuria have chronic kidney disease. Other techniques for evaluating patients with chronic kidney disease include examination of urinary sediment, urine dipstick testing for red and white blood cells, and imaging studies of the kidneys (especially ultrasonography). These techniques also can help determine the underlying cause of chronic kidney disease. Family physicians should weigh the value of the National Kidney Foundation guidelines for their clinical practice based on the strength of evidence and perceived cost-effectiveness until additional evidence becomes available on the usefulness of the recommended quality indicators. PMID:15456118

  11. Intestinal adaptations in chronic kidney disease and the influence of gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Marguerite

    2014-09-01

    Studies have shown that compensatory adaptations in gastrointestinal oxalate transport can impact the amount of oxalate excreted by the kidney. Hyperoxaluria is a major risk factor in the formation of kidney stones, and oxalate is derived from both the diet and the liver metabolism of glyoxylate. Although the intestine generally absorbs oxalate from dietary sources and can contribute as much as 50% of urinary oxalate, enteric oxalate elimination plays a significant role when renal function is compromised. While the mechanistic basis for these changes in the direction of intestinal oxalate movements in chronic renal failure involves an upregulation of angiotensin II receptors in the large intestine, enteric secretion/excretion of oxalate can also occur by mechanisms that are independent of angiotensin II. Most notably, the commensal bacterium Oxalobacter sp. interacts with the host enterocyte and promotes the movement of oxalate from the blood into the lumen, resulting in the beneficial effect of significantly lowering urinary oxalate excretion. Changes in the passive permeability of the intestine, such as in steatorrhoea and following gastric bypass, also promote oxalate absorption and hyperoxaluria. In summary, this report highlights the two-way physiological signalling between the gut and the kidney, which may help to alleviate the consequences of certain kidney diseases. PMID:24951497

  12. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  13. Impact of chronic kidney disease on the natural history of alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Bernardo; Vidinha, Joana; Pêgo, Cátia; Correia, Hugo; Sousa, Tânia

    2012-01-01

    In alkaptonuria, deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its metabolites in the body, resulting in ochronosis. Reports of patients with alkaptonuria who have decreased kidney function are rare, but this seems to play an important role in the natural history of the disease. We describe a 68-year-old female with chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology who started peritoneal dialysis (PD) after 5 years of follow-up and who was diagnosed with alkaptonuria at this time. Progressive exacerbation of ochronotic manifestations had been noted during these last few years, as kidney function worsened. After PD initiation, the disease continued to progress, and death occurred after one year and a half, due to severe aortic stenosis-related complications. Her 70-year-old sister was evaluated and also diagnosed with alkaptonuria. She had no renal dysfunction. Higher HGA excretion and significantly milder ochronosis than that of her sister were found. We present two alkaptonuric sisters with similar comorbidities except for the presence of CKD, who turned out to have totally different evolutions of their disease. This report confirms that kidney dysfunction may be an important factor in determining the natural history of alkaptonuria. PMID:25874097

  14. Kidney-lung connections in acute and chronic diseases: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Luca; Santoro, Domenico; Cernaro, Valeria; Buemi, Michele; Lacquaniti, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Lung and kidney functions are intimately related in both health and disease. The regulation of acid-base equilibrium, modification of partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration, and the control of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis all closely depend on renal and pulmonary activities. These interactions begin in fetal age and are often responsible for the genesis and progression of diseases. In gestational age, urine is a fundamental component of the amniotic fluid, acting on pulmonary maturation and growth. Moreover, in the first trimester of pregnancy, kidney is the main source of proline, contributing to collagen synthesis and lung parenchyma maturation. Pathologically speaking, the kidneys could become damaged by mediators of inflammation or immuno-mediated factors related to a primary lung pathology or, on the contrary, it could be the renal disease that determines a consecutive pulmonary damage. Furthermore, non immunological mechanisms are frequently involved in renal and pulmonary diseases, as observed in chronic pathologies such as sleep apnea syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, progressive renal disease and hemodialysis. Kidney damage has also been related to mechanical ventilation. The aim of this review is to describe pulmonary-renal interactions and their related pathologies, underscoring the need for a close collaboration between intensivists, pneumologists and nephrologists. PMID:26940339

  15. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  16. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of a murine model of chronic kidney disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsing-Wen; Guo, Hengchang; Andrews, Peter M.; Anderson, Erik; Chen, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is characterized by a progressive loss in renal function over time. Pathology can provide valuable insights into the progression of CKD by analyzing the status of glomeruli and the uriniferous tubules over time. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new procedure that can analyze the microscopic structure of the kidney in a non-invasive manner. This is especially important because there are significant artifacts associated with excision biopsies and immersion fixation procedures. Recently, we have shown that OCT can provide real time images of kidney microstructure and Doppler OCT (DOCT) can image glomerular renal blood flow in vivo without administrating exogenous contrast agents. In this study, we used OCT to evaluate CKD in a model induced by intravenous Adriamycin injection into Munich-Wistar rats. We evaluated tubular density and tubular diameter from OCT images at several post- Adriamycin induction time points and compared them with conventional light microscopic histological imaging. Proteinurea and serum creatinine were used as physiological markers of the extent of CKD. Preliminary OCT results revealed changes in tubular density due to tubular necrosis and interstitial fibrosis within the first 4 weeks following Adriamycin injection. From week 4 to 8 after Adriamycin induction, changes in tubular density and diameter occurred due to both tubular loss and tubular dilation. The results suggest OCT can provide additional information about kidney histopathology in CKD. DOCT revealed reduced blood flow in some glomeruli probably as a consequence of focal glomerularsclerosis.

  17. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is associated with risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Case-Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) share common risk factors. However, there is limited information about COPD and CKD. This is case-cohort study was carried out using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to evaluate the correlation between COPD and CKD. We identified cases aged older than 40 years who had an inpatient hospitalization with a first-time COPD diagnosis between 1998 and 2008. Control were selected from hospitalized patients without COPD or CKD and were matched according to age, gender, and year of admission at a 2:1 ratio. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association of CKD and COPD. The overall incidence of CKD was higher in the COPD group (470.9 per 104 person-years) than in the non-COPD group (287.52 per 104 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio of case was 1.61 (P < 0.0001) times that of control. COPD was found to be associated with kidney disease from our follow-up. To detect CKD early, early diagnosis of CKD in patients with COPD and prompt initiation of monitoring and treatment are imperative. PMID:27166152

  18. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III–V, and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III–V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III–V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in

  19. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III-V, and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Karam, Boutros; Faddoul, Geovani; Douaihy, Youssef El; Yacoub, Harout; Baydoun, Hassan; Boumitri, Christine; Barakat, Iskandar; Saifan, Chadi; El-Charabaty, Elie; Sayegh, Suzanne El

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are three times more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) and suffer from increased morbidity and higher mortality. Traditional and unique risk factors are prevalent and constitute challenges for the standard of care. However, CKD patients have been largely excluded from clinical trials and little evidence is available to guide evidence-based treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD. Our objective was to assess whether a difference exists in the management of MI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) among patients with normal kidney function, CKD stage III-V, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on patients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital for the diagnosis of MI between January 2005 and December 2012. Patients were assigned to one of three groups according to their kidney function: Data collected on the medical management and the use of statins, platelet inhibitors, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers were compared among the three cohorts, as well as medical interventions including: catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) when indicated. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions between nominal variables. Binary logistic analysis was used in order to determine associations between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years) were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III-V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9%) (P<0.001). CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078) in binary

  20. Evaluation of Kidney Disease Education on Clinical Outcomes and Knowledge of Self-Management Behaviors of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Enworom, Chinyere D; Tabi, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health problem in United States. Providing kidney disease education (KDE) is an effective and integral part of CKD management. This two-part non-experimental study retrospectively evaluated clinical outcomes of participants of a Medicare Kidney Disease Education (KDE) program and prospectively evaluated kidney disease knowledge of survey participants from the general population of patients with CKD. Results showed that participants of a KDE program demonstrated slower decline in GFR compared to non-participants (M = 18.3 mL/min/1.73m2, SD = 8.3 mL/min/1.73m2 vs. M = 15.0 mL/min/1.73m2, SD = 6.1 mL/min/1.73m2). Providing KDE to individuals with CKD Stage 4 was associated with improved clinical outcomes. PMID:26462309

  1. Sudden cardiac death and chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, L; Rivera, R; Barbera, V; Bellasi, A; Cozzolino, M; Russo, D; De Pascalis, A; Banerjee, D; Floccari, F; Ronco, C

    2016-08-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients demonstrate higher rates of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity; and increased incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) with declining kidney failure. Coronary artery disease (CAD) associated risk factors are the major determinants of SCD in the general population. However, current evidence suggests that in CKD patients, traditional cardiovascular risk factors may play a lesser role. Complex relationships between CKD-specific risk factors, structural heart disease, and ventricular arrhythmias (VA) contribute to the high risk of SCD. In dialysis patients, the occurrence of VA and SCD could be exacerbated by electrolyte shifts, divalent ion abnormalities, sympathetic overactivity, inflammation and iron toxicity. As outcomes in CKD patients after cardiac arrest are poor, primary and secondary prevention of SCD and cardiac arrest could reduce cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:27174593

  2. New Pathogenic Concepts and Therapeutic Approaches to Oxidative Stress in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease inflammatory processes and stimulation of immune cells result in overproduction of free radicals. In combination with a reduced antioxidant capacity this causes oxidative stress. This review focuses on current pathogenic concepts of oxidative stress for the decline of kidney function and development of cardiovascular complications. We discuss the impact of mitochondrial alterations and dysfunction, a pathogenic role for hyperuricemia, and disturbances of vitamin D metabolism and signal transduction. Recent antioxidant therapy options including the use of vitamin D and pharmacologic therapies for hyperuricemia are discussed. Finally, we review some new therapy options in diabetic nephropathy including antidiabetic agents (noninsulin dependent), plant antioxidants, and food components as alternative antioxidant therapies. PMID:27429711

  3. A comparative study of chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats: induction of cyclooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akira; Mitani, Sawane; Sawa, Mariko; Mizukami, Keijiro; Fujiki, Makoto; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated whether renal cyclooxygenase (COX) induction is associated with the severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats. The collected kidneys were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. The immunoreactivities of COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated quantitatively, and the correlations to the plasma creatinine concentrations, glomerular size, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and interstitial cell infiltration were evaluated statistically. Immunoreactivities for COX-1 were heterogeneously observed in the medullary distal tubules and collecting ducts; no correlations with the severity of renal damage were detected. Immunoreactivities for COX-2 were heterogeneously observed in the macula densa (MD) regions. In dogs, the percentage of COX-2-positive MD was significantly correlated with the glomerular size. In cats, glomeruli with COX-2-positive MD had significantly higher sclerosis scores than those with COX-2-negative MD. In conclusion, renal COX-2 is induced in canine and feline CKD, especially in relation to the glomerular changes. PMID:22244709

  4. Perceptions regarding death and dying of individuals with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Molzahn, Anita; Sheilds, Laurene; Bruce, Anne; Stajduhar, Kelli I; Makaroff, Kara Schick; Beuthin, Rosanne; Shermak, Sheryl

    2012-01-01

    This research explores perceptions regarding death and dying among people with chronic kidney disease. The methodology for the study was narrative inquiry informed by social constructivism. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted on two occasions with 14 participants. The participants included 10 men and 4 women (mean age of 66) who were treated in a mid-size Canadian city. Four themes relating to death and dying emerged from the data: awareness of death as a consequence of kidney failure, close calls, contemplation of suicide and/or withdrawal from dialysis, and preparing for death while living life. From the findings, it appeared that participants were very aware of the risk of dying from their illness, experienced serious health crises, and planned for their deaths. They were comfortable in discussing death and dying and acknowledged withdrawal from dialysis as an option. PMID:22866359

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease in United States Hispanics: A Growing Public Health Problem

    PubMed Central

    Lora, Claudia M.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Kusek, John W.; Porter, Anna; Ricardo, Ana C.; Go, Alan S.; Lash, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Hispanics is higher than non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for kidney failure. Likely contributing factors to this burden of disease include diabetes and metabolic syndrome, both are common among Hispanics. Access to health care, quality of care, and barriers due to language, health literacy and acculturation may also play a role. Despite the importance of this public health problem, only limited data exist about Hispanics with CKD. We review the epidemiology of CKD in US Hispanics, identify the factors that may be responsible for this growing health problem, and suggest gaps in our understanding which are suitable for future investigation. PMID:20073150

  6. New Pathogenic Concepts and Therapeutic Approaches to Oxidative Stress in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio; Tapia, Edilia; Scholze, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease inflammatory processes and stimulation of immune cells result in overproduction of free radicals. In combination with a reduced antioxidant capacity this causes oxidative stress. This review focuses on current pathogenic concepts of oxidative stress for the decline of kidney function and development of cardiovascular complications. We discuss the impact of mitochondrial alterations and dysfunction, a pathogenic role for hyperuricemia, and disturbances of vitamin D metabolism and signal transduction. Recent antioxidant therapy options including the use of vitamin D and pharmacologic therapies for hyperuricemia are discussed. Finally, we review some new therapy options in diabetic nephropathy including antidiabetic agents (noninsulin dependent), plant antioxidants, and food components as alternative antioxidant therapies. PMID:27429711

  7. The epidemiology and outcome of acute renal failure and the impact on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Clay A; Schoolwerth, Anton C

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. Recent publications have highlighted changes in the epidemiology and improvement in mortality that was long thought to be static despite improvements in clinical care. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts, such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative, are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease. Two brief case reports are offered to help frame the context and clinical impact of this disorder, followed by a review of some of the recent literature that addresses these points. PMID:17150044

  8. Sociodemographic factors contribute to the depressive affect among African Americans with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Depression is common in end-stage renal disease and is associated with poor quality of life and higher mortality; however, little is known about depressive affect in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. To measure this in a risk group burdened with hypertension and kidney disease, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals at enrollment in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Cohort Study. Depressive affect was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory II and quality of life by the Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Beck Depression scores over 14 were deemed consistent with an increased depressive affect and linear regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with these scores. Among 628 subjects, 166 had scores over 14 but only 34 were prescribed antidepressants. The mean Beck Depression score of 11.0 varied with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from 10.7 (eGFR 50–60) to 16.0 (eGFR stage 5); however, there was no significant independent association between these. Unemployment, low income, and lower quality and satisfaction with life scale scores were independently and significantly associated with a higher Beck Depression score. Thus, our study shows that an increased depressive affect is highly prevalent in African Americans with chronic kidney disease, is infrequently treated with antidepressants, and is associated with poorer quality of life. Sociodemographic factors have especially strong associations with this increased depressive affect. Because this study was conducted in an African-American cohort, its findings may not be generalized to other ethnic groups. PMID:20200503

  9. Barriers to effective communication between veterans with chronic kidney disease and their healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Swati; Fischer, Michael J.; Gordon, Howard S.; Wadhwa, Anuradha; Popli, Subhash; Gordon, Elisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have insufficient knowledge about CKD, which is associated with poorer health outcomes. Effective patient–provider communication can improve CKD patients' knowledge, thereby augmenting their participation in self-care practices. However, barriers to addressing CKD patients' information needs have not been previously characterized. Methods Adults with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant were recruited from a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nephrology clinic. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted to assess patients' CKD information needs and demographic characteristics. A qualitative approach was used to analyze interview transcripts and identify themes pertaining to communication dynamics. Results Thirty-two patients participated. The mean age of participants was 63 years; most were male (94%) and non-Hispanic white (53%). CKD severity groups represented included CKD-3 (eGFR 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2; 34%), CKD-4 (eGFR 15–29 mL/min/1.73 m2; 25%), CKD-5 (eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2; 16%), end-stage kidney disease on dialysis (13%) and kidney transplant recipients (12%). Several key themes emerged about barriers to patient–provider communication based on patients' reported care at both VA and non-VA facilities, including patients perceived their role as a ‘listener’, reported limited CKD knowledge, did not understand physicians' explanations and were dissatisfied with the patient–provider relationship. Conclusions Several barriers to patient–provider communication prevent patients from meeting their information needs and perpetuate patient passivity. Future research should evaluate whether interventions that empower CKD patients to actively participate in their care increase knowledge and improve health outcomes. PMID:26613037

  10. Sociodemographic factors contribute to the depressive affect among African Americans with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Kimmel, Paul L; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A; Bruce, Marino A; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Lash, James P

    2010-06-01

    Depression is common in end-stage renal disease and is associated with poor quality of life and higher mortality; however, little is known about depressive affect in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. To measure this in a risk group burdened with hypertension and kidney disease, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals at enrollment in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension Cohort Study. Depressive affect was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory II and quality of life by the Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Beck Depression scores over 14 were deemed consistent with an increased depressive affect and linear regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with these scores. Among 628 subjects, 166 had scores over 14 but only 34 were prescribed antidepressants. The mean Beck Depression score of 11.0 varied with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from 10.7 (eGFR 50-60) to 16.0 (eGFR stage 5); however, there was no significant independent association between these. Unemployment, low income, and lower quality and satisfaction with life scale scores were independently and significantly associated with a higher Beck Depression score. Thus, our study shows that an increased depressive affect is highly prevalent in African Americans with chronic kidney disease, is infrequently treated with antidepressants, and is associated with poorer quality of life. Sociodemographic factors have especially strong associations with this increased depressive affect. Because this study was conducted in an African-American cohort, its findings may not be generalized to other ethnic groups. PMID:20200503

  11. HLA-E(⁎)01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Pelardy, Mathieu; Loundou, Anderson; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Picard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E(⁎)01:01 and HLA-E(⁎)01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E(⁎)01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E(⁎)01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016-12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  12. HLA-E⁎01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E⁎01:01 and HLA-E⁎01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E⁎01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E⁎01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016–12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  13. Persistence and compliance with newly initiated antihypertensive drug treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Viet Thanh; Moisan, Jocelyne; Kröger, Edeltraut; Langlois, Serge; Grégoire, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease initiating an antihypertensive drug (AH) treatment must persist and comply with it to slow disease progression and benefit from the reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objectives This study evaluates the persistence and compliance with AH treatment and identifies the associated factors among chronic kidney disease patients who initiated AH treatment. Methods A population-based cohort study using Quebec administrative data was conducted. Patients who still take any AH 1 year after initiation were considered persistent. Of these patients, those who had ≥80% of days covered with an AH in the year after initiation were considered compliant. Factors associated with persistence and compliance were identified using a modified Poisson regression. Results Of the 7,119 eligible patients, 78.8% were persistent, 87.7% of whom were compliant with their AH treatment. Compared with patients on diuretic monotherapy, those who initially used angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor monotherapy, angiotensin II receptor blocker monotherapy, calcium channel blocker monotherapy, β-blocker monotherapy, or multidrug therapy were more likely to be persistent. In contrast, individuals who visited their physicians ≥17 times were less likely to be persistent than those who visited between 0 and 8 times. The patients who were more likely to be compliant had initially used an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, β-blocker, calcium channel blocker, or multitherapy as opposed to a diuretic. Conclusion A year after initiating AH treatment, nearly a third of chronic kidney disease patients were either not taking an AH or had not been compliant. Factors associated with persistence and compliance could help identify patients who need help in managing their AH treatment. PMID:27382260

  14. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome due to tumoral calcinosis in a patient with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Baek, Dongjin; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jeon, Sanghoon; Lee, Kihwa; Jung, Jaewook; Joo, Hyunchul; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Yonghan; Choi, Young-gyun

    2014-01-01

    Tumoral calcinosis is a rare syndrome characterized by massive subcutaneous soft tissue deposits of calcium phosphate near the large joints. It is more prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis. A 57-year-old woman was referred to our pain clinic with the complaint of severe pain in the left buttock and lateral hip. The patient had been suffering from chronic kidney disease for 10 years and had been undergoing peritoneal dialysis over the past 5 years. The patient's symptom was initially suspected to be of lumbar origin at the L5 level and a left L5 transforaminal epidural block was performed, but without success. Re-evaluation of the physical examination revealed severe tenderness over the left greater trochanter and piriformis muscle. On ultrasonographic evaluation, multiple mass-like lesions in the left buttock were observed. About 30 mL of fluid was aspirated from the cystic lesions, followed by 30 mL mixture of 0.08% levobupivacaine and triamcinolone 40 mg injected into the bursa under ultrasound guidance, which brought pain relief. Trochanteric bursitis was thought of as the cause of the symptoms. The patient was diagnosed with tumoral calcinosis based on the past medical history, simple plain radiographs, and hip magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We diagnosed a case of greater trochanteric pain syndrome due to tumoral calcinosis related to chronic kidney disease in a patient whose symptoms had initially been considered to be radiating leg pain caused by lumbar spinal disease. We report our experience of symptomatic improvement following the repeated ultrasound-guided aspiration of calcific fluid and the injection of a mixture of local anesthetic and steroid. PMID:25415793

  15. Understanding by Older Patients of Dialysis and Conservative Management for Chronic Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Okamoto, Ikumi; Leydon, Geraldine M.; Murtagh, Fliss E.M.; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults with chronic kidney disease stage 5 may be offered a choice between dialysis and conservative management. Few studies have explored patients’ reasons for choosing conservative management and none have compared the views of those who have chosen different treatments across renal units. Study Design Qualitative study with semistructured interviews. Settings & Participants Patients 75 years or older recruited from 9 renal units. Units were chosen to reflect variation in the scale of delivery of conservative management. Methodology Semistructured interviews audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Analytical Approach Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results 42 interviews were completed, 4 to 6 per renal unit. Patients were sampled from those receiving dialysis, those preparing for dialysis, and those choosing conservative management. 14 patients in each group were interviewed. Patients who had chosen different treatments held varying beliefs about what dialysis could offer. The information that patients reported receiving from clinical staff differed between units. Patients from units with a more established conservative management pathway were more aware of conservative management, less often believed that dialysis would guarantee longevity, and more often had discussed the future with staff. Some patients receiving conservative management reported that they would have dialysis if they became unwell in the future, indicating the conditional nature of their decision. Limitations Recruitment of older adults with frailty and comorbid conditions was difficult and therefore transferability of findings to this population is limited. Conclusions Older adults with chronic kidney disease stage 5 who have chosen different treatment options have contrasting beliefs about the likely outcomes of dialysis for those who are influenced by information provided by renal units. Supporting renal staff in discussing conservative management as a valid

  16. Prevalence of and risk factors for chronic kidney disease in rural Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Julie K.; Tobey, Matthew; Stevens, Lesley A.; Johnson, Sarah; Stringham, Peter; Cohen, Bruce; Brooks, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Mostly anecdotal reports describe a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in northwestern Nicaragua, predominantly among younger men, resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. The true prevalence, nature and aetiology of kidney disease in this region remain unknown. Methods. We performed a population-based prevalence study in Quezalguaque, Nicaragua to assess the frequency of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, and compared the prevalence of reduced eGFR in Quezalguaque with the USA using the NHANES 1999–2006 data. We also conducted an embedded case–control study in a subset of participants to assess kidney disease risk factors. Results. From 1882 eligible households, 771 individuals from 300 households participated in the prevalence study, 98 (13%) of whom had reduced eGFR. Reduced eGFR was more common among older participants, men and participants living at lower altitudes. Among 18–29-year-old participants, 2.6% had reduced eGFR, and among 30–41-year-old participants, 7.4% had reduced eGFR; this compares with 0.2% and 0.8%, respectively, in NHANES. No individuals in these age groups were diabetic. Among cases, only 27% had dipstick proteinuria of 1+ or greater, compared with 7% of controls. Haematuria did not significantly differ between cases and controls (24% versus 18%). In age- and sex-adjusted models, hypertension and residence at lower altitude were independently associated with reduced eGFR, while occupational history was not associated with reduced eGFR. Conclusions. Kidney disease appears common in residents of Quezalguaque, Nicaragua, particularly in younger men, with features most consistent with tubulointerstitial disease. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of kidney disease in this region. PMID:20615905

  17. Is routine hospital episode data sufficient for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease? A comparison study with laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lynn M; Denadai, Lucas; Black, Corri; Fluck, Nicholas; Prescott, Gordon; Simpson, William; Wilde, Katie; Marks, Angharad

    2016-06-01

    Internationally, investment in the availability of routine health care data for improving health, health surveillance and health care is increasing. We assessed the validity of hospital episode data for identifying individuals with chronic kidney disease compared to biochemistry data in a large population-based cohort, the Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II (n = 70,435). Grampian Laboratory Outcomes, Morbidity and Mortality Study-II links hospital episode data to biochemistry data for all adults in a health region with impaired kidney function and random samples of individuals with normal and unmeasured kidney function in 2003. We compared identification of individuals with chronic kidney disease by hospital episode data (based on International Classification of Diseases-10 codes) to the reference standard of biochemistry data (at least two estimated glomerular filtration rates <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) at least 90 days apart). Hospital episode data, compared to biochemistry data, identified a lower prevalence of chronic kidney disease and had low sensitivity (<10%) but high specificity (>97%). Using routine health care data from multiple sources offers the best opportunity to identify individuals with chronic kidney disease. PMID:25552482

  18. Relationships of race and ethnicity to progression of kidney dysfunction and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Alberto

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is much higher for blacks, Native Americans, and Asians than for whites. The incidence of kidney disease is also higher for populations of Hispanic ethnicity. ESRD attributed to diabetes (ESRD-DM), hypertension (ESRD-HT), and glomerulonephritis (ESRD-GN), in this order of frequency, are the major categories of ESRD in the United States for all race/ethnic groups. By using the incidence rates of ESRD, during the period from 1997 through 2000, and with whites as reference, the highest rate ratio (RR) was observed for ESRD-HT in blacks (RR = 5.96), ESRD-DM in Native Americans (RR = 5.11), and ESRD-GN in Asians (RR=2.20). The data suggest that the excess of ESRD observed for racial/ethnic minorities may be reduced by interventions aimed at prevention/control of hypertension and diabetes. The data suggest that before developing ESRD, patients with chronic renal failure from minority groups have to face more barriers to receive high-quality health care. This may explain why they see nephrologists later and are less likely to receive renal transplantation at initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). Improvements in quality of care after initiating RRT may explain the lower mortality and higher scores in heath-related quality of life observed for patients from racial/ethnic minorities. PMID:14730535

  19. Uremic Toxins – Novel Arrhythmogenic Factor in Chronic Kidney Disease – Related Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Chen, Yi-Ann; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen; Lin, Yung-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a high prevalence of AF, and uremic toxins are an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases associated with CKD. Uremic toxins can produce pro-fibrotic, pro-hypertrophic, and pro-inflammatory effects on cardiac tissues and enhance oxidative stress or neurohormonal phenomena of cardiovascular injury, which are recognized as arrhythmogenic factors of AF. This article reviews the clinical, molecular, and electrophysiological data of uremic toxins in CKD considered to induce AF through multiple mechanisms on structural and electrical remodeling of the cardiovascular system. PMID:27274165

  20. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy. PMID:27475662

  1. [Chronic kidney disease associated with Poems syndrome: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    POEMS syndrome is characterized by Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal protein and Skin changes. We report a woman with the syndrome, who had peripheral polyneuropathy, osteosclerotic myeloma, monoclonal IgA elevation, hypothyroidism, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, hyperprolactinemia, adrenal insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, thyroid and parotid enlargement, Castleman’s disease, papilledema, stiff and hyperpigmented skin, white nails, clubbing, ascites and chronic diarrhea. She had also a nephropathy characterized by microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, renal insufficiency and a unilateral kidney retraction. She was treated with melphalan and prednisone, achieving remission of the disease and nephropathy. She survived twelve years and died due to a myocardial infarction 20 years after POEMS diagnosis. PMID:27401385

  2. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum in a parapneumonic effusion in a chronic kidney disease patient on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Gnanasoundran, Vanitha; Fernando, Edwin M; Kumar, Senthil; Kumar, Raj; Valavan, Thiruma; Mohan, Chandra; Mohammed, Noor; Prasad, Srinivasa

    2014-10-01

    Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is an uncommon human pathogen, which is an inhabitant of soil and water. It should be included in the list of suspected nosocomial infections, especially in patients with immunocompromised status. C. meningosepticum infections are not common but are clinically important because the organism is naturally resistant to multiple antibiotics. We report a case where the bacterium was isolated from the pleural fluid from a chronic kidney disease patient on hemodialysis, who developed pneumonia with complicated parapneumonic effusion. To the best of our knowedge, this is the first case where C. meningosepticum is isolated from the pleural effusion, from India. PMID:24698165

  3. Advancing chronic kidney disease care: new imperatives for recognition and intervention.

    PubMed

    Szromba, Charlotte; Thies, Mary Ann; Ossman, Sherry Smith

    2002-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects over 6.2 million people in the U.S. and most commonly results from diabetes and/or hypertension. Patients with CKD have an increased risk of anemia and hypertension. Anemia occurs early in CKD and can be effectively treated with epoetin alfa. Hypertension can be managed with lifestyle modifications and medications. Nurses play a vital role in managing these patients by providing early CKD/anemia screening and intervention, education, patient monitoring, and support for patients and caregivers. PMID:12596604

  4. Apoptosis and expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector molecules in renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Falk, M C

    1999-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) mediated apoptosis is thought to play a major role in the rejection of renal allografts following transplantation, however, the CTL effector mechanism that is primarily responsible for immunological rejection is unknown. The two major effector pathways of CTL killing which lead to apoptosis involve the Fas/Fas ligand (Fas L) lytic pathway, and the perforin/granzyme degranulation pathway. The expression of CTL effector molecules which influence these pathways include Fas, Fas L and TiA-1 (cytotoxic granule protein). This study has investigated apoptosis by in situ terminal deoxytransferase-catalysed DNA nick end labelling (TUNEL), and the expression of CTL effector molecules by immunohistochemistry, in renal allograft biopsies obtained from patients following kidney transplantation. Renal biopsies were classified into three histological groups; acute cellular rejection, chronic rejection, or no rejection. The extent of T-cell infiltration of renal tissues was assessed by immunohistochemical staining with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. Numerous TUNEL positive cells were detected in all transplant biopsies examined; these consisted mainly of renal tubular cells and infiltrating cells, with some TUNEL positive cells also detected in the glomeruli. In the case of normal kidney tissue, renal cells also stained positive for TUNEL but there was no lymphocytic infiltration. There was significantly more T-cell infiltration observed in acute rejection biopsies compared to the no rejection biopsies. In the case of Fas L expression, there was little expression in all three biopsy groups, apart from one case of chronic rejection. Conversely, although there were no significant differences in TiA-1 expression between the three biopsy groups, TiA-1 expression was more prominent in acute rejection biopsies. Furthermore, Fas expression was significantly decreased in acute rejection biopsies when compared to those of chronic and no rejection in which Fas

  5. High Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children: A Guide for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  6. [Using the health literacy concept to promote self-management in a chronic kidney disease patient].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-Hui; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2014-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must learn and use self-management skills to control their disease and delay disease progression. Comprehension of instructions is thus critical to integrating self-management principles into daily life. In this case report, the client had difficulty implementing the behavioral changes necessary to control diet and blood sugar due to the lack of proper and sufficient information. The authors applied health literacy concepts to assess the client's knowledge and skills related to disease control and then provided health teaching at a level appropriate to the client's health literacy level. This individualized care enhanced the client's confidence and motivation to implement self-care activities. Healthcare professionals should help patients overcome barriers to reading and verbal communication to help low-health-literacy patients successfully self-manage their chronic disease. Clients may thus learn to report their symptoms clearly and accurately. PMID:24519350

  7. [Consensus document on treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Artola, Sara; Górriz, José L; Menéndez, Edelmiro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly prevalent chronic diseases that represent a significant public health problem and require multidisciplinary management. T2DM is the main cause of CKD in our setting and it is also a major comorbidity of non-diabetic nephropathy. Patients with diabetes and renal failure represent a special risk group as they have higher morbidity and mortality and are at a higher risk of hypoglycaemia than diabetic individuals with normal renal function. Treatment of T2DM in patients with CKD is controversial because of the scarcity of evidence available. This consensus document aims to facilitate the appropriate selection and dosage of anti-diabetic drugs as well as establishing glycaemic control safety targets in patients with CKD. PMID:24611186

  8. Could physical exercise help modulate the gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Esgalhado, Marta; Borges, Natália A; Mafra, Denise

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have several metabolic disorders caused by chronic oxidative stress and inflammation. The imbalance of gut microbiota has been identified as a factor that may contribute to the development of these disorders, which can promote cardiovascular disease in CKD patients. Among several strategies to modulate gut microbiota, physical exercise could represent a new nonpharmacological approach. Although exercise can reduce cardiovascular risk in CKD patients through its beneficial effects on oxidative stress and inflammation, there are no available data regarding the relationship between exercise and modulation of gut microbiota in CKD patients. This review is intended to provide a brief overview of the hypothesis regarding gut microbiota modulation through physical exercise, with a particular emphasis on CKD. PMID:27159232

  9. Pharmacological targeting of actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization ameliorates chronic kidney disease in diverse animal models

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Mario; Teng, Beina; Gu, Changkyu; Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Kasaikina, Marina; Pham, Vincent A.; Hanke, Nils; Rong, Song; Gueler, Faikah; Schroder, Patricia; Tossidou, Irini; Park, Joon-Keun; Staggs, Lynne; Haller, Hermann; Erschow, Sergej; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Wei, Changli; Chen, Chuang; Tardi, Nicholas; Hakroush, Samy; Selig, Martin K.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Merscher, Sandra; Reiser, Jochen; Sever, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in podocytes represents a common pathway in the pathogenesis of proteinuria across a spectrum of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The GTPase dynamin has been implicated in the maintenance of cellular architecture in podocytes through its direct interaction with actin. Furthermore, the propensity of dynamin to oligomerize into higher-order structures in an actin-dependent manner and to crosslink actin microfilaments into higher order structures have been correlated with increased actin polymerization and global organization of the actin cytoskeleton in the cell. We found that use of the small molecule Bis-T-23, which promotes actin-dependent dynamin oligomerization and thus increased actin polymerization in injured podocytes, was sufficient to improve renal health in diverse models of both transient kidney disease and of CKD. In particular, administration of Bis-T-23 in these renal disease models restored the normal ultrastructure of podocyte foot processes, lowered proteinuria, lowered collagen IV deposits in the mesangial matrix, diminished mesangial matrix expansion and extended lifespan. These results further establish that alterations in the actin cytoskeleton of kidney podocytes is a common hallmark of CKD, while also underscoring the significant regenerative potential of injured glomeruli and that targeting the oligomerization cycle of dynamin represents an attractive potential therapeutic target to treat CKD. PMID:25962121

  10. Proteomics in chronic kidney disease: The issues clinical nephrologists need an answer for.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Ortiz, Alberto; Vanholder, Raymond; El Nahas, Meguid

    2011-06-01

    A growing number of patients are recognised to have chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, only a minority will progress to end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis or transplantation. Currently available diagnostic and staging tools frequently fail to identify those at higher risk of progression or death. Furthermore within specific disease entities there are shortcomings in the prediction of the need for therapeutic interventions or the response to different forms of therapy. Kidney and urine proteomic biomarkers are considered as promising diagnostic tools to predict CKD progression early in diabetic nephropathy, facilitating timely and selective intervention that may reduce the related health-care expenditures. However, independent groups have not validated these findings and the technique is not currently available for routine clinical care. Furthermore, there are gaps in our understanding of predictors of progression or need for therapy in non-diabetic CKD. Presumably, a combination of tissue and urine biomarkers will be more informative than individual markers. This review identifies clinical questions in need of an answer, summarises current information on proteomic biomarkers and CKD, and describes the European Kidney and Urine Proteomics initiative that has been launched to carry out a clinical study aimed at identifying urinary proteomic biomarkers distinguishing between fast and slow progressors among patients with biopsy-proven primary glomerulopathies. PMID:21538916