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Sample records for chronic kidney allograft

  1. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  2. Erythropoietin, but not the correction of anemia alone, protects from chronic kidney allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Cassis, Paola; Gallon, Lorenzo; Benigni, Ariela; Mister, Marilena; Pezzotta, Anna; Solini, Samantha; Gagliardini, Elena; Cugini, Daniela; Abbate, Mauro; Aiello, Sistiana; Rocchetta, Federica; Scudeletti, Pierangela; Perico, Norberto; Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Anemia can contribute to chronic allograft injury by limiting oxygen delivery to tissues, particularly in the tubulointerstitium. To determine mechanisms by which erythropoietin (EPO) prevents chronic allograft injury we utilized a rat model of full MHC-mismatched kidney transplantation (Wistar Furth donor and Lewis recipients) with removal of the native kidneys. EPO treatment entirely corrected post-transplant anemia. Control rats developed progressive proteinuria and graft dysfunction, tubulointerstitial damage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and glomerulosclerosis, all prevented by EPO. Normalization of post-transplant hemoglobin levels by blood transfusions, however, had no impact on chronic allograft injury, indicating that EPO-mediated graft protection went beyond the correction of anemia. Compared to syngeneic grafts, control allografts had loss of peritubular capillaries, higher tubular apoptosis, tubular and glomerular oxidative injury, and reduced expression of podocyte nephrin; all prevented by EPO treatment. The effects of EPO were associated with preservation of intragraft expression of angiogenic factors, upregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor p-Akt in tubuli, and increased expression of Bcl-2. Inhibition of p-Akt by Wortmannin partially antagonized the effect of EPO on allograft injury and tubular apoptosis, and prevented EPO-induced Bcl-2 upregulation. Thus non-erythropoietic derivatives of EPO may be useful to prevent chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:22318420

  3. Relationship between European Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in Patients with Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-SOUSA, María Angeles; TAMAYO, Eduardo; GUZMÁN-FULGENCIO, María; FERNÁNDEZ-RODRÍGUEZ, Amanda; HEREDIA-RODRIGUEZ, María; GARCÍA-ÁLVAREZ, Mónica; BERMEJO-MARTIN, Jesús F; PINEDA-TENOR, Daniel; RUIZ-GRANADO, Patricia; ALVAREZ-FUENTE, Elisa; GÓMEZ-SANCHEZ, Esther; GÓMEZ-HERRERAS, José I; RESINO, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA variants may contribute to differences in mitochondrial function, leading to an altered immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and the development of chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with kidney transplant. A retrospective observational study was carried out on 261 patients who received kidney transplant (114 had stable transplant and 147 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction). DNA samples were genotyped for 14 mtDNA polymorphisms by using Sequenom's MassARRAY platform (San Diego, CA, USA). Only European white patients within the N macro-cluster were included. Patients with haplogroups V (odds ratio (OR)=0.32; p=0.037) and J (OR=0.36; p=0.038) showed lower odds for developing CRAD than patients with haplogroup H. After adjusting for the most significant variables, haplogroups V and J tended to statistical significance (p=0.091 and p=0.067 respectively). This is a preliminary study in which mtDNA haplogroups seem to be implicated in susceptibility or protection for developing chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:25170295

  4. Increase of Th17 Cell Phenotype in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Cho, Mi-La; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the association of Th17 cell phenotype with chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). We compared the expression of Th17 cell phenotype in KTRs with chronic allograft dysfunction group (CAD, n = 52) with four control groups (long-term stable KTRs (LTS, n = 67), early stable KTRs (ES, n = 28), end stage renal disease (ESRD, n = 45), and healthy control (HC, n = 26). We also performed in vitro study using human proximal renal tubular epithelial cell line (HPRTEpiC) to evaluate the effect of IL-17 on human renal tubular epithelial cells. The CAD group showed increased percentage of Th17 cells out of CD4+ T cells and also increased proportion of IL-17 producing cells out of effector memory T cells or out of CCR4+CCR6+/CD4+ T cells compared to the LTS group and other control groups. Also, the serum level of IL-17, IL-33, and RAGE, and the expression of IL-1beta, RAGE, and HMGB1 mRNA showed an increase in the CAD group compared to the LTS group. In vitro study revealed that IL-17 increased production of IL-6 and IL-8 and up-regulated profibrotic gene expression such as ACTA-2 and CTGF in HPRTEpiC in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that IL-17 has a role in the development of renal tubular cell injury. The results of our study may suggest that increase of Th17 cell phenotype could be a marker for the chronic allograft injury; hence there is a need to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools targeting the Th17 cells pathway. PMID:26717145

  5. Application of Label-free Quantitative Peptidomics for the Identification of Urinary Biomarkers of Kidney Chronic Allograft Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luis F.; Campistol, Josep M.; Alcolea, Maria P.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Sol-González, Amandaé; Cutillas, Pedro R.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of quantitative proteomics opens new opportunities in biomedical and clinical research. Although quantitative proteomics methods based on stable isotope labeling are in general preferred for biomolecular research, biomarker discovery is a case example of a biomedical problem that may be better addressed by using label-free MS techniques. As a proof of concept of this paradigm, we report the use of label-free quantitative LC-MS to profile the urinary peptidome of kidney chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD). The aim was to identify predictive biomarkers that could be used to personalize immunosuppressive therapies for kidney transplant patients. We detected (by LC-M/MS) and quantified (by LC-MS) 6000 polypeptide ions in undigested urine specimens across 39 CAD patients and 32 control individuals. Although unsupervised hierarchical clustering differentiated between the groups when including all the identified peptides, specific peptides derived from uromodulin and kininogen were found to be significantly more abundant in control than in CAD patients and correctly identified the two groups. These peptides are therefore potential biomarkers that might be used for the diagnosis of CAD. In addition, ions at m/z 645.59 and m/z 642.61 were able to differentiate between patients with different forms of CAD with specificities and sensitivities of 90% in a training set and, significantly, of ∼70% in an independent validation set of samples. Interestingly low expression of uromodulin at m/z 638.03 coupled with high expression of m/z 642.61 diagnosed CAD in virtually all cases. Multiple reaction monitoring experiments further validated the results, illustrating the power of our label-free quantitative LC-MS approach for obtaining quantitative profiles of urinary polypeptides in a rapid, comprehensive, and precise fashion and for biomarker discovery. PMID:19357086

  6. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to

  7. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  8. Association between the presence of anti-HLA antibodies with acute rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy in the first year after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toresan, R; Manfro, R C; Proença, M C C; Veronese, F J V; Salim, P H; da Silva, D M; Ribeiro, A R; Edelweiss, M I A; Pegas, K L; Jobim, L F J

    2008-04-01

    The clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies following kidney transplantation has been a recent focus of research. Patients who present anti-HLA antibodies in the posttransplantation period have shown higher incidences of acute rejection episodes (ARE) and chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-HLA antibodies during the first year after kidney transplantation and their association with the occurrence of ARE and CAN. Eighty-eight kidney transplant recipients were evaluated for the presence of IgG anti-HLA antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAT-M and LAT-1240, One Lambda Inc, Calif, United States). Protocol kidney biopsies were performed in consenting patients. ARE and CAN were diagnosed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathological criteria. Anti-HLA antibodies were observed in 20 (22.7%) patients. At 1 year follow-up, 26.1% presented ARE and 51.2% developed CAN. Nine patients (45%) with antibodies developed ARE as opposed to 20.6% without antibodies and 64.7% developed CAN as opposed to 47.8% of those without antibodies. In the histological analysis, the anti-HLA antibodies were associated with Banff IIA ARE (P = .001) and Banff grade II CAN (P = .012). Routine posttransplantation search for antibodies may identify cases at higher risk for acute and chronic rejection, and perhaps help to tailor the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:18454996

  9. The Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gandul, C; Mueller, N J; Pascual, M; Manuel, O

    2015-12-01

    Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are a significant cause of morbidity and reduced allograft and patient survival; however, the influence of infection on the development of chronic allograft dysfunction has not been completely delineated. Some viral infections appear to affect allograft function by both inducing direct tissue damage and immunologically related injury, including acute rejection. In particular, this has been observed for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in all SOT recipients and for BK virus infection in kidney transplant recipients, for community-acquired respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients, and for hepatitis C virus in liver transplant recipients. The impact of bacterial and fungal infections is less clear, but bacterial urinary tract infections and respiratory tract colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus spp appear to be correlated with higher rates of chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney and lung transplant recipients, respectively. Evidence supports the beneficial effects of the use of antiviral prophylaxis for CMV in improving allograft function and survival in SOT recipients. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prospective interventional trials assessing the potential effects of preventive and therapeutic strategies against bacterial and fungal infection for reducing or delaying the development of chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:26474168

  10. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration. PMID:19384181

  11. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  12. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  13. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. ...

  14. Infectious Triggers of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Aric L

    2016-07-01

    Survival after lung transplantation is limited in large part due to the high incidence of chronic rejection, known as chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Pulmonary infections are a frequent complication in lung transplant recipients, due both to immunosuppressive medications and constant exposure of the lung allograft to the external environment via the airways. Infection is a recognized risk factor for the development of CLAD, and both acute infection and chronic lung allograft colonization with microorganisms increase the risk for CLAD. Acute infection by community acquired respiratory viruses, and the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are increasingly recognized as important risk factors for CLAD. Colonization by the fungus Aspergillus may also augment the risk of CLAD. Fostering this transition from healthy lung to CLAD in each of these infectious episodes is the persistence of an inflammatory lung allograft environment. PMID:27221821

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  16. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  17. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  18. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Intraparenchymal pseudo-aneurysms in kidney transplant Symptoms: Asymptomatic Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous renal biopsy Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. Case Report: We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. Conclusions: Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  19. Clinical Course and Outcomes of Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Vadym; Ksenofontova, Anna; Onishchenko, Eugene; Golubova, Tatyana; Kichatyi, Sergey; Zakharova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study is provided to increase the efficiency of the treatment of kidney transplant recipients by predicting the development of the late allotransplant dysfunction. Methods. 330 patients who have lived for more than one year with functioning kidney allograft were evaluated. To predict the subsequent duration of the well-functioning of allotransplant the prognostic significance of 15 baseline clinical and sociodemographic characteristics on the results of the survey one year after transplantation was investigated. The result was considered to be positive in constructing the regression prognostication model if recipient lived more than 3 years from the time of transplantation. Results. It was established that more late start of renal allograft dysfunction after transplantation correlates with the more time it takes till complete loss of allograft function. Creatinine and hemoglobin blood concentration and the level of proteinuria one year after transplantation within created mathematical model allow predicting the loss of kidney transplant function three years after the transplantation. Patients with kidney transplant dysfunction are advised to renew the program hemodialysis upon reaching plasma creatinine concentration 0.5–0.7 mmol/L. Conclusion. Values of creatinine, hemoglobin, and proteinuria one year after transplantation can be used for subsequent prognostication of kidney transplant function. PMID:27478631

  20. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  1. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar

    2014-07-01

    Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908

  2. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy. PMID:26047788

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  4. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  5. Commercial kidney transplantation is an important risk factor in long-term kidney allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G V Ramesh; Ananth, Sailesh; Palepu, Sneha; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Transplant tourism, a form of transplant commercialization, has resulted in serious short-term adverse outcomes that explain reduced short-term kidney allograft survival. However, the nature of longer-term outcomes in commercial kidney transplant recipients is less clear. To study this further, we identified 69 Canadian commercial transplant recipients of 72 kidney allografts transplanted during 1998 to 2013 who reported to our transplant center for follow-up care. Their outcomes to 8 years post-transplant were compared with 702 domestic living donor and 827 deceased donor transplant recipients during this period using Kaplan-Meier survival plots and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Among many complications, notable specific events included hepatitis B or C seroconversion (7 patients), active hepatitis and/or fulminant hepatic failure (4 patients), pulmonary tuberculosis (2 patients), and a type A dissecting aortic aneurysm. Commercial transplantation was independently associated with significantly reduced death-censored kidney allograft survival (hazard ratio 3.69, 95% confidence interval 1.88-7.25) along with significantly delayed graft function and eGFR 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) or less at 3 months post-transplant. Thus, commercial transplantation represents an important risk factor for long-term kidney allograft loss. Concerted arguments and efforts using adverse recipient outcomes among the main premises are still required in order to eradicate transplant commercialization. PMID:27083285

  6. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page Content What ... pharmacist and provider need to know about your medicine and supplement use Your kidneys do not filter ...

  8. The Effect of Renin-angiotensin System Inhibitors on Kidney Allograft Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Mao, Michael A.; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Sathick, Insara J. J.; Erickson, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors in patients with chronic kidney disease, and especially in diabetic kidney disease, has been shown to provide renoprotective effects and slow progression to end-stage renal disease. However, this protective effect in kidney transplant patient populations is unclear. Aim: The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of RAS inhibitors on kidney allograft survival. Materials and Methods: A literature search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed from inception through February 2016. Studies that reported relative risks or hazard ratios comparing the risks of renal graft loss in renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors vs. controls were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results: Five studies (3 RCTs and 2 cohort studies) with 20024 kidney transplant patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled RR of allograft failure in recipients who received RAS inhibitors was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.45–1.21). When meta-analysis was limited only to RCTs, the pooled RR of allograft failure in patients using RAS inhibitors was 0.59 (95%: CI 0.20–1.69). The risk for mortality (RR: 1.13 [95% CI: 0.62–2.07]) in patients using RAS inhibitors compared to controls was not significantly reduced. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated insignificant reduced risks of renal graft loss among renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors. Future studies assessing the potential benefits of RAS inhibitors on allograft survival in specific kidney transplant patient populations are needed. PMID:27583237

  9. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  10. Chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of chronic kidney disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26030647

  11. Emerging role of B cells in chronic allograft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Robert B.; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Farris, Alton B.; Minnei, Francesca; Collins, A. Bernard; Smith, R. Neal

    2015-01-01

    B cells have many possible mechanisms by which they can affect allograft survival, including antigen presentation, cytokine production, immune regulation, and differentiation into alloantibody-producing plasma cells. This report reviews the last mechanism, which the authors regard as most critical for the long-term survival of allografts, namely, the promotion of chronic rejection by alloantibodies. Chronic humoral rejection characteristically arises late after transplantation and causes transplant glomerulopathy, multilamination of peritubular capillary basement membranes, and C4d deposition in PTCs and glomeruli. Circulating antidonor human leukocyte antigen class II antibodies are commonly detected and may precede the development of graft injury. Prognosis is poor, especially when recognized after graft dysfunction has developed. Improved detection and treatment are critically needed for this common cause of late graft loss. PMID:21116310

  12. Pretransplant Immune- and Apoptosis-Related Gene Expression Is Associated with Kidney Allograft Function

    PubMed Central

    Kamińska, Dorota; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Chudoba, Paweł; Mazanowska, Oktawia; Banasik, Mirosław; Żabinska, Marcelina; Boratyńska, Maria; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Gomółkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplant candidates present immune dysregulation, caused by chronic uremia. The aim of the study was to investigate whether pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression of immune factors affects clinical outcome of renal allograft recipients. Methods. In a prospective study, we analyzed pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression in87 renal transplant candidates with real-time PCR on custom-designed low density arrays (TaqMan). Results. Immediate posttransplant graft function (14-day GFR) was influenced negatively by TGFB1 (P = 0.039) and positively by IL-2 gene expression (P = 0.040). Pretransplant blood mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes (CASP3, FAS, and IL-18) and Th1-derived cytokine gene IFNG correlated positively with short- (6-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.027, FAS: P = 0.021, and IFNG: P = 0.029) and long-term graft function (24-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.003, FAS: P = 0.033, IL-18: P = 0.044, and IFNG: P = 0.04). Conclusion. Lowered pretransplant Th1-derived cytokine and apoptosis-related gene expressions were a hallmark of subsequent worse kidney function but not of acute rejection rate. The pretransplant IFNG and CASP3 and FAS and IL-18 genes' expression in the recipients' peripheral blood is the possible candidate for novel biomarker of short- and long-term allograft function. PMID:27382192

  13. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:24700874

  14. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. CASE REPORT We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. CONCLUSIONS Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  15. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  16. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney.

  17. Nitration and Inactivation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Chronic Rejection of Human Renal Allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan-Crow, L. A.; Crow, John P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Thompson, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Inflammatory processes in chronic rejection remain a serious clinical problem in organ transplantation. Activated cellular infiltrate produces high levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide. These reactive oxygen species interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify proteins to form 3-nitrotyrosine. We identified enhanced immunostaining for nitrotyrosine localized to tubular epithelium of chronically rejected human renal allografts. Western blot analysis of rejected tissue demonstrated that tyrosine nitration was restricted to a few specific polypeptides. Immunoprecipitation and amino acid sequencing techniques identified manganese superoxide dismutase, the major antioxidant enzyme in mitochondria, as one of the targets of tyrosine nitration. Total manganese superoxide dismutase protein was increased in rejected kidney, particularly in the tubular epithelium; however, enzymatic activity was significantly decreased. Exposure of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent (IC50 = 10 μ M) decrease in enzymatic activity and concomitant increase in tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for peroxynitrite during development and progression of chronic rejection in human renal allografts. In addition, inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite may represent a general mechanism that progressively increases the production of peroxynitrite, leading to irreversible oxidative injury to mitochondria.

  18. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  19. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  20. Sequential cytokine dynamics in chronic rejection of rat renal allografts: roles for cytokines RANTES and MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K C; Azuma, H; Tilney, N L

    1995-01-01

    Chronic rejection, the most important cause of long-term graft failure, is thought to result from both alloantigen-dependent and -independent factors. To examine these influences, cytokine dynamics were assessed by semiquantitative competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR and by immunohistology in an established rat model of chronic rejection lf renal allografts. Isograft controls develop morphologic and immunohistologic changes that are similar to renal allograft changes, although quantitatively less intense and at a delayed speed; these are thought to occur secondary to antigen-independent events. Sequential cytokine expression was determined throughout the process. During an early reversible allograft rejection episode, both T-cell associated [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-2 receptor, IL-4, and interferon gamma] and macrophage (IL-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6) products were up-regulated despite transient immunosuppression. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) peaked at 2 weeks; intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) was maximally expressed at 6 weeks. Macrophage products such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) increased dramatically (to 10 times), presaging intense peak macrophage infiltration at 16 weeks. In contrast, in isografts, ICAM-1 peaked at 24 weeks. MCP-1 was maximally expressed at 52 weeks, commensurate with a progressive increase in infiltrating macrophages. Cytokine expression in the spleen of allograft and isograft recipients was insignificant. We conclude that chronic rejection of kidney allografts in rats is predominantly a local macrophage-dependent event with intense up-regulation of macrophage products such as MCP-1, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The cytokine expression in isografts emphasizes the contribution of antigen-independent events. The dynamics of RANTES expression between early and late phases of chronic rejection suggest a key role in mediating the events of the

  1. A Novel Therapy to Attenuate Acute Kidney Injury and Ischemic Allograft Damage after Allogenic Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gueler, Faikah; Shushakova, Nelli; Mengel, Michael; Hueper, Katja; Chen, Rongjun; Liu, Xiaokun; Park, Joon-Keun; Haller, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion contributes to the initial damage to allografts after kidney transplantation (ktx). In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tetrapeptide EA-230 (AQGV), might improve survival and attenuate loss of kidney function in a mouse model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. IRI was induced in male C57Bl/6N mice by transient bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 35 min. Treatment with EA-230 (20–50mg/kg twice daily i.p. for four consecutive days) was initiated 24 hours after IRI when acute kidney injury (AKI) was already established. The treatment resulted in markedly improved survival in a dose dependent manner. Acute tubular injury two days after IRI was diminished and tubular epithelial cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by EA-230 treatment. Furthermore, CTGF up-regulation, a marker of post-ischemic fibrosis, at four weeks after IRI was significantly less in EA-230 treated renal tissue. To learn more about these effects, we measured renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 28 hours after IRI. EA-230 improved both GFR and RBF significantly. Next, EA-230 treatment was tested in a model of ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. The recipients were treated with EA-230 (50 mg/kg) twice daily i.p. which improved renal function and allograft survival by attenuating ischemic allograft damage. In conclusion, EA-230 is a novel and promising therapeutic agent for treating acute kidney injury and preventing IRI-induced post-transplant ischemic allograft injury. Its beneficial effect is associated with improved renal perfusion after IRI and enhanced regeneration of tubular epithelial cells. PMID:25617900

  2. Frequency of HLA-G exon 8 polymorphisms and kidney allograft outcome in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Aghdaie, Mahdokht H; Azarpira, Negar; Kazemi, Kurosh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Darai, Masumeh; Malekhoseini, Seid Ali

    2011-06-01

    The 14-bp polymorphism in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene is associated with HLA-G mRNA stability and the patterns of alternative isoform splicing and may influence the functionality of the HLA-G molecule. HLA-G expression was related to allograft acceptance and fewer episodes of acute rejection during heart, kidney and liver-kidney transplantation. In order to determine a possible correlation between the 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and kidney allograft outcome in our population, genomic DNA was isolated from 144 patients who had received isolated kidney allografts. The recipients was divided into two groups, grafts presenting features of rejection group and a non-rejection group, and compared them with a control group of 100 healthy subjects. There was no significant difference in allelic frequencies of 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism between normal controls and kidney transplant patients. No significant difference was found between the RG and the NRG regarding the 14-bp genotypes and alleles. Therefore, additional studies with more sample size from other populations with analysis of other HLA-G polymorphisms are necessary to define this polymorphism as a valuable clinical marker. PMID:21107725

  3. Timing of Pregnancy After Kidney Transplantation and Risk of Allograft Failure.

    PubMed

    Rose, C; Gill, J; Zalunardo, N; Johnston, O; Mehrotra, A; Gill, J S

    2016-08-01

    The optimal timing of pregnancy after kidney transplantation remains uncertain. We determined the risk of allograft failure among women who became pregnant within the first 3 posttransplant years. Among 21 814 women aged 15-45 years who received a first kidney-only transplant between 1990 and 2010 captured in the United States Renal Data System, n = 729 pregnancies were identified using Medicare claims. The probability of allograft failure from any cause including death (ACGL) at 1, 3, and 5 years after pregnancy was 9.6%, 25.9%, and 36.6%. In multivariate analyses, pregnancy in the first posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of ACGL (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00, 1.40) and death censored graft loss (DCGL) (HR:1.25; 95% CI 1.04, 1.50), while pregnancy in the second posttransplant year was associated with an increased risk of DCGL (HR: 1.26; 95% CI 1.06, 1.50). Pregnancy in the third posttransplant year was not associated with an increased risk of ACGL or DCGL. These findings demonstrate a higher incidence of allograft failure after pregnancy than previously reported and that the increased risk of allograft failure extends to pregnancies in the second posttransplant year. PMID:26946063

  4. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  5. Raman-based detection of hydroxyethyl starch in kidney allograft biopsies as a potential marker of allograft quality in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Vuiblet, Vincent; Fere, Michael; Bankole, Ezechiel; Wynckel, Alain; Gobinet, Cyril; Birembaut, Philippe; Piot, Olivier; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In brain-dead donor resuscitation, hydroxyethyl starch (HES) use has been associated with presence of osmotic-nephrosis-like lesions in kidney transplant recipients. Our aim was to determine whether the presence of HES in protocol renal graft biopsies at three months (M3) after transplantation is associated with renal graft quality. According to the HES administered to the donor during the procurement procedure, two groups of patients were defined according graft exposition to HES: HES group, (N = 20) and control group (N = 6). Detection and relative quantification of HES was performed by Raman spectroscopy microimaging on M3 protocol renal graft biopsies. Statistical analyses were used to investigate the association between Raman data and graft characteristics. HES spectral signal was revealed negative in the control group, whereas it was positive in 40% of biopsies from the HES group. In the HES group, a stronger HES signal was associated with a lower risk of graft failure measured by the Kidney Donor Risk Index (KDRI) and was correlated with the allograft kidney function. Thus, HES accumulation in donor kidney, as probed by Raman biophotonic technique, is correlated with the quality of donor kidney and consequently the graft renal function and graft survival. PMID:27608775

  6. Urinary cell mRNA profiles predictive of human kidney allograft status.

    PubMed

    Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay K; Schwartz, Joseph E; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2014-03-01

    Kidney allograft status is currently characterized using the invasive percutaneous needle core biopsy procedure. The procedure has become safer over the years, but challenges and complications still exist including sampling error, interobserver variability, bleeding, arteriovenous fistula, graft loss, and even death. Because the most common type of acute rejection is distinguished by inflammatory cells exiting the intravascular compartment and gaining access to the renal tubular space, we reasoned that a kidney allograft may function as an in vivo flow cytometer and sort cells involved in rejection into urine. To test this idea, we developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for absolute quantification of mRNA and pre-amplification protocols to overcome the low RNA yield from urine. Here, we review our single center urinary cell mRNA profiling studies that led to the multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT-04) study and the discovery and validation of a 3-gene signature of 18S rRNA-normalized measures of CD3ε mRNA and IP-10 mRNA and 18S rRNA that is diagnostic and predictive of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft. We also review our development of a 4-gene signature of mRNAs for vimentin, NKCC2, E-cadherin, and 18S rRNA diagnostic of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA). PMID:24517436

  7. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bourier, Felix; Kühne, Louisa; Banas, Miriam C.; Rümmele, Petra; Wurm, Simone; Banas, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation. Results Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median) was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival. Conclusion The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis

  8. [Chronic kidney disease and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2016-03-01

    Abnormalities of mineral metabolism develop with decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is called as a CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The standard approach for management of CKD-MBD is to keep serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone in the reference range by dietary intervention and medications. It has been recently pointed out that starting the treatment from early CKD is important for suppressing CKD-MBD. PMID:26923973

  9. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases. PMID:27089331

  10. Campath, calcineurin inhibitor reduction and chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) study: background, rationale, and study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for patients with end-stage renal failure, but uncertainty remains about the best immunosuppression strategy. Long-term graft survival has not improved substantially, and one possible explanation is calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) nephrotoxicity. CNI exposure could be minimized by using more potent induction therapy or alternative maintenance therapy to remove CNIs completely. However, the safety and efficacy of such strategies are unknown. Methods/Design The Campath, Calcineurin inhibitor reduction and Chronic allograft nephropathy (3C) Study is a multicentre, open-label, randomized controlled trial with 852 participants which is addressing two important questions in kidney transplantation. The first question is whether a Campath (alemtuzumab)-based induction therapy strategy is superior to basiliximab-based therapy, and the second is whether, from 6 months after transplantation, a sirolimus-based maintenance therapy strategy is superior to tacrolimus-based therapy. Recruitment is complete, and follow-up will continue for around 5 years post-transplant. The primary endpoint for the induction therapy comparison is biopsy-proven acute rejection by 6 months, and the primary endpoint for the maintenance therapy comparison is change in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline to 2 years after transplantation. The study is sponsored by the University of Oxford and endorsed by the British Transplantation Society, and 18 centers for adult kidney transplant are participating. Discussion Late graft failure is a major issue for kidney-transplant recipients. If our hypothesis that minimizing CNI exposure with Campath-based induction therapy and/or an elective conversion to sirolimus-based maintenance therapy can improve long-term graft function and survival is correct, then patients should experience better graft function for longer. A positive outcome could change clinical practice in kidney transplantation. Trial

  11. Sterile leukocyturia is associated with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in kidney allograft protocol biopsies.

    PubMed

    Coelho, S; Ortíz, F; Gelpi, R; Koskinen, P; Porta, N; Bestard, O; Melilli, E; Taco, O; Torras, J; Honkanen, E; Grinyó, J M; Cruzado, J M

    2014-04-01

    Kidney allograft interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is associated with a poorer renal function and outcome. In the current clinical practice, an early diagnosis can only be provided by invasive tests. We aimed to investigate the association of sterile leukocyturia with Banff criteria histological findings in kidney allograft protocol biopsies. We studied 348 allograft biopsies from two different European countries performed at 8.5 + 3.5 months after transplantation. In these cases, the presence of sterile leukocyturia (Leuc+, n = 70) or no leukocyturia (Leuc-, n = 278) was analyzed and related to Banff elementary lesions. Only IF/TA was significantly different between Leuc+ and Leuc- groups. IF/TA was present in 85.7% of Leuc+ and 27.7% of Leuc- patients (p < 0.001). IF/TA patients had higher serum creatinine and presence of proteinuria (p < 0.05). Independent predictors of IF/TA were donor age, donor male sex, serum creatinine and Leuc+ (hazard ratio 18.2; 95% confidence interval, 8.1-40.7). The positive predictive value of leukocyturia for predicting IF/TA was 85.7% whereas the negative predictive value was 72.3%. These studies suggest that leukocyturia is a noninvasive and low-cost test to identify IF/TA. An early diagnosis may allow timely interventional measures directed to minimize its impact and improve graft outcome. PMID:24517324

  12. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  13. Case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in kidney allograft: Conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tienza, Antonio; Hevia, Mateo; Merino, Imanol; Velis, Jose Maria; Algarra, Ruben; Pascual, Juan Ignacio; Zudaire, Juan Javier; Robles, Jose Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an acute necrotizing infection with gas in the kidney and perinephric space that carries a bad prognosis. Apart from its predisposing clinical entities, diabetes mellitus and immune-incompetence are quite common in patients with this infection. We report a case of a 53-year-old kidney transplant recipient diabetic male, suffering from recurrent fever, abdominal pain and nausea episodes. Immediate broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered and percutaneous drainage was performed after the diagnosis. The bacteria involved were Stahpylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. After 4 weeks of antibiotic treatment and abscesses drainage, the case was resolved. Consecutives urine cultures and ultrasonographies confirm the complete resolution of the disease. We discuss the predisposing factors, clinical presentation and management. PMID:24839494

  14. CD14+CD16+ and CD14+CD163+ monocyte subpopulations in kidney allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monocytes represent a heterogeneous population of cells subdivided according to the expression level of membrane antigens. A pro-inflammatory (intermediate/nonclassical) subpopulation of monocytes is defined by expression of CD16. CD163 seems to be characteristically preferentially expressed by immunosuppressive monocytes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the distribution of monocyte subpopulations in 71 patients with kidney allograft transplantation. Results The phenotype was evaluated by flow cytometry in defined time points. The proportions of peripheral CD14+CD16+ monocytes were downregulated immediately after the kidney transplantation and basiliximab treatment partially attenuated this trend. The transient downregulation of the CD14+CD16+ subpopulation was adjusted to basal values in two months. The proportions of CD14+CD163+ monocytes were transiently upregulated early after the kidney transplantation and remained higher during the first month in most patients. In ATG treated patients, the expansion of CD14+CD163+ monocytes was delayed but their upregulation lasted longer. In vitro data showed the direct effect of ATG and methylprednisolone on expression of CD16 and CD163 molecules while basiliximab did not affect the phenotype of cultured monocytes. Conclusions We assume from our data that kidney allograft transplantation is associated with modulation of monocyte subpopulations (CD14+CD16+ and CD14+CD163+) partially affected by an immunosuppressive regime used. PMID:24499053

  15. Prolonged cold ischemia accelerates cellular and humoral chronic rejection in a rat model of kidney allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Solini, Samantha; Aiello, Sistiana; Cassis, Paola; Scudeletti, Pierangela; Azzollini, Nadia; Mister, Marilena; Rocchetta, Federica; Abbate, Mauro; Pereira, Rafael Luiz; Noris, Marina

    2012-03-01

    One of the leading causes of long-term kidney graft loss is chronic allograft injury (CAI), a pathological process triggered by alloantigen-dependent and alloantigen-independent factors. Alloantigen-independent factors, such as cold ischemia (CI) may amplify the recipient immune response against the graft. We investigated the impact of prolonged cold ischemia and the subsequent delayed graft function on CAI in a fully MHC-mismatched rat model of kidney allotransplantation. Prolonged CI was associated with anticipation of proteinuria onset and graft function deterioration (ischemia: 90d; no ischemia: 150d), more severe tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and glomerulosclerosis, and increased mortality rate (180d survival, ischemia: 0%; no ischemia: 67%). In ischemic allografts, T and B cells were detected very early and were organized in inflammatory clusters. Higher expression of BAFF-R and TACI within the ischemic allografts indicates that B cells are mature and activated. As a consequence of B cell activity, anti-donor antibodies, glomerular C4d and IgG deposition, important features of chronic humoral rejection, appeared earlier in ischemic than in non-ischemic allograft recipients. Thus, prolonged CI time plays a main role in CAI development by triggering acceleration of cellular and humoral reactions of chronic rejection. Limiting CI time should be considered as a main target in kidney transplantation. PMID:22239163

  16. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  17. Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  18. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... checks Your Kidneys and You Meetings Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  19. Angiogenesis and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing worldwide. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the importance of CKD as a risk factor in development of ESRD and in complicating cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been confirmed. In recent years, the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the progression of CKD has been studied, and the potential therapeutic effects on CKD of modulating these factors have been identified. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent pro-angiogenic factor, is involved in the development of the kidney, in maintenance of the glomerular capillary structure and filtration barrier, and in the renal repair process after injury. VEGF-A is also involved in the development of early diabetic nephropathy, demonstrated by the therapeutic effects of anti-VEGF-A antibody. Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 induces the maturation of newly formed blood vessels, and the therapeutic effects of Ang-1 in diabetic nephropathy have been described. In experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, the therapeutic effects of angiogenesis inhibitors, including angiostatin, endostatin and tumstatin peptides, the isocoumarin NM-3, and vasohibin-1, have been reported. Further analysis of the involvement of angiogenesis-related factors in the development of CKD is required. Determining the disease stage at which therapy is most effective and developing an effective drug delivery system targeting the kidney will be essential for pro-or anti-angiogenic strategies for patients with CKD. PMID:20687922

  20. Nephrology Update: Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmeela; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more than 1 in 10 individuals in the United States. The care of these patients must be managed by family physicians and nephrology subspecialists. The kidneys often are affected by systemic processes such as diabetes and hypertension, and optimal management of these conditions is critical to slow decline in renal function in CKD patients. These patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and statin therapy is recommended for adults with CKD who are at least age 50 years and not receiving dialysis. Patients with CKD and anemia can be treated with iron therapy and often with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent. Electrolyte abnormalities are managed with dietary changes and drugs. Sodium restriction and modification of dietary protein intake also may be needed. Consultation with a renal dietitian may be helpful. Because many drugs are metabolized by the kidneys, physicians should ensure that drug dosages are appropriate for the level of renal function. Early consultation with or referral to a nephrology subspecialist for patients with reduced renal function, resistant hypertension or electrolyte levels, and other conditions have been associated with improved outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:27163761

  1. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage. PMID:10080402

  2. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography to Evaluate Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats and Correlations between Time-Intensity Curve Parameters and Allograft Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Zexing; Xu, Yue; Zeng, Song; Zhang, Zijian; Xue, Wenrui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-07-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed changes in the hemodynamic characteristics of renal allografts at different stages in a rat chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) model as well as the relationship between hemodynamic parameters and renal allograft fibrosis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The experimental group used a CAN rat model (n = 30), and the control group used an orthotopic syngeneic renal transplant model (n = 30). After surgery, creatinine clearance rates were regularly monitored every 2 wk. The checking times were set at 4, 12 and 24 wk after surgery, which represent early, middle and late stage of CAN, respectively. At different stages of CAN, eight rats from each group were randomly selected for CEUS examination. Time-intensity curve (TIC) parameters, including rise time, peak intensity, mean transit time, area under the curve, wash-in slope, time-to-peak and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression; Vimentin expression; and chronic allograft damage index scores were evaluated by linear correlation analysis. Before the creatinine clearance rate showed significant abnormalities, the renal allografts in the experimental group had already presented pathologic changes associated with CAN. In the early stage after surgery, compared to the TIC curve of the control group, the experimental group showed increased rise time, mean transit time, area under the curve and time-to-peak, and decreased wash-in slope (p < 0.05). Chronic allograft damage index scores and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin proteins in renal allografts were correlated with TIC parameters (p < 0.05). Compared to creatinine clearance rate, CEUS can detect CAN at earlier stages. The correlations between TIC-related parameters and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin in renal allografts indicate that CEUS is a feasible way to assess the degree of renal allograft fibrosis quantitatively. PMID:27056611

  3. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Nowocin, A K; Meader, L; Edwards, L A; Smith, R A; Wong, W

    2016-04-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab')2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I-A(k) conjugated with the plant-derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti-I-A(k) gelonin immunotoxin depletes I-A(k) expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3(+) cells within donor grafts, diminished donor-specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor-type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient-orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  4. Immunotoxin Against a Donor MHC Class II Molecule Induces Indefinite Survival of Murine Kidney Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, K.; Nowocin, A. K.; Meader, L.; Edwards, L. A.; Smith, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Rejection of donor organs depends on the trafficking of donor passenger leukocytes to the secondary lymphoid organs of the recipient to elicit an immune response via the direct antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, the depletion of passenger leukocytes may be clinically applicable as a strategy to improve graft survival. Because major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II+ cells are most efficient at inducing immune responses, selective depletion of this population from donor grafts may dampen the alloimmune response and prolong graft survival. In a fully MHC mismatched mouse kidney allograft model, we describe the synthesis of an immunotoxin, consisting of the F(ab′)2 fragment of a monoclonal antibody against the donor MHC class II molecule I‐Ak conjugated with the plant‐derived ribosomal inactivating protein gelonin. This anti–I‐Ak gelonin immunotoxin depletes I‐Ak expressing cells specifically in vitro and in vivo. When given to recipients of kidney allografts, it resulted in indefinite graft survival with normal graft function, presence of Foxp3+ cells within donor grafts, diminished donor‐specific antibody formation, and delayed rejection of subsequent donor‐type skin grafts. Strategies aimed at the donor arm of the immune system using agents such as immunotoxins may be a useful adjuvant to existing recipient‐orientated immunosuppression. PMID:26799449

  5. Chronic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  6. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J G; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, H Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J E; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2010-05-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney disease (P = 5.0 x 10(-5) and P = 3.6 x 10(-4), respectively). Our findings provide insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:20383145

  7. Subclinical Rejection Phenotypes at 1 Year Post-Transplant and Outcome of Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Vernerey, Dewi; Tinel, Claire; Aubert, Olivier; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Rabant, Marion; Verine, Jérôme; Nochy, Dominique; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Martinez, Frank; Glotz, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Kidney allograft rejection can occur in clinically stable patients, but long-term significance is unknown. We determined whether early recognition of subclinical rejection has long-term consequences for kidney allograft survival in an observational prospective cohort study of 1307 consecutive nonselected patients who underwent ABO-compatible, complement-dependent cytotoxicity-negative crossmatch kidney transplantation in Paris (2000-2010). Participants underwent prospective screening biopsies at 1 year post-transplant, with concurrent evaluations of graft complement deposition and circulating anti-HLA antibodies. The main analysis included 1001 patients. Three distinct groups of patients were identified at the 1-year screening: 727 (73%) patients without rejection, 132 (13%) patients with subclinical T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), and 142 (14%) patients with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Patients with subclinical ABMR had the poorest graft survival at 8 years post-transplant (56%) compared with subclinical TCMR (88%) and nonrejection (90%) groups (P<0.001). In a multivariate Cox model, subclinical ABMR at 1 year was independently associated with a 3.5-fold increase in graft loss (95% confidence interval, 2.1 to 5.7) along with eGFR and proteinuria (P<0.001). Subclinical ABMR was associated with more rapid progression to transplant glomerulopathy. Of patients with subclinical TCMR at 1 year, only those who further developed de novo donor-specific antibodies and transplant glomerulopathy showed higher risk of graft loss compared with patients without rejection. Our findings suggest that subclinical TCMR and subclinical ABMR have distinct effects on long-term graft loss. Subclinical ABMR detected at the 1-year screening biopsy carries a prognostic value independent of initial donor-specific antibody status, previous immunologic events, current eGFR, and proteinuria. PMID:25556173

  8. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. RESULTS After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  9. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Material/Methods Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. Results After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. Conclusions Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  10. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  11. Urine Free Light Chains as a Novel Biomarker of Acute Kidney Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rubin; Li, Min; Chouhan, Kanwaljit K.; Simon, Eric E.; Hamm, L. Lee; Batuman, Vecihil

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated urine free light chains (FLC) as a potential biomarker for acute kidney allograft injury (AKAI). Methods Urine κ and λ FLC were compared with urine β-2 microglobulin (β2-M), RBP, KIM-1, NGAL and microalbuminuria (MAB) in biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (AR) and ATN. Healthy volunteers (Normal) and transplant recipients with normal allograft function (Control) were used as references. Results Compared to Control or Normal group (N=15), urine FLC, MAB and RBP were higher in ATN (N=29) and AR (N=41) groups (p<0.05). There was no difference in KIM-1, NGAL or β2-M between 4 groups. In AR group, urine κFLC demonstrated the highest predictive value with sensitivity of 95.12% and specificity of 87.5% (p<0.0001). Urine κFLC also performed best with a sensitivity of 96.55% and specificity of 93.33% (p<0.0001) in ATN group. The AUC by ROC analysis is greatest in urine RBP (100%) and FLC (99%), and lowest in KIM-1 (53.5%), then NGAL (71.5%) in AR group. The AUC is also greatest in urine FLC (100%) and RBP (99%), and lowest in urine KIM-1 (55.6%) and NGAL (69.9%) in ATN group. Conclusions Urine FLC appears sensitive for both AR and ATN, and it may be a novel AKAI biomarker. PMID:24304377

  12. [Troponins and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Barbera, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Alberto; Bellasi, Antonio; Cozzolino, Mario; De Pascalis, Antonio; Rivera, Rodolfo; Balducci, Alessandro; Russo, Domenico; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Coronary thrombosis was recognized since 19th century as clinical entity with bad outcomes; only in 1912 it was reported that acute myocardial infarction had to been distinguished from angina pectoris. First diagnostic test was electrocardiogram, while white blood cells count and erythrocytes sedimentation rate were the only available laboratory tests. Late in the 60s and 70s glutammic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyravate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were added to biomarkers pool to provide a diagnosis of myocardial infarction related to myocardial cells injury. Only in 1987 assays for cardiac troponin were developed to assess structural damage of myocardial cells and in 2010 high sensibility troponins first dosage kits became available. It is well known that the population with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than the general population. The use and interpretation of high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays have been particularly challenging in these patients with the majority having elevated levels at baseline. Aim of this review is to evaluate hs-cTn in patients with CKD for the diagnosis of AMI and for the prognostic significance of elevated levels in CKD patients without AMI. PMID:26252257

  13. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process. PMID:25315722

  14. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  15. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-01-01

    Twelve March 2015 will mark the 10th anniversary of World Kidney Day (WKD), an initiative of the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort ever mounted to raise awareness among decision-makers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. Each year WKD reminds us that kidney disease is common, harmful and treatable. The focus of WKD 2015 is on chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations. This article reviews the key links between poverty and CKD and the consequent implications for the prevention of kidney disease and the care of kidney patients in these populations. PMID:25713703

  16. Chronic kidney disease - pediatric risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Janchevska, Aleksandra; Emini, Nora; Sahpazova, Emilija; Gucev, Zoran; Polenakovic, Momir

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the progression of chronic kidney disease is an important issue for every pediatric nephrologist and pediatrician in order to implement appropriate measures to prevent wasting of renal function and the final consequence - end stage renal disease with the need for the dialysis and transplantation. Therefore it is important to know, treat or ameliorate the standard risk factors such as hypertension, proteinuria, anemia, hyperparathyroidism etc. In this review devoted to the World Kidney Day 2016 we will pay attention to the low birth parameters, obesity, hyperuricemia and smoking which emerged as particularly important risk factors for children and adolescent with chronic kidney disease. PMID:27442412

  17. Niacin and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Yutaka; Masuda, Masashi; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Tatsumi, Sawako; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasing problem worldwide. The number of end-stage renal disease patients requiring treatment by dialysis is estimated to be increasing by 10,000 patients per year in Japan. Furthermore, an estimated 13 million people are living with CKD in Japan. Various complications are associated with CKD, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than one-third of CKD patients die from CVD. Thus, prevention of CVD is a primary concern for the treatment of CKD patients. CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a serious complication that typically leads to CVD. Hyperphosphatemia is thought to be a central-risk factor for CKD-MBD. Therefore, managing hyperphosphatemia is crucial to prevent CKD-MBD and CVD. It is difficult to achieve the target serum phosphate level through dietary modifications alone in patients with hyperphosphatemia, because most foods contain phosphate. Thus, phosphate binders such as calcium carbonate are commonly prescribed to CKD patients with hyperphosphatemia, but these have undesirable side effects. Inhibition of intestinal phosphate transport activity has also been investigated as an alternative approach for controlling serum phosphate levels in CKD patients. Nicotinamide, which is the amide of niacin, can inhibit intestinal phosphate transport. Niacin and related compounds have also been developed as drugs for hyperlipidemia conditions, especially hypertriglyceridemia with low high-density lipoprotein. This type of dyslipidemia is frequently observed in CKD patients and is a modifiable risk factor for CVD. Thus, niacin and related compounds may have utility for the treatment of both hyperphosphatemia and dyslipidemia in CKD patients to prevent CVD. PMID:26598845

  18. Kidney Allograft Stone after Kidney Transplantation and its Association with Graft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee-Zavareh, M. S.; Ajudani, R.; Ramezani Binabaj, M.; Heydari, F.; Einollahi, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is said that renal transplantation lithiasis is rare. However, literature has some different frequencies in this field and most of the studies related to this issue are case reports. Also the exact effect of this complication on the graft survival rate is not clear. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of nephrolithiasis among kidney transplant recipients and evaluate its association with the graft survival. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study to determine the prevalence of renal stone among 574 kidney transplant patients aged ≥18 years who had undergone renal transplantation in Baqiyatallah Transplant Center between 1990 and 2010. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the effect of renal stone on the graft survival. Results: The mean±SD follow-up time was 55±53 months. Kidney stones were diagnosed in 31 (4.4%) of all 574 kidney transplants studied. Cox regression analysis revealed that nephrolithiasis after transplantation had no significant effects on the survival of the transplanted kidney (OR 1.04, CI: 0.708–1.54). Conclusion: For the first time, we showed that nephrolithiasis in recipients does not have a significant effect on the transplant survival. PMID:26306157

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines What You Need to Know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ... n n n Notes: For more information National Kidney Disease Education Program 1-866-4 KIDNEY (1-866- ...

  20. Monocytic Tissue Transglutaminase in a Rat Model for Reversible Acute Rejection and Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Padberg, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major risk factor for chronic allograft injury (CAI). Blood leukocytes interacting with allograft endothelial cells during acute rejection were suggested to contribute to the still enigmatic pathogenesis of CAI. We hypothesize that tissue transglutaminase (Tgm2), a multifunctional protein and established marker of M2 macrophages, is involved in acute and chronic graft rejection. We focus on leukocytes accumulating in blood vessels of rat renal allografts (Fischer-344 to Lewis), an established model for reversible acute rejection and CAI. Monocytes in graft blood vessels overexpress Tgm2 when acute rejection peaks on day 9 after transplantation. Concomitantly, caspase-3 is activated, suggesting that Tgm2 expression is linked to apoptosis. After resolution of acute rejection on day 42, leukocytic Tgm2 levels are lower and activated caspase-3 does not differ among isografts and allografts. Cystamine was applied for 4 weeks after transplantation to inhibit extracellular transglutaminase activity, which did, however, not reduce CAI in the long run. In conclusion, this is the first report on Tgm2 expression by monocytes in vivo. Tgm2 may be involved in leukocytic apoptosis and thus in reversion of acute rejection. However, our data do not support a role of extracellular transglutaminase activity as a factor triggering CAI during self-limiting acute rejection. PMID:26063971

  1. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to calcineurin inhibitors. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy with declining glomerular filtration rate (GFR), defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m(2)/min, steadily increasing serum creatinine and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kg bodyweight (BW), followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. Calcineurin inhibitors were reduced to 50% at the start of sirolimus and discontinued at median 7 days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five out of eight patients (p = 0.026), and only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean serum creatinine improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, or on time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, and serum lipids increased transiently. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy-proven chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:16712606

  2. Common Iliac Artery Thrombosis following Pelvic Surgery Resulting in Kidney Allograft Failure Successfully Treated by Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty with Balloon-Expandable Covered Stent

    PubMed Central

    Golla, Maheswara S.; Acharjee, Subasit; Jaber, Bertrand L.; Garcia, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who developed acute kidney allograft failure due to thrombotic occlusion of the common iliac artery after hysterectomy requiring emergent allograft rescue. She underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with endovascular balloon expandable covered stent graft placement in the right common iliac artery. Although there are a handful of case reports of acute limb ischemia secondary to acute common iliac artery thrombosis, this is the first case reported in the literature resulting in successful kidney allograft rescue following pelvic surgery. PMID:26355669

  3. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) mice were transplanted with complete MHC-mismatched A/J kidney grafts, and intragraft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5(-/-) and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35, whereas 65% of allografts in wild-type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts. PMID:27165816

  4. A single center's approach to discriminating donor versus host origin of renal neoplasia in the allograft kidney.

    PubMed

    Robin, Adam J; Cohen, Eric P; Chongkrairatanakul, Tepsiri; Saad, Ehad; Mackinnon, A Craig

    2016-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the allograft of kidney transplant recipient (KTR) patients is rare and may represent a de novo process arising from the transplanted organ or metastasis from a clinically undetectable host primary. Determination of host versus donor origin is important for staging and management. We report our experience utilizing Penta-C (PC) and Penta-D (PD) short-tandem repeat (STR) microsatellite analysis to discriminate between host and donor origin of RCC identified in renal allografts. We identified 5 KTR patients with RCC in the allograft kidney. The PC and PD microsatellite analysis was applied to tumor, host, and donor formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections and/or fresh blood leukocytes to identify the origin of the neoplastic cells. The PC and PD microsatellite alleles were robustly amplified in all samples. Each case showed one or more informative alleles indicating that the neoplastic cells originate from donor tissue. Allele frequency data indicate that by using both PC and PD markers, we will be able to discriminate between host and donor cell of origin in over 99% of cases. The PC and PD microsatellite analysis is a convenient, robust, and efficient strategy to determine donor versus host origin or RCC in transplant kidney specimens. PMID:27402221

  5. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  6. Molecular pathways of chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Bienaimé, Frank; Canaud, Guillaume; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Terzi, Fabiola

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is characterized by the progressive loss of functional nephrons. This loss means that the remaining nephrons are put under stress and are forced to adapt in order to maintain kidney function. Over the time, the strains imposed by these adaptations result in a vicious circle in which the loss of damaged nephrons results in the damage of the so far healthy nephrons. Hence, the rate of chronic kidney disease progression depends on the ability of the remaining nephrons to cope with stress. This article reviews the molecular pathways involved in the compensation and deterioration process after nephron reduction. In particular, we examine the role of mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)/serine-threonine protein kinase AKT, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and unfolded protein response pathways, as well as the pleiotropic function of Lipocalin 2. We also discuss the dual role played by some of these pathways in acute and chronic kidney disease. Finally, the relevance of these experimental finding to human chronic kidney disease is discussed. PMID:26972095

  7. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctly advise them. Moreover, in a more interconnected and globalized society, in which more and more Muslim patients live in the Western countries, this topic is of high interest also for the general practitioner. For this purpose, we carried out a systematic review, including also articles written in Arabic, Turkish, and Persian languages. Our main findings are that: recipients of kidney allograft can safely fast during Ramadan;evidences for safety in patients with nephrolithiasis and CKD are instead mixed and controversial. On the other hand,most studies have been carried out during Ramadan falling in cold seasons, and there is scarce information about Ramadan fasting in hot seasons. For these reasons, the findings may be not generalizable and therefore cautions should be taken and applied; the physicians should carefully monitor their patients during the fasting period with an adequate follow-up, in order to avoid any injurious effect. PMID:25364369

  8. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  9. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    MedlinePlus

    ... online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does it Mean for Me? Page Content ... My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  11. Tuberculosis-associated chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jobson Lopes; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) account for approximately 15-20% of TB cases in immunocompetent patients. The genitourinary system is the third most commonly affected site. We report the case of a 20-year-old man admitted with fever, chills, dry cough, right flank pain, and oliguria who developed renal function loss. The pyelogram evidenced silence of the right kidney, and the abdominal and pelvic magnetic resonance showed significant dilation of the right pyelocaliceal system and proximal ureter. Biopsies of renal cortex and retroperitoneal lymph nodes showed caseous granuloma consistent with TB. Treatment was started with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and the patient presented a favorable outcome but with non-dialytic chronic kidney disease. This case illustrates a case of chronic kidney disease secondary to TB in a young, otherwise healthy man. PMID:21633015

  12. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  13. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  14. Associations of Perfusate Biomarkers and Pump Parameters With Delayed Graft Function and Deceased Donor Kidney Allograft Function.

    PubMed

    Parikh, C R; Hall, I E; Bhangoo, R S; Ficek, J; Abt, P L; Thiessen-Philbrook, H; Lin, H; Bimali, M; Murray, P T; Rao, V; Schröppel, B; Doshi, M D; Weng, F L; Reese, P P

    2016-05-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) is increasingly used in deceased donor kidney transplantation, but controversy exists regarding the value of perfusion biomarkers and pump parameters for assessing organ quality. We prospectively determined associations between perfusate biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL], kidney injury molecule 1, IL-18 and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein [L-FABP]) and pump parameters (resistance and flow) with outcomes of delayed graft function (DGF) and 6-mo estimated GFR (eGFR). DGF occurred in 230 of 671 (34%) recipients. Only 1-h flow was inversely associated with DGF. Higher NGAL or L-FABP concentrations and increased resistance were inversely associated with 6-mo eGFR, whereas higher flow was associated with higher adjusted 6-mo eGFR. Discarded kidneys had consistently higher median resistance and lower median flow than transplanted kidneys, but median perfusate biomarker concentrations were either lower or not significantly different in discarded compared with transplanted kidneys. Notably, most recipients of transplanted kidneys with isolated "undesirable" biomarker levels or HMP parameters experienced acceptable 6-mo allograft function, suggesting these characteristics should not be used in isolation for discard decisions. Additional studies must confirm the utility of combining HMP measurements with other characteristics to assess kidney quality. PMID:26695524

  15. Non-immunologic predictors of chronic renal allograft failure: data from the United Network of Organ Sharing.

    PubMed

    Chertow, G M; Brenner, B M; Mackenzie, H S; Milford, E L

    1995-12-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience suggest that non-immunologic factors are important predictors of long-term renal allograft survival. It has been suggested that chronic allograft failure may in some cases by mediated by non-immunologic factors implicated in the pathobiology of other forms of progressive renal disease. Donor age, sex, and race may influence the "dose" of nephrons delivered in cadaveric renal transplantation. The United Network of Organ Sharing 1994 Public Use Data Tape was used to evaluate these and other risk factors in more than 31,000 recipients of cadaver allografts followed between 1987 and 1992. Female sex and African American race of the donor were important predictors of allograft failure. There was a markedly increased risk of allograft failure at both extremes of donor age. Recipients of large body size had accelerated graft loss. Stratified analyses suggested an interaction between donor and recipient race; nevertheless, all non-immunologic factors examined expressed independent associations with allograft survival. In sum, antigen-independent factors appear to be important determinants of allograft performance. Additional multivariable analyses are required to assess the relative importance of these factors compared with other known immunologic factors, such as HLA antigen mismatch. These findings may have important biomedical and health care policy implications. PMID:8587283

  16. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, G; Jha, V

    2015-05-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  17. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, G.; Jha, V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities. PMID:25760025

  18. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  19. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'. PMID:27334146

  20. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  1. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  2. Vitamin D in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yahn-Yir

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in both the pediatric and adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. CKD is characterized by dysregulation of vitamin D and mineral metabolism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism and its management puts patients with CKD at increased cardiovascular risk. Emergence of experimental and some clinical data suggesting beneficial effects of vitamin D on proteinuria, blood pressure, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes has pushed it to the center stage of CKD research. Pediatric data on vitamin D dysregulation and its consequences are still in its infancy. Ongoing prospective studies such as Chronic Kidney disease in Children (CKiD) and the Cardiovascular Comorbidity in Children with CKD (4 C) should help to delineate the evolution of disturbances in mineral metabolism and its adverse effects on growth, CKD progression and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:22544696

  3. [Chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic kidney chronic kidney disease, an often underestimated complication of diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is a serious complication which can evolve into severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), or even end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It impacts on the patient's quality of life and that of their family and significantly increases the cost of care. The development and progression of chronic kidney disease is prevented by strictly controlling blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risk factors as well as monitoring the markers of kidney disease. In the case of CKD, treatment may need to be adapted. PMID:26036123

  4. Intestinal Microbiota-Kidney Cross Talk in Acute Kidney Injury and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sanjeev; Martina-Lingua, Maria N.; Bandapalle, Samatha; Pluznick, Jennifer; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A.; Peterson, Daniel A.; Rabb, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) involves multiple and overlapping immunological, biochemical, and hemodynamic mechanisms that modulate the effects of both the initial insult and the subsequent repair. Limited but recent experimental data have revealed that the intestinal microbiota significantly affects outcomes in AKI. Additional evidence shows significant changes in the intestinal microbiota in chronic kidney disease patients and in experimental AKI. In this minireview, we discuss the current status of the effect of intestinal microbiota on kidney diseases, the immunomodulatory effects of intestinal microbiota, and the potential mechanisms by which microbiota can modify kidney diseases and vice versa. We also propose future studies to clarify the role of intestinal microbiota in kidney diseases and to explore how the modification of gut microbiota may be a potential therapeutic tool. PMID:25343838

  5. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90 mm Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  6. Soluble Urokinase Receptor and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S.; Sever, Sanja; Ko, Yi-An; Trachtman, Howard; Awad, Mosaab; Wadhwani, Shikha; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Wei, Changli; Hotton, Anna L.; French, Audrey L.; Sperling, Laurence S.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Reiser, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. METHODS We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was −0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with −4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m2) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2, the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. CONCLUSIONS An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation

  7. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Juncos, Luis A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. PMID:24600241

  8. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  9. Phosphorus: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    Phosphorus Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program What Is Phosphorus? Phosphorus is a mineral that helps keep your bones healthy. It also helps ...

  10. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  11. Role of autophagy in chronic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), a common pathway of various glomerular diseases, which carries great morbidity and mortality to people. CKD is characterized by progressive kidney fibrosis and remodeling. CKD is also associated with the depletion of glomerular and tubular cells. Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. It plays an important role in both normal and disease states, including immunity, inflammation, and adaptation to stress. Evidence has indicated that impaired autophagic activity is involved in the development of CKD. Here, we review the progress in our understanding of the role of autophagy in the development and progression of CKD. Targeting the autophagic signaling pathways may be a therapeutic strategy for CKD. PMID:26885176

  12. Mechanisms of progression of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in all age groups, including children. Regardless of the underlying cause, CKD is characterized by progressive scarring that ultimately affects all structures of the kidney. The relentless progression of CKD is postulated to result from a self-perpetuating vicious cycle of fibrosis activated after initial injury. We will review possible mechanisms of progressive renal damage, including systemic and glomerular hypertension, various cytokines and growth factors, with special emphasis on the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), podocyte loss, dyslipidemia and proteinuria. We will also discuss possible specific mechanisms of tubulointerstitial fibrosis that are not dependent on glomerulosclerosis, and possible underlying predispositions for CKD, such as genetic factors and low nephron number. PMID:17647026

  13. Arterial disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Chue, Colin D; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N

    2013-03-01

    End stage renal disease is associated with a very high risk of premature cardiovascular death and morbidity. Early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with an increased frequency of cardiovascular events and is a common but poorly recognised and undertreated risk factor. Cardiovascular disease in CKD can be attributed to two distinct but overlapping pathological processes, namely atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. While the risk of athero-thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction is elevated, arteriosclerosis is the predominant pathophysiological process involving fibrosis and thickening of the medial arterial layer. This results in increased arterial stiffness causing left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis and the exposure of vulnerable vascular beds such as the brain and kidney to high pressure fluctuations causing small vessel disease. These pathophysiological features are manifest by a high risk of lethal arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent work has highlighted the importance of aldosterone and disordered bone mineral metabolism. PMID:23118349

  14. Outcome of Kidney Allografts in Recipients With a Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Özdemir-van Brunschot, Denise M D; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; van Hamersvelt, Henk W; Warlé, Michiel C

    2016-09-01

    Two patients, who were on hemodialysis over a femoral arteriovenous fistula, were transplanted in our center. Despite adequate blood pressure, perfusion of the renal allograft remained poor after completion of the vascular anastomoses. Ligation of the femoral arteriovenous fistula (1.6 L/min) led to adequate perfusion. Initial graft function was good. Although it remains unclear whether ischemia of a renal allograft is caused by venous hypertension or vascular steal due to a femoral arteriovenous fistula, it might be necessary to ligate a femoral arteriovenous fistula to obtain adequate graft perfusion. PMID:27313989

  15. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. PMID:26093993

  16. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  17. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  18. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  19. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  20. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  1. Kidney Allograft Telomere Length Is Not Associated with Sex, Recipient Comorbid Conditions, Post-Transplant Infections, or CMV Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kłoda, Karolina; Domański, Leszek; Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Drozd, Arleta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immunosenescence is closely linked to chromosome telomere erosion and telomerase activity alterations. The aim of this study was to analyze the associations of relative telomere length (RTL) of a graft with sex, comorbid conditions, post-transplant infections, and CMV reactivation among transplanted kidney recipients. Additionally, the associations of donor and recipient hTERT, BICD1 genes and chromosome 18 polymorphisms with post-transplant infections were analyzed, including the analysis of donor-recipient genotype pairs. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study enrolled 119 white Polish kidney allograft recipients (64M/55F, mean age 47.3±14.0). The RTL was assessed by modification of a method developed by Cawthon, using a qPCR system. To identify genotypes of the studied polymorphisms, real-time PCR was performed. RESULTS There were no significant associations between graft RTL and sex of donor and recipient, comorbid DM and AH, as well as post-transplant infections and CMV reactivation. There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of hTERT, BICD1 genes and chromosome 18 graft and recipient polymorphisms genotypes between individuals with post-transplant infection and those without infection. The rs2735940 CX-TT hTERT gene donor-recipient genotypes combination was associated with higher risk of post-transplant infection on the border of statistical significance (OR=4.632, 95%CI (0.853-25.14); p=0.067). CONCLUSIONS Assessment of kidney allograft RTL does not show its association with sex, DM, AH, post-transplant infection, or CMV reactivation in the recipients, suggesting that other factors, probably directly related to the transplantation procedure, have a greater effect on telomere length. PMID:27350315

  2. Functional and histological improvement after everolimus rescue of chronic allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kai Ming; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Luk, Cathy Choi-Wan; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Leung, Chi Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the strategy of mTOR inhibitors with calcineurin inhibitor minimization in renal transplant recipients with known chronic allograft dysfunction. Methods In this open-label, single-arm study, renal transplant patients were recruited after biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction in the absence of acute rejection episode within 2 months, with proteinuria <0.8 g/day, and serum creatinine <220 μmol/L or estimated glomerular filtration rate >40 mL/min/1.73 m2. They were converted to everolimus (aiming for trough everolimus level 3–8 ng/mL) with cyclosporine minimization, to assess the effect on renal function, rate of glomerular filtration rate decline, and longitudinal transplant biopsy at 12 months. Results Seventeen Chinese patients (median transplant duration, 4.2 years) were recruited; no patients discontinued study medication. The mean slope of the glomerular filtration rate over time was −4.31±6.65 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the year before everolimus, as compared with 1.29±5.84 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the 12 months of everolimus therapy, a difference of 5.61 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–10.8) favoring everolimus therapy (P=0.036). Serial renal biopsy histology showed significant decrease of tubular atrophy (15.7%±11.3% versus 7.1%±7.3%, P=0.005) and interstitial fibrosis (14.8%±11.5% versus 7.2%±8.2%, P=0.013). Intrarenal expression of TGF-β1 mRNA showed a nonsignificant decrease after everolimus treatment. Conclusion In renal transplant recipients with biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction, we found a significant beneficial effect of everolimus rescue therapy and calcineurin inhibitor minimization strategy on the improvement of glomerular filtration rate decline rate. In secondary analysis, everolimus was shown to slow down the disease progression by reducing the tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scoring. PMID:26056462

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  4. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guilan; Ali, Reza; Shuldberg, Mark M.; Bastani, Bahar; Brink, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), defined as the presence of hematopoietic elements outside of the medullary cavity of bone, has been reported in patients with various hematopoietic neoplasms including myelofibrosis. EMH commonly occurs in the liver and spleen (resulting in hepatosplenomegaly) and uncommonly involves the kidney. EMH involving the allograft kidney has not been reported in English literature. Herein, we report the first case of EMH in allograft kidney in a patient with myelofibrosis. The clinical and pathological findings are described. Through comparison of the medullary neoplastic infiltrate with the renal allograft infiltrate, we postulate the neoplastic nature of the infiltrate in the allograft kidney. PMID:26120442

  5. Early subclinical inflammation correlates with outcomes in positive crossmatch kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Dean, Patrick G; Park, Walter D; Cornell, Lynn D; Schinstock, Carrie A; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between early subclinical findings (10- and 90-day histology and gene expression data) and late outcomes (transplant glomerulopathy and graft loss) in positive crossmatch kidney transplants (+XMKTx). We compared 34 +XMKTx (19 receiving eculizumab and 15 receiving standard of care without eculizumab) to 13 -XMKTx (between August 2001 and August 2011). At 10 days, light microscopy identified subclinical inflammation in only 18% of +XMKTx, while intragraft gene expression identified inflammation in 79% (gene sets for activated macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells or T cells). Inflammation persisted at 90 days and was associated with the development of transplant glomerulopathy by 2 years and graft loss. In contrast, endothelial cell (EC) changes present at 90 days by either electron microscopy or gene expression were not associated with transplant glomerulopathy or graft loss in this cohort. Eculizumab treatment did not appear to alter inflammation or EC changes. Therefore, intragraft inflammation might be an appropriate surrogate marker of progression and also a target of therapy to prevent chronic antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27225518

  6. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  7. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  8. [Treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) is a progressive cardiovascular syndrome caused by complex and interrelated causes. The early markers of this syndrome are often present even before the blood pressure (BP) elevation; therefore, SAH cannot only be classified by the BP elevation threshold, which sometimes is discreet. Its progression is strongly associated with structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities, which lead to end-organ damage (heart, kidney, brain, blood vessels and other organs), and cause premature morbidity and death. In this sense, the BP is only a biomarker of this cardiovascular syndrome, which is why it is more useful to consider individual BP patterns of the ill patient rather than a single BP threshold. The study and treatment of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has made some progresses, especially in patients requiring dialysis. The use of non-invasive technology to register the BP has reconfigured health care of patients in regards to the diagnosis, circadian pattern, clinical surveillance, pharmacological prescription, prognosis, and risk of cardiovascular events (as well as mortality). The opportunity in the diagnosis and treatment means a delay in the onset of complications and, also, of dialysis. The blockade of the renin-aldotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a regular monitoring of the dry weight of the population in dialysis, and non-pharmacological interventions to modify lifestyle are the maneuvers with greater impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients. PMID:27284847

  9. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  10. Genetic Considerations in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Lyndsay A; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is an irreversible process that, in some cases, may lead to end-stage renal disease. The majority of children with CKD have a congenital disorder of the kidney or urological tract arising from birth. There is strong evidence for both a genetic and epigenetic component to progression of CKD. Utilization of gene-mapping strategies, ranging from genome-wide association studies to single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis, serves to identify potential genetic variants that may lend to disease variation. Genome-wide association studies evaluating population-based data have identified different loci associated with CKD progression. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms on an individual level suggests that secondary systemic sequelae of CKD are closely related to dysfunction of the cardiovascular-inflammatory axis and may lead to advanced cardiovascular disease through abnormal vascular calcification and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Similarly, genetic variants affecting cytokine control, fibrosis, and parenchymal development may modulate CKD through development and acceleration of renal interstitial fibrosis. Epigenetic studies evaluate modification of the genome through DNA methylation, histone modification, or RNA interference, which may be directly influenced by external or environmental factors directing genomic expression. Lastly, improved understanding of the genetic and epigenetic contribution to CKD progression may allow providers to identify a population at accelerated risk for disease progression and apply novel therapies targeted at the genetic mechanism of disease. PMID:27617141

  11. Effect of tolerance versus chronic immunosuppression protocols on the quality of life of kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia L.; Spencer, Philip J.; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran; Crisalli, Kerry A.; Chang, David C.; Markmann, James F.; Elias, Nahel; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Sachs, David H.; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney transplant patients on tolerance protocols avoid the morbidity associated with the use of conventional chronic immunosuppressive regimens. However, the impact of tolerance versus conventional regimens on the quality of life (QOL) of kidney transplant patients is unknown. METHODS Five patients who achieved long-term immunosuppression-free renal allograft survival after combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation (tolerant group) were compared with thirty-two comparable kidney transplant recipients on conventional immunosuppression (conventional group). QOL was compared with 16 conventional recipients using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL SF-36) and the Modified Transplant Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress Scale (MTSOSD-59R). RESULTS Patients in the tolerant group required significantly less treatment after transplant for hypertension and no medications for diabetes (P < 0.01). There was no incidence of diabetes, dyslipidemia, or malignancies in the tolerant group, while these were observed in 12.5%, 40.6%, and 11.8% of the conventional group, respectively. Tolerant patients experienced better overall health (P < 0.01) and scored higher on kidney transplant-targeted scales and healthy survey scales than patients in the conventional group according to the KDQOL SF-36 (P < 0.05). Tolerant patients were less likely to experience depression, dyspnea, excessive appetite/thirst, flatulence, hearing loss, itching, joint pain, lack of energy, muscle cramps, and lack of libido than conventional patients according to the MTSOSD-59R (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Kidney transplant recipients who achieved tolerance experience significantly fewer incidences of complications, improved QOL, and fewer comorbid symptoms compared with patients on conventional immunosuppression. These results support the expanded use of tolerance protocols in kidney transplantation. PMID:27336062

  12. Chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism: epidemiology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Keattiyoat; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An estimated 13% of Americans have kidney disease. We sought to describe the association of kidney disease with risk of venous thromboembolism and discuss possible mechanisms explaining this association. Recent findings All severities of kidney disease appear to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism. In the general population the risk associated with mild to moderate kidney disease is 1.3–2-fold increased, and present even for microalbuminuria, although stage 1 chronic kidney disease itself has not been studied. End-stage renal disease is also associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk, compared to the general population. Although data are limited, risk increases after kidney transplant and with nephrotic syndrome as well. Summary Rates of kidney disease are increasing rapidly in the population and kidney disease is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. An improved understanding of mechanisms linking kidney disease with venous thromboembolism will allow further study of best prevention efforts. PMID:19561505

  13. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  14. Neprilysin inhibition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Judge, Parminder; Haynes, Richard; Landray, Martin J; Baigent, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Despite current practice, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Neprilysin inhibition (NEPi) is a new therapeutic strategy with potential to improve outcomes for patients with CKD. NEPi enhances the activity of natriuretic peptide systems leading to natriuresis, diuresis and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which could act as a potentially beneficial counter-regulatory system in states of RAS activation such as chronic heart failure (HF) and CKD. Early NEPi drugs were combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but were associated with unacceptable rates of angioedema and, therefore, withdrawn. However, one such agent (omapatrilat) showed promise of NEP/RAS inhibition in treating CKD in animal models, producing greater reductions in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with isolated RAS inhibition. A new class of drug called angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi) has been developed. One such drug, LCZ696, has shown substantial benefits in trials in hypertension and HF. In CKD, HF is common due to a range of mechanisms including hypertension and structural heart disease (including left ventricular hypertrophy), suggesting that ARNi could benefit patients with CKD by both retarding the progression of CKD (hence delaying the need for renal replacement therapy) and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. LCZ696 is now being studied in a CKD population. PMID:25140014

  15. Molecular characterization and sequence analysis of polyomavirus strains isolated from needle biopsy specimens of kidney allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Boldorini, R; Omodeo-Zorini, E; Suno, A; Benigni, E; Nebuloni, M; Garino, E; Fortunato, M; Monga, G; Mazzucco, G

    2001-10-01

    We retrospectively examined 29 renal allograft biopsy specimens from 42 kidney transplant recipients by means of molecular biologic techniques (nested polymerase chain reaction), immunohistochemical analysis (anti-SV40 antibody), and histologic examination to evaluate the presence of polyomaviruses (PVs), viral genotypes, genomic mutations, and their pathologic significance. PV genomes were found in six cases (21%); restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis characterized 4 as JC virus (JCV) and 2 as BK virus (BKV). The latter also were positively stained immunohistochemically and showed histologically typical intranuclear viral inclusions; JCV cases were negative. DNA sequence analysis revealed only minor changes in the 4 JCV cases (3 archetypes and 1 JCV type 3, not associated with a known pathogenic genotype) but identified 2 specific variants in the BKV isolates (AS and WW strains). Given the different histologic findings (mixed inflammatory infiltration in the AS and no inflammation in the WW strain), we speculate that different BKV strains may cause differential damage in transplanted kidneys. Finally, the negative histologic and immunohistochemical JCV results, as well as the absence of viral mutations, indicate that JCV renal infection is latent in transplant recipients. PMID:11601133

  16. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results Statistically significant correlation between the estimated creatinine clearance values and the average of the calculated values of kidney volume was found (p<0.01). Average value of the kidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. PMID:27452323

  17. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  18. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for answers to your questions about kidney function, dialysis, keeping a job, Medicare, exercise, and more. With ... touch of the sugar". About 44% of new dialysis patients have diabetes. What you can do: Kidney ...

  19. Serum tumor markers in chronic kidney disease: as clinical tool in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is singled out as the biggest cause of death in the world, predicted to reach 13.1 million cancer-related deaths by the year 2030. Although there are no specific tumor markers used in cancer screening, some markers can be used to assist in making a diagnosis and determining a prognosis. They can be used to follow in cases where the diagnosis is cancer through monitoring of the disease recurrence and/or evaluating the response to therapy. These markers are not specific as the number increases in multiple cases of cancer. Some markers are positive in a single type of cancer; others are detectable in more than one type. An ideal tumor marker should be highly sensitive, specific, and reliable with high prognostic value. Other characteristics of an ideal tumor marker are organ specificity and correlation of it with tumor stages. However, none of the tumor markers reported to date has all these characteristics. Influence of different stages of chronic kidney function on serum tumor markers is variable. Furthermore, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation affect on tumor markers differently. Sometimes, no study has been found in the literature review. Combined serum tumor markers may also be valuable. This literature review points the role of serum tumor markers in screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of cancer patients in chronic kidney disease patients and renal allograft recipients. In addition, impact of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation on different serum tumor markers is briefly explored. PMID:26907957

  20. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  1. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  2. Contextual Poverty, Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) outcomes. One of the strongest factors that impacts nutrition is socioeconomic status as evidenced by the large body of epidemiologic data showing that income and education are directly associated with diet quality. Apart from individual-level markers of socioeconomic status such as income and education, contextual factors such as availability of and transportation to food outlets that provide healthy food options and the density of fast food restaurants within particular regions markedly impact the ability of individuals to comply with nutrition recommendations. This is particularly true for nutrition guidelines most specific to individuals with CKD such as the consumption of protein, saturated fat, sodium and phosphorus, all of which have been shown to impact CKD health and are influenced by the availability of healthy food options within individual neighborhood food environments. Because of the strong association of contextual poverty with the diet quality, any serious attempt to improve the diet of CKD patients must include a discussion of the environmental barriers that each individual faces in trying to access healthy foods and health care providers should take account of these barriers when tailoring specific recommendations. PMID:25573510

  3. [Chronic kidney disease: therapy and care].

    PubMed

    Noel, Natacha; Gaha, Khaled; Rieu, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem. It is therefore important to slow its progression and to treat its complications. Regardless of the causal nephropathy, arterial hypertension and proteinuria are the major progression factors of CKD. Thus, optimal control of blood pressure, reduction of proteinuria by using rennin angiotension system inhibitors can slow the progression of CKD. This effect can be enhanced by reducing sodium intake. The recent recommendations suggest that blood pressure should not be higher than 130/80 mmHg and proteinuria should not exceed 0,5 g/day. The consequences of advanced stages of the CKD have to be diagnosed and treated early: anemia, abnormal bone metabolism, hyperkalemia, fluid overload, metabolic acidosis... A particular emphasis has to be given to cardiovascular complications and risk factors. Monitoring data are well defined by the actual recommandations. Nephrologist can provide a set of recommended intervention to the primary care physician. The most accepted criterion of initiation of dialysis, in absence of clinic uremic manifestation is a glomerular filtration rate lower than 7 ml/min/1,73m2. Psychological and medical preparation of the patient to dialysis is essential. The possibility of renal transplantation should be evaluated during the following of patient with CKD PMID:22335066

  4. Chronic kidney disease and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Etsu; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Takahashi, Masao; Homma, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition among male chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Its prevalence is estimated to be approximately 80% among these patients. It has been well established that the production of nitric oxide from the cavernous nerve and vascular endothelium and the subsequent production of cyclic GMP are critically important in initiating and maintaining erection. Factors affecting these pathways can induce ED. The etiology of ED in CKD patients is multifactorial. Factors including abnormalities in gonadal-pituitary system, disturbance in autonomic nervous system, endothelial dysfunction, anemia (and erythropoietin deficiency), secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs, zinc deficiency, and psychological problems are implicated in the occurrence of ED. An improvement of general conditions is the first step of treatment. Sufficient dialysis and adequate nutritional intake are necessary. In addition, control of anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism is required. Changes of drugs that potentially affect erectile function may be necessary. Further, zinc supplementation may be necessary when zinc deficiency is suspected. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) are commonly used for treating ED in CKD patients, and their efficacy was confirmed by many studies. Testosterone replacement therapy in addition to PDE5Is may be useful, particularly for CKD patients with hypogonadism. Renal transplantation may restore erectile function. ED is an early marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which it frequently precedes; therefore, it is crucial to examine the presence of ED in CKD patients not only for the improvement of the quality of life but also for the prevention of CVD attack. PMID:25374815

  5. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2009-03-01

    Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

  6. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation. PMID:22992469

  7. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  8. The Chronic Kidney Disease - Colonic Axis.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has long been known to cause significant gastrointestinal and colonic pathology. Recent advances in understanding of the role of colonic bacterial microbiome and its function and composition in health and disease have revealed previously unappreciated effects of CKD-associated colonic pathology on the development of uremic complications. CKD can result in profound changes in the microbiome composition and biosynthetic pattern, and the structure and function of the colon. Increases in bacteria that produce urease, uricase, p-cresol- and indole-forming enzymes and the depletion of bacteria that possess short chain fatty acid forming enzymes have been described in human and animal models. Disruption of the colonic epithelial tight junction in different animal models of CKD has been reported and is largely due to the conversion of luminal urea to ammonia by urease possessing bacteria. Together, these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity by allowing the translocation of endotoxin and microbial fragments into the circulation. Additionally, colonic bacteria are the main source of several well-known pro-inflammatory uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate, P-cresol sulfate. This review is intended to provide an overview of the effects of CKD on the colonic microbiome and the intestinal epithelial barrier structure and function and their role in the pathogenesis the systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. PMID:25855516

  9. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90 mmHg in the general population and 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  10. Recurrent Light Chain Proximal Tubulopathy in a Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Angioi, Andrea; Amer, Hatem; Fervenza, Fernando C; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2016-09-01

    We describe a rare case of light chain proximal tubulopathy developing in a kidney transplant 12 months following transplantation. The patient was known to have a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) for more than 15 years. A kidney biopsy done to determine the cause of decline in kidney transplant function showed light chain proximal tubulopathy characterized by numerous eosinophilic and fuchsinophilic granules in proximal tubular epithelial cells, which stained for κ light chains on pronase-based immunofluorescence studies. Electron microscopy confirmed the diagnosis and showed numerous amorphous and geometrically shaped inclusions in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Evaluation of free light chains revealed markedly elevated κ light chains and bone marrow biopsy showed 5% to 10% κ light chain-restricted plasma cells. Retrospective evaluation of the native kidney biopsy performed 15 years earlier also showed numerous fuchsinophilic granules in proximal tubules that stained brightly for κ light chains on pronase-based immunofluorescence studies. The patient was treated with a regimen of bortezomib and dexamethasone with good partial hematologic response and improvement of kidney function. To summarize, we describe a case of recurrent light chain proximal tubulopathy in the transplant, which is an unusual but important cause of decreased kidney function in the setting of a monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:27321964

  11. Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158020.html Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds ... affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study ...

  12. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Center Medical Education Institute, Inc. (MEI) MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: ...

  13. The PROCARE consortium: toward an improved allocation strategy for kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Otten, H G; Joosten, I; Allebes, W A; van der Meer, A; Hilbrands, L B; Baas, M; Spierings, E; Hack, C E; van Reekum, F; van Zuilen, A D; Verhaar, M C; Bots, M L; Seelen, M A J; Sanders, J S F; Hepkema, B G; Lambeck, A J; Bungener, L B; Roozendaal, C; Tilanus, M G J; Vanderlocht, J; Voorter, C E; Wieten, L; van Duijnhoven, E; Gelens, M; Christiaans, M; van Ittersum, F; Nurmohamed, A; Lardy, N M; Swelsen, W T; van Donselaar-van der Pant, K A M I; van der Weerd, N C; Ten Berge, I J M; Bemelman, F J; Hoitsma, A J; de Fijter, J W; Betjes, M G H; Roelen, D L; Claas, F H J

    2014-10-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment option for patients with end-stage renal failure. At present, approximately 800 Dutch patients are registered on the active waiting list of Eurotransplant. The waiting time in the Netherlands for a kidney from a deceased donor is on average between 3 and 4 years. During this period, patients are fully dependent on dialysis, which replaces only partly the renal function, whereas the quality of life is limited. Mortality among patients on the waiting list is high. In order to increase the number of kidney donors, several initiatives have been undertaken by the Dutch Kidney Foundation including national calls for donor registration and providing information on organ donation and kidney transplantation. The aim of the national PROCARE consortium is to develop improved matching algorithms that will lead to a prolonged survival of transplanted donor kidneys and a reduced HLA immunization. The latter will positively affect the waiting time for a retransplantation. The present algorithm for allocation is among others based on matching for HLA antigens, which were originally defined by antibodies using serological typing techniques. However, several studies suggest that this algorithm needs adaptation and that other immune parameters which are currently not included may assist in improving graft survival rates. We will employ a multicenter-based evaluation on 5429 patients transplanted between 1995 and 2005 in the Netherlands. The association between key clinical endpoints and selected laboratory defined parameters will be examined, including Luminex-defined HLA antibody specificities, T and B cell epitopes recognized on the mismatched HLA antigens, non-HLA antibodies, and also polymorphisms in complement and Fc receptors functionally associated with effector functions of anti-graft antibodies. From these data, key parameters determining the success of kidney transplantation will be identified which will lead to the

  14. OCCUPATIONAL SILICA EXPOSURE AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Vupputuri, Suma; Parks, Christine G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Hogan, Susan L.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Occupational exposure to silica may be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Most studies have been conducted in occupational cohorts with high levels of exposure but small numbers of cases. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study of occupational silica exposure and CKD. Methods Cases were hospital patients with newly diagnosed CKD and community controls were selected using random digit dialing and frequency matched by age, gender, race and proximity to the hospital. Silica exposure estimates were assigned by industrial hygiene review of lifetime job history data and weighted for certainty and intensity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for CKD conditioned on demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. Results The mean age of participants was 62 years (range, 30-83 years), 56% were male and 54% were white. Any silica exposure (compared to none) was associated with a 40% increased risk of CKD (OR=1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04, 1.89) in a multivariable adjusted model. The mean cumulative duration of silica exposure was significantly higher in exposed cases than in exposed controls (33.4 vs. 24.8 years, respectively). Overall, compared to non-exposed participants, the ORs (95% CI) for those below and above the median duration of silica exposure were 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.86) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.14, 2.71), respectively. Conclusions We found a positive relationship between occupational silica exposure and CKD. A dose-response trend of increasing CKD risk with increasing duration of silica exposure was observed and was particularly strong among non-whites. PMID:22032652

  15. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined. PMID:23756992

  16. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 212–889–2210 Fax: 212–689–9261 Internet: www.kidney.org A Healthy Food Guide for ... Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000 Chicago, IL 60606–6995 Internet: www.eatright.org Your Kidney Test Results Solving ...

  17. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching.

    PubMed

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-05-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  18. Stop chronic kidney disease progression: Time is approaching

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf El Din, Usama Abdel Azim; Salem, Mona Mansour; Abdulazim, Dina Ossama

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is inevitable. However, the last decade has witnessed tremendous achievements in this field. Today we are optimistic; the dream of withholding this progression is about to be realistic. The recent discoveries in the field of CKD management involved most of the individual diseases leading the patients to end-stage renal disease. Most of these advances involved patients suffering diabetic kidney disease, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, renal amyloidosis and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. The chronic systemic inflammatory status and increased oxidative stress were also investigated. This inflammatory status influences the anti-senescence Klotho gene expression. The role of Klotho in CKD progression together with its therapeutic value are explored. The role of gut as a major source of inflammation, the pathogenesis of intestinal mucosal barrier damage, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and the dietary and therapeutic implications add a novel therapeutic tool to delay CKD progression. PMID:27152262

  19. Successful three-way kidney paired donation with cross-country live donor allograft transport.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, R A; Katznelson, S; Bry, W I; Zachary, A A; Houp, J; Hiller, J M; Shridharani, S; John, D; Singer, A L; Segev, D L

    2008-10-01

    Providing transplantation opportunities for patients with incompatible live donors through kidney paired donation (KPD) is seen as one of the important strategies for easing the crisis in organ availability. It has been estimated that an additional 1000-2000 transplants per year could be accomplished if a national KPD program were implemented in the United States. While most of these transplants could be arranged within the participants' local or regional area, patients with hard-to-match blood types or broad HLA sensitization would benefit from matching across larger geographic areas. In this case, either patients or organs would need to travel in order to obtain maximum benefit from a national program. In this study, we describe how a triple KPD enabled a highly sensitized patient (PRA 96%) to receive a well-matched kidney from a live donor on the opposite coast. The kidney was removed in San Francisco and transported to Baltimore where it was reperfused 8 h later. The patient had prompt function and 1 year later has a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/dl. This case provides a blueprint for solving some of the complexities that are inherent in the implementation of a national KPD program in a large country like the United States. PMID:18828774

  20. Genetic or Pharmaceutical Blockade of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase P110δ Prevents Chronic Rejection of Heart Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Marlene L.; McCormack, Ann M.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the major cause of long-term heart allograft failure, characterized by tissue infiltration by recipient T cells with indirect allospecificity. Phosphoinositol-3-kinase p110δ is a key mediator of T cell receptor signaling, regulating both T cell activation and migration of primed T cells to non-lymphoid antigen-rich tissue. We investigated the effect of genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of PI3K p110δ on the development of chronic allograft rejection in a murine model in which HY-mismatched male hearts were transplanted into female recipients. We show that suppression of p110δ activity significantly attenuates the development of chronic rejection of heart grafts in the absence of any additional immunosuppressive treatment by impairing the localization of antigen-specific T cells to the grafts, while not inducing specific T cell tolerance. p110δ pharmacologic inactivation is effective when initiated after transplantation. Targeting p110δ activity might be a viable strategy for the treatment of heart chronic rejection in humans. PMID:22479345

  1. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  2. Gut microbiota and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifactorial phenotype that in chronic kidney disease is associated with adverse patient outcomes. Recently, alterations in gut microbiota composition and intestinal barrier have been associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD patients. Vanholder and Glorieux recently critically reviewed [Clin Kidney J (2015) 8 (2): 168-179] the current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in the production of uraemic toxins and the therapeutic implications. Where do we stand now? The basic mechanisms of the gut-kidney crosstalk must still be clarified. In addition, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic strategies to modulate the gut microbiota in order to decrease uraemic toxin production and inflammation in chronic kidney disease should be evaluated. Finally, an impact of such strategies on hard outcomes should be demonstrated before incorporation into routine clinical practice. PMID:26034597

  3. Fatigue in chronic kidney disease: Definition, assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zalai, Dora; Bohra, Miqdad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue--an overwhelming subjective feeling of mental or physical exhaustion--impacts patients' everyday functioning and quality of life, delays recovery after hemodialysis, and increases mortality. There are a number of factors that may perpetuate clinically significant fatigue among individuals with chronic kidney disease, including sleep disorders, depression, sedentary lifestyle, anemia, and chronic inflammation. Some of these factors (i.e., anemia and inflammation) are in the forefront of clinical attention, whereas the other contributing factors often remain unrecognized. This article provides a pragmatic overview of the definition, assessment, maintaining factors, and management of fatigue in chronic kidney disease. Given that chronic fatigue is a major determinant of patients' quality of life, nurses can bring about a fundamental improvement in patients' well-being if they recognize the most common fatigue-perpetuating factors and facilitate fatigue management interventions. PMID:27215061

  4. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  5. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  6. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. PMID:26300515

  7. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  8. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  9. High Water Intake and Progression of Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon; Ha, Sung Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Impact of water intake on the courses of chronic kidney and urinary tract diseases, such as urolithiasis, urinary tract infections, chronic kidney diseases (CKD), autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases and bladder cancer, has recently been studied. It still remains controversial whether increased water intake slows the progression of CKD or not. However, high water intake suppresses plasma levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is expected to be beneficial for the preservation of the kidney function. Previous studies suggest that water intake suppresses plasma levels of AVP, and high levels of AVP have been suggested to play deleterious roles in animal models of kidney disease. Moreover, recent epidemic of CKD of unknown origin, which was supposed to be related to the insufficient water intake and chronic volume depletion, has been reported in Central America, further suggesting that the suppression of AVP by sustained water intake might be beneficial in this CKD population. Indeed, the data from recent studies were consistent with the view that high water intake is associated with slower progression of CKD. However, contradictory findings also exist. The intriguing effects of increased urine volume in preserving the glomerular filtration rate in human patients with CKD require more large and well-designed randomized prospective clinical trials. PMID:26848303

  10. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases. PMID:27442377

  11. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  12. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  13. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  14. Excellent long term patient and renal allograft survival after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: Experience of one center

    PubMed Central

    Melexopoulou, Christina; Marinaki, Smaragdi; Liapis, George; Skalioti, Chrysanthi; Gavalaki, Maria; Zavos, George; Boletis, John N

    2015-01-01

    % vs 92%, P = ns). The mean serum creatinine and the estimated glomerular filtration rate by the modification of diet in renal disease formula at 1, 3, 5 and 8 years did not differ significantly between ABOi and ABOc group. None of the patients in the ABOi group developed acute or chronic antibody-mediated rejection evidenced by histological signs. Four patients (13.3%) in the ABOi group and 3 (10%) in the ABOc group experienced acute cellular rejection, which was treated successfully in all cases. Bacterial and viral infections were also similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: ABOi kidney transplantation is a safe and effective alternative that enables kidney transplantation in countries with unacceptably long deceased-donor waiting lists. PMID:26722661

  15. Impact of cytokine expression in the pre-implanted donor lung on the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction subtypes.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takahashi, H; Kaneda, H; Binnie, M; Azad, S; Sato, M; Waddell, T K; Cypel, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-12-01

    The long-term success of lung transplantation continues to be challenged by the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cytokine expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs and the posttransplant development of CLAD and its subtypes, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS). Of 109 patients who underwent bilateral lung or heart-lung transplantation and survived for more than 3 months, 50 BOS, 21 RAS and 38 patients with No CLAD were identified by pulmonary function test results. Using donor lung tissue biopsies sampled from each patient, expression levels of IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA were measured. IL-6 expression levels were significantly higher in pre-implanted lungs of patients that ultimately developed BOS compared to RAS and No CLAD (p = 0.025 and 0.011, respectively). Cox regression analysis demonstrated an association between high IL-6 expression levels and BOS development (hazard ratio = 4.98; 95% confidence interval = 2.42-10.2, p < 0.001). In conclusion, high IL-6 mRNA expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs were associated with the development of BOS, not RAS. This association further supports the contention that early graft injury impacts on both late graft function and early graft function. PMID:24164971

  16. Abnormal Localization of STK17A in Bile Canaliculi in Liver Allografts: An Early Sign of Chronic Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Aini, Wulamujiang; Tamaki, Keiji; Haga, Hironori; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya

    2015-01-01

    The biological significance of STK17A, a serine/threonine kinase, in the liver is not known. We analyzed STK17A expression in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Accordingly, we investigated whether STK17A could help in identifying earlier changes during the evolution of chronic rejection (CR) after liver transplantation. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence were used to analyze STK17A expression in HepG2 cells. Antibody microarray was performed using human liver samples from CR and healthy donors. Immunohistochemistry was used to verify the clinical utility of STK17A on sequential biopsies for the subsequent development of CR. A novel short isoform of STK17A was found in HepG2 cells. STK17A was localized in the nuclei and bile canaliculi in HepG2 cells and human livers. Microarray of STK17A revealed its decrease in failed liver allografts by CR. During the evolution of CR, the staining pattern of bile canalicular STK17A gradually changed from diffuse linear to focal intermittent. The focal intermittent staining pattern was observed before the definite diagnosis of CR. In conclusion, the present study was the first to find localization of STK17A in normal bile canaliculi. Abnormal expression and localization of STK17A were associated with CR of liver allografts since the early stage of the rejection process. PMID:26305096

  17. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø <9 cm), unstructured, amorphous, with acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD. PMID:23229668

  18. A new Internet resource for chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ormandy, P; Vlaminck, H; Harrington, M; Forest, M; Visser, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portal in the World Wide Web (WWW), which captures and locates quality information for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It examines the problems patients face when accessing and understanding information gleaned from Web sites and describes an idea from a Research Board Member to facilitate patient access to quality information. The idea germinated into the development of a patient specific Web site, providing one stop access and links to appropriate CKD information, assessed by patients and health professionals. Collaboration between the EDTNA/ERCA Research Board and CEAPIR the European Federation of Kidney Patients has enhanced the project. PMID:16700172

  19. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    PubMed

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 body surface area) based on a single serum creatinine measurement was 0%-67% men and 0%-57% women. Prevalence was generally higher in male farmworkers aged 20-50 years, and varied by community economic activity and altitude. Cause was unknown in 57.4%-66.7% of patients. The dominant histopathological diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis. Associations were reported with agricultural work, agrochemical exposure, dehydration, hypertension, homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors. PMID:24878644

  20. Cadmium, diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Joshua R. Prozialeck, Walter C.

    2009-08-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between exposure to the environmental pollutant cadmium (Cd) and the incidence and severity of diabetes. In this review, we examine the literature suggesting a relationship between Cd exposure, elevated blood glucose levels, and the development of diabetes. In addition we review human and animal studies indicating that Cd potentiates or exacerbates diabetic nephropathy. We also review the various possible cellular mechanisms by which Cd may alter blood glucose levels. In addition, we present some novel findings from our own laboratories showing that Cd elevates fasting blood glucose levels in an animal model of subchronic Cd exposure before overt signs of renal dysfunction are evident. These studies also show that Cd reduces insulin levels and has direct cytotoxic effects on the pancreas. Together, these findings indicate that Cd may be a factor in the development of some types of diabetes and they raise the possibility that Cd and diabetes-related hyperglycemia may act synergistically to damage the kidney.

  1. Dehydrated Amniotic Membrane Allograft for Treatment of Chronic Leg Ulcers in Patients With Multiple Comorbidities: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and/or tissue-based products (CTPs) are emerging treatment options for chronic non-healing wounds. Dehydrated amniotic membrane allograft (DAMA) was used in 7 patients whose wounds had not responded adequately to standard and adjuvant therapies; four VLUs, 2 surgical wounds, and 1 DFU. Patients had multiple comorbidities, including 2 with autoimmune disorders (CREST syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus). Patients received 3–8 applications of DAMA at weekly to biweekly intervals (average, 5.4 applications). Complete wound healing was observed in 6 of 7 patients during study period, with an average time to closure of 7.9 weeks. Closure was achieved in 3 of 7 patients after 3 DAMA applications. In the patient with CREST syndrome who did not completely close, DAMA reduced the area and volume by nearly 50% and later went on to closure. These cases suggest that DAMA is a viable option for recalcitrant DFUs, VLUs, and surgical wounds. PMID:27104144

  2. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  3. Long-term risk of chronic kidney disease in unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Omer; Chandar, Jayanthi; Rodriguez, Maria M; Abitbol, Carolyn L; Seeherunvong, Wacharee; Freundlich, Michael; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2011-04-01

    The clinical spectrum of renal dysplasia includes the non-functioning multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK). We report our experience of the outcome of unilateral MCDK and its contralateral kidney in 101 children with the diagnosis of MCDK from 1985 to 2009. Data collected included urine protein/creatinine ratio, estimated GFR (eGFR), blood pressure, surgical intervention, renal length and abnormalities of the contralateral kidney, and the involution rate. There was a predominance of left-sided MCDK. Diagnosis was made prenatally in 86.7%. Contralateral abnormalities included vesicoureteral reflux (16.8%), UPJ obstruction (4.1%), and megaureter (2.4%). Complete involution of MCDK occurred within 5 years in 60%. Compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral kidney to >97% occurred in 74.1%. Nephrectomy was performed in 19.8%. There was an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥ 2, and hypertension in those with contralateral abnormalities (p<0.0001; p<0.001 respectively). In those without contralateral abnormalities, hyperfiltration with mean eGFR of 149 ± 13 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was seen in 32% and proteinuria in 9.8%. There was a significantly inverse relationship between proteinuria and eGFR (p<0.0001). In conclusion, children with contralateral abnormalities are at risk for developing decreased kidney function, whereas a substantial number of patients with no obvious contralateral abnormalities have markers of renal injury. Therefore, systematic follow-up of all patients is recommended. PMID:21240528

  4. Sexual dysfunction in men and women with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. PMID:12616463

  5. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  6. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  7. The central nervous system in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Debbie S; Duquette, Peter J; Icard, Phil F; Hooper, Stephen R

    2007-10-01

    Neurodevelopmental deficits in pediatric and adult survivors of childhood onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been documented for many years. This paper reviews the available literature on central nervous system involvement incurred in childhood CKD. The studies reviewed include recent work in neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and neuropsychology, along with commentary on school functioning and long-term outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for monitoring the neurodevelopmental status and pursuing appropriate early interventions for children with CKD. PMID:17072652

  8. Dietary Sodium in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Julie A.; Cavanaugh, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake. PMID:20557489

  9. Intensive Blood-Pressure Control in Hypertensive Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Lawrence J.; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Agodoa, Lawrence Y.; Astor, Brad C.; Bakris, George L.; Cleveland, William H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Faulkner, Marquetta L.; Gabbai, Francis B.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Hebert, Lee A.; Jamerson, Kenneth A.; Kopple, Joel D.; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Lea, Janice P.; Lewis, Julia B.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Massry, Shaul G.; Miller, Edgar R.; Norris, Keith; Phillips, Robert A.; Pogue, Velvie A.; Randall, Otelio S.; Rostand, Stephen G.; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J.; Toto, Robert D.; Wang, Xuelei

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In observational studies, the relationship between blood pressure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is direct and progressive. The burden of hypertension-related chronic kidney disease and ESRD is especially high among black patients. Yet few trials have tested whether intensive blood-pressure control retards the progression of chronic kidney disease among black patients. METHODS We randomly assigned 1094 black patients with hypertensive chronic kidney disease to receive either intensive or standard blood-pressure control. After completing the trial phase, patients were invited to enroll in a cohort phase in which the blood-pressure target was less than 130/80 mm Hg. The primary clinical outcome in the cohort phase was the progression of chronic kidney disease, which was defined as a doubling of the serum creatinine level, a diagnosis of ESRD, or death. Follow-up ranged from 8.8 to 12.2 years. RESULTS During the trial phase, the mean blood pressure was 130/78 mm Hg in the intensive-control group and 141/86 mm Hg in the standard-control group. During the cohort phase, corresponding mean blood pressures were 131/78 mm Hg and 134/78 mm Hg. In both phases, there was no significant between-group difference in the risk of the primary outcome (hazard ratio in the intensive-control group, 0.91; P = 0.27). However, the effects differed according to the baseline level of proteinuria (P = 0.02 for interaction), with a potential benefit in patients with a protein-to-creatinine ratio of more than 0.22 (hazard ratio, 0.73; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In overall analyses, intensive blood-pressure control had no effect on kidney disease progression. However, there may be differential effects of intensive blood-pressure control in patients with and those without baseline proteinuria. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and others.) PMID:20818902

  10. Development of cytotoxic antibodies following renal allograft transplantation is associated with reduced graft survival due to chronic vascular rejection.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A; Younie, M E; Parsons, J E; Klouda, P T

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively followed 64 patients who had had no cytotoxic antibodies prior to first cadaveric renal allograft transplantation for post-transplant antibodies. During a mean follow-up period of 62 months (range 45-92) cytotoxic antibodies developed in 36 patients (56%). Sixteen grafts were lost due to chronic vascular rejection in the group of patients who developed antibodies compared to two in those who remained antibody negative, P < 0.01. Renal function was worse in the antibody-positive group, median serum creatinine 215 mumol/l (131-256) (interquartile range) versus 111 mumol/l (98-127) in the antibody-negative group, P = 0.002, and creatinine clearance 39 ml/min (25-55) versus 90 ml/min (55-104), P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in immunosuppressive protocol, HLA-mismatching, blood transfusion history, the number of acute rejection episodes, mean arterial blood pressure, or proteinuria between the groups. The presence of cytotoxic antibodies predated the classical manifestations of chronic vascular rejection. This suggests that humoral mechanisms may play a role in the development of chronic vascular rejection. PMID:7816298

  11. Adenovirus-mediated HIF-1α gene transfer promotes repair of mouse airway allograft microvasculature and attenuates chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinguo; Khan, Mohammad A; Tian, Wen; Beilke, Joshua; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kosek, Jon; Yoder, Mervin C; Semenza, Gregg L; Nicolls, Mark R

    2011-06-01

    Chronic rejection, manifested as small airway fibrosis (obliterative bronchiolitis [OB]), is the main obstacle to long-term survival in lung transplantation. Recent studies demonstrate that the airways involved in a lung transplant are relatively hypoxic at baseline and that OB pathogenesis may be linked to ischemia induced by a transient loss of airway microvasculature. Here, we show that HIF-1α mediates airway microvascular repair in a model of orthotopic tracheal transplantation. Grafts with a conditional knockout of Hif1a demonstrated diminished recruitment of recipient-derived Tie2⁺ angiogenic cells to the allograft, impaired repair of damaged microvasculature, accelerated loss of microvascular perfusion, and hastened denudation of epithelial cells. In contrast, graft HIF-1α overexpression induced via an adenoviral vector prolonged airway microvascular perfusion, preserved epithelial integrity, extended the time window for the graft to be rescued from chronic rejection, and attenuated airway fibrotic remodeling. HIF-1α overexpression induced the expression of proangiogenic factors such as Sdf1, Plgf, and Vegf, and promoted the recruitment of vasoreparative Tie2⁺ cells. This study demonstrates that a therapy that enhances vascular integrity during acute rejection may promote graft health and prevent chronic rejection. PMID:21606594

  12. High Serum Level of β2-Microglobulin in Late Posttransplant Period Predicts Subsequent Decline in Kidney Allograft Function: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Trailin, Andriy V.; Pleten, Marina V.; Ostapenko, Tatiana I.; Iefimenko, Nadiia F.; Nikonenko, Olexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Identification of patients at risk for kidney allograft (KAG) failure beyond the first posttransplant year is an unmet need. We aimed to determine whether serum beta-2-microglobulin (β2MG) in the late posttransplant period could predict a decline in KAG function. Methods. We assessed a value of single measurement of serum β2MG at one to seventeen years after transplantation in predicting the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the decline in eGFR over a period of two years in 79 recipients of KAG. Results. At baseline serum β2MG concentration was higher (P = 0.011) in patients with allograft dysfunction: 8.67 ± 2.48 µg/mL versus those with satisfactory graft function: 6.67 ± 2.13 µg/mL. Higher β2MG independently predicted the lower eGFR, the drop in eGFR by ≥25% after one and two years, and the value of negative eGFR slope. When combined with proteinuria and acute rejection, serum β2MG had excellent power in predicting certain drop in eGFR after one year (AUC = 0.910). In conjunction with posttransplant time serum β2MG had good accuracy in predicting certain eGFR drop after two years (AUC = 0.821). Conclusions. Elevated serum β2MG in the late posttransplant period is useful in identifying patients at risk for rapid loss of graft function. PMID:26633915

  13. Amniotic membrane is a potential regenerative option for chronic non-healing wounds: a report of five cases receiving dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft.

    PubMed

    Mrugala, Andrew; Sui, Audrey; Plummer, Malgorzata; Altman, Igor; Papineau, Elaine; Frandsen, Devn; Hill, Danielle; Ennis, William J

    2016-08-01

    A case series of five patients with a total of six chronic non-healing wounds (>30 day duration) were non-randomly selected to evaluate the performance, safety and handling properties of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, an amniotic membrane scaffolding product. The patients had lower extremity wounds that had previously failed standard of care within a university outpatient/inpatient wound healing programme. Five wounds treated with dehydrated amnion/chorion membrane allograft showed a mean 43% area reduction from baseline (51% median) at 3 weeks into treatment and completely healed with a 64-day median time to closure (SD ±27·6 days). One wound worsened at 3 weeks and was found to have a complete central vein obstruction that was treated with long-term mild compression but still eventually healed at 6 months. Removing this outlier, the four responding wounds had a 72% mean and 69% median change in area from baseline, at the 3 week point. All five patients received only one application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, and there were no adverse events. The product was easy to use, administer and handle. In summary, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft appears to be a safe, effective and easy to use therapy for chronic non-healing wounds. This study describes the details of these clinical cases and provides an overview of the current evidence on the use of amniotic tissue in clinical practice. PMID:25974156

  14. How to Read a Food Label: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Read a Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program If you have CKD, you may ... 4 KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  15. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  16. Chimeric Allografts Induced by Short-Term Treatment With Stem Cell-Mobilizing Agents Result in Long-Term Kidney Transplant Survival Without Immunosuppression: A Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Okabayashi, T; Cameron, A M; Wang, Y; Hisada, M; Li, J; Raccusen, L C; Zheng, Q; Montgomery, R A; Williams, G M; Sun, Z

    2016-07-01

    Transplant tolerance allowing the elimination of lifelong immunosuppression has been the goal of research for 60 years. The induction of mixed chimerism has shown promise and has been extended successfully to large animals and to the clinic; however, it remains cumbersome and requires heavy early immunosuppression. In this study, we reported that four injections of AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, plus eight injections of low-dose FK506 (0.05 mg/kg per day) in the first week after kidney transplantation extended survival, but death from renal failure occurred at 30-90 days. Repeating the same course of AMD3100 and FK506 at 1, 2 and 3 mo after transplant resulted in 92% allograft acceptance (n = 12) at 7 mo, normal kidney function and histology with no further treatment. Transplant acceptance was associated with the influx of host stem cells, resulting in a hybrid kidney and a modulated host immune response. Confirmation of these results could initiate a paradigm shift in posttransplant therapy. PMID:26749344

  17. Allograft dysfunction in a patient with an odd-looking kidney: case of renal lipomatosis and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Maria Aurora; Chua, Elizabeth; Thomas, Beje; Savage, Stephen J.; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2012-01-01

    Renal lipomatosis was diagnosed in a kidney transplant recipient who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) several years after transplantation. The patient had an odd-looking kidney transplant on ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan, showing a medullary mass with resultant compression of the surrounding renal parenchyma. A biopsy of the renal medulla confirmed fatty infiltration of the renal parenchyma. The patient underwent percutaneous nephrostomy and AKI resolved with relief of the obstruction. Renal lipomatosis is a rare condition that should be differentiated from other neoplasms of the kidney. When it occurs in a functioning transplant kidney, the treatment approach proves to be very challenging. PMID:25874099

  18. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD. PMID:22960848

  19. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-08-01

    CAN is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to CNIs. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric CAN with declining GFR, defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m2/min, steadily increasing SCr and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kgBW, followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. CNIs were reduced to 50% at start of sirolimus and discontinued at median seven days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m2/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five of eight patients (p = 0.026), only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean SCr improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, nor time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, serum lipids transiently increased. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from CNIs to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy proven CAN. PMID:16856992

  20. Protective function of pirfenidone and everolimus on the development of chronic allograft rejection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Heigel, E; Pfaehler, S; Haneya, A; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W; Lehle, K

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival of lung allografts is limited by chronic rejection (CR). Oxidative stress (OxS) plays a central role in the development of CR. We investigated the influence of pirfenidone (alone or in combination with everolimus) on OxS and CR. A rat model of left lung allo-transplantation (F344-to-WKY) was used to evaluate the effects of pirfenidone alone [0,85% in chow from postoperative day (POD) -3 to 20/60] and in combination with everolimus [2,5 mg/kg bw daily from POD 7 to 20/60]. Allografts of non-treated animals, everolimus treated animals and right, non-transplanted lungs were used as references. Immunohistology of myeloperoxidase (MPO), haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), iron and platelet-derived-growth-factor-receptor-alpha (PDGFR-a) were performed. On POD 20, all groups showed severe acute rejection (ISHLT A3-4/B1R-B2R). Groups treated with pirfenidone showed a lower interstitial inflammatory infiltration and a lower participation of highly fibrotic degenerated vessels (ISHLT-D2R). In the long term follow up (POD 60), pirfenidone alone significantly reduced chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), interstitial fibrosis (IF; p≤0.05), content of collagen (p≤0.05), expression of PDGFR-a (p≤0.05) and the deposition of iron (p≤0.05). All groups treated with pirfenidone showed a high expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1 (p≤0.05). The additional application of everolimus resulted in a significant decrease of chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), vasculopathy (ISHLT; p≤0.05) and IF (p≤0.05). In conclusion, early application of pirfenidone inhibited the progression of CR by its anti-fibrotic and anti-oxidative properties. The additional application of an m-TOR-inhibitor increased the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone which resulted in a reduction of CR after experimental LTx. PMID:26707547

  1. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nashar, Khaled; Egan, Brent M

    2014-01-01

    Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing in incidence and lead to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The relationship between these two entities is complex. Individual components of the MetS are known risk factors for incident kidney disease, but it is not clear how the clustering of these components is linked to the development and progression of kidney disease. Cross-sectional studies show an association of the MetS and prevalent CKD; however, one cannot draw conclusions as to which came first – the MetS or the kidney disease. Observational studies suggest a relationship between MetS and incident CKD, but they also demonstrate the development of MetS in patients with established CKD. These observations suggest a bidirectional relationship. A better understanding of the relationship between components of the MetS and whether and how these components contribute to progression of CKD and incident cardiovascular disease could inform more effective prevention strategies. PMID:25258547

  2. Influence of chronic kidney disease on cardiac structure and function.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Coresh, Josef

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the presence of kidney dysfunction and/or damage, is a worldwide public health issue. Although CKD is independently associated with various subtypes of cardiovascular diseases, a recent international collaborative meta-analysis demonstrates that CKD is particularly strongly associated with heart failure, suggesting its critical impact on cardiac structure and function. Although numerous studies have investigated the association of CKD and cardiac structure and function, these studies substantially vary regarding source populations and methodology (e.g., measures of CKD and/or parameters of cardiac structure and function), making it difficult to reach universal conclusions. Nevertheless, in this review, we comprehensively examine relevant studies, discuss potential mechanisms linking CKD to alteration of cardiac structure and function, and demonstrate clinical implications as well as potential future research directions. We exclusively focus on studies investigating both CKD measures, kidney function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine clearance, or levels of filtration markers), and kidney damage represented by albuminuria, since current international clinical guidelines of CKD recommend staging CKD and assessing its clinical risk based on both GFR and albuminuria. PMID:26194332

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  4. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression. PMID:26490952

  5. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  6. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J.; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent a high-risk group for thrombosis both in the cardiovascular territory and also in the venous circulation. At the same time, abnormalities in the platelet membranes put them at risk of bleeding which is significantly more than other patients with chronic diseases. Anticoagulation may be ideal to prevent the former, but the co-existing bleeding risk and also that the commonly used drugs for inhibiting coagulation are eliminated by renal pathways pose additional problems. In this review, we try to explain the complex thrombotic-haemorrhagic state of chronic kidney disease patients, and practical considerations for the management of anticoagulation in them with a focus on heparins. PMID:25878775

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease toward kidney donation in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bello, Babawale T; Raji, Yemi R

    2016-01-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, kidney transplant programs are dependent on the willingness of relatives of patients with kidney failure to donate kidneys. This study assessed the attitudes of relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) toward kidney donation. This was a cross-sectional survey of relatives of patients with CKD attending the nephrology service of our hospital. The respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge and beliefs about kidney transplantation, as well as their willingness to donate a kidney, were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 161 respondents who returned completed questionnaires; the mean age of the respondents was 34.8±12.6 years and 52.2% of them were female. About 85.1% of the respondents were aware that kidney transplantation was a treatment option for end-stage renal failure, while 70% of them believed that kidney transplantation resulted in an improvement in the quality of life of these patients. However, 25.5% of the respondents believed that kidney donors were at risk of developing kidney failure in the future. Overall, 77.6% of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney, especially if the affected individual was their offspring. The majority of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a relative with CKD. PMID:26787577

  8. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy: Maternal and fetal outcomes and progression of kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Penny; Callaway, Leonie K; Barrett, Helen L; Fagermo, Narelle; Lust, Karin; Shakhovskoy, Rebekah E

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of Australian data regarding renal disease in pregnancy. We undertook a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary institution to examine the impact of renal disease on pregnancy outcomes and the effect of pregnancy on disease progression. Methods A total of 55 pregnancies of patients with renal disease admitted from 2003 to 2010 to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital were analysed. Pre-conception variables, fetal/delivery and maternal outcomes were analysed in this group and in a control group of women with normal kidney function pre-pregnancy. Results Of the 55 pregnancies, 71% experienced pre-term delivery, 38% had intra-uterine growth restriction and 62% required caesarean section. Of all, 60% of neonates required neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and six perinatal deaths occurred. Of all, 67% of women suffered preeclampsia, 47% anaemia and 3 patients required dialysis in pregnancy. Postpartum deterioration of renal function occurred in patients with pre-conception chronic kidney disease stage 3–5. Conclusions Chronic kidney disease of all stages is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. In a tertiary institution however, there is a high rate of successful pregnancy (84%).

  9. Chronic kidney disease in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fabian, J; Katz, I; Gerntholtz, T; Goetsch, S; Naicker, S

    2007-06-01

    -uninfected transplant recipients. However, high rates of acute and chronic rejection have been observed among HIV-infected kidney transplant recipients. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) published guidelines in 2005, recommending that all individuals be assessed for kidney disease at the time of diagnosis of HIV infection with a screening urinalysis for proteinuria and a calculated estimate of renal function. Therefore any patient with persistent proteinuria, persistent haematuria or glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) should be referred to an institution where a specialist can evaluate this patient for further investigations. An integrated plan to reduce the progression to kidney failure together with lifestyle measures, focusing also on high risk groups with effective management at all levels of chronic kidney disease remains essential. PMID:17625482

  10. Anemia of chronic kidney disease: when normalcy becomes undesirable.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, Sevag G; Nurko, Saul

    2008-05-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease and renal failure, hemoglobin levels have been rising in parallel with more intensive use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). However, several recent studies indicate that raising hemoglobin to normal levels with ESAs can be too much of a good thing. Compared with partial correction, normalization of hemoglobin did not improve outcome, and it may have led to more frequent adverse events. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now recommends a hemoglobin goal in the range of 10 to 12 g/dL. PMID:18556877

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  12. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described. PMID:27455803

  13. Chronic kidney disease in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Stanifer, John W; Muiru, Anthony; Jafar, Tazeen H; Patel, Uptal D

    2016-06-01

    Most of the global burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). As a result of rapid urbanization in LMICs, a growing number of populations are exposed to numerous environmental toxins, high infectious disease burdens and increasing rates of noncommunicable diseases. For CKD, this portends a high prevalence related to numerous etiologies, and it presents unique challenges. A better understanding of the epidemiology of CKD in LMICs is urgently needed, but this must be coupled with strong public advocacy and broad, collaborative public health efforts that address environmental, communicable, and non-communicable risk factors. PMID:27217391

  14. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  15. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  16. Why do young people with chronic kidney disease die early?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shankar; Bogle, Richard; Banerjee, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease poses the greatest risk of premature death seen among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Up to 50% of mortality risk in the dialysis population is attributable to cardiovascular disease and the largest relative excess mortality is observed in younger patients. In early CKD, occlusive thrombotic coronary disease is common, but those who survive to reach end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis are more prone to sudden death attributable mostly to sudden arrhythmic events and heart failure related to left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary vascular calcification and electrolyte disturbances. In this review, we discuss the basis of the interaction of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease with various pathological processes such as endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, low grade chronic inflammation, neurohormonal changes and vascular calcification and stiffness which account for the structural and functional cardiac changes that predispose to excess morbidity and mortality in young people with CKD. PMID:25374808

  17. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated with poor outcomes in children with CKD. The exact mechanisms leading to these unfavorable conditions are not fully elucidated and are most likely multifactorial. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of nutrition disorders and inflammation and their impact on clinical outcomes in children with CKD. PMID:27152263

  18. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated with poor outcomes in children with CKD. The exact mechanisms leading to these unfavorable conditions are not fully elucidated and are most likely multifactorial. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of nutrition disorders and inflammation and their impact on clinical outcomes in children with CKD. PMID:27152263

  19. Anti-HLA sensitization after kidney allograft nephrectomy: changes one year post-surgery and beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Matignon, Marie; Leibler, Claire; Moranne, Olivier; Salomon, Laurent; Charron, Dominique; Lang, Philippe; Jacquelinet, Christian; Suberbielle, Caroline; Grimbert, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of anti-HLA sensitization at the time of and following allograft nephrectomy may help clinicians to define better both the indications for nephrectomy and preventive therapeutic strategies. We carried out a retrospective analysis of anti-HLA antibodies in 63 clinically indicated nephrectomies (baseline and three and 12 months after) according to the time elapsed since transplantation (six months) and clinical background. An intervention study included 10 patients without donor-specific antibodies (DSA) at the time of nephrectomy treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (1.5 g/kg). Early nephrectomies were performed in 15 patients (24%). Among the late nephrectomies, 14 patients (22%) were asymptomatic and 34 (54%) had graft intolerance syndrome (GIS). At baseline, anti-HLA sensitization was significantly lower in the early and late asymptomatic groups than in the GIS group, but increased considerably within the three months following surgery. In the group of 10 patients treated with IVIG, only the number of class I non-DSA increased in the three months after surgery, whereas in the control group (N = 13), all anti-HLA variables increased significantly. All patients undergoing a clinically indicated allograft nephrectomy become highly sensitized within the 12 months after surgery. In patients without DSA before nephrectomy, high doses of IVIG may prevent anti-HLA sensitization. PMID:27140447

  20. Aggressive blood pressure control for chronic kidney disease unmasks moyamoya!

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. Keefe; Halabi, Carmen M.; Siefken, Philp; Karmarkar, Swati; Leonard, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive crises in children or adolescents are rare, but chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for occurrence. Vesicoureteral reflux nephropathy is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and is associated with hypertension. Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to delay progression of CKD and treatment is targeted for the 50th percentile for height when compared with a target below the 90th percentile for the general pediatric hypertensive patient. We present a case of an adolescent presenting with seizures and renal failure due to a hypertensive crisis. Hypertension was thought to be secondary to CKD as she had scarred echogenic kidneys due to known reflux nephropathy. However, aggressive BP treatment improved kidney function which is inconsistent with CKD from reflux nephropathy. Secondly, aggressive BP control caused transient neurological symptoms. Further imaging identified moyamoya disease. We present this case to highlight the consideration of moyamoya as a diagnosis in the setting of renal failure and hypertensive crisis. PMID:26064513

  1. Risk Factors for Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Amy; Wong, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review Provides an overview of the identified risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression emphasizing the pediatric population. Recent findings Over the past ten years, there have been significant changes to our understanding and study of pre-terminal kidney failure. Recent refinements in the measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR estimating equations are important tools for identification and association of risk factors for CKD progression in children. In pediatric CKD, lower level of kidney function at presentation, higher levels of proteinuria, and hypertension are known markers for a more rapid decline in GFR. Anemia and other reported risk factors from the pre-genomic era have need for further study and validation. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic loci which have provided novel genetic risk factors for CKD progression. Summary With cohort studies of children with CKD becoming mature, they have started to yield important refinements to the assessment of CKD progression. While many of the traditional risk factors for renal progression will certainly be assessed, such cohorts will be important for evaluating novel risk factors identified by genome-wide studies. PMID:20090523

  2. High burden and unmet patient needs in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Braun, LeeAnn; Sood, Vipan; Hogue, Susan; Lieberman, Bonnie; Copley-Merriman, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex debilitating condition affecting more than 70 million people worldwide. With the increased prevalence in risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in an aging population, CKD prevalence is also expected to increase. Increased awareness and understanding of the overall CKD burden by health care teams (patients, clinicians, and payers) is warranted so that overall care and treatment management may improve. This review of the burden of CKD summarizes available evidence of the clinical, humanistic, and economic burden of CKD and the current unmet need for new treatments and serves as a resource on the overall burden. Across countries, CKD prevalence varies considerably and is dependent upon patient characteristics. The prevalence of risk factors including diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and congestive heart failure is noticeably higher in patients with lower estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) and results in highly complex CKD patient populations. As CKD severity worsens, there is a subsequent decline in patient health-related quality of life and an increased use of health care resources as well as burgeoning costs. With current treatment, nearly half of patients progress to unfavorable renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Although curative treatment that will arrest kidney deterioration is desired, innovative agents under investigation for CKD to slow kidney deterioration, such as atrasentan, bardoxolone methyl, and spherical carbon adsorbent, may offer patients healthier and more productive lives. PMID:23293534

  3. Update on the Current Status of Kidney Transplantation for Chronic Kidney Disease in Animals.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is a novel treatment option for cats suffering from chronic renal failure or acute irreversible renal injury. Improvement in quality of life as well as survival times of cats that have undergone transplantation has helped the technique to gain acceptance as a viable treatment option for this fatal disease. This article reviews information regarding the optimal time for intervention, congenital and acquired conditions that have been successfully treated with transplantation, recipient and donor screening, immunosuppressive therapy, recent advances in anesthetic and surgical management, postoperative monitoring and long-term management, and troubleshooting perioperative and long-term complications. PMID:27593577

  4. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  5. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients. PMID:26479287

  6. BEYOND GENETICS: EPIGENETIC CODE IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Rama S.; Herman, James G.; McCaffrey, Timothy; Raj, Dominic SC

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to a heritable change in the pattern of gene expression that is mediated by a mechanism specifically not due to alterations in the primary nucleotide sequence. Well known epigenetic mechanisms encompass DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling (histone modifications) and RNA interference. Functionally, epigenetics provides an extra layer of transcriptional control and plays a crucial role in normal physiological development, as well as in pathological conditions. Aberrant DNA methylation is implicated in immune dysfunction, inflammation and insulin resistance. Epigenetic changes may be responsible for “metabolic memory” and development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. MicroRNAs are critical in the maintenance of glomerular homeostasis and hence RNA interference may be important in the progression of renal disease. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic modifications orchestrate the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and eventually fibrosis of the renal tissue. Oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperhomocysteinemia and uremic toxins could induce epimutations in chronic kidney disease. Epigenetic alterations are associated with inflammation and cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. Reversible nature of the epigenetic changes gives an unique opportunity to halt or even reverse the disease process through targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:20881938

  7. Vitamin D for health and in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D is taken for granted and is not appreciated for its importance in overall health and well-being. Vitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin, is appreciated as being important for the prevention of rickets in children. It is now recognized that vitamin D is important for not only the growing skeleton, but for the maintenance of a healthy musculoskeletal system throughout life. Vitamin D deficiency in adults precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis and causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia. The revelation that vitamin D is biologically inactive and requires sequential hydroxylations in the liver and kidney to form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D helps explain why patients with renal failure are often resistant to vitamin D and suffer from secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. In addition to its role in maintaining calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D is now being recognized as important for maintaining maximum muscle strength and for the prevention of many chronic diseases, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, cardiovascular heart disease, and many common cancers. Vitamin D status is best determined by the measurement of circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Vigilance for maintaining a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of at least 20 ng/ml and preferably 30-50 ng/ml has important benefits for both healthy children and adults, as well as children and adults suffering from chronic kidney disease. PMID:16076348

  8. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Pazarín-Villaseñor, Leonardo; Yanowsky-Escatell, Francisco Gerardo; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60-89 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is <30 mg/day. Albuminuria represents the excretion of >300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  9. Palliative care for patients with advance chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The fastest expanding group receiving dialysis has been the elderly. However, for those patients who are very elderly with co-morbidity, dialysis may not offer a survival advantage. Therefore, active conservative management is a growing service offered by many renal units in the UK and focuses on non-dialytic correction of fluid and electrolyes, management of renal anaemia, and assessment and management of symptoms. The five-year survival of a patient over 75 years of age starting dialysis is 20% and if a patient is over 75 years, has co-morbidity, or a poor performance status, dialysis may not offer any survival advantage. Whether a patient is managed by dialysis or by conservative management the symptom burden suffered is high. These symptoms are under-recognised and often managed poorly because of increased drug toxicity in renal failure. This complex group of patients require close working between renal, palliative care, medicine for the elderly, and community teams, to allow best quality of life and end of life care. This review describes some of the challenges in providing Advanced Care Planning for dialysis and conservatively managed patients, highlights the symptom burden of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, and offers guidance in how to manage the symptoms effectively. PMID:25318401

  10. Homoarginine and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: Results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Kollerits, Barbara; Meinitzer, Andreas; März, Winfried; Ritz, Eberhard; König, Paul; Neyer, Ulrich; Pilz, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Kronenberg, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Background Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54–5.19) using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. Results Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min), 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60–90 ml/min), 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30–60 ml/min) and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min), respectively (p = 0.002). The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L) of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16–2.27, p = 0.005). This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11–2.20, p = 0.01), and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98–1.98, p = 0.06). Conclusions Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  11. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  12. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-03-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  13. Chronic kidney disease in children and adolescents in Brunei Darussalam

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi Ying; Naing, Lin; Han, Aye; Khalil, Muhammad Abdul Mabood; Chong, Vui Heng; Tan, Jackson

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine epidemiology of Bruneian paediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and factors that affect growth and progression of disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study conducted on all children below 18 years old who were diagnosed with CKD over a ten year period (2004 to 2013). The reference population was all children (< 18 years old) suffering from CKD and attending the tertiary paediatric nephrology clinic in Brunei Darussalam. Demographic (current age, age of diagnosis, gender, ethnicity), anthropometric (weight and height), diagnosis, laboratory data (serum creatinine and haemoglobin, urinalysis) and blood pressure were extracted from the patients’ clinical case notes and recorded using a data collection form. RESULTS: The study revealed a high national prevalence [736 per million child population (pmcp)] and incidence (91 pcmp) of CKD. If CKD was defined at Stage 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, the associated prevalence figures were 736, 132, 83, 50 and 33 pmcp. Glomerulonephritis accounted for 69% of all prevalent cases, followed by congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (20%) and tubulointerstitial diseases (8%). Minimal change disease being the most common histological diagnosis. The median age of diagnosis was 4.5 years, with congenital disease patients experiencing an earlier onset of diagnosis. A large proportion of patients were below the 5% percentile for height and weight. Non-glomerular diseases, adolescent and female patients were significantly associated with poor growth, but not glomerular filtration rate, age of diagnosis or steroid usage. CONCLUSION: Brunei has a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the paediatric population with glomerulonephritis being the most common disease. PMID:26981447

  14. Rat Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Prevents Accelerated Chronic Rejection in CMV-Naïve Recipients of Infected Donor Allograft Hearts.

    PubMed

    Streblow, D N; Hwee, Y K; Kreklywich, C N; Andoh, T; Denton, M; Smith, P; Hart, E; Broekel, R; Pallett, C; Rogers, K; Streblow, A D; Chuop, M; Perry, A; Slifka, M; Messaoudi, I; Orloff, S L

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus accelerates transplant vascular sclerosis (TVS) and chronic rejection (CR) in solid organ transplants; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. We determined the efficacy of a CMV vaccine in preventing CMV-accelerated rat cardiac allograft rejection in naïve recipients of CMV+ donor hearts. F344 donor rats were infected with RCMV 5 days prior to heterotopic cardiac transplantation into CMV-naïve or H2 O2 -inactivated RCMV-vaccinated Lewis recipients. Recipients of RCMV-infected donor hearts rejected at POD59, whereas vaccinated recipients exhibited a significantly prolonged time to rejection-POD97, similar to recipients of uninfected donor hearts (POD108). Although all of the donor hearts were preinfected, the vaccinated recipients had lower graft and PBMC viral loads at POD 7 compared to unvaccinated controls. Adoptive T cell and passive antibody transfers from vaccinated Lewis rats into naïve recipients demonstrate that both T-cell and B-cell arms of the adaptive immune response provide protection against CMV-accelerated rejection. Similar findings were obtained when testing three different adjuvants in passive transfer experiments. We have determined that the timing of the vaccine prior to transplantation and the specific adjuvant play critical roles in mediating anti-viral responses and promoting graft survival. CMV vaccination prior to transplantation may effectively increase graft survival. PMID:25766876

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induced Airway Epithelial Injury Drives Fibroblast Activation: A Mechanism in Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, L A; Suwara, M I; Carnell, S C; Green, N J; Mahida, R; Dixon, D; Gillespie, C S; Cartwright, T N; Horabin, J; Walker, A; Olin, E; Rangar, M; Gardner, A; Mann, J; Corris, P A; Mann, D A; Fisher, A J

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial infections after lung transplantation cause airway epithelial injury and are associated with an increased risk of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The damaged epithelium is a source of alarmins that activate the innate immune system, yet their ability to activate fibroblasts in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome has not been evaluated. Two epithelial alarmins were measured longitudinally in bronchoalveolar lavages from lung transplant recipients who developed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and were compared to stable controls. In addition, conditioned media from human airway epithelial cells infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was applied to lung fibroblasts and inflammatory responses were determined. Interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α) was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage of lung transplant recipients growing P. aeruginosa (11.5 [5.4-21.8] vs. 2.8 [0.9-9.4] pg/mL, p < 0.01) and was significantly elevated within 3 months of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (8.3 [1.4-25.1] vs. 3.6 [0.6-17.1] pg/mL, p < 0.01), whereas high mobility group protein B1 remained unchanged. IL-1α positively correlated with elevated bronchoalveolar lavage IL-8 levels (r(2)  = 0.6095, p < 0.0001) and neutrophil percentage (r(2)  = 0.25, p = 0.01). Conditioned media from P. aeruginosa infected epithelial cells induced a potent pro-inflammatory phenotype in fibroblasts via an IL-1α/IL-1R-dependent signaling pathway. In conclusion, we propose that IL-1α may be a novel therapeutic target to limit Pseudomonas associated allograft injury after lung transplantation. PMID:26714197

  16. Pretransplant CD4 Count Influences Immune Reconstitution and Risk of Infectious Complications in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Kidney Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J F; Rosa, R; Lorio, M A; Morris, M I; Abbo, L M; Simkins, J; Guerra, G; Roth, D; Kupin, W L; Mattiazzi, A; Ciancio, G; Chen, L J; Burke, G W; Goldstein, M J; Ruiz, P; Camargo, J F

    2016-08-01

    In current practice, human immunodeficiency virus-infected (HIV(+) ) candidates with CD4 >200 cells/mm(3) are eligible for kidney transplantation; however, the optimal pretransplant CD4 count above this threshold remains to be defined. We evaluated clinical outcomes in patients with baseline CD4 >350 and <350 cells/mm(3) among 38 anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)-treated HIV-negative to HIV(+) kidney transplants performed at our center between 2006 and 2013. Median follow-up was 2.6 years. Rates of acute rejection and patient and graft survival were not different between groups. Occurrence of severe CD4 lymphopenia (<200 cells/mm(3) ), however, was more common among patients with a baseline CD4 count 200-349 cells/mm(3) compared with those transplanted at higher counts (75% vs. 30% at 4 weeks [p = 0.04] and 71% vs. 5% at 52 weeks [p = 0.001], respectively, after transplant). After adjusting for age, baseline CD4 count of 200-349 cells/mm(3) was an independent predictor of severe CD4 lymphopenia at 4 weeks (relative risk [RR] 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.1) and 52 weeks (RR 14.3; 95% CI 2-100.4) after transplant. Patients with CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) at 4 weeks had higher probability of serious infections during first 6 months after transplant (19% vs. 50%; log-rank p = 0.05). These findings suggest that ATG must be used with caution in HIV(+) kidney allograft recipients with a pretransplant CD4 count <350 cells/mm(3) . PMID:26953224

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease Screening Methods and Its Implication for Malaysia: An in Depth Review

    PubMed Central

    Almualm, Yasmin; Huri, Hasniza Zaman

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred. Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia. Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR < 60ml/min/1.73m2, showed less bias and improved precision at GFR>60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been

  18. Multiple New Loci Associated with Kidney Function and Chronic Kidney Disease: The CKDGen consortium

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Böger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Glazer, Nicole L.; Parsa, Afshin; Gao, Xiaoyi; Yang, Qiong; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Li, Man; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Isaacs, Aaron; Ketkar, Shamika; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Paré, Guillaume; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Zeller, Tanja; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Tönjes, Anke; Hayward, Caroline; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore; Harris, Tamara B.; Rapmersaud, Evadnie; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Struchalin, Maksim; Cavalieri, Margherita; Singleton, Andrew; Giallauria, Francesco; Metter, Jeffery; de Boer, Ian; Haritunians, Talin; Lumley, Thomas; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Oostra, Ben A.; Feitosa, Mary; Province, Michael; Levy, Daniel; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Wilde, Sandra; Muenzel, Thomas F.; Leak, Tennille S; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Meisinger, Christa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Koenig, Wolfgang; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Minelli, Cosetta; Hu, Frank B.; Johansson, Åsa; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Imboden, Medea; Nitsch, Dorothea; Brandstätter, Anita; Kollerits, Barbara; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Mägi, Reedik; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; Boban, Mladen; Campbell, Susan; Endlich, Karlhans; Völzke, Henry; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Badola, Sunita; Parker, Alexander N.; Ridker, Paul M.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Franke, Andre; Rochat, Thierry; Paulweber, Bernhard; Prokopenko, Inga; Wang, Wei; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Shlipak, Michael G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Hastie, Nick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H.; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem, and recent genetic studies have identified common CKD susceptibility variants. The CKDGen consortium performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 67,093 Caucasian individuals from 20 population-based studies to identify new susceptibility loci for reduced renal function, estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea <60 ml/min/1.73m2; n = 5,807 CKD cases). Follow-up of the 23 genome-wide significant loci (p<5×10−8) in 22,982 replication samples identified 13 novel loci for renal function and CKD (in or near LASS2, GCKR, ALMS1, TFDP2, DAB2, SLC34A1, VEGFA, PRKAG2, PIP5K1B, ATXN2, DACH1, UBE2Q2, and SLC7A9) and 7 creatinine production and secretion loci (CPS1, SLC22A2, TMEM60, WDR37, SLC6A13, WDR72, BCAS3). These results further our understanding of biologic mechanisms of kidney function by identifying loci potentially influencing nephrogenesis, podocyte function, angiogenesis, solute transport, and metabolic functions of the kidney. PMID:20383146

  19. Soluble CD59 is a Novel Biomarker for the Prediction of Obstructive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Budding, Kevin; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Kardol-Hoefnagel, Tineke; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M; Luijk, Bart D; Oudijk, Erik-Jan D; van Kessel, Diana A; Grutters, Jan C; Hack, C Erik; Otten, Henderikus G

    2016-01-01

    CD59 is a complement regulatory protein that inhibits membrane attack complex formation. A soluble form of CD59 (sCD59) is present in various body fluids and is associated with cellular damage after acute myocardial infarction. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the final treatment for end-stage lung diseases, however overall survival is hampered by chronic lung allograft dysfunction development, which presents itself obstructively as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). We hypothesized that, due to cellular damage and activation during chronic inflammation, sCD59 serum levels can be used as biomarker preceding BOS development. We analyzed sCD59 serum concentrations in 90 LTx patients, of whom 20 developed BOS. We observed that BOS patients exhibited higher sCD59 serum concentrations at the time of diagnosis compared to clinically matched non-BOS patients (p = 0.018). Furthermore, sCD59 titers were elevated at 6 months post-LTx (p = 0.0020), when patients had no BOS-related symptoms. Survival-analysis showed that LTx patients with sCD59 titers ≥400 pg/ml 6 months post-LTx have a significant (p < 0.0001) lower chance of BOS-free survival than patients with titers ≤400 pg/ml, 32% vs. 80% respectively, which was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 6.2, p < 0.0001). We propose that circulating sCD59 levels constitute a novel biomarker to identify patients at risk for BOS following LTx. PMID:27215188

  20. Soluble CD59 is a Novel Biomarker for the Prediction of Obstructive Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Budding, Kevin; van de Graaf, Eduard. A.; Kardol-Hoefnagel, Tineke; Kwakkel-van Erp, Johanna M.; Luijk, Bart D.; Oudijk, Erik-Jan D.; van Kessel, Diana A.; Grutters, Jan C.; Hack, C. Erik; Otten, Henderikus G.

    2016-01-01

    CD59 is a complement regulatory protein that inhibits membrane attack complex formation. A soluble form of CD59 (sCD59) is present in various body fluids and is associated with cellular damage after acute myocardial infarction. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the final treatment for end-stage lung diseases, however overall survival is hampered by chronic lung allograft dysfunction development, which presents itself obstructively as the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). We hypothesized that, due to cellular damage and activation during chronic inflammation, sCD59 serum levels can be used as biomarker preceding BOS development. We analyzed sCD59 serum concentrations in 90 LTx patients, of whom 20 developed BOS. We observed that BOS patients exhibited higher sCD59 serum concentrations at the time of diagnosis compared to clinically matched non-BOS patients (p = 0.018). Furthermore, sCD59 titers were elevated at 6 months post-LTx (p = 0.0020), when patients had no BOS-related symptoms. Survival-analysis showed that LTx patients with sCD59 titers ≥400 pg/ml 6 months post-LTx have a significant (p < 0.0001) lower chance of BOS-free survival than patients with titers ≤400 pg/ml, 32% vs. 80% respectively, which was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 6.2, p < 0.0001). We propose that circulating sCD59 levels constitute a novel biomarker to identify patients at risk for BOS following LTx. PMID:27215188

  1. Interactions between cytokines, congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1-5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  2. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Valério, Flávia Cordeiro; Vasconcelos, Mariana Affonso; Miranda, Débora Marques; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24066006

  3. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Otovic, Natasa Eftimovska; Taneva, Borjanka

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) became a new epidemic of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the leading causes of end-stage renal failure as a result of the diabetes epidemic worldwide. AIM: The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of CKD in the Republic of Macedonia and its association with diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a part of a study conducted in 2006 in terms of screening for early detection of kidney disease. It was a cross-sectional study based on a random sample of patients aged > 20, consecutively consulting their primary physician for any cause. Fifty physicians throughout the country were included in the study. A total of 2637 patients have been analyzed based on integrity data. GFR was estimated using corrected values of serum creatinine and calculating kidney function by the Cockroft & Gault formula, adjusted for body surface using the Gehan & George formula. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min were considered as having CKD. Blood pressure, body weight, height, serum creatinine, glucose, hemoglobin, hematocrit, urinalysis and medical history for presence of cardiovascular diseases or diabetes were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects was 45.97 ± 16.55 SD and 17.97% were older than 60. Regarding gender, 44.14% were males. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Subjects with CKD (eGFR less than 60 ml/min) were 7.53% of the total. Subjects aged 60 or above, had 20 times higher risk of having CKD (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Out of the total group of subjects, 13.9% had diabetes mellitus and they had 3.13 times higher risk of having CKD stage 3-5 (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) when compared to non-diabetics. The results showed that diabetes was significantly more associated with lower eGFR (less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) in younger subjects (age less than 60) compared to older ones (odds ratio 3

  4. In experimental chronic kidney disease or cancer, parathyroid hormone is a novel mediator of cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Mitch, William E

    2016-05-01

    Hyperparathyroidism plays a central role in the disordered bone mineral metabolism of chronic kidney disease, and has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in that setting. A recent study suggests a novel role for parathyroid hormone and its receptor in muscle wasting and cachexia occurring in advanced chronic kidney disease. PMID:27083271

  5. Polyoma (BK) virus associated urothelial carcinoma originating within a renal allograft five years following resolution of polyoma virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Steven P; Myers-Gurevitch, Patricia M; Chu, Stacy; Robinson, Brian D; Dadhania, Darshana; Seshan, Surya V

    2016-03-01

    A direct role for BK polyomavirus infection in malignant tumors of renal allografts and urinary tract is emerging. Case reports suggest a link between BK virus (BKV) reactivation and development of malignancy in renal allograft recipients. Herein we describe the first case of BKV positive invasive urothelial carcinoma within the renal allograft, presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss 5 years following resolution of BK viremia/nephropathy (BKVN). Unique to our case was the remote history of BK viremia/BKVN, rising titer of anti-HLA antibody and presence of renal limited urothelial carcinoma with microinvasion of malignant cells staining positive for SV40 large T antigen (T-Ag). These findings suggest that persistence of subclinical BKV infection within the renal allograft may play a role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. Patients with history of BKVN may be at risk for kidney and urinary tract malignancy despite resolution of BK viremia/BKVN. PMID:26709521

  6. Prevalence of risk factors of chronic kidney disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M S; Dutta, P K; Islam, M N; Hasan, M J; Mondol, G

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emergent public health burden. Its prevalence varies country to country, even in different professional and social groups in the same country. In Bangladesh there is no reported nationwide survey but there are some reports of survey in disadvantageous and advantageous population. In this study 125 CKD patients (cases) and 125 age and sex matched healthy subjects (control) in Mymensingh Medical College, a tertiary hospital of Bangladesh were compared for the presence of non-modifiable [age, sex, family history of hypertension (HTN), Cardiovascular disease (CVD), family history of kidney disease and Socioeconomic condition] and modifiable [HTN, Diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking habit, and obesity] risk factors. The mean age of control was 43.5 ± 6.3 years and the mean age of CKD cases was 44.7 ± 12.7 years. Out of 125 patients of CKD, males were 96 in number (76.8%) and females were 29 in numbers (23.2%). Most of the patients (52.8%) were in poor socioeconomic status while most of controls were from middle class (68.8%). Most of the participants were in stage-3 CKD [67.2%, creatinine clearance (Ccr):36.74 ± 13.61 ml/min]. Glomerulonephritis was the dominant cause of CKD (67.2%) followed by diabetes (24%), hypertension (4.8%) and others (4%). 72.8% of CKD patients were smokers. Among CKD, 86.4% participants had hypertension and 26.4% had diabetes. The difference of hypertension, diabetes and Body mass index (BMI) between case and control group is statistically significant (p<0.001). No statistically significant difference was found with risk factor like family history of kidney diseases. This emphasizes risk factor identification in general population to early diagnose CKD. PMID:23134905

  7. The risk of allograft failure and the survival benefit of kidney transplantation are complicated by delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jagbir; Dong, Jianghu; Rose, Caren; Gill, John S

    2016-06-01

    Concern about the long-term impact of delayed graft function (DGF) may limit the use of high-risk organs for kidney transplantation. To understand this better, we analyzed 29,598 mate kidney transplants from the same deceased donor where only 1 transplant developed DGF. The DGF associated risk of graft failure was greatest in the first posttransplant year, and in patients with concomitant acute rejection (hazard ratio: 8.22, 95% confidence interval: 4.76-14.21). In contrast, the DGF-associated risk of graft failure after the first posttransplant year in patients without acute rejection was far lower (hazard ratio: 1.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.29). In subsequent analysis, recipients of transplants complicated by DGF still derived a survival benefit when compared with patients who received treatment with dialysis irrespective of donor quality as measured by the Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI). The difference in the time required to derive a survival benefit was longer in transplants with DGF than in transplants without DGF, and this difference was greatest in recipients of lower quality kidneys (difference: 250-279 days for KDPI 20%-60% vs. 809 days for the KDPI over 80%). Thus, the association of DGF with graft failure is primarily limited to the first posttransplant year. Transplants complicated by DGF provide a survival benefit compared to treatment with dialysis, but the survival benefit is lower in kidney transplants with lower KDPI. This information may increase acceptance of kidneys at high risk for DGF and inform strategies to minimize the risk of death in the setting of DGF. PMID:27165823

  8. Chronic active thrombotic microangiopathy in native and transplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping L; Prichard, Jeffery W; Lin, Fan; Shultz, Michael F; Malek, Sayeed K; Shaw, John H; Hartle, James E

    2006-01-01

    We report 2 complicated cases of thrombotic microangiopathy with chronic features and active components. The first case was a 36-yr-old woman with positive anti-DNA antibody and possible lupus cerebritis, who developed thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to a series of syndromes, including preeclampsia and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed no evidence of lupus nephritis and her renal function returned to normal 1 week after the biopsy. The second case was a 46-yr-old man who developed thrombotic microangiopathy of unknown etiology, which led to end-stage renal disease within 6 mo. The patient received a living related-donor transplant, but thrombotic microangiopathy recurred in the donor kidney only 40 days after the renal transplantation. PMID:16951274

  9. A distributed approach to alarm management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Estudillo-Valderrama, Miguel A; Talaminos-Barroso, Alejandro; Roa, Laura M; Naranjo-Hernández, David; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Aresté-Fosalba, Nuria; Milán-Martín, José A

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the feasibility study of using a distributed approach for the management of alarms from chronic kidney disease patients. In a first place, the key issues regarding alarm definition, classification, and prioritization according to available normalization efforts are analyzed for the main scenarios addressed in hemodialysis. Then, the middleware proposed for alarm management is described, which follows the publish/subscribe pattern, and supports the Object Management Group data distribution service (DDS) standard. This standard facilitates the real-time monitoring of the exchanged information, as well as the scalability and interoperability of the solution developed regarding the different stakeholders and resources involved. Finally, the results section shows, through the proof of concept studied, the viability of DDS for the activation of emergency protocols in terms of alarm prioritization and personalization, as well as some remarks about security, privacy, and real-time communication performance. PMID:25014977

  10. Hyperphosphatemia Management in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Ahmed M; Kowalski, Stefan R

    2016-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is a potentially life altering condition that can lead to cardiovascular calcification, metabolic bone disease (renal osteodystrophy) and the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). It is also associated with increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and mortality rates. To effectively manage hyperphosphatemia in CKD patients it is important to not only consider pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options but also to understand the underlying physiologic pathways involved in phosphorus homoeostasis. This review will therefore provide both a background into phosphorus homoeostasis and the management of hyperphosphatemia in CKD patients. In addition, it will cover some of the most important reasons for failure to control hyperphosphatemia with emphasis on the effect of the gastric pH on phosphate binders efficiency. PMID:27330380